During the COVID-19 Pandemic:
Until further notice, all OneNOAA seminars will be presented via remote access only. This will be true even if the seminar was originally listed with a physical location. If you have questions about attending a specific seminar, please reach out to the Seminar Contact listed in the seminar's calendar entry.

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

• Seminar submission guidelines

29 October 2020

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: Drought Projects for the NE DEWS
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center and Dan McElvoy, Desert Research Institute, Art DeGaetano, Northeast Regional Climate Center, Kirsten Lackstrom, Carolinas Integrated Sciences and Assessments, Matt Petkewich, US Geological Survey, and Mathew Barlow, UMass-Lowell
Date & Time: 29 October 2020
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: via GoToWebinar (registration required)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Drought Projects for the NE DEWS

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and
Dan McElvoy, Desert Research Laboratory,
Art DeGaetano, Northeast Regional Climate Center,
Kirsten Lackstrom, Carolinas Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments team, with
Matt Petkewich, U.S. Geological Survey, and
Mathew Barlow, UMass-Lowell.


Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:

Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:

The webinar will feature a recap of October conditions and a panel of speakers reviewing the projects they're working on related to drought in the Northeast Drought Early Warning System (New England and New York). These projects are, or were, supported by NOAA and the National Integrated Drought Information System.

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 16: AI/ML for Post-Processing and Data dissemination, Part 3
Presenter(s): Laura Dobbs - Microsoft, Yun Fan - NCEP/CPC, Manuel Castellote - NOAA AFSC and UW, Sunyoung Kim - NIMS, KMA
Date & Time: 29 October 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 16: AI/ML for Post-Processing and Data dissemination, Part 3 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):
AI and Clouds at Microsoft - Laura Dobbs (Microsoft)

Improving CFS Precipitation and 2m Temperature Anomaly Outlooks from Week-1 to Week-6 with Machine Learning- Yun Fan (NCEP/CPC)

Shifting to AI for Passive Acoustic Monitoring of the Endangered Cook Inlet Beluga Whale - Manuel Castellote (NOAA AFSC and UW)

Precipitation prediction from radar data using deep learning - Sunyoung Kim (NIMS, KMA)
Panel Discussion - Panelists: Science Committee Members

Sponsor(s):

AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php
Seminar Contact: Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5493025262133451019Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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Title: Designing Interactive Tools for Understanding Urban Accessibility
Presenter(s): Manaswi Saha, Ph.D. Student, Computer Science and Engineering, University of Washington
Date & Time: 29 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Manaswi Saha, Ph.D. Student, Computer Science and Engineering, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website. Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:
JOIN VIA WEBINARJoin WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 183 732
Meeting password: JhWEAzQs628

JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 903 183 732Can't join the meeting? Contact support.
ABSTRACTSidewalks form the backbone of pedestrian infrastructure. Urban accessibility, specifically sidewalk accessibility, significantly impacts the mobility, safety, and independence of millions of citizens, especially people with disabilities. Over 30 million people have some form of disability in the US. Of these, half report using mobility aids. But despite the growing need for accessible sidewalks, many cities remain inaccessible even after 30 years of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regulations being in place. Existing approaches to sidewalk data collection relies on physical audits, which is a laborious and an expensive process. Due to a lack of city scale data, limited tools exist for people to know more about urban accessibility. This talk will present Project Sidewalk (http://projectsidewalk.io), an interactive crowdsourcing-based web tool that collects sidewalk accessibility data virtually by utilizing volunteers who explore city streets remotely. The talk will then touch upon tools that utilize this data, one of which is an interactive web visualization tool that will help (i) visualize and quantify the issue of urban (in)accessibility across cities, (ii) make city's accessibility efforts more visible, and (iii) aid citizens in holding civic leaders accountable for accessibility issues in their cities. With this project, we hope to build tools that make this issue more visible and drive cities towards improving physical accessibility of urban infrastructure.

BIOGRAPHYManaswi Saha is a Computer Science and Engineering Ph.D. student at the University of Washington, Seattle. Her research lies at the intersection of Human Computer Interaction (HCI), accessibility, urban and civic technology, and data visualization. Her experience in the domain of urban informatics started from her research in energy sustainability of buildings and smart homes. However, in the last four years, she transitioned to urban accessibility, where her work ranges from building navigation tools for people with visual disabilities to tools for generating awareness around urban accessibility. She has published in major HCI conferences, has received several awards and fellowships, including being a Google Ph.D. Fellow, and the work on Project Sidewalk won the best paper award at CHI, the top conference in HCI.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more informatio
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30 October 2020

Title: Three Minute Thesis Webinar: Communication and Engagement in a Virtual World
Presenter(s): Michelle (Micki) Olson, NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Weather Program Office; Corey Pieper, National Weather Service Office of Communications; Charlie Woodrum, National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office - Shreveport, LA; Beth Russell & Hilary Peddicord, NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Global Systems Laboratory; Tricia Ryan, NOAA National Ocean Service Office of Coastal Management; Greg Romano, NOAA National Weather Service Heritage Project Lead and Senior Advisor; Tim Brice, National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office - El Paso, TX; John Ogren, National Weather Service Chief Learning Office
Date & Time: 30 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Three Minute Thesis

Remote Access:
Communication and Engagement in a Virtual World

Presenter(s):

Best Practices for Virtual and Mediated Communication -- Michelle (Micki) Olson (NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Weather Program Office)Twitter: A Few Things Everyone Should Know -- Corey Pieper (National Weather Service Office of Communications) Facebook Live During COVID-19 with High-Impact Weather -- Charlie Woodrum (National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office - Shreveport, LA)Science On a Sphere Explorer (SOSx): The Go-To for NOAA Virtual Education -- Beth Russell & Hilary Peddicord (NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Global Systems Laboratory)

How to Get Better at Being Online All the Time -- Tricia Ryan (NOAA National Ocean Service Office of Coastal Management)Meet Me for Coffee: Personal Connections in a Virtual World -- Greg Romano (NOAA National Weather Service Heritage Project Lead and Senior Advisor)Connecting Scientists to Classrooms -- Tim Brice (National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office - El Paso, TX)Learning in a Virtual World -- John Ogren (National Weather Service Chief Learning Officer)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Region Collaboration Team Seminar Contact: Keli Pirtle, keli.pirtle@noaa.gov and Bethany Perry, bethany.perry@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register for the Three Minute Thesis

Remote Access:
Communication and Engagement in a Virtual World -- https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3622511892013962254 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
What's a Three Minute Thesis Webinar? Borrowing from a format used by universities across the country, colleagues from NOAA and partners will each have one slide and three minutes to present on their topic. There will also be time for questions from the audience between each group of speakers. We look forward to your attendance and feedback on the webinar - a way to get to know more about your colleagues, partners, noteworthy projects, unique ideas, and more! Recordings: Unable to attend in person? A recording of the webinar will be made available at https://www.regions.noaa.gov/central/ on Monday after the webinar.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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2 November 2020

Title: What Has Happened at Hanauma Bay Without Direct Human Impact?
Presenter(s): Sarah Severino, University of Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology
Date & Time: 2 November 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Severino, University of Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1594633118402444560

Abstract:
Hanauma Bay located within the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary is one of the most famous and popular visitor destinations in all of Hawaiʻi. During normal times, Hanauma Bay attracts over over three million visitors per year and suffers greatly from overuse. Hanauma is both a Nature Preserve and a Marine Life Conservation District (the first of several established in the State of Hawaiʻi). Visitors are required by law to refrain from mistreating marine animals or from touching and walking on the coral reefs.However, since March 2020, the Bay has been closed to all public uses. This has allowed researchers from the University of Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology to study the impact of humans on the park's diverse marine life. Join Ms. Severino as she discusses what researchers have learned so far and how this data can add to our knowledge of what happens to marine protected areas when human uses are taken out of the equation.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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3 November 2020

Title: Optimizing multispecies stratified survey designs for Gulf of Alaska groundfishes
Presenter(s): Zack Oyafuso, AFSC, NRC post-doc
Date & Time: 3 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webex Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Optimizing multispecies stratified survey designs for Gulf of Alaska groundfishes

Presenter(s):
Zack Oyafuso, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Research Council post-doc

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesPlease contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Remote Access:
Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mb66637e99438b9610e5a9a4465bd9053Webex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 727 5307 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 199 727 5307

Abstract:
In designing and performingsurveys of population abundance, fisheries monitoring programs often struggleto determine the sampling intensity and design required to achieve theirobjectives, and this problem greatly increases in complexity for multispeciessurveys with inherent tradeoffs among species. To address these issues, Ideveloped a flexible stratified survey design optimization using a geneticalgorithm that optimizes both the stratification as well as the optimal effortallocation across strata subject to pre-specified precision targets. I willpresent this framework using the Gulf of Alaska groundfish bottom trawl surveyas a case example.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
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Title: Developing a Public-Private Partnership to Manage Elevated Phosphorus Fields For Agricultural Production and Water Quality
Presenter(s): Jay Martin, The Ohio State University
Date & Time: 3 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
Developing a Public-Private Partnership to Manage Elevated Phosphorus Fields For Agricultural Production and Water Quality / Great Lakes Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jay Martin, Ohio State University

Remote Access:
Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6620608521895602699

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (NOAA GLERL) and the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR)Seminar Contact: Mary Ogdahl, ogdahlm@umich.edu

Abstract:
We established a Private Public Partnership (PPP) to identify and manage agricultural fields in the Western Lake Erie Basin where large reductions in phosphorus are likely to be realized. Fields with high risk of phosphorus runoff were identified based on soil test phosphorus levels two times greater than agronomic recommendations. Phosphorus runoff from these fields cannot be managed by only in field practices because fertilizer application is not required for crop production. Therefore, to further reduce phosphorus runoff from these sites requires the use of edge of field BMPs. Establishing a PPP allowed private partners to maintain proprietary data while assisting the public partners in identifying fields with high risk of phosphorus loss. The private partners, farmers and their consultants, best know their field characteristics and can facilitate field identification and the selection of conservation plans that are likely to be effective. Through collaboration with 4R Certification Program, Nutrient Service Providers, and farmers we are implementing and monitoring the impacts of conservation practices on 14 elevated phosphorus fields in the Maumee Watershed. Preliminary results from the project will describe the characteristics and runoff water quality from elevated phosphorus fields. The structure and results from this research demonstrate the value of collaborating with NSPs to identify legacy sources of nutrients, and the value of forming PPPs when proprietary information can limit the identification and accessibility of sites where environmental management practices can be most beneficial.

Bio(s):
Jay Martin is a professor of ecological engineering who analyzes and integrates human and natural systems. As a faculty member in the Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering and a Faculty co-lead for the OSU Sustainability Institute, he seeks to use natural systems to improve water quality and increase sustainability. His interdisciplinary research links field studies, watershed models, and socio-economic analyses with stakeholder groups to investigate connections between downstream water quality and management practices in upstream watersheds.Currently, Dr. Martin is leading a $5M USDA-NIFA project to establish a Public-Private Partnership with crop consultants and farmers, to identify fields with elevated nutrient levels where management practices will be installed and monitored in an effort to reduce nutrient runoff. He is also leading an interdisciplinary research team to evaluate the impacts of a large green infrastructure project, “Blueprint Columbus,” on water, communities, ecosystems, economics and public health within the City of Columbus. Outside of Ohio, Dr. Martin's other research has included Mayan agroecosystems in southern Mexico, biodigesters in Costa Rica, Andes wetlands in Colombia, and the use of algae as a soil amendment by Oʻahu farmers in Hawaii. As of 2019, he has published over 65 peer-reviewed articles, successfully advised over 35 Graduate Students and Post Docs, and been awarded more than $17M to support his research program. He is certified as a Senior Ecologist by the Ecological Society of America and a Professional Engineer in Ohio.Recordings: Recording will be made available shortly after the seminar at: https://ciglr.seas.umich.edu/event/110320-jay-martin/
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4 November 2020

Title: Autonomous and fabulous: The U.S. Antarctic Marine Living Resources Program’s transition to using underwater gliders for fisheries surveys
Presenter(s): Jen Walsh, Research Biologist, NOAA Fisheries, Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 4 November 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Autonomous and fabulous: The U.S. Antarctic Marine Living Resources Program's transition to using underwater gliders for fisheries surveys

Presenter(s):
Jen Walsh, Research Biologist, NOAA Fisheries, Southwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Coordinator is
Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/gliders/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
In December 2018, the U.S. Antarctic Marine Living Resources (AMLR) Program at NOAA Fisheries transitioned to an at-sea program of glider-based fisheries surveys as a replacement for our traditional vessel-based surveys. During the past two Antarctic summers (December through March), we deployed five deep-diving (1000m), long-range underwater gliders - two in 2018/19 and three in 2019/20. Our deployments occurred around the northern Antarctic Peninsula, and our objective was to obtain biomass estimates of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba), the target of the largest fishery in the Southern Ocean, in areas that are important for the fishery and foraging penguins and seals. We continue to process data from 2019/20; however, glider-based biomass estimates from 2018/19 were comparable to previous estimates from the AMLR Program's 25-year, ship-based time series. In under a year, we demonstrated that glider-based fisheries surveys are a promising alternative to vessel-based surveys, and can provide the data needed to manage regional fisheries. We also demonstrated that the transition from ships to gliders can happen quickly, but the learning curve is steep. This presentation is from the perspective of a brand-new glider pilot, plucked from her station at a chemistry lab fume hood and tossed into a world of oceanographic robots, with only 10 months to go from neophyte to dynamite.

Bio(s):
Jen Walsh is a Research Biologist with the Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center. For the first nine years of her NOAA career, she spent her time doing biochemical analyses of Antarctic krill and other zooplankton to study diet, body condition, and trophic position in relation to environmental conditions. These days, she spends her time piloting autonomous underwater gliders in Antarctica to study the distribution and abundance of krill in relation to chlorophyll concentration. When she's not virtually chasing gliders around the Southern Ocean, she enjoys kayaking, cooking, and messing up knitting projects.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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Title:
New
Joint seminar: Benefits of fishing portfolios & Commercial fisheries and local economies
Presenter(s): Kiva Oken andMatt Reimer, University of California, Davis
Date & Time: 4 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Titles: The effects of populationsynchrony, life history, and access constraints on benefits from fishingportfolios and Commercial fisheries & local economies

Presenter(s):
Drs. Kiva Oken and Matt Reimer, University of California,Davis

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division;coordinator: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://meet.google.com/prt-ezpa-trv; phonenumber: +1 661-473-0853; PIN: ‪764 850 507#; Please arrive on time to avoid disruption.Abstracts: (1) Harvesting from ataxonomically and/or geographically diverse portfolio of fisheries can reducefinancial risk that fishermen incur, but constraining access to fisheries hasother ecological and economic benefits. As linked human-natural systems, bothecological and fishing dynamics influence the specific advantages anddisadvantages of increasing the diversity of fishing portfolios. To explorethis, I built a bioeconomic model based on the Dungeness crab, Chinook salmon,and groundfish fisheries in the California Current. I used it to explore theinfluence of population synchrony, life history, and permit access on averagerevenue and revenue variability at the fleet and individual levels, as well asinequality within the fleet. Overall, the results illustrate theimportance of considering connections between social and ecological dynamicswhen evaluating management options that constrain or facilitate fishers'ability to diversify their fishing. Finally, I will briefly touch on some ofthe other themes of my overall research program.(2) Do commercialfisheries contribute to local economies? The answer to this question is oftenpresumed to be yes and plays an influential role in the decisions of policymakers. However, there is actually little empirical evidence to support thisclaim. This is surprising since natural resources are generally not guaranteedto contribute to local economies in a meaningful way. In this talk, I'llpresent some recent work that attempts to estimate direct and spillover effectsfrom Alaskan commercial fisheries on local wages, employment, and income.Commercially exploited fish stocks are found to have positive direct effects:additional fishing and processing crew are hired, and processed harvestsproduce more value added. We also find statistical evidence of employmentspillovers from commercial fishing into non-fishing sectors. Overall, we findan increase of one dollar in fisheries earnings results in an increase of totalincome by 1.54 dollars. Our results also suggest that the primary channelthrough which spillover effects take place is the earnings of localcommercial-fishing permit owners, as opposed to the delivery (or landing) offish to local businesses for value-added processing.

Bio(s):
Kiva Oken is an assistant professor in theDepartment of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology at the University ofCalifornia, Davis. Her research uses mathematical models and statistical toolsto study the dynamics and ecology of marine populations, how they respond tohuman pressures, and ultimately how all of those dynamics impact the ecosystemservices that populations provide. She completed her PhD at the University ofWashington in Quantitative Ecology & Resource Management and didpostdoctoral research at Rutgers University and the Northwest Fisheries ScienceCenter.Matt Reimer is an Associate Professor at UCDavis in the Departments of Agricultural & Resource Economics andEnvironmental Science & Policy. Previously, Matt spent seven years at theUniversity of Alaska. Matt's research focuses on the design and evaluation ofpublic policies for managing marine resources. Recent topics include predictivemodels of commercial fishing behavior, contributions of commercial fisheries tolocal economies, economic impacts of marine protected areas, policy-inducedspillovers across fisheries, and decision support tools for adaptive managementof marine resources.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weeklyemail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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Title: Three Lightning Talks: Labrador Sea freshening linked to Beaufort Gyre freshwater release, Summer pCO2 dynamics based on autonomous surface vehicles in eastern Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea, & Developing Ocean Acidification Indices for Bering Sea Fisheries
Presenter(s): Jiaxu Zhang, University of Washington Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies, jiaxu.zhang@noaa.gov; Hongie Wang, University of Washington Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies, hongjie.wang@noaa.gov; Esther Kennedy, University of California Davis, egkennedy at ucdavis.edu
Date & Time: 4 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Titles: Labrador Sea freshening linked to Beaufort Gyre freshwater release (Jiaxu Zhang); Summer pCO2 dynamics based on autonomous surface vehicles in eastern Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea (Hongjie Wang) & Developing Ocean Acidification Indices for Bering Sea Fisheries (Esther Kennedy) / EcoFOCI Seminar Series Lightning Talks

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jiaxu Zhang, PhD, Post-doctoral Researcher at the University of Washington Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies, Seattle, WA
Hongjie Wang, PhD, Post-doctoral Researcher at the University of Washington Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies, Seattle, WA
Esther Kennedy, University of California Davis, Davis, CA

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact: Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstracts:

Bio(s):
Jiaxu Zhang is a postdoc scholar of physical oceanography at UW/CICOES and NOAA/PMEL. Her current work focuses specifically on Arctic freshwater content and its distribution, Beaufort Gyre dynamics, and Arctic-Atlantic/Arctic-Pacific interactions. Hongjie Wang is a postdoc scholar at UW/CICOES and NOAA/PMEL conducting research focusing on the Arctic and Alaska marine carbon cycle including new technology development and ocean acidification monitoring. Esther Kennedy is a PhD student at UC Davis working in the Ocean Climate Lab led by Dr. Tessa Hill.

Slides:
Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

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Title: Mapping the water depths from polar-orbiting ocean color satellites: leveraging temporal variation in image data
Presenter(s): Jianwei Wei, NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 4 November 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

NOCCG Seminar cross-listed with OneNOAA and STAR Seminars

Title:
NOCCG Seminar : Mapping the water depths from polar-orbiting ocean color satellites: leveraging temporal variation in image data

Presenter(s):
Jianwei Wei, Global Science and Technology/NOAA/NESDIS/STAR

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact:
Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/217486949

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (312) 757-3121

Access Code: 217-486-949

Abstract:
Water depth is a much-needed geophysical parameter in the coastal ocean. It is important for navigation, engineering, tourism, and resource management including benthic biodiversity and water quality monitoring. Polar-orbiting satellites frequently fly over the global shallow waters, generating ocean color images potentially useful for the derivation of the water depths. In this talk, we present a newly developed physics-based algorithm for such retrieval. The algorithm takes into account the temporal variation of water-column optical properties and the fact that the water depths and bottom substrates remain relatively stable within a short period. Practically it incorporates two images into one optimization process to estimate the water depth. We evaluate the algorithm performance with synthetic water depth and light field data. We show that the algorithm can be applied to different benthic substrates such as coral reefs, seagrass meadows, and sand, with satisfactory depth estimates. The application of the algorithm is also demonstrated with satellite ocean color images from Landsat 8, Suomi-NPP, and Sentinel 3. Our analyses confirm the promise of the semi-analytical water depth retrieval from multi-spectral satellite sensors by delineating the temporal characteristics in images. It suggests one path forward for operational mapping of the water depths in global shallow environments.

Bio(s):
Jianwei earned his Ph.D. degree from the Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Canada, in 2013. Shortly after graduation, he went to Boston to pursue postdoctoral training at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Upon finishing PostDoc, he stayed on as a research associate, and later took a position as research assistant professor with School for the Environment, University of Massachusetts Boston. Starting from September of 2019, he has been a senior remote sensing scientist contracting with Global Science & Technology, Inc. to work at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR at College Park, Maryland.His research experiences include ocean color instrumentation, development of ocean color calibration and validation techniques, development of ocean color algorithms for retrieval of water-column and bottom properties, and ocean color classification and data quality assurance, etc. His current research includes the satellite estimation of the ocean primary production. In his research career, he has authored and co-authored about 30 peer-reviewed manuscripts. He participated in the NASA GEO-CAPE and HyspIRI missions and multiple NOAA ocean color Cal/Val missions. He is currently a science team member for the NASA Carbon Monitoring System.

Slides:
When available after the seminar they can be found here: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov
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5 November 2020

Title: Microplastics in invasive mussels (Dreissena sp.) of Lake Michigan: Patterns across sites and relationship to chemical pollutants
Presenter(s): Timothy Hoellein, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Loyola University, Chicago
Date & Time: 5 November 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Microplastics in invasive mussels (Dreissena sp.) of Lake Michigan: Patterns across sites and relationship to chemical pollutants

Presenter(s):
Timothy Hoellein, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Loyola University, Chicago

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series and NOAA Office of Response and Restoration; coordinators for this seminar are Amy.Uhrin@noaa.gov and
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/hoellein/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
Invasive zebra and quagga mussels (Dreissena sp.) in the Great Lakes of North America serve as biomonitors for chemical contaminants, but are also exposed to microplastics (< 5mm). Little research has examined microplastic consumption by dreissenid mussels or the relationship between microplastics and other contaminants. We measured microplastics and contaminant concentration in mussels from Milwaukee Harbor (Lake Michigan, USA) spanning a gradient from reference (i.e., clean water) conditions to sites influenced by wastewater and urban river discharge. Mussels were deployed in cages, collected after 30 and 60 days, sorted by size class, and analyzed for microplastics and contaminants. As expected, microplastic concentrations were high in the largest mussels at the wastewater-adjacent site in July. However, there was no distinction among sites for microplastic concentrations for smaller size classes, and no differences among sites in August. Microplastics and chemical contaminants were unrelated in mussels. Microplastics have a diversity of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which influence their ingestion, retention, and egestion by mussels, and are likely distinct for chemicals relative to particulate pollutants. Dreissenid mussels may not serve as plastic pollution 'indicators' as they do for chemical contaminants. However, microplastic ingestion by dreissenid mussels is widespread, with unknown effects on physiology, population dynamics, and mussel-mediated ecosystem processes. These data will inform our understanding of the spatial distribution of microplastics in urban freshwaters, the role of dreissenid mussels in plastic budgets, and models for the fate of plastic contaminants in the Great Lakes and elsewhere.

Bio(s):
Dr. Hoellein is originally from Edinboro, PA, and completed a BS in Biology from West Virginia Wesleyan College and a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Notre Dame. Since 2010, he's been a professor in the Biology Department at Loyola University Chicago. Dr. Hoellein's research focuses on measuring the sources, fate, and biological interactions of pollutants including dissolved chemicals (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus) and particulates (i.e., microplastics and trash) in urban, freshwater environments. The goals of this research are to 1) quantify pollution dynamics in order to contribute to solutions, 2) include students and teaching into the research process, and 3) communicate our results to scientists, policy makers, and the general public.

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Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 17: AI/ML for Post-Processing and Data dissemination, Part 4
Presenter(s): Hyesook Lee - KMA, Theodore A.D. Slawecki - LimnoTech, Hui Su - JPL/Caltech
Date & Time: 5 November 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 17: AI/ML for Post-Processing and Data dissemination, Part 4 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):
NIMS R&D strategy for Alpha Weather - Hyesook Lee (KMA)

Predicting Algal Bloom Toxicity in Lake Erie: Lessons From Machine Learning - Theodore A.D. Slawecki (LimnoTech)

Applying satellite observations of tropical cyclone internal structures to rapid intensification forecast with machine learning - Hui Su (JPL/Caltech)

Sponsor(s):

AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php
Seminar Contact: Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6712726705247924236Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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Title: Enhancing Stock Assessment Methodologies for Main Hawaiian Islands Bottomfish Through Inclusion of Research Video-Camera Surveys
Presenter(s): Benjamin Richards, NOAA-PIFSC, Fisheries Research Biologist; Brian Langseth, NOAA-NWFSC, Research Mathematical Statistician
Date & Time: 5 November 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series and National Stock Assessment Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov, and Kristan Blackhart, kristan.blackhart@noaa.gov

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7254265869094580752


Presenter(s):
Benjamin Richards, NOAA-PIFSC, Fisheries Research Biologist; Brian Langseth, NOAA-NWFSC, Research Mathematical Statistician

Abstract:
We present a summary of the collective efforts between stock assessment scientists, survey technologists, fishermen, and academics in incorporating a fishery-dependent survey into the stock assessment for deepwater bottomfish in Hawaii. These efforts were initiated in 2012 but first incorporated into stock assessment in 2018, and were awarded the NOAA Bronze medal this year. We highlight the process and discuss lessons learned for inspiring similar efforts in other data moderate fisheries.

Bio(s):
Benjamin Richards received his PhD from the University of Hawaii, studying spatial distribution of Pacific reef fishes and currently serves as a fishery biologist at the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center. Ben is lead scientist for the Bottomfish Fishery-Independent Survey in Hawaii, largely responsible for initial survey design and its continued implementation. He led development and implementation of the current video camera systems and manages industry research fishing operations.

Brian Langseth is a stock assessment scientist currently with the Northwest Fisheries Science Center but previously with the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center. While at PIFSC Brian led deepwater bottomfish stock assessments in Hawaii and the territories. He received his Ph.D from Michigan State University, incorporating food-web interactions into harvest policies for lake whitefish in Lake Huron.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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6 November 2020

Title: Development and Applications of Dense Optical Flow for New Generation Satellite Imagery
Presenter(s): Jason Apke, CIRA
Date & Time: 6 November 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Note: This seminar will be presented online only.

Presenter(s):
Jason Apke,Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA)

Contributions From: Steven Miller (CIRA), Dan Lindsey (NOAA/STAR), Kristopher Bedka (NASA/Langley Research Center), and Eric Olson (CIRA)

Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series

Abstract:
The science of computing brightness motion in imagery pairs and sequences at every image pixel, or so-called “Dense Optical Flow” (DOF), has advanced considerably in the last four decades to support applications like objective robotic vision, autonomous driving, augmented reality, and motion picture special effects. While seldom explored, DOF derivation is now enabled in visible and infrared satellite imagery by the spatial and temporal resolution of new-generation instruments like the Advanced Baseline Imager on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-R series platform. DOF derivation from satellite imagery would have a variety of unique applications that are beneficial for research,forecasting, and decision-making products currently in development. These applications include atmospheric motion vector retrieval, temporal brightness interpolation, feature tracking, feature nowcasting, image stereoscopy, and semi-Lagrangian cloud-top cooling derivation. This presentation will go into detail on how some of these new DOF techniques are derived and highlight studies at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere to explore and validate novel applications. Demonstrations will also be shown on how improving feature tracking with DOF can complement machine-learning and artificial intelligence efforts for image classification and prognosis tasks. Examples of several DOF satellite imagery applications will be presented along with validation comparisons to state-of-the-art Derived Motion Wind products. Finally, this presentation will highlight current efforts to bring novel DOF applications into relevant operational environments.

Bio(s):
Jason Apke is a Research Scientist I at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere. He received his Bachelor of Sciences degree in Meteorology from the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley, CO in 2011, a Master's degree in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 2013, and a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Alabama-Huntsville in 2018. His dissertation focused on using atmospheric motion vectors to depict flow fields over deep convection observed from super-rapid scan geostationary satellite imagery, and how they could be used to identify signals relevant severe weather forecasting. He currently works on developing and implementing dense-optical flow derivation algorithms for a variety of satellite meteorology-related applications.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Seminar Contact:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: The Occurrence of Humpback Whales Across the Hawaiian Archipelago Revealed Through Acoustics
Presenter(s): Dr. Marc Lammers, Research Coordinator at NOAA's Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 6 November 2020
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Marc Lammers, Research Coordinator at NOAA's Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8498167562172672271

Abstract:
This presentation will describe recent fluctuations in the presence of humpback whales in Hawai'i over the past several years and the science being conducted to understand these trends. Dr. Marc Lammers will describe the application of novel tools to understand the occurrence of humpback whales in remote habitats, including the use of a Wave Glider and machine learning algorithms to detect the presence of whales in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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9 November 2020

Title: The Contribution of Diet to the Dramatic Reduction of the 2013 Year-Class of Age-0 Pollock in the Western Gulf of Alaska
Presenter(s): Jesse Lamb, Fisheries Biologist at the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA, jesse.f.lamb@noaa.gov
Date & Time: 9 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
The Contribution of Diet to the Dramatic Reduction of the 2013 Year-Class of Age-0 Pollock in the Western Gulf of Alaska

Presenter(s):
Jesse Lamb, Fisheries Biologist at the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact: Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract:
The 2013 year-class of age-0 Walleye Pollock potentially crashed due to relatively poor feeding conditions for large proportions of the population, which left them undersized and therefore ill prepared for overwinter survival.

Bio(s):
Since 1999, I have been working primarily as a zooplankton taxonomist. My main interest is how climate change affects zooplankton ecology and therefore the upper trophic levels supported by the zooplankton community. It has been demonstrated over the last twenty years that the zooplankton community structure reflects the hydrology of the habitat from which they live, and therefore zooplankton can be ecosystem indicators of climate change. I joined EcoFOCI in November, 2015 after many years working on the zooplankton community off the Oregon and Washington coasts. At EcoFOCI, I use my taxonomic expertise to identify both the zooplankton community and the stomach contents of larval fish of the Gulf of Alaska, Bering Sea, and Arctic. Using the zooplankton community as biological indicators of current climate conditions and therefore larval fish recruitment has the potential of being a critical tool for fisheries management in the future of these regions.

Slides:
Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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10 November 2020

Title:
New
Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Winter Outlook
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center, Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, Pam Knox, University of Georgia, Mike Halpert, NWS Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 10 November 2020
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Climate Overview and Hurricane Outlook Update: Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox, University of Georgia

Winter Outlook: Mike Halpert, NWS Climate Prediction Center

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact: Meredith Muth, NIDIS, (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/1287144793876293389

Abstract:

Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

The November 10 webinar will also feature a presentation on the Winter Outlook by Mike Halpert, NWS Climate Prediction Center.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
Democratizing the Creation of Custom Models with GOES and NEXRAD Data
Presenter(s): Dr. Guha Jayachandran, Founder; Shriphani Palakodety; Galana Gebisa
Date & Time: 10 November 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: Tiffany House tiffany.house@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7416270111623128332

Join us for our next NOAA Innovators Seminar on November 10th at 12PM EST!

Presenter(s):
Dr. Guha Jayachandran, Onai, Founder; Shriphani Palakodety, Onai; Galana Gebisa, Onai

Abstract:
NOAA's Big Data Project has made available several valuable weather satellite and radar station datasets. While a critical first step, many organizations that would benefit from the data are not technologically capable of easily performing state-of-the-art machine learning. Unlocking the power of the data for those who can most benefit, we demonstrate a browser-accessible tool that enables users to automatically build deep learning models and leverage NOAA data to address their own challenges.

Key Words: GOES, NEXRAD, Artificial Intelligence

Bio(s):
Headquartered in Silicon Valley, Onai's world-class team is developing the future of decentralized computing and machine intelligence technologies, with a focus on addressing real-world challenges. The speakers bring expertise in groundbreaking computational capabilities together with a desire to maximize the positive real-world impact of NOAA's datasets.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Effects of otolith-informed spatial misspecification on assessment model performance
Presenter(s): Matt Siskey, AFSC/SAFS, JISAO post-doc
Date & Time: 10 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webex Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Effects of otolith-informed spatial misspecification on assessment model performance

Presenter(s):
Matt Siskey, Alaska Fisheries Science Center/School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean post-doc

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesPlease contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Remote Access:
Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mb66637e99438b9610e5a9a4465bd9053Webex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 727 5307 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 199 727 5307

Abstract:
TBDSubscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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12 November 2020

Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 19: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 2
Presenter(s): William Collins - LBNL, UC Berkeley, Srija Chakraborty - NASA GSFC/ USRA, Xiaoming Liu - NOAA/NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 12 November 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 19: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 2 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):
Machine learning for detection of climate extremes: New approaches to uncertainty quantification - William Collins (LBNL, UC Berkeley)

Analysis of Multispectral Land Surface Reflectance Time-Series for Detecting and Classifying Land Cover Change - Srija Chakraborty (NASA GSFC/ USRA)

Super-Resolution of VIIRS-Measured Ocean Color Products Using Deep Convolutional Neural Network - Xiaoming Liu (NOAA/NESDIS/STAR)

Sponsor(s):

AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php
Seminar Contact: Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5650166364746654476Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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18 November 2020

Title: An old, new threat: increasing fisheries and seabird bycatch in the Canadian Arctic
Presenter(s): Jennifer Provencher, Conservation Biologist at the Environment and Climate Change Canada, Ottawa, Canada, jennifer.provencher@canada.ca
Date & Time: 18 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
An old, new threat: increasing fisheries and seabird bycatch in the Canadian Arctic

Presenter(s):
Jennifer Provencher, Conservation Biologist at the Environment and Climate Change Canada, Ottawa, Canada

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact: Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract:
We examine the implications of growing fisheries in the eastern Canadian Arctic on northern fulmar populations using a variety of modelling, observation and genomic tools.

Bio(s):
Jennifer F. Provencher is a Canadian conservation biologis focusing on the impact of human activities on the health of Arctic seabirds and marine ecosystems. Jennifer Provencher is Head of the Wildlife Health Unit at the Canadian Wildlife Service (Environment and Climate Change Canada), and her work focuses on the effect of diseases, parasites and contaminants on the conservation of wildlife. As of 2019, she is an adjunct researcher at three Canadian universities: Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario; Acadia University, Wolfville, Nova Scotia; and Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada

Slides:
Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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19 November 2020

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: El Nino Observations for the Eastern Region
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center and Michelle L'Heureux, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 19 November 2020
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: via GoToWebinar (registration required)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/El Nino Observations for the Eastern Region

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and
Michelle L'Heureux, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center.


Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:

Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:

The webinar will feature a recap of November conditions and a discussion on conditions that set up El Nino and potential impacts to the Eastern Region.

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Guides to ID Deep-sea corals: Different approaches to demystifying coral diversity of the US Atlantic margin
Presenter(s): Enrique J Salgado, Marine Data Specialist, and Andrew Shuler, Ecological Science Analyst, both with CSS, Inc., in support of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 19 November 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Guides for the Identification of Deep-sea corals: Different approaches to demystifying coral diversity of the US Atlantic margin

Presenter(s):
Enrique J Salgado, Marine Data Specialist, CSS, Inc., in support of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, andAndrew Shuler, Ecological Science Analyst, CSS, Inc., in support of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Coordinator is
Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/deepseacoralid/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
The Biogeography Branch of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), along with collaborators from the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER), and academic partners, have produced two photo-identification collections, intended to provide visual references to commonly observed deep-sea corals in the Southeast United States, Gulf of Mexico, and U.S.Caribbean. These documents also aim to provide an effectual representation of the diversity of coral fauna in mesophotic and deep-sea marine areas of the greater U.S. Southeast region. The first release uses a database to correlate specimens collected during recent Okeanos Explorer cruises, and representative in situ photographs, to produce dynamic reference guides. This database, and the corresponding outputs can be updated as new observations, revised taxonomic identifications, and data from new explorations becomes available. The second collection provides documentation of Alcyonacean specimens collected and/or photographed from the Pinnacle Trend, using in situ and ex situ photography, with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The collection of samples utilized from the DWH NRDA does not represent a comprehensive census of everytaxon that could possibly occur in the area. However, it provides edification of the most common taxa observed and collected. Both guides provide remarks regarding the recommended level of precision in terms of identifications from in situ imagery, and whether the catalogued taxa have been confirmed by morphological or genetic analysis.The utility of these guides is to help support video/image based analysis in future surveys of the region. With these releases NOAA scientists attempt to garner the expertise of taxonomic experts to photographically correlate collected specimens to in situ observations, where needed, and therefore enhance the scientific value of deep-sea exploration and discovery. We also strive to improve the consistent identification and systematics of many of the taxa featured in this volume as essential for the valuation and protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems (VMEs), and to document potential new discoveries.

Bio(s):

Enrique (Ren) Salgado developed a love and respect for the sea growing up fishing, sailing, and diving in the shores of Puerto Rico and the USVI. Ren has been one of the key players in spearheading the deep-sea coral program in NCCOS and has been involved in ROV science, coral biology, husbandry, and marine spatial data analysis since 2006. Ren has extensive experience with image analysis using multiple vehicles and platforms in the Gulf of Mexico, Southeast US, Caribbean and Alaska. Ren is currently a marine data specialist for CSS, inc. under contract to NOAA.Andrew Shuler is originally from the Eastern Shore of MD, but started his scientific career in 2001 as a member of Alan Lewitus' South Carolina Algal Ecology Lab (SCDNR). Since then he has developed a robust taxonomic knowledge of microbial, invertebrate, and fin fish species. As well as, developed extensive advanced microscopy skills, which have focused both on light and electron microscopy. Andrew became part of the NCCOS family in 2009 as a member of NOAA's Phytoplankton Monitoring Program and in2014 he became part of NCCOS' Deep Coral Ecology Lab where his taxonomic and microscopy skills are being put to use identifying deep sea corals.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 20: Looking Ahead (Using AI for NOAA mission), Part 2
Presenter(s): David Hall - NVIDIA, Dan Morris - Microsoft AI for Earth, Kimberly Goetz - NOAA/NMFS/AFSC/MML, Matt Dornback - NOAA/OAR/OER
Date & Time: 19 November 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 20: Looking Ahead (Using AI for NOAA mission), Part 2 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):
Exploring the Frontiers of Deep Learning for Earth and Space - David Hall (NVIDIA)

Accelerating biodiversity surveys with computer vision: successes and challenges - Dan Morris (Microsoft AI for Earth)

Counting Belugas from Space: Can we use very high resolution satellite imagery to accurately assess the critically endangered beluga whale population in Cook Inlet, Alaska? - Kimberly Goetz (NOAA/NMFS/AFSC/MML)

Tackling challenges of Ocean Exploration with Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence - Matt Dornback (NOAA/OAR/OER)

Sponsor(s):

AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php
Seminar Contact: Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/634104158879112716Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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23 November 2020

Title: Winter in the Changing Arctic: overwintering onboard RV Polarstern | Science and Stories from MOSAIC
Presenter(s): Julia Grosse, PhD, Biological Oceanographer at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, GERMANY, jgrosse@geomar.de
Date & Time: 23 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Winter in the Changing Arctic: overwintering onboard RV Polarstern | Science and Stories from MOSAIC

Presenter(s):
Julia Grosse, PhD, Biological Oceanographer at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact: Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract:
This talk is about my first hand experience overwintering onboard RV Polarstern in the Central Arctic Ocean. In fall 2019 the largest Arctic research expedition set out to be trapped in the ice for an entire year to fill the data gaps. The MOSAiC (Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate) campaign onboard the German icebreaker POLARSTERN drifted across the Central Arctic Ocean so an international team from 20 countries could study atmospheric processes, ice and ocean physics, biogeochemical cycles and ecosystem changes. The winter leg from November to March was defined by low temperatures and constant darkness but also by lead openings and buildup of pressure ridges, demonstrating that the “New Arctic” is not just a concept anymore but that it is already a reality.

Bio(s):
Dr. Julia Grosse is a member of the Biological Oceanography Group in the Marine Biogeochemistry Division at GEOMAR and a postdoc in the Micro-ARC project. She is a phytoplankton ecologist/ biogeochemist interested in the drivers of phytoplankton productivity, the consequences on the cycling of organic matter (especially individual compounds such as amino acids and carbohydrates) and the repercussions for the microbial loop as well as food webs.

Slides:
Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

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30 November 2020

Title: The Cultural Significance of Humpback Whales in Hawaiʻi
Presenter(s): Solomon Pili Kahoʻohalahala, seventh generation native Hawaiian descendant, kupaʻāina, from the small island of Lānaʻi
Date & Time: 30 November 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Solomon Pili Kahoʻohalahala, seventh generation native Hawaiian descendant, kupaʻāina, from the small island of Lānaʻi

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8591043309396061454

Abstract:
Whales are known as koholā in Hawaiian and have long had a place in the Hawaiian culture. The Kumulipo creation chant speaks about the birth of the whale, “Hanau ka Palaoa noho i kai” (born is the whale living in the sea). The koholā was believed to be a manifestation of Kanaloa, the god of the ocean, and is said to be responsible in helping the Polynesians discover the Hawaiian Islands. Join Solomon Pili Kahoʻohalahala as he shares that whales are also revered as ‘aumakua (spiritual protector) to specific families and were generally viewed as divine beings.

This presentation is in celebration of November, which is Hoʻi Koholā (Return of Humpback Whale Month).More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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1 December 2020

Title: Combining fisheries surveys to inform marine species distribution modelling
Presenter(s): Meadhbh Moriarty, Marine Scotland Science / Ulster Univ., UK
Date & Time: 1 December 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webex Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Combining fisheries surveys to inform marine species distribution modelling

Presenter(s):
Meadhbh Moriarty, Marine Scotland Science / Ulster Univ., UK

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesPlease contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Remote Access:
Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mb66637e99438b9610e5a9a4465bd9053Webex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 727 5307 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 199 727 5307

Abstract:
TBDSubscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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2 December 2020

Title: Amplifying diverse voices, advocacy for the protection and integration of Arctic indigenous culture, language and knowledge in science and policy
Presenter(s): Kimberly Aiken, Potential PhD Candidate at the Arctic University, Tromso, Norway
Date & Time: 2 December 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Amplifying diverse voices, advocacy for the protection and integration of Arctic indigenous culture, language and knowledge in science and policy

Presenter(s):
Kimberly Aiken, Potential PhD Candidate at the Arctic University, Tromso, Norway

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact: Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract:


Bio(s):
Kimberly Aiken is an an early career professional focusing on stakeholder engagement, polar political policy, and diversity and inclusion. Kimberly's interests include Arctic Indigenous traditional and local knowledge, incorporating these knowledge systems in all areas of Arctic research, with the aim of informing policy and improving communication and collaboration between various stakeholder groups. Kimberly advocates for the protection of the Antarctic Southern Ocean and the integration of Indigenous knowledge in science and policy. Kimberly aspires to be an inspirational leader and role model for young girls and people of color that are interested in the Polar Regions. https://womeninthearcticandantarctic.ca/women-in-the-arctic-profiles/antarctic-profiles/kimberly-aiken/

Slides:
Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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3 December 2020

Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 22: AI/ML for Models Parameterization, Emulation, and Hybrid Model/AI Construct, Part 2
Presenter(s): Vladimir Krasnopolsky - NOAA/NCEP/EMC, Spencer Clark - Vulcan, Inc./NOAA GFDL, Garrett Limon - University of Michigan, Janni Yuval - MIT
Date & Time: 3 December 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 22: AI/ML for Models Parameterization, Emulation, and Hybrid Model/AI Construct, Part 2 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):
Using Neural Networks as Model Physics Components in Numerical Weather Prediction - Vladimir Krasnopolsky (NOAA/NCEP/EMC)

Challenges associated with training a machine-learning based moist physics parameterization by coarse-graining in a model with topography - Spencer Clark (Vulcan, Inc./NOAA GFDL)

Exploring Various Machine Learning Techniques for Emulating Simplified Physical Parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model - Garrett Limon (University of Michigan)

Stable machine-learning parameterization of subgrid processes for climate modeling at a range of resolutions - Janni Yuval (MIT)

Sponsor(s):

AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php
Seminar Contact: Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8119485862289831948Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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8 December 2020

Title: The science-industry rockfish research collaboration in Alaska
Presenter(s): Madison Hall, AFSC, NRC post-doc
Date & Time: 8 December 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webex Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
The science-industry rockfish research collaboration in Alaska

Presenter(s):
Madison Hall, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Research Council post-doc

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesPlease contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Remote Access:
Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mb66637e99438b9610e5a9a4465bd9053Webex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 727 5307 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 199 727 5307

Abstract:
TBDSubscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Developing a financial sustainability assessment tool for Marine Protected Areas
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 8 December 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Remote only; See description for registration information
Description:



Title:
Developing a financial sustainability assessment tool for Marine Protected Areas

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at hhttps://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Tik52a_iQFGqppbrnIZnYg

Presenter(s):
John Bohorquez of Stony Brook University

Abstract:
Lack of financial resources and staff capacity may limit the effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in meeting their conservation objectives. We are developing a replicable framework to assess the sustainability of MPA financial strategies and identify potential solutions to identified risks, including improving the efficiency and allocation of available resources, expanding or improving in-place financial mechanisms, and developing alternative financial mechanisms. The framework development and assessment is supported by real-world case studies from Colombia, the Caribbean Netherlands, Belize, and Mexico.

Co-

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National MPA Center and OCTO (MPA News, OpenChannels, EBM Tools Network)

Seminar Contact: Lauren Wenzel (lauren.wenzel@noaa.gov) and Zachary Cannizzo (zac.cannizzo@noaa.gov)

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

9 December 2020

Title: The Science of Sea-Bird Scientific
Presenter(s): Kim Martini, PhD, Sea-Bird Scientific, Seattle, WA, kmartini@seabird.com
Date & Time: 9 December 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
The Science of Sea-Bird Scientific

Presenter(s):
Kim Martini, PhD, Sea-Bird Scientific, Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact: Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract:
How design, calibration and data mining are being used to continually improve oceanographic sensors.

Bio(s):
Dr. Kim Martini received her Ph.D. in Oceanography at the University of Washington, and went on to do post-doctoral work at the University of Alaska. Kim came to Sea-Bird from NOAA PMEL, where she was a lead scientist with the Ecosystems & Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations (EcoFOCI) group. Throughout here career, Kim worked with many Sea-Bird Scientific instruments on a wide variety of platforms. Her job at Sea-Bird is to make your data better. She is an expert in ocean instrumentation and data analysis, working globally with customers to solve problems and refine sensor performance. As the lead instructor for Sea-Bird University, Kim directly train scientists and technicians on observational and processing best practices. https://www.seabird.com/science-team

Slides:
Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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15 December 2020

Title: Genomics, Transcriptomics, and eDNA-OH MY! How can advances in these fields help answer your crab and groundfish research questions?
Presenter(s): Wes Larson, NOAA AFSC ABL
Date & Time: 15 December 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webex Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Genomics, Transcriptomics, and eDNA-OHMY! How can advances in these fields help answer your crab and groundfish research questions?

Presenter(s):
Wes Larson, NOAA AFSC ABL

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesPlease contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Remote Access:
Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mb66637e99438b9610e5a9a4465bd9053Webex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 727 5307 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 199 727 5307

Abstract:
TBDSubscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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16 December 2020

Title: Effects of Climate Change on Zooplankton Communities
Presenter(s): Deana Crouser, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 16 December 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Effects of Climate Change on Zooplankton Communities

Presenter(s):
Deana Crouser, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact: Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract:
An overview and comparison of changing marine environments in Puget Sound and the Bering Sea. Warming waters and anthropogenic contributions have led to increasing incidences of coastal hypoxia world wide, as well as, early sea ice retreat observed in the Arctic. Copepods are an important tropic link between marine primary production and upper trophic levels, and how they respond to climate change will greatly affect the future of our oceans. This research seeks to contribute to implications that hypoxia causes a disruption to copepods diel-vertical migration patterns and early sea ice retreat is prompting a shift in bloom timing relative to zooplankton abundance on the Eastern Bering Sea Shelf.

Bio(s):
See Deana's story at Be Boundless: https://www.washington.edu/boundless/oceanography-research/

Slides:
Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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17 December 2020

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: High-tide Flooding Report and Impacts to the Eastern Region
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center and Billy Sweet, NOAA/NOS/Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services
Date & Time: 17 December 2020
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: via GoToWebinar (registration required)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/High-tide Flooding Report and Impacts to the Eastern Region

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and
Billy Sweet, NOAA/NOS/Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services.


Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:

Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:

The webinar will feature a recap of December conditions and a discussion on the most recent high-tide flooding report (July 2020) and impacts to the Eastern Region.

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 24: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 3
Presenter(s): Sarvesh Garimella - ACME AtronOmatic, Hugh Runyan - SIO/UCSD, Mark Veillette - MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Jiali Wang - Argonne National Laboratory
Date & Time: 17 December 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 24: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 3 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):
A Deep Learning Approach for Intelligent Thinning of Satellite Data - Sarvesh Garimella (ACME AtronOmatic)

Automation-assisted segmentation to expedite 3D coral mapping - Hugh Runyan (SIO/UCSD)

A Storm Event Imagery Dataset for Deep Learning Applications in Radar and Satellite Meteorology - Mark Veillette (MIT Lincoln Laboratory)

Precipitation downscaling using conditional super-resolution based deep neural network - Jiali Wang (Argonne National Laboratory)

Sponsor(s):

AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php
Seminar Contact: Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4245790948914123788Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

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Developer - Lori K. Brown