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All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

October 19, 2018

Title: October 2018 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: October 19, 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) 
Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and  National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov or rthoman@alaska.edu)
Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/October2018
Abstract:The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for November and the early winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

October 22, 2018

Title: Southern Plains Drought & El Niño Webinar
Presenter(s): Speakers: Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Kyle Brehe, Southern Regional Climate Center; Victor Murphy, NWS Southern Region
Date & Time: October 22, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speakers: Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Kyle Brehe, Southern Regional Climate Center; Victor Murphy, NWS Southern Region

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with the National Weather Service

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov

Remote access: Register for the webinar at: https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/southern-plains-drought-el-ni%C3%B1o-webinar-october-22-2018 

Abstract: This webinar will focus on the current drought, its impacts, and El Niño and the fall/winter drought outlook in the Southern Plains region. The webinar will be led by NIDIS, the National Weather Service, the Southern Regional Climate Center, Southern Climate Impacts Planning Program (SCIPP, a NOAA RISA), the USDA Southern Plains Climate Hub, the National Drought Mitigation Center,  and state climatologists in the region.

About the Speakers: 

Elizabeth Weight is the Regional Drought Information Coordinator for both the Intermountain West and Southern Plains Drought Early Warning Systems (DEWS) for NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System. Elizabeth has more than 20 years of international water management and research experience in 14 countries in Asia and Africa, most recently with the CGIAR's International Water Management Institute in Sri Lanka.

Kyle Brehe is the Regional Climatologist for the Southern Regional Climate Center at LSU which oversees Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Tennessee. As Regional Climatologist, Mr. Brehe provides weekly US Drought Monitor support, summarizes regional climate conditions in monthly, quarterly, and yearly regional and state reports, supervises and performs duties related to regional climate services, designs web-based climate data product interfaces, serves as the Louisiana state CoCoRaHS coordinator, oversees social media accounts, and performs outreach, among other duties.

Victor Murphy is the Climate Services Program Manager for the NWS Southern Region which comprises New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, and the Gulf Coast States. In this capacity, Mr. Murphy works with NWS Weather Forecast Offices and River Forecast Centers to provide partners with climate data, information, and forecasts to help ensure resiliency and mitigation in decision making processes.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Pacific Northwest Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Speakers: Phil Mote, Oregon State Climatologist; NWS Climate Prediction Center; Emily York, CIRC; Kris Ray, Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation
Date & Time: October 22, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Phil Mote, Oregon State Climatologist; NWS Climate Prediction Center; Emily York, CIRC; Kris Ray, Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

Seminar sponsor: National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Climate Impacts Research Consortium (CIRC - a NOAA RISA), NOAA Climate Program Office

Seminar POC for questions: britt.parker@noaa.gov

Remote access: Register for the webinar at: https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/pacific-northwest-drought-climate-outlook-webinar-october-22-2018

Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar

The Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (PNW DEWS) October 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Niño and La Niña).

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Climate Recap and Current Conditions
Phil Mote | Oregon State Climatologist

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Dan Collins | NWS Climate Prediction Center

Health Effects of Drought and Wildfire in the Northwest
Emily York | CIRC

An Introduction to Smoke Ready Communities
Kris Ray | Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

About the Speakers:

Phil Mote is a professor of atmospheric sciences at Oregon State University and heads CIRC's (a NOAA RISA) Climate Science activity. Along with co-leading CIRC, Phil directs the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute (OCCRI) and the Oregon Climate Service, and has helped co-lead several long-term research projects looking into the impacts of climate change. You might also find him rowing along the Northwest's scenic waterways.

Dr. Dan Collins is a research meteorologist with the Operational Prediction Branch of the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) within the National Weather Service and NOAA, responsible for the management of several interagency NOAA Climate Test Bed (CTB) projects developing subseasonal to seasonal (S2S) forecast capabilities based on hybrid statistical-dynamical methods and multi-model ensembles. Prior to CPC, Dr. Collins worked as a research scientist at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and Georgia Tech. Dr. Collins is originally from New Jersey and earned a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.S. from Rutgers University, and a Ph.D. from New York University. 

Emily York leads the Oregon Climate and Health program and is an author of the Northwest Chapter of the forthcoming U.S. National Climate Assessment. She chairs the Healthy Environments section of the Oregon Public Health Association, co-chairs the NW Climate and Health Network and a steering committee member of the International Transformational Resilience Coalition. She has graduate degrees in public health and sustainability from Portland State University and undergraduate degrees in planning and visual communications from the University of Washington. Before joining the State, Emily led local policy initiatives at the City of Portland and worked with the Coalition for a Livable Future.

Kris Ray has worked for the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation for many years and now manages the Air Quality Program for the last 9.5 years. Currently the program is developing the concept of smoke ready communities to provide practical methods to minimize health related problems due to wood smoke. The program also instigated the Okanogan River Airshed Partnership to look at the many sources of emissions on and off the Reservation and then develop strategies for decreasing exposure. The program operates three PM 2.5 BAM 1020 monitors, an E-BAM, a pesticide deposition monitor and multiple sensors. The program also conducts yearly emissions inventories, participates in compliance and permitting activates, issues agricultural burn permits, determines burn bans and has delegation for several parts of the Federal Air Rules for Reservations. Kris is an EPA credentialed inspector for air quality.   

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

October 23, 2018

Title: Preparing Ocean Governance for Species on the Move
Presenter(s): Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor, Rutgers University. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: October 23, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 for NOAA Silver Spring staff
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Preparing Ocean Governance for Species on the Move

Speaker: Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor, Rutgers University. Presenting remotely.

Sponsors:
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar and the National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Science and Technology; co-hosts are Roger Griffis and Tracy Gill

Webinar Access: We will be using Adobe Connect for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time, hit button "Enter as Guest", then enter your name:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ 
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.; Google Chrome often works too.You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. 
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Fisheries provide critical sources of food and employment for people around the world, and yet rapid shifts in the geographic distribution of marine animals represent an emerging governance challenge for which states and international bodies are underprepared. Past experience suggests that conflict, overfishing, and ultimately fewer marine resources to share are common outcomes when fished stocks move across political boundaries. Moreover, the projected widespread emergence of new transboundary stocks and the gaps in current institutions suggest that new policy and legal approaches are needed to facilitate cooperation. Potential solutions could include broadening the scope of negotiations and mandates, regular governance updates to reflect changes in stock distribution, internationally tradable fisheries permits, and neutral research bodies to guide negotiations. The challenges of shifting fisheries are entirely foreseeable, and with sufficient preparation, ocean fisheries can continue to provide the benefits relied upon by billions of people.

About the Speaker: Malin Pinsky is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources and an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow in Ocean Sciences at Rutgers University. He leads a research group studying the ecological and evolutionary impacts of climate change in the ocean, and he developed the OceanAdapt website to document shifting ocean animals in North America. He has published articles in Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and other international journals, and his research has received coverage in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, BBC, National Public Radio, and other media. He has a Ph.D. from Stanford University, an A.B. from Williams College, and earlier connections along the coast of Maine.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to 
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. 
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Fish age estimation using Fourier transform-near infrared spectroscopy: A pathway to operationalization
Presenter(s): Thomas Helser, Program Manager, Age and Growth, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: October 23, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Thomas Helser, Program Manager, Age and Growth, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management, Alaska Fisheries Science Center


Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Abstract: Estimating the age of fish is of national relevance since the availability of age-structure for stock assessments tends to reduce uncertainty in catch projections, in support of sustainable fishery management. Thus, fish age data play a vital role in identifying appropriate overfishing and annual catch limits.  Age data are also essential for estimating growth"and its variability over time and space"and estimating recruitment success, which are key components for ecosystem drivers of population dynamics. Fish age is usually determined by visual microscopic counting of opaque and translucent growth bands from otoliths and other hard structures, which requires a large expense in human capital, equipment and quality control to ensure reliability of the data. With the demand for age data outstripping our capacity to deliver them using conventional means, new innovative approaches for fish age determination are needed. Fourier Transform-near infrared spectroscopy, which is widespread in the pharmaceutical, chemical, and petrochemical industries, represents a new and transformative technology in fisheries science to rapidly, reliably, and accurately estimate age from otoliths and other hard structures. Beyond ageing fish, other potential applications, including analysis of gonad samples for maturity status and stomach contents for diet analysis, could fundamentally change biological sample collection either at-sea or in the laboratory. This seminar will focus theoretical aspects of the technology, highlight recent developments and case studies, and discuss a pathway to operationalizing FT-NIRS for age estimation.


Webinar Access: AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.
 
2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, October 23, 2018
10:00 am  |  Pacific Daylight Time (San Francisco, GMT-07:00)  |  1 hr
Meeting number: 806 264 950
Meeting password: dawson
   

When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Effects of Sea Level Rise on New England Salt Marshes
Presenter(s): Jennifer West, Narragansett Bay National Estaurine Research Reserve
Date & Time: October 23, 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Please register through GoToWebinar (see below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Jennifer West, Narragansett Bay National Estaurine Research Reserve, Email: jennifer@nbnerr.org

Sponsors:
NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html or http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar). 

Webinar Access: GoToWebinar: http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar

Abstract:
Join us to learn from a regional workshop led by the New England NERRS that brought together scientists and managers to discuss the latest developments on salt marshes and sea level rise. The workshop increased knowledge of the regional status and trends of salt marsh condition; increased awareness of partnership and collaboration opportunities; improved connections between research, management, and restoration sectors; created a more robust information sharing network; and increased awareness of NERRs as unique sites suitable for long-term research and management “test beds” for management strategies.

About the Speaker: Jennifer West has been the Coastal Training Program Coordinator with the Narragansett Bay Research Reserve since 2005. In this position, she develops and delivers training events and technical assistance programs for municipal officials and other decision-maker audiences on topics related to water quality, habitat protection, and climate change. Jennifer has expertise in program design, management, and evaluation; communicating science to diverse audiences; meeting facilitation; and planning and implementing collaborative methods for engaging stakeholders in successfully addressing environmental issues.

Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or boumad@umich.edu

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to 
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. 
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

October 24, 2018

Title: NOAA Geospatial (Geographic Information System) Hot Topics
Presenter(s): Tony LaVoi, NOAA Geospatial Information Officer, NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer and Integrated Information Services Division Chief, NOAA Office for Coastal Management; Kim Valentine, Geospatial Data Manager, National Ocean Service, Office of the Assistant Chief Information Officer; and Randy Warren, GIS Coordinator, National Ocean Service, Office for Coastal Management
Date & Time: October 24, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Title: NOAA Geospatial (Geographic Information System) Hot Topics

Speakers:
  • Tony LaVoi, NOAA Geospatial Information Officer, NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer, and Integrated Information Services Division Chief, NOAA Office for Coastal Management;
  • Kim Valentine, Geospatial Data Manager, National Ocean Service, Office of the Assistant Chief Information Officer; and 
  • Randy Warren, GIS Coordinator, National Ocean Service, Office for Coastal Management
Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will be using Adobe Connect for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time, hit button "Enter as Guest" and then please enter your name:  
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test. Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
NOAA's diverse mission is enabled by the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies. During this webinar we will demonstrate several ways how GIS is used to meet NOAA's mission. We will also provide an overview of the NOAA GIS Committee, resources for end users including the NOAA GIS Community website, and discuss benefits of the new NOAA Esri Enterprise License Agreement, which includes access to software, ArcGIS Online, and GIS training.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: The Developing El Niño and the Ongoing Drought in the Southwest
Presenter(s): Speakers: Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Gerry Bell, NWS Climate Prediction Center; David Simeral, Desert Research Institute/DRI, Western Regional Climate Center/WRCC
Date & Time: October 24, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Gerry Bell, NWS Climate Prediction Center; David Simeral, Desert Research Institute (DRI), Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC)

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with the National Weather Service

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov 

Remote access: Register for the webinar at: https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/developing-el-ni%C3%B1o-and-going-drought-southwest 

Abstract: 

What does El Niño mean for the exceptional drought in the Southwest? This webinar will provide an El Niño overview and share up-to-date information on the long-term drought, its impacts, and how El Niño may influence temperature and precipitation in the region, which includes portions of Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. The webinar series is a collaboration of NIDIS, NWS, Western Water Assessment (WWA, a NOAA RISA), Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS, a NOAA RISA), Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), USDA Southwest Climate Hub, the National Drought Mitigation Center, state climatologists, universities and other drought experts.

About the Speakers:  


Elizabeth Weight is the Regional Drought Information Coordinator for both the Intermountain West and Southern Plains Drought Early Warning Systems (DEWS) for NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System. Elizabeth has more than 20 years of international water management and research experience in 14 countries in Asia and Africa, most recently with the CGIAR's International Water Management Institute in Sri Lanka.

Gerry Bell is a meteorologist, climate specialist, and El Niño expert with NOAA's Climate Prediction Center (CPC) in Camp Springs, Maryland. Dr. Bell specializes in monitoring and predicting global climate variability, especially patterns related to the El Niño/ La Niña cycle and other large-scale atmospheric processes. He is a forecaster for NOAA's monthly El Niño predictions, and a co-editor for NOAA's weekly El Niño updates. Dr. Bell is also the chief editor and co-author of the monthly Climate Diagnostics Bulletin, which provides the latest El Niño analyses and diagnoses along with a description and analysis of global weather and climate conditions. Dr. Bell has published numerous scientific papers, and given many lectures and webinars, on El Niño and its impacts, and he has received NOAA-wide awards for accurate El Niño predictions. 

Dave Simeral is an Associate Research Scientist of Climatology with the Division of Atmospheric Sciences at the Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) in Reno, Nevada. Dave's interests cover a broad spectrum within the fields of climatology, meteorology, physical geography, and snow science. Over the past 15 years at the DRI/WRCC, Mr. Simeral has worked on a wide variety of projects in the fields of meteorology and climatology with state, federal, and university entities. Mr. Simeral is one of twelve national authors for the U.S. Drought Monitor and serves on several steering committees for the NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS).

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

October 25, 2018

Title: Understanding Underwater Behavior of Humpback Whales to Mitigate Ship Strike and Entanglement
Presenter(s): Dave Wiley, Sanctuary Research Coordinator, NOAA"s Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: October 25, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Understanding the Underwater Behavior of Humpback Whales to Mitigate Ship Strike and Entanglement

Speaker: Dave Wiley, Sanctuary Research Coordinator, NOAA"s Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667.  Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract: Recent innovations in technologies available to investigate the underwater behavior of whales (multi-sensor acoustic and video recording tags) and analytic software (TrackPlot and GeoZUI4D) have enabled scientists and collaborators from the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary to gather unprecedented information about large whales. Since 2004, the team has tagged 193 humpback whales and analyzed hundreds of hours of tag-derived data. Analysis and data visualizations suggest that humpback's demonstrate complex behaviors that indicate cooperation and competition for resources, and feed primarily in the top and bottom portions of the water column. The latter make the animals particularly vulnerable to interactions with ships and bottom-set fishing gears.

About the Speaker: Dr. David Wiley is the Research Coordinator for NOAA's Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. His research focuses on the ecology of large whales and seabirds and his numerous publications include being featured on the cover of journals as diverse as Conservation Biology and Behaviour. He has been awarded a Gulf of Maine Visionary Award, the Society for Marine Mammalogy's award for Excellence in Scientific Communication and the Department of Commerce's Gold Medal for Scientific Leadership. He is a recipient of an Ian Axford/Fulbright Fellowship in Public Policy and is adjunct faculty in the School of Science and Mathematics at the University of Massachusetts - Boston and the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Ghosts of Oceans Past: How Fishing Reshapes Communities of Fishes and their Parasites
Presenter(s): Chelsea Wood, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: October 25, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: CHELSEA WOOD, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington  

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT
Marine ecosystems contain a vast diversity of ecologically influential parasites. My work aims to pinpoint ways in which fishing may reshape these assemblages. My past research has focused on quantifying variability in parasite abundance and diversity across contemporary spatial variation in fishing pressure. I have tackled this challenge with empirical work in several marine systems (e.g., coral reefs of the Northern Line Islands archipelago, marine reserves in central Chile) and by using synthesis techniques. These data have shown that fishing tends to erode parasite diversity and shift parasite assemblage composition away from complex life cycle parasite taxa and toward directly transmitted parasite taxa. An obvious implication of this work - that the accumulation of fishing impacts on marine ecosystems may have driven similar shifts in parasite assemblages over time - has never been addressed. Our lab group is currently working to “turn back the clock”, by generating primary data on the dynamics of marine parasites over long time profiles and at unprecedented temporal, spatial, and taxonomic resolutions, and I'll show some preliminary data from this effort.

BIO
Chelsea is a marine ecologist interested in how fishing drives change in parasite assemblages. She received her Ph.D. in 2013 from Stanford University, where she was a student of marine ecologist and conservation biologist Fiorenza Micheli. She went on to complete post-docs at the University of Colorado and the University of Michigan. Chelsea is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

October 30, 2018

Title: Reproduction and population biology of rockfish and flatfish in Alaskan waters
Presenter(s): Todd TenBrink, Research Fish Biologist, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: October 30, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Todd TenBrink, Research Fish Biologist, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access:
AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.
 
2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, October 30, 2018
10:00 am  |  Pacific Daylight Time (San Francisco, GMT-07:00)  |  1 hr
Meeting number: 801 520 707
Meeting password: dawson
   

When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

October 31, 2018

Title: Are fieldwork studies being relegated to second place in conservation science?
Presenter(s): Dr. Carlos Antonio Ríos-Saldaña, BioCórima/Technological Institute of Linares, Arteaga, Coahuila, Mexico. Presenting from Coahuila, Mexico
Date & Time: October 31, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Are fieldwork studies being relegated to second place in conservation science?

Speaker: Dr. Carlos Antonio Ríos-Saldaña, BioCórima/Technological Institute of Linares, Arteaga, Coahuila, Mexico. Presenting from Coahuila, Mexico.

Sponsors: NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will be using Adobe Connect for this webinar.  To join a session, please go to the following site at the scheduled date and time and "Enter as Guest": https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/  
Users should use either IE, Edge or Google Chrome on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

Audio will be available thru the computer only (voice over IP) - no phone.
Adjust the volume of your computer speakers or headset to hear the speaker.
Questions will be addressed in the chat window.
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Abstract: The collection of biological information, including data gathered in the field, is fundamental to improve our understanding of how human impacts on biological systems can be recognized, mitigated or averted. However, the role of empirical field research has faded appreciably in the past decades with sobering implications. Indeed, important instruments to help set national and global priorities in biodiversity conservation (i.e. synthetic analyses and big data approaches) can be severely handicapped by a lack of sound observational data, collected through fieldwork. Here, we show that the proportion of fieldwork-based investigations in the conservation literature dropped significantly from the 1980s until today; and we found that the most highly cited academic journals in conservation science published fieldwork studies less frequently than the lower rank journals. We contend that an apparent decrease in fieldwork-based investigations is the result of bottom-up pressures, including those associated with the publishing and the academic reward systems, while a second set acts top-down, driven by current societal needs and/or priorities. We urge researchers, funders and journals to commit, respectively, to conducting, funding and divulging relevant fieldwork research, and make some recommendations on specific steps that can be adopted in that direction.

About the Speaker: Antonio Ríos is co-founder and director of a Mexico-based biodiversity nonprofit called BioCórima. He is also a research associate in the Technological Institute of Linares. Antonio is acknowledged by the National System of Researchers (Sistema Nacional de Investigadores or SNI), a governmental agency established to promote both the quantity and quality of scientific research in Mexico. He received a Bachelor's degree in Forestry from the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL, for its acronym in Spanish), Mexico. Afterward, he obtained a Master of Science degree in Wildlife Research and a Ph.D. in Wildlife Management and Conservation, both, in the University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. His research focuses on game management, ecology and wildlife conservation. Antonio received the Professional Development Award by the UANL in 2017 (Mexico). Additionally, he won the Research Award “Cuenta Joven 2006” by the Caja España (Spain) and the Award for Excellence in the Social Service by the UANL in 2004 (Mexico). He lives with his wife and two dogs in Saltillo, Mexico, and enjoys kayaking, dog walking and travel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 1, 2018

Title: Effects of Temperature on Fish Sex Determination: Potential Bioindicators of Global Climate Change
Presenter(s): Yoji Yamamoto, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology 
Date & Time: November 1, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: YOJI YAMAMOTO, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology   

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

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November 6, 2018

Title: Coastal Wetlands Reduce Disaster Risk, Protect Biodiversity, and Promote Human Health and Well-Being
Presenter(s): Ariana Sutton-Grier, Director of Science the MD-DC Chapter of the Nature Conservancy and Associate Research Professor University of Maryland. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring. And
Paul Sandifer, Director of the Center for Coastal Environmental and Human Health at the College of Charleston. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: November 6, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Coastal Wetlands Reduce Disaster Risk, Protect Biodiversity, and Promote Human Health and Well-Being

Speakers: 
Ariana Sutton-Grier, Director of Science the MD/DC Chapter of the Nature Conservancy & Associate Research Professor University of Maryland, and Paul Sandifer, Director of the Center for Coastal Environmental and Human Health at the College of Charleston

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Webinar Access: We will use Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to the followinsite at the scheduled date and time and "Enter as Guest": https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/  
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: There is substantial, growing literature that details positive human health effects, psychological and physiological, of exposure to “nature,” including “green” and “blue space,” with evidence suggesting that diversity of species or environments may have specific positive human health benefits. These health benefits are important ecosystem services provided by healthy ecosystems. In this presentation, we discuss several critical ecosystem services provided by wetlands including disaster risk reduction, with an emphasis on benefits to human health and well-being. Impacts to human health via damage to ecosystem services from disasters have rarely been considered in disaster planning or mitigation, nor have the health benefits been part of the framework for planning urban greenspaces and land-use. Coastal wetlands can be part of “natural and nature-based” solutions, minimizing the impacts of disasters by buffering coastal communities from storms and erosion and absorbing flood waters. In addition, mental and physical health benefits of experiencing healthy wetlands could offset some stress and disease encounters related to disasters. Thus, coastal wetlands should be part of a strategy for reducing the risk posed by disasters and facilitating recovery. We conclude with recommendations for research priorities and specific inclusion of wetlands in coastal community planning for disaster response and recovery.

About the Speakers:
Dr. Ariana Sutton-Grier is the Director of Science for the Maryland/DC Chapter of the Nature Conservancy and is also a Visiting Associate Research Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Sutton-Grier is an ecosystem ecologist with expertise in wetland ecology and restoration, biodiversity, biogeochemistry, climate change, and ecosystem services. She holds Honors Bachelor degrees from Oregon State University in Environmental Science and International Studies and a doctoral degree from Duke University in Ecology. Her research interests include the relationships between nature/biodiversity and human health, coastal blue carbon, and natural and nature-based coastal resilience strategies.

Dr. Paul Sandifer is the Founding Director of the Center for Coastal Environmental and Human Health at the College of Charleston where he conducts research and advises graduate students. He has a broad background in ecological and aquaculture research, natural resource management, science policy, and the intersection of environmental and human health. He is currently working on development of a community health observing system for the Gulf of Mexico and implementation of a new NIEHS-funded Center for Oceans and Human Health at the University of SC. His prior career includes nearly 12 years as a Senior Scientist and Science Advisor in NOAA and 31 years as a scientist and manager, including as agency Director, with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Paul has been a member of numerous boards, commissions, and committees including the US Commission on Ocean Policy. He is an Honorary Life Member of the World Aquaculture Society, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Fellow of the Ecological Society of America, and Emeritus Member of the National Association of Marine Laboratories.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Ecological interactions among major groundfish species in the Gulf of Alaska
Presenter(s): Cheryl Barnes, Ph.D. Student, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: November 6, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Speaker: Cheryl Barnes, Ph. D. Student, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access:
AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.
 
2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, November 6, 2018
10:00 am  |  Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00)  |  1 hr
Meeting number: 800 147 324
Meeting password: dawson
   

When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: East Asian Monsoon as a predictor of U.S. Great Plains Heat Waves.
Presenter(s): Dr. Hosmay Lopez, Assistant Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: November 6, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Hosmay Lopez, Assistant Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/189397677

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (312) 757-3121
Access Code: 189-397-677

Abstract: Heat waves are large-scale and persistent extreme warm temperature events that are responsible for the most weather-related cause of death in the United States (U.S.). The number of heat waves and their severity have been increasing in recent decades and are projected to continue increasing into the 21stCentury under anthropogenic (i.e., human influence) forcing. Future projections of heat extremes and the role of anthropogenic forcing on its modulation is still not well understood. A recent study has shown that anthropogenic forcing will govern the occurrence of heat waves over the western U.S. and Great Lakes region, whereas the presence of large natural variability will dominate heat wave occurrence over the Great Plains, hence adding uncertainty in their future projections. This calls for the need to identify potential natural predictors of these extreme events over the Great Plains, which should aid in their prediction and understanding of future projections.In this work, we look at the influence of a summer teleconnection pattern forced remotely by diabatic heating over the East Asian Monsoon (EAM) as a potential modulator of extreme warm temperatures and heat waves over the Great Plains of North America. Our hypothesis is that midtropospheric heating due to deep convection from the EAM forces a stationary wave pattern across the North Pacific, setting up the stage for more likelihood for atmospheric blocking events and heat waves over the Great Plains. While summer mean atmospheric circulation is relatively weak, hence limiting large-scale teleconnections, the extra-tropical nature of the EAM and its proximity to the mean storm track allows for heating anomalies to remotely influence circulation. These results provide a useful basis in order to understand potential mechanisms of drivers of heat waves with the aim at improving their predictions.

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November 7, 2018

Title: Northern rock sole recruitment response to winds and temperature in the eastern Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Dan Cooper, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: November 7, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Dan Cooper, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA.

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.


Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. 
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Creating environment-recruitment models for short and long-term forecasting of rock sole.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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November 8, 2018

Title: Measuring and Modeling Ecological Interactions in the Wild
Presenter(s): Andrew Hein, Ph.D., Research Ecologist, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, UC Santa Cruz Institute of Marine Sciences
Date & Time: November 8, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: ANDREW HEIN, Ph.D., Research Ecologist, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, 
UC Santa Cruz Institute of Marine Sciences

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 13, 2018

Title: Impacts of the 'warm blob' on Gulf of Alaska Pacific cod: A 1st year of life perspective
Presenter(s): Ben Laurel, Research Fish Biologist, Fish Behavior Ecology, Resource Assessment and Conservation Ecology, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: November 13, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker:
Ben Laurel, Research Fish Biologist, Fish Behavior Ecology, Resource Assessment and Conservation Ecology, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access: AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.
 
2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, November 13, 2018
10:00 am  |  Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00)  |  1 hr
Meeting number: 804 776 791
Meeting password: dawson
   

When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 14, 2018

Title: A Proof-of-Concept Application of a New Ecosystem Assessment/Decision Framework: Restoring Rookery Islands of the Mission-Aransas Reserve
Presenter(s): John H. Gentile, Harwell Gentile & Associates, LC, Cape Cod, MA, and Mark A. Harwell, Harwell Gentile & Associates, LC, Port Orange, FL
Date & Time: November 14, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: John H. Gentile, Harwell Gentile & Associates, LC, Cape Cod, MA, and Mark A. Harwell, Harwell Gentile & Associates, LC, Port Orange, FL

Co-Authors: Larry D. McKinney, Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, TX, and John (Wes) W. Tunnell Jr., Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, TX

Sponsors: NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Kathleen.Ernst @noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will use the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and select 'Enter as guest': https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Over the past century, the environment of the Gulf of Mexico has been significantly altered and impaired by extensive human activities. A national commitment to restore the Gulf was finally initiated in response to the unprecedented Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010. Consequently, there is now a critical need for an assessment framework and associated set of indicators that can characterize the health and sustainability of an ecosystem having the scale and complexity of the Gulf. Such an assessment framework presented here has been developed as an integration of previous ecological risk- and environmental management-based frameworks for assessing ecological health. This conceptual framework is in its essence a comprehensive conceptual model of the coupled human-ecological system. It was designed to identify the natural and anthropogenic Drivers, Pressures, and Stressors impinging on ecosystems and ecosystem services and the ecological Conditions that result, manifested as effects on valued ecosystem components. Four types of societal and ecological Responses are also specified: reduction of pressures and stressors, remediation of existing stressors, active ecosystem restoration, and natural ecological recovery. From this conceptual framework are derived the specific indicators to characterize ecological condition and progress towards achieving defined ecological health and sustainability goals. We present a proof-of-concept evaluation of this integrated assessment/ decision framework to inform specific environmental management decisions of the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve. This pilot study has demonstrated the utility of the assessment and decision-support framework in restoring Texas coastal resident and migratory bird populations through enhancement of rookery islands in the Reserve.

About the Speakers: 
Dr. John H. (Jack) Gentile is an ecologist whose primary interest is the design and implementation of watershed- and regional-scale integrated risk assessments. Dr. Gentile was a senior scientist with the U.S. EPA for 30 years, where he directed programs in marine ecotoxicology, ocean disposal of hazardous wastes, ocean incineration, marine water quality criteria, and the disposal of dredged materials. As a visiting scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Dr. Gentile developed strategies and methods for conducting ecological risk assessments in near-coastal environments. He concluded his US EPA career as Senior Science Coordinator for the Risk Assessment Forum, where he played a leading role in the development of the US EPA Framework for Ecological Risks. Dr. Gentile has published numerous scientific papers on topics ranging from toxic blue-green algae, marine ecotoxicology, water quality criteria, hazardous waste disposal, incineration-at-sea, the ecological effects of climate change, ecological risk assessment, and ecosystem management. While Senior Research Scientist at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School, Dr. Gentile participated a series of interdisciplinary studies on human interactions with the South Florida environment, including field, mesocosm, and modeling studies in Biscayne Bay and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, as well as the US MAB project on ecological sustainability and ecosystem management of the Everglades. Dr. Gentile, along with Dr. Harwell, has conducted several large ecological risk assessments, including on Tampa Bay, Biscayne Bay, the Coeur d'Alene River basin, Prince William Sound, and the Bay of Fundy. Working with the South Florida Water Management District, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force, Dr. Gentile facilitated the development of Assessment Guidance for evaluating the success of the Everglades Ecosystem Restoration. Dr. Gentile, working with Dr. Harwell and teams of scientists, developed a series of conceptual ecosystem models for several National Estuarine Research Reserves, and for Prince William Sound. He has worked extensively on characterizing the long-term residual ecological risks and recovery from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and along with Dr. Harwell is developing an ecosystem health report card for the Gulf of Mexico. 

Dr. Mark A. Harwell is an ecosystems ecologist specializing in ecological risk assessments, ecological modeling, and ecosystem management. He (with colleague Dr. Jack Gentile) was a leader in the development of the US EPA ecological risk assessment framework, which has been widely adopted by US EPA and throughout the federal government; they have led several large-scale ecological risk assessments, including on Biscayne Bay, Tampa Bay, Apalachicola Bay, Prince William Sound, the Coeur d'Alene River basin, and the Bay of Fundy. He and Dr. Gentile conducted extensive risk assessment studies on residual exposures and effects in the PWS ecosystem from the Exxon Valdez oil spill, and they presently are developing a framework for an ecosystem health report card for the Gulf of Mexico. Dr. Harwell spent 25 years in academia, primarily leading interdisciplinary environmental research centers at Cornell University and the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School. He chaired the US Man and the Biosphere Program's Human-Dominated Systems Directorate, and led its core project to develop ecosystem management principles and apply them to the Florida Everglades, providing the conceptual framework for the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration. He served for over ten years as a member of the US EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB), including two terms as Chair of the Ecological Processes and Effects Committee. He led the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) 5-year international study to assess the global environmental effects of nuclear war on ecological and agricultural systems, and directed a series of case studies on the ecological effects of climate change on Venezuela, India, Japan, China, and Sub-Saharan Africa. He served on the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) panel on ecological risks in the US and Poland and the NA
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Title: The return of Maine’s kelp forests: patterns, drivers and implications for stakeholders
Presenter(s): Thew Suskiewicz, PhD, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, Portland, ME.
Date & Time: November 14, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Thew Suskiewicz, PhD, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, Portland, ME.

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: How intense overfishing on both groundfish and the herbivores has pushed the Gulf of Maine into a novel ecosystem

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Drivers of Knowledge Use: Learning how NERRS has generated usable science and technology
Presenter(s): James Arnott is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Michigan and Associate Director of the Aspen Global Change Institute
Date & Time: November 14, 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Please register through GoToWebinar (see below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: James Arnott is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Michigan and Associate Director of the Aspen Global Change Institute

Sponsors:
NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html or http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar). 

Webinar Access: GoToWebinar: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2072068538911038465

Abstract:
Making science usable for solving societal problems may require changes to the way research is practiced and funded. For example, there is growing belief that incorporating end-users into the research process will increase the use of resulting knowledge, among other benefits. And, increasingly, funders of research are considering rules that encourage or require some form of end-user participation in the research they sponsor. But how do these changes affect the research and its use for societal benefit? Drawing upon the history of funded research within NERRS as a natural experiment, this research examines how changes in NERRS funding shaped research practice and how closer interactions between scientists and end-users influenced the ultimate end-uses of research.

About the Speaker: 
James Arnott is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Michigan and Associate Director of the Aspen Global Change Institute. James has worked closely with the NERR System during the completion of his doctoral thesis on topics related to science funding, the use of science, and climate change adaptation. In 2011, James was awarded the McCloy Fellowship in Environmental Policy and in 2009 James received a B.A. in Political Science and Economics from Principia College.

Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or boumad@umich.edu

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to 
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. 
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Title: CANCELLED: A Rare Great Lakes Ecosystem: Exploring the Sinkholes of Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Stephanie Gandulla, NOAA Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: November 14, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Stephanie Gandulla, NOAA Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4895467060831741186

Abstract: Underwater explorations in Lake Huron have revealed unique hotspots of biogeochemical activity at several submerged groundwater vents in Lake Huron. Learn about the techniques scientists use to explore unique single-celled microorganism communities that dominate this freshwater habitat. Educators will be provided with information and links to lessons that feature this unique Great Lakes research topic.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 15, 2018

Title: Marine Heatwaves under Global Warming: Discovering Risks for Marine Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Prof. Thomas Frölicher, Assistant Professor in Ocean Modelling, Climate and Environmental Physics, University of Bern, Switzerland. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: November 15, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Marine Heatwaves under Global Warming: Discovering Risks for Marine Ecosystems

Speaker: Prof. Thomas Frölicher, Assistant Professor in Ocean Modelling, Climate and Environmental Physics, University of Bern, Switzerland. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: TBD, Will likely be Adobe Connect.

Abstract: Extreme climate and weather events shape the structure of biological systems and affect the biogeochemical functions and services they provide for society in a fundamental manner. There is overwhelming evidence that the frequency, duration and intensity of extreme events on land are changing under global warming, increasing the risk of severe, pervasive and in some cases irreversible impacts on natural and socio-economic systems. In contrast, we know very little about the past occurrences and the future progression of marine heatwaves. This knowledge gap is of particular concern as some of the recently observed marine heatwaves revealed the high vulnerability of marine ecosystems and fisheries to such extreme climate events. 

Here we use satellite observations and a suite of Earth system model simulations to show that the number of marine heatwave days doubled between 1982 and 2016, and this is projected to increase further if global temperature continue to increase. If temperature were to rise by 3.5 degrees Celsius relative to preindustrial levels, as is predicted to result from current national policies for the reduction of global carbon emissions, the average probability of marine heatwaves occurring would be 41 times higher than in preindustrial times. Such an increase in marine heatwaves will probably increase the risk of severe and long-lasting impact on marine organisms, such as coral reefs and those living at low latitudes, where many marine species live close to their upper thermal limits. Potential impacts on physical and human systems will also be discussed. 

About the Speaker: Thomas Frölicher is currently a SNF Assistant professor at the Climate and Environmental Physics Division of the University of Bern and interested in marine ecosystem-carbon-climate interactions with focus on ocean extreme events and their impacts on marine organisms and ecosystem services. He studied environmental sciences at ETH Zürich and graduated at the University of Bern. He worked 2 ½ years as a postdoctoral fellow at Princeton 
University and 4 years as a senior researcher at ETH Zürich. He is also the recipient of a SNF Ambizione fellowship. He authored or co-authored 46 peer-reviewed publications, is the lead author of chapter six of the upcoming IPCC Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a changing climate, and contributed to the fifth assessment report of working group II of the IPCC. A portrait about Thomas' work is available on
http://www.zeit.de/2016/20/thomas-froelicher-klimaforscher-schweiz

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Title: Initial Geostationary Lightning Mapper Observations
Presenter(s): Scott Rudlosky  - NESDIS/STAR/CoRP
Date & Time: November 15, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553 , NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Presenter:
Scott Rudlosky  - NESDIS/STAR/CoRP

Sponsor:
STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:    995 269 347
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=e06a832718796d679faaf25f456ef1ab0

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416

Abstract:
The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) is the first sensor of its kind, and this technological advancement now allows continuous operational monitoring of lightning on time and space scales never before available. This has led to a golden age of lightning observations, which will spur more rapid progress toward synthesis of these observations with other meteorological datasets and forecasting tools. This study documents the first nine months of GLM observations, illustrating that the GLM captures similar spatial patterns of lightning occurrence to many previous studies. The present study shows that GLM flashes are less common over the oceans, but that the oceanic flashes are larger, brighter, and last longer than flashes over land. The GLM characteristics also help diagnose and document data quality artifacts that diminish in time with tuning of the instrument and filters. The GLM presents profound possibilities, with countless new applications anticipated over the coming decades. The baseline values reported herein aim to guide the early development and application of the GLM observations.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Scott Rudlosky is a NOAA/NESDIS physical scientist in the Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) Cooperative Research Program (CoRP). He is co-located with the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites (CICS) in College Park, Maryland. Scott is the NESDIS Subject Matter Expert on lightning and science lead for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). He originally joined CICS as a Research Associate in January 2011 following completion of his M.S. (2007) and Ph.D. (2011) in Meteorology at Florida State University. He obtained his B.S. (2004) in Geography with a specialization in Atmospheric Science from Ohio State University.

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Title: Working with NOAA and Multiple Partners to Restore Oysters, Abalone, and Kelp and Develop Sustainable Shellfish and Kelp Aquaculture
Presenter(s): Louisa Harding, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Date & Time: November 15, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Louisa Harding, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife  

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

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November 16, 2018

Title:
New
Rapid warming in the tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans-and its impacts on MJO and the global climate
Presenter(s): Dr. Roxy Mathew Koll, NRC Senior Research Associate at PMEL, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: November 16, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/110386877
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Dr. Roxy Mathew Koll, NRC Senior Research Associate at PMEL, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab
 
Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/110386877 

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (312) 757-3121 
Access Code: 110-386-877 

About the Speaker: Dr. Roxy Mathew Koll joined PMEL as a Visiting Scientist in August 2018. He is a Climate Scientist at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology and an Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Pune, in India. Roxy is currently leading research on the rapid warming in Indian Ocean and its impact on the tropical climate variability including the monsoon"and the marine ecosystem. He is a Co-Chair of the CLIVAR Indian Ocean Region Panel, and a Lead Author of the IPCC Special Report on Oceans and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate. He was awarded the Kavli Fellowship by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in 2015. The Indian Meteorological Society felicitated him with the Young Scientist Award in 2016, for his research on the changes in the Monsoon and the Indian Ocean.  Learn more about Dr. Koll and his work on his lab's homepage: http://climate.rocksea.org

Seminar POC: adi.hanein@noaa.gov

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Title: November 2018 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: November 16, 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) 
Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and  National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov or rthoman@alaska.edu)
Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/November2018
Abstract:The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for December and the winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

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November 19, 2018

Title: Causes for the record low sea-ice extent in the Bering Sea in 2018
Presenter(s): Phyllis Stabeno Ph.D., Oceanographer, NOAA Research, Seattle, WA.
Date & Time: November 19, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Phyllis Stabeno Ph.D., Oceanographer, NOAA Research, Seattle, WA.


Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

First GoToMeeting? Let's do a quick system check: https://link.gotomeeting.com/system-check

Abstract: An in-depth look at the driving factors of a warm Bering Sea including ice arrival, extent, and implications

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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November 27, 2018

Title: Integration of Habitat Mapping & Acoustic Technologies to Advance Ecosystem Based Management
Presenter(s): Dr. Mark Monaco, Director, Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, NCCOS. Presenting in person in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: November 27, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Integration of Habitat Mapping & Acoustic Technologies to Advance Ecosystem Based Management

Speaker: Dr. Mark Monaco, Director, Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). Presenting in person in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: NOAA/NCCOS's Marine Spatial Ecology Division and partners couple satellite-based and air-borne remote sensing (e.g., multi-spectral imagery) and ship-based (e.g., multi-beam soundings) technologies to map coastal and benthic habitats. The map products are key components in structuring sampling designs to monitor reef fish distribution and abundance through visual and fish acoustic surveys. The habitat maps and reef fish monitoring data support development of ecologically relevant hydro-acoustics arrays to define species' habitat utilization patterns and movements through acoustic telemetry. The integration of the biophysical data advances our ability to define ecological connectivity of marine ecosystems based on species' habitat utilization patterns and is a key component to advance EBM through spatial management of marine resources. We present results of benthic habitat mapping efforts coupled with underwater acoustic telemetry to quantify diel movements, spatial patterns, and habitat affinities of reef fishes and pelagic prey in the U.S Caribbean. Fish presence and movement data contribute to defining ecological connectivity among habitats (e.g., corals, algae, seagrasses) and associated management areas. Results aid in assessing the efficacy of managed areas designed to enhance coral reef ecosystems and provided evidence of ecological connectivity across habitat types in the seascape and among management areas to support EBM efforts.

About the Speaker: Dr. Mark E. Monaco of NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) has been a practicing scientist and manager in the field of marine spatial planning for over 35 years. His current position is Chief of the Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science that is comprised of about 120 Federal and contract staff located around the country. During his career at NOAA, he led development and implementation NOAA's Biogeographic Assessment Framework that has been used in conducting geospatial assessments to facilitate marine spatial planning processes and implementation plans. Applications include defining and evaluating the efficacy of marine protected areas, defining and modifying the spatial boundaries of NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries, and supporting US States in developing marine spatial plans with emphasis on the siting of alternative energy facilities. He currently serves as the co-chair of the steering committee for NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program that provides a framework to inform ecosystem-based management decisions. He represents NOAA on the Chesapeake Bay Scientific Technical Advisory Committee and co-Leads NOAA's Ecological Forecasting-Habitat Science and Ecological Forecasting Technical Team that is addressing how habitats are changing in quantity and quality over space and time to forecast ecosystem responses to habitat modifications. Today he will present an integrated suite of remote sensing technologies to couple habitat and species distributions to support Ecosystem Based Management.

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Title: Using fishing industry catch data directly for stock assessment: Aleutian Islands Golden King Crab
Presenter(s): Chris Siddon, Marine Fisheries Scientist, Division of Commercial Fisheries, Alaska Department of Fish and Game
Date & Time: November 27, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Chris Siddon, Marine Fisheries Scientist, Division of Commercial Fisheries, Alaska Department of Fish and Game

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access:
AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.
 
2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, Liz Dawson, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, November 27, 2018
10:00 am  |  Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00)  |  1 hr
Meeting number: 805 217 062
Meeting password: dawson
   

When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode: 5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 28, 2018

Title: A multidisciplinary approach for generating globally consistent data on mesophotic, deep-pelagic and bathyl biological communities: The General Ocean Survey and Sampling Iterative Protocol
Presenter(s): Lucy Woodall, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: November 28, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: VIa webinar (see login below) or for NOAA staff: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A multidisciplinary approach for generating globally consistent data on mesophotic, deep-pelagic and bathyl biological communities: The General Ocean Survey and Sampling Iterative Protocol

Speaker:
Lucy Woodall, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation. Presenting remotely.

Co-Authors and Affiliations: Dominic A. Andradi-Brown, World Wildlife Fund-US; Andrew S. Brierley, University of St Andrews, Malcolm R. Clark, National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research; Douglas Connelly, National Oceanography Centre; Rob A. Hall, University of East Anglia; Kerry L. Howell, University of Plymouth; Veerle A.I. Huvenne, National Oceanography Centre; Katrin Linse, British Antarctic Survey; Rebecca E. Ross, University of Plymouth; Paul Snelgrove, Memorial University of Newfoundland; Paris V. Stefanoudis, Nekton Foundation; Tracey T. Sutton, Nova Southeastern University; Michelle Taylor, University of Essex; Thomas F. Thornton, University of Oxford; Alex D. Rogers, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation

Authors and Affiliations: Lucy Woodall, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation; Dominic A. Andradi-Brown, World Wildlife Fund-US; Andrew S. Brierley, University of St Andrews; Malcolm R. Clark, National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research; Douglas Connelly, National Oceanography Centre; Rob A. Hall, University of East Anglia; Kerry L. Howell, University of Plymouth; Veerle A.I. Huvenne, National Oceanography Centre; Katrin Linse, British Antarctic Survey; Rebecca E. Ross, University of Plymouth; Paul Snelgrove, Memorial University of Newfoundland; Paris V. Stefanoudis, Nekton Foundation; Tracey T. Sutton, Nova Southeastern University; Michelle Taylor, University of Essex; Thomas F. Thornton, University of Oxford; and Alex D. Rogers, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov.

Webinar Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and "Enter as Guest":
 https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: In marine science there are almost as many sampling methods as there are researchers. Our individual research questions are fundamental to how we conduct our research and the data we collect; however, understanding the patterns of diversity of ocean life over different temporal and geographic scales requires extensive data both biological and environmental. Therefore, to address these questions, extensive collaboration and comparable data are required. GOSSIP (General Ocean Survey and Sampling Iterative Protocol) is a multidisciplinary framework for generating globally comparable data for biological communities, which has been designed as a guide on how these data can be collected. In this presentation we will share the 20 parameters that have been chosen, explain why each is considered important and how the framework could be utilised. GOSSIP is intended to change over time as technology and techniques evolve. Alongside this recently published paper, we have produced a technical guide that simply pulls together data on current protocols and indicates where further information can be found.

About the Speaker: Lucy is a marine biologist and her research sits within the theme of Ocean Risk. She is based at Oxford University where she lectures in Marine Ecology and Animal Adaptions. Lucy's current work broadly focuses on understanding the processes that drive biodiversity in the marine biome and how human activities modify these. She has conducted work into microplastics and litter in the marine environment, and her microplastics research was the first to reveal the ubiquity of this pollutant in the deep sea. She continues to publish research about microplastics and marine litter, is actively involved in policy consultations and leads a program to develop a model to help prioritise location specific solutions to minimising litter. Alongside her work in marine plastics, Lucy leads a program in deep-sea exploration, sits on the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC) for seahorses and pipefish, and leads the legislation implementation working group for this team. Lucy regularly provides expert evidence for national and international organisations and through Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative (DOSI), is actively engaged in providing solutions that can be used in the high-seas regulation implementing agreement that is currently being negotiated at the UN.

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Title: Modeled impact of coastal biogeochemical processes and climate variability on ocean acidification in the Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Dr. Darren Pilcher, Research Scientist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: November 28, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Dr. Darren Pilcher, Research Scientist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Examination of spatial and temporal variability of the carbon cycle from 2003-2012 and the connection to ocean acidification.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 29, 2018

Title: Warming Seas, Falling Fortunes - Stories of Fishermen on the Front Lines of Climate Change
Presenter(s): Avery Siciliano, former ocean policy research associate at the Center for American Progress and current program integrity specialist at Best Aquaculture Practices, and Alexandra Carter, ocean policy research associate at the Center for American Progress
Date & Time: November 29, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 for NOAA Silver Spring staff
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Warming Seas, Falling Fortunes - Stories of Fishermen on the Front Lines of Climate Change

Speakers: Avery Siciliano, former ocean policy research associate at the Center for American Progress and current program integrity specialist at Best Aquaculture Practices, and 
Alexandra Carter, ocean policy research associate at the Center for American Progress

Sponsor:
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will use the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and "enter as guest", and please enter your name: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
As the northwest Atlantic warms, more than two-thirds of marine species are moving north in search of cooler water. Similar changes are occurring from Alaska to Florida; fish and shellfish once found in large numbers in certain locations are now scarce in those same places. These shifts are causing economic hardships as fishing stocks and fishing effort become misaligned. In the absence of a global carbon solution, many fishermen have changed the way they do business to compete in this new environment. 

The report pulls first-hand experiences of over a dozen fishermen from around the country and couples them with current scientific evidence to illustrate man-made climate change impacts on the industry.

About the Speakers: 

Avery Siciliano: Avery Siciliano is a specialist at the Global Aquaculture Alliance's Best Aquaculture Practices certification program. Her focus is on advancing environmental and social responsibility in the global aquaculture supply chain. Prior to joining Best Aquaculture Practices, Avery advocated for sustainable fisheries policy and seafood traceability at the Center for American Progress and Oceana in Washington, DC. 

Alexandra Carter is a research associate for Ocean Policy at the Center for American Progress. Her primary field experience is in fisheries management, having worked with the California and Oregon Departments of Fish and Wildlife and as a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-certified fisheries observer in the Bering Sea, Alaska. Prior to joining American Progress, Carter worked in the office of Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-OR).

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: NOAA’s Aquaculture Program: Having Our Fish and Eating Them Too
Presenter(s): Laura Hoberecht, Ph.D., Aquaculture Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region, NOAA Western Regional Center
Date & Time: November 29, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: LAURA HOBERECHT, Ph.D., Aquaculture Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region, NOAA Western Regional Center   

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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December 4, 2018

Title:
New
Acquiring Multispectral Images Using a Commercial Camera
Presenter(s): Carlos Iturrino, Electrical Engineer, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Currently he is completing his Master of Science degree in Digital Signal Processing at UPRM as a CREST Scholar. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: December 4, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Acquiring Multispectral Images Using a Commercial Camera

Speaker: Carlos Iturrino, Electrical Engineer, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Currently he is completing his Master of Science degree in Digital Signal Processing at UPRM as a CREST Scholar. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsors: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators for this seminar are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Robert.A.Warner@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and "Enter as guest" and please add your first and last name:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets. Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Multispectral Images are a powerful tool for many marine scientists but they have to rely on satellite information and/or expensive instruments. Carlos presents a useful system that can acquire multispectral information using a commercial camera. The goal of this work is for this system is to be mounted on a drone for data acquisition of ocean color in coastal regions, especially where satellite optical sensors do not have sufficient spatial or temporal resolution.

About the Speaker: Carlos Iturrino was born in 1991 in San Juan Puerto Rico. He graduated from the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, specializing in Instrumentation and automatic control. Currently he is completing his Master of Science degree in Digital Signal Processing at UPRM as a CREST scholar. His project is based on acquiring spatial and spectral information using a commercial camera. In other words, he is developing a multispectral camera. Its main application is to measure ocean color, so this system will be mounted on a drone. Carlos will be at NOAA Silver Spring until the end of December (SSMC4, cube 9XXX), please stop by his office if you are interested in this work. Carlos has loved the ocean since he was a little boy. Almost all of his hobbies and the things that he likes to do in Puerto Rico are in the ocean, including surfing, fishing, spear fishing, diving, sailing, snorkeling, etc. As an engineer and a sea lover, he tries to look for the best way to incorporate both. So through his college years he has worked on projects like an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), where he and his team developed the instrumentation and camera systems for the AUV. Another relevant project was a wave measuring buoy, with data transmitted to a smart phone. Currently he is developing a camera for measuring ocean color to be mounted on a drone. Carlos hasn't decided what he will do after he receives his MS in Electrical Engineering from UPRM. He is considering continuing his education for a PhD or working in marine engineering.   

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Title: Making a case for model-based estimation of data products from fisheries-independent surveys
Presenter(s): Stan Kotwicki, Program Manager, Groundfish Assessment Program, Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: December 4, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Stan Kotwicki, Program Manager, Groundfish Assessment Program, Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access: AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.
 
2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, December 4, 2018
10:00 am  |  Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00)  |  1 hr
Meeting number: 806 290 992
Meeting password: dawson
   

When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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December 6, 2018

Title: Salmon Ocean Ecology in British Columbia
Presenter(s): Jackie King, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Date & Time: December 6, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Jackie King, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada  

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

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December 11, 2018

Title: Interaction of commercial fishing gears and long-lived structure forming invertebrate species in the Aleutian Islands: A risk assessment
Presenter(s): John Olson, Fisheries Biologist, Habitat Conservation Division, Alaska Regional Office
Date & Time: December 11, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: John Olson, Fisheries Biologist, Habitat Conservation Division, Alaska Regional Office

Sponsor:
NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access:
AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.
 
2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
10:00 am  |  Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00)  |  1 hr
Meeting number: 808 190 652
Meeting password: dawson
   

When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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December 12, 2018

Title: Analyses of multi species ichthyoplankton data along the US west coast as indicators of ecosystem changes
Presenter(s): Jens Nielsen Ph.D., NRC postdoctoral researcher, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA.
Date & Time: December 12, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s):
Jens Nielsen Ph.D., NRC postdoctoral researcher, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA.

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Do different fish larvae communities have shared responses to climatic changes?

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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December 19, 2018

Title: A New Diet Index: Predicting fish length from diet composition
Presenter(s): Nissa C. Ferm, Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Contractor with Lynker Inc., Seattle, WA
Date & Time: December 19, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s):
Nissa C. Ferm, Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Contractor with Lynker Inc., Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access: Please join our meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: What did the fish eat? On the surface this seems to be a relatively simple question. However, when diet data are incorporated into models, there are both logistical and ecological limitations. Understanding the methodologies of how diet data are generated, combined with an understanding of the underlying predator-prey ecology, can help generate more informed models.  I will present an overview of diet data methodologies used to investigate feeding of young of the year Walleye Pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus). Based on this knowledge, I will describe a Random Forest model, built upon the scaffold of predator-prey ecology that was designed to predict Walleye Pollock condition. The model I developed predicts fish length from consumed prey taxa weight and composition. Fish length is related to known ontogentic shifts in diet that are important milestones for juvenile Pollock survival and ability to overwinter. Using the difference between the actual length of the fish and the modeled length gives us a metric. This metric tells us how far away a fish is from an average diet for its specific length. The metric was determined to have a significant non-linear relationship with dry energy density.  When modeled fish size was much larger than observed, dry energy density declined. I concluded that fish were not consuming their optimal prey for their particular size in order to meet energetic demands. One possible mechanism for not meeting these energetic demands is a spatial mismatch between the fish and optimal prey.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Sendan email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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December 20, 2018

Title:
New
The JCSDA Community Radiative Transfer Model : From Development to Operations
Presenter(s): Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson - JCSDA
Date & Time: December 20, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553 , NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

STAR Science Seminars

Presenter:
Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson - JCSDA

Sponsor:
STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx
Event Number: 995 114 967  
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees: https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=e51bba6463196946d380d45602d794cb0


Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416

Abstract:
The Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) is a fast, 1-D radiative transfer model designed to simulate top-of-the-atmosphere radiances consistent with a wide variety of satellite based sensors. The CRTM was primarily developed by JCSDA-funded scientists with essential contributions from NOAA/STAR and NOAA/EMC scientists. The primary goal of CRTM is to provide fast, accurate satellite radiance simulations and associated Jacobian calculations under all weather and surface conditions. CRTM supports all current operational and many research passive sensors, covering wavelengths ranging from the visible through the microwave. The model has undergone substantial improvement and expansion, since the first version in 2004. The CRTM has been used in the NOAA/NCEP and U.S. Navy operational data assimilation systems and by many other JCSDA partners such as NOAA/NESDIS/STAR, NOAA/OAR, NASA/GMAO, Naval Research Laboratory, Air Force Weather, and within multiple university environments. Over the past 14 years, both external research groups and operational centers alike have made essential contributions to the continued development and growth of CRTM.
A major goal of the CRTM core team is to ensure that CRTM becomes a true community radiative transfer model for all users. The CRTM official baseline code is developed and maintained based on internal and community-wide inputs, consisting of both improvements and externally contributed codes.
This presentation will briefly review the scientific and technical basis of CRTM, including its many strengths and limitations. There will also be an overview of the current status of the recently released CRTM version 2.3.0; and the future planned release of CRTM version 3.0.0 - which will represent a major milestone in CRTM's development and capabilities.

About the Speaker:
Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson joined NOAA/NESDIS/STAR (via AER, Inc.) in support of JCSDA in July 2015.  In January 2017, he was hired through UCAR as the JCSDA project lead for the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM).    Dr. Johnson's primary responsibilities are to ensure that the CRTM project continues to be proactively developed and managed to meet operational user requirements.   This involves coordinating efforts and support for a large number of users and developers across a wide range of agencies and universities, both domestic and international.  
Dr. Johnson received a B.S. in Physics from Oklahoma State University, with an emphasis on hard-sphere sedimentation crystallization and photonics.  Combining his interest in weather, computing, and physics, he studied Atmospheric Science at Purdue University, where he received a M.S. degree. The next stop was the University of Wisconsin, where he completed his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science advised by Dr. Grant Petty.
Before completing his Ph.D. in 2007, Dr. Johnson started working at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in 2004 on the Global Precipitation Measurement mission, primarily focused on precipitation retrieval algorithm development and satellite observation simulations. During the intervening years, he has coordinated multiple NASA field campaigns as a mission scientist, and actively participates in the CGMS/WMO International Precipitation Working Group (IPWG), International TOVs Working Group (ITWC), and the International Workshop on Space-based Snowfall Measurement (IWSSM).   He is a member of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), and the American Meteorological Society (AMS).  
Dr. Johnson's primary areas of expertise are measuring and simulating cloud microphysical processes, theoretical and applied atmospheric radiative transfer, satellite remote sensing of clouds and precipitation, and satellite-based radar simulations in cold-cloud precipitating scenes.
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December 21, 2018

Title: December 2018 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: December 21, 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminr Series

Speaker: Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) 
Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and  National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov or rthoman@alaska.edu)
Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/December2018
Abstract:The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for January 2019! and the winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Developer - Lori K. Brown


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