All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

21 May 2019

Title: NOAA Hurricane Awareness Series: Assessing Post-Storm Damage: NOAA Emergency Response
Presenter(s): Mike Aslaksen, NOAA National Geodetic Survey, and Parks Camp, Tallahassee Weather Forecast Office, NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 21 May 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: NOAA Hurricane Awareness Series:Assessing Post-Storm Damage: NOAA Emergency Response

Presenter(s):
Mike Aslaksen, NOAA National Geodetic Survey, and Parks Camp, Tallahassee Weather Forecast Office, NOAA's National Weather Service

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Southeast and Caribbean Regional Collaboration Team (SECART). Point of contact is Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov
Webinar Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7441285087707170562
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more.
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Title: Where does all the carbon go? Piecing together the North American carbon puzzle from a synthesis of top-down and bottom-up estimates
Presenter(s): Daniel J. Hayes, University of Maine, and Rodrigo Vargas, University of Delaware. Both presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 21 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Where does all the carbon go? Piecing together the North American carbon puzzle from a synthesis of top-down and bottom-up estimates.
Seminar 13 in the Series, "From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle (SOCCR2) Seminar Series". We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - June 11

Presenter(s):
 Rodrigo Vargas, University of Delaware. Presenting from Delaware..
Co-author: Daniel J. Hayes, University of Maine 

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyamo Shrestha & Tracy Gill.
Webinar Access: We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/, enter as "Guest", and please enter your first and last name. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Scientific information quantifying and characterizing regional-to-global scale carbon cycling is necessary for developing national and international policy on climate change impacts, mitigation and adaptation. In this presentation, we show how we can piece together the various components of the North American carbon budget from multiple constraints on continental-scale estimates of the major stocks and flows. Our analysis synthesizes bottom-up estimates of stock change over the past decade among carbon pools of the major land sectors (forests and wood products, agricultural soils, grasslands, wetlands, and arctic-boreal ecosystems) and lateral transfers along the terrestrial-aquatic system (inland waters, tidal wetlands, estuaries and the coastal ocean). Using a simple but comprehensive and consistent budget accounting framework, we reconcile the various bottom-up assessments into an overall estimate of net land-atmosphere exchange of carbon from North America's land and coastal ocean to the atmosphere, and compare this estimate with top-down estimates for the continent over the last decade.
About the

Presenter(s):
 
Daniel Hayes is Assistant Professor in the School of Forest Resources and serves as Director of the Wheatland Geospatial Analysis Laboratory at the University of Maine. He teaches, does research and performs outreach in the use of remote sensing in forest inventory and ecosystem applications. Dan studies the role of climate change and disturbance in the dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems, with a particular focus on Arctic and Boreal regions. He has contributed to various regional, continental and global carbon budget modeling and synthesis efforts and publishes on the methods and results of multi-disciplinary, ecosystem-scale scientific investigations. Prior to his appointment at the University of Maine, Dan was a post-doctoral fellow in the Institute of Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a research scientist in the Climate Change Science Institute at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He is currently involved in various collaborative efforts including the interagency North American Carbon Program (NACP), NASA's Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE), DOE's Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE-Arctic) and the NSF Permafrost Carbon Network. 
Rodrigo Vargas is an Associate Professor at the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences at the University of Delaware. He completed his PhD at the University of California-Riverside and a postdoc at the University of California-Berkeley. His research interests focus on how biophysical factors regulate greenhouse gas dynamics in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. He studies soil-plant-atmosphere interactions to understand and quantify the response of ecosystems to management, extreme events, and global environmental change. His research spans from data mining and digital soil mapping, to remote sensing and micrometeorological measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes at multiple spatio-temporal scales and vegetation types. Dr. Vargas has published over 100 peer-reviewed publications and has received funding from NSF, NASA, USDA, DOD and several state and international organizations. He serves as an Associate Editor for Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences published by the American Geophysical Union. He is part of the science steering groups of the North American Carbon Program, North American Forestry Commission, Mexican Carbon Program, and AmeriFlux. He is a member of the committee on Science and the Arts in the Earth and Environmental Science cluster of the Franklin Institute, and a member of the U.S. National Committee for Soil Science of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: Estimating Coral Feeding Habits from Space
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Fox, Postdoctoral Scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Date & Time: 21 May 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Michael Fox, Postdoctoral Scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429
Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6762138742323434253

Abstract:
Reef-building corals rely on a symbiosis with microscopic algae for much of their energetic needs. Rising ocean temperatures threaten this symbiosis and can cause it to break down in a process known as coral bleaching, which is one of the primary threats to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems globally. Corals are not helpless, however, as they are also excellent predators and if they can capture food to maintain their energy budgets while bleached they may have a greater chance for survival. Learn more how natural variation in food availability on reefs around the world and how this may influence coral resilience and recovery from bleaching events.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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22 May 2019

Title: Advancing U.S. Operational Weather Prediction Capabilities in the Next Decade with Exascale HPC, Machine Learning and Big Data Technologies
Presenter(s): Mark Govett, ESRL/GSD
Date & Time: 22 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar or NCWCP rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s):
Mark Govett, ESRL/GSD

Sponsor(s):
 ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER SEMINAR for more information visit https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html
JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4
Meeting number: 900 826 795
Meeting password: a3YhdEPN
JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3)
1-877-953-0315
1-517-268-7866 (toll number)
Participant: 1262920#

Abstract:
 https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/abstract.2019/Govett.html
Poster: https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/poster/Govett.seminar.poster.jpg
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: Recent Trends in Nutrient & Sediment Loading to Coastal Areas of the Conterminous US: Insights & Global Context
Presenter(s): Gretchen P. Oelsner, Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey, New Mexico Water Science Center, Albuquerque, NM
Date & Time: 22 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
Recent Trends in Nutrient & Sediment Loading to Coastal Areas of the Conterminous US: Insights & Global Context

Presenter(s):

Gretchen P. Oelsner, Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey, New Mexico Water Science Center, Albuquerque, NM

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Suzanne Bricker and Tracy Gill

Remote Access:

We will use Adobe Connect webinar. Register for the seminar at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandseds/event/registration.html
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows (Google chrome seems to work fine too) or Safari if using a Mac.Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio will be available thru the computer only, no phone, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset. Questions?  Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov
 

Abstract:
Coastal areas in the U.S. and worldwide have experienced massive population and land-use changes contributing to significant degradation of coastal ecosystems. Excess nutrient pollution causes coastal ecosystem degradation, and both regulatory and management efforts have targeted reducing nutrient and sediment loading to coastal rivers. Decadal trends in flow-normalized nutrient and sediment loads were determined for 95 monitoring locations on 88 U.S. coastal rivers, including tributaries of the Great Lakes, between 2002 and 2012 for nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and sediment. N and P loading from urban watersheds generally decreased between 2002 and 2012. In contrast, N and P trends in agricultural watersheds were variable indicating uneven progress in decreasing nutrient loading. Coherent decreases in N loading from agricultural watersheds occurred in the Lake Erie basin, but limited benefit is expected from these changes because P is the primary driver of degradation in the lake. Nutrient loading from undeveloped watersheds was low, but increased between 2002 and 2012, possibly indicating degradation of coastal watersheds that are minimally affected by human activities. Regional differences in trends were evident, with stable nutrient loads from the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico, but commonly decreasing N loads and increasing P loads in Chesapeake Bay. Compared to global rivers, coastal rivers of the conterminous U.S have somewhat lower TN yields and slightly higher TP yields, but similarities exist among land use, nutrient sources, and changes in nutrient loads. Despite widespread decreases in N loading in coastal watersheds, recent N:P ratios remained elevated compared to historic values in many areas. Additional progress in reducing N and P loading to U.S. coastal waters, particularly outside of urban areas, would benefit coastal ecosystems.

Bio:
Gretchen completed her PhD in Hydrology at the University of Arizona in 2007. Her dissertation focused on nutrient cycling in the semi-arid Upper Rio Grande. Following her PhD, Gretchen did a post-doc with the EPA's Office of Research and Development's Western Ecology Division examining changes in water quality in lakes and streams affected by acid rain. In 2011, Gretchen joined the U.S. Geological Survey in the New Mexico Water Science Center and worked on many projects related to surface-water quality in New Mexico. In 2013, Gretchen began work with the USGS's National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Project as part of the Surface Water Trends Team. Initially she worked to harmonize data from 600+ sources of water-quality data across the country and screen them for trend analysis. Once the trend analysis was complete, Gretchen started to work on projects to interpret the trend results including trends in nutrient and sediment loading in coastal streams (the focus of this presentation) and possible drivers of national salinity concentration trends.     
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: Water Level Sensing through Collaboration and Innovation
Presenter(s): David Schoenmaker, Stillwater Technologies LLC & Crane Johnson, Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center
Date & Time: 22 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Sponsor(s):
Join the NOAA Central Library and the Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) for the new NOAA Innovators Series! This series will be facilitated by Derek Parks, Technology Transfer Program Manager.
Webinar ONLY: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8960343963276030977

Presenter(s):
David Schoenmaker, Software and Hardware Engineer, Stillwater Technologies LLC & Crane Johnson, Hydrologist, Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center [Moderator] Derek Parks.

Abstract:
A new and innovative water level sensor was developed by the Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center to help fill data gaps in Alaska's current water level sensing network. After successfully deploying these small low cost gages at over 40 locations, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was established with Stillwater Technologies to continue development and bring these gages to the retail market. The development of the iGage river water level sensor, technology transfer through the CRADA and subsequent improvements will be presented.
About the

Presenter(s):
David Schoenmaker grew up in the Seattle area has spent his entire career in software and hardware development. In addition to working in software development for Microsoft he has experience in wireless, cellular and data communications. Outside of work he enjoys flying, amateur radio and continuing to learn.
Crane Johnson has been living and working in Alaska since 1995. As a registered Civil Engineer he has spent most of his career working on water resource projects that includes over a decade of water control and flood forecasting experience. Outside of work Crane enjoys to ski and hike Alaska's mountains. 
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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23 May 2019

Title: Effects of ocean acidification and hypoxia on rockfish across multiple life stages
Presenter(s): Scott Hamilton, PhD., Moss Landing Marine Laboratories
Date & Time: 23 May 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Scott Hamilton, PhD., Moss Landing Marine Laboratories

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.
WEBINAR
Join Webex: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m42adb0a9bd882bec37c6e44e3c14e4b5
Meeting number and Access Code: 808 021 158
Join by Phone: 1-650-479-3207 Call-in toll number (US/Canada)
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

Abstract:
TBD
BIO : TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Human and Environmental Well-being in Alaska's Kachemak Bay Watershed: An Ecosystem Services Assessment
Presenter(s): Ellie Flaherty, University of Michigan; Kate Kirkpatrick, University of Michigan; Trey Snow, University of Michigan; and Julia Wondoleck, University of Michigan
Date & Time: 23 May 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Wednesday, 3103 Mainway, Burlington, ON L7M 1A1, Canada
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ellie Flaherty, University of Michigan; Kate Kirkpatrick, University of Michigan; Trey Snow, University of Michigan; and Julia Wondoleck, University of Michigan

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html or http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar). 
WEBINAR
Please register through GoToWebinar
(https//attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4561833459928484098).

Abstract:
The Kachemak Bay watershed, located on the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska, encompasses several terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems that provide a range of benefits and services that are not easily quantified. This webinar highlights methods and findings from a Master's project - advised by Dr. Julia Wondolleck - that provides insights about current ecosystem services valued in Kachemak Bay using a socio-cultural, place-based, ecosystem services framework. 
In addition to hearing from the students, their partners at Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve will share how they hope to apply their findings, and offer ideas for others interested in working with a student team in the future. Master's projects are interdisciplinary capstone experiences that enable University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability master's students to develop solutions to pressing problems faced by real-world clients. To learn more, read the team's recent report and review the process for proposing an idea for a future project.
Learn more about: [Human and Environmental Well-being in Alaska's Kachemak Bay Watershed: An Ecosystem Services Assessment
SPEAKER BIOS:
Ellie Flaherty holds a Master of Science from the University of Michigan, School for Environment and Sustainability, with concentrations in Environmental Policy and Conservation Ecology. Ellie has experience in environmental compliance support, as well as policy and program analysis, and currently works as a Research Associate for the NEERS Science Collaborative (NSC) program at the University of Michigan's Water Center. Ellie's particular interests lie in marine and coastal management and collaborative resource management processes.
Kathryn Kirkpatrick holds a Master of Science in Conservation Ecology and Environmental Policy within the School for Environment and Sustainability (SEAS) at the University of Michigan. She holds a particular interest in wetland restoration, fostered by various work experiences in ecological consulting, wetland banking, and independent research. Her master's project in evaluating human and environmental well-being in Alaskan watersheds helped develop an interest in environmental policy, leading to her current position as a student assistant in the Water Resources Division at the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE), formerly the MDEQ.
Trey Snow is a 2019 graduate from the School for Environment and Sustainability at University of Michigan where he received a Master's of Science in Environmental Policy and Planning. While at the University of Michigan, Trey was a teaching assistant for environmental policy and geospatial analysis courses. Following his bachelors in economics from Bucknell University in 2016, Trey spent time across the US from the Montana backcountry with the US Forest Service to an organic farm in New England. His work on this ecosystem service master's project highlights his interest in building connections between ecological monitoring and public policies and outreach.
Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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24 May 2019

Title: May 2018 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 24 May 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) 

Sponsor(s):
 OAR/CPO/RISA/Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service

POC:
Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (rthoman@alaska.edu)

Remote Access:
 https://accap.uaf.edu/May2019

Abstract:
 The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for June and the summer season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.
Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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28 May 2019

Title: Future of the North American Carbon Cycle
Presenter(s): Deborah Nicole Huntzinger, Associate Professor, Climate Science, School of Earth & Sustainability, Northern Arizona University, and Abhishek Chatterjee, Scientist, Universities Space Research Association, Columbia, MD, and NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, Greenbelt, MD
Date & Time: 28 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
Future of the North American Carbon Cycle 

Presenter(s):

Deborah Nicole Huntzinger, Associate Professor, Climate Science, School of Earth & Sustainability, Northern Arizona University,   
Co-Author:Abhishek Chatterjee, Scientist, Universities Space Research Association, Columbia, MD, and NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, Greenbelt, MD. Both are SOCCR-2 Chapter 19 Contributing Authors 

Sponsor(s):

U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha , & Tracy Gill
Webinar Access:
We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/, enter as "Guest", and please enter your first and last name. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Questions? Email Tracy Gill

Abstract:
Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, primarily due to fossil fuel emissions and land-use change, are expected to continue to drive changes in both climate and the terrestrial and ocean carbon cycles. Over the past two-to-three decades, there has been considerable effort to quantify terrestrial and oceanic system responses to environmental change, and project how these systems will interact with, and influence, future atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate. In this presentation, we will summarize key findings related to projected changes to the North American carbon cycle, and the potential drivers and associated consequences of these changes, as reported in Chapter 19 of the Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2). The findings not only capture projections of emissions from fossil fuel and changes in land cover and land use, but also highlight the decline in future carbon uptake capacity of North American carbon reservoirs and soil carbon losses from the Northern high-latitudes. Such a discussion of future carbon cycle changes is new in SOCCR-2. It underlines the progress made since the release of the First State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-1) in 2007 in identifying the vulnerability of key carbon pools and their co-evolution with changing climatic conditions. We will also discuss key knowledge gaps and outline a set of future research priorities, including both monitoring and modeling activities, that are necessary to improve projections of future changes to the North American carbon cycle and associated adaptation and resource-management decisions. 
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title:
New
California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System May Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Dr. Dan Cayan, CNAP, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD; Bryan Henry, Meteorologist, National Interagency Fire Center, Dr. Dan McEvoy, CNAP, Western Regional Climate Center
Date & Time: 28 May 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System May Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar.
These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. 
Feature Topics, Speakers and Affiliations:
Drought & Climate Update & Outlook, by Dr. Dan Cayan, Climate-Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego
Wildland Fire Potential Outlook, by Bryan Henry, Meteorologist, National Interagency Fire Center 
Drought Indices & Wildfire: A Test Case for the CA-NV DEWS, by Dr. Dan McEvoy, Climate-Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Western Regional Climate Center

Sponsor(s):
 
National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Drought.gov. For additional information contact Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS

Remote Access:

Register here.

Abstract:

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) May 2019 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Niño and La Niña). The webinar takes place at 11 a.m. PT, Tuesday May 28, 2019.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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29 May 2019

Title: SmallScaleOA [Ocean Acidification] for Coral and Beyond!
Presenter(s): Katherine Leigh -Kat- Leigh, Marine Biologist, Leader of SmallScaleOA. Presenting at NOAA Silver Spring
Date & Time: 29 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar, or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Rm 8150, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
SmallScaleOA [ocean acidification], for Coral and Beyond!

Presenter(s):

Katherine Leigh (Kat) Leigh, Marine Biologist, Leader of SmallScaleOA

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar hosts are Jason Philabotte and Tracy Gill

Remote Access:

We will use Adobe Connect. To register for this event, go to 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/smallscaleoa/event/registration.html
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Questions? Email Tracy Gill
 

Abstract:
SmallScaleOA is a multi-entity, collaborative initiative to conduct proof-of-concept pilot projects that will demonstrate a viable approach for incentivizing resilient coastal communities and seafood industry. SmallScaleOA will create a circular data economy to incentivize traceable, transparent seafood; as well as inclusive, low-cost, coastal research on a hyper-localized scale. Using aquatic sensors, mobile phones, satellites, and IoT concepts, SmallScaleOA will exponentially decrease the cost of collecting coastal/ocean observations; increase the inclusivity and local relevance of scientific research; facilitate access to financial services, investment capital, and insurance coverage; and fill several data gaps in our knowledge of ocean changes like acidification, deoxygenation, and temperature rise. SmallScaleOA will collect continuous, observational data across entire coastal areas (not just one stationary point) as well as across multiple aquaculture sites, while simultaneously gathering fishery and aquaculture production and chain-of-custody data. SmallScaleOA will begin in Southeast Asia (a region where coverage is currently lacking), and expand to other regions over time. SmallScaleOA's interoperable blockchain technologies will connect dispersed fishers, farmers, businesses, academics, government agencies, NGOs, etc. to a data ecosystem, ensure the validity and accessibility of this data, and adequately reward these actors for their contributions all without requiring a central authority.

Bio:

Katharine (Kat) Leigh is the Leader of SmallScaleOA. Kat has held positions in both the for-profit and non-profit sector with entities including The Nature Conservancy, Environmental Defense Fund, Cornell University, and Epic Software Systems. Her roles have spanned across project management and implementation, administration and marketing, scientific visioning, public data access strategizing, and community-based fisheries management. Although employed full-time, Kat dedicates much of her spare time towards launching her initiative, SmallScaleOA as well as leading her social venture, KomunikasIndonesia (KI). Ultimately, her goal is to combine economics, marine ecology/biology, and a dash of technology in order to incentivize sustainability in Indonesian small-scale fisheries. She has been a member of the Women's Aquatic Network (WAN) since 2017, having joined after networking with current members and participating in the organization's coastal clean-up event. Kat has a B.S. in Biology with a concentration in Marine Biology from Cornell University. She also holds minors in Environment and Resource Economics and International Development.
Despite having already spent over 10 years advocating for sustainable seafood, food systems and waste disposal, Kat wants to further expand her knowledge and become a better problem-solver. Thus, she will be going to graduate school in the fall of 2019. Kat's love of Marine Ecology continues to transcend traditional academic and social boundaries, merging into the fields of International Development and Environmental Economics. Ultimately, by drawing from her broad educational background, she plans to dedicate her career towards sustainability, and alleviating marine resource inequalities. She aims to focus on the incentive structures within small-scale fisheries in Southeast Asia. By bridging chronic communication and data silos, she will promote equity, accessibility, practicality, and resiliency at the interface between government, business, institutions, research, and the general public.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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30 May 2019

Title: The impact of remote forcing on US summer temperature extremes
Presenter(s): Dr. Hosmay Lopez, Assistant Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 30 May 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Hosmay Lopez, Assistant Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov
Remote access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/395323237
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (224) 501-3412
Access Code: 395-323-237

Abstract:
TBA
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Pacific herring across space and time: what can modern and ancient DNA reveal about population structure in a pelagic fish?
Presenter(s): Eleni Petrou, M.S., School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 30 May 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s):

Eleni Petrou, M.S., School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):

NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Join Webex: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m42adb0a9bd882bec37c6e44e3c14e4b5
Meeting number and Access Code: 808 021 158
Join by Phone: 1-650-479-3207 Call-in toll number (US/Canada) 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

Abstract:
TBD

Bio:
TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title:
New
Using Integrated Stream and Wetland Restoration Systems to Improve Habitat and Achieve Clean Water Objectives
Presenter(s): Erik Michelsen, Administrator of Anne Arundel County MD's Watershed Protection and Restoration Program
Date & Time: 30 May 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Restoration Webinar Series
The Restoration Webinar Series, hosted by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is a venue for disseminating new approaches, best management practices and innovative restoration techniques to some of our nation's greatest restoration challenges. The series covers a broad spectrum of topics including: planning and implementing restoration projects; project monitoring and evaluation at multiple time scales; accounting for a changing climate in restoration; regional restoration planning and priority setting; and permitting.
For more information and for upcoming webinars visit the Restoration Webinar Series program page.

Seminar Title: 
Using Integrated Stream and Wetland Restoration Systems to Improve Habitat and Achieve Clean Water Objectives 

Presenter(s):

Erik Michelsen, Administrator of Anne Arundel County MD's Watershed Protection and Restoration Program.

Sponsor(s):

US Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA.  Contact Eric Tsakiris or Nina Garfield with questions.
Webinar access:
For more information and to register: 
1. Go to https://doilearn2.webex.com/doilearn2/onstage/g.php?MTID=e3113e16f44d7ae7b15fe88b1bf493aed
2. Click "Register". 
3. Fill out the registration form and then click "Submit". 
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is committed to providing access to this webinar for all participants. Please direct all requests for closed captioning or other accommodation needs to Eric Tsakiris, 304-876-7430, eric_tsakiris@fws.gov, TTY 800-877-8339 at least three business days in advance of the event. 

Abstract:
Anne Arundel County, MD, like many municipalities in the Chesapeake Bay region, has aggressive, regulatory clean water goals and has authorized hundreds of millions of dollars to achieve those aims. Rather than simply focusing on numeric attainment of its MS4 permit and Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) goals, the County has tried " where possible " to emulate the functions of historical, integrated stream and wetland systems throughout the jurisdiction to provide both water quality and habitat benefits in a dramatically manipulated landscape. This presentation will focus on a number of case studies, and discuss the evolution of the approach over time.

Bio:

Erik Michelsen is currently the Administrator of Anne Arundel County's Watershed Protection and Restoration Program and is charged with managing its restoration effort to clean up the County's waterways and satisfy its Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) and Chesapeake Bay TMDL requirements.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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4 June 2019

Title: North American Energy System Contributions to the Global Carbon Cycle: Will the cycle be unbroken?
Presenter(s): Peter J. Marcotullio, Professor of Geography, Director of the Institute for Sustainable Cities, 
Hunter College, City University of New York
Date & Time: 4 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
North American Energy System Contributions to the Global Carbon Cycle: Will the cycle be unbroken?

Presenter(s):

Peter J. Marcotullio, Professor of Geography, Director of the Institute for Sustainable Cities, 
Hunter College, City University of New York.

Sponsor(s):
 
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha, & Tracy Gill.
Webinar Access:
We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/, enter as "Guest", and please enter your first and last name. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Questions? Email Tracy Gill

Abstract:
The North American energy system has undergone dramatic changes over the past 15 years. From a monotonic trend of increasing energy use based upon fossil fuel combustion since the early 1990s, the system headed into energy use declines starting around 2007. The latest trend has lasted through to 2016. The presentation will examine this decline, detailing from where and what sectors both energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions decreases were experienced. The seminar then overviews the factors behind the declining trends. We end the discussion with a look at what the future might bring from a variety of different scenarios, asking whether current trends will continue.  

Bio:

Peter J. Marcotullio is Professor of Geography, Hunter College, City University of New York (CUNY), Director of the Institute for Sustainable Cities at Hunter College, Associate of the CUNY Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) and faculty member in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Program at the CUNY Graduate Center. He is also Adjunct Professor of Urban Planning at Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation (GSAPP). Prior to 2006, Prof. Marcotullio was Lecturer (1999-2001) and Professor (2001-2006) of Urban Planning in the Urban Engineering Department, University of Tokyo and held several positions at the United Nations University, Institute for Advanced Studies, Japan (1997-2008). His research interests focus on urbanization, energy use and the environment. Professor Marcotullio is currently co-Editor-in-Chief of Urban Climate (Elsevier), Associate Editor of Sustainability Science, Springer, and on the Advisory Board of One Earth, Cell Press.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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5 June 2019

Title: The State of the ocean 2018.
Presenter(s): Dr. Rick Lumpkin, Oceanographer, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 5 June 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Rick Lumpkin, Oceanographer, (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)
Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov
Remote access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/571313661
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 571-313-661

Abstract:
TBA
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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6 June 2019

Title:
New
Gotta Be Fresh: Benthic Habitat Mapping in the Great Lakes
Presenter(s): Yizhen Li, Computational Ecologist, CSS Inc., Under Contract to NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science - NCCOS, HAB Forecasting Branch. Presenting at NOAA Silver Spring
Date & Time: 6 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
An update to the Gulf of Maine Harmful Algal Bloom (Alexandrium catenella) Forecast System

Presenter(s):

Will Sautter, Marine GIS Analyst with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science in Silver Spring, MD. Presenting at NOAA Silver Spring, SSMC4, Rm 8150.

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

We will use Adobe Connect; URL TBD - check back . Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy Gill


Abstract:
NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) has expanded it's habitat mapping expertise to the clear, cold and fresh waters of the Great Lakes. The team of scientists and surveyors have ventured up to Wisconsin and Michigan over the past three years with the Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab (GLERL) and the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) to conduct several mapping missions on the R/V Storm for exploration and characterization of the lakebed. The NCCOS Marine Spatial Ecology Division has adapted the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) to these freshwater habitats by analyzing high resolution sidescan sonar, multibeam bathymetry, backscatter, topographic LiDAR, and hundreds of high definition, underwater drop camera videos to understand the changes in substrate, geoform, and biotic cover. NCCOS is using these surveys and other benthic mapping data to produce several spatial prioritization and BIOmapper tools which will be demonstrated during the talk. From finding lost shipwrecks to monitoring invasive mussel cover, these maps are excellent tools for planning and natural resource management for the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and future marine protected areas in the Great Lakes. 

Bio:

Will Sautter is a marine GIS analyst under contract with CSS Inc., with the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science in Silver Spring, MD. Originally from Charleston, SC, he received a Bachelor of Science in Geology at Appalachian State University in North Carolina and is currently working on a Master's in Environmental Science and Policy from John's Hopkins University. He specializes in mapping the seafloor using multibeam sonars and underwater ground validation video data. He has conducted several surveys for habitat mapping in the Channel Islands, Grey's Reef, Flower Garden Banks, and the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuaries, but he is mostly excited at the opportunities to research and explore our federally protected waters.  .
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: Synchrony and thresholds in salmon abundance and forecast performance
Presenter(s): William Satterthwaite, PhD., Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 6 June 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s):
William Satterthwaite, PhD., Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov
WEBINAR  
Join Webex: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m42adb0a9bd882bec37c6e44e3c14e4b5
Meeting number and Access Code: 808 021 158
Join by Phone: 1-650-479-3207 Call-in toll number (US/Canada) 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

Abstract:
TBD
BIO : TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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7 June 2019

Title: Interannual variability of currents at 4N, 23W.
Presenter(s): Dr. Renellys Perez, Oceanographer, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 7 June 2019
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Renellys Perez, Oceanographer, (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)
Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov
Remote access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/138827389
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (646) 749-3122
Access Code: 138-827-389

Abstract:
TBA
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Lessons learned from the 2017-18 hurricane seasons and what lies ahead?
Presenter(s): Roberto Garcia, San Juan Puerto Rico Weather Forecast Office, NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 7 June 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see access below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Lessons learned from the 2017-18 hurricane seasons and what lies ahead?
Presentation will be in Spanish

Presenter(s):
Roberto Garcia, San Juan Puerto Rico Weather Forecast Office, NOAA's National Weather Service

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Southeast and Caribbean Regional Collaboration Team (SECART). Point of contact is Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov
Webinar Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5245938599038483202
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more.
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10 June 2019

Title: Impact of propagating sea level anomaly features on the AMOC
Presenter(s): Dr. Cyril Germineaud, Postdoctoral Fellow, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 10 June 2019
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Cyril Germineaud, Postdoctoral Fellow, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov
Remote access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/577819389
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3212
Access Code: 577-819-389

Abstract:
TBA
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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11 June 2019

Title: Observing System Experiments for the 2017 and 2018 Atlantic hurricane seasons.
Presenter(s): Dr. George Halliwell, Oceanographer, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 11 June 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. George Halliwell, Oceanographer, (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)
Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov
Remote access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/991129245
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (312) 757-3121
Access Code: 991-129-245

Abstract:
TBA
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Protecting Blue Whales and Blue Skies - Vessel Speed Reduction in California
Presenter(s): Jessica Morten, Resource Protection Specialist, contractor to NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary & Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary through the Greater Farallones Association
Date & Time: 11 June 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jessica Morten, Resource Protection Specialist, contractor to NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary & Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary through the Greater Farallones Association
Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429
Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8116706283566697739

Abstract:
California's nutrient-rich coastal waters are home to several species of large whales, including gray whales and endangered blue, humpback, and fin whales. The state is also home to four major shipping ports - San Diego, Long Beach, Los Angeles, and Oakland - that result in thousands of large container and tanker transits taking place within California national marine sanctuary waters. In the past decade, over 10 whale fatalities have been recorded along the California coast as a result of ship and whale collisions, and recent research suggests that many more of these ship strikes are going undetected each year. To address this global issue, learn more about how west coast national marine sanctuaries have been working with a number of partners to better understand the issue of ship strikes and slow vessels down to reduce harmful air emissions and protect endangered whales.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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12 June 2019

Title: Rigorously Valuing the Role of US Coral Reefs in Coastal Hazard Risk Reduction
Presenter(s): Curt Storlazzi, PhD, Research Geologist. US Geological Survey, Coastal and Marine Hazards and Resources Program
Date & Time: 12 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htmOneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
Rigorously Valuing the Role of US Coral Reefs in Coastal Hazard Risk Reduction    

Presenter(s):

Curt Storlazzi, PhD. Research Geologist. US Geological Survey, Coastal and Marine Hazards and Resources Program

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

We will use Adobe Connect; please register for seminar here: web address TBD.
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/gulfofmainehabforecastsystem/event/event_info.html . Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at this link. Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.  Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov
 

Abstract:
The degradation of coastal habitats, particularly coral reefs, raises risks by increasing the exposure of coastal communities to flooding hazards. The protective services of these natural defenses are not assessed in the same rigorous economic terms as artificial defenses, such as seawalls, and therefore often are not considered in decision making. Here we combine engineering, ecologic, geospatial, social, and economic tools to provide a rigorous valuation of the coastal protection benefits of all populated U.S. coral reefs in the States of Hawaii and Florida, the Territories of Guam, American Samoa, Puerto Rico, and Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. We follow risk-based valuation approaches to map flood zones at 10-square-meter resolution along all 3,100+ kilometers of U.S. reef-lined shorelines for different storm probabilities that account for the effect of coral reefs in reducing coastal flooding. We quantify the coastal flood risk reduction benefits provided by coral reefs using the latest information from the U.S. Census Bureau, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and Bureau of Economic Analysis for return-interval storm events and in terms of their annual expected benefits, a measure of the annual protection provided by coral reefs. Based on these results, the annual value of flood risk reduction provided by U.S. coral reefs is more than 18,000 lives and $1.805 billion in 2010 U.S. dollars. These data provide stakeholders and decision makers with spatially explicit, rigorous valuation of how, where, and when U.S. coral reefs provide critical coastal storm flood reduction benefits. The overall goal is to ultimately reduce the risk to, and increase the resiliency of U.S. coastal communities.

Bio:

Curt Storlazzi is the Chief Scientist of the USGS Coral Reef Project and leads a research team of 13 scientists that examines the geologic and oceanographic processes that affect the sustainability of US coral reefs and reef-lined coasts, authoring more than 140 scientific papers, reports, and book chapters on these topics. He received his BSc from the University of Delaware in 1996, his PhD from the University of California at Santa Cruz in 2000, and has been a research geologist in the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program since 2003. His research focuses on the quantitative study of hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and geomorphology in coastal and marine environments across the Pacific, Atlantic, Arctic, and Indian Oceans. Curt is on the steering committee for the US Coral Reef Task Force and regularly contributes scientific review for the US Global Change Research Program, NOAA's National Marine Sanctuary Program, the National Park Service, the USFWS Landscape Change Cooperatives, and the USGS Climate Science Centers.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium: Geostationary Satellite Improvements for Better Viewing of Alaska and Surrounding Areas
Presenter(s): Tim Schmit, Research Satellite Meteorologist, NOAA NESDIS STAR at the University of Wisconsin
Date & Time: 12 June 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
 Tim Schmit, Research Satellite Meteorologist NOAA NESDIS STAR at the University of Wisconsin
Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and  NOAA CPO RISA Program

Remote Access:
https://accap.uaf.edu/VAWS_June2019

Abstract:
 
There have been many recent changes to better observe Alaska from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) perspective. The most significant change was on February 12, 2019 when GOES-17 became NOAA's operational West geostationary satellite. The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) has spectral bands covering the visible, near-infrared and infrared portions of the electro-magnetic spectrum. The ABI represents a major improvement from the legacy GOES imagers for many attributes, such as those relating to: spectral, spatial, temporal, radiometric, and image navigation/registration. An on-board cooling issue associated with the Loop Heat Pipe on GOES-17 causes degradation for certain periods of the year, at certain times, mostly at night. The affected spectral bands are those with wavelengths greater than 4 micrometers with effects that start with biasing, striping, banding, and ultimately complete saturation for the most affected bands. In order to mitigate the impacts of this issue, improvements to the calibration procedures are improving the image quality before and after saturation occurs. These improvements include a modification to the ABI timeline in the 10-min Full Disk flex mode, predictive calibration, and other changes. Once a spectral band is saturated, there is little that can be done to better calibrate the data. The current status of Level 2 or derived products, such as cloud heights or atmospheric motion vectors, from the GOES-17 ABI will also be covered.
Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks
Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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13 June 2019

Title: Finding Meteotsunamis: A Signal in the Noise of NOAA Tide Gauges
Presenter(s): Greg Dusek, PhD, Senior Scientist, NOAA/NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services. Presenting at NOAA in SIlver Spring, SSMC4, Room 8150
Date & Time: 13 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Finding Meteotsunamis: A Signal in the Noise of NOAA Tide Gauges 

Presenter(s):
Greg Dusek, PhD, Senior Scientist, NOAA/NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). Presenting at NOAA in SIlver Spring, SSMC4, Room 8150.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
Webinar Access: We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/, enter as "Guest", and
please enter your first and last name. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov
Abstract and 

Bio:
TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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21 June 2019

Title:
New
Underlying physical mechanism of the relationship between US tornado activity and MJO
Presenter(s): Dr. Dongmin Kim, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 21 June 2019
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Dongmin Kim, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov
Remote access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/162958909
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 162-958-909

Abstract:
TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: June 2019 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy - ACCAP
Date & Time: 21 June 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:



Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) 

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and  National Weather Service

POC:
Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (rthoman@alaska.edu)

Remote Access:
 https://accap.uaf.edu/June2019

Abstract:
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for July and the remaining summer season and early fall. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.
Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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26 June 2019

Title:
New
Exploring Applications of Ecosystem Service Conceptual Models for Coastal Habitats
Presenter(s): Ellie Flaherty, University of Michigan; Kate Kirkpatrick, University of Michigan; Trey Snow, University of Michigan; and Julia Wondoleck, University of Michigan
Date & Time: 26 June 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s):
Sara Mason, Duke University and Lydia Olander, Duke University

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html or http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar). 
WEBINAR
Please register through GoToWebinar
(https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7354325813176875523).

Abstract:
Estuarine systems are areas of immense ecological importance and provide numerous social, economic, and environmental benefits. These benefits, both direct and indirect, are referred to as ecosystem services. Ecosystem services considerations are of increasing importance to the NERRS and many of their partners, and this webinar describes a project aimed at finding streamlined ways to incorporate ecosystem services into NERR coastal decision-making. We use Ecosystem Service Conceptual Models (ESCMs) as a framework to think about ecosystem services and how they can be considered within the NERRS. We will describe our work with the North Carolina and Rookery Bay NERRs to develop oyster reef and mangrove ESCMs, our efforts to apply these models to specific restoration sites at these NERRs, and our use of the models as a way to think about standardized monitoring of ecosystem services outcomes across the NERR network.
Learn more about: [Exploring Applications of Ecosystem Service Conceptual Models for Coastal Habitats] 
SPEAKER BIOS:
Sara Mason joined the Ecosystem Services Program at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions as a policy associate after graduating from Duke with a master's degree in environmental management. Her work focuses on the interdisciplinary nature of biodiversity conservation and how that can be leveraged to engage the public and policy makers in conservation efforts. Prior to joining the Nicholas Institute, Sara worked in ecological field research and endangered animal rehabilitation.
Lydia Olander directs the Ecosystem Services Program at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions at Duke University. She leads the National Ecosystem Services Partnership, supporting efforts to integrate ecosystem services into decision making, and studies environmental markets and mitigation, including forestry and agricultural based climate mitigation; wetland, stream and endangered species mitigation; and water quality trading. She also serves on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board and the secretariat of The Bridge Collaborative.
Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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10 July 2019

Title: Catch and Release: Large whale entanglements and response efforts to mitigate the threat
Presenter(s): Ed Lyman, Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 10 July 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Speaker: Ed Lyman, Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary
Sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429
Remote access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/121031339510977036

Abstract:
Entanglement or by-catch is a global issue that affects many marine animals, including large whales like the charismatic humpback whale. Hundreds of thousands of whales die worldwide each year, but the impacts go beyond mortality. When conditions and resources allow, trained responders under NOAA's Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program attempt the dangerous task of freeing whales from life-threatening entanglements. However, the ultimate goal is to gain information to reduce the threat for whales and humans alike. The Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary working closely with its partners and the community, coordinates response efforts for Hawaii, the principle breeding and calving ground of humpback whales in the North Pacific. The effort represents a unique and valuable opportunity to gain a broader understanding of large whale entanglement threat. Learn more about whale entanglements and response efforts from expert Ed Lyman.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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