All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

June 20, 2018

Title:
New
Quality Management and Continuous Improvement Principles for Fisheries Dependent Data
Presenter(s): Vivian Matter, NMFS/SEFSC/SFD)
Date & Time: June 20, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter: Vivian Matter, Recreational Fisheries Data Analyst, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Central Library. POC: Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Remote access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6310010761828527618 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: The inherently regional nature of fisheries science and management makes standardized processes difficult to develop and implement. As new technologies come online, and new needs driven by changing conditions in our ocean ecosystems emerge, data programs need to try and keep one step ahead. That's the role of the Fisheries Information System Program Quality Management and Continuous Improvement Professional Specialty Group. In this presentation we'll share tools, techniques, and processes for ensuring high-quality products and services, as well as the systems necessary to implement them.

About The Speaker: Vivian Matter works in the Fisheries Statistics Division of the Southeast Fisheries Science Center. She integrates recreational data from various surveys and data collection programs used for assessments and management in the Southeast region. She has been a member of the FIS Quality Management and Continuous Improvement Professional Specialty Group since 2015.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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June 20, 2018

Title: A Basis for K. brevis Harmful Algal Bloom Prediction and a West Florida Shelf Outlook for 2018
Presenter(s): Robert Weisberg, Professor, University of South Florida, College of Marine Science. Presenting remotely.)
Date & Time: June 20, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Robert Weisberg, Professor, University of South Florida, College of Marine Science. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Quay.Dortch@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the Webex application while logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: Given that the West Florida Shelf (WFS) is generally described as oligotrophic, how is it possible that the WFS supports abundant living marine resources and experiences major blooms of the harmful alga, Karenia brevis? A possible explanation is that the WFS is not always oligotrophic. Interactions by the Gulf of Mexico Loop Current with the shelf slope (under certain conditions) can reset the WFS nutrient structure in ways that may obviate bloom development.  Analyses are presented using 25 years of coincident K. brevis cell count and satellite altimetry data to developing a predictive capability for major K. brevis bloom occurrence. The scheme evinces success in 19 out of 24 years, and it suggests that the present, 2018 year will be one of major bloom occurrence. In essence, the organism biology and the ocean circulation physics are equally important in determining bloom occurrence and anything of an ecological nature on the WFS. 

About The Speaker: Dr. Weisberg is a physical oceanographer engaged in ocean circulation and ocean-atmosphere interaction studies in the tropics, on continental shelves, and in estuaries. His research presently emphasizes the West Florida Continental Shelf (WFS) and the interactions that occur between the shelf and the deep ocean and between the shelf and the estuaries. He maintains a coordinated program of real-time, in-situ measurements, analyses, and numerical circulation models aimed at describing and understanding the processes that determine WFS water properties. Applications include harmful algal blooms, fisheries, hurricane storm surge, waves, tracking of oil and other spilled substances and other topics of societal concern.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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June 20, 2018

Title: Volcanic Cloud Monitoring in the North Pacific: The Dawning of the GOES-R Era
Presenter(s): Michael J. Pavolonis, NOAA/NESDIS; NOAA Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies; University of Wisconsin - Madison)
Date & Time: June 20, 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Michael J. Pavolonis (NOAA/NESDIS; NOAA Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies; University of Wisconsin - Madison)

Seminar sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy (a NOAA RISA team)


Remote access: https://accap.uaf.edu/VAWS_June2018

Abstract: Volcanic clouds, which are a major aviation hazard, are complex and the background environment in which they reside is often complicated as well. Much of the complexity is due to the multi-composition nature of volcanic clouds, which frequently consist of some combination of volcanic ash, volcanic gases, and hydrometeors. Thus, volcanic cloud remote sensing is very challenging. “Next generation” geostationary meteorological satellites, such as GOES-17, have many more spectral channels, improved spatial resolution, and provide far more frequent images compared to heritage geostationary satellites. The more advanced spectral, spatial, and temporal capabilities of next generation geostationary satellites allow for much improved qualitative and quantitative volcanic cloud remote sensing. The additional spectral channels help to distinguish between volcanic ash and other features and improve the accuracy of ash cloud property retrievals. Spectral channels that are sensitive to volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2) are also available. The improvement in spatial resolution and the dramatic increase in image frequency results in earlier detection of volcanic emissions and for more robust long term tracking of volcanic clouds. While no single satellite sensor is ideal for detecting and characterizing all volcanic clouds at all times, it will be shown that improved spectral, spatial, and temporal attributes of next generation satellites have a significant positive impact on volcanic cloud identification, tracking, and characterization. The full potential of the next generation geostationary satellites, however, will only be realized if automation is used to supplement manual interrogation of imagery, as daily data volumes are about 100 times greater than the previous generation of satellites.

In an effort to fully utilize next generation geostationary measurements for real-time volcanic cloud applications, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin, has developed the Volcanic Cloud Analysis Toolkit (VOLCAT). VOLCAT utilizes many different satellite sensors generate alerts when volcanic unrest or an eruption is detected. VOLCAT also automatically tracks and characterizes volcanic clouds. Through advanced use of spectral, spatial, and temporal information, the VOLCAT algorithms are capable of automatically detecting a broad range of volcanic clouds, including opaque multi-component (ash, ice, and SO2) clouds. Several examples are used to illustrate the value of VOLCAT and next generation satellites, with an emphasis on volcanic activity in the North Pacific.

Seminar POC for questions: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu)

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June 21, 2018

Title: How do fishermen understand the ecosystem? Local Ecological Knowledge in Maine’s Commercial Fisheries
Presenter(s): Emily Farr, NOAA/NMFS/OHC/HPD)
Date & Time: June 21, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter: Emily Farr, NOAA/NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation 

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part of the monthly Knauss Fellows Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Remote access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Through regular interaction with the environment, fishermen generate “local ecological knowledge” that is often fine-scale in nature, and is sensitive to the interrelationships between ecosystem components. As regulatory measures in fisheries management increasingly constrain the ability of individuals to enter diverse fisheries, the diversity and scope of that ecological knowledge is also constrained. Through interviews with commercial fishermen in eastern Maine, we use a network approach to analyze cognitive maps of the ecosystem structure and dynamics described by fishermen to understand how institutions shape knowledge, with implications for the capacity of fishermen to engage in ecosystem-based fisheries management.

About The Speaker: Emily Farr is a Knauss Fellow in the NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation. She holds a Master of Environmental Management from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, and a Master's in Food Studies from the University of Gastronomic Sciences. This talk will focus on research she conducted as a Research Fellow with Maine Center for Coastal Fisheries.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3663868&CustomerID=321 If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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June 21, 2018

Title: Floodplain Reconnection on Butano Creek – Design, Implementation and Preliminary Post-Project Results
Presenter(s): Chris Hammersmark, registered civil engineer, hydrologist, CBEC, Inc, Eco Engineering)
Date & Time: June 21, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar - Register in advance with Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Speaker: Chris Hammersmark, registered civil engineer, hydrologist, CBEC, Inc, Eco Engineering Sponsors: FWS and NOAA Restoration Webinar Series, hosts are Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov and Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov Webinar Access: Register in advance with Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov Abstract: Chris Hammersmark will present the design, implementation and initial post-project results of a floodplain reconnection project undertaken on Butano Creek, a flashy coastal stream along the Central Coast of California. About the Speaker: Chris Hammersmark - Chris is a registered civil engineer (CA P.E. C66595) specializing in hydraulics, hydrology, geomorphology, water quality, ecology, and ecosystem rehabilitation/restoration. He has over 18 years of experience on a diverse array of projects including river and floodplain restoration, sediment and water quality studies, flood inundation and water supply investigations. The environmental settings for these projects range from natural to urban, from coastal estuaries through lowland alluvial rivers to headwater streams and adjacent meadows and forests. Dr. Hammersmark's technical experience includes numerical hydraulic and hydrologic modeling (e.g., HEC, USGS, USBR and DHI models), habitat suitability modeling, terrain modeling, GIS and a variety of types of field investigations including sediment characterization and sediment transport measurements, water quality sampling, flow gauging, groundwater sampling, water table measurement habitat characterization and mapping, vegetation sampling, topographic and bathymetric surveys, soil infiltration and compaction monitoring. Dr. Hammersmark's dissertation research involved developing an integrated surface water-groundwater model to establish a water budget for a wetland system, providing spatial and temporal estimates of storage and flux though the integrated surface-subsurface system. Drawing from his diverse academic and consulting background, Dr. Hammersmark seeks innovative and sustainable process-based solutions to complex multi-objective water resource and ecosystem restoration challenges, while operating within the specific constraints of each project. He is committed to the conservation, preservation and rehabilitation of aquatic, wetland and terrestrial ecosystems. If you are interested in receiving continuing education credits under SER's Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner Program, contact Jen Lyndall at certification@ser.org. To receive an e-mail notification when registration opens, send your e-mail address to jennifer_ryan@fws.gov. To access the Restoration Webinar Series recording archive, visit https://nctc.fws.gov/topic/online-training/webinars/restoration.html Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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June 22, 2018

Title: June 2018 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service Alaska)
Date & Time: June 22, 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC 407
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service Alaska Region: POC: Tina Buxbaum (ACCAP) tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu and richard.thoman@noaa.gov

Speaking: Rick Thoman, NOAA's National Weather Service

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/June_2018

Abstract:The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for July and the remaining summer season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ 

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June 25, 2018

Title:
New
Satellite-derived ocean color fields in NCEP operational models
Presenter(s): Avichal Mehra and Vladimir Krasnopolsky, NOAA/NWS/NCEP/EMC)
Date & Time: June 25, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room S561 Greentech IV Building 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Avichal Mehra and Vladimir Krasnopolsky
NOAA/NWS/NCEP/EMC

Host: JPSS PROVING GROUND SEMINAR April Science Seminar. POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov


877-401-9225
53339716

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mb89a5eaa26a87ad12e2796600b436cc6
Meeting number: 745 410 707
Host key: 974055
Meeting password: Jpss2018!

Abstract
Satellite remote-sensing of ocean color (OC) parameters provides the only means for broadly observing the biological component of the world's oceans. Consequently, this capability must be exploited for analyzing and predicting ocean bio-physical processes, as well as for establishing a linkage to ocean ecological forecasts. NWS/NCEP/EMC has been exploring operational integration/assimilation of Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) ocean color fields (chlorophyll, KdPAR) into NOAA's operational ocean and coupled models at multiple temporal and spatial scales.
This presentation will discuss the following primary objectives outlined as: (a) to investigate improvements in ocean and coupled model states as a result of more representative prescribed ocean color fields; (b) to quantify impact of latency of ocean color fields in ocean modeled states; and (c) to embed neural network (NN) model in coupled models to improve seasonal predictions. NN approach will be briefly presented and its application to developing NN empirical OC model will be introduced.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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June 25, 2018

Title:
New
Hot & Dry Summer: Drought and Fire Outlook for the Pacific Northwest
Presenter(s): Speakers: John Abatzoglou, University of Idaho, CIRC - Climate Impacts Research Consortium - a NOAA RISA; Andrea Bair, NWS Western Region; Bart Nijssen, University of Washington; Ed Delgado, NIFC - National Interagency Fire Center Predictive Services )
Date & Time: June 25, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: John Abatzoglou, University of Idaho, CIRC - Climate Impacts Research Consortium (a NOAA RISA); Andrea Bair, NWS Western Region; Bart Nijssen, University of Washington; Ed Delgado, National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) Predictive Services

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)

Seminar POC for questions: britt.parker@noaa.gov

Remote access: Register for the webinar at https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/pacific-northwest-drought-climate-outlook-webinar-june-25-2018 

The Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (PNW DEWS) June 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Niño and La Niña). This webinar takes place at 2 pm ET/11 am PT on Monday, June 25, 2018.

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Climate Recap & Current Conditions
John Abatzoglou | University of Idaho/CIRC - Climate Impacts Research Consortium (a NOAA RISA)

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Andrea Bair | NWS Western Region 

Hydrological Data and Tools on NW Climate Toolkit
Bart Nijssen | University of Washington

Fire Conditions, Impacts & Outlook
Ed Delgado |  National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) Predictive Services

About the Speakers:

John Abatzoglou is the creator of the Multivariate Adaptive Constructed Analogs (MACA), a tool that translates large scale global climate data into small scale visualizations of local climate impacts. A researcher at the University of Idaho, John has written multiple papers on both observed and projected climate changes in the Northwest. His work has been essential to several CIRC (a NOAA RISA) projects, including the Northwest Climate Toolbox and Integrated Scenarios and PUMA. John is currently building several Climate Tools for CIRC as well as the CIRC-related tool Climate Engine. 

Andrea Bair
is the Climate Services Program Manager for the Western Region of the National Weather Service. Andrea serves as a liaison between the 27 western NWS field offices and NWS Headquarters, as well as with other NOAA line offices. She also coordinates regional scale climate services between the NWS in the west and key NOAA partners within the climate community. Andrea has been with the NWS for 23 years.

Bart Nijssen is a hydrologist and leading member of the University Washington's surface hydrology group. A large-scale hydrologic modeler, Bart has been instrumental in the development and running of the UW Northwest Drought Monitor, Integrated Scenarios, and in the PUMA project. His work has helped inform drought information systems, including the US Drought Monitor, in both for the western US and globally. He has worked for the University of Washington, the University of Arizona and for 3TIER, a private environmental prediction firm based in Seattle.

Ed Delgado is the National Program Manager for Predictive Services, located at the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) in Boise, Idaho. Predictive Services is a decision support unit that provides weather and fuels assessments and forecasts for the wildland fire managers across the country. Ed has been with Predictive Services for 17 years and has held his current position since 2011. Prior to Predictive Services, Ed worked for the National Weather Service for 15 years with tours at Fort Worth, Denver, Raleigh, and Greer - the last two tours as a senior forecaster. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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June 25, 2018

Title:
New
Southwest Drought Status & Monsoon Prediction
Presenter(s): Becky Bolinger, Colorado Assistant State Climatologist; Brian Klimowski, Meteorologist-in-Charge,  Flagstaff Weather Forecast Office)
Date & Time: June 25, 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers:  Becky Bolinger, Colorado Assistant State Climatologist; Brian Klimowski, Meteorologist-in-Charge at Flagstaff Weather Forecast Office

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with the National Weather Service and the National Drought Mitigation Center 

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov 

Remote access: Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1160162180057784579

Abstract: 

Due to the severity of drought conditions in the Southwest, a collaboration of experts are providing up-to-date information on drought in the region, including portions of Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. Recent scorching temperatures have contributed to worsening of drought conditions across the region. Join this webinar to learn about drought conditions and impacts, as well as monsoon predictions for the Southwest.

About the Speakers:  

Becky Bolinger is the Assistant State Climatologist for Colorado. She received her B.S. in meteorology from Metro State University of Denver, M.S. in meteorology from Florida State University, and her Ph.D. in atmospheric science from Colorado State University. She is now the Assistant State Climatologist at the Colorado Climate Center (within CSU's department of Atmospheric Science). Her research interests are focused on Colorado's climate variability, climate extremes, and drought. She spends her spare time with her husband and daughter, hiking, cycling, running, and enjoying Colorado's beautiful outdoors.

Brian Klimowski has served as the Meteorologist-in-Charge of the National Weather Service office in Flagstaff since 2003, supervising 20 employees and managing operations in the Flagstaff office. Brian enjoys research, and spent several years flying through severe thunderstorms on the High Plans investigating for the origins of large hail and severe winds. He is a weather nerd, outdoor enthusiast, and "photographer wanna-be when not otherwise distracted by clouds". 

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June 26, 2018

Title:
New
Integrated Decision-Making in the EEZ: South Africa's National Oceans and Coasts Information Management System
Presenter(s): Dr. Deirdre A. Byrne, Oceans and Coasts, Department of Environmental Affairs, Republic of South Africa)
Date & Time: June 26, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar 

Presenter: Dr Deirdre Byrne, Oceans and Coasts, Department of Environmental Affairs, Republic of South Africa

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Central Library. POC: Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Remote access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2585724085135867393 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP). 

Abstract: Integrated decision-making tools are the new kid on the block when it comes to providing information to support marine and maritime activities in an intelligent, environmentally sustainable, and economically efficient manner. We present an overview of South Africa's developing marine and coastal decision-making support system: the national Oceans and Coastal Information Management System, or national OCIMS. What is it designed to do? What won't it do? What is under the hood? How will it support the implementation of existing legislation, and ease the drafting and implementation of new laws? What challenges does South Africa face in the development of this product, and what is the way forward?

About The Speaker: Dr. Deirdre Byrne is interested in the regional physical oceanography of southern Africa, with a focus on information with economic and societal impact. Her current work is looking at the seasonal cycles of the shelf regions around South Africa, and anomalies from these. Working with the Pathfinder SST v5.3 Climate Data Record, and soon with the POES-GOES blended SST (both NOAA products). She spends most of her time on the strategic direction, planning and implementation of operational ocean observing systems for South Africa, including moored buoy systems, shore-based HF radar, remote sensing, autonomous platforms, and information systems and IT infrastructure/architecture for ocean sciences. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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June 26, 2018

Title: Building Resilient Communities with Green Infrastructure One Code at a Time
Presenter(s): Julia Noordyk, M.S., Water Quality and Coastal Community Outreach Specialist, University of Wisconsin Sea Grant Institute. Presenting remotely from Green Bay, Wisconsin)
Date & Time: June 26, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

June 26-28, 12-1pm EDT: A Mini-Symposium - Nutrient Management Tools to Improve Water Quality  

Seminar #1 of 3: Building Resilient Communities with Green Infrastructure One Code at a Time

Speaker: Julia Noordyk, M.S., Water Quality and Coastal Community Outreach Specialist, University of Wisconsin Sea Grant Institute. Presenting remotely from Green Bay, Wisconsin.

Sponsors: NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series and the NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Point of Contact is Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov (734-741-2254)

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application while logging in - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract: Green infrastructure is a proven and effective means to reduce stormwater pollution and volume, but there remain critical barriers to its implementation. Outdated local regulations often will directly or indirectly discourage or prohibit these practices deterring developers, engineers and planners from including them in projects. Based on the work of 1000 Friends of Wisconsin and with support from the NOAA Coastal Storms Program, Wisconsin Sea Grant, developed Tackling Barriers to Green Infrastructure: An Audit of Local Codes and Ordinances, a workbook to help communities audit, revise and prioritize codes that prevent the implementation of green infrastructure. During this webinar you will learn about why codes and ordinances are a major barrier to green infrastructure, common code challenges and the impact code changes can have on stormwater runoff volume and pollution. You will also be introduced to the workbook which includes a community-oriented engagement approach, provides a detailed codes and ordinances auditing tool and recommends next steps for prioritization.

About The Speaker: Julia Noordyk works closely with the Clean Bay Backers in delivering education and outreach to elected officials and community leaders on restoring the health of Green Bay. She also focuses on hazard mitigation, community resilience and reducing stormwater impacts with green infrastructure. Julia came to Wisconsin from the Maine Coastal Program where she was a NOAA Coastal Management Fellow working on offshore wind energy, water quality and coastal public access. Julia has a M.S. degree in conservation biology and sustainable development from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a B.S. in zoology from Colorado State University.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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June 26, 2018

Title: Postponed to 7/11: Update to NOAA's Global Surface Temperature Dataset
Presenter(s): Huai-min Zhang, PhD, NOAA NESDIS NCEI)
Date & Time: June 26, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Seminar Postponed to July 11, 2018

Speaker:   Huai-min Zhang, PhD (NOAA NESDIS NCEI)

Sponsor: NOAA's NESDIS NCEI. POC: Tim.Boyer@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: 
Webex: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c
Phone: 1-877-725 4068 (8634769#)

Abstract: TBD

About The Speaker: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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June 27, 2018

Title: The Watershed Game: Using interactive simulations to engage communities, provide effective education, and enhance the skills and solutions leaders have to achieving clean water goals
Presenter(s): John Bilotta; Water Resource Management and Policy Extension Educator for Minnesota Sea Grant and University of Minnesota Extension, based in St. Paul, MN and Cindy Hagley; Environmental Quality Extension Educator for Minnesota Sea Grant, based in Duluth, MN. Presenting remotely from MN.)
Date & Time: June 27, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

June 26-28, 12-1pm EDT: A Mini-Symposium - Nutrient Management Tools to Improve Water Quality

Seminar #2 of 3: The Watershed Game: Using interactive simulations to engage communities, provide effective education, and enhance the skills and solutions leaders have to achieving clean water goals

Speakers: John Bilotta; Water Resource Management and Policy Extension Educator for Minnesota Sea Grant and University of Minnesota Extension, based in St. Paul, MN and Cindy Hagley; Environmental Quality Extension Educator for Minnesota Sea Grant, based in Duluth, MN. Presenting remotely from MN.

Sponsors: NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series and the NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS); Seminar Host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov. and Point of Contact: felix.martinez@noaa.gov (734-741-2254)

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx app when logging in - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract: The Watershed Game is an interactive tool with a record of success in helping local government officials, students, and others understand the connection between land use and water quality. Participants learn how a variety of land uses impact water and natural resources, increase their knowledge of best management practices (BMPs), and learn how their choices can prevent adverse impacts. Participants apply plans, practices, and policies that help them achieve a water quality goal for a stream, lake, or river. It has been used throughout Minnesota and in other areas of the country to build the knowledge base of local leaders, providing sound science and easier understanding of TMDL's and their role in achieving them.

The Watershed Game has been a resource of the Minnesota Sea Grant Program and Minnesota Extension and an effective tool for Extension Educators from land-grant and sea-grant institutions for more than ten years. In 2017-18, a comprehensive evaluation of its uses revealed the positive impacts it has had for many communities and our colleagues that use it as a water education and community engagement tool for critical conversations around sustainable water and land use planning. The Watershed Game for Local Leaders is available in three models (lake, river and stream) and focus their use with elected and volunteer community leaders. The Classroom Version was designed for middle school-aged youth and is intended for use by formal and informal educators. This presentation will describe the Watershed Game activity and how it's been used, highlight the program used to train over 150 facilitators in 15 states to use the activity, and share some of the evaluation results from the Game's use. We will also discuss ongoing advances, changes and new adaptations for nitrogen and climate scenarios.

About the Speakers: John Bilotta and Cindy Hagley are Extension Educators with the University of Minnesota Extension and Minnesota Sea Grant Programs.

John's efforts focus on providing education programs for elected and appointed community leaders and training for the advancement of water resource professionals. He leads the NEMO (Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials) and the Watershed Game programs that providing interactive learning experiences for community leaders to enhance their knowledge about water management and land use. John also provides and supports professional training programs for colleagues in water resource education, management, and policy. John's background includes 18+ years in Extension Education at the University of Minnesota and 6+ years in other public and private capacities in soil and water resource management. John has a BA in Environmental Studies and Natural Resources with an emphasis in Soil Resources and M.S. in Soil Science with a focus on Fertility and Nutrient Management.

Cindy's work centers on sharing the science and management of lakes and streams with coastal communities, property owners, educators, and resource managers. Primarily, she develops and implements professional development programs for educators, often involving week-long workshops aboard ships on the Great Lakes. Much of her work involves the relationship between land use and water quality. Cindy holds a M.S. in Aquatic Ecology/ Limnology from the University of California Davis and a B.S. in Biology from the University of Minnesota.

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June 27, 2018

Title:
New
Southern Plains Drought Webinar
Presenter(s): Victor Murphy, Climate Services Program Manager for the NWS Southern Region)
Date & Time: June 27, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:


Speaker: Victor Murphy, Climate Services Program Manager for the NWS Southern Region

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with the National Weather Service and the National Drought Mitigation Center

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov

Remote access: Register for the webinar at https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/southern-plains-drought-webinar-june-27-2018-0

Abstract:
Despite pockets of heavy rain scattered across the area, recent record warm temperatures across parts of New Mexico, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas have made drought improvement spotty, with areas that have not received rainfall still mired in extreme to exceptional drought. Join the webinar to see what parts of these states have seen drought conditions improve, and what parts are still in 1 to 50 year or worse drought conditions. 

Featured Speaker:
Victor Murphy, Climate Services Program Manager for the NWS Southern Region will present current drought conditions and recent changes, impacts, and the outlook for the rest of summer. 

Victor Murphy is the Climate Services Program Manager for the NWS Southern Region which comprises New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, and the Gulf Coast States. In this capacity, Mr. Murphy works with NWS Weather Forecast Offices and River Forecast Centers to provide partners with climate data, information, and forecasts to help ensure resiliency and mitigation in decision making processes.

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June 28, 2018

Title:
New
Empowering Communities with Online Action Planning Tools - Tipping Point Planner for Improving Water Quality across the Great Lakes
Presenter(s): Kara Salazar, M.S.E., M.P.A; Sustainable Communities Extension Specialist, Illinois - Indiana Sea Grant, Purdue University; Yu-Chun Kao, Research Associate, Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University; and Anthony Kendall, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University. Presenting from Michigan.)
Date & Time: June 28, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

June 26-28, 12-1pm EDT: A Mini-Symposium - Nutrient Management Tools to Improve Water Quality

Seminar #3 of 3: Empowering Communities with Online Action Planning Tools -
Tipping Point Planner for Improving Water Quality across the Great Lakes

Speakers: Kara Salazar, M.S.E., M.P.A; Sustainable Communities Extension Specialist, Illinois - Indiana Sea Grant, Purdue University; Yu-Chun Kao, Research Associate, Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University; and Anthony Kendall, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University. Presenting from Michigan.

Sponsors: NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series and the NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Point of Contact: felix.martinez@noaa.gov (734-741-2254)

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx app while logging in - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract: Tipping Point Planner is a research and extension program for Great Lakes communities comprised of a web-based decision support system (DSS) and facilitated community visioning and action planning process (http://tippingpointplanner.org). The decision support system models relationships between land use practices and endpoints of interest at present and future timescales. The tool and associated facilitation process is used by extension specialists, coastal managers, and consultants who work with plan commissions, watershed planning committees, and agency managers to prioritize and develop management plans that sustain coastal resources. This tool helps watershed leaders identify land-based activities that result in point and nonpoint source nutrient, sediment and pathogen pollution and the impacts of such runoff on tributary streams, coastal wetlands, nearshore food webs, and beaches, in watersheds and coastal areas. Communities use the tool to develop sustainable action plans for their watershed or community. This three part webinar will provide an overview of the decision support system, applications for community planning, and models used within the decision support system for food web response to nutrient input and watershed nutrient and bacterial sources and delivery.

Webinar Overview:
(Part 1) Decision Support System Overview and Applications for Community Planning (15 min) " Kara Salazar, Sustainable Communities Extension Specialist, IL-IN Sea Grant and Purdue University Extension
(Part 2) Food Web Response to Nutrient Input (20 min) " Yu-Chun Kao, Associate Scientist " Fisheries, Great Lakes Science Center, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University
(Part 3) Watershed Nutrient and Bacterial Sources and Delivery (20 min) " Anthony Kendall, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University
(Wrap up) Q&A / Discussion

About the Speakers: Kara Salazar is Sustainable Communities Extension Specialist for Purdue University's Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant. Working with multidisciplinary teams, Kara develops programs, products, and resources to support community planning and sustainable development strategies in Indiana communities. Focus areas include placemaking and enhancing public spaces, lawn and landscaping conservation practices, community development, and natural resources management. 

Yu-Chun Kao is an Associate Scientist at Michigan State University. His research provides natural resource managers information needed for sustainable inland fisheries management. To practically achieve this goal, it requires an understanding of aquatic ecosystems and a capacity to evaluate management strategies in a timely manner. Yu-Chun's research strives to use quantitative ecological models to (1) identify the causality between concurrent factors and observed ecosystem changes and (2) provide timely evaluations on current and potential management strategies.

Anthony Kendall is a Research Assistant Professor at Michigan State University. His research is focused on regional-scale landscape hydrology, examining the terrestrial hydrologic cycle and its relationship to climate, vegetation and biogeochemical cycles. He co-developed the Landscape Hydrology Model (LHM), an integrated modeling tool to study large-scale, fine-resolution hydrologic processes using modest computational tools. Partly due to the challenge of providing fine-resolution inputs at regional scales, and because of the importance of the questions at those scales he has become involved in all aspects of “big data” discovery, processing, and analysis. This includes using machine learning algorithms to yield insights into environmental phenomena and to better prepare inputs for process-based models. He is also actively involved in field data collection, and view this as a critical and foundational aspect of hydrologic sciences.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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July 11, 2018

Title:
New
Update to NOAA's Global Surface Temperature Dataset
Presenter(s): Huai-min Zhang, PhD, NOAA NESDIS NCEI)
Date & Time: July 11, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 4817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker:   Huai-min Zhang, PhD (NOAA NESDIS NCEI)

Sponsor: NOAA's NESDIS NCEI. POC: Tim.Boyer@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: 
Webex: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c
Phone: 1-877-725 4068 (8634769#)

Abstract: TBD

About The Speaker: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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July 12, 2018

Title: Climate Science: What’s New?
Presenter(s): Katharine Hayhoe, Atmospheric Scientist, Texas Tech University. Presenting remotely.)
Date & Time: July 12, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, in partnership with NOAA.

Climate Series, Seminar 1:

Speaker: Katharine Hayhoe, Atmospheric Scientist, Texas Tech University. Presenting remotely.

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: Human emissions of greenhouse gases now overwhelm the influence of natural drivers on Earth's climate. How will our energy choices and resulting emissions affect temperature and precipitation, extreme events, sea level rise and more, over this century and beyond? What are the implications for meeting the targets of the Paris Agreement and avoiding dangerous change? And what about the potential for surprise, as we push the climate system harder and faster than any time in human history? Join Katharine as she highlights key results and new science from the first volume of the Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment, and lays out what to expect from the second volume on how climate change is affecting regions and sectors across the U.S.

About The Speaker: Katharine Hayhoe is an atmospheric scientist whose research focuses on understanding what climate change means for people and the places where we live. She served as a lead author on the Second, Third, and Fourth National Climate Assessments and is also known for her communication and outreach efforts, such as the PBS Digital Series Global Weirding. This year, she was the recipient of the Stephen H. Schneider Award for Outstanding Climate Science Communication. Katharine has a B.Sc. in Physics and Astronomy from the University of Toronto and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is currently a Professor of Public Administration and directs the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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July 12, 2018

Title:
New
Unmanned Systems (UxS): Transforming How We Study and Manage the Marine Environment
Presenter(s): John McDonough, Senior Program Advisor, Office of Marine and Aviation Operations, NOAA)
Date & Time: July 12, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker, John McDonough, Senior Program Advisor,  Office of Marine and Aviation Operations, NOAA

Sponsors: Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MarineDebris.info, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

Abstract: Unmanned Systems (UxS) are transforming how we study and manage the marine environment. This presentation will provide an overview of unmanned aerial systems, unmanned surface vehicles, unmanned underwater vehicles, buoyancy gliders, and remotely operated vehicles. Emphasis will be placed on their contributions to establishing and managing marine protected areas. 

Webinar Access:  https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_GxqSuaiRQ1SAZh5u9CDaDw

Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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July 18, 2018

Title:
New
NESDIS snowfall rate product and assessment in NWS Forecast Offices
Presenter(s): Huan Meng, NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research, and Kristopher White, NWS/Huntsville, AL Weather Forecast Office and NASA/MSFC/Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center
Date & Time: July 18, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Room 2554-2555, NCWCP, 5830 University Research Ct, College Park, MD 20740, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

STAR Seminar Series

Speakers: Huan Meng, NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research, and Kristopher White, NWS/Huntsville, AL Weather Forecast Office and NASA/MSFC/Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center

Sponsor: NOAA NESDIS STAR

Host and contact: Ralph.R.Ferraro@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

Webex - event address for attendees: https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=e6264cd9de7be3b4177ecc46f0791645e

Event number: 991 988 937

Event password: STAR

Audio:

Conference #:  1-888-396-1320

Passcode: 9371952


Abstract:
An over land snowfall rate (SFR) product has been produced operationally at NOAA/NESDIS since 2012. The product utilizes the passive microwave measurements from the ATMS sensor aboard S-NPP and NOAA-20, and from AMSU and MHS sensor pair aboard the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) operated by NOAA and EUMETSAT. Recently, SFR product has also been developed for SSMIS aboard the DMSP satellites and for GMI aboard NASA's GPM core satellite. The SFR algorithm consists of two components: snowfall detection and snowfall rate estimation. Both components mainly rely on the high frequencies at and above 88/89 GHz due to their sensitivity to solid precipitation. The snowfall detection component is a statistical algorithm that optimally combines snowfall probabilities derived from a satellite-based module and a numerical weather prediction model-based module. The snowfall rate component is a physical, 1DVAR-based algorithm. The SFR product has been validated extensively against gauge observations and radar snowfall rate estimates with satisfactory results. As part of a project supported by the JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction program, the SFR product retrieved from eight satellites was also evaluated at some NWS Weather Forecast Offices in winter 2017-2018. NWS meteorologists evaluated and provided feedback regarding the SFR product suite via an online survey, emails and a webinar. Evaluation results affirmed operational utility of the SFR product, especially as it pertains to the analysis and forecast of snowfall rates in regions that lack necessary radar and in-situ observations. Some data issues were also discovered and addressed during the evaluation period, highlighting the positive aspects of the intensive assessment process, which fosters direct interaction between product developers and end-users. Conclusions and recommendations for future iterations of the SFR product will also be discussed.

About the Speakers:

Huan Meng: TBD

Kristopher White: TBD

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July 18, 2018

Title: Projecting the Impacts of Climate Change on the Distribution of North American Marine Species
Presenter(s): James W. Morley, postdoctoral researcher, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences)
Date & Time: July 18, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: James W. Morley, postdoctoral researcher, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Todd.Kellison@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install MyMeeting's WebEx app while logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: In recent decades warming oceans have led to shifts in distribution for many marine species around the U.S. These shifts have challenged fisheries management, which is often based on the assumption of static stock boundaries and equilibrium based assessment models. We developed projections for shifts in the preferred thermal habitat for hundreds of species on the U.S. continental shelf in the coming century as a result of climate change using two future carbon emissions scenarios. Projections were conducted by using extensive bottom trawl survey data to develop models of thermal habitat for each species. These models were coupled with sixteen climate projection models, which allowed us to quantify how robust species projections are to uncertain future ocean conditions. These projections of climate change impacts represent an important tool for developing climate adaptive fisheries management. 

About The Speaker: Jim Morley did his graduate work at North Carolina State University, examining recruitment dynamics of bluefish, particularly how variable winter conditions can impact contributions from two spawning periods. At Rutgers University as a postdoc, he used long term survey data to examine how climate variability impacts marine assemblages on the southeast U.S. continental shelf. Following that study, he conducted the projections that are the topic of the seminar. Presently, he is a postdoc at the University of North Carolina where he continues to analyze sources of uncertainty with species projections. He is also conducting a major field-based investigation on how oyster aquaculture impacts the ecosystem services of estuaries.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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July 19, 2018

Title: Detection and Attribution of Climate Change from the (Climate Science Special Report) U.S. Perspective
Presenter(s): Thomas R. Knutson, Research Meteorologist, NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Presenting remotely.)
Date & Time: July 19, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, 
in partnership with NOAA.

Speaker: Thomas R. Knutson, Research Meteorologist, NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Presenting remotely.

Climate Series, Seminar 2: 

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: Climate change detection and attribution is the process of assessing whether certain observed changes in the climate, including certain extreme events, are unlikely to be due to natural variability alone and whether the changes or events can be attributed to some known forcing mechanism such as increasing greenhouse gases. Based on IPCC AR5 (and reinforced by new record global temperatures since IPCC AR5), it is extremely likely that more than half of the global mean temperature increase since 1951 was caused by human influence on climate. The record-high level of global temperatures in 2016 was not even possible without anthropogenic forcing, according to CMIP5 models. However, going beyond global temperature, the CSSR plays a unique role in focusing on detection and attribution from a U.S. perspective. Examples of detection and attribution statements and summary findings from the CSSR for the U.S. are summarized for a number of variables, including regional surface temperature, precipitation, atmospheric circulation, drought, flooding, wildfires, extreme storms, and sea level rise. An update on more recent post-CSSR research on U.S. precipitation trends by the author will also be presented

About The Speaker: Thomas Knutson is a climate scientist with NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, in Princeton, New Jersey. He is a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society, and currently serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Climate. As Chair of the World Meteorological Organization's "Task Team on Tropical Cyclones and Climate Change", he is leading development of a new science assessment on this topic. Recently, he was the lead author on the "Detection and Attribution of Climate Change" chapter of the U.S. Climate Science Special Report. Mr. Knutson's research interests include hurricanes and climate change, and climate change detection and attribution.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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July 23, 2018

Title:
New
Climate Change Threatens the World’s Marine Protected Areas
Presenter(s): John Bruno, Professor, Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Date & Time: July 23, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker, John Bruno, Professor, Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Sponsors: Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MarineDebris.info, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

Abstract: MPAs and the species they protect are increasingly being impacted by climate change. Although MPAs are widely promoted as a means to mitigate the effects of climate change, the opposite perspective is more in line with the scientific reality: without drastic reductions in carbon emissions, ocean warming, acidification and oxygen depletion will disrupt the composition and functioning of the ecosystems currently protected within the world's MPAs. The community- and ecosystem-level impacts of climate change threaten to negate decades of progress in conservation and further imperil species and ecosystems that are already in jeopardy. 

Webinar Access:  https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_zxkX-c5JStm1vFsMkOrNkw

Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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July 26, 2018

Title: Droughts, Floods, and Wildfire
Presenter(s): Michael Wehner, Senior Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Presenting remotely.)
Date & Time: July 26, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, 
in partnership with NOAA.

Speaker: Michael Wehner, Senior Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Presenting remotely.

Climate Series, Seminar 3: 

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: Droughts, floods, and wildfire have significant negative effects throughout much of the United States. Volume I of the Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4) " aka the Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) " has a chapter that details how climate change exacerbates the risks of such major events. These aspects of climate change are complicated due to the interaction of the changes in temperature and precipitation. Droughts are classified by a hierarchy of meteorological, agricultural, hydrological, or socio-economic types. The effect of global warming is most pronounced on agricultural drought, a deficit of surface moisture, due to increased temperatures. Floods are determined both by extreme precipitation as well as surface characteristics, and vary both on spatial and temporal scales. Short-term extreme precipitation is widely accepted as already having been intensified by climate change and will continue as the climate warms further. Western wildfires are affected both by forest management and climate change. The former leads to changes in fuel density while the latter increases flammability. These topics, as discussed in CSSR Chapter 8, are reviewed in this talk.

About The Speaker: Michael F. Wehner is a senior staff scientist in the Computational Research Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Wehner's current research concerns the behavior of extreme weather events in a changing climate, especially heat waves, intense precipitation, drought, and tropical cyclones. Before joining the Berkeley Lab in 2002, Wehner was an analyst at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the Program for Climate Modeling Diagnosis and Intercomparison. He is the author or co-author of over 170 scientific papers and reports. He was a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group I contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) and the second, third, and fourth U.S. National Climate Assessments. He was recently selected as a lead author for the upcoming IPCC Sixth Assessment Report. Dr. Wehner earned his master's degree and Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and his bachelor's degree in Physics from the University of Delaware.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 2, 2018

Title: Climate Potential Surprises - Compound Extremes and Tipping Elements
Presenter(s): Radley Horton, Associate Research Professor, Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Presenitng remotely.)
Date & Time: August 2, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, 
in partnership with NOAA.

Speaker: Radley Horton, Associate Research Professor, Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Presenting remotely.

Climate Series, Seminar 4: 

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: Diverse lines of evidence suggest that the further the climate system is 'pushed' through increases in greenhouse gas concentrations, the greater the potential for rapid changes that are difficult to model or otherwise foresee. Several examples will be presented within a risk management framework, ranging from a) the probable to b) the low probability but catastrophic should they occur.

About The Speaker: Radley Horton's research focuses on climate extremes, tail risks, climate impacts, and adaptation. Radley was a Convening Lead Author for the Third National Climate Assessment. He currently Co-Chairs Columbia's Adaptation Initiative, and is the Lead Principal Investigator for the NOAA-Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments-funded Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast and the WWF-Columbia University ADVANCE partnership. Radley is also the Columbia University lead for the Department of Interior-funded Northeast Climate Adaptation Center. He has also served as Deputy Lead for NASA's Climate Adaptation Science Investigator Working Group, charged with linking NASA's science to its institutional stewardship. Radley also teaches in Columbia University's Sustainable Development department. Radley is a leading climate science communicator, appearing regularly on television, radio, and in print.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 9, 2018

Title: Long-Term Climate Mitigation Perspectives and the 2°C Objective
Presenter(s): Benjamin DeAngelo, Deputy Director, NOAA Climate Program Office. Presenting remotely.)
Date & Time: August 9, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, 
in partnership with NOAA.

Climate Series, Seminar 5:

Speaker: Benjamin DeAngelo, Deputy Director, NOAA Climate Program Office. Presenting remotely.

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: The presentation addresses estimates of different cumulative carbon budgets in light of future global warming objectives " with a particular focus on the now, oft-cited 2°C goal, its origin, and the chances of meeting such an objective.

About The Speaker: Benjamin DeAngelo has over 20 years of experience bridging science and policy for the stewardship of the global environment. Ben is the Deputy Director of the Climate Program Office within NOAA's research arm, and serves as the U.S. head of delegation for the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP), a working group under the Arctic Council. Ben was the lead author on the mitigation chapter of the Climate Science Special Report (2017), from which this presentation is largely based. Prior to starting at NOAA in 2017, Ben was the Deputy Director of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and special assistant for climate change to the President's Science Advisor in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and had a 18-year career at EPA working on climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 9, 2018

Title:
New
Integrating Social Network Development into MPA Management Capacity Building and Institutionalization in the Philippines and Indonesia
Presenter(s): Speakers: Anne Nelson, NOAA MPA Center International Capacity Building Program, on contract with Lynker Technologies, Inc.; and, Gabrielle Johnson, NOAA International MPA Capacity Building Program / Coral Reef Conservation Program, on contract with The Baldwin Group)
Date & Time: August 9, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

Speakers:  Anne Nelson, NOAA MPA Center International Capacity Building Program, on contract with Lynker Technologies, Inc.; and, Gabrielle Johnson, NOAA International MPA Capacity Building Program / Coral Reef Conservation Program, on contract with The Baldwin Group.

Abstract:   Integrating social network development into MPA management capacity building and institutionalization in the Philippines and Indonesia by Anne Nelson and Gabrielle Johnson of NOAA. Every MPA site, region, and capacity building program is unique in structure and content, yet all programs need to build trust and community to create a locally-relevant format and framework. To contribute to the ongoing growth of the global social network of marine protected area (MPA) practitioners, the presenters will share observations from the social MPA network building that was part of recent NOAA MPA Center International Capacity Building in the Philippines and Indonesia. These programs deliver technical capacity for effective MPA management and a participatory learning framework for participants to enhance their MPA social network to support long term implementation of gained knowledge and skills.

Webinar Access:  https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_gGfcTtoeS0iae5vzXjVQtg

Seminar POCs:  Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:  Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe). Register for the webinar at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_gGfcTtoeS0iae5vzXjVQtg.
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August 16, 2018

Title: The Causes and Consequences of a Rapidly Changing Arctic
Presenter(s): Patrick C. Taylor, Climate Research Scientist, NASA Langley Research Center. Presenting remotely.)
Date & Time: August 16, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, 
in partnership with NOAA.

Speaker: Patrick C. Taylor, Climate Research Scientist, NASA Langley Research Center. Presenting remotely.

Climate Series, Seminar 6: 

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: Earth's climate system is highly interconnected, meaning that changes to the global climate influence the United States climatically and economically. In much the same way as European and Asian financial markets affect the U.S. economy, changes to ice sheet mass and energy flows in the far reaches of the planet affect our climate. Life on Earth is sensitive to climate conditions; human society is especially susceptible due to the climate-vulnerable, complex, and often fragile systems that provide food, water, energy, and security. Observed changes to the global climate affecting the United States include rising global temperatures, diminishing sea ice, melting ice sheets and glaciers, rising sea levels, etc. These documented changes have global economic and national security implications, including for the United States. For example, sea level rise alone is putting $100 billion dollars of U.S. military assets at risk, according to the Dept. of Defense. Arctic climate change continues to outpace the rest of the globe. Over the last 30 years, rapid and, in many cases, unprecedented changes to Arctic temperatures, sea ice, snow cover, land ice, and permafrost have occurred. While the Arctic may seem far away, changes in the Arctic climate system have a global reach, affecting sea level, the carbon cycle, atmospheric winds, ocean currents, and potentially the frequency of extreme weather. This presentation discusses the changes in the observed in the Arctic, the projected changes, and the potential impacts to us living the U.S.

About The Speaker: Dr. Taylor is a research scientist at NASA Langley Research Center. His research focuses on understanding the mysterious life of clouds. Understanding cloud behavior provides valuable information for improving weather and climate models. Dr. Taylor received his PhD from Florida State University in 2009 and has since worked at NASA Langley Research Center receiving that 2012 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) and a NASA Early Career Achievement Medal in 2013 for his research. In 2015, he became a National Academy of Science Kavli Fellow. Dr. Taylor was appointed to the Virginia's Climate Change and Resiliency Commission by Governor McAuliffe, a member of the science working group for the Old Dominion University led Sea Level Rise Initiative, and currently working as a lead author on the Climate Science Special Report commissioned by the NASA, NOAA, and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. At NASA Langley Research Center, Dr. Taylor is a member of the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) science team, leads the climate processes and diagnostics research group, and serves as a member of the Science Directorate 10-year planning committee as co-lead for the Radiation Budget focus area.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 23, 2018

Title: Climate Tidings of the Tides
Presenter(s): William Sweet, Oceanographer, Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services,
NOAA's National Ocean Service. Presenting in Silver Spring.)
Date & Time: August 23, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, 
in partnership with NOAA.

Speaker: William Sweet, Oceanographer, Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services,
NOAA's National Ocean Service. Presenting in Silver Spring.

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Climate Series, Seminar 7: 

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: Human activities are a significant contributor to the rise in global sea levels, which have risen about 7-8 inches since 1900 with about 3 of those inches occurring since 1993. By 2100, global sea levels are very likely to rise by 1.0"4.3 feet above year 2000 levels depending upon future emissions of greenhouse gases, though emerging science regarding Antarctic ice sheet stability suggests that a rise above 8 feet is physically possible. The amount of relative rise will not be uniform along the U.S. coastlines due to changes in Earth's gravitational field and rotation from melting of land ice, changes in ocean circulation, and vertical land motion. As sea levels have risen, annual flood frequencies of disruptive/minor tidal flooding have been accelerating within Atlantic and Gulf Coast cities over the last couple of decades. With continued rise, it is likely that damaging/moderate coastal flooding will occur several times a year within dozens of U.S. coastal locations within the next several decades. 

About The Speaker: William Sweet is a NOAA oceanographer researching changes in nuisance-to-extreme coastal flood risk due to sea level rise (SLR). He has assessed risks to U.S. coastal military installations worldwide for the military and is an author of the 4th U.S. National Climate Assessment. He lives in Annapolis, MD to witness SLR effects first-hand.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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August 28, 2018

Title: The Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment: An Overview of Volume 1
Presenter(s): Donald J. Wuebbles, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois. Presenting remotely)
Date & Time: August 28, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program,
in partnership with NOAA.

Speaker: Donald J. Wuebbles, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois. Presenting remotely.

Sponsors: The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Climate Series, Seminar 8: 

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: New observations and new research have increased our understanding of past, current, and future climate change. The Fourth National Climate Assessment confirms prior assessments in concluding that the climate on our planet, including the United States, is changing, and changing rapidly. Observational evidence for a changing climate abounds, from the top of the atmosphere to the depths of the oceans. Documented changes include surface, atmospheric, and oceanic temperatures; melting glaciers; disappearing snow cover; shrinking sea ice; and rising sea level. Many lines of evidence demonstrate that human activities have been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century. Changes in the characteristics of extreme events are particularly important for human safety, infrastructure, agriculture, water quality and quantity, and natural ecosystems. Some extremes have already become more frequent, intense, or of longer duration, and many extremes are expected to continue to increase or worsen, presenting substantial challenges. Heatwaves have become more frequent in the United States since the 1960s, while extreme cold temperatures and cold waves have become less frequent. Heavy rainfall is increasing in intensity and frequency across the United States and globally. These and other trends in severe weather are expected to continue. The Earth's climate is projected to continue to change over this century and beyond. As a result, global average sea levels are expected to continue to rise. This presentation provides an overview of the findings from the new assessment, with a special focus on severe weather.

About The Speaker: Donald J. Wuebbles is the Harry E. Preble Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Illinois. He is also a Presidential Fellow at the University of Illinois, with the aim of helping the university system develop new initiatives in urban sustainability. From 2015 to early 2017, Dr. Wuebbles was Assistant Director with the Office of Science and Technology Policy at the Executive Office of the President in Washington DC. He was Head of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois for many years, and led the development of the School of Earth, Society, and Environment, and was its first director. Dr. Wuebbles is an expert in atmospheric physics and chemistry, with over 500 scientific publications related to the Earth's climate, air quality, and the stratospheric ozone layer. He has co-authored a number of international and national scientific assessments, including several international climate assessments led by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), for which IPCC was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He was a leader in the 2013 IPCC international assessment and the 2014 Third U.S. National Climate Assessment. More recently, he co-led the Climate Science Special Report, the 475-page first volume of the Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment published in November 2017 that assesses the science of climate change. Dr. Wuebbles has also led special assessments of the impacts of climate change on human society and ecosystems for the U.S. Midwest, the Northeast, and a special assessment for the city of Chicago. Dr. Wuebbles has received several major awards, including the Cleveland Abbe Award from the American Meteorological Society, the Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and is a Fellow of three major professional science societies, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Meteorological Society.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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September 25, 2018

Title: Plastics in the Ocean: Facts, Fiction, and Unknowns
Presenter(s): Anna Robuck, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography)
Date & Time: September 25, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote - Online Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Anna Robuck, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries 

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6922965402939033090 

Abstract:  Although plastics are vital in a slew of consumer applications, plastic pollution in the ocean has turned out to be a not-so-fantastic outcome of modern day plastic dependence. This presentation provides an overview of the ocean plastic pollution problem, explaining the difference between marine debris and microplastics. It also will outline the current state of knowledge about microplastic impacts in the ocean and marine food webs, and provide insight into an ongoing research project using seabirds as indicators of plastic pollution in the Northwest Atlantic.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ 
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October 17, 2018

Title: Understanding Ocean Acidification - Using NOAA’s New Educational Tools
Presenter(s): Amy Dean, NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System)
Date & Time: October 17, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Speaker: Amy Dean, NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/690023097051840771 Abstract: Data in the Classroom is designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional and global scale. In this presentation, participants will dive deep into Data in the Classroom's Ocean Acidification Module to explore the processes that cause acidification, examine data from across the globe and take a virtual tour of the new web-based curricular modules and data tools. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 14, 2018

Title: A Rare Great Lakes Ecosystem: Exploring the Sinkholes of Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): John Bright, NOAA's Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary)
Date & Time: November 14, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote - Online Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Speaker: John Bright, Research Coordinator for NOAA's Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4895467060831741186 Abstract: Underwater explorations in Lake Huron have revealed unique hotspots of biogeochemical activity at several submerged groundwater vents in Lake Huron. Learn about the techniques scientists use to explore unique single-celled microorganism communities that dominate this freshwater habitat. Educators will be provided with information and links to lessons that feature this unique Great Lakes research topic. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Hosted at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR for the OneNOAA Seminar Series
Developer - Lori K. Brown