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All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

April 23, 2018

Title: Drought and Wildfire in the Southern Plains
Presenter(s): Speaker: Brian Fuchs, Climatologist at National Drought Mitigation Center
Date & Time: April 23, 2018
11:30 am - 12:45 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Speakers: Brian Fuchs, National Drought Mitigation Center as well as state and regional fire specialists

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with the National Weather Service and the National Drought Mitigation Center

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov 

Remote access: Register for the webinar at 
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4268142900674306051

Abstract: 
Due to drought severity across the Southern Plains, including portions of Oklahoma, Kansas, New Mexico, Colorado, and Texas, a collaboration of drought, climate and fire experts are providing up-to-date information on the drought and the potential for wildfires. This webinar will provide the latest information on current drought conditions, impacts and outlooks and will also highlight fire vulnerabilities and outlooks for the region. Brian Fuchs, a Climatologist with the National Drought Mitigation Center will lead the webinar. He will be joined by state and regional fire experts. Presenters will be available for questions at the end of the presentations. The webinar will be recorded and made available on drought.gov.

About the Speaker:  
Brian Fuchs joined the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) in 2005. Prior to joining the NDMC, he worked for 5 years as a Regional Climatologist for the High Plains Regional Climate Center. He has worked extensively with weather/climate data and on the development of the Applied Climate Information System (ACIS) and applied data products. Brian contributes to the production of the U.S. Drought Monitor and he serves as a media contact for climate- and drought-related issues.

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Title: Blossoms and Snow Melt: Spring in the Pacific Northwest
Presenter(s): Speakers: Philip Mote, Oregon State Climatologist, Jeremy Wolf NWS Weather Forecast Office - Spokane, Sarah Kapnick, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Lee Kalcsits, Washington State University
Date & Time: April 23, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Philip Mote, Oregon State Climatologist, Jeremy Wolf NWS Weather Forecast Office - Spokane, Sarah Kapnick, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Lee Kalcsits, Washington State University

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)

Seminar POC for questions: britt.parker@noaa.gov

Remote access: Register for the webinar at 
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7688943474973460739

Webinar ID: 972-335-003
Access Code: 221-717-031
Participants can use their telephone or computer mic & speakers (VoIP).
United States: +1 (562) 247-8422
Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar
Attendee - muted

Abstract: The NIDIS Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (PNW DEWS) February 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars that provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. 

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Climate Recap and Current Conditions
Philip Mote | OR State Climatologist

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outloo
Jeremy Wolf | WFO Spokane

Snowpack Prediction
Sarah Kapnick | NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

Climatic Resilience for Tree Fruit Production in Washington State
Lee Kalcsits | Washington State University

About the Speakers:
Philip Mote is a professor of atmospheric sciences at Oregon State University and heads CIRC’s (a NOAA RISA) Climate Science activity. Along with co-leading CIRC, Phil directs the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute (OCCRI) and the Oregon Climate Service, and has helped co-lead several long-term research projects looking into the impacts of climate change. You might also find him rowing along the Northwest’s scenic waterways.

Jeremy Wolf is a forecaster and the office climate program manager at the NWS office in Spokane, WA. Jeremy has studied impacts of ENSO across Eastern Washington and north Idaho and has written and published numerous blogs regarding current weather and climate information. Jeremy also utilizes a NWS developed tool LCAT (Local Climate Analysis Tool) to study long term changes in temperature and precipitation, including a study on possible impacts with future fire seasons.

Dr. Sarah Kapnick
is a Research Physical Scientist and Deputy Division Leader of the Seasonal to Decadal Variability and Predictability Division at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Her research focuses on the mechanisms controlling the hydroclimate, with an emphasis on: precipitation, extreme storms and mountain snowpack. She is the recipient of the American Geophysical Union Cryosphere Section Early Career Award for 2015 and NOAA OAR Daniel L. Albritton Outstanding Science Communicator Award for 2017. She presently serves as an Associate Editor of Water Resources Research.

Dr. Lee Kalcsits is an assistant professor of tree fruit physiology in the Department of Horticulture at the Washington State University Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center in Wenatchee, Washington. His research program works towards understanding the interactions between environment, horticultural management and genetics of tree fruit. Currently, his work is focused on understanding the mechanisms contributing to calcium-related disorders and the development of symptoms of abiotic stress in apple and, also, developing strategies to mitigate those problems.

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April 24, 2018

Title: Exploring Using Artificial Intelligence (AI) for NWP and Situational Awareness Applications
Presenter(s): Sid Boukabara, NOAA/NESDIS
Date & Time: April 24, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor EMC seminar
Speaker: Sid Boukabara (NOAA/NESDIS)
Title:ExploringUsing Artificial Intelligence (AI) for NWP and Situational Awareness Applications    
Date,Time, Room: Tuesday April17, at noon in NCWCP Rm 2155
Contact: Sid Boukabara <Sid.Boukabara@noaa.gov>

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4
Meeting number: 900 826 795
Meeting password: a3YhdEPN

JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3)
1-877-953-0315
1-517-268-7866 (toll number)
Leader: 9702437#
Participant: 1262920#

Can't join the meeting? Contact support here:
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract:
   

Exploring Using Artificial Intelligence (AI) for NWP andSituational Awareness Applications

Application to Remote Sensing and Data Assimilation/Fusion

S. A. Boukabara, E. Maddy, K. Ide, K. Garrett, E. Jones, K.Kumar and N. Shahroudi

Abstract— The volume and diversity of environmental data obtained from avariety of Earth-observing systems, has experienced a significant increase inthe last couple years with the advent of high spectral, high- spatial andtemporal resolutions sensors. At the same time, users-driven requirements,especially for nowcasting and short-term forecasting applications but also formedium-range weather forecasting, strongly point to the need for providing thisdata in a consistent, comprehensive and consolidated fashion, combiningspace-based, air-based and surface-based sources, but at higher spatial andtemporal resolutions and with low latency. This trend is expected to continuefurther with the emergence of commercial space-based data from multipleindustry players and the advent of flotillas of small satellites (Cubesats) aswell as new sources of data (such as Internet of Things IoT) to complementtraditional environmental data. Yet, the data volume presents already asignificant challenge. Satellite measurements input to data assimilation algorithmsfor instance, need to be aggressively thinned spatially, spectrally and temporallyin order to allow the products generation, calibration, assimilation andforecast system to be executed. Only a fraction of satellite data gets actuallyassimilated. Taking full advantage of all the observations, allowing moresources of observations to be used for initial conditions setting, and to do itwithin an ever shrinking window of assimilation/dissemination, requiresexploring new approaches for processing the data, from ingest to dissemination.We present in this study the results of a pilot project’s effort to usecognitive learning approaches for numerical weather prediction (NWP)applications. The Google’s machine learning open-source tool TensorFlow, usedfor many Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications, was used to reproduce theperformances of remote sensing and some data assimilation tools (radiativetransfer), with flexibility to extend to other sources such as IoT. Theapproach relies on training a deep-layer neural network on a set of inputs fromNASA’s GEOS-5 Nature Run (NR) as well as ECMWF analyses, along with correspondingobservations simulated  using theCommunity Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and other forward operators. Thepresent study demonstrates the proof of concept and shows that using AI holdssignificant promise in potentially addressing the vexing issue of computationalpower and time requirements needed to handle the extraordinarily highvolume ofenvironmental data, current and expected. It is found that AI-based algorithmshave dramatically lower execution times, and provide very favorableperformances when compared to traditional approaches.


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Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar.

Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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Title:
New
Fire: Modeling and Prediction Issues (part 2)
Presenter(s): Uma Bhatt, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Edward Delgado, Bureau of Land Management, Adam Kochanski, University of Utah, James Randerson, University of California, Irvine
Date & Time: April 24, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Online Access and CPO Fishbowl SSMC3 Rm 12871
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Uma Bhatt (University of Alaska, Fairbanks), Edward Delgado (Bureau of Land Management), Adam Kochanski (University of Utah), James Randerson (University of California, Irvine)

Sponsor: NOAA OAR/CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program

Seminar POC: Daniel.Barrie@noaa.gov

REMOTE ACCESS INFORMATION:

- Link: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e7735858817d6e10a0a31f13b27c0ee64
- Passcode: 20910
- For audio: After logging on to WebEx, click "I will call in" (to hear audio via phone). Make sure to enter both the access code and attendee ID #. If you do not see the option "I will call in," click the "Quick Start" tab in WebEx, and you'll see the option.
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Abstracts:


Uma Bhatt - TBD

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Edward Delgado - Challenges for Wildland Fire Forecasters

Wildland fire forecasting is a critical part of decision support for managing and suppressing fire on the landscape. Land managers need to this support to: know where fire is likely to occur; identify when and where to position limited fire fighting resources to maximize effectiveness and efficiency; and ultimately, protect life and property. There are challenges to wildland fire forecasting. Wildland fire varies across the country both seasonally and geographically. It is drive not just by the natural elements of weather and vegetation but also by the day-to-day activities of people. Number of ignitions, spread or growth rates, and final size of fires provide some usefulness in accounting but their value in forecasting decreases when factors such as management strategies, values at risk, and resource capabilities enter the equation. Meteorologists must rethink how wildland fire forecasts are made. This will require better definitions of what is being forecast, approaching the problem from the perspective of fire business, and providing scalable products to address spatial and temporal needs. 

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Adam Kochanski - Recent advancements in smoke modeling using coupled fire-atmosphere model WRF-SFIRE

The United States has entered a new era of increasing wildfire frequency & intensity and worsening fire impacts. The landscape has become more fire-prone as a result of recent climatic change and urban development resulting in steeply rising fire-suppression costs. Yet, fire is a part of the natural environment and fire prevention practices can at times lead to excessive fuel accumulation and catastrophic fires that are difficult to manage. The need for management decisions based on multifaceted analyses of benefits and risks associated with both wildfires and prescribed burns, including smoke impacts calls for new advanced decision support tools that interactively integrate satellite/aerial remote sensing with coupled high-resolution fire-weather modeling.

As the resolution of operational weather prediction products increase, coupled forecasting of fire progression, smoke generation, as well as plume rise, and dispersion becomes feasible. This integrated approach, based on coupled fire-atmosphere models, facilitates simulations in which not only the weather conditions drive fire propagation, but the fire itself also impacts local weather conditions through the fire heat and moisture fluxes released into the atmosphere. However, fire impacts on the weather conditions are not limited to local warming and generation of pyro-convective updrafts inducing inflows into to base of the convective column. The smoke itself proves to be an important factor significantly altering local weather conditions by its impact on the radiative heat budget.

In this presentation, we illustrate general capabilities of WRFX (the integrated forecasting system based on WRF-SFIRE), in terms of simulating plume rise and dispersion. We also present new model developments that extend model capabilities in terms of rendering fire-atmosphere interactions. The existing coupling mechanisms, through the wind field (modified by fire heat and moisture fluxes) and through the fuel moisture (controlled by local the weather conditions), are now extended by radiative smoke impacts. We present selected test cases and compare modeled plume rise to MISR observations. We also show how the new coupling mechanism improves estimates of the incoming solar radiation and the surface temperatures in smoked valleys.

-----

James Randerson - TBD

--
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April 26, 2018

Title: Evaluating methods for estimating mortality of Great Lakes walleye using acoustic telemetry data
Presenter(s): Lisa Peterson, Knauss Fellow, NOAA NMFS, OST
Date & Time: April 26, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter: Lisa Peterson, Knauss Fellow, NOAA NMFS, Office of Science and Technology Assessment & Monitoring Division (ST4)

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part of the monthly Knauss Fellow Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library. POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Remote access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: The Great Lakes Acoustic Telemetry Observation System (GLATOS) in North America includes millions of tag detections for Lake Erie walleye. These data provide researchers with information about behaviour, habitat use, and population dynamics. Natural mortality as a phenomenon is difficult to observe, but remains a critical component of stock assessments and quota estimation. This project developed methods to estimate mortality using acoustic telemetry detections and evaluated them using a simulation framework based on existing GLATOS data, assuming different scenarios of study design and true mortality rates. Our results should help inform researchers about the accuracy of estimation methods and study designs for determining mortality of fish populations using acoustic telemetry data.

About the Speaker: Lisa Peterson is a Knauss fellow in NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology, working with Brett Alger on electronic technologies. Lisa received her B.S. (2011) and M.S (2014) in Fisheries and Wildlife from Michigan State University. She is currently finishing up her Ph.D. in the Quantitative Fisheries Center. She has worked on Lake Erie yellow perch and walleye stock assessment models as well as with Great Lakes acoustic telemetry data. She is from Royal Oak, Michigan.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3586366&CustomerID=321 If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program: http://www.wfm.noaa.gov/workplace/RAC_inter_bus_rules.html

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Title: Positive or neutral effects of non-native plant species in hybrid ecosystems: The use of songbirds and other observable wildlife as measures of restoration success
Presenter(s): Sandy DeSimone, Audubon California
Date & Time: April 26, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Sandy DeSimone, Audubon California

Sponsors: FWS and NOAA Restoration Webinar Series, hosts are Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov and Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Register in advance with Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Abstract: Sandy DeSimone, will discuss her group’s study of the impacts of a non-native ground layer species on an otherwise native ecosystem.

About the Speaker: Born in Indianapolis, Indiana. After receiving a B.S. in Education from Indiana University, I left for the east coast where I worked as an elementary classroom teacher in Boston and Manhattan for three years. I developed an interest in bird watching and, after attending the Audubon Camp on Hog Island, decided to leave teaching. Spent three months as a “naturalist-in-training” at the Sharon Audubon Center in northwest Connecticut then worked at the Center as a teacher/naturalist. Met my husband Peter while banding kestrels and after we got married we lived for five happy years in a two room cabin without indoor plumbing or electricity in a state forest. Plants soon became my passion and after a move to Audubon’s Starr Ranch Sanctuary in Orange County, California (where Peter took a position as manager) got my master’s degree then Ph.D. working in the rare coastal sage scrub. As soon as I finished my Ph.D., Peter took a chance and hired me to work as education and research director at Starr Ranch. I developed “Starr Ranch Field Ecology Programs,” an innovative approach that integrates ecological research into education. People of all ages come for our programs, taught by biologists with graduate degrees, and have a hands-on experience in simulated or actual field research. I also began five years of research on biology and non-chemical control of a priority non-native plant species, artichoke thistle. Since 1997, we have found a control method and have reduced artichoke thistle cover without herbicides by 95% per stand in 600 of the 720 acres targeted for control. The second year of artichoke thistle control we begin restoration to two rare habitats, coastal sage scrub or needlegrass grassland. It has been a pleasure to hire seasonal field crews composed of recent college graduates from all over the country, who come live in the historic buildings on the Ranch and do the research and physical work of our non-native control and restoration project. Over the years I’ve won some awards for our unusual conservation projects (US FWS Certificate of Appreciation, Cal-IPC Land Manager of the Year, Audubon Chapter Conservation Award).

If you are interested in receiving continuing education credits under SER’s Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner Program, contact Jen Lyndall at certification@ser.org.  To receive an e-mail notification when registration opens, send your e-mail address to jennifer_ryan@fws.gov.  To access the Restoration Webinar Series recording archive, visit 
https://nctc.fws.gov/topic/online-training/webinars/restoration.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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Title:
New
Spatial variation and cryptic collapses in herring metapopulations
Presenter(s): Daniel Okamoto, Department of Biological Science, Florida State University
Date & Time: April 26, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Daniel Okamoto, Department of Biological Science, Florida State University 
 
Seminar Sponsor: For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov. 

Remote Access: 
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D607405942%26UID%3D485714733%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATmUJARtbfkwLTwaiHA8tiq_u6zTZCl6RnvyP5ITwePC-bNSYwdyr-15l9Dw1Q0_4L-oME9PoSItcnB_B2T0XxW0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmdc7ace9e83d3851b3187b42993c64ffc
Meeting number and Access Code:  809 638 766
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207


ABSTRACT: Spatial mismatches between population dynamics and the scale at which they are managed are pervasive problems in natural resource management.  In this work, we explore causes, consequences and solutions for spatial mismatches for Pacific herring - an ecologically, economically, and culturally important forage fish – and present evidence for fine-scale (i.e. within stock) variability in dynamics. While spatial complexity in population dynamics can promote stability at large scales, we show how failing to consider such complexity in management produces cryptic negative consequences by magnifying risk of population collapse at small spatial scales. Such effects asymmetrically impact locally constrained fishers and predators who are more exposed to risks of cryptic collapses. Sustainable and equitable use of spatially complex resources requires either management input at finer scales or more conservative harvests to minimize unforeseen collapses at local scales.

BIO: I study population dynamics with a focus on rocky reef species in temperate systems. I am interested in how environment and species interactions regulate fluctuations in demographics (i.e. recruitment, growth, reproduction & mortality) and how fisheries management impacts dynamics in space and time. These interests require studying dynamics with different approaches (lab and field studies as well as numerical, theoretical and statistical modeling) and at different spatial scales.  I enjoy studying processes at the scale of micrometers (i.e. dynamics of sperm-egg interactions during spawning), meters (i.e. predator-prey interactions) to hundreds of kilometers (population and metapopulation scales. Focal taxa include sea urchins, abalone, herring, kelp, and reef fish. I earned a PhD in Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology from UC Santa Barbara, and MS in Fisheries from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a BS in Biology from UW.  After a post-doc at Simon Fraser University I started a faculty position in the Department of Biological Science at Florida State in January.
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May 2, 2018

Title: Nutrient Biogeochemistry of Vatia Bay, American Samoa: Variability, Sources and Effects
Presenter(s): Dr. David Whitall, Senior Scientist and Coastal Ecologist, NOAA/NOS/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Stressor Detection & Impacts Division, Monitoring and Assessment Branch
Date & Time: May 2, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: David Whitall, PhD, Senior Scientist and Coastal Ecologist, NOAA/NOS/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Stressor Detection & Impacts Division, Monitoring and Assessment Branch

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: Over the pastten years field observations have noted a decrease in healthy coral cover inVatia Bay, on the island of Tutuila, American Samoa.  The cause forthis is unknown, but one hypothesis is that nutrient pollution from the localvillage may be driving the decline.  Excess nutrients (nitrogen andphosphorus) can impact corals directly by lowering fertilization success, and reducingboth photosynthesis and calcification rates, or indirectly such as throughstimulation of the grown of benthic algae. Declining coral health adverselyaffects the biodiversity of the Bay and likely decreases ecosystemservices.  Water samples were collected monthly at sites selected from astratified random design for analysis for nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, urea,total nitrogen, orthophosphorus, total phosphorus, silica andsalinity. Biological surveys found that reef habitat was more degraded inthe inner portion of the Bay, which coincides with elevated levels of nitrogenand phosphorus.  However, other stressors (sedimentation andincreased turbidity) may also be driving this pattern.  Land basedcontributions of phosphorus and reactive nitrogen can enter the environmentfrom a variety of sources, but in Vatia the most likely sources are piggeriesand septic systems.  Analysis of water samples for tracers of humanwaste (caffeine and sucralose) confirmed that human derived nutrients arecontributing to the nutrient budget of the Bay.  These data areuseful not only to enhance our understanding of the role that anthropogenicnutrients play in the biodiversity and ecosystem health of the Bay, but alsoserve as an important “baseline” against which to measure future change.  Currentongoing research will attempt to model the nutrient budget of the watershedthat drains the Bay, as well as focus on event sampling to better captureprecipitation events.

About theSpeaker: Dr.Dave Whitall is a senior coastal ecologist with the National Centers forCoastal Ocean Science’s Stressor Detection and Impacts Division.  Hisexpertise is in aquatic biogeochemistry, and pollution in marineecosystems.  He has been with NOAA since 2003, and has completed researchin a diverse range of ecosystems, including Chesapeake Bay, North Carolinaestuaries, the Gulf of Mexico, Florida, the U.S. Caribbean and the U.S. PacificIslands. Prior to joining NOAA he conducted research in New England, the GreatLakes and Antarctica.  He holds degrees from Penn State Universityand the University of North Carolina


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Title:
New
Capelin in the Gulf of Alaska: environmental influences on spatial dynamics and implications for monitoring
Presenter(s): David W.McGowan Ph.D candidate, University of Washington Seattle, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: May 2, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): David W.McGowan Ph.D candidate, University of Washington Seattle, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA’s EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/).
 
Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Capelin (Mallotus villosus) are an important mid-trophic link within marine food webs, yet there is limited information describing fluctuations in their distributions and population abundance in the Northeast Pacific.  This study investigated environmental influences on spatial patterns of age-1+ capelin in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA).  Data from two independent,fisheries-oceanographic surveys (the GOAIERP’s offshore acoustic-trawl survey and the EcoFOCI late-summer, small-mesh trawl survey) were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models to quantify spatial and temporal variability in distributions and abundances of capelin over the GOA continental shelf during an 8-year period from 2000-2013.  Capelin were found to concentrate over or near shallow, submarine banks to the south and east of the Kodiak Archipelago.  Interannual fluctuations in abundance occurred in the western GOA, while capelin were observed infrequently in Southeast Alaska. Model results indicated that capelin concentrated in areas associated with increased vertical mixing and enhanced primary production.  Mean densities of capelin were not directly related to interannual differences in temperature.  Results from this study can be used to predict responses of capelin to climate-related changes to the GOA, and to improve monitoring efforts to detect changes in capelin biomass and availability to predators.


Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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May 8, 2018

Title: Heavy Metal on the High Seas: USS Monitor and World War II Shipwrecks off the North Carolina Coast
Presenter(s): Tane Casserley, Research Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, National Ocean Service, NOAA
Date & Time: May 8, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Tane Casserley, Research Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, National Ocean Service, NOAA.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Steve.Gittings@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeetingwebinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone:dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# 
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under"Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add confno: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install thecorrect plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary webexapplication works fine.

Abstract: Situated 16 miles off the coast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, NOAA’s Monitor National Marine Sanctuary protects the shipwreck of the famed Civil War iron clad, USS Monitor. Over the last 40 years NOAA has been honoring the men of USS Monitor, its legacy with the United States Navy, and its impact on worldevents. This presentation will discuss NOAA’s use of cutting edge science to preserve this iconic piece of Civil War history and how these efforts have led to a greater understanding of North Carolina’s shipwrecks, in particular how World War II’s Battle of the Atlantic came to America’s shores. NOAA’s goal is to protect these fragile historic resources for future generations, and to preserve the memory of the brave Allied service men and U.S. merchant mariners who fought to rid the world of tyranny. From the U.S. Civil War to World War II, this presentation will highlight NOAA’s efforts to protect these fragile national treasures and their history above and below the waves.

About the Speaker: Tane Casserley is a maritime archaeologist who specializes in 19th-century warships and deep-water archaeology. Casserley holds a graduate certificate in maritime archaeology from the University of Hawaii and a Master’s degree from the Program in Maritime Studies at East Carolina University. He has ledNOAA archaeological expeditions in the Florida Keys, the Great Lakes,California, the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Alaska, and the USS Monitor. He was most recently part of the Monitor National Marine Sanctuary's ongoing research to document the maritime landscape of the WWII Battle of the Atlantic off the coast of North Carolina. Casserley’s projects have used technical diving, remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), autonomous underwater vehicles(AUVs), and manned submersibles. 

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Title: Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool for MPA Managers
Presenter(s): Sara Hutto of Greater Farallones Association and Lara Hansen of EcoAdapt
Date & Time: May 8, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Virtual Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers:  Sara Hutto of Greater Farallones Association and Lara Hansen of EcoAdapt

Register at:  https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_EPeYfTTzR--fdy8nef2Ffw

Sponsors:  Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MarineDebris.info, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

Seminar POC:  Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Abstract:  This North American Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool helps marine protected area managers evaluate the implications of climate change for the habitats of their sites. The tool was created as part of a project on climate assessment and adaptation by the Commission for Environmental Cooperation.  It is available in English and Spanish and has three parts (a user guide, a set of blank worksheets, and a booklet containing sample completed worksheets), which used together allow marine protected area managers to conduct a rapid vulnerability assessment and adaptation strategy development process. This webinar will cover: 1) why the tool was created, 2) an overview of the tool (how it works, what it looks like, where to find it), 3) the experience of using the tool, and 4) additional application of the tool. Learn more about the tool here: http://www3.cec.org/islandora/en/item/11733-north-american-marine-protected-area-rapid-vulnerability-assessment-tool-en.pdf

Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe). 

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May 9, 2018

Title: Ecosystem Modeling (EM) for Living Marine Resource (LMR) management
Presenter(s): Howard Townsend, Ph.D., NOAA, National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: May 9, 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar, https://goo.gl/fddvsB, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Howard Townsend, Ecologist with NOAA, National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Science and Technology and National Ecosystem Modeling Coordinator.

Sponsors: NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: NMFS EBM/EBFM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov); Webinar host: Librarian Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov). 

Remote access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://goo.gl/fddvsB Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Ecosystem Modeling (EM) for Living Marine Resource (LMR) management includes a range of quantitative representations of part or all of an ecosystem focused on a single LMR, aggregate groups of LMRs, or whole food webs with focal LMRs and the relevant biophysical context of the LMR or LMR group/food web. As such, an EM is a quantitative tool used for resource management that incorporates factors internal and external to a focal LMR or group of LMRs. The tools may be something as simple as a statistical analysis of regression model showing the correlations between a particular fish species and its habitat, or it may be as complex as an end-to-end model that incorporates oceanographic model output and interactions between fished species, fisheries, and protected resources. The important aspect of this definition is that an EM is focused on practical application for simply attempting to understand a system, for understanding trade-offs among ecosystem components, or to set specific management reference points. NMFS has a wide range of major legislative mandates (Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act – MSA, Marine Mammal Protection Act – MMPA, Clean Water Act – CWA, Coastal Zone Management Act – CZMA, Endangered Species Act – ESA) that require a movement towards many levels of ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM). NOAA’s mission, vision, and policy statements have promoted and continue to promote movement towards EBFM. Most of the NMFS mandates require the use of the best available science. NMFS is advancing the use of ecosystem models to ensure the best available science is developed and applied for Ecosystem-based Fisheries Management.

About the Speaker: Howard Townsend is an ecologist with NOAA/National Marine Fisheries Service/Office of Science and Technology. He serves as the National Ecosystem Modeling Coordinator. In this position, Howard works with modelers across NMFS regions to develop, implement, and review modeling and analytical tools necessary for ecosystem-based fisheries management. Previously Howard worked with the NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office focused ecosystem and population modeling for living resource management. His research projects centered around modeling the effects of external factors (e.g., environment, climate, species interactions) on fisheries stocks using ecosystem modeling approaches. In addition, worked on linking ecosystem and socioeconomic models to estimate the societal benefits of natural resources. Howard earned his Ph.D. in Biology from Wake Forest University in 2004. His dissertation work was focused on the population ecology of seabirds in the Galápagos Islands.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3610950&CustomerID=321. If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program: http://www.wfm.noaa.gov/workplace/SignLangInterServices.html

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May 23, 2018

Title: A Preview of 2018 Fieldwork for Southeast Deep Coral Initiative and It’s Management Implications
Presenter(s): Daniel Wagner, PhD., Deep Coral Ecology Lab, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Presenting remotely from Charleston, SC
Date & Time: May 23, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

First seminar in a Double-header on Deep-Sea Corals!

Speaker: Daniel Wagner, PhD., Deep Coral Ecology Lab, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Presenting remotely from Charleston, SC.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract: TBD   

About the Speaker: TBD

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May 24, 2018

Title: Rescheduled for May 31, 2pm EDT seminar as Zach Proux et al: New Models and Analyses of Deep-sea Corals to Support Essential Fish Habitat Designations in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Peter Etnoyer, PhD., Deep Coral Ecology Lab, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Presenting remotely from Charleston, SC
Date & Time: May 24, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
RESCHEDULED FOR MAY 31 SEMINAR AS ZACH PROUX ET AL!
Second seminar in a Double-header on Deep-Sea Corals!

Speaker: Peter Etnoyer, PhD., Deep Coral Ecology Lab, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Presenting remotely from Charleston, SC.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract: TBD

About the Speaker: TBD

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Title: Where Shrews Walk on Water: Diversity by Design for British Columbia South Coast
Presenter(s): Pamela Zevit, British Columbia's South Coast Conservation Program
Date & Time: May 24, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar - Register in advance with Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Pamela Zevit, British Columbia's South Coast Conservation Program

Sponsors: FWS and NOAA Restoration Webinar Series, hosts are Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov and Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Register in advance with Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Abstract: Pamela Zevit will discuss her program’s work to fulfill an identified need for science-based guidance for stewards, land managers, and practitioners in habitat protection, restoration, mitigation, and ecosystem management to broaden the potential benefits of ecosystem-based restoration efforts.

About the Speaker: Before turning her attention to a full-time career in 1995 in conservation planning through the British Columbia provincial government and more recently as a consultant, Pamela Zevit studied design and archaeology at the University of Calgary. Pamela is a Registered Professional Biologist (RPBio) in BC, Canada with expertise in biodiversity conservation, landscape ecology and ecosystem restoration and planning. She currently divides her time between the South Coast Conservation Program (SCCP) as their Special Projects Coordinator focusing on conserving species and ecosystems at risk in southwest BC and the Association of Professional Biology as their Director of Advocacy and Outreach working on science communication and professional development programming for natural resource professionals.

If you are interested in receiving continuing education credits under SER’s Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner Program, contact Jen Lyndall at certification@ser.org. To receive an e-mail notification when registration opens, send your e-mail address to jennifer_ryan@fws.gov. To access the Restoration Webinar Series recording archive, visit
https://nctc.fws.gov/topic/online-training/webinars/restoration.html

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May 30, 2018

Title: Managers, modelers, and measuring the impact of species distribution model uncertainty on marine zoning decisions.
Presenter(s): Bryan Costa, Marine Ecologist at NOAA, Currently detailed to the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, University of California Santa Barbara, and Matt Kendall, Marine Biologist, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch
Date & Time: May 30, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Bryan Costa, Marine Ecologist at NOAA, Currently detailed to the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, University of California Santa Barbara, and
Matt Kendall, Marine Biologist, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: TBD

Abstract: Marine managers routinely use spatial data to make decisions about their marine environment. Uncertainty associated with this spatial data can have profound impacts on these management decisions and their projected outcomes. Recent advances in modeling techniques, including species distribution models (SDMs), make it easier to generate continuous maps showing the uncertainty associated with spatial predictions and maps. However, SDM predictions and maps can be complex and nuanced. This complexity makes their use challenging for non-technical managers, preventing them from having the best available information to make decisions. To help bridge these communication and information gaps, we developed a framework to illustrate how SDMs and associated uncertainty can be translated into simple products for managers. We also explicitly described the potential impacts of uncertainty on marine zoning decisions. This framework was applied to a case study in Saipan Lagoon, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). Managers in Saipan are interested in minimizing the potential impacts of personal watercraft (e.g., jet skis) on staghorn Acropora species, an important coral assemblage in the lagoon. We used a recently completed SDM for staghorn Acropora to develop simple map products showing the sensitivity of zoning options to three different prediction and three different uncertainty thresholds (nine combinations total). Our analysis showed that the amount of area and geographic location of predicted staghorn Acropora presence changed based on these nine combinations. These dramatically different spatial patterns would have significant zoning implications when considering where to exclude and/or allow jet skis operations inside the lagoon. They also show that different uncertainty thresholds may lead managers to markedly different conclusions and courses of action. Defining acceptable levels of uncertainty upfront is critical for ensuring that managers can make more informed decisions, meet their marine resource goals and generate favorable outcomes for their stakeholders.

About the Speakers: TBD

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May 31, 2018

Title: Pushing the Boundaries: Technology-Driven Exploration of the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): John Bright, Research Coordinator and Unit Diving Supervisor, Thunder BayNational Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: May 31, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:


OneNOAAScience Seminar Series

Speaker: John Bright, Research Coordinator and Unit Diving Supervisor, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, NOAA

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean ServiceScience Seminar; co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Steve.Gittings@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar usesphone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-freefrom US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "ParticipantJoin", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. Nocode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct application forWebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: Join the researchers at NOAA’sThunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary as they take you on a ‘deep dive’ into anarchaeological expedition during the summer of 2017. Using cutting edgetechnology through partnerships with the University of Delaware, MichiganTechnological University, and Northwestern Michigan College, two historicshipwrecks were discovered and documented 300 feet below the surface of LakeHuron, in the waters just off Presque Isle.

About the Speaker:  John Bright is the Research Coordinator and Unit Diving Supervisor forNOAA’s Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary. He holds a BS in Biology and anMA in Maritime Studies from East Carolina University. Prior to his transitionto NOAA in 2015, John spent 5 years working with the National Park ServicesSubmerged Resources Center. In this role he conducted archaeological researchprojects across the federal system, often in partnership with agencies such asthe Bureau of Ocean Energy Management as well as NOAA’s Office of NationalMarine Sanctuaries. John specializes in advanced scientific diving techniques,applied GIS, and marine remote sensing. 

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Title: Assessing the Relationship Between Geomorphology and Deep-Sea coral Community on the West Florida Escarpment
Presenter(s): Zach Proux, MS Candidate, Marine Biology, Grice Marine Lab, College of Charleston
Date & Time: May 31, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:



OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Zach Proux, MS Candidate, Marine Biology, Grice Marine Lab,College of Charleston 

Coauthors: Dr.Leslie Sautter, Associate Professor, Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences, College of Charleston and

Dr.Peter Etnoyer, Lead Scientist, Deep Coral Ecology Laboratory, National Centers of Coastal Ocean Science, NOAA 

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract: Stony coral and Blackcoral are foundational ecological groups common on the West Florida Escarpmentin the Gulf of Mexico. The distribution of these corals, and most otherdeep-sea coral, depends primarily on depth, presence of hard substrate, andvertical relief of the seafloor, but less is known about how deep-sea coralassemblages vary with different geomorphologic features. The primary goal ofthis study is to compare abundance and diversity of deep-sea coral assemblagesas they relate to specific geomorphologic features. This study focuses on threeHabitat Areas of Particular Concern (HAPC) recommended for regulation by theGulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council with depths between ~200 and 1000 m.High-resolution multibeam sonar data from a survey by NOAA Ship Nancy Foster (2008) are used in concertwith historical coral presence data from NOAA’s Deep-Sea Coral Research and TechnologyProgram (DSCRTP).  Additionally, coral presence-absence data from ROVimages collected by NOAA Ship Nancy Foster in August 2017 andNOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in November 2017 and April 2018 areused to enumerate and identify assemblages on flats, mounds, and ridges. Understandingthe relationship between specific geomorphologic features and deep-sea coralcommunities will better inform managers regarding which geographic areas arecritical to the protection of these animals. The results of this study will also provide insight into whether theWest Florida Escarpment is comprised of fragmented deep-sea coral habitat or iscontinuous, high-quality habitat along the entire feature.



About the Speaker: Zach Proux was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, but raised in asuburb of Chicago.  He earned his B.S. inZoology with a concentration in Marine Biology from Michigan State Universityin 2016.  He is currently in his secondyear at College of Charleston working towards an M.S. in Marine Biology, workingunder the guidance of Dr. Leslie Sautter from the College of Charleston and Dr.Peter Etnoyer from NOAA’s Deep Coral Ecology Laboratory. His thesis, and thetopic of his NOAA presentation, aims to characterize the relationship between geomorphologyand deep-sea coral communities on the West Florida Escarpment. Zach hope tofinish his M.S. by December 2018 to pursue opportunities in Marine Policy, andeventually move into the environmental consulting industry.

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June 5, 2018

Title: Marine Ecological Climate Services: User-Driven Forecasts of Life in the Ocean
Presenter(s): Mark R. Payne, Senior Researcher, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark.Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.
Date & Time: June 5, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Mark R. Payne, Senior Researcher, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; hostis 
Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# 
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event",  then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Besure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract: Marine scientists have long dreamed of forecasting life in the ocean, but after a century of trying, we have little to show for our efforts. However, recent years have seen a rapid development in the ability of earth system models to predict the physical state of the ocean on seasonal (3-6 months) and even decadal (5-10 years) time scales. Such forecasts are potentially of great value to society, as these are the time-scales where many important decisions are made. Here I review the rapidly emerging field of marine ecological forecasting that aims to generate such predictions of biological variables and develop so-called “Marine Ecological Climate Services”.I first examine existing ecological forecast products globally to identify the conditions where forecasts have been successfully developed. I then use these lessons to identify “low-hanging fruit” that can potentially be predicted and illustrate these approaches to prediction using examples of both successes and failures from my own work in Europe, including the distribution of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) and blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou), the productivity of herring (Clupea harengus) and citizen-science driven forecasts of Garfish (Belone belone) migration. Ensuring the usefulness of these forecast products requires close collaboration between actively engaged end-users and researchers and I discuss the importance of co-development. Finally, I look at future opportunities, approaches and applications, including the use of forecast information to support climate adaptation and sustainable development goals.

About the Speaker: Mark R. Payne is a Senior Researcher at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU-Aqua) in Copenhagen, Denmark, whose research examines the impacts of climate change and climate variability on life in the ocean. His work is pioneering the development of Climate Services for monitoring and managing life in the ocean in Europe and involves coupling biological knowledge to climate models to produce predictions that are of direct relevance to end-users. Payne has published over 40 articles in a wide range of scientific journals including Nature and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and is the leader the Climate Services work package within the EU project “Blue Action”.


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June 14, 2018

Title: Finding the right 10%: Assessing MPA progress and the BlueBRIDGE platform
Presenter(s): Miles Macmillan-Lawler, GRID-Arendal
Date & Time: June 14, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Miles Macmillan-Lawler of GRID-Arendal

Sponsors: Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MarineDebris.info, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

Seminar POC:  Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Webinar Access:  https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_U_nlEioQQcCJrZwihGXTuQ

Abstract: As we move towards the 2020 deadline for countries to fulfil their commitments under the Convention on Biological Diversity Aichi Target 11, now is a good time to take stock and ask the question – are we protecting the right 10% of marine area in our MPAs? Not only does Aichi Target 11 talk about conserving 10% of coastal and marine areas, it specifies the effective conservation of areas of particular importance for biodiversity and ecosystem services and ecologically representativeness as key goals. So how do we know if we are achieving this? This webinar will outline a framework for assessing the progress of MPAs in achieving these goals and present the Protected Areas Impact Maps Virtual Research Environment on the BlueBRIDGE platform (https://bluebridge.d4science.org/web/protectedareaimpactmaps), an open access application which uses this framework to assist countries in assessing their progress against Aichi Target 11 and ensuring that they get the right 10%. 

Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe). 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ 

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June 19, 2018

Title: Cooperative Institutes and Grantees
Presenter(s): Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS; Sarah Davis, MLS, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: June 19, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar, https://goo.gl/KNPTTT, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar

Speakers: Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS and Sarah Davis, MLS, NOAA Central Library

Sponsor: NOAA Institutional Repository

Remote access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the webinar: https://goo.gl/KNPTTT After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP). Each seminar will be on a topic related to the NOAA IR and these seminars will occur bimonthly Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of NOAA IR seminars.

POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter judith.salter@noaa.gov; IR Managing Librarian: Jennifer Fagan-Fry (jennifer.fagan-fry@noaa.gov); Sr. Bibliometrics Librarian: Sarah Davis (sarah.davis@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Welcome to NOAA's Institutional Repository Seminar Series! Each bimonthly NOAA IR seminar will be on a topic related to the NOAA IR. Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. June 2018's seminar will focus on Cooperative Institutes and Grantees. NOAA's Institutional Repository (NOAA IR) provides long-term public access to NOAA publications and articles. Join us in the library for Cooperative Institutes and Grantees to learn more about how CIs and Grantees can best utilize the IR. A Q&A session will follow the presentation.

About the Speakers: Jennifer Fagan-Fry received her MLIS from Catholic University and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2015. Jenn manages the IR ingest. Sarah Davis received her M.L.S from the University of Maryland and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2008. She heads the bibliometrics team and also works with the NOAA Institutional Repository and the library website.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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June 20, 2018

Title: Seasonal and Short-term Prediction of K. brevis Harmful Algal Bloom Outbreaks on the West Florida Shelf
Presenter(s): Robert Weisberg, Professor, University of South Florida, College of Marine Science
Date & Time: June 20, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Robert Weisberg, Professor, University of South Florida, College of Marine Science

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Quay.Dortch@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct application for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: and About the Speaker: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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June 21, 2018

Title: Floodplain Reconnection on Butano Creek – Design, Implementation and Preliminary Post-Project Results
Presenter(s): Chris Hammersmark, registered civil engineer, hydrologist, CBEC, Inc, Eco Engineering
Date & Time: June 21, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar - Register in advance with Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Chris Hammersmark, registered civil engineer, hydrologist, CBEC, Inc, Eco Engineering

Sponsors: FWS and NOAA Restoration Webinar Series, hosts are Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov and Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Register in advance with Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Abstract: Chris Hammersmark will present the design, implementation and initial post-project results of a floodplain reconnection project undertaken on Butano Creek, a flashy coastal stream along the Central Coast of California.

About the Speaker: Chris Hammersmark - Chris is a registered civil engineer (CA P.E. C66595) specializing in hydraulics, hydrology, geomorphology, water quality, ecology, and ecosystem rehabilitation/restoration. He has over 18 years of experience on a diverse array of projects including river and floodplain restoration, sediment and water quality studies, flood inundation and water supply investigations. The environmental settings for these projects range from natural to urban, from coastal estuaries through lowland alluvial rivers to headwater streams and adjacent meadows and forests. Dr. Hammersmark’s technical experience includes numerical hydraulic and hydrologic modeling (e.g., HEC, USGS, USBR and DHI models), habitat suitability modeling, terrain modeling, GIS and a variety of types of field investigations including sediment characterization and sediment transport measurements, water quality sampling, flow gauging, groundwater sampling, water table measurement habitat characterization and mapping, vegetation sampling, topographic and bathymetric surveys, soil infiltration and compaction monitoring. Dr. Hammersmark's dissertation research involved developing an integrated surface water-groundwater model to establish a water budget for a wetland system, providing spatial and temporal estimates of storage and flux though the integrated surface-subsurface system. Drawing from his diverse academic and consulting background, Dr. Hammersmark seeks innovative and sustainable process-based solutions to complex multi-objective water resource and ecosystem restoration challenges, while operating within the specific constraints of each project. He is committed to the conservation, preservation and rehabilitation of aquatic, wetland and terrestrial ecosystems.

If you are interested in receiving continuing education credits under SER’s Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner Program, contact Jen Lyndall at certification@ser.org.  To receive an e-mail notification when registration opens, send your e-mail address to jennifer_ryan@fws.gov.  To access the Restoration Webinar Series recording archive, visit 
https://nctc.fws.gov/topic/online-training/webinars/restoration.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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September 25, 2018

Title: Plastics in the Ocean: Facts, Fiction, and Unknowns
Presenter(s): Anna Robuck, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography
Date & Time: September 25, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote - Online Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Anna Robuck, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries 

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6922965402939033090 

Abstract: Although plastics are vital in a slew of consumer applications, plastic pollution in the ocean has turned out to be a not-so-fantastic outcome of modern day plastic dependence. This presentation provides an overview of the ocean plastic pollution problem, explaining the difference between marine debris and microplastics. It also will outline the current state of knowledge about microplastic impacts in the ocean and marine food webs, and provide insight into an ongoing research project using seabirds as indicators of plastic pollution in the Northwest Atlantic.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ 

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October 17, 2018

Title: Understanding Ocean Acidification - Using NOAA’s New Educational Tools
Presenter(s): Amy Dean, National Estuarine Research Reserve System
Date & Time: October 17, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Amy Dean, National Estuarine Research Reserve System 

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries 

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/690023097051840771

Abstract: Data in the Classroom (https://dataintheclassroom.noaa.gov/) is designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional and global scale. In this presentation, participants will dive deep into Data in the Classroom's Ocean Acidification Module to explore the processes that cause acidification, examine data from across the globe and take a virtual tour of the new web-based curricular modules and data tools.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ 

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November 14, 2018

Title: A Rare Great Lakes Ecosystem: Exploring the Sinkholes of Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): John Bright, NOAA's Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: November 14, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote - Online Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: John Bright, Research Coordinator for NOAA's Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries 

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4895467060831741186 

Abstract: Underwater explorations in Lake Huron have revealed unique hotspots of biogeochemical activity at several submerged groundwater vents in Lake Huron. Learn about the techniques scientists use to explore unique single-celled microorganism communities that dominate this freshwater habitat. Educators will be provided with information and links to lessons that feature this unique Great Lakes research topic.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ 

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