All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

December 18, 2017

Title:
New
It's Dark in Alaska, but the Future of JPSS is Bright
Presenter(s): Carl Dierking and Eric Stevens, Geographic Information Network of Alaska, GINA
Date & Time: December 18, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Bldg, 7700 Hubble Drive, Lanham MD 20771, Conference Room S650
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Speakers: Carl Dierking and Eric Stevens, Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA)

Sponsor: Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) December Science Seminar
POC for questions: Dr.  Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Webex:
877-401-9225
pc: 53339716
JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=ma247c34e47fc91c1ccfad89ac1715a20
Meeting number: 744 026 354 
Host key: 162816 
Meeting password: Jpss2017!  

Abstract: Surveilling Alaskas weather presents unique challenges.  Alaska is large, topographically complex, and compared to much of the CONUS suffers from a sparsity of observations from weather radars, METARs, and radiosondes.  However, Alaska does have one advantage: thanks to its high latitude, Alaska receives very frequent coverage from polar orbiting weather satellites such as S-NPP and (soon) NOAA-20.  The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) operates two direct broadcast antennas to track and receive data from these and other satellites.  The data are then processed by GINA and fed into NWS Alaskas AWIPS via an LDM pathway.  The advantage of this approach is a reduction in latency: NWS meteorologists are examining the latest imagery on AWIPS within approximately 15 minutes of a satellites passage over Alaska, with the motivation that even the highest quality satellite imagery is of little use to forecasters if it arrives too late to be included in the decision making process.

This arrangement, the High Latitude Satellite Proving Ground, has served Alaska for a number of years, with each year bringing upgrades and improvements.  Building on this success, several new products and enhancements to existing products have been implemented during 2017.  These achievements include generation of mosaic imagery where successive passes of a given wavelength are stitched together with the most recent image always on top, thereby mitigating to some extent the problem of hard edges outlining each swath.  Two new multispectral RGBs developed specifically for use in the fire weather context were enthusiastically embraced during the summer wildfire season.  A number of microwave-based products were also introduced, with a formal assessment of new microwave imagery used by the NWS Alaska Sea Ice Program (ASIP) conducted during the spring of 2017.  

Plans are also in the works to continue expanding the relationship between GINA and NWS Alaska in 2018.  For years the spatial resolution of imagery products has been made coarser due to considerations of bandwidth and storage. Now, with the implementation of a tiling approach, GINA will soon deliver full-resolution imagery to NWS Alaska for display in AWIPS.  And lastly, a handful of CLAVR-X cloud products is planned for production in 2018. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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December 19, 2017

Title: Shoreline hardening and upland land use affect estuarine fish and crustaceans at local and system scales: lessons from a Chesapeake Bay meta-analysis
Presenter(s): Matthew S. Kornis, Ph.D., Research Associate, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, and Fish Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Presenting remotely from Wisconsin.
Date & Time: December 19, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

This seminar is also part of the Mid-Atlantic Shoreline Seminar Series

Presenter: Matthew S. Kornis, Ph.D., Research Associate, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, and Fish Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Presenting remotely from Wisconsin.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar hosts are Elizabeth.Turner@noa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:Shoreline hardening and human alternation of land cover are intensifying due to human population growth and sea level rise.  We sought to describe how fishes and crustaceans valuable to coastal systems are affected by these changes by examining patterns in the abundance, biomass, size structure, and diversity of nearshore taxa at two natural (wetland, beach) and two hardened (bulkhead, riprap) shoreline types. These local-scale analyses demonstrated that shoreline hardening had predominantly negative effects on estuarine fauna, with responses mediated by functional species group and body size.  Species abundance patterns from 39 subestuaries from Chesapeake Bay and Delaware Coastal Bays were also examined across gradients of urban and agricultural land cover as well as the percent of shoreline comprised of wetland and hardened shoreline to evaluate system-scale relationships.This meta-analysis provided empirical evidence that shoreline hardening had cumulative, negative system-scale effects on the abundance of most species, and that abundances of four bottom-oriented species were also negatively related to watershed cropland cover. These results highlight important issues for conservation and management strategies in coastal environments, and will require managers and policymakers to navigate difficult decisions at local and regional scales.
 
About the Speaker: Matt received a Ph.D. in limnology and marine science in 2011 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has conducted research on issues ranging from shoreline and land use stressors, invasive species, food webs, and fisheries.  His work in coastal estuaries stemmed from a post-doctoral fellowship with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.  He is currently a fish biologist and data analyst with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service working in the Great Lakes on issues pertaining to the survival, movement, wild recruitment, and diet of salmon and trout. Away from work he enjoys spending time with his wife and two sons, gardening, hiking, and fishing.  

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Title: Assessing vulnerability of Interior Alaskan Subsistence Users to Impacts of Environmental Change on Travel and Access
Presenter(s): Helen Cold, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: December 19, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Helen Cold, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy ACCAP, a NOAA RISA Team
https://accap.uaf.edu/

Webinar Access: https://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=503ec327e1&e=9097598e1a

Abstract:Changes in climate are disproportionately affecting northern latitudes, and this is altering relationships between human societies and their environments. Rural communities in boreal Alaska rely heavily on natural resources for provisional and cultural purposes, and have reported challenges caused by contemporary environmental changes. Environmental disturbances associated with climate change, such as shifts in fire regime, hydrologic changes affecting waterways, thawing of permafrost, extreme weather events, and unstable snow and ice conditions, have been qualitatively associated with altered accessibility of subsistence resources. 

Our research objective was to quantify the impact of disturbances driven by climate change on access to ecosystem services in Interior Alaska.  In collaboration with nine rural boreal Alaska communities, we documented changes observed by subsistence users. Through combining traditional ecological knowledge and scientific analysis, we characterized the impact of climate change on travel networks used for subsistence resource harvest across the study region and provide information that collaborating communities can use to optimize community resilience and self-reliance. These data can be used by agencies and local communities to foster adaptation to a rapidly changing climate.

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Title: Migratory Species Conservation Project Tools: New Spatial Decision Support Tool for the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Jorge Brenner, Associate Director of Marine Science, The Nature Conservancy, Texas Chapter, and Valerie Pietsch, Marine GIS Manager, The Nature Conservancy, Texas
Date & Time: December 19, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Medium Conference Room - 9348
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Jorge Brenner, Associate Director of Marine Science, The Nature Conservancy, and Valerie Pietsch, Marine GIS Manager, The Nature Conservancy. Presenting remotely from Texas.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Marine species migrate to fulfill essential needs: to find food, reproduce, or seek out a more habitable location. The Gulf of Mexico hosts a wealth of active biodiversity migration -70% of highly migratory fish, five sea turtles, one-third of the bird species in North America, and most of the North Atlantic's marine mammals migrate through this ecosystem. Since 2016, the Conservancy has led the development of a framework for migratory species assessment and conservation in the Gulf with the publication of the Pathways, Threats and Conservation report. More recently we published the Migratory Species Conservation project web site (http://www.migratoryblueways.org/), to share our vision to identify migratory blueways - and address the knowledge gap of migratory pathways, threats, and opportunities for their conservation. Additionally we created an accompanying online Blueways Conservation Decision Support Tool (DST -http://maps.bluewaysconservation.org/) to provide support for planners, resource managers, government officials, and the ocean conservation community to understand marine species blueways, threats, and key stopovers. The DST is built from more than one-thousand animal satellite tracking data from over 100 researchers and institutions in the United States, Mexico, and Cuba.  The tool includes a visualization platform to highlight information about migration corridors, movement density, occurrence hotspots, and stopovers, along with marine environmental data, and human and climate-related threats and contains several apps that can be used for careful marine planning and resource management.

About the Speakers:
Jorge Brenner is an Associate Director of Marine Science with The Nature Conservancy in Houston, Texas. The focus of his work is marine biodiversity conservation, spatial analyses, ecological economics, climate change adaptation and spatial tools development. He has experience conducting research in marine species ecology, biodiversity informatics, coastal zone management, ecosystem services valuation, geographic information systems (GIS), sea-level rise and coastal resilience and conservation planning. He has worked in the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea of Cortez and Mediterranean. In his current position with The Nature Conservancy in the Gulf of Mexico large marine ecosystem he oversees species to habitat to whole system conservation projects, supports multinational conservation planning efforts, online coastal resilience and biodiversity decision support tools development and collaborates with a variety of partnership networks, including Mexico and Cuba. Dr. Brenner is currently a member of several initiatives around the Gulf that seeks its restoration, and has previously participated with the National Academies.

Valerie Pietsch McNulty is the Marine GIS Manager for The Nature Conservancy in Houston, TX. In this position, her work includes data analyses for Gulf of Mexico marine conservation projects, creative design and implementation of marine planning decision support tools, and program website management. Valerie has previously worked as a Spatial Analyst for The Conservancy's New York City program, mapping green roof infrastructure and its relationship with the urban heat island effect. She has a MA in Climate and Society from Columbia University and a BS in Environmental Engineering from Cornell University.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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December 20, 2017

Title: What does it mean to end overfishing?
Presenter(s): Richard D. Methot Jr., NOAA Senior Scientist for Stock Assessments, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NMFS. Presenting remotely from Seattle, WA
Date & Time: December 20, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Richard D. Methot Jr., NOAA Senior Scientist for Stock Assessments, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NMFS. Presenting remotely from Seattle, WA.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Overfishing is catching too many fish. Overfishing depletes fish stocks, harms ecosystems, and diminishes future fishing opportunities. The need to prevent it is a strong focus of the Sustainable Fisheries Act since its origins in 1976 and a global perspective shows that the U.S. and several other industrialized nations  are achieving sustainable fisheries by implementing a science-based fishery management system with strong enforcement of strict guidelines. Yet instances of overfishing persist and are rampant in some regions of the world. The conceptual basis for sustainable fisheries is rooted in the same ecological principles that underlie all natural resource management.  The mix of species within an ecosystem has an inherent quasi-stable carrying capacity toward which it will grow if disturbed. Think of an old growth forest or undisturbed prairie.  Humans are a new top predator in these systems, an invasive species, that introduces a disturbance, fishing in this case, that resets the balance point.  In a fished system, fished species are less abundant and younger than at carrying capacity, but now have a harvestable surplus production. The role of fishery science is then to guide us towards a point that produces food and benefits for human society, but does not result in an unsustainable ecosystem; different, but sustainably so.  In this presentation I will discuss the prevention of overfishing from four perspectives:  political, management, operational-tactical science, strategic-holistic science.

Methot Jr., R.D., Tromble, G.R., Lambert, D.M. and Greene, K.E.  2013.  Implementing a science-based system for preventing overfishing and guiding sustainable fisheries in the U.S.  ICES JMS.  DOI:	10.1093/icesjms/fst119.

About the Speakers: Richard Methot serves as NOAAs Senior Scientist for Stock Assessments. During his 36-year career with NOAA Fisheries he has worked in the Southwest, Alaska, and Northwest Fisheries Science Centers and Office of Science & Technology. Throughout his career, he has focused on development and application of fishery assessment models and communication of assessment results to the fishery management process. In 2008, he was awarded the Department of Commerce Gold Medal for his development of the Stock Synthesis assessment approach.  Dr. Methot has a prominent role in several national and international committees related to marine fish stock assessment and management.  In his senior scientist role, he strives to improve assessment methods, including bringing more ecosystem and environmental information into the assessments, and to improve communication of the role that assessments serve in supporting sustainable fisheries.

Dr. Methot's educational background includes a B.S. in Fisheries (1975) from the University of Washington; Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego (1981); and a post-doctoral position at the Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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Title: Bering Canyon: Physics, Flow and Zooplankton
Presenter(s): Colleen Harpold, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA and Carol Ladd, Physical Oceanographer, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: December 20, 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Colleen Harpold, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA and Carol Ladd, Physical Oceanographer, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAAs EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/). 

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Zooplankton of Bering Canyon and how the physics and flow of the region affect their distribution.

Seminar POC for questions: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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December 22, 2017

Title: Alaska Region Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Richard Thoman, Climate Science and Services Manager, NWS Alaska Region
Date & Time: December 22, 2017
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: 407 Akasofu Building, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Richard Thoman, Climate Science and Services Manager, NWS Alaska Region

Seminar Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, 
Point of Contact: accap@uaf.edu

Remote Access: Register at 
https://accap.uaf.edu/NWS_Briefings

Abstract: This webinar will review recent conditions and current state of the climate system in and near Alaska and the status of important global climate drivers, review guidance available for the monthly and seasonal scale outlooks and finish up with the official outlooks by NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.  Rick will also present a "Feature-of-the-Month" special addition in which each month he will highlight a topic relevant to the particular month.

Recordings from past Briefings available here: http://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=6b7287a9eb&e=9097598e1a

About the Speaker: Richard Thoman works as the Climate Science and Services Manager, for NWS Alaska Region Headquarters. He works closely with NOAA line offices and partners throughout Alaska providing information on climate monitoring, analysis and forecasting at the two week to one year time frame

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January 10, 2018

Title: Synthesis​ ​of​ ​public​ ​water​ ​supply​ ​use​ ​in​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States: Spatio-temporal patterns and socio-economic controls
Presenter(s): Sankar Arumugam, Ph.D., Professor and University Faculty Scholar, Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
Date & Time: January 10, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Sankar Arumugam, Ph.D., Professor and University Faculty Scholar, Dept. of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. 
 
Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Recent U.S. Geological Survey water-use report suggests that increasing water-use efficiency could mitigate the supply-and-demand imbalance arising from changing climate and growing population. However, this rich data have neither analyzed to understand the underlying patterns, nor have been investigated to identify the factors contributing to this increased efficiency. A national-scale synthesis of public supply withdrawals (withdrawals) reveals a strong Northsouth gradient in public supply water use with the increasing population in the South contributing to increased withdrawal. Contrastingly, a reverse Southnorth gradient exists in per capita withdrawals (efficiency), with northern states consistently improving the efficiency, while the southern states' efficiency declined. Our analyses of spatial patterns of per capita withdrawals further demonstrate that urban counties exhibit improved efficiency over rural counties. Improved efficiency is also demonstrated over high-income and well-educated counties. Given the potential implications of the findings in developing long-term water conservation measures (i.e., increasing block rates), we argue the need for frequent updates, perhaps monthly to annual, of water-use data for identifying effective strategies that control the water-use efficiency in various geographic settings under a changing climate.

About the Speaker: Dr. Sankar Arumugam is a  Professor in the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering at NCSU. He is also a University Faculty Scholar (2013-2018). He is primarily associated with the Environmental, Water Resources, and Coastal Engineering and Computing and Systems groups within the department.
Dr. Arumugam currently teaches CE 383  Hydrology and Urban Water Systems, CE 586  Engineering Hydrology, CE 777  Stochastic Methods in Water and Environmental Engineering and CE 786  Hydroclimatology.

Dr. Arumugam currently serves as the associate editor for the Journal of Hydrology (Elsevier) and for the Journal of Hydrometeorology (AMS). He also served as the associate editor for  Water Resources Research (AGU), Journal of Hydrologic Engineering (ASCE) and as the editor of Journal of Water and Climate Change (IWA). Dr. Arumugam is also a member of American Geophysical Union, American Meteorological Society and Environmental Water Research Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers.
He earned his B.S. in agricultural engineering in 1991, his M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering in 1996, and his Ph.D. in Water Resources Engineering in 2001.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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Title: Tools for evaluating tradeoffs inherent in marine ecosystem-based management: a perspective from the West Coast (Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series)
Presenter(s): Isaac Kaplan, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: January 10, 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/648CBS, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Isaac Kaplan, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC)

Abstract: Isaac Kaplan will discuss tools in use on the West Coast to assess several core tradeoffs inherent in ecosystem-based marine management. These include 1) tradeoffs between recovering marine mammal populations and protected or harvested fish stocks 2) harvest of forage fish that also sustain predator populations 3) energy development that excludes some types of fishing 4) global scale decisions about business-as-usual CO2 emissions versus local effects on fisheries. The case studies emphasize the need for collaborative interdisciplinary efforts that apply a suite of modeling approaches, with rapid deployment of simple models that can identify data gaps and inform more detailed approaches.

Remote access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the January EBM/EBFM seminar:  https://goo.gl/648CBS After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP). 

About the Speaker: Isaac Kaplan is a Research Fishery Biologist at NOAAs Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA. He is a member of the Conservation Biology Division and the Integrative Marine Ecology Team, and the California Current Integrated Ecosystem Assessment. His research collaborations involve food web modeling, bioenergetics, seasonal ocean forecasting, and "end-to-end" Atlantis simulation models that include oceanography, ecology, and fishing fleet dynamics. 

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January 11, 2018

Title: Vertical Datum Transformation (VDATUM) software tool
Presenter(s): Stephen White, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: January 11, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 Room 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Stephen White, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor: NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4503513150235676419. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States:  +1 (914) 614-3221  ; Access Code: 512-021-663; Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar; Webinar ID: 209-003-067.

Abstract: VDatum is a free NOAA software tool to vertically transform geospatial data among various tidal, orthometric, and ellipsoidal vertical datums, allowing users to convert data from different horizontal/vertical references into a common system. New features and future development efforts will be discussed.

About the Speakers: Stephen White is the VDATUM Program Manager.

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January 16, 2018

Title: Bloom and Bust: Algae Takes a Toll on the Housing Market
Presenter(s): Tingting Liu, Ph.D., Drought Policy & Impact Analyst, National Drought Mitigation Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Date & Time: January 16, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Tingting Liu, Ph.D., Drought Policy & Impact Analyst, National Drought Mitigation Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Presenting remotely from Lincoln.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: We examine the impact of water quality in Narragansett Bay on housing prices in coastal towns and municipalities using a hedonic housing-price model. Unlike other hedonic studies of water quality, we test whether housing market responds to average water quality or more to extreme events. We also test the spatial and temporal extent of effects of water quality on housing prices. We find that poor coastal water quality, measured in terms of the concentration of chlorophyll, has a negative impact on housing prices that diminishes with distance from the shoreline. Furthermore, our finding suggests that housing prices are most influenced by the extreme environmental conditions, which may be accompanied by unpleasant odors, discoloration and even fish kills. We further predict potential increases in home values associated under water quality improvement scenarios and find an increase in the values of homes in coastal communities along Narragansett Bay of about $18 million up to $136 million.   

About the Speaker: Tingting Liu joined the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) at University of Nebraska-Lincoln in September 2017 as a Drought Policy and Impact Analyst following a three-year appointment as an Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) Postdoc Fellow with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. She received a Ph.D. degree in Environmental and Natural Resource Economics from University of Rhode Island in 2014, M.A. degree in Economics from Guangxi Normal University in 2006 and a B.S. in Information Management and Information System at Shanxi University in 2003. She had been an assistant professor at the Guangxi Normal University School of Economics and Management in Guilin, China prior to coming to the U.S. in 2009. Her research focuses on valuation of ecosystem goods and services, land use change, watershed management. She will focus on the impact analysis of drought and valuation of drought early warning at NDMC.
 
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January 17, 2018

Title: Building a Twenty First Century Heavy Icebreaker: Balancing Security and Science Capabilities
Presenter(s): Commander Kenneth J. Boda, Chief of Aids to Navigation and Icebreaking Capabilities, Office of Cutter Forces, Commandant -CG-751, U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, DC. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: January 17, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150, but may change
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Commander Kenneth J. Boda, Chief of Aids to Navigation and Icebreaking Capabilities, Office of Cutter Forces, Commandant (CG-751), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, DC. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
 .
Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: The United States Coast Guard is designing and building new heavy polar icebreakers to replace aging and increasingly obsolescent ships. We have developed and evaluated icebreaker operational requirements, seeking the greatest capability within the bounds of affordability. These ships must conduct the missions of U.S. Coast Guard (which include safety, security, and stewardship of U.S. waters) while serving the survey and science needs of our partner agencies across the federal government. In this presentation, Boda will outline the icebreaker acquisitions process, highlighting USCG outreach with the U.S. Navy, NOAA, industry and international partners. He will discuss the concept of icebreaker operations in both the Arctic and Antarctic, and will present the key performance capabilities required of the vessel in terms of icebreaking, endurance, and interoperability, and the resulting design implications. He will also discuss the capabilities that support U.S. Coast Guard maritime missions such as boat and aviation operations.  Finally, he will detail the survey and science capabilities required of these icebreakers to increase our knowledge of the remote Polar Regions.

About the Speaker: Commander Ken Boda is the Aids to Navigation and Icebreaker Policy and Capabilities Division Chief in the Office of Cutter Forces at Coast Guard Headquarters (CG-751). He is a career icebreaker sailor having served eight years afloat as Communications Officer and Operations Officer in USCGC POLAR SEA (WAGB 11), Supply/Training Officer in USCGC EAGLE (WIX 327), and Executive Officer in USCGC POLAR STAR (WAGB 10). His staff tours include Marine Science Instructor at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, Analyst in the Office of Strategic Analysis at Coast Guard Headquarters (CG- 095), and leader of the interagency Operational Science Advisory Team (OSAT-2) for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill response.

Commander Boda is a 1997 graduate of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy with a degree in
Marine and Environmental Sciences (with high honors). He holds masters degrees from
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University in Physical Oceanography,
and from the Naval War College in National Security and Strategic Studies (with
distinction). Commander Boda is a 2016 Massachusetts Institute of Technology Seminar
XXI Fellow. He is a native of Fairfield, Connecticut, and is married to the former Alison Baikal of Kensington, Connecticut; they have a five year old son, Patrick, and reside in Crofton, MD.

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January 18, 2018

Title: Strategies to Improve the Analysis and Prediction of Ocean Mesoscale Variability Evaluated in the OSSE Framework
Presenter(s): Dr. George Halliwell, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: January 18, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. George Halliwell (NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD)

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/553113557

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 553-113-557

Abstract: TBA

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January 23, 2018

Title:
New
Convective-Scale Ensemble Prediction Experiments over Yangtze-Huaihe River Basin
Presenter(s): Prof. Huiling Yuan, Nanjing University
Date & Time: January 23, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor EMC seminar.  
Speaker: Prof. Huiling Yuan, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China
Title: Convective-Scale Ensemble Prediction Experiments over Yangtze-Huaihe River Basin
Date,Time, Room:   January 23rd, 2018 at noon in NCWCP Rm 2155
Contact: Yuejian Zhu

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
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Meeting number: 900 826 795
Host key: 796253
Meeting password: a3YhdEPN

JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3)
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Leader:  9702437# 
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======
Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar.

Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling,  and other requested people.  The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site  http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and  EMC facebook page  http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

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Title: Economic Valuation of Natural Infrastructure Provided by the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve
Presenter(s): Jarrod Loerzel, Social Scientist, Matt Gorstein, Resource Economist, Chloe Fleming, Social Scientist, Sarah Gonyo, Resource Economist, all from NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science - NCCOS
Date & Time: January 23, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

This seminar was moved from Dec. 21, 2017.

Speakers: Jarrod Loerzel, Social Scientist, Matt Gorstein, Resource Economist, 
Chloe Fleming, Social Scientist, Sarah Gonyo, Resource Economist, all from NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science - NCCOS

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: For this project, we estimated the economic value of shoreline protection provided by natural habitats (such as marshes) to areas in and around the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve (JC NERR) using a combination of storm, coastal wave, and marsh migration models (i.e. ADCIRC+SWAN and SLAMM). The economic value of natural infrastructure in the area was estimated by first identifying and mapping shoreline habitats in relation to developed land areas vulnerable to environmental threats such as storm surge and sea level rise. Then, researchers estimated the amount of shoreline protection provided to those areas by existing shoreline habitats in a select number of storm and marsh migration scenarios. Finally, we articulate the calculated value of damages avoided (e.g., from storm surge and sea level rise) to coastal communities due to the presence of natural infrastructure using three storm scenarios coupled with current and future marsh migration. Using the assembled data and results, additional analyses may help determine locations for future nature-based infrastructure projects to increase any coastal communitys resilience to future environmental or climate-based disturbances.
 
About the Speakers:
Jarrod Loerzel is a social scientist with NOAA NCCOS and works at the Hollings Marine Lab in Charleston, SC. Among other things, Jarrods work is focused on the development, theory, and application of a variety of survey methods. He is interested in the spatial aspects of social phenomena, particularly as they relate to place attachment and environmental resource condition.

Matt Gorstein is a natural resource economist with NOAA NCCOS sitting at the Hollings Marine Lab in Charleston, SC. Much of his work is focused on economic valuation and statistical analysis, as well as data collection and data management. Matt is interested in indicator development, ecosystem service valuation, and in using numbers to tell stories.

Chloe Fleming is a marine and coastal social scientist and policy specialist with NOAA NCCOS at the Hollings Marine Lab in Charleston, SC. Her work is focused on the interactions between communities and coastal and marine environments. Among other things, Chloe is interested in community vulnerability and resilience to climate change impacts, sustainable use and management of coastal resources, and scientific writing and communication.

Sarah Gonyo is an economist with NOAA NCCOS in Silver Spring, MD. Her work is focused on economic valuation, survey development, and statistical analysis. Sarah is interested in ecosystem service valuation, particularly non-market valuation, and how humans use and interact with nature.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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January 25, 2018

Title: Decision Support Tools and a Framework for Climate-smart Restoration
Presenter(s): Isaiah Thalmayer and Thomas Gardali, Point Blue Conservation Science
Date & Time: January 25, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Isaiah Thalmayer and Thomas Gardali, both with Point Blue Conservation Science

Seminar Sponsors: NOAA and USFWS; NOAA Points of Contact are NOAA's Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov, and US Fish and Wildlife Service's Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Seminar Registration: https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e3y9wv1gvm1o/event/registration.html
Invitations to register for the webinar will be emailed a week or two prior to the event. For the best viewing experience, please use Internet Explorer. 

Abstract: This month will feature two presentations by Isaiah Thalmayer and Thomas Gardali: Isaiah will discuss a web-based decision support tool designed to help select plants for restoration projects and Thomas will present a framework designed to guide incorporation of the impacts of climate change in restoration plans.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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January 30, 2018

Title: Data Driven Decision-Making: Introducing the American Community Survey
Presenter(s): Nesreen Khashan, Data Dissemination Specialist, U.S. Census Bureau. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: January 30, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Nesreen Khashan, Data Dissemination Specialist, U.S. Census Bureau. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.
 
Abstract: Whether you are in public health or public policy, the nonprofit sector or in business, you can make data-driven decisions using statistics from the nations largest statistical agency, the U.S. Census Bureau. This webinar will introduce you to the American Community Survey, which releases more than 65 demographic, socio-economic and housing measures every year at granular geographic levels. Inform your research while revealing insightful narratives about the areas you serve by analyzing trends, comparing geographies and examining variations of characteristics across communities. These estimates are publicly-accessible via the Census Bureaus website and API. Youll receive a brief demonstration of a handful of tools that will help you access these data and learn where to find methodology and technical notes. Well conclude with some useful tips on how to sign up for free webinars and on-site trainings.  

About the Speaker: As a data dissemination specialist, Nesreen Khashan provides presentations and trainings to the public on how to access and understand Census Bureau statistics. Since 2012, Nesreen has served in this role for the state of Maryland and the Metro DC area. Most recently, she has included Virginia in her service area. She has helped scores of small business owners, grant writers, educators, journalists, and others use statistics to improve how they make decisions and assess the effectiveness of their current operations. Delivering trainings both in person and via webinars, she has been able to expand her reach as demand to understand publicly available data increases. Nesreen is also a contributing writer to America Counts, the Census Bureaus story-telling portal (census.gov/AmericaCounts).

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January 31, 2018

Title: Well below 2 °C: Mitigation strategies for avoiding dangerous to catastrophic climate changes
Presenter(s): Yangyang Xu, Assistant Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences , College of Geosciences, Texas A&M University. Presenting from Texas.
Date & Time: January 31, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Yangyang Xu, Assistant Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences , College of Geosciences, Texas A&M University. Presenting from Texas.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract and About the Speaker: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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February 14, 2018

Title:
New
Transformative Mindset Change as a Precondition to Successful Reorganization: Part 1
Presenter(s): Dr. Pavel Hosa, MBA, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: February 14, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Pavel Hosa, MBA, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Webinar Access: Please check back on 2/12/17; we are switching webinar systems.

Abstract: Traditionally, costly reorganizations do not lead to success. Only organizations and teams perfectly aligned with their external environments succeed in the 21st century. Dr. Pavel Hosa explains the transformative mindset change necessary now, and why it is crucial for any successful reorganization to succeed! He presents his transformative mindset change results based on the Theory U and MIT-guided research. This seminar is the first of a two-part series; the second seminar is being held on Feb. 28, 12-1pm ET.
.
About the Speaker: As a special assistant of the Czech Secretary of Defense and former Czech president Vaclav Havel, Dr. Pavel Hosa supported the long-term reorganization of the Czech Republics military. During that process, he worked with the former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Air National Guard Commander. Pavel supported the Czech President during his seven official and closed-door negotiations with President Clinton, Defense Secretaries Rumsfeld and Cohen, and Secretary of State Albright. During his tour of duty at the Supreme Allied Headquarters Atlantic in Norfolk, VA, Pavel led a global team of 200+ international government-level managers, briefed President G. W. Bush on cultural and government personnel-related challenges associated with the NATO enlargement, and applied PhD-level analytic methodologies and principles and achieved significant operating costs savings and greater levels of innovation.

Dr. Pavel Hosa has been trained by the U.S. Air Force and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in innovative thinking for success in the 21st century. He holds a Masters degree in management from the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, FL, and a doctoral degree in organization and management from the Capella University in Minneapolis, MN. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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February 15, 2018

Title:
New
Natural Shoreline Infrastructure: Working with Nature to Increase Coastal Resilience
Presenter(s): Jenna Judge, PhD, SF Bay and Outer Coast Sentinel Site Cooperative, NOAA
Date & Time: February 15, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Jenna Judge, PhD, San Francisco Bay and Outer Coast Sentinel Site Cooperative, NOAA. Presenting remotely from NOAA's Office of Coastal Management Office in Oakland, CA

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

WebinarAccess: To be determined; probably an Adobe Connect webinar - check back within a week of the webinar.

Abstract: Sea level rise and erosion are major threats to California's coast, requiring solutions that preserve the many benefits of a natural coast that Californians enjoy: flood protection, recreation, habitat for wildlife, water quality, and more. Seawalls are commonly installed in an attempt to keep the shoreline in place and hold back the sea; however, they ultimately worsen impacts by increasing erosion along the seawall and the shoreline adjacent to it, causing already vulnerable beaches to shrink more. Natural shoreline infrastructure is an alternative that is more likely to preserve the benefits coastal ecosystems provide while also maintaining coastal access. The California coastline is heterogeneous and no single solution will address all of the challenges we anticipate in the future. Dr. Judge developed detailed case studies highlighting a range of approaches and offering lessons related to the design, permitting, implementation, and monitoring challenges encountered when pursuing nature-based solutions to climate-related coastal hazards.
 
About the Speaker: Dr. Jenna Judge coordinates the San Francisco Bay and Outer Coast Sentinel Site Cooperative, one of five NOAA Sentinel Site Cooperatives in the country, dedicated to improving both ecosystem and community resilience to rising sea levels, storms, and flooding events. Dr. Judge works with partners to develop resources for and advance dialogue between diverse stakeholder groups that are planning and implementing strategies for sea level rise adaptation. Judge received a bachelor's degree in aquatic biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and earned her doctorate in integrative biology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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February 21, 2018

Title: Allisions, Collisions and Groundings: The Impact of the Physical Oceanographic Real Time System (PORTS®) On Accident Reduction
Presenter(s): Speaker: K. Eric Wolfe, Chief Economist, Office of the Associate Administrator, National Ocean Service, NOAA. Presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.
Date & Time: February 21, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: K. Eric Wolfe, Chief Economist, Office of the Associate Administrator, National Ocean Service, NOAA. Presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.
 
Abstract: Reductions in the rates of domestic allisions, collisions and groundings (ACGs) are the result of technological advances as well as implementation of best practices in the maritime industry. This study investigated long-term gross benefits derived from expanded implementation of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System (PORTS) with respect to reductions in ACG rates in the United States. Following PORTS installations that provided expanded coverage of U.S. ports and adjoining areas, concomitant decreases in accident rates occurred.  While previous estimates suggested that between twenty and sixty percent of grounding accident reductions were due to PORTS, current research suggests that between 44 and 51 percent of ACG rate reductions were due to such installations. Annual gross benefits resulting from lowered ACG rates PORTS locations installed through 2016 were estimated to approach $29 million. Over the estimated ten-year economic life of PORTS instruments, present PORTS installations could produce a present value saving of $180 million. If expanded to an additional 23 ports where economic justification might be made, up to $10 million could be saved.  Over ten years this would equate to over $84 million.   

About the Speaker: K. Eric Wolfe is the chief economist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations National Ocean Service.  He was a senior executive at the Association of American Railroads where he managed industry interline revenue and financial clearinghouse operations, operations and reference file data, as well as the Surface Transportation Boards Carload Waybill Sample from 1983 to 1999. He also served as a senior executive at the American Trucking Associations and as a Certified Financial Planner. Wolfe earned his Master of Science degree in economics from the University of Maryland. He has served as co-general and associate editor of the Journal of the Transportation Research Forum (JTRF) and has published several research articles on the transportation industry. His research has appeared in such journals as Transportation Journal, Traffic Quarterly, Journal of Leisure Research, JTRF, Journal of Ocean and Coastal Economics.  

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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February 22, 2018

Title: Citizen Science Benefits Coral Reef Restoration
Presenter(s): Dalton Hesley, Research Associate, University of Miami RSMAS Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: February 22, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dalton Hesley, Research Associate, University of Miami RSMAS. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.
 
Abstract and About the Speaker: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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February 28, 2018

Title:
New
Transformative Mindset Change as a Precondition to Successful Reorganization: Part 2
Presenter(s): Dr. Pavel Hosa, MBA, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: February 28, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Pavel Hosa, MBA, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Webinar Access: Please check back on 2/12/17; we are switching webinar systems.

Abstract: Traditionally, costly reorganizations do not lead to success. Only organizations and teams perfectly aligned with their external environments succeed in the 21st century. Dr. Pavel Hosa explains the transformative mindset change necessary now, and why it is crucial for any successful reorganization to succeed! He presents his transformative mindset change results based on the Theory U and MIT-guided research. This seminar is the second of a two-part series; the first seminar was held on Feb. 14, 12-1pm ET.
.
About the Speaker: As a special assistant of the Czech Secretary of Defense and former Czech president Vaclav Havel, Dr. Pavel Hosa supported the long-term reorganization of the Czech Republics military. During that process, he worked with the former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Air National Guard Commander. Pavel supported the Czech President during his seven official and closed-door negotiations with President Clinton, Defense Secretaries Rumsfeld and Cohen, and Secretary of State Albright. During his tour of duty at the Supreme Allied Headquarters Atlantic in Norfolk, VA, Pavel led a global team of 200+ international government-level managers, briefed President G. W. Bush on cultural and government personnel-related challenges associated with the NATO enlargement, and applied PhD-level analytic methodologies and principles and achieved significant operating costs savings and greater levels of innovation.

Dr. Pavel Hosa has been trained by the U.S. Air Force and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in innovative thinking for success in the 21st century. He holds a Masters degree in management from the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, FL, and doctoral degree in organization and management from the Capella University in Minneapolis, MN. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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March 7, 2018

Title:
New
Risk Factors for Seabird Bycatch in the Hawaii Pelagic Longline Tuna Fishery
Presenter(s): Eric Gilman, Tuna Program, The Nature Conservancy, Co-authors include: Milani Chaloupka, Ecological Modeling Services and University of Queens, and John Peschon and Sarah Ellgen, both with NOAA NMFS PIRO
Date & Time: March 7, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OnenOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Eric Gilman, Tuna Program, The Nature Conservancy. Co-authors include: Milani Chaloupka, Ecological Modeling Services and University of Queens, and John Peschon and Sarah Ellgen, both with NOAA/NMFS/PIRO

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: TBD - check back a few days before the seminar

Abstract: Capture in global pelagic longline fisheries threatens the viability of some seabird populations. The Hawaii longline tuna fishery annually catches hundreds of seabirds, primarily Laysan (Phoebastria immutabilis) and black-footed (P. nigripes) albatrosses. Since seabird regulations were introduced in 2001, the seabird catch rate has declined 74%. However, over the past decade, seabird catch levels significantly increased due to significant increasing trends in both effort and nominal seabird catch rates. We modelled observer data using a spatio-temporal generalized additive mixed model with zero-inflated Poisson likelihood to determine the significance of the effect of various risk factors on the seabird catch rate. The seabird catch rate significantly increased as annual mean multivariate ENSO index values increased, suggesting that decreasing ocean productivity observed in recent years in the central north Pacific may have contributed to the increasing trend in nominal seabird catch rate. A significant increasing trend in number of albatrosses attending vessels, possibly linked to declining regional ocean productivity and increasing absolute abundance of black footed albatrosses, may also have contributed to the increasing nominal seabird catch rate. Largest opportunities for reductions are through augmented efficacy of seabird bycatch mitigation north of 23 N where mitigation methods are required and during setting instead of during hauling. Both side vs. stern setting, and blue-dyed vs. untreated bait significantly reduced the seabird catch rate. Of two options for meeting regulatory requirements, side setting had a significantly lower seabird catch rate than blue-dyed bait. There was significant spatio-temporal and seasonal variation in the risk of seabird capture with highest catch rates in April and May and to the northwest of the main Hawaiian Islands. This presentation is based on the following open source publication: Gilman, E., Chaloupka, M., Peschon, J., Ellgen, S. 2016. Risk factors for seabird bycatch in a pelagic longline tuna fishery. PLoS ONE 11(5): e0155477. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0155477. 

About the Speaker: Eric Gilman conducts research on: direct and collateral ecological effects of pelagic (oceanic) fisheries, fishing gear selectivity to reduce bycatch of at-risk taxa, mechanisms underpinning pelagic ecosystem stability, and broad ecosystem-level effects of fishing. He is Associate Faculty at Hawaii Pacific University and senior fisheries advisor to The Nature Conservancy. He has a PhD from the University of Tasmania School of Geography and Environmental Studies, Australia; an MSc from Oregon State University Department of Oceanography; and a BA from Wesleyan University. Publications are available at: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Eric_Gilman2 and https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Eric_Gilman2.

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March 13, 2018

Title: Methane Variation Over Terrestrial And Marine Arctic Areas (2010 – 2016): IASI Satellite Data
Presenter(s): Leonid Yurganov, PhD., Senior Research Scientist, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250. Presenting at NOAA Silver Spring, SSMC4, Room 8150. Other authors include F. Muller-Karger and I. Leifer.
Date & Time: March 13, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OnenOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Leonid Yurganov, PhD., Senior Research Scientist, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250. Presenting at NOAA Silver Spring, SSMC4, Room 8150. Other authors include F. Muller-Karger and I. Leifer.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary app works fine.

Abstract: There is evidence that methane is being released into the atmosphere at high northern latitudes as the Arctic warms up. Methane concentration in the Arctic lower troposphere was estimated between 2010 and 2016 with the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), a thermal IR spectrometer orbiting the Earth on a satellite MetOp-A. The area studied encompasses the Barents/Kara seas and the West Siberian Lowland (WSL), one the most important methane sources in high northern latitudes. Methane anomalies were referenced to a specific deep sea region in the North Atlantic between 50 N and 83 N and assumed to be proportional to methane flux. Methane anomalies over the Arctic Ocean reach maxima in winter, coinciding with periods of strong and deep mixing of the Arctic Ocean water column. In summer, anomalies over the ocean decrease to zero every year. Annually averaged anomalies over sea and over land in summer-time have been increasing after 2014, and were twice as large in 2016 compared to 2010-2013. Methane anomalies estimated using the Japanese short-wave IR spectrometer GOSAT/TANSO over the WSL have also been increasing. Annual methane flux from the Barents and Kara Seas was estimated to be about 1/3 that from the West Siberian Lowland.

Plain Language Summary: Methane input to the lower atmosphere from many ground sources is temperature-dependent. Satellite data show evidence of a growing emission of methane to the atmosphere after 2014 both from land and sea areas in the Arctic. 

About the Speaker: TBD

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Title: Understanding Ocean Acidification - Using NOAA’s New Educational Tools
Presenter(s): Amy Dean, National Estuarine Research Reserve System
Date & Time: March 13, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Amy Dean, National Estuarine Research Reserve System 

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries 

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/690023097051840771

Abstract: Data in the Classroom (https://dataintheclassroom.noaa.gov/) is designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional and global scale. In this presentation, participants will dive deep into Data in the Classroom's Ocean Acidification Module to explore the processes that cause acidification, examine data from across the globe and take a virtual tour of the new web-based curricular modules and data tools.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ 

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Developer - Lori K. Brown