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banner - 4th Symposium: Impact of an Ice-Diminishing Arctic on Naval and Maritime Operations
photo: ensign piloting small craft photo: Coast Guard vessel in the Arctic photo: Coast Guard vessel in the Arctic photo: Coast Guard vessel Healy breaks ice photo: The submarine USS Annapolis, participating in Ice Exercise 2009 in the Arctic Ocean photo: The US Navy submarine USS Providence, moored at the North Pole photo: From top: US Navy ship USS Porter, Canadian ship HMCS Montréal, and the Danish ship HMDS Vaedderen in the Labrador Sea photo: The MV Nanuq, a 300 foot ice-class anchor handler purpose-built by Shell for oil spill response, 2008 photo: NOAA vessel in the Arctic photo: NOAA vessel in the Arctic photo: NOAA vessels in the Arctic

4th Symposium on the Impacts of an Ice-Diminishing Arctic
on Naval and Maritime Operations

Arctic Sea Ice Reaches the 3rd Lowest Extent on Record - Animation
(courtesy of the NOAA Environmental Visualization Lab)

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Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean melts to its lowest extents around the 15th of September each year. Since 1979, satellites have been used to closely monitor these dynamics of ice growth and retreat - since not only is sea ice important in determining global climate and weather patterns, but also for commerce, transportation, and national security. With these careful satellite measurements, scientists have documented an almost 9% decrease in ice extent per decade. And though some years experience ice extent levels greater than the previous year, in general there has been a dramatic annual decline in Arctic ice.

In 2010, these trends continued making this year the third lowest sea ice extent ever measured by satellite. Only 2007 and 2008 had a lesser amount during the September minimum. In 2010, ice extent around the September 15th minimum was 22% below the average minimum of the past 30 years. To put it in perspective, a loss of 22% of the contiguous U.S. would be equivalent to losing all of the land area in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, Southeast, and Appalachian states. Not only is area of sea ice at near record low levels, but also the thickness and concentrations are equally low.


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2011 Symposium Information

Symposium Hosts

Participating / Invited Agencies

 
image of text: Hosted By:
National Ice Center logo
U.S. Arctic Research Commission logo
image of text: Supporting Agencies:
The Office of Naval Research logo
NOAA Center for Satellite Applications & Research (STAR) logo
The U.S. Naval Academy logo
Canadian Ice Service logo
 
image of text: Other Participants:
U.S. Navy logo
The Oceanographer & Navigator of the Navy - Task Force Climate Change logo
The Naval Oceanographic Office logo
The Naval Research Laboratory logo
The U.S. Coast Guard logo
International Ice Patrol logo
NOAA logo
National Aeronatic and Space Administration (NASA) logo
U.S. State Department logo
University of Alaska Fairbanks - International Arctic Research Center logo
University of Alaska Fairbanks - Geophysical Institute logo
Environment Canada logo
Transport Canada logo
Shell Exploration logo
Kongsberg Satellite Services AS logo
Office of Naval Intelligence
Canadian Coast Guard
University of Alaska - Fairbanks
CNA - Analysis & Solutions
United States Senate
UNH Center for Coastal & Ocean Mapping Joint Hydrographic Center logo
UNH Coastal Response Research Center logo
Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) - Department of the Interior logo
U.S. Geological Survey logo
 

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