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All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

July 23, 2018

Title: Battling the Extremes: Drought and Fire Outlook for California-Nevada
Presenter(s): Speakers:  Dave Simeral, Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute; Amanda Sheffield, National Integrated Drought Information System; National Interagency Fire Center Predictive Services; Julie Kalansky, CNAP - a NOAA RISA, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Date & Time: July 23, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Dave Simeral, Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Desert Research Institute (DRI); Amanda Sheffield, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS); National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) Predictive Services; Julie Kalansky, CNAP (a NOAA RISA), Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Seminar sponsor: National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA Climate Program Office

Seminar POC for questions: amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov 

Remote access: Register for the webinar at https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/california-nevada-drought-climate-outlook-webinar-july-23-2018

Abstract
The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) July 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Niño and La Niña). The webinar takes place at 11 a.m. PT, Monday July 23, 2018.

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Drought & Climate Update
Dave Simeral | Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Desert Research Institute (DRI)

Drought & Climate Outlook
Amanda Sheffield | National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)

Fire Conditions, Impacts & Outlook
National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) Predictive Services

Working to Understand Climate Projections with Southern Nevada Water Authority 
Julie Kalansky | CNAP (a NOAA RISA), Scripps Institution of Oceanography

About the Speakers:

Dave Simeral is an Associate Research Scientist of Climatology with the Division of Atmospheric Sciences at the Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) in Reno, Nevada. Dave's interests cover a broad spectrum within the fields of climatology, meteorology, physical geography, and snow science. Over the past 15 years at the DRI/WRCC, Mr. Simeral has worked on a wide variety of projects in the fields of meteorology and climatology with state, federal, and university entities. Mr. Simeral is one of twelve national authors for the U.S. Drought Monitor and serves on several steering committees for the NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS).

Amanda Sheffield
is a Regional Drought Information Coordinator with the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS). Dr. Sheffield serves are the program point of contact for the California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System and is located at Scripps Institution of Oceanography/UC San Diego.

Julie Kalansky is a climate scientist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography/UC San Diego and program manager with CNAP (California Nevada Climate Application Program - a NOAA RISA) at Scripps. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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July 23, 2018

Title: Climate Change Threatens the World’s Marine Protected Areas
Presenter(s): John Bruno, Professor, Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Date & Time: July 23, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker, John Bruno, Professor, Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Sponsors: Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MarineDebris.info, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

Abstract: MPAs and the species they protect are increasingly being impacted by climate change. Although MPAs are widely promoted as a means to mitigate the effects of climate change, the opposite perspective is more in line with the scientific reality: without drastic reductions in carbon emissions, ocean warming, acidification and oxygen depletion will disrupt the composition and functioning of the ecosystems currently protected within the world's MPAs. The community- and ecosystem-level impacts of climate change threaten to negate decades of progress in conservation and further imperil species and ecosystems that are already in jeopardy. 

Webinar Access:  https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_zxkX-c5JStm1vFsMkOrNkw

Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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July 24, 2018

Title: Recent changes in Lake Michigan’s lower food web
Presenter(s): Dr. Hunter J. Carrick, Dept. of Biology and Institute for Great Lakes Research, Central Michigan University
Date & Time: July 24, 2018
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Dr. Hunter J. Carrick, Dept. of Biology and Institute for Great Lakes Research, Central Michigan University 

Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/277823890655753731

Abstract: Lake Michigan has experienced recent changes in the plankton assemblage coinciding with reductions in watershed nutrient loadings and the introduction of invasive species. As such, we evaluated the population dynamics of key plankton components in Lake Michigan along a series of near to offshore transects in southern Lake Michigan (2013-18). Chlorophyll analysis revealed that the picoplankton fraction (Ppico, <2 μm) contributed an average of >50% to total phytoplankton biomass, a percentage much larger than observed prior to 2005. Particulate P made up nearly all of the TP in the water column; this pool was mainly composed of poly-P present in pico-sized particles (>80% of total). The abundance of Ppico (5,200 to 70,700 cells/mL) was considerable and the assemblage was dominated by cyanobacteria taxa and pico-eukaryotes. The occurrence of diatoms (mainly Cyclotella and Discotella taxa) was limited to the nearshore region during the spring and early stratification periods. We estimated growth and grazing losses attributable to small grazers (microzooplankton, protists) and median-sized grazers (mesozooplankton, crustaceans) from enclosure experiments. Ppico had lower growth (0.20 +/- 0.27) relative to grazing losses by microzooplankton (-0.33 +/- 0.37), and limited clearance by mesozooplankton. These results indicate tight coupling between picoplankton and small grazers, suggesting that carbon flow from picoplankton to metazoa may dominate the current, trophic dynamics in the lake. 

Bio: Hunter has 28 years of experience in the field of environmental science and education (post Ph.D). He received his B.S. Degree in Biology from Binghamton University in 1983, his M.S. Degree from the Bowling Green State University in 1985, and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1990. In 1990-91, He served as the first CILER/CIGLR post-doctoral fellow, when he contributed to a large NOAA project that studied coastal hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. He has served on the faculty at San Francisco State University, University at Buffalo, and Penn State University; he is currently is a professor at Central Michigan University.

Hunter's research focuses on understanding the mechanisms that govern food web dynamics and nutrient cycling in large lakes, streams, and coastal ecosystems. He has published 130 scientific documents (papers, reports, book chapters) and authored 250 professional presentations. His body of work includes 50 completed research projects (total funding >$9 million). His current research evaluates recent changes in the lower food web in Lake Michigan.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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July 25, 2018

Title: Southwest Drought & Wildfire Status, Impacts and Outlook
Presenter(s): Speakers: Nancy Selover, Arizona State Climatologist; Ed Delgado, National Program Manager for National Interagency Fire Center Predictive Services
Date & Time: July 25, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers:  Nancy Selover, Arizona State Climatologist; Ed Delgado, National Program Manager for National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) Predictive Services

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with the National Weather Service and the National Drought Mitigation Center 

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov 

Remote access: Register for the webinar at https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/southwest-drought-status-webinar-july-25-2018

Abstract: 

As "extreme" and "exceptional" drought continues its grip on the Southwest, impacts of the drought deepen and exacerbate wildfire threats. A collaboration of experts will provide up-to-date information on drought in the region, including portions of Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. Join the webinar to learn about drought conditions and impacts and wildfire impacts, predictions and forecasts. Arizona State Climatologist Nancy Selover will discuss drought conditions, impacts and outlook for the Southwest region, and a fire expert will provide updates on wildfire conditions and outlooks for the region. 

About the Speakers:  

Nancy Selover is the State Climatologist for Arizona. Dr. Selover educates groups across the state on climate topics including the urban heat island, monsoon, drought, extreme weather, climate change, and Arizona's climate. She interfaces with state and city agencies, private businesses, researchers, and the public, providing climate data and information to assist these diverse groups. Dr. Selover serves on numerous committees including the Technical Monitoring Committee of the Statewide Drought Task Force and the State Hazard Mitigation Planning team. Nancy regularly teaches a meteorological instruments course at Arizona State University. She also mentors K-12 teachers in a climate course carried out in conjunction with the American Meteorological Society.

Ed Delgado is the National Program Manager for Predictive Services, located at the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) in Boise, Idaho. Predictive Services is a decision support unit that provides weather and fuels assessments and forecasts for the wildland fire managers across the country. Ed has been with Predictive Services for 17 years and has held his current position since 2011. Prior to Predictive Services, Ed worked for the National Weather Service for 15 years with tours at Fort Worth, Denver, Raleigh, and Greer - the last two tours as a senior forecaster. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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July 26, 2018

Title: Droughts, Floods, and Wildfire! (Climate Science Special Report)
Presenter(s): Michael Wehner, Senior Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: July 26, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, in partnership with NOAA. 

Climate Series, Seminar 3 of 8: 

Title: Droughts, Floods, and Wildfire! 

Speaker: Michael Wehner, Senior Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Presenting remotely.

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED. 
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. 
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ 
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Droughts, floods, and wildfire have significant negative effects throughout much of the United States. Volume I of the Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4) - aka the Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) - has a chapter that details how climate change exacerbates the risks of such major events. These aspects of climate change are complicated due to the interaction of the changes in temperature and precipitation. Droughts are classified by a hierarchy of meteorological, agricultural, hydrological, or socio-economic types. The effect of global warming is most pronounced on agricultural drought, a deficit of surface moisture, due to increased temperatures. Floods are determined both by extreme precipitation as well as surface characteristics, and vary both on spatial and temporal scales. Short-term extreme precipitation is widely accepted as already having been intensified by climate change and will continue as the climate warms further. Western wildfires are affected both by forest management and climate change. The former leads to changes in fuel density while the latter increases flammability. These topics, as discussed in CSSR Chapter 8, are reviewed in this talk.

About The Speaker: Michael F. Wehner is a senior staff scientist in the Computational Research Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Wehner's current research concerns the behavior of extreme weather events in a changing climate, especially heat waves, intense precipitation, drought, and tropical cyclones. Before joining the Berkeley Lab in 2002, Wehner was an analyst at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the Program for Climate Modeling Diagnosis and Intercomparison. He is the author or co-author of over 170 scientific papers and reports. He was a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group I contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) and the second, third, and fourth U.S. National Climate Assessments. He was recently selected as a lead author for the upcoming IPCC Sixth Assessment Report. Dr. Wehner earned his master's degree and Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and his bachelor's degree in Physics from the University of Delaware.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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July 26, 2018

Title:
New
SCIENCE and publishing in SCIENCE
Presenter(s): Dr. Jesse Smith, Science
Date & Time: July 26, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter: Dr. Jesse Smith, Science

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Central Library. POC: Outreach Librarian, Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Remote access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8037155512692908803 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Science was first published in 1880, and to this day continues to be the flagship journal of AAAS. In this presentation, Senior Editor Jesse Smith will discuss the essential elements of what is involved in publishing a manuscript in Science

About The Speaker: Dr. Smith is a stable isotope geochemist and climatologist with expertise in the areas of climate, paleoclimate, non-biological oceanography, atmospheric science and ice sheets. He earned his PhD from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, and has been an Editor at Science since 1999. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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July 31, 2018

Title: Marine Megafauna Movement Analytical Program: convergence of patterns in open and coastal oceans
Presenter(s): Dr Ana MM Sequeira, University of Western Australia. Presenting remotely from Western Australia!
Date & Time: July 31, 2018
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Speaker: Dr Ana MM Sequeira, University of Western Australia. Presenting remotely from Western Australia! Sponsors: NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series and the NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov Remote Access: TBD Abstract: The Marine Megafauna Movement Analytical Program (mmmap.wordpress.com) aims to significantly improve our understanding of marine megafauna movement at a global scale to ultimately assist the conservation and management of economically important, charismatic and threatened highly migratory marine species. MMMAP is composed of a core group of 11 international experts in movement ecology, and an increasing network of collaborators from multiple institutions around the world. Since its inception, MMMAP has been working on a range of high impact papers and some of the major outputs so far will be presented at the seminar. About the Speaker: Dr Sequeira is an ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) Research Fellow at the Indian Ocean Marine Research Centre (IOMRC) supported by the University of Western Australia (UWA) and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS). She is interested in the development of models to assist understanding the marine environment with strong emphasis in supporting marine spatial planning and conservation. Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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July 31, 2018

Title:
New
The NOAA Digital Coast: Turning Coastal Data and Tools into Actionable Information
Presenter(s): Josh Murphy, Geospatial Program Analyst, Doug Marcy, Coastal Hazards Specialist and Nate Herold, Physical Scientist. All with the NOAA/NOS/OCM/Science and Geospatial Division
Date & Time: July 31, 2018
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only - register below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Speakers: Josh Murphy, Geospatial Program Analyst, Doug Marcy, Coastal Hazards Specialist and Nate Herold, Physical Scientist. All with the NOAA/NOS/OCM/Science and Geospatial Division Sponsors: Webinar hosted by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO & NatureServe), in partnership with NOAA's Digital Coast. NOAA point of contact: Melissa.Rosa@noaa.gov Webinar Access: Register at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_WzBSJVBbRlSezGWIljjqDQ. Abstract: NOAA's Digital Coast is a website and partnership that provides public access to coastal data, tools, training, and resources in order to meet the unique needs of coastal communities. Coastal resource managers can access collections of high quality, authoritative geospatial data (e.g., topography, coastal land cover change, socioeconomic information), tools, and trainings to address coastal and ocean management challenges. More than just a website, the Digital Coast provides the framework and information needed to save organizations time and money and allows groups that might not otherwise work together to join forces. Content on the Digital Coast comes from many sources, all of which are vetted by NOAA. This webinar will provide an overview of the Digital Coast and demonstrate two geospatial tools that turn data into actionable information: 1) Sea Level Rise Viewer (https://coast.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/tools/slr), which visualizes coastal flooding scenarios and social vulnerability due to sea level rise; and 2) Land Cover Atlas (https://coast.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/tools/lca), an online data viewer that provides user-friendly access to coastal land cover and land cover change information developed through NOAA's Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP). Visit NOAA's Digital Coast at https://coast.noaa.gov/digitalcoast. Webinar hosted by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).
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August 1, 2018

Title:
New
The Coastal Recovery from Storms Tool (CReST): A Model for Assessing the Impact of Sea Level Rise on Natural and Managed Beaches and Dunes
Presenter(s): Peter Ruggiero, Professor, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University. Presenting at NOAA in SIlver Spring.
Date & Time: August 1, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar, or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Speaker: Peter Ruggiero, Professor, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University. Presenting at NOAA in SIlver Spring (For NOAA folks, SSMC4, Room 8150). Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and David.Kidwell@noaa.gov Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install MyMeeting's WebEx app while logging in - the temporary application works fine. Abstract: The barrier islands within the North Carolina Sentinel Site Cooperative sustain rich ecosystems, host valuable infrastructure, and protect the mainland coast from sea level rise (SLR) and storms. A transdisciplinary team of coastal geomorphologists and ecologists, led by Dr. Peter Ruggiero from Oregon State University, are developing a new model for evaluating beach dune system response and recovery from storms. This innovative modeling system couples an emerging understanding of the feedbacks between dune vegetation and sand transport with a recently developed coastal dune model to assess beach and dune evolution in both natural (e.g., Cape Lookout National Seashore) and managed systems (e.g., areas which are nourished such as Bogue Banks, NC) in response to SLR and extreme storms. Dr. Ruggiero and team are identifying how dunes respond and recover to storms at the current sea level along with examining a range of sea level rise scenarios. About the Presenter: Peter Ruggiero is a Professor in the College of Earth, Ocean, & Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University (http://ceoas.oregonstate.edu/profile/ruggiero/). Ruggiero's primary research interests include coastal geomorphology and coastal hazards and he has over two decades of experience in observing, modeling, and predicting beach and dune evolution. Presently, Ruggiero's research group is developing probabilistic and interdisciplinary approaches for assessing vulnerability to coastal hazards in light of a changing and variable climate. Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 1, 2018

Title: Understanding Marine and Aquatic Community Responses in Species Composition, Diversity, and Population Genetics: Targeted Metagenomics from eDNA and Plankton Samples
Presenter(s): Dr. Carol Stepien, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab
Date & Time: August 1, 2018
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Dr. Carol Stepien, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab

Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7510707146728480769

Abstract: Ecological sampling depends on accurate taxon identification, delineation, and abundances, yet is time consuming, expensive, involves considerable taxonomic expertise, and often is thwarted by lack of diagnostic morphological characters. Multiple targeted metagenomic analyses entailing (1) primer design for specific mitochondrial and nuclear DNA gene regions having appropriate levels of variation, (2) field sampling of water, plankton, sediment and/or gut contents, (3) high-throughput sequencing (HTS), and (4) custom bioinformatics offer means to rapidly and accurately simultaneously characterize the species diversity and compositions of entire communities, along with their relative representation and population genetic variation. This approach is useful for evaluating all taxonomic groups, all members, and all taxonomic levels of biological communities including rare and cryptic species, invasive species, and fishery stocks. Examples are presented of diagnostic assays that characterize fishes and invertebrates from environmental (e)DNA water and plankton samples in various marine and freshwater ecosystems, ranging from the hydrothermal vent plumes at Axial Seamount, the Salish Sea, Alaskan and Arctic waters, the Laurentian Great Lakes, and the Baltic Sea. These examples and analyses illustrate new ability to assess species diversity and population responses of biological communities to changing conditions, including acidification, temperature, harmful algal blooms, and hypoxia. Results from these metagenomic analyses demonstrate considerable application across marine and freshwater ecosystems at a scale, accuracy, complexity, and capacity for automation not otherwise feasible.

Bio: Carol Stepien recently joined PMEL as the new Ocean Environment Research Division (OERD) leader. She comes to PMEL from directing the Lake Erie Research Center at the University of Toledo. She brings with her expertise in evolutionary biology, biogeography, and conservation genetics and genomics. Her special research interests include environmental DNA, sensor networks, genomic adaptations, and bioinformatics of marine animals, fisheries, and communities. She mentors several graduate students and postdoctoral associates and will continue to do so while at PMEL through the University of Toledo and the University of Washington's Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean. During her time at the University of Toledo she was honored as a Distinguished University Professor of Ecology. She is also active in the community and enjoys participating in outreach events. Carol serves on the Editorial Board of the journal Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, and is an editor for the new journal Ecological Processes and the genetics editor for the journal Biological Invasions.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 2, 2018

Title:
New
Science communication @ NOAA: Effective strategies to increase public engagement and understanding of science
Presenter(s): Leticia Williams, NWS/COO/OPS
Date & Time: August 2, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter: Leticia Williams, Postdoctoral Fellow, NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology

POC: Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); Leticia Williams (leticia.williams@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Researchers have defined science communication as sharing science-related knowledge from experts (e.g., scientists) or professional science communicators (e.g., public information officers, journalists) to non-experts (e.g., policy makers, stakeholders) and the lay public. Effective science communication is integral to NOAA's goals to foster an informed and weather-ready nation, healthy oceans, and environmentally sustainable and vibrant communities. Come and learn what tools you can use to accomplish these goals to increase public engagement and understanding of science such as user-centered messaging and visual communication.

About The Speaker: Dr. Leticia Williams is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology (NCAS-M) at Howard University, and is currently contributing to social science research at the National Weather Service in the Operations Division for the Office of the Chief Operating Officer. Her research specialization is science communication, which focuses on strengthening public communication and engagement with science.

Remote access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4368892252976866819 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 2, 2018

Title: Climate Potential Surprises - Compound Extremes and Tipping Elements (Climate Science Special Report)
Presenter(s): Radley Horton, Associate Research Professor, Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Presenitng remotely.
Date & Time: August 2, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, in partnership with NOAA.

Climate Series, Seminar 4 of 8:
Title: Climate Potential Surprises - Compound Extremes and Tipping Elements

Speaker: Radley Horton, Associate Research Professor, Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Presenting remotely.

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED. 
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. 
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ 
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window.
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Diverse lines of evidence suggest that the further the climate system is 'pushed' through increases in greenhouse gas concentrations, the greater the potential for rapid changes that are difficult to model or otherwise foresee. Several examples will be presented within a risk management framework, ranging from a) the probable to b) the low probability but catastrophic should they occur.

About The Speaker: Radley Horton's research focuses on climate extremes, tail risks, climate impacts, and adaptation. Radley was a Convening Lead Author for the Third National Climate Assessment. He currently Co-Chairs Columbia's Adaptation Initiative, and is the Lead Principal Investigator for the NOAA-Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments-funded Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast and the WWF-Columbia University ADVANCE partnership. Radley is also the Columbia University lead for the Department of Interior-funded Northeast Climate Adaptation Center. He has also served as Deputy Lead for NASA's Climate Adaptation Science Investigator Working Group, charged with linking NASA's science to its institutional stewardship. Radley also teaches in Columbia University's Sustainable Development department. Radley is a leading climate science communicator, appearing regularly on television, radio, and in print.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 9, 2018

Title: Long-Term Climate Mitigation Perspectives and the 2°C Objective. Seminar 4 of 8 of the Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Benjamin DeAngelo, Deputy Director, NOAA Climate Program Office. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: August 9, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, 
in partnership with NOAA.

Climate Series, Seminar 5 of 8:

Long-Term Climate Mitigation Perspectives and the 2°C Objective

Speaker: Benjamin DeAngelo, Deputy Director, NOAA Climate Program Office. Presenting remotely.

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED. 
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. 
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
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Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. 
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: The presentation addresses estimates of different cumulative carbon budgets in light of future global warming objectives " with a particular focus on the now, oft-cited 2°C goal, its origin, and the chances of meeting such an objective.

About The Speaker: Benjamin DeAngelo has over 20 years of experience bridging science and policy for the stewardship of the global environment. Ben is the Deputy Director of the Climate Program Office within NOAA's research arm, and serves as the U.S. head of delegation for the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP), a working group under the Arctic Council. Ben was the lead author on the mitigation chapter of the Climate Science Special Report (2017), from which this presentation is largely based. Prior to starting at NOAA in 2017, Ben was the Deputy Director of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and special assistant for climate change to the President's Science Advisor in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and had a 18-year career at EPA working on climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 9, 2018

Title: Integrating Social Network Development into MPA Management Capacity Building and Institutionalization in the Philippines and Indonesia
Presenter(s): Speakers: Anne Nelson, NOAA MPA Center International Capacity Building Program, on contract with Lynker Technologies, Inc.; and, Gabrielle Johnson, NOAA International MPA Capacity Building Program / Coral Reef Conservation Program, on contract with The Baldwin Group
Date & Time: August 9, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

Speakers:  Anne Nelson, NOAA MPA Center International Capacity Building Program, on contract with Lynker Technologies, Inc.; and, Gabrielle Johnson, NOAA International MPA Capacity Building Program / Coral Reef Conservation Program, on contract with The Baldwin Group.

Abstract:   Integrating social network development into MPA management capacity building and institutionalization in the Philippines and Indonesia by Anne Nelson and Gabrielle Johnson of NOAA. Every MPA site, region, and capacity building program is unique in structure and content, yet all programs need to build trust and community to create a locally-relevant format and framework. To contribute to the ongoing growth of the global social network of marine protected area (MPA) practitioners, the presenters will share observations from the social MPA network building that was part of recent NOAA MPA Center International Capacity Building in the Philippines and Indonesia. These programs deliver technical capacity for effective MPA management and a participatory learning framework for participants to enhance their MPA social network to support long term implementation of gained knowledge and skills.

Webinar Access:  https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_gGfcTtoeS0iae5vzXjVQtg

Seminar POCs:  Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:  Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe). Register for the webinar at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_gGfcTtoeS0iae5vzXjVQtg.
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August 16, 2018

Title: The Causes and Consequences of a Rapidly Changing Arctic. Seminar 6 of 8 of the Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Patrick C. Taylor, Climate Research Scientist, NASA Langley Research Center. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: August 16, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, in partnership with NOAA.

Climate Series, Seminar 6 of 8:
Title: The Causes and Consequences of a Rapidly Changing Arctic.

Speaker: Patrick C. Taylor, Climate Research Scientist, NASA Langley Research Center. Presenting remotely.

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED. 
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. 
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ 
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
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Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. 
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Earth's climate system is highly interconnected, meaning that changes to the global climate influence the United States climatically and economically. In much the same way as European and Asian financial markets affect the U.S. economy, changes to ice sheet mass and energy flows in the far reaches of the planet affect our climate. Life on Earth is sensitive to climate conditions; human society is especially susceptible due to the climate-vulnerable, complex, and often fragile systems that provide food, water, energy, and security. Observed changes to the global climate affecting the United States include rising global temperatures, diminishing sea ice, melting ice sheets and glaciers, rising sea levels, etc. These documented changes have global economic and national security implications, including for the United States. For example, sea level rise alone is putting $100 billion dollars of U.S. military assets at risk, according to the Dept. of Defense. Arctic climate change continues to outpace the rest of the globe. Over the last 30 years, rapid and, in many cases, unprecedented changes to Arctic temperatures, sea ice, snow cover, land ice, and permafrost have occurred. While the Arctic may seem far away, changes in the Arctic climate system have a global reach, affecting sea level, the carbon cycle, atmospheric winds, ocean currents, and potentially the frequency of extreme weather. This presentation discusses the changes in the observed in the Arctic, the projected changes, and the potential impacts to us living the U.S.

About The Speaker: Dr. Taylor is a research scientist at NASA Langley Research Center. His research focuses on understanding the mysterious life of clouds. Understanding cloud behavior provides valuable information for improving weather and climate models. Dr. Taylor received his PhD from Florida State University in 2009 and has since worked at NASA Langley Research Center receiving that 2012 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) and a NASA Early Career Achievement Medal in 2013 for his research. In 2015, he became a National Academy of Science Kavli Fellow. Dr. Taylor was appointed to the Virginia's Climate Change and Resiliency Commission by Governor McAuliffe, a member of the science working group for the Old Dominion University led Sea Level Rise Initiative, and currently working as a lead author on the Climate Science Special Report commissioned by the NASA, NOAA, and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. At NASA Langley Research Center, Dr. Taylor is a member of the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) science team, leads the climate processes and diagnostics research group, and serves as a member of the Science Directorate 10-year planning committee as co-lead for the Radiation Budget focus area.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 23, 2018

Title: Climate Tidings of the Tides. Seminar 7 of 8 of the Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series
Presenter(s): William Sweet, Oceanographer, Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services,
NOAA's National Ocean Service. Presenting in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: August 23, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, in partnership with NOAA.

Climate Seminar 7 of 8:
Title:  Climate Tidings of the Tides

Speaker: William Sweet, Oceanographer, Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, NOAA's National Ocean Service. Presenting in Silver Spring.

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov


Webinar Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED. 
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. 
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ 
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. 
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Human activities are a significant contributor to the rise in global sea levels, which have risen about 7-8 inches since 1900 with about 3 of those inches occurring since 1993. By 2100, global sea levels are very likely to rise by 1.0"4.3 feet above year 2000 levels depending upon future emissions of greenhouse gases, though emerging science regarding Antarctic ice sheet stability suggests that a rise above 8 feet is physically possible. The amount of relative rise will not be uniform along the U.S. coastlines due to changes in Earth's gravitational field and rotation from melting of land ice, changes in ocean circulation, and vertical land motion. As sea levels have risen, annual flood frequencies of disruptive/minor tidal flooding have been accelerating within Atlantic and Gulf Coast cities over the last couple of decades. With continued rise, it is likely that damaging/moderate coastal flooding will occur several times a year within dozens of U.S. coastal locations within the next several decades. 

About The Speaker: William Sweet is a NOAA oceanographer researching changes in nuisance-to-extreme coastal flood risk due to sea level rise (SLR). He has assessed risks to U.S. coastal military installations worldwide for the military and is an author of the 4th U.S. National Climate Assessment. He lives in Annapolis, MD to witness SLR effects first-hand.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 23, 2018

Title: The Devil (Weed) is in the Details: The Spread and Ecology of an Invasive Seaweed
Presenter(s): Dr. Lindsay Marks, California Sea Grant Fellow for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and former Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar
Date & Time: August 23, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Speaker: Dr. Lindsay Marks, California Sea Grant Fellow for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and former Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9041514304956514562 Abstract: Invasive species are the second-greatest driver of biodiversity loss worldwide, and invasive seaweeds represent a major challenge to ocean health. This talk will share what has been learned about a Japanese seaweed called Devil Weed, which is rapidly spreading rapidly across the reefs of southern California. Topics that will be discussed include: why this seaweed is a successful invader; the ways in which it may affect native species; the role that Marine Protected Areas can play in resisting its spread; and techniques that can be used to control this and other invasive seaweeds. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 28, 2018

Title: The Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment: An Overview of Volume 1. Seminar 8 of 8 of the Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Donald J. Wuebbles, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: August 28, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, n partnership with NOAA.

Climate Seminar 8 of 8:
Title: The Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment: An Overview of Volume 1

Speaker: Donald J. Wuebbles, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois. Presenting remotely.

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED. 
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. 
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ 
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. 
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: New observations and new research have increased our understanding of past, current, and future climate change. The Fourth National Climate Assessment confirms prior assessments in concluding that the climate on our planet, including the United States, is changing, and changing rapidly. Observational evidence for a changing climate abounds, from the top of the atmosphere to the depths of the oceans. Documented changes include surface, atmospheric, and oceanic temperatures; melting glaciers; disappearing snow cover; shrinking sea ice; and rising sea level. Many lines of evidence demonstrate that human activities have been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century. Changes in the characteristics of extreme events are particularly important for human safety, infrastructure, agriculture, water quality and quantity, and natural ecosystems. Some extremes have already become more frequent, intense, or of longer duration, and many extremes are expected to continue to increase or worsen, presenting substantial challenges. Heatwaves have become more frequent in the United States since the 1960s, while extreme cold temperatures and cold waves have become less frequent. Heavy rainfall is increasing in intensity and frequency across the United States and globally. These and other trends in severe weather are expected to continue. The Earth's climate is projected to continue to change over this century and beyond. As a result, global average sea levels are expected to continue to rise. This presentation provides an overview of the findings from the new assessment, with a special focus on severe weather.

About The Speaker: Donald J. Wuebbles is the Harry E. Preble Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Illinois. He is also a Presidential Fellow at the University of Illinois, with the aim of helping the university system develop new initiatives in urban sustainability. From 2015 to early 2017, Dr. Wuebbles was Assistant Director with the Office of Science and Technology Policy at the Executive Office of the President in Washington DC. He was Head of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois for many years, and led the development of the School of Earth, Society, and Environment, and was its first director. Dr. Wuebbles is an expert in atmospheric physics and chemistry, with over 500 scientific publications related to the Earth's climate, air quality, and the stratospheric ozone layer. He has co-authored a number of international and national scientific assessments, including several international climate assessments led by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), for which IPCC was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He was a leader in the 2013 IPCC international assessment and the 2014 Third U.S. National Climate Assessment. More recently, he co-led the Climate Science Special Report, the 475-page first volume of the Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment published in November 2017 that assesses the science of climate change. Dr. Wuebbles has also led special assessments of the impacts of climate change on human society and ecosystems for the U.S. Midwest, the Northeast, and a special assessment for the city of Chicago. Dr. Wuebbles has received several major awards, including the Cleveland Abbe Award from the American Meteorological Society, the Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and is a Fellow of three major professional science societies, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Meteorological Society.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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September 5, 2018

Title: Underwater: Rising Seas, Chronic Floods, and the Implications for US Coastal Real Estate
Presenter(s): Dr. Kristina Dahl, Senior Climate Scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: September 5, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Title: Underwater: Rising Seas, Chronic Floods, and the Implications for US Coastal Real Estate Speaker: Dr. Kristina Dahl, Senior Climate Scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists. Presenting remotely. Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine. Abstract: Sea levels are rising. Tides are inching higher. High-tide floods are becoming more frequent and reaching farther inland. And hundreds of US coastal communities will soon face chronic, disruptive flooding that directly affects people's homes, lives, and properties. Yet property values in most coastal real estate markets do not currently reflect this risk. And most homeowners, communities, and investors are not aware of the financial losses they may soon face. This seminar examines what's at risk for US coastal real estate from sea level rise"and the challenges and choices we face now and in the decades to come. About the Speaker:Dr. Kristina Dahl is a senior climate scientist for the Climate & Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. In her role, she designs, executes, and communicates scientific analyses to make climate change more tangible to the general public, and to policymakers. Her research focuses on the impact of climate change, particularly sea level rise, on people and places. Dr. Dahl holds a PhD from the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program.he second volume on how climate change is affecting regions and sectors across the U.S. Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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September 19, 2018

Title: Approaches for Addressing Missing Temperature Data for Longitudinal Studies
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: September 19, 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Dr. Thomas Grothues, Rutgers University & Jacques Cousteau, National Estuarine Research Reserve System

Sponsor: NOAA's NERRS Science Collaborative. 
For questions contact dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or boumad@umich.edu

Remote Access: Please register through GoToWebinar:
http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar

Abstract: The National Estuarine Research Reserves' System-wide Monitoring Program  (SWMP) data can contribute to research and discussion on climate change. The treatment of temperature data is of particular concern when applied to the analysis of interannual trends. Seasonal cycles can impose fluctuations that greatly exceed diurnal, tidal, or event-scale fluctuations, and seasonally skewed distribution of missing data biases calculations of annual or seasonal means. 


This webinar will provide insights on encoded algorithms for measuring temperature trends, including the conservative approach of replacing missing temperature data with smoothed day-of-the-year averages and seasonal decomposition as well as the benefits and disadvantages of alternative approaches. 


About the Speakers: 
Dr. Tom Grothues has a Research Faculty appointment as a fish ecologist at Rutgers University and begins as Research Coordinator for Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve System in Fall 2019. He has been using SWMP data in peer-reviewed publications about fish habitat use, migration, and recruitment since 2007.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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September 25, 2018

Title: Plastics in the Ocean: Facts, Fiction, and Unknowns
Presenter(s): Anna Robuck, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography
Date & Time: September 25, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote - Online Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Anna Robuck, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries 

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6922965402939033090 

Abstract:  Although plastics are vital in a slew of consumer applications, plastic pollution in the ocean has turned out to be a not-so-fantastic outcome of modern day plastic dependence. This presentation provides an overview of the ocean plastic pollution problem, explaining the difference between marine debris and microplastics. It also will outline the current state of knowledge about microplastic impacts in the ocean and marine food webs, and provide insight into an ongoing research project using seabirds as indicators of plastic pollution in the Northwest Atlantic.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ 
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October 17, 2018

Title: Understanding Ocean Acidification - Using NOAA’s New Educational Tools
Presenter(s): Amy Dean, NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System
Date & Time: October 17, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Speaker: Amy Dean, NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/690023097051840771 Abstract: Data in the Classroom is designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional and global scale. In this presentation, participants will dive deep into Data in the Classroom's Ocean Acidification Module to explore the processes that cause acidification, examine data from across the globe and take a virtual tour of the new web-based curricular modules and data tools. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 14, 2018

Title: A Rare Great Lakes Ecosystem: Exploring the Sinkholes of Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): John Bright, NOAA's Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: November 14, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote - Online Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Speaker: John Bright, Research Coordinator for NOAA's Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4895467060831741186 Abstract: Underwater explorations in Lake Huron have revealed unique hotspots of biogeochemical activity at several submerged groundwater vents in Lake Huron. Learn about the techniques scientists use to explore unique single-celled microorganism communities that dominate this freshwater habitat. Educators will be provided with information and links to lessons that feature this unique Great Lakes research topic. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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