All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

23 September 2019

Title: Preparing for the Next Water Year: Drought & Climate Outlook for California-Nevada
Presenter(s): Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS
Date & Time: 23 September 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
 
Drought & Climate Update, Dr. Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS 
Drought & Climate Outlook, Eric Boldt, NOAA NWS, Los Angeles/Oxnard
Precipitation Regime Change in Western North America: The Role of Atmospheric Rivers, Dr. Sasha Gershunov, CNAP, Scripps Institution of Oceanography/UC San Diego

Sponsor(s):
 National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP)

POC:
 Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
 https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/california-nevada-drought-climate-outlook-webinar-september-23-2019

Abstract:
 
Another record hot summer is coming to a close in California and Nevada. However, both states have avoided drought for some time, with the exception of a small slice on the California/Arizona border. The region is now looking ahead to prepare for the next water year. This webinar will provide an overview of the current conditions and outlook for the fall into winter as well as the role of atmospheric rivers in Western North America.
The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) September 2019 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Niño and La Niña). 
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)
Seminar POC for questions: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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24 September 2019

Title:
New
How to Make a Tornado: Ideas emerging from decades of theory, simulation, and field observations, plus challenges for operational NWP
Presenter(s): Paul Markowski, Penn State
Date & Time: 24 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Paul Markowski, Penn State

Sponsor(s):
ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER SEMINAR for more information visit https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Participant: 1262920#

Abstract:
https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/abstract.2019/Markowski.html Poster: https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/poster/Markowski.seminar.poster.jpg Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: Computer Vision for Conservation
Presenter(s): Christin Khan, Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 24 September 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter:
Christin Khan, Northeast Fisheries Science Center 

Sponsor(s):
 NEDTalk NOAA Environmental Data Talks - Speaker Series (https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/nesdis-datafest/nedtalks).

POC:
tiffany.small@noaa.gov
NOAA DataFest is a month-long effort throughout September to educate the public and inspire our colleagues at NOAA to learn more about NOAA data while celebrating its value, reliability, and accessibility. NOAA data covers a robust collection of scientific earth and environmental observations available to the scientific community and the public. 

Remote Access:
 To see a presentation, join the Q&A session via Adobe Connect and follow the prompts to "enter as a guest.". Click on https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fnoaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com%2Fnoaa-interview%2F&sa=D&ust=1566329343243000&usg=AFQjCNFBxyn61aRKTvl53Egt6wsUcS6oHA

Abstract:
 Motivated by recent developments in image recognition, we hosted a data science challenge on the crowdsourcing platform Kaggle to automate the identification of endangered North Atlantic right whales. The winning solution automatically identified individual whales with 87% accuracy with a series of convolutional neural networks to identify the region of interest on an image, rotate, crop, and create standardized photographs of uniform size and orientation and then identify the correct individual whale from these passport-like photographs. Recent advances in deep learning coupled with this fully automated workflow have yielded impressive results and have the potential to revolutionize traditional methods for the collection of data on the abundance and distribution of wild populations.

Bio:
 Christin Khan is a Fishery Biologist in the Protected Species Branch at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole. She is an aerial survey observer and data manager of the North Atlantic Right Whale Sighting Survey which conducts aerial surveys to monitor right whale abundance and distribution from New Jersey to Canada. When not in the air, Christin also works on right whale social behavior, automated image recognition, right whale outreach signs, the Right Whale Sighting Advisory System, interactive Google map, and the Whale Alert app.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Where are all the fish going? Identifying patterns of genetic connectivity across the Hawaiian Archipelago
Presenter(s): Dr. Richard Coleman, former Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology
Date & Time: 24 September 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Speaker: Dr. Richard Coleman, former Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology
Sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429
Remote access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4031243235500459275

Abstract:
Understanding connectivity and dispersal pathways, as well as identifying the underlying mechanisms influencing these patterns are essential to properly understand how biodiversity is generated in the sea and to inform management strategies. Since direct observation of larvae is impractical, a variety of genetic methods have been developed to characterize connectivity and dispersal patterns in marine organisms. Join Dr. Richard Coleman as he explains how he incorporated several genetic-based approaches to assess connectivity of two recreationally important reef fishes across the Hawaiian Archipelago to assess connectivity between the Main Hawaiian Islands and the Papāhanaumokuākea Marine National Monument.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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25 September 2019

Title: A Long Endurance Fixed Wing Vertical Takeoff and Landing Drone for Shipboard Operations
Presenter(s): Dr. Ben Cameron, Creare LLC
Date & Time: 25 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
Join the NOAA Central Library and the Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) for the new NOAA Innovators Series! This series will be facilitated by Tiffany House, SBIR Commercialization Specialist.
Webinar ONLY: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8960343963276030977

Presenter(s):
Dr. Ben Cameron, Creare LLC

Abstract:
Creare is developing a fixed wing Vertical Takeoff and Landing (VTOL) drone for shipboard operations to eliminate the complex launch and recovery procedures typical of non-VTOL drones. Creare's drone utilizes a biplane configuration to achieve lower flight speeds and higher endurance than existing monoplane with the same wingspan. The drone employs a novel control method that eliminates the added cost, weight and complexity of traditional control surfaces (e.g., elevators and ailerons) and also reduces weight by using a single propulsion system for vertical and horizontal flight.

Bio:
Ben Cameron is the Principal Investigator of this NOAA SBIR Phase II effort. At Creare, Dr. Cameron leads the Unmanned Aircraft Systems research group and oversees development of complete drone systems and airborne sensor packages for specialized scientific missions.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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Title:
New
We’ve Got Chemistry! Leveraging Partnerships and the Ocean Acidification Information Exchange to Advance Ocean Acidification and MPA Science
Presenter(s): Julianna Mullen of NERACOOS and the OAInfoExchange.org, Jenny Waddell of the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, and Francis Chan of Oregon State University
Date & Time: 25 September 2019
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar only; Please note this webinar will last 1.5 hours.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
We've Got Chemistry! Leveraging Partnerships and the Ocean Acidification Information Exchange to
Advance Ocean Acidification and MPA Science

Presenter(s):
Julianna Mullen, Marine Scientist & Communications Specialist and Site Manager of the New England Regional Association of Coastal and Ocean Observation Systems (NERACOOS) and the OAInfoExchange.org,
Jenny Waddell, Research Coordinator, at the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, and 
Francis Chan, Associate Faculty, Senior Researcher in the Department of Integrative BiologyOregon State University
Co-

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas (MPA) Center and the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program with OCTO (MPA News, OpenChannels, EBM Tools Network). Webinar points of contact: Zac Cannizzo and Meg Chadsey.
Webinar Access: 
Register here.

Abstract:
Marine protected areas (MPAs), sanctuaries, and reserves offer refuge to a wide variety of marine species, but can they also protect vulnerable organisms from the effects of ocean acidification (OA) and other climate-related stressors? Increasingly, OA scientists and MPA managers are working together to explore questions of adaptability in marine protected areas to explore this question and sharing their ideas on a dynamic new online platform called the OA Information Exchange (OAIE). In this webinar, we will: 1) provide an orientation to the OAIE to the MPA community and other new users, 2) describe how innovative collaborations between researchers and volunteer scientists are advancing both OA and MPA science in Oregon Marine Reserves, and 3) provide examples of efforts to document changing ocean conditions and understand potential impacts of ecosystem change in Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, including how the development of a sentinel site for ocean acidification on the Olympic Coast supports OA coordination and collaboration in Washington.
[Please note this webinar will last 1.5 hours.]
About the

Presenter(s):
Julianna Mullen: Julianna is the Community Manager for the Ocean Acidification Information Exchange, a collaborative online platform for professionals working or interested in ocean and coastal acidification. Through her role as manager, Julianna works to increase engagement among members, maintain an online environment where users feel empowered to share, and improve the site interface. The OA Information Exchange is a program of NERACOOS, the regional ocean observation network for New England, and Julianna also oversees NERACOOS' communications programs, focusing on raising awareness of the organization's activities and successes.
Jenny Waddell joined the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary team as sanctuary research coordinator in the summer of 2016, after several years of international work as a team lead at the Office for Coastal Management's Coral Reef Conservation Program. Jenny enjoys being able to focus on more 'place-based' conservation efforts as part of the OCNMS team, helping to protect the wild and wonderful outer coast of Washington state.
Francis Chan is an Associate Faculty, Senior Researcher in the Department of Integrative Biology at OSU. Dr. Chan leads much of the coastal oceanography work in Oregon for PISCO (Partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans), which is teaming up with marine reserve community groups up and down the coast, to not only fill geographic gaps in ocean acidification monitoring, but to also engage citizens in addressing this complex issue.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: Translating Resilience-based Management from Theory to Practice
Presenter(s): Dr. Anne Chung, Lynker Technologies, on contract to NOAA-NMFS Pacific Islands Regional Office, Habitat Conservation Division
Date & Time: 25 September 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below), or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4 - Medium Conference Room - 8348
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
Translating Resilience-based Management from Theory to Practice

Presenter(s):

Dr. Anne Chung, Lynker Technologies, on contract to NOAA/NMFS Pacific Islands Regional Office, Habitat Conservation Division

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
Webinar Access: Please register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/coralresilience/event/registration.html
After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to us Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Guidance on how to maintain or increase coral reef resilience has been commonly made at a broad, global scale. In this study, I took one particular recommended intervention " to protect herbivorous fishes through herbivore management areas " and distilled it into specific recommendations at an sub-island scale. To do so, I modified existing design principles for the creation of no-take marine area networks and applied them to a case study in the Main Hawaiian Islands. Next, I applied these design principles to lead a spatial desktop analysis, incorporating local ecological and social data to identify areas within a coastline where herbivore management could lead to greater resilience. This work demonstrates how one could refine resilience-based management guidance to a regional level and clarifies how to maximize the use of this one particular resilience-building tool.

Bio:
Dr. Anne Chung has been working in conservation science and planning in Hawaii for the last 10 years. She is a recent doctoral graduate from the University of Hawaii's Marine Biology Graduate Program and this work is part of her dissertation research. Previously, she worked supporting the Hawaii Division of Aquatic Resources on numerous projects including the Marine 30x30 Initiative, the Makai Watch Program, and the Coral Bleaching Recovery Plan. She has recently become a Natural Resource Specialist with Lynker Technologies, on contract to the NMFS Pacific Islands Regional Office where she is supporting the Essential Fish Habitat program as well as coordination of place-based restoration work in West Hawaii through the Habitat Blueprint Program.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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26 September 2019

Title: Serving Coral Connections in the US Virgin Islands
Presenter(s): Dan Dorfman, Senior Marine Spatial Ecologist, NOAA/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science; Leslie Henderson, Coral Reef Initiative Coordinator, USVI Dept of Planning and Natural Resources; Pedro Nieves, Project Coordinator, USVI Dept of Planning and Natural Resources. Dan presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring and Leslie and Pedro presenting remotely from USVI
Date & Time: 26 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
Serving Coral Connections in the US Virgin Islands

Presenter(s):
Dan Dorfman, Senior Marine Spatial Ecologist, NOAA/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science;
Leslie Henderson, Coral Reef Initiative Coordinator, USVI Dept of Planning and Natural Resources;
Pedro Nieves, Project Coordinator, USVI Dept of Planning and Natural Resources.
Dan presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring and Leslie and Pedro presenting remotely from USVI.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, the Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the NOS Science Seminar Series; Coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
Webinar Access:
Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/usvi/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
NCCOS and the USVI Department of Planning and Natural Resources have partnered to develop an on-line tool and mapping services in support of coral ecosystem planning and management. The tool provides a wide range of information associated with coral reef ecosystems. The information provided includes locations of coral and distributions of benthic habitats. Data from in water surveys, ecosystem characterization, and human uses. By providing the information as public map services and an on-line tool, we enable local planners and managers to readily and reliably integrate information on coral ecosystems into management decisions. The tool can be applied by the USVI DPNR to provide ecosystem context to permitting and land use decisions. Additionally, this on-line capacity can support a wide range of needs including promoting public awareness, advancing scientific research, and communicating management decision.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
Salmon in the Central Valley (CA) and Seattle (WA): Improving Habitat Function in Compromised Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Stuart Munsch, Ph.D., Fish Ecology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 26 September 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
  NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov. 

Presenter(s):
Stuart Munsch, Ph.D., Fish Ecology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
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Meeting password: 5A5Ptfax
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Abstract:
The applied ecologist's job is often to understand how ecosystem changes impact habitat function. From this understanding we may develop solutions to ecological challenges or place the role of ecosystem components in the greater context of management realms, especially when total restoration is impractical. Two systems where this is the case are salmon in the Central Valley (CA) and Elliott Bay (WA). The Central Valley is a transformed, seasonally-arid landscape that is increasingly susceptible to drought. It also supports human activities that divert water and salmon fisheries increasingly reliant on hatcheries. Elliott Bay in downtown Seattle is an urban waterfront that aggregates human activities along its highly modified shoreline. Despite these stressors, both systems are inhabited by federally listed salmon. In this talk, I will discuss how (1) in the Central Valley, (a) annual rearing windows of juvenile salmon are constrained by its climate and engineered water supply system and (b) fisheries management, flow regulation, and habitat restoration may coordinate to increase productivity of naturally spawned salmon and (2) in Elliott Bay, (a) armoring and overwater structures impair juvenile salmon habitats and (b) the City of Seattle rebuilt its downtown waterfront with science-informed habitat features that attempt to repair these lost habitat functions. By appreciating how ecosystem modifications impact habitat function, we may work within constraints of human activities to improve salmon outcomes.
BIO
Stuart Munsch earned a B.S. in Biology from Gonzaga University in 2010 and a Ph.D. in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences from the University of Washington in 2016. He is currently in the Watershed Program at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center. 
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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1 October 2019

Title: Designing Port Infrastructure for Sea Level Change: A Survey of Engineers
Presenter(s): Ben Sweeney, NOAA Coastal Management Fellow, New Hampshire Coastal Program
Date & Time: 1 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below), or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
Designing Port Infrastructure for Sea Level Change: A Survey of Engineers

Presenter(s):
 
Ben Sweeney, NOAA Coastal Management Fellow, New Hampshire Coastal Program
Co-Author: 
Austin Becker, Associate Professor, University of Rhode Island Department of Marine Affairs

Sponsor(s):
 
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
Webinar Access: 
We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, register at: 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/port/event/registration.html 
After registering, you should receive an email from Tracy Gill with the link to the webinar.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to us Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Seaports are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change due to their coastal location. Engineers play a pivotal role in improving the resilience of ports, as they are responsible for designing port infrastructure that will be adequately prepared for future sea level change (SLC). However, incorporating SLC is a challenging task due to the uncertainty of SLC projections and the long service lives of port infrastructure. Through an online survey of 85 U.S. port and marine infrastructure engineers, this research explores the engineering community's attitude and approach to planning for SLC for large-scale maritime infrastructure projects. Survey findings highlight that only 29% of respondents indicated that their organization had an internal policy or planning document that communicates how to design for SLC. Furthermore, results show the lack of regulatory design standards in this area leads to engineers and their clients disregarding SLC more frequently. There is a clear need for collaboration among engineers, port authorities, and policy makers to develop practical design methods for designing resilient port infrastructure.

Bio:
Ben Sweeney recently graduated with his master's degree in marine affairs from the University of Rhode Island (URI). For his thesis, Ben researched how port and marine infrastructure engineers are incorporating sea level change (SLC) into the design specifications of piers, terminals, wharves, and other marine civil works. He is primarily interested in how regional uncertainty of SLC, differing guidelines and recommendations for managing SLC, and the long working lifespans of these structures affect the engineering community's attitude and approach to planning for SLC for large-scale port engineering projects. Ben has also had the opportunity to contribute to several other major research projects during his time as a graduate student. For example, Ben has assisted with developing a GIS inventory of critical coastal infrastructure land use in Caribbean Island Small Island Developing States. After graduating from URI, Ben was selected as a NOAA Coastal Management Fellow to work with the New Hampshire Coastal Program (NHCP). He has been with NHCP since August, and primarily works on coastal hazard adaptation and resiliency planning. Prior to attending URI, he received a B.S. in Environmental Engineering from the University of New Hampshire.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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2 October 2019

Title:
New
CHIKRisk App: Global Mapping and Prediction of Chikungunya Risk
Presenter(s): Dr. Assaf Anyamba, Research Scientist, Goddard Earth Sciences Technology and Research,  NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Date & Time: 2 October 2019
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Via webinar or to attend in Silver Spring, SSMC3, Room 12836 (if not with NOAA, contact Lisa, below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
CHIKRisk App: Global Mapping and Prediction of Chikungunya Risk
Speaker:
Dr. Assaf Anyamba, Research Scientist with Goddard Earth Sciences Technology and Research (GESTAR/USRA) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's International Research and Applications Project (IRAP) and the Department of Defense (DOD) demonstrates the potential applications of climate data and information - including forecasts - to reduce risk in the public health sector. The NOAA National Weather Service is a partner in this effort.  
In Person and Remote Participation:
The seminar will be held in Room 12836 (the large conference room) in SSMC3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD). If you are not with NOAA, and would like to be cleared into the building, please let us know ahead of time by contacting Lisa.Vaughan@noaa.gov so that we can make arrangements.
To participate remotely, please join my meeting from your computer, tablet, or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/881886005
Join the conference call:
866.746.8145 (Call in number- Domestic)
210.814.0730 (Call in number- International)
9016398 (Leader Passcode)1495809 (Participant Passcode)
New to GoToMeeting? Get the app now and be ready when your first meeting starts:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/install/881886005
Questions? Email Lisa.Vaughan@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Emerging and re-emerging diseases of global public health concern are recognized to be closely associated with variations in global climate regime. Recent chikungunya epidemics in the Americas (2013-2016), Africa, Indian Ocean and Asia (2005-20067 and have been associated with extreme departures in climate parameters including rainfall and temperature. Chikungunya in particular has illustrated the potential for global spread as demonstrated with epidemics in the Americas, Mediterranean Europe and by the limited local transmission in Florida and Texas. Under the umbrella of the Department of Defense (DoD) " Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) " Biosurveillance Ecosystem (BSVE) and NOAA International Research and Applications Project (IRAP) programs, we have developed a global chikungunya mapping and forecasting application system to map areas at risk for chikungunya concurrently and 1 to 3 months ahead. Using this model, we are producing monthly risk maps based on climate observations and forecast risk maps based on NOAA's North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME) temperature and rainfall seasonal forecasts. This effort is aimed at supporting DoD Force Health Protection (FHP) mission, regions of the US at risk (Texas and Florida) and international public health agencies (including World Health Organization, PAHO). This nascent effort illustrates how massive amounts of climate datasets combined with publicly available outbreak information using machine learning methods, can be brought to address an issue of public health concern. This effort demonstrates and provides a template that can be employed in the immediate and near future to develop applications relevant to other vector-borne and ecologically coupled diseases.

Bio:

Dr. Assaf Anyamba is a Research Scientist with Goddard Earth Sciences Technology and Research (GESTAR/USRA) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. He received his undergraduate degree from Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya in Geography and Economics (1989) and a Masters degree in Geography from Ohio University, Athens (1992). He received his Ph.D. (1997) in Geography with a focus on Remote Sensing of Land Surface Patterns of ENSO from Clark University, Worcester, MA. His research interests are in the extraction of interannual climate variability signals from remotely sensed vegetation measurements, drought pattern analysis, applications of remotely sensed data in agricultural monitoring, drought & famine early warning and the links between climate and disease outbreaks. His current work supports research and development for USDA/FAS-PECAD and USAID/FEWNET, DoD-GEIS, USDA/CMAVE and FDA Programs.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Spatio-temporal models connecting across line offices; regional ocean models, biogeographic assessments, and modes of variability in fish spatial distribution
Presenter(s): James Thorson , Program lead, Habitat and Ecosystem Process Research program, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, NOAA. Presenting remotely from Seattle.
Date & Time: 2 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar, or for NOAA staff in Silver Spring, SSMC4, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
Spatio-temporal models connecting across line offices; regional ocean models, biogeographic assessments, and modes of variability in fish spatial distribution

Presenter(s):

James Thorson, Program lead, Habitat and Ecosystem Process Research program, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, NOAA. Presenting remotely from Seattle.

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator for this event is Tracy Gill.
Webinar Access:
Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/stmodels/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Questions? Email Tracy Gill

Abstract:

NOAA Line Offices conduct research on a tremendous variety of topics, including hurricane tracking, harmful algal bloom forecasts, support for marine sanctuaries, and information for fishery harvest advice. Research communities addressing these different topics often develop different analytic methods, using various standards of model evaluation, and communicating results differently. In response to differences between habitat, ecosystem, and stock-assessment methods within the National Marine Fisheries Service, colleagues have been developing spatio-temporal methods that estimate variation in population density across space for multiple species and its evolution over time; these models can then be summarized to identify key habitats, summarize community dynamics, or estimate regional population abundance. In this talk, I speculate about how spatio-temporal models could also address important topics for other NOAA line offices; for illustration I focus on regional ocean models, biogeographic assessments, and identifying modes of variability in ocean and atmospheric dynamics that drive biological processes. I hope to start a conversation this powerful new class of statistical methods that can be adapted NOAA-wide.

Bio:

James Thorson worked as a stock-assessment scientist at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center, before accepting a new position as lead of Loss of Sea Ice and Essential Fish Habitat programs at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center. He plans and conducts research regarding physical and biological processes that can inform ecosystem-based fisheries management.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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3 October 2019

Title:
New
Growing Reefs in a Changing Ocean: What Isotopes and Metals Can Teach Us about the Adaptability of Coral Skeletal Growth to Climate Change
Presenter(s): Alex Gagnon, University of Washington
Date & Time: 3 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
  NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Alex Gagnon, University of Washington
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Meeting number: 908 213 663
Meeting password: 5A5Ptfax
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Access code: 908 213 663

Abstract:
TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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8 October 2019

Title: OceanReports: The first intelligent web application for marine spatial analysis of the entire U.S. EEZ
Presenter(s): Dr. James A. Morris, Jr., Marine Ecologist at NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 8 October 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. James A. Morris, Jr., Marine Ecologist at NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429
Remote access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8971704121223874060

Abstract:
OceanReports (https://coast.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/tools/ort.html) is the most comprehensive web-based spatial assessment tool for the ocean in the U.S., designed to improve decision-making and increase transparency for ocean and coastal users, and resource managers. The tool contains approximately 100 distinct data layers capable of analyzing energy and minerals, natural resources (including species and habitats), transportation and infrastructure, oceanographic and biophysical conditions, and the local ocean economy for any area of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). Learn more about OceanReports from Dr. Morris and help NOAA determine how formal and informal educators can utilize this robust online product.
OceanReports was developed through a partnership between the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, NOAA, and the Department of Energy, and utilizes new and authoritative data from MarineCadastre.gov and other trusted sources.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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9 October 2019

Title: US Fishery Disasters: Trends, Causes, and Impacts of Pacific Salmon Declines on Native American Communities
Presenter(s): Kimberly A. Marshall McLean, PhD, George Mason University, Department of Environmental Science & Public Policy
Date & Time: 9 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
U.S. Fishery Disasters: Trends, Causes, and Impacts of Pacific Salmon Declines on Native American Communities

Presenter(s):

Kimberly A. Marshall McLean, PhD, George Mason University, Department of Environmental Science & Public Policy

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov
Webinar Access:
We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/salmon/event/registration.html
After registering, you will receive an email from Tracy Gill with the link to the webinar.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to us Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
A fishery disaster is a way the government can provide financial relief when commercial fishermen have had a failure in their fishery. This study used data reported by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) on fishery disasters. It calculated the estimated costs of fishery disasters from 1989-2017 to be ~$1.4 billion. Trends analyses were performed on several variables relating to fishery disasters over that time period. 255 fishery disasters were found, 18 of which were catastrophic regional fishery disasters (e.g., hurricanes) and 237 were fishery-specific disasters. It was observed that the greatest impacts were in the Pacific coast region, which accounted for 53% of all fishery disasters across all five U.S. regions examined. Statistically significant upward trends in fishery disasters were observed for inland Pacific salmon (three of the runs were ESA listed or Species of Concern) and Native American communities in those states (p = 0.0075 and 0.0016, respectively).  
The cause of each disaster was investigated. Several key findings were observed: 1) the five most frequently cited (top 20%) causes across all 255 disasters were El Niño, high ocean water temperatures, disease/pathogen, drought, and flooding, suggesting climate change may be playing a significant role in causing disasters; 2) all 8 causes cited in 2017 had all previously appeared, suggesting conditions causing disasters are persisting; 3) hurricanes are numerous and persistent; 4) 36% of the causes reported are within the last ten years: changing climatic conditions, extreme weather event, habitat loss, poor freshwater quality, predation, unfavorable ocean conditions, and positive Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO); 5) some causes with low frequencies of citations (e.g., urban development, agriculture, dams/hydroelectric power, logging (generally habitat destruction and degradation), predation, and overfishing) were more prominently cited during later interviews with tribal members; and 6) excess fishing was last reported in the mid-1990s.

Bio:

Kim Marshall McLean recently earned her PhD in Environmental Science & Public Policy from George Mason University and holds a Master of Science in Biology. She has been working on conservation science and policy issues for over 20 years. Kim is currently the Fishery Disasters Lead for NOAA Fisheries. She also served on the Restoration Planning Leadership Team for the NOAA Restoration Center developing habitat restoration projects in the Gulf of Mexico to restore natural resources harmed from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and was instrumental in securing $8 million in funding under the RESTORE Act to implement a program that, through partnerships with other federal and state agencies, Federally-recognized tribes, and The Corps Network, stood up a Conservation Corps in the Gulf of Mexico that restores habitats in the Gulf while investing in local communities by training local youth for jobs as Corps members. Kim's doctoral research was on the Trends in Fishery Disasters and Impacts of the Declines in Pacific Salmon on Native American Tribes. This Spring, she was awarded the Dissertation Award for Greatest Impact on the Study of Environmental Science and Public Policy from George Mason University. Kim is married and has two children.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ for more information.
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Title: Prevention, Control, Mitigation, and Socioeconomics of Harmful Algal Blooms: FY 2020 Federal Funding Opportunity Overview and Q&A
Presenter(s): Felix Martinez, PCMHAB Program Manager, NCCOS/Competitive Research Program, NOAA
Date & Time: 9 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar, or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Note: This 10/9 seminar is subject to Federal Funding Opportunity getting posted in Federal Register by 10/9/19.
Title:
Prevention, Control, Mitigation, and Socioeconomics of Harmful Algal Blooms: FY 2020 Federal Funding Opportunity Overview and Q&A

Presenter(s):
  Felix Martinez, PCMHAB Program Manager, NCCOS/Competitive Research Program, NOAA

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) and National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
Webinar Access: 
Please register at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pcmhabs/event/registration.html 
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm 
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Webinar Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Since the authorization of the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act, NOAA has made available competitive funding for research on how and why harmful algal blooms (HABs) form and persist, as well as addressing the effects of the blooms through bloom prevention, control of their spread, or mitigation of their impacts. Through this webinar we will provide those interested in HABs research with information and answer questions about NCCOS/CRP's FY 20 Federal Funding Opportunity focused on prevention, control, mitigation, and socioeconomics of HABs.

Bio:
Felix Martinez has over 15 years of experience as a Federal Program Officer in NOAA. Since coming to NOAA, Felix has developed and implemented research programs that have funded projects focused on coral reefs, mesophotic coral ecosystems, invasive species, hypoxia, valuation of ecosystem services, harmful algal blooms, and ecosystem based management. As part of the NCCOS/CRP HABs Team, he manages the Prevention, Control, and Mitigation of HABs Program or PCMHAB.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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10 October 2019

Title:
New
Life and Death of Big Chinook Salmon in the Ocean
Presenter(s): Andrew Seltz, University of Alaska-Fairbanks
Date & Time: 10 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
  NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Andrew Seltz, University of Alaska-Fairbanks
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Join Webex
Meeting number: 908 213 663
Meeting password: 5A5Ptfax
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Access code: 908 213 663

Abstract:
TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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16 October 2019

Title:
New
Conceptualizing and Designing Collaborative Science Projects
Presenter(s): Alison Watts, University of New Hampshire; Jennifer West, Narragansett Bay NERR; Nikki Dix, Guana Tolomat Matanzas NERR; and Julia Wondolleck, University of Michigan
Date & Time: 16 October 2019
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

Title: Conceptualizing and Designing Collaborative Science Projects

Presenter(s):
Alison Watts, University of New Hampshire; Jennifer West, Narragansett Bay NERR; Nikki Dix, Guana Tolomat Matanzas NERR; and Julia Wondolleck, University of Michigan

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html or http://www.nerrssciencecollaborative.org/webinar-series). 
Seminar POCs for questions: Dwight.Trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu
Webinar: Please register through GoToWebinar at
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4949278270574270467

Abstract:
Planning a collaborative research project can be challenging " it requires integrating researchers and the intended users of the science in a collaborative process that is unlike most traditional research approaches.
Join us for a panel discussion webinar highlighting the collective advice of three panelists who have helped design and manage collaborative science projects addressing a range of coastal management issues. This webinar will help participants understand the key factors to consider in designing collaborative research projects. The panel discussion will explore lessons learned about:
  • Conceptualizing research to ensure it addresses natural resource management needs; and
  • Designing a collaborative research process to ensure that it succeeds. 

About the

Presenter(s):
Alison Watts, PhD, Research Assistant Professor, University of New Hampshire. Learn more about her project.
Jennifer West, Coastal Training Program Coordinator, Narragansett Bay NERR. Learn more about her involvement in a recent project, and a regional initiative to advance marsh resilience.
Nikki Dix, PhD, Research Director, Guana Tolomato Matanzas NERR. Learn about her work in recent projects about living shorelines and oyster management.
Julia Wondolleck, PhD, NERRS Science Collaborative. Learn more about Julia's research and her Science Collaborative work developing training and tools to help teams manage their collaborative processes. 
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the work 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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17 October 2019

Title:
New
Machine Learning for Forecasting and Data Assimilation
Presenter(s): Brian Hunt, University of Maryland
Date & Time: 17 October 2019
11:30 am - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 4552-4553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter:
Brian Hunt, University of Maryland

Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:   900 990 334   
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=mf010724abf20590830c96cf584ac7410

Audio:
  
    +1-415-527-5035 US Toll
    Access code: 900 990 334

Abstract:
Brian will present recent work using machine learning to analyze time series data from chaotic systems.  Most of the results concern learning the systems dynamics to facilitate forecasting and climate simulation, but I will also discuss potential applications in data assimilation.  First I will show successful application of a particular form of machine learning called reservoir computing to data from relatively low-dimensional systems, and discuss a partial theory for how the method works.  Then I will present extensions of the method to handle high-dimensional, spatially-extended systems using parallel computing, and to a hybrid approach using machine learning to improve an imperfect physics-based model.

Bio:

Dr. Brian Hunt is with the University of Maryland.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title:
New
Using Pelagic Predators to Understand Biophysical Interactions at the Oceanic (Sub)Mesoscale
Presenter(s): Camrin Braun, University of Washington
Date & Time: 17 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
  NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Camrin Braun, University of Washington
JOIN VIA WEBINAR
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Meeting number: 908 213 663
Meeting password: 5A5Ptfax
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Access code: 908 213 663

Abstract:
TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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22 October 2019

Title: Decoding a Decade of Detections: Acoustic Telemetry and Connectivity of Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary with the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Ocean
Presenter(s): Bethany Williams, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/MSE/Biogeography Branch and CSS Inc., and Matt Kendall, Marine Biologist, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/MSE/Biogeography Branch
Date & Time: 22 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:  Decoding a Decade of Detections: Acoustic Telemetry and Connectivity of Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary with the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Ocean

Presenter(s):
  Bethany Williams, Marine Ecologist, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/MSE/Biogeography Branch and CSS Inc., and Matt Kendall, Marine Biologist, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/MSE/Biogeography Branch
Co-Authors:
Kimberly Roberson, Research Coordinator, NOAA/NOS/ONMS/GRNMS and
Joy Young, Fish and Wildlife Biologist, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy Gill. Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov 
Webinar Access:
We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/grnms/event/registration.html 
After registering, you should receive an email from Tracy Gill with the link to the webinar.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to us Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.

Abstract:
TBD
About the

Presenter(s):
TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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24 October 2019

Title: Quantifying Observation Impacts in Ocean Data Assimilation Systems
Presenter(s): Andy Moore, PhD, Professor of Oceanography, University of California Santa Cruz
Date & Time: 24 October 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Medium Conference Room - 8348
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Quantifying Observation Impacts in Ocean Data Assimilation Systems

Presenter(s):
  Andy Moore, PhD, Professor of Oceanography, University of California Santa Cruz

Sponsor(s):
 NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series and the NOAA/NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS); coordinators for this event are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Aijun.Zhang@noaa.gov.
Webinar Access:
Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/impacts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:

Observations are a critical component of ocean analysis and forecast system. They are costly to acquire and maintaining current observing systems is a constant challenge in the face of rising costs and shrinking budgets. It therefore behooves the ocean modeling community to demonstrate the value of existing observing systems, and if possible, demonstrate ways in which a constellation of instruments can perhaps be optimized. In this talk Andy will present some state-of-the-art methods for monitoring the impact of observations within real-time ocean analysis-forecast systems run in support of U.S. IOOS, and which demonstrate the sometimes complex interplay between different observation types. The talk will end with a discussion about how these same methods could be used to augment and/or optimize existing observing systems.

Bio:
Andy obtained a PhD in Physical Oceanography from the University of Oxford, more years ago than he cares to remember, and since then has held research and academic positions at the CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, the Nova Oceanographic Center and the University of Colorado. He is currently a Professor of Oceanography at the University of California Santa Cruz. During his career he has worked on ocean data assimilation, adjoint methods, and coupled ocean-atmosphere modeling. He is one of the co-developers of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4-Dimensional Variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title:
New
Selective Consumption of Sockeye Salmon by Brown Bears
Presenter(s): Alex Lincoln, King County Water and Land Resources Division
Date & Time: 24 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
  NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Alex Lincoln, King County Water and Land Resources Division
JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join Webex
Meeting number: 908 213 663
Meeting password: 5A5Ptfax
JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 908 213 663

Abstract:
TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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29 October 2019

Title: Improving Microplastics Research
Presenter(s): Judith S. Weis, Professor Emerita, Rutgers University
Date & Time: 29 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below), or for NOAA staff in Silver Spring, SSMC Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
Improving Microplastics Research

Presenter(s):

Judith S. Weis, Professor Emerita, Rutgers University

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
Webinar Access: 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/weiss/event/registration.html
After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to us Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
There has been a virtual explosion of research on microplastics (MPs). Every week new articles are published, but not all are original or important. Dozens of papers report the number of microplastic particles found in some water body, but they cannot be compared because there are no standardized methods for collection or analysis. However, it has become clear that collecting with nets misses most of the MPs, since microfibers, which are by far the most abundant type when whole water samples are analyzed, pass through nets. These microfibers are derived primarily from synthetic clothing via wastewater from washing machines. Counting under a microscope is not as accurate as using sophisticated technology such as Raman or FTIR which can identify different plastic polymers. Another common study documents that some species consumes MPs. It seems that every animal studied eats them; it would be of greater interest to learn why they do or find one that does not ingest them. Although animals consume them, few studies have examined how soon and how many are egested. Most may pass through the gut without causing any noticeable effects; this needs to be studied. MPs are considered vectors for transferring contaminants to animals and up the food chain, but few studies demonstrate this with realistic scenarios such as providing the animals some “real” food and time to egest. Effects attributed to MPs may be symptoms of inadequate nutrition or a clogged digestive tract. It is also important to learn how much of the adsorbed contaminants the gut can desorb during the time that MPss are passing through. Future feeding studies should not use spherical MPs which are rare in aquatic environments but should use primarily microfibers which are the predominant shape found, provide real food, and allow time for egestion. Other research needs include examining respiration as a mode of intake in aquatic as well as in terrestrial biota, and developing ways to modify the manufacture of textiles to shed fewer microfibers.

Bio:

Dr. Judith S. Weis is a Professor Emerita of Biological Sciences at Rutgers University, Newark. Her research is on estuarine ecology and ecotoxicology, and she has published over 200 refereed scientific papers, as well as books for the general public on salt marshes, fish, crabs, and marine pollution, a technical book on marine pollution and one on biological invasions and animal behavior. She is interested in stresses in estuaries and their effects on organisms, populations and communities. She is on the editorial board for BioScience, is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and was a Fulbright Fellow in Indonesia. She has been on advisory committees for EPA, NOAA and NAS and chairs the Science Advisory Board of NJ DEP. She chaired the Biology Section of AAAS, and was president of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) in 2001. She received the Merit Award from the Society of Wetland Scientists in 2016.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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31 October 2019

Title: Prioritizing Areas for Future Seafloor Mapping, Research, and Exploration Offshore of California, Oregon, and Washington
Presenter(s): Bryan Costa, Marine Ecologist, NOAA's National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch, USA. Presenting from California
Date & Time: 31 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
Prioritizing Areas for Future Seafloor Mapping, Research, and Exploration Offshore of California, Oregon, and Washington

Presenter(s):
Bryan Costa, Marine Ecologist, NOAA's National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch, USA. Presenting from California.
Co-Authors: Ken Buja, Matt Kendalland Jen Kraus, all with NOAA's National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch, USA, and
Bethany Williams, on contract to Consolidated Safety Services, Inc., USA, in support of NOAA's National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Biogeography Branch, USA

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
Webinar Access:
Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/prioritize/event/registration.htm
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:

Spatial information about the seafloor is critical for decision-making by marine science, management and tribal organizations. While this type of information is important, its collection is expensive, time consuming and logistically intensive. Developing a network of partners and coordinating data needs can help overcome these challenges by leveraging collective resources to meet shared goals. To help promote coordination across organizations, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) developed a spatial framework, process and online application to identify common data collection priorities across space. This application was used by organizations participating in NOAA's West Coast Deep Sea Coral Initiative (WCDSCI) and Expanding Pacific Research and Exploration of Submerged Systems (EXPRESS) Campaign to identify overlapping, high priority areas for seafloor mapping, sampling and visual surveys offshore of U.S. West CONUS Coast (WCC). Ten high priority locations were broadly identified for future mapping, sampling and visual surveys based on the results of the prioritization. These locations were distributed throughout the WCC, primarily in depths less than 1,000 m. Participants consistently selected (1) Exploration, (2) Biota/Important Natural Area and (3) Research as their top reasons (i.e., justifications) for prioritizing locations. Participants also consistently selected (1) Benthic Habitat Map and (2) Bathymetry and Backscatter as their top data or product needs in high priority grid cells. The map layers developed here were published in NOAA's U.S. Mapping Coordination website to allow participants (and other users) to collectively track their overall progress towards addressing key priorities areas identified in this effort. Combined, these tools and this information will enable NOAA WCDSCI, EXPRESS and other organizations to more efficiently leverage resources and coordinate their mapping of high priority locations along the WCC.

Bio:
 
Bryan Costa graduated from Middlebury College with a joint degree in Biology and Environmental Studies and from the University of Maryland, College Park with an MPS in Geospatial Sciences. He joined the NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) in 2005 as a marine ecologist. Since joining NOAA NCCOS, he has worked as a principal investigator on a variety of projects, characterizing, monitoring and modeling marine ecosystems in the United States. His research interests include novel applications of state-of-the-art remote sensing and geospatial technologies. He currently is co-located with the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary in Santa Barbara, CA. 
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title:
New
Research in Support of Green Sturgeon Recovery: Devices and Desires
Presenter(s): Mary Moser, NWFSC
Date & Time: 31 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
  NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Mary Moser, NWFSC
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Meeting number: 908 213 663
Meeting password: 5A5Ptfax
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Access code: 908 213 663

Abstract:
TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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7 November 2019

Title:
New
Steelhead at the Surface: Impacts of the Hood Canal Floating Bridge on Migrating Steelhead Smolts
Presenter(s): Megan Moore, NWFSC
Date & Time: 7 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
  NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Megan Moore, NWFSC
JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join Webex
Meeting number: 908 213 663
Meeting password: 5A5Ptfax
JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 908 213 663

Abstract:
TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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14 November 2019

Title:
New
Sablefish and Siscowet Lake Trout: Common Strategies for Living Deep in Oceans and Lakes
Presenter(s): Rick Goetz, NWFSC
Date & Time: 14 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
  NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Rick Goetz, NWFSC
JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join Webex
Meeting number: 908 213 663
Meeting password: 5A5Ptfax
JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 908 213 663

Abstract:
TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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21 November 2019

Title:
New
Nearshore and Vertical Distribution of Salmon off the Coast of Washington
Presenter(s): Bill Matsubu, National Research Council
Date & Time: 21 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
  NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Bill Matsubu, National Research Council
JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join Webex
Meeting number: 908 213 663
Meeting password: 5A5Ptfax
JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 908 213 663

Abstract:
TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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5 December 2019

Title:
New
Central Valley Chinook Salmon Smolt Outmigration Mortality in Freshwater and Estuarine Habitats
Presenter(s): Mark Henderson, US Geological Survey
Date & Time: 5 December 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
  NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Mark Henderson, US Geological Survey
JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join Webex
Meeting number: 908 213 663
Meeting password: 5A5Ptfax
JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 908 213 663

Abstract:
TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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Title: Sinkholes to Stars: Exploring Microbial Ecosystems in Lake Huron’s Sinkholes
Presenter(s): Bopi Biddanda, Annis Water Resources Institute at Grand Valley State University
Date & Time: 5 December 2019
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Bopi Biddanda, Annis Water Resources Institute at Grand Valley State University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429
Remote access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5603720784819152141

Abstract:
Join Professor Bopi Biddanda as he shares the excitement of over a decade of exploration of life in Lake Huron's sinkholes carried out in collaboration with NOAA's Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary. He will ponder the relevance of these findings to major issues of both scientific and societal interest such as Earth's current biologic and physiologic diversity, oxygenation of early Earth in the distant past, and humanity's ongoing search for extraterrestrial life. For an introduction to life in Lake Huron's sinkholes, see this overview educational article: http://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/rock-water-microbes-underwater-sinkholes-in-lake-25851285
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Developer - Lori K. Brown