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All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

September 24, 2018

Title: Preparing for the Next Water Year: Drought & Climate Outlook for California-Nevada
Presenter(s): Speakers: Dan McEvoy, Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute; Michelle Mead, NWS Sacramento; Michael Dettinger, USGS
Date & Time: September 24, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Dan McEvoy, Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute; Michelle Mead, NWS Sacramento; Michael Dettinger, USGS 

Seminar sponsor: National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA Climate Program Office

Seminar POC for questions: amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov 

Remote access: Register for the webinar at https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/california-nevada-drought-climate-outlook-webinar-sept-24-2018 

Abstract
The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) September 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Niño and La Niña). The webinar takes place at 11 a.m. PT, Monday Sept. 24, 2018.

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Drought & Climate Update
Dan McEvoy  | Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Desert Research Institute (DRI)

Drought & Climate Outlook
Michelle Mead | NWS Sacramento

Developing New Drought Early Warning Approaches/Indices
Michael Dettinger | USGS 

About the Speakers:

Dan McEvoy is a regional climatologist with the Western Regional Climate Center at the Desert Research Institute. His research interests include advancing drought monitoring technology, seasonal drought prediction, the role of evaporative demand on drought, quality and uncertainty assessment of weather observations, and climate modeling.

Michelle Mead is the Warning Coordination Meteorologist at the NWS Weather Forecast Office in Sacramento, CA. Michelle manages communications for the Sacramento office, including the social media effort and National Weather Service Impact Decisions Support Services. She received her Bachelors of Science in Earth Science and Meteorology from St. Cloud State University in Minnesota. 

Michael Dettinger is a senior research hydrologist for the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Cycle Branch; a research associate of the Climate, Atmospheric Sciences and Physical Oceanography Division at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California; and a resident scientist at the University of Nevada Reno. Dettinger has monitored and researched the hydrology, climates, and water resources of the West for 35 years, focusing on atmospheric rivers and especially their Western impacts, regional surface water and groundwater resources, watershed modeling, causes of hydroclimatic variability, and climatic-change influences on western water and land resources. He has degrees from the University of California San Diego, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles (Atmospheric Sciences). 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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September 25, 2018

Title: The Impact of the Mississippi River and Its Delta on the Oceanography, Ecology and Economy of the Gulf of Mexico: A Modern Synthesis
Presenter(s): Alexander S. Kolker, Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium and Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Tulane University. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: September 25, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Impact of the Mississippi River and Its Delta on the Oceanography, Ecology and Economy of the Gulf of Mexico: A Modern Synthesis

Speaker: Alexander S. Kolker, Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium and Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Tulane University

Sponsors: NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Janessy.Frometa@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and "enter as guest":
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.
Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: While it has long been recognized that the Mississippi River is the largest source of freshwater, nutrients, and sediments to the Gulf of Mexico; and that the Mississippi River Delta is the largest geomorphological feature in the Gulf, there have been few efforts to holistically evaluate their impacts across the physical, natural and social sciences. This talk will examine the impacts of the Mississippi River and its delta on the Gulf by coupling synthesis products with a critical examination of decades of research, reflecting both investigator-level analyses and the products of a multi-disciplinary working group that meet over a period of several years. 
We show that the Mississippi River and Mississippi River Delta have a broad influence on the oceanography, ecology and economy of the Gulf. Critical impacts include the development of a plume that can be >25,000 km2 in area at any given time, the flux of nutrients and carbon that can feed large fisheries, can fuel hypoxia, and provide energy to deep sea communities, while providing for a complex human civilization that depends on living and natural resources. The need to further understand these influences is underscored by critical management concerns that range from climate change and fisheries management to coastal resiliency, navigation, commerce and to the restoration the Gulf after the BP/Deepwater Horizon oil spill. 

About the Speaker: Alex Kolker is a coastal oceanographer; he investigates the physical and anthropogenic activities that drive coastal systems, and focuses on: 1) the hydrology and sedimentology of large rivers and their impacts on the ocean; 2) the impacts of climate variability and change on coastal systems; 3) the geology of coastal wetlands,; and 4) the role of groundwater in river deltas. Alex Kolker currently works at the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium and teaches in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science at Tulane University. Alex is a coastal oceanographer with a PhD in Marine and Atmospheric Science from Stony Brook University, State University of New York. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Statistical simulations of drogued vs. undrogued drifters to improve understanding of marine debris transport pathways.
Presenter(s): Dr. Rick Lumpkin, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: September 25, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149), OAR - AOML - 1st Flr Conf Room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Rick Lumpkin (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/531284381

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3412
Access Code: 531-284-381

Abstract: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Climate-driven species redistribution in marine systems
Presenter(s): Gretta Peci of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies and Centre for Marine Socioecology
Date & Time: September 25, 2018
4:30 pm - 5:30 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Gretta Pecl of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies and Centre for Marine Socioecology

Sponsors: Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

Abstract: Climate change is driving a pervasive global redistribution of the planet's species, with manifest implications from genes to ecosystems across multiple temporal and spatial scales. Species redistribution defies current approaches to natural resource management that focus on restoring systems to a baseline and are often based on boundaries drawn in the past. Changes in distribution of marine resources creates difficulties, particularly when species cross jurisdictional boundaries and where historical catch rates and assessment processes may no longer be appropriate. Moreover, we are still a long way from understanding the suite of mechanisms and processes underlying the high variation in rate and magnitude of shifts. We have even less understanding of how species redistribution will drive changes in ecological communities and further complicate aspirations of ecosystem-based management. Climate-driven species redistribution therefore presents intriguing ecological challenges to unravel, as well as fundamental philosophical questions and urgent issues related to ecology, fisheries, food security, Indigenous and local livelihoods, and many other aspects of human well-being. This presentation will highlight some of the progress with adaptation planning and adaptation actions at international, national and local scales, including the need for an interdisciplinary approach and stakeholder engagement.

Webinar Access: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_s7RGZ_PxTaCbS7rj78tZNw

Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Plastics in the Ocean: Facts, Fiction, and Unknowns
Presenter(s): Anna Robuck, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography
Date & Time: September 25, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote - Online Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Anna Robuck, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries 

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6922965402939033090 

Abstract:  Although plastics are vital in a slew of consumer applications, plastic pollution in the ocean has turned out to be a not-so-fantastic outcome of modern day plastic dependence. This presentation provides an overview of the ocean plastic pollution problem, explaining the difference between marine debris and microplastics. It also will outline the current state of knowledge about microplastic impacts in the ocean and marine food webs, and provide insight into an ongoing research project using seabirds as indicators of plastic pollution in the Northwest Atlantic.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ 
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September 26, 2018

Title: Avoiding the Ecological Limits of Forage Fish for Fed Aquaculture
Presenter(s): Halley E. Froehlich, Postdoctoral Scholar, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California, Santa Barbara. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: September 26, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Avoiding the ecological limits of forage fish for fed aquaculture

Speaker: Halley E. Froehlich, Postdoctoral Scholar, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California, Santa Barbara. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.
Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667.
Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join",
click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web.
Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract: Aquaculture is supporting demand and surpassing wild-caught seafood. Yet, most fed aquaculture species (finfish and crustacea) rely on wild-captured forage fish for essential fatty acids and micronutrients, an important but limited resource. As the fastest growing food sector in the world, fed aquaculture demand will eventually surpass ecological supply of forage fish, but when and how best to avoid this ecological boundary is unclear. Using global production data, feed use trends, and human consumption patterns we show how combined actions of fisheries reform, reduced feed use by non-carnivorous aquaculture and agricultural species, and greater consistent inclusion of fish byproducts in China-based production can circumvent forage fish limits by mid-century. However, we also demonstrate the efficacy of such actions are diminished if global diets shift to more seafood (i.e., pescetarian diets) and are further constrained by possible ecosystem-based fisheries regulations in the future. Long-term, nutrient-equivalent alternative feed sources are essential for more rapid and certain aquaculture sustainability

About the Speaker: Dr. Halley E. Froehlich is a postdoctoral scholar and primary researcher from the Science for Nature and People Partnership (SNAPP) Sustainable Open-Ocean Aquaculture Working Group, at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), University of California, Santa Barbara. She is also the co-founder of the Conservation Aquaculture Research Team (CART) " an initiative motivated by the SNAPP research " aimed to build up the scientific foundation of ocean-based aquaculture understanding for improved conservation and management now and in the future. Dr. Froehlich is particularly interested in how to better align marine aquaculture with conservation efforts at multiple scales.

 Dr. Halley E. Froehlich received her Ph.D. from the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington and B.Sc. in Animal Biology from the University of California, Davis. As a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, she took an interdisciplinary approach studying the effects of anthropogenic disturbances (e.g., hypoxia) on marine organisms and fisheries. A key facet of Dr. Froehlich's graduate and postdoctoral research is linking important ecological questions with conservation and management objectives.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Or email tracy.gill@noaa.gov and I will have your name and email added.
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Title: Deep Sea Coral Communities and Commercial Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Randy Clark & Laughlin Siceloff, both Marine Biologists, with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch. Presenting in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: September 26, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Title: Deep Sea Coral Communities and Commercial Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico

Speakers: Randy Clark & Laughlin Siceloff, both Marine Biologists, with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch. Presenting in Silver Spring

Sponsors: NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Skype often works if you have a good connection.
For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install MyMeeting's WebEx app while logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: Deep sea corals are taxonomically and morphologically diverse and a valuable resource globally. Corals and sponges form complex, three-dimensional biogenic structures that directly and indirectly influence the occurrence and abundance of many fish and invertebrate species. Globally, deep-sea fisheries that target stocks on outer continental shelves and slope habitats may remove or disturb benthic fauna particularly hard and soft corals. Fishing activity may compromise habitat infrastructure and re-occurrence in the same area prevents recovery. In the Gulf of Mexico bottom trawling and bottom longline gear may have significant interactions with sensitive coral communities. This presentation examines fishing effort information and potential impacts with known and predicted deep coral communities in the Gulf of Mexico.

About the Speakers:
Randy Clark and Laughlin Siceloff are non-beltway NOAA/NCCOS marine biologists with offices at Stennis Space Center, MS. Both enjoy all the great things New Orleans have to offer!

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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September 27, 2018

Title: Global meridional overturning circulation inferred from a data-constrained ocean & sea-ice model.
Presenter(s): Dr. Sang-Ki Lee, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: September 27, 2018
10:00 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Sang-Ki Lee (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/400755573

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3212
Access Code: 400-755-573

Abstract: Ocean tracers such as heat, salt and carbon are perpetually carried by the global meridional overturning circulation (GMOC) and redistributed between hemispheres and across ocean basins from their source regions. The GMOC is therefore a crucial component of the global heat, salt and carbon balances. In order to better understand and describe the GMOC, here we carry out a global ocean model simulation with its temperature and salinity corrected toward observations. The derived GMOC is presented and summarized in a new schematic, which highlights two important aspects of the GMOC concerning how the heaviest water mass formed around the Antarctica continent is brought to the near surface and where a deep water mass is formed in the Atlantic Ocean. These important aspects of the GMOC are poorly captured in a model run without the temperature and salinity corrections, suggesting that current generation climate models may have some limitations in reproducing realistic paths of the GMOC and the associated global heat, salt and carbon balances.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Depth-dependent Temperature Variability in the Southern California Bight with Implications for Cold-water Octocorals
Presenter(s): Elizabeth F. Gugliotti, University of Charleston
Date & Time: September 27, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4 Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Depth-dependent Temperature Variability in the Southern California Bight with Implications for Cold-water Octocorals

Speaker: Elizabeth F. Gugliotti, University of Charleston. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Peter Etnoyer, both with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science 

Webinar Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.
Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667.
Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join",
click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web.
Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract: Water temperature is an important determinant of cold-water coral distribution. In recent years, several marine heatwave events have impacted marine ecosystems, including in the northeast Pacific Ocean. However, little is known about how these extreme ocean temperatures might impact cold-water corals. Determining the upper thermal limits of cold-water octocorals is an important first step in identifying if these warm-water events pose a potential threat. Live colonies of the common gorgonian octocoral, Adelogorgia phyllosclera, were collected from the CINMS using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). A laboratory study investigated the health, polyp activity, and estimated survival of A. phyllosclera through a series of thermal exposure assays. Results of the temperature analysis indicated that warm-water anomalies occurred frequently at 50 and 100 m, with most of these falling during strong ENSO months. The experimental results suggest that the upper thermal limit of A. phyllosclera could lie near 20℃. Though this upper thermal limit was not exceeded frequently during the 2015-2016 ENSO event, the anomalously warm conditions could have elicited physiological and cellular effects. Understanding the thermal stress responses of cold-water corals enables prediction of their resilience to predicted ocean warming.

About the Speaker: Elizabeth Gugliotti recently graduated with an M.S. in Marine Biology from the University of Charleston, SC where her thesis focused on the implications of warming oceans on cold-water corals. Prior to her graduate work, Elizabeth spent time studying the effects of climate change on the sex ratios of loggerhead sea turtle sex-ratios with Dr. David Owens of the College of Charleston and then conducted coral reef ecology research while studying abroad in Bonaire in the Dutch Caribbean as a part of her undergraduate studies at Wofford College. In addition to pursuing a career in research, Elizabeth has also worked as an environmental education teacher to K-12 students at the Barrier Island Environmental Education Program in South Carolina.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
Hydrologic response of the Columbia River Basin to Climate Change
Presenter(s): Bart Nijssen, Ph.D., Professor, University of Washington
Date & Time: September 27, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Bart Nijssen, Ph.D., Professor, University of Washington  

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). 


https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/index.cfm. The NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM is also part of the OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminar Series, a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to pool seminars of common interest to help share science and management information and to promote constructive dialogue between scientists, educators, and resource managers. All seminars begin at 11:00 AM at the NWFSC's Auditorium and are open to the public.

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT
The Columbia River, which drains much of the Pacific Northwest, is the fourth-largest river by volume in the United States. Hydroelectric facilities on its main stem and tributaries are responsible for nearly half of total U.S. hydroelectric power generation. Pacific Northwest rivers are also home to anadromous fish, such as salmon, that sustain environmentally, economically, and culturally important fisheries. Northwest rivers provide irrigation water for economically valuable crops and support barge transportation on the lower reaches of the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These competing uses can result in conflict at times. For example, as a result of habitat degradation, dam construction, reservoir operation, and other interventions, many salmon, trout, and sturgeon populations in the Pacific Northwest are now listed as threatened or endangered. Climate change can affect the hydrology of the region in a number of ways. Even without changes in precipitation, changes in temperature will affect snow accumulation and melt. Temperature increases will result in more rainfall in winter, less water stored as snow, and earlier melt of these thinner snow packs. For some rivers, peak flows may no longer occur in spring, but may occur in fall and winter instead. Warmer summers may increase drought conditions, especially if less spring and summer runoff is available from mountain snow packs. Changes in precipitation may alleviate or worsen some of these impacts. Here, we report on a recent study to evaluate climate change impacts on the hydrology in the Columbia River basin and evaluate how methodological choices in the modeling process affect the spread in projected changes for different aspects of hydrology.


BIO
Dr. Nijssen is a Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Washington where he heads the UW Hydro | Computational Hydrology group. He has over 20 years' experience in the research, development, and application of hydrological models with a focus on model applications at large spatial scales. He has played an active role in the development and maintenance of hydrological models that are widely used within the hydrological community (including VIC, DHSVM and SUMMA) and currently still maintains the public source code repository for the VIC model. Prior to returning to the University of Washington in 2011, he was Vice-President of Technology at 3TIER, a private sector company that provided forecasting and assessment services for the renewable energy industry. In that role, he managed a team of about 25 software engineers, scientists, data managers and system administrators responsible for the generation of operational weather and hydrological forecasts, forecast delivery, software and web development, information technology and data management, and guided development and implementation of real-time forecast systems for reservoir inflows, wind power production and solar power production. Current research interests and projects include the hydrological impacts of climate change, sub-seasonal to seasonal (S2S) forecasting, data assimilation, stream temperature modeling in regulated systems, and the development of new hydrologic models and innovative ways for model evaluation. He currently serves on the AGU meetings committee and is an associate editor for Water Resources Research.


RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS
Chegwidden, O. S., B. Nijssen, D. Rupp, J. R. Arnold, M. P. Clark, J. Hamman4, S.-C. Kao, Y. Mao, N. Mizukami, P. Mote, M. Pan, E. Pytlak, M. Xiao, 2018: How do modeling decisions affect the spread among hydrologic climate change projections? Earth Futures, in review.


River Management Joint Operating Committee (RMJOC), 2018: Climate and Hydrology Datasets for RMJOC Long-Term Planning Studies, Second Edition: Part I " Hydroclimate Projections and Analyses. 112pp. Available on line at: https://www.bpa.gov/p/Generation/Hydro/Pages/Climate-Change-FCRPS-Hydro.aspx.


Hamman, J. J., B. Nijssen, T. J. Bohn, D. R. Gergel, and Y. Mao, 2018: The Variable Infiltration Capacity Model, Version 5 (VIC-5): Infrastructure improvements for new applications and reproducibility. Geoscientific Model Development, doi:10.5194/gmd-11-3481-2018.


Gergel, D. R., B. Nijssen, J. T. Abatzoglou, D. P. Lettenmaier, M. R. Stumbaugh, 2017: Effects of climate change on snowpack and fire potential in the western United States. Climatic Change, doi:10.1007/s10584-017-1899-y.


Nijssen, B., D. P. Lettenmaier, X. Liang, S. W. Wetzel, and E. F. Wood, 1997: Streamflow simulation for continental-scale river basins. Water Resources Research, doi:10.1029/96WR03517.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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October 2, 2018

Title: Integration of Habitat Mapping & Acoustic Technologies to Advance Ecosystem Based Management
Presenter(s): Dr. Mark Monaco, Director, of Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: October 2, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Mark Monaco, Director, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). Presenting in person in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: NOAA/NCCOS's Marine Spatial Ecology Division and partners couple satellite-based and air-borne remote sensing (e.g., multi-spectral imagery) and ship-based (e.g., multi-beam soundings) technologies to map coastal and benthic habitats. The map products are key components in structuring sampling designs to monitor reef fish distribution and abundance through visual and fish acoustic surveys. The habitat maps and reef fish monitoring data support development of ecologically relevant hydro-acoustics arrays to define species' habitat utilization patterns and movements through acoustic telemetry. The integration of the biophysical data advances our ability to define ecological connectivity of marine ecosystems based on species' habitat utilization patterns and is a key component to advance EBM through spatial management of marine resources. We present results of benthic habitat mapping efforts coupled with underwater acoustic telemetry to quantify diel movements, spatial patterns, and habitat affinities of reef fishes and pelagic prey in the U.S Caribbean. Fish presence and movement data contribute to defining ecological connectivity among habitats (e.g., corals, algae, seagrasses) and associated management areas. Results aid in assessing the efficacy of managed areas designed to enhance coral reef ecosystems and provided evidence of ecological connectivity across habitat types in the seascape and among management areas to support EBM efforts. 

About The Speaker: Dr. Mark E. Monaco of NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) has been a practicing scientist and manager in the field of marine spatial planning for over 35 years. His current position is Chief of the Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science that is comprised of about 120 Federal and contract staff located around the country. During his career at NOAA, he led development and implementation NOAA's Biogeographic Assessment Framework that has been used in conducting geospatial assessments to facilitate marine spatial planning processes and implementation plans. Applications include defining and evaluating the efficacy of marine protected areas, defining and modifying the spatial boundaries of NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries, and supporting US States in developing marine spatial plans with emphasis on the siting of alternative energy facilities. He currently serves as the co-chair of the steering committee for NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program that provides a framework to inform ecosystem-based management decisions. He represents NOAA on the Chesapeake Bay Scientific Technical Advisory Committee and co-Leads NOAA's Ecological Forecasting-Habitat Science and Ecological Forecasting Technical Team that is addressing how habitats are changing in quantity and quality over space and time to forecast ecosystem responses to habitat modifications. Today he will present an integrated suite of remote sensing technologies to couple habitat 

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October 4, 2018

Title:
New
Working with NOAA and Multiple Partners to Restore Oysters, Abalone, and Kelp and Develop Sustainable Shellfish and Kelp Aquaculture
Presenter(s): Betsy Peabody, Executive Director and Founder, Puget Sound Restoration Fund
Date & Time: October 4, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: BETSY PEABODY, Executive Director and Founder, Puget Sound Restoration Fund   

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov)

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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October 9, 2018

Title:
New
From vessels to models: Steps to measure the value of age/length/diet sampling in data collection and model-based management advice
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: October 9, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: James Thorson, Program Lead, Habitat and Ecological Processes Research, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access: WebEx information coming soon
Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, passcode:5944500#

Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Abstract: TBD

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
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See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

(James Thorson, Program Lead, Habitat and Ecological Processes Research, Alaska Fisheries Science Center) 

 
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October 11, 2018

Title:
New
Implications of climate change for managing coastal and marine protected habitats and species
Presenter(s): Cefas)
Date & Time: October 11, 2018
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Speaker: Paul Buckley of the Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas) Thursday, October 11, 10 am EDT/7 am PDT/2 pm Abstract: Climate change is already affecting a wide range of marine and coastal conservation features (habitats, species, and communities). Impacts on the quality, composition and presence of these protected features presents challenges to their conservation within protected sites and their wider networks. Here we present findings from recent studies undertaken by the UK Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership (MCCIP) on the implications of climate change for protected features and wider marine biodiversity legislation. Case studies on the vulnerability of specific marine conservation features to climate change are presented, and potential management options explored. Broader issues for the implementation of legislation that includes coastal and marine biodiversity are discussed, including mechanisms that exist within these obligations to ‘accommodate' impacts of climate change. Finally, wider challenges, and opportunities, for the conservation of marine species, habitats, and communities in a changing climate are explored. Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe). Webinar Access and Registration: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bhcxAfSETNioIwFsdnY3hA Sponsors: Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MarineDebris.info, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe). Webinar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@NOAA.gov Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (Paul Buckley of the Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science
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Title:
New
Why People Matter When Designing and Implementing Large-scale Marine Protected Areas
Presenter(s): Patrick Christie, Professor, University of Washington's School of Marine and Environmental Affairs and Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Date & Time: October 11, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Why people matter when designing and implementing large-scale marine protected areas

Speaker: Patrick Christie, Professor, University of Washington's School of Marine and Environmental Affairs and Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will use the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.  
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and 'Enter as guest': 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov


Abstract: Large-scale marine protected areas (LSMPAs) are rapidly increasing. Due to their sheer size, complex socio-political realities, and distinct local cultural perspectives and economic needs, implementing and managing LSMPAs successfully creates a number of human dimensions challenges. This paper draws on the results of a global “Think Tank on the Human Dimensions of Large Scale Marine Protected Areas” involving 125 people from 17 countries, including representatives from government agencies, non-governmental organizations, academia, professionals, industry, cultural/indigenous leaders and LSMPA site managers. The overarching goal of this effort was to be proactive in understanding the issues and developing best management practices and a research agenda that address the human dimensions of LSMPAs. Identified best management practices for the human dimensions of LSMPAs included: integration of culture and traditions, effective public and stakeholder engagement, maintenance of livelihoods and wellbeing, promotion of economic sustainability, conflict management and resolution, transparency and matching institutions, legitimate and appropriate governance, and social justice and empowerment. A shared human dimensions research agenda was developed that included priority topics under the themes of scoping human dimensions, governance, politics, social and economic outcomes, and culture and tradition.

About the Speaker: Patrick Christie is a professor at the University of Washington's School of Marine and Environmental Affairs and Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. His scholarship focuses on the human dimensions of marine conservation and climate change social movements. In particular, he studies why citizens, fishers, and policy makers either accept or reject environmental policies. He believes, like many, that ‘We don't manage the fish, we manage the people.' Increasingly he is researching and teaching on the social movements surrounding oil pipeline resistance movements, especially those led by indigenous communities. He draws from his three years of experience living in a Philippine fishing community implementing a community-based marine protected area as a Peace Corps Volunteer and many years as a co-investigator for a participatory-action research project on the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua. He is a Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation, the Editor-In-Chief for the peer reviewed journal Coastal Management, and board member of the Coastal Conservation and Education Foundation in the Philippines. He has a bachelor's degree in zoology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a master's degree in conservation biology and doctorate in environmental sociology and policy from the University of Michigan.

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
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See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: The Morphology and Systematic Biology of Fishes: A Renaissance
Presenter(s): Eric Hilton Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine Science, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA
Date & Time: October 11, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Eric Hilton Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine Science, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI visiting scientist seminar series in conjunction with the bi-annual EcoFOCI Seminar Series, focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract:
Traditional and cutting-edge approaches for the morphology of fishes, and the importance of both

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
Collective Sensing and Navigation in Mobile Animal Groups
Presenter(s): Andrew Bardahl, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, university of Washington
Date & Time: October 11, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: ANDREW BERDAHL, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington   

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov)

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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October 16, 2018

Title:
New
Why juvenile rock sole are moving north and juvenile yellowfin sole are not
Presenter(s): Cynthia Yeung, Research Fish Biologist, Groundfish Assessment Program, Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: October 16, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Cynthia Yeung, Research Fish Biologist, Groundfish Assessment Program, Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access:
WebEx information coming soon
Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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October 17, 2018

Title: Understanding Ocean Acidification - Using NOAA’s New Educational Tools
Presenter(s): Amy Dean, NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System
Date & Time: October 17, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Amy Dean, NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/690023097051840771

Abstract: Data in the Classroom is designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional and global scale. In this presentation, participants will dive deep into Data in the Classroom's Ocean Acidification Module to explore the processes that cause acidification, examine data from across the globe and take a virtual tour of the new web-based curricular modules and data tools.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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October 18, 2018

Title:
New
Touching Salmon, When Is it Wrong? Consequences of Release or Escape from Fisheries Capture
Presenter(s): Scott Hinch, Ph.D., Professor, Fisheries Conservation, University of British Columbia
Date & Time: October 18, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: SCOTT HINCH, Ph.D., Professor, Fisheries Conservation, University of British Columbia


Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov)

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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October 19, 2018

Title:
New
October 2018 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: October 19, 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) 
Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and  National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov or rthoman@alaska.edu)
Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/October2018
Abstract:The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for November and the early winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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October 23, 2018

Title: Preparing Ocean Governance for Species on the Move
Presenter(s): Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor, Rutgers University. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: October 23, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor, Rutgers University. Presenting remotely.

Sponsors:
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar and the National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Science and Technology; co-hosts are Roger Griffis and Tracy Gill

Webinar Access: We will be using Adobe Connect for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time andand "Enter as Guest": 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ 
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.; Google Chrome often works too.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. 
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Fisheries provide critical sources of food and employment for people around the world, and yet rapid shifts in the geographic distribution of marine animals represent an emerging governance challenge for which states and international bodies are underprepared. Past experience suggests that conflict, overfishing, and ultimately fewer marine resources to share are common outcomes when fished stocks move across political boundaries. Moreover, the projected widespread emergence of new transboundary stocks and the gaps in current institutions suggest that new policy and legal approaches are needed to facilitate cooperation. Potential solutions could include broadening the scope of negotiations and mandates, regular governance updates to reflect changes in stock distribution, internationally tradable fisheries permits, and neutral research bodies to guide negotiations. The challenges of shifting fisheries are entirely foreseeable, and with sufficient preparation, ocean fisheries can continue to provide the benefits relied upon by billions of people.

About the Speaker: Malin Pinsky is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources and an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow in Ocean Sciences at Rutgers University. He leads a research group studying the ecological and evolutionary impacts of climate change in the ocean, and he developed the OceanAdapt website to document shifting ocean animals in North America. He has published articles in Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and other international journals, and his research has received coverage in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, BBC, National Public Radio, and other media. He has a Ph.D. from Stanford University, an A.B. from Williams College, and earlier connections along the coast of Maine.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to 
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. 
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
Fish age estimation using Fourier transform-near infrared spectroscopy: A pathway to operationalization
Presenter(s): Thomas Helser, Program Manager, Age and Growth, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: October 23, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Thomas Helser, Program Manager, Age and Growth, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access: WebEx information coming soon
Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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October 24, 2018

Title: NOAA Geospatial (Geographic Information System) Hot Topics
Presenter(s): Tony LaVoi, NOAA Geospatial Information Officer, NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer and Integrated Information Services Division Chief, NOAA Office for Coastal Management; Kim Valentine, Geospatial Data Manager, National Ocean Service, Office of the Assistant Chief Information Officer; and Randy Warren, GIS Coordinator, National Ocean Service, Office for Coastal Management
Date & Time: October 24, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Title: NOAA Geospatial (Geographic Information System) Hot Topics

Speakers:
  • Tony LaVoi, NOAA Geospatial Information Officer, NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer, and Integrated Information Services Division Chief, NOAA Office for Coastal Management;
  • Kim Valentine, Geospatial Data Manager, National Ocean Service, Office of the Assistant Chief Information Officer; and 
  • Randy Warren, GIS Coordinator, National Ocean Service, Office for Coastal Management
Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time, and Enter as Guest: 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.
Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
NOAA's diverse mission is enabled by the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies. During this webinar we will demonstrate several ways how GIS is used to meet NOAA's mission. We will also provide an overview of the NOAA GIS Committee, resources for end users including the NOAA GIS Community website, and discuss benefits of the new NOAA Esri Enterprise License Agreement, which includes access to software, ArcGIS Online, and GIS training.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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October 25, 2018

Title: Understanding Underwater Behavior of Humpback Whales to Mitigate Ship Strike and Entanglement
Presenter(s): Dave Wiley, Sanctuary Research Coordinator, NOAA"s Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: October 25, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Understanding the Underwater Behavior of Humpback Whales to Mitigate Ship Strike and Entanglement

Speaker: Dave Wiley, Sanctuary Research Coordinator, NOAA"s Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.
Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667.
Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join",
click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web.
Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract and About the Speaker: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. 
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
Ghosts of Oceans Past: How Fishing Reshapes Communities of Fishes and their Parasites
Presenter(s): Chelsea Wood, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: October 25, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: CHELSEA WOOD, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington  

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov)

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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October 30, 2018

Title:
New
Reproduction and population biology of rockfish and flatfish in Alaskan waters
Presenter(s): Todd TenBrink, Research Fish Biologist, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: October 30, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Todd TenBrink, Research Fish Biologist, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access:
WebEx information coming soon
Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

October 31, 2018

Title: Are fieldwork studies being relegated to second place in conservation science?
Presenter(s): Dr. Carlos Antonio Ríos-Saldaña, BioCórima/Technological Institute of Linares, Arteaga, Coahuila, Mexico. Presenting from Coahuila, Mexico
Date & Time: October 31, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Are fieldwork studies being relegated to second place in conservation science?

Speaker: Dr. Carlos Antonio Ríos-Saldaña, BioCórima/Technological Institute of Linares, Arteaga, Coahuila, Mexico. Presenting from Coahuila, Mexico.

Sponsors: NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will be using Adobe Connect for this webinar.  To join a session, please go to the following site at the scheduled date and time and "Enter as Guest": https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/  
Users should use either IE, Edge or Google Chrome on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

Audio will be available thru the computer only (voice over IP) - no phone.
Adjust the volume of your computer speakers or headset to hear the speaker.
Questions will be addressed in the chat window.
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Abstract: The collection of biological information, including data gathered in the field, is fundamental to improve our understanding of how human impacts on biological systems can be recognized, mitigated or averted. However, the role of empirical field research has faded appreciably in the past decades with sobering implications. Indeed, important instruments to help set national and global priorities in biodiversity conservation (i.e. synthetic analyses and big data approaches) can be severely handicapped by a lack of sound observational data, collected through fieldwork. Here, we show that the proportion of fieldwork-based investigations in the conservation literature dropped significantly from the 1980s until today; and we found that the most highly cited academic journals in conservation science published fieldwork studies less frequently than the lower rank journals. We contend that an apparent decrease in fieldwork-based investigations is the result of bottom-up pressures, including those associated with the publishing and the academic reward systems, while a second set acts top-down, driven by current societal needs and/or priorities. We urge researchers, funders and journals to commit, respectively, to conducting, funding and divulging relevant fieldwork research, and make some recommendations on specific steps that can be adopted in that direction.

About the Speaker: Antonio Ríos is co-founder and director of a Mexico-based biodiversity nonprofit called BioCórima. He is also a research associate in the Technological Institute of Linares. Antonio is acknowledged by the National System of Researchers (Sistema Nacional de Investigadores or SNI), a governmental agency established to promote both the quantity and quality of scientific research in Mexico. He received a Bachelor's degree in Forestry from the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL, for its acronym in Spanish), Mexico. Afterward, he obtained a Master of Science degree in Wildlife Research and a Ph.D. in Wildlife Management and Conservation, both, in the University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. His research focuses on game management, ecology and wildlife conservation. Antonio received the Professional Development Award by the UANL in 2017 (Mexico). Additionally, he won the Research Award “Cuenta Joven 2006” by the Caja España (Spain) and the Award for Excellence in the Social Service by the UANL in 2004 (Mexico). He lives with his wife and two dogs in Saltillo, Mexico, and enjoys kayaking, dog walking and travel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 1, 2018

Title:
New
Effects of Temperature on Fish Sex Determination: Potential Bioindicators of Global Climate Change
Presenter(s): Yoji Yamamoto, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Tokyo University of Marine Science 
and Technology 
Date & Time: November 1, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: YOJI YAMAMOTO, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Tokyo University of Marine Science 
and Technology   

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov)

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 6, 2018

Title:
New
Ecological interactions among major groundfish species in the Gulf of Alaska
Presenter(s): Cheryl Barnes, Ph.D. Student, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: November 6, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Speaker: Cheryl Barnes, Ph. D. Student, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access:
WebEx information coming soon
Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

November 7, 2018

Title: Northern rock sole recruitment response to winds and temperature in the eastern Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Dan Cooper, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: November 7, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Dan Cooper, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA.

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.


Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. 
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Creating environment-recruitment models for short and long-term forecasting of rock sole.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 8, 2018

Title:
New
Measuring and Modeling Ecological Interactions in the Wild
Presenter(s): Andrew Hein, Ph.D., Research Ecologist, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, 
UC Santa Cruz Institute of Marine Sciences
Date & Time: November 8, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: ANDREW HEIN, Ph.D., Research Ecologist, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, 
UC Santa Cruz Institute of Marine Sciences

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov)

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

November 13, 2018

Title:
New
Impacts of the 'warm blob' on Gulf of Alaska Pacific cod: A 1st year of life perspective
Presenter(s): Ben Laurel, Research Fish Biologist, Fish Behavior Ecology, Resource Assessment and Conservation Ecology, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: November 13, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker:
Ben Laurel, Research Fish Biologist, Fish Behavior Ecology, Resource Assessment and Conservation Ecology, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access: WebEx information coming soon
Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

November 14, 2018

Title: The return of Maine’s kelp forests: patterns, drivers and implications for stakeholders
Presenter(s): Thew Suskiewicz, PhD, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, Portland, ME.
Date & Time: November 14, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Thew Suskiewicz, PhD, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, Portland, ME.

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: How intense overfishing on both groundfish and the herbivores has pushed the Gulf of Maine into a novel ecosystem

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
CANCELLED: A Rare Great Lakes Ecosystem: Exploring the Sinkholes of Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Stephanie Gandulla, NOAA Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: November 14, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Speaker: Stephanie Gandulla, NOAA Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4895467060831741186 Abstract: Underwater explorations in Lake Huron have revealed unique hotspots of biogeochemical activity at several submerged groundwater vents in Lake Huron. Learn about the techniques scientists use to explore unique single-celled microorganism communities that dominate this freshwater habitat. Educators will be provided with information and links to lessons that feature this unique Great Lakes research topic. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

November 15, 2018

Title: Marine Heatwaves under Global Warming: Discovering Risks for Marine Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Prof. Thomas Frölicher, Assistant Professor in Ocean Modelling, Climate and Environmental Physics, University of Bern, Switzerland. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: November 15, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Marine Heatwaves under Global Warming: Discovering Risks for Marine Ecosystems

Speaker: Prof. Thomas Frölicher, Assistant Professor in Ocean Modelling, Climate and Environmental Physics, University of Bern, Switzerland. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: TBD, Will likely be Adobe Connect.

Abstract: Extreme climate and weather events shape the structure of biological systems and affect the biogeochemical functions and services they provide for society in a fundamental manner. There is overwhelming evidence that the frequency, duration and intensity of extreme events on land are changing under global warming, increasing the risk of severe, pervasive and in some cases irreversible impacts on natural and socio-economic systems. In contrast, we know very little about the past occurrences and the future progression of marine heatwaves. This knowledge gap is of particular concern as some of the recently observed marine heatwaves revealed the high vulnerability of marine ecosystems and fisheries to such extreme climate events. 

Here we use satellite observations and a suite of Earth system model simulations to show that the number of marine heatwave days doubled between 1982 and 2016, and this is projected to increase further if global temperature continue to increase. If temperature were to rise by 3.5 degrees Celsius relative to preindustrial levels, as is predicted to result from current national policies for the reduction of global carbon emissions, the average probability of marine heatwaves occurring would be 41 times higher than in preindustrial times. Such an increase in marine heatwaves will probably increase the risk of severe and long-lasting impact on marine organisms, such as coral reefs and those living at low latitudes, where many marine species live close to their upper thermal limits. Potential impacts on physical and human systems will also be discussed. 

About the Speaker: Thomas Frölicher is currently a SNF Assistant professor at the Climate and Environmental Physics Division of the University of Bern and interested in marine ecosystem-carbon-climate interactions with focus on ocean extreme events and their impacts on marine organisms and ecosystem services. He studied environmental sciences at ETH Zürich and graduated at the University of Bern. He worked 2 ½ years as a postdoctoral fellow at Princeton 
University and 4 years as a senior researcher at ETH Zürich. He is also the recipient of a SNF Ambizione fellowship. He authored or co-authored 46 peer-reviewed publications, is the lead author of chapter six of the upcoming IPCC Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a changing climate, and contributed to the fifth assessment report of working group II of the IPCC. A portrait about Thomas' work is available on
http://www.zeit.de/2016/20/thomas-froelicher-klimaforscher-schweiz

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title:
New
Working with NOAA and Multiple Partners to Restore Oysters, Abalone, and Kelp and Develop Sustainable Shellfish and Kelp Aquaculture
Presenter(s): Louisa Harding, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Date & Time: November 15, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Louisa Harding, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife  

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov)

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 16, 2018

Title:
New
November 2018 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: November 16, 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:

Speaker: Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) 
Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and  National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov or rthoman@alaska.edu)
Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/November2018
Abstract:The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for December and the winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 19, 2018

Title: Causes for the record low sea-ice extent in the Bering Sea in 2018
Presenter(s): Phyllis Stabeno Ph.D., Oceanographer, NOAA Research, Seattle, WA.
Date & Time: November 19, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Phyllis Stabeno Ph.D., Oceanographer, NOAA Research, Seattle, WA.


Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

First GoToMeeting? Let's do a quick system check: https://link.gotomeeting.com/system-check

Abstract: An in-depth look at the driving factors of a warm Bering Sea including ice arrival, extent, and implications

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 27, 2018

Title:
New
Using fishing industry catch data directly for stock assessment: Aleutian Islands Golden King Crab
Presenter(s): Chris Siddon, Marine Fisheries Scientist, Division of Commercial Fisheries, Alaska Department of Fish and Game
Date & Time: November 27, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Chris Siddon, Marine Fisheries Scientist, Division of Commercial Fisheries, Alaska Department of Fish and Game

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access:
WebEx information coming soon
Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

November 28, 2018

Title:
New
A multidisciplinary approach for generating globally consistent data on mesophotic, deep-pelagic and bathyl biological communities: The General Ocean Survey and Sampling Iterative Protocol
Presenter(s): Lucy Woodall, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: November 28, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: VIa webinar (see login below) or for NOAA staff: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A multidisciplinary approach for generating globally consistent data on mesophotic, deep-pelagic and bathyl biological communities: The General Ocean Survey and Sampling Iterative Protocol

Speaker:
Lucy Woodall, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation. Presenting remotely.


Co-Authors and Affiliations: Dominic A. Andradi-Brown, World Wildlife Fund-US; Andrew S. Brierley, University of St Andrews, Malcolm R. Clark, National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research; Douglas Connelly, National Oceanography Centre; Rob A. Hall, University of East Anglia; Kerry L. Howell, University of Plymouth; Veerle A.I. Huvenne, National Oceanography Centre; Katrin Linse, British Antarctic Survey; Rebecca E. Ross, University of Plymouth; Paul Snelgrove, Memorial University of Newfoundland; Paris V. Stefanoudis, Nekton Foundation; Tracey T. Sutton, Nova Southeastern University; Michelle Taylor, University of Essex; Thomas F. Thornton, University of Oxford; Alex D. Rogers, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation


Authors and Affiliations: Lucy Woodall, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation; Dominic A. Andradi-Brown, World Wildlife Fund-US; Andrew S. Brierley, University of St Andrews; Malcolm R. Clark, National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research; Douglas Connelly, National Oceanography Centre; Rob A. Hall, University of East Anglia; Kerry L. Howell, University of Plymouth; Veerle A.I. Huvenne, National Oceanography Centre; Katrin Linse, British Antarctic Survey; Rebecca E. Ross, University of Plymouth; Paul Snelgrove, Memorial University of Newfoundland; Paris V. Stefanoudis, Nekton Foundation; Tracey T. Sutton, Nova Southeastern University; Michelle Taylor, University of Essex; Thomas F. Thornton, University of Oxford; and Alex D. Rogers, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov.

Webinar Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and "Enter as Guest":
 https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.
Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: In marine science there are almost as many sampling methods as there are researchers. Our individual research questions are fundamental to how we conduct our research and the data we collect; however, understanding the patterns of diversity of ocean life over different temporal and geographic scales requires extensive data both biological and environmental. Therefore, to address these questions, extensive collaboration and comparable data are required. GOSSIP (General Ocean Survey and Sampling Iterative Protocol) is a multidisciplinary framework for generating globally comparable data for biological communities, which has been designed as a guide on how these data can be collected. In this presentation we will share the 20 parameters that have been chosen, explain why each is considered important and how the framework could be utilised. GOSSIP is intended to change over time as technology and techniques evolve. Alongside this recently published paper, we have produced a technical guide that simply pulls together data on current protocols and indicates where further information can be found.

About the Speaker: Lucy is a marine biologist and her research sits within the theme of Ocean Risk. She is based at Oxford University where she lectures in Marine Ecology and Animal Adaptions. Lucy's current work broadly focuses on understanding the processes that drive biodiversity in the marine biome and how human activities modify these. She has conducted work into microplastics and litter in the marine environment, and her microplastics research was the first to reveal the ubiquity of this pollutant in the deep sea. She continues to publish research about microplastics and marine litter, is actively involved in policy consultations and leads a program to develop a model to help prioritise location specific solutions to minimising litter. Alongside her work in marine plastics, Lucy leads a program in deep-sea exploration, sits on the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC) for seahorses and pipefish, and leads the legislation implementation working group for this team. Lucy regularly provides expert evidence for national and international organisations and through Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative (DOSI), is actively engaged in providing solutions that can be used in the high-seas regulation implementing agreement that is currently being negotiated at the UN.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Modeled impact of coastal biogeochemical processes and climate variability on ocean acidification in the Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Dr. Darren Pilcher, Research Scientist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: November 28, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Dr. Darren Pilcher, Research Scientist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Examination of spatial and temporal variability of the carbon cycle from 2003-2012 and the connection to ocean acidification.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 29, 2018

Title:
New
NOAA’s Aquaculture Program: Having Our Fish and Eating Them Too
Presenter(s): Laura Hoberecht, Ph.D., Aquaculture Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region, NOAA Western Regional Center
Date & Time: November 29, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: LAURA HOBERECHT, Ph.D., Aquaculture Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region, NOAA Western Regional Center   

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov)

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

December 4, 2018

Title:
New
Making a case for model-based estimation of data products from fisheries-independent surveys
Presenter(s): Stan Kotwicki, Program Manager, Groundfish Assessment Program, Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: December 4, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Stan Kotwicki, Program Manager, Groundfish Assessment Program, Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access: WebEx information coming soon
Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

December 6, 2018

Title:
New
Salmon Ocean Ecology in British Columbia
Presenter(s): Jackie King, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Date & Time: December 6, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Jackie King, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada  

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov)

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

December 11, 2018

Title:
New
Interaction of commercial fishing gears and long-lived structure forming invertebrate species in the Aleutian Islands: A risk assessment
Presenter(s): John Olson, Fisheries Biologist, Habitat Conservation Division, Alaska Regional Office
Date & Time: December 11, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: John Olson, Fisheries Biologist, Habitat Conservation Division, Alaska Regional Office

Sponsor:
NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access:
WebEx information coming soon
Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

December 12, 2018

Title: Analyses of multi species ichthyoplankton data along the US west coast as indicators of ecosystem changes
Presenter(s): Jens Nielsen Ph.D., NRC postdoctoral researcher, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA.
Date & Time: December 12, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s):
Jens Nielsen Ph.D., NRC postdoctoral researcher, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA.

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Do different fish larvae communities have shared responses to climatic changes?

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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December 19, 2018

Title: A New Diet Index: Predicting fish length from diet composition
Presenter(s): Nissa C. Ferm, Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Contractor with Lynker Inc., Seattle, WA
Date & Time: December 19, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s):
Nissa C. Ferm, Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Contractor with Lynker Inc., Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access: Please join our meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: What did the fish eat? On the surface this seems to be a relatively simple question. However, when diet data are incorporated into models, there are both logistical and ecological limitations. Understanding the methodologies of how diet data are generated, combined with an understanding of the underlying predator-prey ecology, can help generate more informed models.  I will present an overview of diet data methodologies used to investigate feeding of young of the year Walleye Pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus). Based on this knowledge, I will describe a Random Forest model, built upon the scaffold of predator-prey ecology that was designed to predict Walleye Pollock condition. The model I developed predicts fish length from consumed prey taxa weight and composition. Fish length is related to known ontogentic shifts in diet that are important milestones for juvenile Pollock survival and ability to overwinter. Using the difference between the actual length of the fish and the modeled length gives us a metric. This metric tells us how far away a fish is from an average diet for its specific length. The metric was determined to have a significant non-linear relationship with dry energy density.  When modeled fish size was much larger than observed, dry energy density declined. I concluded that fish were not consuming their optimal prey for their particular size in order to meet energetic demands. One possible mechanism for not meeting these energetic demands is a spatial mismatch between the fish and optimal prey.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Sendan email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

December 21, 2018

Title:
New
December 2018 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: December 21, 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminr Series

Speaker: Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) 
Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and  National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov or rthoman@alaska.edu)
Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/December2018
Abstract:The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for January 2019! and the winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

 

Hosted at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR for the OneNOAA Seminar Series
Developer - Lori K. Brown


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