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All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

August 23, 2017

Title: Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium Webinar: HRRR-AK: Status and Future of a High-Resolution Forecast Model for Alaska
Presenter(s): Trevor Alcott, NOAA and Jiang Zhu, GINA/UAF
Date & Time: August 23, 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online or at IARC/Akasofu 407, 930 Koyukuk Drive, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Rescheduled from August 16.

Speakers: Trevor Alcott (NOAA) and Jiang Zhu (GINA/UAF)

Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy. Point of contact is Tina Buxbaum, tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

Remote Access: http://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=7deb5c10b9&e=9097598e1a

Abstract: The High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) Alaska model (HRRR-AK) is a new weather forecast model that uses a specially configured version of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model to predict atmospheric and surface conditions over all of Alaska, at 3-km grid spacing, out to 36 hours. HRRR-AK is cycled every 3 hours at NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL), assimilating many novel and conventional observations to produce a “best” initial atmospheric state, and benefiting from recent improvements to the existing contiguous-US HRRR physics suite. However, Alaska lies at the functional fringe of geostationary satellite coverage and is notorious for a scarcity of conventional surface observations. To address this issue, ESRL has partnered with the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) group at University of Alaska Fairbanks to explore the effective use of polar orbiting satellite data. This talk will cover the current configuration of HRRR-AK, known strengths and weaknesses, and ongoing work at GINA toward assimilating new satellite datasets for improved HRRR-AK forecasts.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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August 24, 2017

Title:
New
Informing Red Drum Stocking Strategies in South Carolina
Presenter(s): Christopher Katalinas, M.S., 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Executive Fellow, NOAA Sea Grant
Date & Time: August 24, 2017
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Christopher Katalinas, M.S., 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Executive Fellow, NOAA OAR, National Sea Grant College Program

Seminar sponsors: NOAA Central Library; Knauss Brown Bag Program. Seminar POCs: Knauss August coordinator:  megan.hall@noaa.gov; Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator/webinar host: judith.salter@noaa.gov

Remote access: Register for the August Knauss webinars here: https://goo.gl/qmSSdP After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP). 

Abstract: The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) began stocking red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, in 1989 to augment the abundance of juveniles available for recreational harvest in SC estuaries. Katalinas et al. (2017) examined the genetic influences of stocking on the adult population offshore the Charleston Harbor estuary from 1999-2011. This study aimed to forecast the genetic influences of stock enhancement on the wild spawning population by validating an individual-based model (IBM) using empirical estimates of genetic diversity. Simulations monitored changes in genetic diversity under several stocking scenarios, which differed in the number of breeders in the hatchery (2, 6, and 10), the contribution of stocked fish to each year-class in the wild (30, 60 and 90%), and the census size of the wild adult population (500, 5,000 and 50,000). The IBM accurately simulated empirical measures of genetic diversity estimated from 1999 to 2011, and can therefore inform responsible strategies for future red drum stocking efforts. Model results indicate that the SCDNR red drum stock enhancement program should maintain mean contributions of stocked fish per year-class no greater than 30% over a 45-year stocking period, coupled with a hatchery effective population size of at least 10 broodstock.

About the Speaker: Christopher Katalinas grew up in Manchester, NH, but migrated out of New England to receive his B.S. in Biology at Dickinson College. Christopher received his M.S. in Marine Biology from the College of Charleston.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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Title:
New
Acoustic and biological trends on coral reefs off Maui, Hawaii
Presenter(s): Max Kaplan, Ph.D, 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Executive Fellow, NOAA Ocean Acidification Program
Date & Time: August 24, 2017
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring,MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Maxwell Kaplan, 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Executive Fellow, NOAA OAR, Ocean Acidification Program

Seminar sponsors: NOAA Central Library; Knauss Brown Bag Program. Seminar POCs: Knauss August coordinator:  megan.hall@noaa.gov; Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator/webinar host: judith.salter@noaa.gov

Remote access: Register for the August Knauss webinars here: https://goo.gl/qmSSdP After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP). 

Abstract: Coral reef soundscapes comprise a range of biological sounds. To investigate how the sounds produced on a given reef relate to the species present, 7 Hawaiian reefs that varied in their species assemblages were equipped with acoustic recorders operating on a 10% duty cycle for 16 months, starting in September 2014. Benthic and fish visual surveys were conducted 4 times over the course of the study. Acoustic analyses were carried out in 2 frequency bands (50-1200 Hz and 1.8-20.5 kHz) that corresponded with the spectral features of the major sound-producing taxa on these reefs, fish and snapping shrimp, respectively. In the low-frequency band, the presence of humpback whales (December-May) was the major driver of sound level, whereas in the high-frequency band sound level closely tracked water temperature. On shorter timescales, the magnitude of the diel trend varied in strength among reefs and related to species assemblages, despite seasonal variability. Thus, long-term acoustic recordings can capture and distill the substantial acoustic variability present in coral reef ecosystems.

About the Speaker: Max Kaplan completed his PhD in biological oceanography in the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Oceanography. Prior to that, Max completed a BSc in Marine Biology at the University of St Andrews in Scotland.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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August 30, 2017

Title: A Look at 2016: Takeaways from the Annual State of the Climate Report
Presenter(s): Jessica Blunden, Ph.D., Climatologist, NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information
Date & Time: August 30, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Sciencew Seminar Series

Speaker: Jessica Blunden, Ph.D., Climatologist, NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: A new State of the Climate report confirmed that 2016 surpassed 2015 as the warmest year in 137 years of recordkeeping. Last year’s record heat resulted from the combined influence of long-term global warming and a strong El Nińo early in the year. Major indicators of climate change continued to reflect trends consistent with a warming planet. Examples of the indicators include various types of greenhouse gases; temperatures throughout the atmosphere, ocean, and land; cloud cover; sea level; ocean salinity; sea ice extent; and snow cover. Several markers such as land and ocean temperatures, sea level and greenhouse gas concentrations broke records set just one year prior. This is the 27th annual issuance of the report, led by NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. The report is based on contributions from more than 450 scientists from more than 60 countries around the world and reflects tens of thousands of measurements from multiple independent datasets. It provides a detailed update on global climate indicators, notable weather events and other data collected by environmental monitoring stations and instruments located on land, water, ice and in space. 

About the Speaker: Jessica Blunden is a climatologist, working in the Center for Weather and Climate at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information in Asheville, North Carolina. She holds Masters and Doctorate degrees in Atmospheric Science from North Carolina State University. For the past seven years, Jessica has served as a lead editor for the State of the Climate report, an annual peer reviewed report published by the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society that examines climate and climate change across the globe, and has previously served as the lead scientific consultant for the Statement on the Status of the Global Climate report published by the United Nation’s World Meteorological Organization. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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August 31, 2017

Title:
New
Will landowner behavior and resilient forests hold back marsh migration in Long Island Sound?
Presenter(s): Chris Field, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, National Socio-environmental Synthesis Center, University of Maryland, presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD. Co-authors include: Ashley Dayer, PhD, Assistant Professor, Global Change Center, Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech, and Chris Elphick, PhD, Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut
Date & Time: August 31, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 or via Webinar - see login info below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Chris Field, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, National Socio-environmental Synthesis Center, University of Maryland, presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.  
Co-authors include: 
Ashley Dayer, PhD, Assistant Professor, Global Change Center, Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech, and 
Chris Elphick, PhD, Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: NOAA’s updated Atlantic hurricane season outlook, to be updated August 9th, will be presented. Climate factors and conditions expected to influence the upcoming peak months (August-October) of the hurricane season will be discussed from both a general and scientific perspective. The updated outlook will also serve to highlight issues related to hurricane preparedness and understanding, both of which are fundamental to help minimize potential hurricane effects and to better make a weather ready nation.

About the Speaker: Gerry Bell is a hurricane climate specialist, a global climate monitoring and analysis specialist, and a research meteorologist at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center (CPC) in College Park, Maryland. Gerry has been at the CPC since 1990.

Dr. Bell's extensive research into the climate factors controlling seasonal hurricane activity contributed to the establishment of NOAA's seasonal Atlantic hurricane outlooks in 1998. Since that time he has been the lead scientist of NOAA's Seasonal Hurricane Outlook Team, and lead author of both the Atlantic and eastern Pacific seasonal hurricane outlooks. Dr. Bell has published numerous scientific papers and given many lectures and webinars on Atlantic hurricane variability and on the climate factors controlling hurricane activity. 

Abstract: The future of tidal marshes globally will be determined in large part by the potential for landward migration, which depends on physical, ecological, and social factors. While we are starting to understand more about the physical factors that will influence the extent of marsh migration, there are still major gaps in our understanding of ecological and social factors. We present the results of two coast-wide surveys from Long Island Sound aimed at filling these knowledge gaps. The ecological survey quantified the extent of recent migration and coastal forest dieback. The social survey quantified the proportion of landowners who are likely to build sea walls or participate in conservation agreements that would allow migration. We also measured beliefs and attitudes that might influence landowners’ stated intentions and found surprising correlations that raise questions about the effectiveness of common conservation strategies, such as raising awareness of the ecosystem services provided by tidal marshes. The results of these surveys highlight significant challenges for encouraging migration in Long Island Sound, including coastal forest that may be persistent in the face of sea-level rise and social challenges to using common strategies for protecting migration corridors.

About the Speaker: Chris Field is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Socio-environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) at the University of Maryland. He conducted his dissertation research at the University of Connecticut, where he studied the effects of sea-level rise on the birds, vegetation, and human communities of tidal marsh ecosystems. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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September 5, 2017

Title:
New
Corals, Canyons, and Conservation: Science Based Fisheries Management Decisions in the Eastern Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Steve MacLean, Protected Species Coordinator, North Pacific Fishery Management Council) and Dr. Chris Rooper, Research Fish Biologist, NOAA, NMFS, AFSC, RACED
Date & Time: September 5, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 or via webinar - see login below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Steve MacLean, Protected Species Coordinator, North Pacific Fishery Management Council and Dr. Chris Rooper, Research Fish Biologist, NOAA, NMFS, AFSC, RACED.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: When making science matter for conservation, marine conservation practitioners, and managers must be prepared to make the appropriate decision based on the results of
the best available science used to inform it. For nearly a decade, many stakeholders
encouraged the North Pacific Fishery Management Council to enact protections for
deep-sea corals in several canyons in the Eastern Bering Sea slope. In 2014, at the
request of the Council, the National Marine Fisheries Service, Alaska Fisheries Science
Center conducted a strip-transect survey along the Eastern Bering Sea slope to validate
the results of a model predicting the occurrence of deep-sea coral habitat. More than
250,000 photos were analyzed to estimate coral, sponge, and sea whip abundance,
distribution, height, and vulnerability to anthropogenic damage. The results of the survey
confirmed that coral habitat and occurrence was concentrated around Pribilof Canyon
and the adjacent slope. The results also confirmed that the densities of corals in the
Eastern Bering Sea were low, even where they occurred. After reviewing the best
available scientific information, the Council concluded that there is no scientific evidence
to suggest that deep-sea corals in the Eastern Bering Sea slope or canyons are at risk
from commercial fisheries under the current management structure, and that special
protections for deep-sea corals were not warranted.

About the Speakers: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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September 6, 2017

Title: Chasing Coral: A Film Documentary
Presenter(s): Jennifer Koss, Director, Coral Reef Conservation Program; Mark Eakin, Lead Scientist, Coral Reef Watch Program and co-Chief Scientific Advisor of Chasing Coral; and Britt Parker, CRCP Senior Climate and International Specialist
Date & Time: September 6, 2017
10:00 am - 12:20 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 1W611 (First floor large conf room); No webinar.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Featuring a Q&A Discussion Panel with:
- Jennifer Koss, Director, Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP)
- Mark Eakin, Lead Scientist,  Coral Reef Watch Program and co-Chief Scientific Advisor of 
  Chasing Coral, and 
- Britt Parker, CRCP Senior Climate and International Specialist

Sponsors: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; One NOAA Science Seminars, NOAA/NOS/OCM Coral Reef Conservation Program, and NOAA/NESDIS Coral Reef Watch Program. Point of contact is Miguel.Figuerola@noaa.gov

Note: No webinar is available for this event.

Abstract: The full environmental and economic value of coral reefs is estimated at $375 billion per year. 93% of the heat trapped in the atmosphere is absorbed by the ocean, with sea surface temperatures rising at an average rate of 0.13°F per decade since 1901. In the 2016 global bleaching event, we lost 29% of the Great Barrier Reef. Chasing Coral is an ocean adventure film. It reveals the story of a team of photographers, scientists and other experts who discover and try to capture one of the world’s largest coral bleaching events. It took 3.5 years to make and features over 500 hours of underwater footage with submissions from over 30 countries. The film is about 90 minutes long and we’ll be watching all the way through to enjoy Frozen’s own Kristen Bell sing the final song and another special surprise. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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Title:
New
EndNote Training for NOAA: with a subject focus on Aquaculture
Presenter(s): Donna Kirking, Clarivate Analytics
Date & Time: September 6, 2017
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: via Webinar and NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Donna Kirking, Product Specialist, EndNote

Duration: approximately 90 minutes, including time for questions

Remote access: Webinar registration link (via Clarivate Analytics): https://thomsonreuters.webex.com/thomsonreuters/k2/j.php?MTID=t63378faf022a224e0bbb6eafc7e14275  

Each attendee logging in will need to register in advance because each person receives a unique link to the class—and only one person can use that link. If people will be meeting as a group in a conference room, only the person logging in needs to register.

You are also welcome to follow along with Librarians in the Brown Bag area of the NOAA Central Library. 

Note: this training will not be archived by the library, but we will post the links to the EndNote recording in our archives. There is a class recording of a similar class at https://youtu.be/qv0TzM38GYM.

NOAA has a site-wide EndNote 8X license provided by the NOAA Central Library. Download EndNote software and product keys for NOAA staff at: https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/nites-endnote/

Endnote Training Guide: http://clarivate.libguides.com/endnote_training 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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September 7, 2017

Title:
New
Are there common, fundamental, emergent properties of all marine ecosystems, and if so are they useful?
Presenter(s): J.S. Link, NOAA Fisheries, Senior Scientist for Ecosystems and Chief Ecologist
Date & Time: September 7, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: J.S. Link, NOAA Fisheries, Senior Scientist for Ecosystems and Chief Ecologist 

Remote access: https://goo.gl/vRjRsq 

Abstract: Whether there are common and emergent patterns from marine ecosystems remains an important question because marine ecosystems provide billions of dollars of ecosystem services to the global community, but face many perturbations with significant consequences. Here, we develop cumulative trophic patterns for marine ecosystems, featuring sigmoidal cumulative biomass (cumB)–trophic level (TL) and ‘hockey-stick’ production (cumP)–cumB curves. The patterns have a trophodynamic theoretical basis and capitalize on emergent, fundamental, and invariant features of marine ecosystems. These patterns have strong global support, being observed in over 120 marine ecosystems. Parameters from these curves elucidate the direction and magnitude of marine ecosystem perturbation or recovery; if biomass and productivity can be monitored effectively over time, such relations may prove to be broadly useful. Curve parameters are proposed as possible ecosystem thresholds, perhaps to better manage the marine ecosystems of the world.

About the Speaker: Dr. Link is the agency’s senior-most authority on ecosystem science, conducting research and coordinating activities of NOAA Fisheries’ science support for effective ecosystem-based management. He is responsible for the creation of approaches and models that support development of ecosystem-based fisheries management plans throughout the agency. A key element of Dr. Link’s work is the development of the tools and approaches that will allow NOAA Fisheries to deal with the impacts of climate change on our marine trust species. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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September 12, 2017

Title: Nutrients and Chlorophyll near Estuarine Shores
Presenter(s): Thomas E. Jordan, Donald E. Weller, and Carey E. Pelc, all from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, Maryland 21037. Presenting in person.
Date & Time: September 12, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

NOS Special Seminar Series: The Mid-Atlantic Shorelines Project

Speakers: Thomas E. Jordan, Donald E. Weller, and Carey E. Pelc, all from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, Maryland 21037. Presenting in person.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Elizabeth.Turner@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.
 
Abstract: Nutrient inputs have degraded estuaries worldwide. We investigated the sources and effects of nutrient inputs by comparing water quality at shallow (<2m deep) nearshore (within 200m) locations in a total of 49 Chesapeake subestuaries and Mid-Atlantic coastal bays with differing local watershed land-use. During July-October, concentrations of total nitrogen (TN), dissolved ammonium, dissolved inorganic N (DIN), and chlorophyll-a were positively correlated with the percentages of cropland and developed land in the local watersheds.  TN, DIN, and nitrate were positively correlated with the ratio of watershed area to subestuary area.  Total phosphorus (TP) and dissolved phosphate increased with cropland but were not affected by developed land.  The relationships among N, P, chlorophyll-a, and land-use suggest N limitation of chlorophyll-a production from July-October.  We compared our measurements inside the subestuaries to measurements by the Chesapeake Bay Program in adjacent estuarine waters outside the subestuaries.  TP and dissolved inorganic P concentrations inside the subestuaries correlated with concentrations outside the subestuaries.  However, water quality inside the sub-estuaries generally differed from that in adjacent estuarine waters.  The concentration of nitrate was lower inside the subestuaries, while the concentrations of other forms of N, TP, and chlorophyll-a were higher. This suggests that shallow nearshore waters inside the subestuaries import nitrate while exporting other forms of N as well as TP and chlorophyll-a.  The importance of local land-use and the distinct biogeochemistry of shallow waters should be considered in managing coastal systems.

Dr. Thomas Jordan is a Senior Scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC). He received a BS in Biology from Bucknell University, Pennsylvania; and a PhD in Biology from Boston University, Massachusetts. His research is on the transport and transformation of the nitrogen and phosphorus in ecosystems.  Human alterations of the global cycles of these essential plant nutrients have led to their overabundance in aquatic ecosystems and detrimental impacts on coastal waters worldwide. Since starting at SERC in 1980, Jordan has studied the sources of nutrient releases from watersheds, the uptake of nutrients by wetlands and riparian forests, and the fates and effects of nutrients in estuaries, especially in Chesapeake Bay and its watershed. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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September 13, 2017

Title:
New
Sea-level rise 'hot spots' along the U.S. Atlantic coast
Presenter(s): Arnoldo Valle-Levinson, Professor, University of Florida, Civil and Coastal Engineering Department
Date & Time: September 13, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Arnoldo Valle-Levinson, Professor, University of Florida, Civil and Coastal Engineering Department

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Sea-level rise (SLR) accelerated in a “hot spot” along the north of Cape Hatteras over the past several decades, including an abrupt rise of ~13 cm in 2009-2010.  This regional acceleration in SLR has been attributed to weakening in Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), although this causal link remains debated. Professor Valle-Levinson will talk about a striking shift in the pattern of SLR along the U.S. Atlantic coast during 2011-2015, whereby SLR decelerated north of Cape Hatteras and accelerated south of the Cape to >20 mm/yr, despite continued decline in AMOC strength. Tide-gauge records, 95-yr long, show that similar SLR intervals have occurred repeatedly over ~1500-km stretches of coastline. Causes for this variability are likely associated with the cumulative effects of ENSO and NAO. The regional expression of SLR hot spots documented here is a key factor in determining coastal vulnerability in the context of continued global mean sea-level rise and should be captured in global climate models of regional sea-level change.?

About the Speaker: Arnoldo Valle-Levinson carried out undergraduate studies at the University of Baja California, in Mexico, and graduate studies on Marine Sciences at Stony Brook University, New York. He is author in 160+ peer-reviewed publications in international journals. His research concentrates in coastal hydrodynamics, specifically in the areas of morphologic effects on estuarine and coastal circulation, and on wind-driven, tidally driven and density-driven circulation. Arnoldo has been Visiting Researcher at several institutions in the Netherlands, Spain, Australia, Mexico, Chile, Japan, and France.  He is one of the 100 worldwide Corresponding Members of the Mexican Academy of Sciences.  He is Associate Editor of Continental Shelf Research, Estuaries and Coasts, and Oceanography.?

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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September 14, 2017

Title: Simulating the Impacts of Nutrient Reductions on Hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico: Implications for Nutrient Management
Presenter(s): Katja Fennel, PhD., Professor, Dep't of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada, presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD. Co-author: Dr. Arnaud Laurent, Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Halifax
Date & Time: September 14, 2017
9:00 am - 10:00 am ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

NOTE: This seminar is on Sept 14, 9-10am EDT (moved from 9/14, 12-1pm EDT).

Speaker: Katja Fennel, PhD., Professor, Dep't of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada, presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD. 
Co-author: Dr. Arnaud Laurent, Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. 

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Alan.Lewitus@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.
 
Abstract: A large hypoxic area (15,000 km2 on average) forms every summer over the continental shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Hypoxia results from decay of organic matter that is primarily derived from nutrient inputs from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River System. Efforts are underway to reduce the extent of hypoxic conditions through nutrient management in the watershed; for example, the interagency Hypoxia Task Force is developing Action Plans with input from various stakeholders that set out targets for hypoxia reduction. Open questions are how far nutrient loads would have to be decreased in order to produce the desired reductions in hypoxia, and when these would be measurable given significant natural variability. We have simulated a large number of multi-year nutrient load reduction scenarios with a regional biogeochemical model for the region. The model is based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), explicitly includes nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) species as inorganic nutrients, and has been shown to realistically reproduce the key processes responsible for hypoxia generation. We have quantified the effects of differential reductions in river N and P loads on hypoxic extent. An assessment of the effects of N versus P reductions is important because, thus far, nutrient management efforts have focused on N, yet P is known to limit primary production in spring and early summer. Our results strongly indicate that N is the ‘ultimate’ limiting nutrient to primary production determining the areal extent and duration of hypoxic conditions in a cumulative sense, while P is temporarily limiting in spring. Although reductions in river P load would decrease hypoxic extent in early summer, they would have a much smaller effect than N reductions on the cumulative extent and duration of hypoxic conditions. Combined reductions of N and P have the greatest effect.

About the Speaker: Dr. Katja Fennel is Professor in the Department of Oceanography at Dalhousie University. As head of the Marine Environmental Modeling Group (http://memg.ocean.dal.ca) she leads the development of marine ecosystem and biogeochemical models at Dalhousie. For over two decades, Dr. Fennel has developed and applied numerical models of marine ecosystems and biogeochemistry with particular focus on continental shelf systems and the cycling of nitrogen, carbon and oxygen. In addition to implementing biogeochemical models, Dr. Fennel has developed and applied methods for the assimilation of observations into these models in order to improve their predictive capabilities. She serves as co-editor-in-chief of the high-impact journal Biogeosciences, and has served on the editorial boards of three other scientific journals and on several international science advisory bodies including the IMBER/LOICZ Continental Margins Task Team and the CLIVAR Working Group on Ocean Model Development. Currently she is science team member of GODAE OceanView, co-chairs the GODAE Marine Ecosystem Analysis and Prediction Task Team, and serves on the international science advisory board of the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service in Europe, the Scientific Committee of the Ocean Frontier Institute at Dalhousie, and the international Biogeochemical Argo Steering Committee.

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Title: Satellite tracking sharks and fishing vessels to assess a remote MPA
Presenter(s): Tim White, Stanford University
Date & Time: September 14, 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker:  Tim White of Stanford University

Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2334009580381970945

Sponsors: This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org).

Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:  Large marine protected areas (MPAs) have recently been established throughout the world at an unprecedented pace, yet the value of these reserves for mobile species conservation remains uncertain. This webinar will describe how recent advances in satellite technology and big data analytics have improved our ability to observe and understand the benefits of large MPAs. As a primary case study, the webinar will outline recent efforts to track fishing vessels and reef sharks within the Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, a U.S.-administered protected area in the central Pacific Ocean. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov  with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.  See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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September 20, 2017

Title: How Does the Early 21st Century Drought in the U.S. Compare to the Drought Episodes of the 1930s and 1950s?
Presenter(s): Richard R. Heim Jr., Meteorologist, NOAA/NESDIS/National Centers for Environmental Information - NCEI. Presenting remotely from Asheville, NC
Date & Time: September 20, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Richard R. Heim Jr., Meteorologist, NOAA/NESDIS/National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Presenting remotely from Asheville, NC.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar, coordinated by Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: The United States experienced a severe drought which peaked in 2012 and which was characterized by near-record extent, record warmth, and record dryness in several areas. For some regions, the 2012 drought was a continuation of drought which began in earlier years and which continued through 2014. The 1998-2014 drought episode is compared to the two other major drought episodes of the 20th century in terms of duration, areal extent, intensity, and spatial pattern using operational datasets produced by the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. It is characterized by more short-term dryness, more concurrent (regional) wetness, and warmer temperatures than the other two drought episodes. The implications of these differences for water resource managers and decision-makers are discussed.

About the Speaker: Richard R. Heim Jr. earned a bachelors degree in Mathematics (with 5 minors) and a masters in meteorology/climatology from the Geography Department at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. During his 35 years with NOAA, Mr. Heim managed the 1961-1990 U.S. and Global Climate Normals project, the Snow Climatology Project, and the first two years of the U.S. Climate Reference Network. He has been involved in drought monitoring and drought research at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Research since 1988, is an author of the U.S. Drought Monitor and North American Drought Monitor, and is collaborating with colleagues in the U.S. and internationally on the creation of the Global Drought Information System.

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September 22, 2017

Title: Alaska Region Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Richard Thoman,Climate Science and Services Manager, NWS Alaska Region
Date & Time: September 22, 2017
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: 407 Akasofu Building, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Richard Thoman, Climate Science and Services Manager, NWS Alaska Region

Seminar Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, 
Point of Contact: accap@uaf.edu

Remote Access: Register at 
https://accap.uaf.edu/NWS_Briefings

Abstract: This webinar will review recent conditions and current state of the climate system in and near Alaska and the status of important global climate drivers, review guidance available for the monthly and seasonal scale outlooks and finish up with the official outlooks by NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.  Rick will also present a "Feature-of-the-Month" special addition in which each month he will highlight a topic relevant to the particular month.

Recordings from past Briefings available here: http://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=6b7287a9eb&e=9097598e1a

About the Speaker: Richard Thoman works as the Climate Science and Services Manager, for NWS Alaska Region Headquarters. He works closely with NOAA line offices and partners throughout Alaska providing information on climate monitoring, analysis and forecasting at the two week to one year time frame

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September 27, 2017

Title: Observation system experiments with the hourly-updating Rapid Refresh model using GSI hybrid ensemble/variational data assimilation
Presenter(s): Eric James, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory
Date & Time: September 27, 2017
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: David Skaggs Research Center (DSRC), Boulder, CO Room 3C404/405.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Eric James (Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory), eric.james@noaa.gov

Sponsor: Assimilation Development Branch of the Global Systems Division. POC: eric.james@noaa.gov

Remote Access: TBD

Abstract: A set of observation system experiments (OSEs) over 3 seasons using the hourly-updated Rapid Refresh (RAP) numerical weather prediction (NWP) assimilation/forecast system identifies the importance of the various components of the North American observing system for 3-12h RAP forecasts.  Aircraft observations emerge as the strongest-impact observation type for wind, relative humidity (RH), and temperature forecasts, permitting a 15-30% reduction in 6h forecast error in the troposphere and lower stratosphere.  Major positive impacts are also seen from rawinsondes, GOES satellite cloud observations, and surface observations, with lesser but still significant impacts from GPS-PW observations, satellite atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs), radar reflectivity observations, and satellite radiance data.  A separate experiment revealed that the aircraft-related RH forecast improvement was augmented by 50% due specifically to the addition of aircraft moisture observations.  Additionally, observations from enroute aircraft and those from ascending or descending aircraft contribute approximately equally to overall forecast skill, with the strongest impacts in the respective layers of the observations.  Initial results from these OSEs supported implementation of an improved assimilation configuration of boundary-layer pseudo-innovations from surface observations, as well as allowing the assimilation of satellite AMVs over land.  The breadth of these experiments over the 3 seasons suggests that observation impact results are applicable to general forecasting skill, not just classes of phenomena in limited time periods.  

Bio: Eric James is a Professional Research Associate with the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado.  Based within the Assimilation Development Branch of the Global Systems Division in the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, his research interests include mesoscale data assimilation for numerical weather prediction (NWP), applications of NWP for renewable energy, and the use of high-resolution NWP for hydrologic forecasting.  A core member of the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) development team, Eric supports research and development for NWP data assimilation for operational U.S. weather forecasting.  He holds a B.S. in Geography and Meteorology from the University of Utah, and an M.S. degree in Atmospheric Science from Colorado State University. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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September 28, 2017

Title:
New
Multidecadal Variability and Climate Shift in the North Atlantic Ocean
Presenter(s): James Reagan, Oceanographer, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland and NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information - NCEI
Date & Time: September 28, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: James Reagan, Oceanographer, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland and NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Alan.Lewitus@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.
 
Abstract: The North Atlantic Ocean is home to diverse marine ecosystems, resources, and plays an integral role in the global thermohaline circulation.  It has been well documented that ocean heat content (OHC) has been rising globally over the past ~50 years; however, much less is understood with respect to regional OHC changes.  For this study we focus on documenting and investigating regional OHC changes in the North Atlantic Ocean by utilizing the World Ocean Atlas 2013 version 2 (WOA13v2) decadal climatologies.  The WOA13v2 contains six decadal climatologies of temperature and salinity dating back to 1955.  It provides horizontal resolutions of up to Ľ-degree and on 102 standard depth levels from 0 to 5500m.  We find, by comparing two 30-year climates from 1955-2012, that OHC changes in the North Atlantic are highly inhomogeneous with the largest increases in OHC occurring to the southeast of the Gulf Stream Extension.  Additionally, we find that the multidecadal shift in temperature in the Gulf Stream region occurred primarily at the subsurface between 300 and 500m depths.  This presentation will discuss the aforementioned results in more detail as well as a possible connection between North Atlantic OHC changes and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation.

About the Speaker: TBD

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Title: Overview of Society for Ecological Restoration (SER's) New Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner Program
Presenter(s): Jen Lyndall, Society for Ecological Restoration
Date & Time: September 28, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Jen Lyndall, Society for Ecological Restoration (SER)

Seminar Sponsors: NOAA and USFWS; NOAA Points of Contact are NOAA's Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov, and US Fish and Wildlife Service's Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Seminar Registration: https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e3y9wv1gvm1o/event/registration.html
Invitations to register for the webinar will be emailed a week or two prior to the event. For the best viewing experience, please use Internet Explorer. 

Abstract: Jen Lyndall will discuss SER’s new ecological restoration practitioner certification programs developed to create a high professional standard for ecological restoration.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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October 5, 2017

Title: Product circularity and the hidden economic opportunities of discarded fishing nets and ropes
Presenter(s): Martin Charter, Director of The Centre for Sustainable Design of the University for the Creative Arts
Date & Time: October 5, 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Martin Charter, Director of The Centre for Sustainable Design of the University for the Creative Arts

Register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8478172917184475907

Sponsors: This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org).

Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract: Circular economies aim to minimize resource inputs, emissions, and energy leakage by designing long-lasting products; maintaining, repairing, and reusing them; and recycling them at the end of their useful life. This is in contrast to traditional linear economies utilizing 'take, make, dispose' models of production. The talk will provide guidance on how organizations can implement circular economy principles related to products, processes, and business models. It will also introduce the Circular Ocean project which pursues innovative and sustainable solutions for marine plastic waste arising from waste fishing nets and ropes (FNRs). Issues related to waste FNRs, existing products that utilize FNRs, and potential new business models for waste FNRs will be presented. Read more about the Circular Ocean project at http://www.circularocean.eu. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov  with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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October 10, 2017

Title:
New
What caused the most toxic algal bloom ever recorded in Monterey Bay, California?
Presenter(s): MBARI). Presenting from California
Date & Time: October 10, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 or via Webinar - see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: John Ryan, Biological Oceanographer and Senior Research Specialist, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). Presenting from California.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: An ecologically and economically disruptive harmful algal bloom (HAB) affected much of the northeast Pacific margin in 2015, during a prolonged oceanic warm anomaly. Caused by diatoms of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia, this HAB produced the highest particulate concentrations of the biotoxin domoic acid (DA) ever recorded in Monterey Bay, California. Bloom inception followed strong spring upwelling, which introduced nutrients and eliminated the warm anomaly locally. Subsequently, moderate and intermittent upwelling created favorable conditions for growth and accumulation of HAB biomass, which was dominated by a highly toxigenic species, P. australis. High cellular DA concentrations were associated with available nitrogen for DA synthesis coincident with silicate exhaustion, a condition known to increase toxicity. Disproportionate depletion of silicate in upwelling source waters during the warm anomaly, the most severe depletion observed in a quarter century, was a key factor in HAB causality.

About the Speaker: John Ryan received the BS degree in biology in 1988 from the University of Massachusetts, and the MS and PhD degrees in biological oceanography in 1993 and 1998 from the University of Rhode Island. He began a postdoctoral fellowship in fall 1998 at Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) where he is now Senior Research Specialist.  John was awarded an Office of Naval Research fellowship in support of his MS and a NASA New Investigator grant in support of his postdoctoral research.  His research explores oceanographic processes driving variations in marine life, from microscopic algae to whales.  Working with engineers at MBARI, John contributes to augmenting capabilities of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) so that they can recognize and respond to unpredictable encounters with dynamic features, such as phytoplankton blooms.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

(John Ryan, Biological Oceanographer and Senior Research Specialist, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute 
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October 12, 2017

Title: Restoring an Urban River: The Acushnet Sawmill Ecological Restoration Project.
Presenter(s): Sara Quintal, Buzzards Bay Coalition
Date & Time: October 12, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Sara Quintal, Buzzards Bay Coalition

Seminar Sponsors: NOAA and USFWS; NOAA Points of Contact are NOAA's Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov, and US Fish and Wildlife Service's Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Seminar Registration: https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e3y9wv1gvm1o/event/registration.html
Invitations to register for the webinar will be emailed a week or two prior to the event. For the best viewing experience, please use Internet Explorer. 

Abstract: Sara Quintal (Buzzards Bay Coalition) will discuss the restoration of a 19-acre former industrial property. This extensive project includes dam and impervious surface removal, and the creation of swamp and freshwater marsh.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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October 17, 2017

Title:
New
Know Before You Go: Rip Current Science, Forecasting and Communication at NOAA
Presenter(s): Greg Dusek, Chief Scientist, NOAA/NOS/CO-OPS - Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services - Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: October 17, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Greg Dusek, Chief Scientist, NOAA/NOS/CO-OPS - Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services - Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract and About the Speaker: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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October 18, 2017

Title: Synthesis​ ​of​ ​public​ ​water​ ​supply​ ​use​ ​in​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States: Spatio-temporal patterns and socio-economic controls
Presenter(s): Sankar Arumugam, Ph.D., Professor and University Faculty Scholar, Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
Date & Time: October 18, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Sankar Arumugam, Ph.D., Professor and University Faculty Scholar, Dept. of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. 
 
Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Recent U.S. Geological Survey water-use report suggests that increasing water-use efficiency could mitigate the supply-and-demand imbalance arising from changing climate and growing population. However, this rich data have neither analyzed to understand the underlying patterns, nor have been investigated to identify the factors contributing to this increased efficiency. A national-scale synthesis of public supply withdrawals (“withdrawals”) reveals a strong North–south gradient in public supply water use with the increasing population in the South contributing to increased withdrawal. Contrastingly, a reverse South–north gradient exists in per capita withdrawals (“efficiency”), with northern states consistently improving the efficiency, while the southern states' efficiency declined. Our analyses of spatial patterns of per capita withdrawals further demonstrate that urban counties exhibit improved efficiency over rural counties. Improved efficiency is also demonstrated over high-income and well-educated counties. Given the potential implications of the findings in developing long-term water conservation measures (i.e., increasing block rates), we argue the need for frequent updates, perhaps monthly to annual, of water-use data for identifying effective strategies that control the water-use efficiency in various geographic settings under a changing climate.

About the Speaker: Dr. Sankar Arumugam is a  Professor in the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering at NCSU. He is also a University Faculty Scholar (2013-2018). He is primarily associated with the Environmental, Water Resources, and Coastal Engineering and Computing and Systems groups within the department.
Dr. Arumugam currently teaches CE 383 – Hydrology and Urban Water Systems, CE 586 – Engineering Hydrology, CE 777 – Stochastic Methods in Water and Environmental Engineering and CE 786 – Hydroclimatology.

Dr. Arumugam currently serves as the associate editor for the Journal of Hydrology (Elsevier) and for the Journal of Hydrometeorology (AMS). He also served as the associate editor for  Water Resources Research (AGU), Journal of Hydrologic Engineering (ASCE) and as the editor of Journal of Water and Climate Change (IWA). Dr. Arumugam is also a member of American Geophysical Union, American Meteorological Society and Environmental Water Research Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers.
He earned his B.S. in agricultural engineering in 1991, his M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering in 1996, and his Ph.D. in Water Resources Engineering in 2001.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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November 30, 2017

Title: Restoration of Shad and Anadromous Fish to the White Clay Creek National Wild and Scenic River in Delaware
Presenter(s): Gerald Kauffman, University of Delaware, Water Resources Center
Date & Time: November 30, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Gerald Kauffman, University of Delaware, Water Resources Center

Seminar Sponsors: NOAA and USFWS; NOAA Points of Contact are NOAA's Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov, and US Fish and Wildlife Service's Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Seminar Registration: https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e3y9wv1gvm1o/event/registration.html
Invitations to register for the webinar will be emailed a week or two prior to the event. For the best viewing experience, please use Internet Explorer. 

Abstract: Gerald Kauffman will discuss the first dam removal project for fish passage in the entire state of Delaware. This project is the first of seven planned removals to ultimately reopen 14 miles of the creek to fish passage.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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December 7, 2017

Title: Arkansas River Instream Habitat Restoration Project: How Can Monitoring be Used to Inform Adaptive Management?
Presenter(s): Eric Richer, Colorado Parks and Wildlife
Date & Time: December 7, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Eric Richer, Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Seminar Sponsors: NOAA and USFWS; NOAA Points of Contact are NOAA's Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov, and US Fish and Wildlife Service's Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Seminar Registration: https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e3y9wv1gvm1o/event/registration.html
Invitations to register for the webinar will be emailed a week or two prior to the event. For the best viewing experience, please use Internet Explorer. 

Abstract: Eric Richer will provide an overview of the project design, goals, and long-term monitoring of the Upper Arkansas River in-stream restoration to rehabilitate and enhance aquatic habitat for a five mile reach with the primary goals of increasing trout population density and to improve age and size class structure.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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January 25, 2018

Title: Decision Support Tools and a Framework for Climate-smart Restoration
Presenter(s): Isaiah Thalmayer and Thomas Gardali, both with Point Blue Conservation Science
Date & Time: January 25, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Isaiah Thalmayer and Thomas Gardali, both with Point Blue Conservation Science

Seminar Sponsors: NOAA and USFWS; NOAA Points of Contact are NOAA's Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov, and US Fish and Wildlife Service's Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Seminar Registration: https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e3y9wv1gvm1o/event/registration.html
Invitations to register for the webinar will be emailed a week or two prior to the event. For the best viewing experience, please use Internet Explorer. 

Abstract: This month will feature two presentations by Isaiah Thalmayer and Thomas Gardali: Isaiah will discuss a web-based decision support tool designed to help select plants for restoration projects and Thomas will present a framework designed to guide incorporation of the impacts of climate change in restoration plans.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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Developer - Lori K. Brown


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