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All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

August 16, 2018

Title:
New
Bringing Back the Dinosaurs of the Deep: A Framework for Species Reintroduction
Presenter(s): Jessica Collier, USFWS
Date & Time: August 16, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter: Jessica Collier, Knauss Fellow, USFWS Coastal and Marine Program

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part of the monthly Knauss Fellows Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Remote access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Species reintroductions are complex strategies to protect and conserve imperiled species and they often require detailed planning and adaptive management to ensure long-term success. Lake sturgeon were once vastly abundant throughout the Great Lakes, but now only exist at 1% of their historic levels. To mitigate and reverse population declines, management groups have focused efforts on rehabilitating lake sturgeon stocks throughout the basin. This presentation outlines a comprehensive approach to incorporate biological, managerial, and community perspectives that facilitate successful reintroduction efforts for restoring lake sturgeon to a Great Lakes tributary. 

About The Speaker:
Jessica Collier is a 2018 Knauss Fellow in the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service's Coastal Program where she gets to work with an amazing team of Biologists on a wide variety of conservation and restoration topics. Jessica earned a B.S. in Biology from the University of Findlay, a M.S. in Conservation Biology from Central Michigan University, and most recently earned her PhD in Ecology from the University of Toledo where she focused on habitat modeling to reintroduce endangered lake sturgeon in a Great Lakes tributary.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: The Causes and Consequences of a Rapidly Changing Arctic
Presenter(s): Patrick C. Taylor, Climate Research Scientist, NASA Langley Research Center. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: August 16, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, in partnership with NOAA.

Climate Series, Seminar 6 of 8:
Title: The Causes and Consequences of a Rapidly Changing Arctic.

Speaker: Patrick C. Taylor, Climate Research Scientist, NASA Langley Research Center. Presenting remotely.

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED. 
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. 
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and 'enter as guest': 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ 
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. 
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov


Video recordings of the climate seminars can be found here: https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars

Abstract: Earth's climate system is highly interconnected, meaning that changes to the global climate influence the United States climatically and economically. In much the same way as European and Asian financial markets affect the U.S. economy, changes to ice sheet mass and energy flows in the far reaches of the planet affect our climate. Life on Earth is sensitive to climate conditions; human society is especially susceptible due to the climate-vulnerable, complex, and often fragile systems that provide food, water, energy, and security. Observed changes to the global climate affecting the United States include rising global temperatures, diminishing sea ice, melting ice sheets and glaciers, rising sea levels, etc. These documented changes have global economic and national security implications, including for the United States. For example, sea level rise alone is putting $100 billion dollars of U.S. military assets at risk, according to the Dept. of Defense. Arctic climate change continues to outpace the rest of the globe. Over the last 30 years, rapid and, in many cases, unprecedented changes to Arctic temperatures, sea ice, snow cover, land ice, and permafrost have occurred. While the Arctic may seem far away, changes in the Arctic climate system have a global reach, affecting sea level, the carbon cycle, atmospheric winds, ocean currents, and potentially the frequency of extreme weather. This presentation discusses the changes in the observed in the Arctic, the projected changes, and the potential impacts to us living the U.S.

About The Speaker: Dr. Taylor is a research scientist at NASA Langley Research Center. His research focuses on understanding the mysterious life of clouds. Understanding cloud behavior provides valuable information for improving weather and climate models. Dr. Taylor received his PhD from Florida State University in 2009 and has since worked at NASA Langley Research Center receiving that 2012 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) and a NASA Early Career Achievement Medal in 2013 for his research. In 2015, he became a National Academy of Science Kavli Fellow. Dr. Taylor was appointed to the Virginia's Climate Change and Resiliency Commission by Governor McAuliffe, a member of the science working group for the Old Dominion University led Sea Level Rise Initiative, and currently working as a lead author on the Climate Science Special Report commissioned by the NASA, NOAA, and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. At NASA Langley Research Center, Dr. Taylor is a member of the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) science team, leads the climate processes and diagnostics research group, and serves as a member of the Science Directorate 10-year planning committee as co-lead for the Radiation Budget focus area.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 17, 2018

Title: August NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: August 17, 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaking: Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Sponsor: NWS
POC: richard.thoman@noaa.gov and Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/August_2018

Abstract:The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for September and the Fall/early winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 21, 2018

Title: Climate change will Exacerbate Effects of Coastal Eutrophication in the Northern Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Arnaud Laurent, Research Associate, Dalhousie University
Date & Time: August 21, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff: SSMC4, Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Multi-stressor effects of ultraviolet light, temperature, and salinity on oil toxicity in estuarine species


Speaker: Arnaud Laurent, Research Associate, Dalhousie University. 

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.
Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667.
Enter code 7028688#  For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join",
click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web.
Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract: The continental shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico experiences eutrophication-driven seasonal low-oxygen conditions (hypoxia) and acidification (a decrease in bottom water pH by respired CO2). Under the future climate, rising surface ocean temperatures, freshwater discharge, and atmospheric CO2 will further exacerbate these conditions. Projections indicate that more severe and prolonged periods of hypoxia will occur, while pH will decrease significantly with lowest values in low-oxygen waters. Lower buffering capacity of seawater and increased stratification will enhance respiration-induced acidification, which will further amplify the climate-induced acidification.

About The Speaker: Dr. Arnaud Laurent is a Research Associate working with Katja Fennel in the Oceanography Department at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada. Dr. Laurent's research focuses on biogeochemistry in shelf environments, including deoxygenation and acidification, using coupled circulation-biogeochemical models. Dr. Laurent received a B.S. in Marine Ecology from Pierre et Marie Curie University in Paris followed by a M.S. in Marine and Fisheries Sciences at the University of Aberdeen (Scotland) and a PhD in Biological Oceanography at Dalhousie University (Canada).

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
NOAA Institutional Repository Seminar: What, Why, and How of the NOAA IR
Presenter(s): Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS; Sarah Davis, MLS, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: August 21, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar, https://goo.gl/KNPTTT, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar  
 
Speakers: Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS and Sarah Davis, MLS, NOAA Central Library 

Remote access:  If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the webinar: https://goo.gl/KNPTTT  After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP). Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of NOAA IR seminars.  

POC: IR Managing Librarian: Jennifer Fagan-Fry (jennifer.fagan-fry@noaa.gov); Sr. Bibliometrics Librarian: Sarah Davis (sarah.davis@noaa.gov)   
 
Abstract: Welcome to NOAA's Institutional Repository Seminar Series! Each bimonthly NOAA IR seminar will be on a topic related to the NOAA IR. Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. August 2018's topic is a What, Why, and How of the NOAA IR.  Join us in the library to learn more about grey literature, the benefits of submitting to the NOAA IR, how the IR is different than the NOAA Publications List and more. A Q&A session will follow the presentation. 

About the Speakers: 
Jennifer Fagan-Fry received her MLIS from Catholic University and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2015. Jenn manages the NOAA Institutional Repository, provides cataloging/metadata services and works with the library website. Sarah Davis received her M.L.S from the University of Maryland and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2008. She heads the bibliometrics team and also works with the NOAA Institutional Repository and the library website. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ 
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Title:
New
Carbon Projects in Alaska: How they work and the risks and rewards
Presenter(s): Nathan Lojewski, Forestry Manager, Chugachmiut; and Clare Doig, Forest Land Management, Inc.
Date & Time: August 21, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaking: Nathan Lojewski, Forestry Manager, Chugachmiut; and Clare Doig, Forest Land Management, Inc.

Sponsor: ACCAP and NWS

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/carbon_offset

Abstract: As forests grow, the trees absorb CO2 from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and store it within their growing biomass (trunk, branches, leaves and root systems). A “forest carbon offset,” is a metric ton of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e)"the emission of which is avoided or newly stored"that is purchased by greenhouse gas emitters to compensate for emissions occurring elsewhere. Offsets may be developed under voluntary market standards or compliance market standards, each of which has specific carbon accounting and eligibility rules. This presentation will focus on how offset projects work and the different types of forest management activities involved, all with a focus on Alaska. It will also cover specific carbon projects in Alaska and working with land owners (including village corporations) assessing the risks and rewards of such projects and whether or not they want to be involved in a project.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
Climate Crowd - Crowdsourcing to Help People and Nature in a Changing Climate
Presenter(s): Nikhil Advani, PhD, Lead Specialist, Climate, Communities and Wildlife, World Wildlife Fund
Date & Time: August 21, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Climate Crowd - Crowdsourcing to Help People and Nature in a Changing Climate

Speaker: Nikhil Advani, PhD, Lead Specialist, Climate, Communities and Wildlife, World Wildlife Fund

Sponsor: NOAA Environmental Data Talks, hosted by the National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS); Point of Contact: justin.grieser@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and 'enter as guest': https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/noaa-interview/

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available through the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email justin.grieser@noaa.gov

Abstract: Through interviews with community members and personal observations, World Wildlife Fund Climate Crowd partners collect information from the field and submit it to wwfclimatecrowd.org. WWF curates submissions and shares collected data for use by researchers, educators, conservation and development practitioners and policy-makers.
WWF also shares stories from their partners to raise awareness of the immediate impacts of climate change across the globe. And they support promising, small projects that aim to help communities and wildlife adapt to change.

About the Speaker: Dr. Nikhil Advani leads WWF's work on climate, communities and wildlife. This includes researching how wildlife and rural communities are being affected by changes in weather and climate, and developing and implementing solutions to help them adapt. Nikhil's recent projects include: an initiative to crowdsource this data (WWF Climate Crowd), a Wildlife and Climate assessment series, creation of a Wildlife Adaptation Innovation Fund, and he serves as an activity lead on the IUCN Species Survival Commission Climate Change Specialist Group. Nikhil was born and raised in Kenya, and has a bachelor's degree and Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. His thesis focused on gaining a better mechanistic understanding of species response to climate change, using the Glanville Fritillary butterfly as a model species. He then worked for the Nature Conservancy in Texas, prior to joining WWF in 2013. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 22, 2018

Title: Multi-stressor effects of ultraviolet light, temperature, and salinity on oil toxicity in estuarine species
Presenter(s): Marie DeLorenzo, NOAA, National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science,.Presenting in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: August 22, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Multi-stressor effects of ultraviolet light, temperature, and salinity on oil toxicity in estuarine species

Speaker: Marie  DeLorenzo, NOAA's National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Charleston, SC. Presenting in Silver Spring.
Co-authors include: Pete Key, Katy Chung, Emily Pisarski, and Ed Wirth. Key and Wirth are also with NCCOS in Charleston, SC; and Chung and Pisarsky are also with CSS Scientific Applications, Charleston, SC.

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.
Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# 
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", 
then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. 
Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract: The cumulative and interactive stressors of chemical contaminants and environmental factors are especially relevant in estuaries where tidal fluctuations cause wide variability in salinity and temperature. Changes in depth also affect ultraviolet (UV) light penetration, which is an important modifying factor for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) toxicity. Many early life stages congregate at the surface or in the upper mixing layer making them prone to UV light exposure and thin sheens of oil at the surface. The introduction of oil into estuarine systems may have different levels of effect depending on the tidal stage and time of year. This study examined how the toxicity of thin oil sheens of unweathered Louisiana Sweet Crude (LSC) oil was altered by temperature, salinity, and UV light. Several estuarine species representing different trophic levels and habitats were evaluated. This seminar will present data from one of the estuarine species tested, the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio. Larval grass shrimp were most sensitive to oil sheen exposure under UV light, low salinity, and high temperature conditions. Characterizing the interactions of multiple stressors on oil toxicity will improve prediction of environmental impacts under various spill scenarios.

About the Speaker:  Dr. Marie DeLorenzo is a research ecologist with the NOAA, National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science laboratory in Charleston, SC. Dr. DeLorenzo received a B.S. in Environmental Resource Management with a minor in Marine Science from Penn State University, followed by a M.S. degree in Ecology from Penn State. She earned her Ph.D. at Clemson University in Environmental Toxicology. Marie is the Program Lead for Environmental Physiology within the Ecotoxicology Branch and is currently serving a detail as Acting Branch Chief for the Monitoring and Assessment Branch. Dr. DeLorenzo serves on the graduate faculty at the College of Charleston, the University of South Carolina, the Medical University of South Carolina, and Florida A&M University's School of the Environment. She is the NOAA representative to the National Water Quality Monitoring Council and is Past President of the Carolinas Chapter of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. Dr. DeLorenzo's research at NOAA includes environmental toxicology of estuarine species, physiological mechanisms of contaminant effects, climate change and multi-stressor assessments, and coastal resource management.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) Development of Alaska-Relevant Satellite Applications from Suomi-NPP/JPSS-1 and GOES-R
Presenter(s): Steve Miller, Colorado State University
Date & Time: August 22, 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Steve Miller, Colorado State University

Sponsor: ACCAP and the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) have created this new webinar series with the National Weather Service (NWS): Virtual Alaska Weather Symposia

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov)

Webinar Access: https://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=1edb365d60&e=9097598e1a

Abstract: The Alaska Region achieves a unique resonance of natural hazards spanning the surface to the top of the troposphere and civilian/multi-agency activities impacted directly by them. The remote and data sparse expanses of this region elevate the value to forecasters of satellite-based remote sensing, and take best advantage of polar-orbiting assets in a way that the mid- to low-latitude users cannot. 

Over the past decade we have entered a new era of capabilities at the high latitudes thanks to advances on the NOAA new-generation satellite programs. The introduction of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) and Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1, or NOAA-20) satellites, and their Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) sensors, have begun to ‘shed light' on the extended nights of the cool seasons in novel and useful ways. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R Series (GOES-R) promises to far surpass the capabilities of previous GOES imager for Alaska coverage once GOES-17 migrates into position this Fall. Together, these new polar -and geo-satellites pack a formidable one-two punch in terms of providing coverage and capability for this key domain of increasing strategic importance, commercial activity, and attendant infrastructure/population growth.

The Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), established at Colorado State University in 1980, works closely with NOAA to develop algorithms and applications based on its cadre of environmental satellites. Here, we present some of these applications, including the science behind them, with an eye toward their relevance to the Alaska Region. Examples include VIIRS/DNB nighttime applications, estimates of cloud geometric thickness for aviation and cold air aloft, atmospheric moisture retrievals, and products that anticipate GOES-17 ABI utility over all parts of Alaska and surroundings. Some of these products are currently being fielded to Alaskan users via coordination with the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: The Devil (Weed) is in the Details: The Spread and Ecology of an Invasive Seaweed
Presenter(s): Dr. Lindsay Marks, California Sea Grant Fellow for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and former Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar
Date & Time: August 22, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Lindsay Marks, California Sea Grant Fellow for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and former Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9041514304956514562

Abstract: Invasive species are the second-greatest driver of biodiversity loss worldwide, and invasive seaweeds represent a major challenge to ocean health. This talk will share what has been learned about a Japanese seaweed called Devil Weed, which is rapidly spreading rapidly across the reefs of southern California. Topics that will be discussed include: why this seaweed is a successful invader; the ways in which it may affect native species; the role that Marine Protected Areas can play in resisting its spread; and techniques that can be used to control this and other invasive seaweeds.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 23, 2018

Title: Tidings of the Tides
Presenter(s): William Sweet, Oceanographer, Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, NOAA's National Ocean Service. Presenting in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: August 23, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, in partnership with NOAA.

Climate Seminar 7 of 8: Title: Tidings of the Tides

Speaker: William Sweet, Oceanographer, Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, NOAA's National Ocean Service. Presenting in Silver Spring.

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED FROM ORIGINAL PLAN.
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. 
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and 'enter as guest': 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ 
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. 
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Video recordings of the climate seminars can be found here: https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars

Abstract: Human activities are a significant contributor to the rise in global sea levels, which have risen about 7-8 inches since 1900 with about 3 of those inches occurring since 1993. By 2100, global sea levels are very likely to rise by 1.0"4.3 feet above year 2000 levels depending upon future emissions of greenhouse gases, though emerging science regarding Antarctic ice sheet stability suggests that a rise above 8 feet is physically possible. The amount of relative rise will not be uniform along the U.S. coastlines due to changes in Earth's gravitational field and rotation from melting of land ice, changes in ocean circulation, and vertical land motion. As sea levels have risen, annual flood frequencies of disruptive/minor tidal flooding have been accelerating within Atlantic and Gulf Coast cities over the last couple of decades. With continued rise, it is likely that damaging/moderate coastal flooding will occur several times a year within dozens of U.S. coastal locations within the next several decades. 

About The Speaker: William Sweet is a NOAA oceanographer researching changes in nuisance-to-extreme coastal flood risk due to sea level rise (SLR). He has assessed risks to U.S. coastal military installations worldwide for the military and is an author of the 4th U.S. National Climate Assessment. He lives in Annapolis, MD to witness SLR effects first-hand.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 28, 2018

Title: The Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment: An Overview of Volume 1
Presenter(s): Donald J. Wuebbles, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: August 28, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA staff, SSMC4, Room 8150, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, n partnership with NOAA.

Climate Seminar 8 of 8:
Title: The Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment: An Overview of Volume 1

Speaker: Donald J. Wuebbles, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois. Presenting remotely.

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED. 
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. 
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and 'Enter as guest': 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ 
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Video recordings of the climate seminars can be found here: https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars

Abstract: New observations and new research have increased our understanding of past, current, and future climate change. The Fourth National Climate Assessment confirms prior assessments in concluding that the climate on our planet, including the United States, is changing, and changing rapidly. Observational evidence for a changing climate abounds, from the top of the atmosphere to the depths of the oceans. Documented changes include surface, atmospheric, and oceanic temperatures; melting glaciers; disappearing snow cover; shrinking sea ice; and rising sea level. Many lines of evidence demonstrate that human activities have been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century. Changes in the characteristics of extreme events are particularly important for human safety, infrastructure, agriculture, water quality and quantity, and natural ecosystems. Some extremes have already become more frequent, intense, or of longer duration, and many extremes are expected to continue to increase or worsen, presenting substantial challenges. Heatwaves have become more frequent in the United States since the 1960s, while extreme cold temperatures and cold waves have become less frequent. Heavy rainfall is increasing in intensity and frequency across the United States and globally. These and other trends in severe weather are expected to continue. The Earth's climate is projected to continue to change over this century and beyond. As a result, global average sea levels are expected to continue to rise. This presentation provides an overview of the findings from the new assessment, with a special focus on severe weather.

About The Speaker: Donald J. Wuebbles is the Harry E. Preble Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Illinois. He is also a Presidential Fellow at the University of Illinois, with the aim of helping the university system develop new initiatives in urban sustainability. From 2015 to early 2017, Dr. Wuebbles was Assistant Director with the Office of Science and Technology Policy at the Executive Office of the President in Washington DC. He was Head of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois for many years, and led the development of the School of Earth, Society, and Environment, and was its first director. Dr. Wuebbles is an expert in atmospheric physics and chemistry, with over 500 scientific publications related to the Earth's climate, air quality, and the stratospheric ozone layer. He has co-authored a number of international and national scientific assessments, including several international climate assessments led by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), for which IPCC was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He was a leader in the 2013 IPCC international assessment and the 2014 Third U.S. National Climate Assessment. More recently, he co-led the Climate Science Special Report, the 475-page first volume of the Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment published in November 2017 that assesses the science of climate change. Dr. Wuebbles has also led special assessments of the impacts of climate change on human society and ecosystems for the U.S. Midwest, the Northeast, and a special assessment for the city of Chicago. Dr. Wuebbles has received several major awards, including the Cleveland Abbe Award from the American Meteorological Society, the Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and is a Fellow of three major professional science societies, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Meteorological Society.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: 2017 Annual Climate Trends and Impacts Summary for the Great Lakes Basin
Presenter(s): Dr. Jeffrey Andreson, Great Lakes Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments team and Michigan State Climatologist et. al.
Date & Time: August 28, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: 2017 Annual Climate Trends and Impacts Summary for the Great Lakes Basin 

Speakers
Jeffrey Andresen, William Baule, Kim Channell, Jenna Jorns - Great Lakes Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) team 
Wendy Leger, Sylvain Deland, Nancy Stadler-Salt, Frank Seglenieks, Robert Whitewood - Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC)

Brent Lofgren - NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab (GLERL)
Jonathan Weaver, Beth Hall - Midwestern Regional Climate Center
Meredith Muth - NOAA OAR Climate Program Office
Doug Kluck - NOAA NESDIS National Centers for Environmental Information


Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR, Great Lakes Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) team and the Climate Program Office

Remote Access: 
FOR WEBCAST
Blue Jeans web conference: https://bluejeans.com/190594461


FOR AUDIO
Call-in number: +1-888-240-2560
Meeting ID: 190594461

Abstract:
Under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA), the Annex 9 Extended Subcommittee on Climate Change Impacts generated a pilot product for 2017, titled ‘2017 Annual Climate Trends and Impacts Summary for the Great Lakes Basin.' The product aims to provide a timely and succinct summary of the past year's climate trends, notable climate-related events, and relevant new research, assessments, and relevant activities in the context of the Great Lakes. 2017 was a particularly interesting year for climate events and trends in the basin with higher than average seasonal temperature and precipitation, flooding, and low ice cover. The majority of the region experienced a wet spring with persistent heavy rain and snowfall. Water levels in the five Great Lakes were above average, continuing a similar trend during the past several years. Due primarily to high spring rainfall, Lake Ontario reached its highest ever recorded water level in May 2017 resulting in shoreline flooding in New York and Ontario. Winter and fall warm spells led to record warm temperatures in parts of the basin. At just 15% areal coverage, Great Lakes maximum ice cover for the year was 40% below the long-term average. The United States and Canada (via representatives on the Annex 9 Subcommittee) coordinated on synthesizing this information in a short and easy-to-understand document. This prototype climate information product will be that is intended to be replicated each year if the product is found to be useful to GLWQA annexes, the Great Lakes Executive Committee, and policy and decision makers at all levels in the Great Lakes. This webinar will share the 2017 pilot product and solicit feedback on its utility.

Seminar POC for questions: meredith.f.muth@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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August 29, 2018

Title: Cooperative Monitoring Program for Fish Spawning Aggregations in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Brad Erisman, Assistant Professor of Fisheries Ecology, The University of Texas at Austin. Presenting in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: August 29, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Cooperative Monitoring Program for Fish Spawning Aggregations in the Gulf of Mexico

Speaker: Brad Erisman, Assistant Professor of Fisheries Ecology, The University of Texas at Austin.
Presenting in Silver Spring.

Sponsors: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Janessy.Frometa@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window.
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Fish spawning aggregations are key components of ecosystems and fisheries in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, but they've received limited attention for research and management. This presentation will review a project supported by the NOAA RESTORE Act Science Program to compile and evaluate existing information on fish spawning aggregations in the Gulf of Mexico as the basis to design a long-term, cooperative, Gulf-wide monitoring program. The results of the project, including details on existing data gaps and priorities for future research and management, will be highlighted.

About The Speaker: Brad Erisman is a fisheries ecologist with expertise on the reproductive biology, spawning behavior, population dynamics, management, and conservation of marine fishes. His current research focuses on characterizing spatial and temporal interactions between fish reproductive dynamics, fisheries, and environmental conditions as a means to assess reproductive resilience in exploited fish populations (https://fisheries.utexas.edu). He is a member of the IUCN Species Survival Commission and the Coastal Resources Advisory Committee for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 30, 2018

Title: Exploring Deepwater Habitats of the Southeast US Continental Margin
Presenter(s): Dr. Leslie Reynolds Sautter, Dept. of Geology and Environmental Geosciences, College of Charleston. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: August 30, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4 Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Leslie Reynolds Sautter, Dept. of Geology and Environmental Geosciences, College of Charleston. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsors: NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
Skype often works if you have a good connection.
For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event",
then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install MyMeeting's
WebEx app while logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: TBD

About The Speaker: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in Tropical Cyclone Monitoring
Presenter(s): Xiaofeng Li, NESDIS/STAR/SOCD/MECB
Date & Time: August 30, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Central Library

Presenter: Dr. Xiaofeng Li, GST at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR

Abstract: We present a suite of hurricane products (wind, wave, rain, pressure, eye location) that can be generated from the Spaceborne synthetic Aperture Radar onboard Canadian RADARSAT and ESA's Sentinel-1 satellites.

About The Speaker: Xiaofeng Li received his Ph.D. in physical oceanography from North Carolina State University in 1997. He has been supporting the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) tasks ever since. He has authored more than 130 peer-reviewed publications and edited 3 books. He currently serves as an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing and the Ocean Section Editor-in-Chief of Remote Sensing

Remote access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1938566935465839874
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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September 5, 2018

Title:
New
Underwater: Rising Seas, Chronic Floods, and the Implications for US Coastal Real Estate
Presenter(s): Dr. Kristina Dahl, Senior Climate Scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: September 5, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Title: Underwater: Rising Seas, Chronic Floods, and the Implications for US Coastal Real Estate Speaker: Dr. Kristina Dahl, Senior Climate Scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists. Presenting remotely. Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine. Abstract: Sea levels are rising. Tides are inching higher. High-tide floods are becoming more frequent and reaching farther inland. And hundreds of US coastal communities will soon face chronic, disruptive flooding that directly affects people's homes, lives, and properties. Yet property values in most coastal real estate markets do not currently reflect this risk. And most homeowners, communities, and investors are not aware of the financial losses they may soon face. This seminar examines what's at risk for US coastal real estate from sea level rise"and the challenges and choices we face now and in the decades to come. About the Speaker:Dr. Kristina Dahl is a senior climate scientist for the Climate & Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. In her role, she designs, executes, and communicates scientific analyses to make climate change more tangible to the general public, and to policymakers. Her research focuses on the impact of climate change, particularly sea level rise, on people and places. Dr. Dahl holds a PhD from the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program.he second volume on how climate change is affecting regions and sectors across the U.S. Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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September 6, 2018

Title: State of the Nation’s River: How is the Potomac doing?
Presenter(s): Hedrick Belin, President, Potomac Conservancy, and Caitlin Wall, Director of Policy, Potomac Conservancy
Date & Time: September 6, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see login below) or at NOAA SSMC4, Room 8150 (NOAA staff only)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Hedrick Belin, President, Potomac Conservancy, and Caitlin Wall, Director of Policy, Potomac Conservancy

Sponsors:
NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  Skype often works if you have a good connection.
For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install MyMeeting's WebEx app while logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: In 2018, the Potomac River earned its highest grade ever (a “B”) from Potomac Conservancy! In a dramatic turnaround for our region's drinking water source, the Potomac's health improved from an abysmal D to a B in just ten years. For the first time in generations, we are within reach of enjoying a healthy, thriving Potomac River. It's taken decades of hard work to strengthen water protections and undo the damage wrought by reckless polluters. But, we're at a critical tipping point and there's more work to be done. Polluted runoff, rapid deforestation, and new attacks on water protections threaten to return dangerous pollution to local waters. The Potomac's journey to an "A" will not be easy, but it's worth fighting for because we all deserve a healthy river and clean water. Learn more about what's going right and wrong with the Potomac.

About the Speakers:
 Belin Hedrick
provides strategic direction to the Potomac Conservancy as it fights to improve the Potomac River and its surrounding lands through conservation and advocacy. Under his leadership, the Conservancy has launched several successful initiatives to promote river-friendly land use and to expand the base of volunteers actively engaged in the stewardship of our local green spaces. He comes to the Conservancy with over 15 years of nonprofit fundraising and leadership experience, most recently as Vice President of the Metropolitan Group, a strategic communication and resource development consulting firm. Before joining the Metropolitan Group, Hedrick worked for several conservation groups, including the National Park Foundation, Izaak Walton League of America, and the League of Conservation Voters. In addition, Hedrick has experience mobilizing grassroots advocates, formulating public policy, partnering with public agencies and developing conservation programs. Hedrick received his bachelor's degree in history from Yale University, and his master's in public administration from George Washington University. He lives with his wife and two children in Silver Spring, Maryland. 

Caitlin Wall joined the Potomac Conservancy in 2016 as director of the Conservancy's policy efforts in Maryland and the District of Columbia. She previously worked at Marstel-Day, LLC, leading policy efforts to develop compatible use partnerships between military installations and communities. Caitlin earned a BA from the College of William and Mary in public policy and environmental studies and an MA from Colorado State University in political science. Caitlin has experience with a variety of conservation organizations, including Greenpeace, the Piedmont Environmental Council, AmeriCorps, and Oregon State Parks. She is a Senior Fellow in the Environmental Leadership Program and a Faculty Adviser for the George Mason Washington Youth Summit on the Environment, and enjoys hiking, camping, yoga, and triathlons.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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September 11, 2018

Title: NOAA Geospatial (Geographic Information System) Hot Topics
Presenter(s): Tony LaVoi, NOAA Geospatial Information Officer, NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer and Integrated Information Services Division Chief, NOAA Office for Coastal Management; Kim Valentine, Geospatial Data Manager, National Ocean Service, Office of the Assistant Chief Information Officer; and Randy Warren, GIS Coordinator, National Ocean Service, Office for Coastal Management
Date & Time: September 11, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers
  •  Tony LaVoi, NOAA Geospatial Information Officer, NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer, and
      Integrated Information Services Division Chief, NOAA Office for Coastal Management;
  •  Kim Valentine, Geospatial Data Manager, National Ocean Service, Office of the Assistant Chief   
     Information Officer; and 
  •  Randy Warren, GIS Coordinator, National Ocean Service, Office for Coastal Management
Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.  
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.
Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window.
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov
You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Abstract: NOAA's diverse mission is enabled by the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies. During this webinar we will demonstrate several ways how GIS is used to meet NOAA's mission. We will also provide an overview of the NOAA GIS Committee, resources for end users including the NOAA GIS Community website, and discuss benefits of the new NOAA Esri Enterprise License Agreement, which includes access to software, ArcGIS Online, and GIS training. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Climate-driven species redistribution in marine systems
Presenter(s): Gretta Peci of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies and Centre for Marine Socioecology
Date & Time: September 11, 2018
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Gretta Pecl of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies and Centre for Marine Socioecology

Sponsors: Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

Abstract: Climate change is driving a pervasive global redistribution of the planet's species, with manifest implications from genes to ecosystems across multiple temporal and spatial scales. Species redistribution defies current approaches to natural resource management that focus on restoring systems to a baseline and are often based on boundaries drawn in the past. Changes in distribution of marine resources creates difficulties, particularly when species cross jurisdictional boundaries and where historical catch rates and assessment processes may no longer be appropriate. Moreover, we are still a long way from understanding the suite of mechanisms and processes underlying the high variation in rate and magnitude of shifts. We have even less understanding of how species redistribution will drive changes in ecological communities and further complicate aspirations of ecosystem-based management. Climate-driven species redistribution therefore presents intriguing ecological challenges to unravel, as well as fundamental philosophical questions and urgent issues related to ecology, fisheries, food security, Indigenous and local livelihoods, and many other aspects of human well-being. This presentation will highlight some of the progress with adaptation planning and adaptation actions at international, national and local scales, including the need for an interdisciplinary approach and stakeholder engagement.

Webinar Access: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_s7RGZ_PxTaCbS7rj78tZNw

Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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September 12, 2018

Title:
New
Solving the Challenge of Predicting Nature: How Close are We and How Do We Get There?
Presenter(s): Michael Dietze, Associate Professor, Department of Earth & Environment, Boston University
Date & Time: September 12, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Solving the Challenge of Predicting Nature: How Close are We and How Do We Get There?

Speaker: Michael Dietze, Associate Professor, Department of Earth & Environment, Boston University

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.
Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667.
Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join",
click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web.
Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract: Is nature predictable? If so, can we use that understanding to better manage and conserve ecosystems? Near-term ecological forecasting is an emerging interdisciplinary research area that aims to improve our ability to predict ecological processes on timescales that can be meaningfully validated and iteratively updated. In this talk I argue that near-term forecasting is a win-win for accelerating basic science and making it more relevant to society. I will focus on the challenges and opportunities in this field, spanning advances in environmental monitoring, statistics, and cyberinfrastructure. I will present a first-principles framework for understanding the predictability of ecological processes and synthesizing this understanding across different systems. Finally, I will highlight ongoing efforts to build an ecological forecasting community of practice.

About the Speaker: Michael Dietze leads the Ecological Forecasting Laboratory at Boston University, whose mission is to better understand and predict ecological systems, and is author of the book “Ecological Forecasting”. He is interested in the ways that iterative forecasts, which are continually confronted with new data, can improve and accelerate basic science in ecology, while at the same time making that science more directly relevant to society. Much of the current work in the lab is organized within the Near-term Ecological Forecasting Initiative (NEFI) and the PEcAn project. NEFI is focused on addressing overarching questions about ecological predictability, while developing forecasts for a wide range of ecological processes (vegetation phenology and land-surface fluxes; ticks, tick-borne disease and small mammal hosts; soil microbiome; aquatic productivity and algal blooms) and advancing statistical and informatic tools for ecological forecasting. PEcAn is focused on the terrestrial carbon cycle, improving our capacity for carbon MRV (monitoring, reporting, verification), forecasting, data assimilation, and multi-model benchmarking and calibration within the land component of Earth System models.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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September 19, 2018

Title: Approaches for Addressing Missing Temperature Data for Longitudinal Studies
Presenter(s): Dr. Thomas Grothues, Rutgers University & Jacques Cousteau, National Estuarine Research Reserve System
Date & Time: September 19, 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online access (webinar)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Dr. Thomas Grothues, Rutgers University & Jacques Cousteau, National Estuarine Research Reserve System

Sponsor: NOAA's NERRS Science Collaborative. 
For questions contact dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or boumad@umich.edu

Remote Access: Please register through GoToWebinar:
http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar

Abstract: The National Estuarine Research Reserves' System-wide Monitoring Program  (SWMP) data can contribute to research and discussion on climate change. The treatment of temperature data is of particular concern when applied to the analysis of interannual trends. Seasonal cycles can impose fluctuations that greatly exceed diurnal, tidal, or event-scale fluctuations, and seasonally skewed distribution of missing data biases calculations of annual or seasonal means. 

This webinar will provide insights on encoded algorithms for measuring temperature trends, including the conservative approach of replacing missing temperature data with smoothed day-of-the-year averages and seasonal decomposition as well as the benefits and disadvantages of alternative approaches. 


About the Speakers: 
Dr. Tom Grothues has a Research Faculty appointment as a fish ecologist at Rutgers University and begins as Research Coordinator for Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve System in Fall 2019. He has been using SWMP data in peer-reviewed publications about fish habitat use, migration, and recruitment since 2007.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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September 21, 2018

Title: September NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: September 21, 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Speaking: Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Sponsor: NWS
POC: richard.thoman@noaa.gov and Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/August_2018

Abstract: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for September and the Fall/early winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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September 25, 2018

Title: Plastics in the Ocean: Facts, Fiction, and Unknowns
Presenter(s): Anna Robuck, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography
Date & Time: September 25, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote - Online Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Anna Robuck, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries 

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6922965402939033090 

Abstract:  Although plastics are vital in a slew of consumer applications, plastic pollution in the ocean has turned out to be a not-so-fantastic outcome of modern day plastic dependence. This presentation provides an overview of the ocean plastic pollution problem, explaining the difference between marine debris and microplastics. It also will outline the current state of knowledge about microplastic impacts in the ocean and marine food webs, and provide insight into an ongoing research project using seabirds as indicators of plastic pollution in the Northwest Atlantic.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ 
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September 27, 2018

Title:
New
Depth-dependent Temperature Variability in the Southern California Bight with Implications for Cold-water Octocorals
Presenter(s): Elizabeth F. Gugliotti, University of Charleston
Date & Time: September 27, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4 Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Depth-dependent Temperature Variability in the Southern California Bight with Implications for Cold-water Octocorals

Speakers: Elizabeth F. Gugliotti, University of Charleston.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Peter Etnoyer, both with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science 

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.
Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667.
Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join",
click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web.
Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract: Water temperature is an important determinant of cold-water coral distribution. In recent years, several marine heatwave events have impacted marine ecosystems, including in the northeast Pacific Ocean. However, little is known about how these extreme ocean temperatures might impact cold-water corals. Determining the upper thermal limits of cold-water octocorals is an important first step in identifying if these warm-water events pose a potential threat. Live colonies of the common gorgonian octocoral, Adelogorgia phyllosclera, were collected from the CINMS using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). A laboratory study investigated the health, polyp activity, and estimated survival of A. phyllosclera through a series of thermal exposure assays. Results of the temperature analysis indicated that warm-water anomalies occurred frequently at 50 and 100 m, with most of these falling during strong ENSO months. The experimental results suggest that the upper thermal limit of A. phyllosclera could lie near 20℃. Though this upper thermal limit was not exceeded frequently during the 2015-2016 ENSO event, the anomalously warm conditions could have elicited physiological and cellular effects. Understanding the thermal stress responses of cold-water corals enables prediction of their resilience to predicted ocean warming.

About The Speaker: Elizabeth Gugliotti recently graduated with an M.S. in Marine Biology from the University of Charleston, SC where her thesis focused on the implications of warming oceans on cold-water corals. Prior to her graduate work, Elizabeth spent time studying the effects of climate change on the sex ratios of loggerhead sea turtle sex-ratios with Dr. David Owens of the College of Charleston and then conducted coral reef ecology research while studying abroad in Bonaire in the Dutch Caribbean as a part of her undergraduate studies at Wofford College. In addition to pursuing a career in research, Elizabeth has also worked as an environmental education teacher to K-12 students at the Barrier Island Environmental Education Program in South Carolina.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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October 17, 2018

Title: Understanding Ocean Acidification - Using NOAA’s New Educational Tools
Presenter(s): Amy Dean, NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System
Date & Time: October 17, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Amy Dean, NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/690023097051840771

Abstract: Data in the Classroom is designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional and global scale. In this presentation, participants will dive deep into Data in the Classroom's Ocean Acidification Module to explore the processes that cause acidification, examine data from across the globe and take a virtual tour of the new web-based curricular modules and data tools.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

October 23, 2018

Title: Preparing Ocean Governance for Species on the Move
Presenter(s): Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor, Rutgers University. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: October 23, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor, Rutgers University. Presenting remotely.

Sponsors:
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar and the National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Science and Technology; co-hosts are Roger Griffis and Tracy Gill

Webinar Access: We will be using Adobe Connect for this webinar.  
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ 
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.; google chrome often works too.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. 
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Fisheries provide critical sources of food and employment for people around the world, and yet rapid shifts in the geographic distribution of marine animals represent an emerging governance challenge for which states and international bodies are underprepared. Past experience suggests that conflict, overfishing, and ultimately fewer marine resources to share are common outcomes when fished stocks move across political boundaries. Moreover, the projected widespread emergence of new transboundary stocks and the gaps in current institutions suggest that new policy and legal approaches are needed to facilitate cooperation. Potential solutions could include broadening the scope of negotiations and mandates, regular governance updates to reflect changes in stock distribution, internationally tradable fisheries permits, and neutral research bodies to guide negotiations. The challenges of shifting fisheries are entirely foreseeable, and with sufficient preparation, ocean fisheries can continue to provide the benefits relied upon by billions of people.

About the Speaker: Malin Pinsky is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources and an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow in Ocean Sciences at Rutgers University. He leads a research group studying the ecological and evolutionary impacts of climate change in the ocean, and he developed the OceanAdapt website to document shifting ocean animals in North America. He has published articles in Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and other international journals, and his research has received coverage in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, BBC, National Public Radio, and other media. He has a Ph.D. from Stanford University, an A.B. from Williams College, and earlier connections along the coast of Maine.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to 
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. 
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

October 25, 2018

Title:
New
Understanding Underwater Behavior of Humpback Whales to Mitigate Ship Strike and Entanglement
Presenter(s): Dave Wiley, Sanctuary Research Coordinator, NOAA"s Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: October 25, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Understanding the Underwater Behavior of Humpback Whales to Mitigate Ship Strike and Entanglement

Speaker: Dave Wiley, Sanctuary Research Coordinator, NOAA"s Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.
Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667.
Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join",
click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web.
Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract and About the Speaker: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. 
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

November 14, 2018

Title: A Rare Great Lakes Ecosystem: Exploring the Sinkholes of Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): John Bright, NOAA's Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: November 14, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote - Online Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Speaker: John Bright, Research Coordinator for NOAA's Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4895467060831741186 Abstract: Underwater explorations in Lake Huron have revealed unique hotspots of biogeochemical activity at several submerged groundwater vents in Lake Huron. Learn about the techniques scientists use to explore unique single-celled microorganism communities that dominate this freshwater habitat. Educators will be provided with information and links to lessons that feature this unique Great Lakes research topic. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

 

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