All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

October 23, 2017

Title:
New
Development and Application of Gridded NOAA Unique Combined Processing System (NUCAPS) for Operational Forecasting Challenges
Presenter(s): Emily Berndt, NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center
Date & Time: October 23, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Room S561 Greentech IV Building 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771 or via webinar; see remote access info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Emily Berndt, NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT)

Remote Access: 
877-401-9225
pc:  53339716
JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m97b03eba6edf81ab29cb05a2df1ea044
Meeting number: 742 618 901
Host key: 991999
Meeting password: Jpss2017!

Sponsor: JPSS PROVING GROUND SEMINAR
POC: Dr.  Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Abstract: Cross-track Infrared Sounder/Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (CrIS/ATMS) soundings processed though the NOAA Unique Combined Processing System (NUCAPS) (i.e. NUCAPS Soundings) are currently available in AWIPS-II for forecasters to diagnose unique forecasting challenges.  Vertical temperature and moisture soundings are useful to diagnose the pre-convective environment; however, they are limited to a single-point (footprint) based measurement.  A team of scientists and forecasters developed the capability to view 2-D gridded plan view and cross section displays of NUCAPS Soundings (i.e. Gridded NUCAPS) in AWIPS-II.  The capability was initially developed in conjunction with the Anchorage, Alaska, Center Weather Service Unit (CWSU) to diagnose layers of cold air aloft which are hazardous to aviation activities.  The CWSU routinely issues Meteorological Impact Statements (MIS) to alert the aviation community to hazardous conditions.  Gridded NUCAPS provided an additional dataset beyond model data and observations to diagnose such events.  After successful demonstration of the Gridded NUCAPS with the CWSU, the product was introduced to forecasters in a testbed environment at the Hazardous Weather Testbed (HWT).  Forecasters had the opportunity to analyze temperature and moisture fields as well as stability indices during the Spring Experiment and provide feedback on the utility of the data for convective forecasting.  This presentation outlines the development of the Gridded NUCAPS product for display in AWIPS-II and highlights application examples from the 2016-2017 winter evaluation with the CWSU and 2017 HWT Spring Experiment.  Future work includes continued development to address forecaster feedback and suggestions to improve the usability and functionality of the product

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October 24, 2017

Title: Mercury in the Great Lakes: Can We Explain Trends?
Presenter(s): Dr. Mark Cohen, Physical Scientist, NOAA OAR Air Resources Laboratory. Presenting at NOAA, SIlver Spring, MD
Date & Time: October 24, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Mark Cohen, Physical Scientist, NOAA OAR Air Resources Laboratory. Presenting at NOAA, SIlver Spring, MD

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.
 
Abstract: Many top predator fish in the Great Lakes (GL) have Hg concentrations high enough to pose risks to public health and to fish-eating wildlife.  Atmospheric mercury emissions and subsequent atmospheric mercury deposition is the largest current loading pathway for mercury (Hg) to the GL, and newly introduced Hg may be more bioavailable than legacy contamination. Emissions, atmospheric concentrations, and atmospheric deposition of mercury have been decreasing in recent years in the United States and Canada, but concentrations of mercury in some Great Lakes fish have been increasing. Why is this happening? This talk will discuss recent measurement and modeling results as well as possible explanations for this puzzling development. The NOAA Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) carries out research and development on several atmospheric chemistry, dispersion, and surface exchange topics, including the measurement and modeling of atmospheric mercury.

About the Speaker: Dr. Mark Cohen is a Physical Scientist with the NOAA Air Resources Laboratory. He has developed and applied special versions of the NOAA HYSPLIT model to simulate atmospheric toxic pollutants such as mercury and dioxin. The overarching goal of his work is to estimate the relative importance of different air emissions sources in contributing atmospheric deposition of a given pollutant to a given ecosystem.

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Title:
New
Assessment of the Application of Climate Information in Wildfire Management in Alaska: Experiences from the Alaska Fire Science Consortium
Presenter(s): Melanie Colavito, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: October 24, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Melanie Colavito, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor: ACCAP Alaska Climate Webinar
POC: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

To register for the webinar, please follow the registration link available at:
https://accap.uaf.edu/Assessment_AFSC

Abstract: The Alaska Fire Science Consortium (AFSC) is a boundary organization that works across the science-management interface to enhance the role that scientific information plays in decision-making for fire management in Alaska. We conducted a case study of AFSC to examine how they facilitate the delivery, development, and application of climate and related information and to determine the outcomes of their work. Specifically, this talk will outline the evolution of AFSC to examine how the activities they use to deliver science and facilitate new research development, their engagement with climate science information, and the outcomes of their work change over time.

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Title: California Collaborative Fisheries Research Program: Using a Citizen Science Model to Monitor California's Nearshore Fisheries
Presenter(s): Dr. Dean Wendt, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo; Dr. Rick Starr, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories; and Dr. Melissa Monk, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: October 24, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3, Rm 3404, Silver Spring, MD or via webinar; see remote access info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Dr. Dean Wendt (Cal Poly San Luis Obispo), Dr. Rick Starr (Moss Landing Marine Laboratories), and Dr. Melissa Monk (NOAA Fisheries)

Sponsor: NOAA Fisheries Quantitative Ecology and Socioeconomics Training (QUEST) Program; Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://goo.gl/KZYTiM

Abstract: This webinar will focus on the development and implementation of the California Collaborative Fisheries Research Program (CCFRP), a citizen-science based program to support fisheries management. The CCFRP was formed in 2006 to participate in the monitoring of marine reserves established through Californias Marine Life Protection Act. It was conceived and planned through a collaboration of scientists, managers and fishermen on the central coast of California. Data are collected each year by scientists and volunteers, including. The program, now in its 11th year, has expanded statewide and includes the involvement of 5 universities collaborating with fishing communities along the entire California coast. During the webinar we will talk about how we 1) engaged the community and government scientists in the development of the program, 2) how we involve citizens in the data collection, 3) what the data show about the impact of marine reserves on fish populations, and, 4) how the data are important to management of marine resources by state and federal agencies.

About the speaker: Dean Wendt is a Professor at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. His focus is on marine ecology and conservation. A long-standing research project is working with the local fishing community to collect data to better
understand the status of our nearshore fish populations. Dean earned his B.S. in Biology from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo (1993) and his Ph.D. at Harvard University (1999). He is also Dean of the College of Science and Mathematics at Cal Poly. Rick Starr is a Research Faculty member at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. His focus is on the biology and ecology of fished species and finding solutions to marine conservation problems. In 2006, he and Dean Wendt created the California Collaborative Research Program to work with the fishing community to monitor Marine Protected Areas in California. Ricks current research entails developing and testing new tools and techniques to identify the distribution and abundance of species and habitats, understand fish movements, and describe changes in fish abundance through time. Melissa Monk is a Research Mathematical Statistician with NOAAs Southwest Fisheries Science Centers Fisheries Ecology Division. Melissas research includes understanding the link between recreational fishing effort and habitat of West Coast rockfishes, as well as research related to improving fisheries stock assessments. She received her Bachelor of Science from Virginia Tech in Wildlife Science (2004), a Masters of Science from Virginia Tech in Fisheries (2007), and PhD from Louisiana State University (2012) in Oceanography and Coastal Sciences.

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October 25, 2017

Title: Ecological Models to Assess the Response of Narragansett Bay Hypoxia to State-imposed Nutrient Reductions
Presenter(s): Mark J Brush, Ph.D., Virginia Institute of Marine Science, and Jamie Vaudrey, Ph.D., University of Connecticut
Date & Time: October 25, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Speakers: Mark J Brush, Ph.D., Virginia Institute of Marine Science, and Jamie Vaudrey, Ph.D., University of Connecticut

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Alan.Lewitus@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.
 
Abstract: Narragansett Bay (NB) is a moderately-sized temperate estuary characterized by seasonal-periodic hypoxia during summer.  Most of the external nutrient loading derives from wastewater treatment facility effluent discharged directly to the bay or in the surrounding watershed.  A targeted 50% reduction in wastewater loading has been ongoing in recent years through the addition of tertiary treatment, reaching the final stages of completion in 2014.  These load reductions were undertaken concurrent with a changing climate, presenting an ideal natural experiment for understanding estuarine response to changing nutrient loads and warming temperatures, and for application of a novel, management-focused modeling approach to predict bay response and inform future nutrient loading targets.  We will present the results of our recently-completed NOAA Coastal Hypoxia Research Program project in NB, in which we applied a reduced complexity model to predict the response of hypoxia to load reductions and climate warming, and leveraged extensive observations to develop and validate the resulting models.  Ecological modeling consisted of two complementary approaches (denoted EcoGEM and EcoOBM) with nearly identical ecology formulations  including a reduced set of state variables, rate processes, and parameters  and coarse-resolution spatial elements, but different means of computing exchanges between spatial elements.  EcoGEM utilized a gross exchange matrix (GEM) method, based on dye simulations from a highly resolved ROMS model, focused on two contrasting years, while EcoOBM utilized a salt balance approach to simulate a 14-year period.  The models reproduced observed water quality and metabolic rates across the bay, and predicted strong responses to nutrient load reductions in summer but not spring.  The 50% load reduction resulted in a reduction in the duration and spatial extent of modeled hypoxia, but a 75% reduction was required to eliminate hypoxia from most of the bay.  Effects of increased water temperatures on hypoxia due to climatic warming were small, given the dominance of inorganic nutrients compared to organic matter in the external loads.  Both models have been provided directly to managers for their use, EcoGEM via an executable and user guide, and EcoOBM via an online interface.

About the Speakers:
Dr. Jamie Vaudrey is an Assistant Research Professor with the Department of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut. Dr. Vaudrey received a B.A. in Biology with a minor in Philosophy from Wellesley College, MA. She worked as an environmental educator for six years in the Florida Keys, New Hampshire, and Oregon before completing her Ph.D. in Oceanography at the University of Connecticut, followed by a postdoctoral position at UConn. Her research interests are in the area of ecosystem dynamics in the coastal zone, specifically in the effect of land-use on the coastal environment and how anthropogenic changes to the landscape may change our coastal ecosystems. She is specifically interested in the relationship between human activities and expression of eutrophication in large systems (Narragansett Bay, Long Island Sound) and small embayments of these larger systems. Dr. Vaudrey has worked on modeling the relationship between nitrogen input and hypoxia in Narragansett Bay and on developing a model relating nitrogen load to trophic status in Long Island Sound embayments.  She also has an interest in seagrass systems as indicators of a desirable state of water quality and inputs to coastal systems. Dr. Vaudrey is a member of the Long Island Sound Studys (LISS) Science and Technical Advisory Committee and the Narragansett Bay Estuary Programs (NBEP) Science Advisory Committee. Dr. Vaudrey is also involved with local community-based monitoring groups and NGOs as a science advisor (Save the Sound, CUSH, Save the River-Save the Hills) and is involved with encouraging and supporting community-based monitoring throughout Long Island Sound via the Unified Water Study initiative.

Dr. Mark Brush is an Associate Professor of Marine Science at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) in Gloucester Point, VA, part of the College of William and Mary.  Dr. Brush received his B.S. in Biological Sciences from Cornell University in 1995 and his Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography from the University of Rhode Island in 2002, and has been at VIMS since 2002 as a postdoctoral fellow, research scientist, and faculty member.  His lab focuses on the ecology of coastal marine ecosystems such as estuaries and lagoons, through both field-based ecological investigations and synthetic, interdisciplinary ecosystem simulation modeling.  Recent projects have focused on modeling the response of coastal systems to nutrient enrichment and climate change, with a focus on water quality (e.g., algal blooms, hypoxia/anoxia) and ecosystem function (metabolism, nutrient cycling, and source/sink dynamics of carbon).  Projects have also included modeling watershed nutrient loading and the carrying capacity and ecosystem impacts of restored and cultured bivalves (primarily oysters and hard clams).  A key aspect of Brushs research involves development of reduced complexity, readily accessible modeling tools that can be delivered online for direct use by other researchers, managers, and educators.  Brush teaches courses in interdisciplinary coastal field research, estuarine ecology, and ecosystem modeling.  He recently served as President of the Atlantic Estuarine Research Society and is currently a Member-at-Large for the Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation.  

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Title: Seeing the invisible in coastal waters: imaging systems for ecological monitor and forecasts
Presenter(s): Dr. Hongsheng Bi, University of Maryland
Date & Time: October 25, 2017
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Dr. Hongsheng Bi, University of Maryland

Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/520920407257382146

Abstract: Imaging systems have been proven useful for marine ecology. However, deploying them in shallow coastal waters are often hampered by complex dynamic processes which often lead to sub-ideal image quality, highly variable contents and backgrounds. In the present study, we deployed a shadowgraph imaging system (PlanktonScope) to understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of dominant plankton taxa and an adaptive resolution imaging sonar (ARIS) to quantify forage species and their habitat utilization in shallow water estuaries. Results from PlanktonsCope captured a full bloom cycle of Noctiluca sp. in Shenzhen Bay in 2016, while the deployment of ARIS system in Chesapeake Bay in 2016  2017 yielded useful estimates of forage abundance and their habitat utilization. Our results highlight that imaging systems could be useful for ecological monitor and forecasts in coastal waters and provide better insights on the spatial and temporal dynamics of key species, trophic interactions and habitat utilization.

Bio: Hongsheng Bi is a fisheries Oceanographer specializing in the fine scale spatial distributions of different marine organisms and their trophic interactions. Hongsheng deploys advanced optical imaging systems and high resolution sonar imaging systems to quantify the spatial distributions and overlap of plankton, forage fish, and jellyfish. He is particularly interested in understand jellyfish dynamics and their interactions with other trophic levels. He is currently funded by NSF to investigate jellyfish dynamics and their impact on the Bering Sea ecosystem structure by deploying towed zooplankton imaging system (PlanktonScope) and the adaptive resolution imaging sonar (ARIS) systems. Hongsheng also operates a time-resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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October 26, 2017

Title: Public acceptance of U.S. wind energy: Historical lessons and results from the first nationally representative survey of wind farm neighbors
Presenter(s): Joe Rand, Research Affiliate, and Ben Hoen, Research Scientist, both with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Joe is presenting remotely from Arcata, CA and Ben from Milan, NY.
Date & Time: October 26, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers:Joe Rand, Research Affiliate, and  Ben Hoen, Research Scientist, both with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Joe is presenting remotely from  Arcata, CA and Ben from Milan, NY. 

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Joe Rand and Ben Hoen will present on their work as part of a three-year Dept of Energy funded effort to characterize the baseline of attitudes and annoyances near US wind installations.  Joe recently published a literature review that was the first step in the project, entitled, Thirty Years of North American Wind Energy Acceptance Research: What Have We Learned?" That review encompassed over 100 papers primarily focused on existing and proposed North American wind projects through 2016. He will summarize some of the key takeaways from that review, such as community perceptions of economic aspects, sound and visual/landscape aspects, environmental concerns, and development process fairness. In 2016, following the literature review, survey data were collected from over 1,700 individuals living within 5 miles of 234 US wind projects. Ben Hoen, the PI for the project, will overview results from the analysis of those data, such as: overall attitudes and their drivers; what influences the perception that the planning process was fair; and, how well does modelled sound predict audibility and annoyance to turbines.  This first-of-its-kind research provides the first nationally applicable baseline of attitudes, annoyances, and other opinions toward existing wind projects.  These results can help enlighten existing and potential wind project hosting communities, as well as wind project developers, on various impacts of wind development, the drivers of attitudes and annoyance, and how to promote responsible wind deployment.   

About the Speakers: Joseph Rand is Research Affiliate at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the Electricity Markets and Policy Group. Joe conducts research and analysis on renewable energy, including: cost and market analysis; spatial data analysis; and research related to public acceptance and deployment barriers of renewable energy. He was awarded the Switzer Environmental Fellowship, the Hydro Research Fellowship, and the 'Novus Ventus' award from the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Power Program in 2015. Joes research has been published in Energy Research and Social Science. Joe holds an MS in Energy and Resources from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA in Environmental Studies from Macalester College in St. Paul, MN.

Ben Hoen is a Research Scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the Electricity Markets and Policy Group. Ben conducts research and analysis on renewable energy, including: renewable energy policy analysis and assistance; cost, benefit and market analysis; and, public acceptance and deployment barriers. Much of his work has focused on real estate, as a proxy for public acceptance. He has led teams to conduct seminal research in the areas of property value impacts near wind energy facilities, solar home market valuations, and most recently on the attitudes and annoyances of those living close to wind energy facilities. His work has been published in the Journal of Real Estate Research, Contemporary Economic Policy, the Appraisal Journal, Energy Research and Social Science, Renewable Energy Focus and Energy Economics. He has presented over 100 times to groups ranging from 10 to 500. Ben has Bachelors degrees in Finance and General Business from University of Maryland and a Master of Science degree in Environmental Policy from Bard College.

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Title: Tips and Strategies to Communicate Success and Share Your CSC Story with Internal and External Stakeholders
Presenter(s): Dr. Tia C. M. Tyree, Professor, Department of Strategic, Legal and Management Communications, Howard University
Date & Time: October 26, 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Tia C. M. Tyree, Professor, Department of Strategic, Legal and Management Communications, Howard University

Remote access to seminar: http://connectpro46305642.adobeconnect.com/rrv2v9anw0qj/

POC for questions: Dr. Audrey Trotman, NOAA OEd EPP Cooperative Science Center Program Manager, audrey.trotman@noaa.gov

Abstract:
It's important in today's society to not only communicate properly within organizations, but communicate what is happening internally to external stakeholders, too. However, it starts with understanding who your stakeholders are, what they want to know, and how to effectively share information in our fast-paced, nonstop, oversaturated information world. This seminar will offer participants a way to understand who internal and external stakeholders are, how to identify and share messages internally and how to present science information in a digital space. An emphasis will be placed on providing tips to create key messages, identify key internal "faces" and external influencers and develop external platforms and content to share information and stories.
  
About The Speaker:
 Dr. Tia C. M. Tyree is a Professor at Howard University within the Department of Strategic, Legal and Management Communications. She teaches graduate and undergraduate communications courses. Her research interests include hip hop, rap, reality television, film, social media as well as African-American and female representations in mass media. She has several published book chapters and peer-reviewed articles in journals, such as those in Women and Language; Howard Journal of Communications; Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism; Journal of Black Studies and the International Journal of Emergency Management. She is the author of The Interesting and Incredibly Long History of American Public Relations and coeditor of HBCU Experience  The Book, Social Media: Pedagogy and Practice as well as Social Media: Culture and Identity. She is also cofounder of the Social Media Technology Conference and Workshop, which is a two-day conference designed to bring both professionals and academicians together to discuss cutting-edge research and trends in social media.  Speaker's Email: ttyree@howard.edu 
 
Note: This seminar is part of the 2017/2018 NOAA EPP Cooperative Science Center Seminar Series. The work was supported by NOAA Office of Education, Educational Partnership Program Award # NA16SEC4810006.

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Title: Your Science is Awesome, Now Show the World Through Video: Case Studies for NOAA Fisheries
Presenter(s): Paul Hillman, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Communications and External Affairs
Date & Time: October 26, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Paul Hillman, Science & Natural History Filmmaker, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Communications and External Affairs 

Remote Access:
Join Webex  
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D559007857%26UID%3D4893665142%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATLhtse-XNhcpPV2sA3m8RonKvbFAFHPMQzn3HBWheMmb7BTHrbfLj0V3ueHok32TOy2e7iPyiUGBMmykbDpz0b0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmbe8bb14ed1e132b10b62cf91809643c3
Meeting number and Access Code: 804 755 712
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

Host: Monster Seminar Jam,
 https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm
POC: Vicky Krikelas, Outreach Coordinator
Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

ABSTRACT: TBD

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Title: Using Web of Science to support NOAA aquaculture research
Presenter(s): Kristen Faeth, Web of Science, Clarivate Analytics
Date & Time: October 26, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: via Webinar and NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, NOAA HQ SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Kristen Faeth, Product Specialist, Web of Science, Clarivate Analytics

Seminar Sponsor: NOAA Central Library; POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator: (judith.salter@noaa.gov)

Remote access: JOIN WEBEX MEETING (via Clarivate Analytics)
https://clarivate.webex.com/clarivate/j.php?MTID=m6f64b2c7bd29dcc4e165cd9843ee405c
Meeting number (access code): 802 340 980
Meeting password: 25aJ4fXw

JOIN FROM A VIDEO SYSTEM OR APPLICATION
Dial sip:802340980@clarivate.webex.com

JOIN BY PHONE: +1-240-454-0887 US Toll

Global call-in numbers: 
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Can't join the meeting? 
https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

You are also welcome to follow along with Librarians in the Brown Bag area of the NOAA Central Library. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Please note that this WebEx service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter. By joining this session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, discuss your concerns with the host or do not join the session.

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October 27, 2017

Title: Alaska Region Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Richard Thoman,Climate Science and Services Manager, NWS Alaska Region
Date & Time: October 27, 2017
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: 407 Akasofu Building, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Richard Thoman, Climate Science and Services Manager, NWS Alaska Region

Seminar Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, 
Point of Contact: accap@uaf.edu

Remote Access: Register at 
https://accap.uaf.edu/NWS_Briefings

Abstract: This webinar will review recent conditions and current state of the climate system in and near Alaska and the status of important global climate drivers, review guidance available for the monthly and seasonal scale outlooks and finish up with the official outlooks by NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.  Rick will also present a "Feature-of-the-Month" special addition in which each month he will highlight a topic relevant to the particular month.

Recordings from past Briefings available here: http://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=6b7287a9eb&e=9097598e1a

About the Speaker: Richard Thoman works as the Climate Science and Services Manager, for NWS Alaska Region Headquarters. He works closely with NOAA line offices and partners throughout Alaska providing information on climate monitoring, analysis and forecasting at the two week to one year time frame

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October 31, 2017

Title: Feedbacks between small herbivores and habitat complexity: a new hope for degraded coral reefs?
Presenter(s): Robert Dunn, PhD Candidate, San Diego State University & University of California, Davis, and Andrew Altieri, Staff Scientist, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Date & Time: October 31, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA science Seminar Series

Speakers: Robert Dunn, PhD Candidate, San Diego State University & University of California, Davis, and Andrew Altieri, Staff Scientist, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar,hosted by Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Habitat complexity plays a vital role in shaping ecological communities, but many coral reef ecosystems are shifting to alternative states with altered community assemblages and reduced structural complexity. Small-bodied herbivores, such as sea urchins and small parrotfish, are common inhabitants of reefs, and their importance for controlling the distribution and abundance of algae in marine ecosystems is well understood. Less understood is the role of habitat complexity and species identity of foundational species in dictating the abundance of this increasingly-important suite of herbivores. We explored the feedbacks between habitat complexity and herbivory on fringing coral reefs of Bocas del Toro, in Caribbean Panama, and showed that small-bodied species (sea urchin: Echinometra viridis, parrotfish: Scarus iseri) make up the vast majority of herbivore biomass and increase resilience of coral reefs by consuming macroalgae. However, the ability of small-bodied herbivores to provide this ecosystem function is dependent on the availability of structurally complex habitats. Understanding the drivers of herbivore habitat associations is vital for predicting the persistence of coral-dominated reefs due to feedbacks between changing coral reef communities (both species identity and habitat complexity) and shifts to algal dominance.

About the Speakers: Robert Dunn is a PhD candidate in the Joint Doctoral Program in Ecology at San Diego State University and the University of California, Davis. His research focuses broadly on the community ecology of subtidal reefs in both temperate and tropical ecosystems. For his dissertation, Robert is using a combination of empirical and theoretical modeling studies to understand the effects of habitat complexity, fishery harvest, and size-structured interactions on predator-prey dynamics and ecosystem resilience. He earned his Bachelor's in Environmental Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Master's in Marine Science at North Carolina State University. See robertpdunn.wordpress.com for more information.

Dr. Andrew Altieri's research explores human interactions with coastal ecosystems. He examines drivers of change that include overfishing, pollution, species invasions and extinctions, and habitat loss. Using a combination of perspectives grounded in natural history and ecological theory, he explores mechanisms of resilience in biodiversity and ecosystem function of coral reefs, mangrove forests, rocky shores and seagrass meadows. Andrew earned his B.A. at UC Santa Cruz and his Ph.D. at Brown University, and he is now a staff scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. More information at http://www.altierilab.org/.

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Title: The Tropical Atlantic Current Observations Study (TACOS) at 4N, 23W
Presenter(s): Dr. Renellys Perez, NOAA/AOML/PhOD
Date & Time: October 31, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Dr. Renellys Perez (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: roberta.lusic@noaa.gov

Remote access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/827580181 

Abstract: Hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean and rainfall over the neighboring continents are impacted by air-sea fluxes in the tropical Atlantic. These fluxes are highly dependent on upper-ocean temperature and salinity. To better quantify temperature and salinity variations in the tropical Atlantic, upper ocean velocity variations need to be measured and their contributions to advection and vertical turbulent mixing determined. As a first step toward resolving fine vertical scale (less than 10 m) velocity variations in the upper ocean, the Tropical Atlantic Current Observations Study (TACOS) was initiated in March 2017.  As part of the first TACOS deployment, the PIRATA Northeast Extension (PNE) mooring at 4N, 23W was augmented with ten Nortek Aquadopp acoustic current meters. The current meters are distributed between 7 and 87 m depth with vertical resolution of 5 m in the surface mixed layer and 10 to 20 m below the surface mixed layer.  This novel data set will be combined with temperature, salinity, and meteorological data from the PNE mooring to examine how currents vary on diurnal to intraseasonal time scales and how these velocity variations influence temperature and salinity at 4N, 23W.

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November 1, 2017

Title: Overview of Climate Change Research within NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Presenter(s): Vincent S. Saba, Ph.D., Acting Branch Chief, Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University Forrestal Campus. Presenting from New Jersey.
Date & Time: November 1, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Vincent S. Saba, Ph.D., Acting Branch Chief, Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University Forrestal Campus. Presenting from New Jersey.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: This presentation will give an overview of recent NEFSC climate change research focused on the U.S. Northeast Continental Shelf marine ecosystem. Much of this research relies on high-resolution global climate modeling and thus a close partnership with NOAAs Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Presently, most research is focused on the impacts of continued ocean warming on the distribution of marine species' thermal habitat with implications for fisheries. While these distribution models are based primarily on NEFSC fisheries-independent survey data, laboratory studies are currently be conducted to assess thermal habitat model uncertainty. Laboratory studies are also being conducted to determine impacts of ocean acidification on phytoplankton, shellfish, and finfish. Future research needs explore other variables beyond ocean temperature and focus on multiple factors such as primary and secondary productivity, predator-prey interactions, recruitment, ocean acidification, fisheries mortality, and disease.   

About the Speaker: Vincent Saba received a Ph.D. in marine science in 2007 from the College of William and Marys Virginia Institute of Marine Science.  He is currently the Acting Branch Chief of the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch within the NEFSC. His research interests are in the fields of marine ecosystems and climate variability, climate change impacts on living marine resources, fisheries oceanography, 
sea turtle biology, and high-resolution global climate modeling. 
 
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Title:
New
Underwater imaging, automatic identification, and ecology of plankton with a focus on the Arctic ecosystem
Presenter(s): Moritz S Schmid, Postdoctoral Scholar, Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University, Newport, OR
Date & Time: November 1, 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Moritz S Schmid, Postdoctoral Scholar, Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University, Newport, OR

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAAs EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/). 

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: How the lipid content of individually-imaged Arctic copepods influences their depth distributions and seasonal vertical migrations.

Seminar POC for questions: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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November 2, 2017

Title: In situ effects of shoreline type and watershed land use on submerged aquatic vegetation habitat quality in the Chesapeake and Mid-Atlantic Coastal Bays
Presenter(s): J. Brooke Landry, Natural Resource Biologist, Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Date & Time: November 2, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: J. Brooke Landry, Natural Resource Biologist, Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Elizabeth.Turner@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) is an ecologically and economically valuable component of coastal estuaries that acts as an early indicator of both degrading and improving water quality. This study aimed to determine if shoreline hardening, which is associated with increased population pressure and climate change, acts to degrade SAV habitat quality at the local scale. In situ comparisons of SAV beds adjacent to both natural and hardened shorelines in twenty-four subestuaries throughout the Chesapeake and Mid-Atlantic Coastal Bays indicated that shoreline hardening does impact adjacent SAV beds. Species diversity, evenness, and percent cover were significantly reduced in the presence of riprap revetment. A post hoc analysis also confirmed that SAV is locally affected by watershed land use associated with increased population pressure, though to a lesser degree than impacts observed from shoreline armoring. When observed over time, SAV recovery at the local level took approximately three to four years following storm impacts, and SAV adjacent to natural shorelines showed more resilience to storms than SAV adjacent to armored shorelines. The negative impacts of shoreline hardening and watershed development on SAV shown here will inform coastal zone management decisions as increasing coastal populations and sea level rise drive these practices.

About the Speaker: Brooke Landry is a Natural Resource Biologist at Maryland's Department of Natural Resources, and Chair of the Chesapeake Bay Program's Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Workgroup. She has been working on Chesapeake Bay SAV since 2009, specializing in human impacts to the Bay's SAV habitat. Before that, she worked at NOAA's Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research in Beaufort, NC, where she studied seagrasses from North Carolina to the Caribbean. Brooke has a Master's in Marine Science from the University of North Carolina Wilmington and a Bachelor's in Environmental Science from the University of Virginia. 

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Title: IMPAC4: Highlights & Next Steps from 4th International Marine Protected Areas Congress
Presenter(s): Lauren Wenzel, MPA Center Director; Dan Laffoley, Marine Vice Chair World Commission on Protected Areas; Gonzalo Cid, MPA Center International Coordinator; and others TBA
Date & Time: November 2, 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers:  Lauren Wenzel, NOAA National MPA Center Director; Dan Laffoley, Marine Vice Chair World Commission on Protected Areas; Gonzalo Cid, MPA Center International Coordinator; and others TBA

Register at:  https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6147953737043331586

Sponsors:  This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org).

Seminar POC:  Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Abstract:  Over 1,100 people from 59 countries attended the 4th International Marine Protected Areas Congress (IMPAC4) in Chile in September 2017. Join us to learn about what happened, including major themes, accomplishments, messages, and next steps

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November 9, 2017

Title:
New
Tracking progressive oxygen loss in ancient oceans
Presenter(s): Chadlin M. Ostrander, School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA. And Department of Geology and Geophysics, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, USA
Date & Time: November 9, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Chadlin M. Ostrander, School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA, and the Department of Geology and Geophysics, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, USA.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Right now, Earths oceans are losing oxygen. Increasing surface temperature is
decreasing the solubility and ventilation of oxygen throughout the ocean, and nutrients within wastewaters are enhancing the consumption of oxygen in more localized pockets (e.g. seasonally in the Gulf of Mexico). This is bad news for marine habitats, and also for the humans who rely on them. This is not the first time Earths oceans have experienced large-scale oxygen loss, however, as many previous episodes have been identified in the geologic record. In this presentation, I will discuss some new and existing geochemical evidence for a progressive loss of oxygen in Earths oceans preserved in ancient marine sedimentary rocks leading to a major climatic event known as Oceanic Anoxic Event 2. 
The processes driving large-scale marine deoxygenation 94 million years ago are very similar to what is occurring today, and thus allow for an unfortunate but timely comparison.

About the Speaker: Chad is currently a second year Ph.D. student at Arizona State University where he is attempting to become an Isotope Geochemist. His work to date focuses on Earths oxygenation history. Specifically, when did oxygen first accumulate in the atmosphere and oceans, and how has this changed with time? Before arriving at Arizona State, where he also received his B.S. in Geological Sciences in 2016, Chad worked construction, was an old-west reenactor, and served five years in the Marines.

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Title:
New
Business Planning for Protected Areas
Presenter(s): Andrew Rylance, Technical Advisor to the Government of Seychelles-United Nations Development Programme-Global Environment Facility -GOS-UNDP-GEF- Protected Area Financing Project, 2016-2021
Date & Time: November 9, 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Andrew Rylance,Technical Advisor to the Government of Seychelles, United Nations Development Programme-Global Environment Facility (GOS-UNDP-GEF) Protected Area Financing Project (2016-2021)

Register at:  https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5824376261725463298

Sponsors: This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OCTO). 

Seminar POC:  Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Abstract:  A workshop on business planning was recently held to support the financial future of protected areas in Seychelles. Outputs developed under this project have global application. This presentation will outline the importance of business planning for protected areas and how business plans can be used as tools to leverage financial support for conservation management. The presentation will also provide an introduction to the components of business plans and a database of protected area business plans where users can access over 45 examples of protected area business plans and guidelines. 

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Title: Deriving High-accuracy Ellipsoid Heights with OPUS-Projects
Presenter(s): Dan Gillins, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: November 9, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 8836 and webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Dan Gillins, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor: NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/511662513088623364. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (415) 655-0052 ; Access Code: 185-624-087; Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar; Webinar ID: 830-201-947.

Abstract: In the late 1990s, NGS released detailed "height modernization" surveying guidelines for deriving high-accuracy ellipsoid heights on marks with GNSS. In 2013, NGS released OPUS-Projects which is a useful tool for managing static GNSS survey campaigns. This webinar presents empirical research on the accuracy of OPUS-Projects, and presents guidance on the potential use of OPUS-Projects for future height modernization surveys.

About the Speakers: Dan Gillins works within the Observations and Analysis Division at NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.

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November 15, 2017

Title:
New
Ensuring and Improving the Quality of Earth Science Data and Information
Presenter(s): Ge Peng, PhD., Research Scholar, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellite-North Carolina of North Carolina State University and affiliated with the NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information. Presenting remotely from Asheville, North Carolina
Date & Time: November 15, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Ge Peng, PhD., Research Scholar, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellite-North Carolina (CICS-NC) of North Carolina State University and affiliated with the NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Presenting remotely from Asheville, North Carolina.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: The data and information quality is multi-dimensional and is always of concern to end users. Ensuring and improving data and information quality is an end-to-end process and a shared responsibility of all stakeholders, including kay players (data producers, stewards, providers or distributors) and other major stakeholders (sponsor, power users, and management). Clearly defined roles and responsibilities of stakeholders allows for effective cross-disciplinary communication and better resource allocation, supporting organizations in meeting the challenges of stewarding digital Earth Science data products in the Open Data and Big Data era. 

Consistent descriptive information including the quality of individual data products is important to users in making informed and effective use or stewardship decisions. It is necessary for establishing the trustworthiness of the data and information and meeting transparency requirement. This presentation describes some of the researches in these areas, including categorization of information quality based on data product life stages. The goal of the researches aims to facilitate the processes of curating and integrating consistent quality descriptive information for both human and machine end-users. 

About the Speaker: Dr. Ge Peng is a Research Scholar at the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellite-North Carolina (CICS-NC) of North Carolina State University and is affiliated with the NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Dr. Peng holds a Ph. D. in meteorology and is experienced in assessing and monitoring quality of Earth Science data products. She has extensive knowledge of digital data management and experience in working with metadata specialists and software developers. Dr. Peng came to NCEINC, formally National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in late 2009. She is currently leading the development of sea ice climate normal products based on an NOAA climate data record and application of the NCEI/CICS-NC Scientific Data Stewardship Maturity Matrix (DSMM). Dr. Peng has also been coordinating the development of a NCEI data use/service maturity matrix under the NCEI Use/Service Maturity Matrix Working Group. She is an active member of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP)  a member of its Data Stewardship Committee and co-chair of Information Quality Cluster, where she leads the effort in defining and formalizing roles and responsibilities of major product key players and stakeholders for ensuring quality and improving usability of Earth Science data products, in collaboration with NCEI.

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Title:
New
Marine Heat Waves in Alaskan Waters: Past, Present and Future
Presenter(s): Nick Bond, Research Meteorologist, Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: November 15, 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Nick Bond, Research Meteorologist, Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAAs EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/).
 
Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: This presentation will be on the early results on the probable changes in the frequency and severity of extreme events.

Seminar POC for questions: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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November 16, 2017

Title: The Blob, El Niño, La Niña, and North Pacific marine ecosystems
Presenter(s): Laurie Weitkamp, Ph.D.; Research Fisheries Biologist, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: November 16, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Laurie Weitkamp, Ph.D.; Research Fisheries Biologist, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Join Webex  
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D559007857%26UID%3D4893665142%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATLhtse-XNhcpPV2sA3m8RonKvbFAFHPMQzn3HBWheMmb7BTHrbfLj0V3ueHok32TOy2e7iPyiUGBMmykbDpz0b0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmbe8bb14ed1e132b10b62cf91809643c3
Meeting number and Access Code: 804 755 712
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

Host: Monster Seminar Jam (https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm)
POC: vicky.krikelas@noaa.gov

ABSTRACT: TBD

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November 29, 2017

Title: Leveraging the Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units (CESU) Network to help complete your work!
Presenter(s): Jen Lechuga, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, NOAA CESU
Date & Time: November 29, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Jen Lechuga, ONMS Environmental Compliance Coordinator and NOAA CESU Program Manager; Bill Thompson, North Atlantic Coast CESU Research Coordinator; Danny Filer, Chesapeake Watershed CESU Research Coordinator

Seminar POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator/webinar host: judith.salter@noaa.gov; NOAA CESU: Jen Lechuga Jennifer.Lechuga@noaa.gov 

Remote access: Please register at https://goo.gl/7oSidq After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP). 

Abstract/Summary: The talk will explain the background and purpose of the Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units (CESUs) network and how NOAA program managers can benefit from accessing universities and NGOs at a 17.5% overhead rate.  Bill and Danny will focus their presentation on how leveraging the Chesapeake Watershed and North Atlantic Coast CESUs, in particular, can help NOAA accomplish its mission. The network can be used to support virtually any type of technical assistance, education, or research; the network's breadth is as deep as the university departments and expertise that encompass the national network.  The presentation will also include types of projects that are currently being executed within the network among several federal partners.

About the Speakers: Jen has been supporting NOAAs participation in the National Cooperative Ecosystems Studies Units (CESUs) since 2012. CESUs are a network of universities, federal agencies, and other nonfederal partners that engage in cooperative agreements to further research in the biological, physical, social, cultural and engineering disciplines.
 
In assisting the NOAA representative to the National CESU Network (Dr. Cisco Werner, NOAA Fisheries Chief Scientist), Jen has worked to problem solve various challenges that NOAA has experienced in being a full participant in the National CESU Network. Through Jens leadership, NOAA has issued CESU awards in supporting collaborative research with the Universities of Hawaii, Alaska (Anchorage and Southeast), and California.  
 
In addition to her role as NOAAs CESU Program Manager, Jen serves as the Environmental Compliance Coordinator for the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries.  Jen earned her B.S. at Tulane University and a M.S. in Interdisciplinary Ecology from the University of Florida.

Prior to becoming the North Atlantic Coast CESU Research Coordinator, Bill Thompson was the regional inventory and monitoring (I&M) coordinator for the Northeast Region of the USFWS-National Wildlife Refuge System in Hadley, MA since 2010.  Before that, he was the biometrician/terrestrial wildlife program leader for the Southwest Alaska Network for the National Park Services I&M Program in Anchorage, AK during 2004-2010.  Bill also has served as Assistant Unit Leader (Wildlife) at the USGS Arkansas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit in Fayetteville (2000-2004), as a research biologist with the U.S. Forest Services Rocky Mountain Research Station in Boise, ID (1997-2000), as a postdoctoral research fellow at Colorado State University, Fort Collins (1994-1997), and as an environmental research consultant in Bozeman, MT (1994). 
 
Bill has degrees in wildlife and fisheries biology (B.S., University of Vermont), fish and wildlife sciences (M.S., Pennsylvania State University), and biological sciences (Ph.D., Montana State University; statistics minor).  His professional interests include developing designs for sampling and monitoring fish and wildlife populations, decision analysis, and modeling ecological data.  Bills personal interests include fitness training, wilderness hiking/camping, and wildlife photography (especially birds).  He was born and raised in RI.

In addition to serving as an adjunct professor for the History and Philosophy Departments, Danny serves as the Chesapeake Watershed CESU Research Coordinator (www.cesu.psu.edu) for the National Park Service where he works with 15 different federal agencies and nearly 30 university partners to provide education and technical assistance to federal program managers.  The types of research Danny facilitates ranges from anthropology to zoology and everything in between!  
Danny also serves as the president of the Foundation for Frostburg (www.foundationforfrostburg.org), as the Secretary for the Allegany County Historical Society, and as an alternate for the City of Frostburgs Historical Commission.  Danny is a Frostburg native and attended Frostburg State University for his undergraduate (B.A. in History) and graduate degrees (M.Ed. and MBA).  He also holds a Doctor of Education degree from West Virginia University.

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Title:
New
Distributed Biological Laboratory Line 1 and M8: A Changing Ecosystem
Presenter(s): Phyllis Stabeno, Physical Oceanographer, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: November 29, 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Phyllis Stabeno, Physical Oceanographer, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAAs EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/). 

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
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United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Effects of decreasing ice and warming temperatures are already changing the northern Bering Sea ecosystem.

Seminar POC for questions: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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November 30, 2017

Title: Ecophysiology and potential for persistence in a changing ocean
Presenter(s): Jacquline Padilla-Gamino, Ph.D.; Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: November 30, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Jacquline Padilla-Gamino, Ph.D.; Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

Join Webex  
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Meeting number and Access Code: 804 755 712
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Host: Monster Seminar Jam (https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm)
POC: vicky.krikelas@noaa.gov

ABSTRACT: TBD

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Title: Restoration of Shad and Anadromous Fish to the White Clay Creek National Wild and Scenic River in Delaware
Presenter(s): Gerald Kauffman, University of Delaware, Water Resources Center
Date & Time: November 30, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Gerald Kauffman, University of Delaware, Water Resources Center

Seminar Sponsors: NOAA and USFWS; NOAA Points of Contact are NOAA's Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov, and US Fish and Wildlife Service's Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Seminar Registration: https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e3y9wv1gvm1o/event/registration.html
Invitations to register for the webinar will be emailed a week or two prior to the event. For the best viewing experience, please use Internet Explorer. 

Abstract: Gerald Kauffman will discuss the first dam removal project for fish passage in the entire state of Delaware. This project is the first of seven planned removals to ultimately reopen 14 miles of the creek to fish passage.

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December 6, 2017

Title:
New
Finding Conservation Opportunities along Estuary Margins
Presenter(s): Brian Fulfrost, Principal at Oregon Freshwater Solutions and David Thomson, Habitats Program Director at San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory
Date & Time: December 6, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Brian Fulfrost, Principal at Oregon Freshwater Solutions, and
David Thomson, Habitats Program Director at San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Land managers working in estuaries must understand the ecological importance of habitats found along the upland margins of tidal marshes.  These so-called upland transitional habitats provide critical functions both to tidal marsh fauna and their own obligate flora, as well as potential accommodation space for marsh migration during rapid sea level rise.  The current status and location of these habitats in the San Francisco Bay estuary was not well understood nor were potential conservation opportunities easily identified. We found accommodation space for upslope migration of tidal marsh in response to rapid sea level rise lacking in the lower estuary, so work must also be done to prepare the landscape for their migration up-estuary. 

Initially funded by the US Fish & Wildlife Service to assess the status and distribution of upland transitions, we set out to better describe these habitats, develop a way to use topography data and tidal gauges to predict the location of land surfaces within their elevation range (relative to the tides), and then use a set of GIS based metrics to rank their relative utility to estuarine conservation. We also mapped two sea level rise scenarios (61cm and 167cm) to project future distributions of these habitats to inform planning. This mapping and assessment forms the basis of our decision support system.  Land managers use it to predict baseline condition of these habitats in the estuary, find opportunities and assess constraints, and to inform restoration planning and site design.  Our decision support system can also be used to visualize this process in the context of sea level rise and either find opportunities for connectivity or prepare assisted migration scenarios for constraints imposed by the landscape.
 
About the Speakers: Brian Fulfrost is currently Principal at Oregon Freshwater Simulations (http://freshwatersim.com) and also teaches GIS at WSU and SFSU as well as remote sensing at the University of West Florida (online).  Brian has spent more than 20 years utilizing GIS, remote sensing and geospatial technologies to better inform conservation planning, resource management and sustainable planning.  For the last ten years, Brian has worked on mapping and building decision support tools for coastal environments. This work includes the use of high resolution multispectral imagery for mapping marshes and mudflats for the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration authority, developing decision support systems for estuarine-upland transition zones under sea level rise, and using GIS based modeling to map shoreline vulnerability and coastal flood zones.

David Thomson (MS in Biology from SE Louisiana U) is the Habitats Program Director for the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory (www.sfbbo.org). He leads applied research projects on the management of estuarine-terrestrial transitional plant communities around San Francisco Bay, supporting large scale tidal marsh ecosystem restoration projects. He has been collaborating with Brian Fulfrost to map the distribution of upland transitional habitats and predict their value to tidal marsh ecosystem conservation.

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Title: Vibrio pathogens in the Chesapeake Bay under future climate change scenarios
Presenter(s): Barbara Muhling, University of California, Santa Cruz and NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: December 6, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter: Barbara Muhling, University of California, Santa Cruz and NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Bacteria in the genus Vibrio can cause illness to people through eating of contaminated seafood, or exposure to contaminated water. Vibrios occur naturally in the Chesapeake Bay, but their abundance varies with water temperature, salinity and other factors. We assessed the potential effects of climate change on the future abundance of three Vibrios in the Chesapeake Bay using outputs from four statistically downscaled climate models. We show that abundance of Vibrios in the water column, and in oysters, may increase as temperatures warm and flow regimes change. In addition, the seasons of
highest risk may last longer, compared to the present day. This suggests that Vibrio-related illnesses in the Chesapeake Bay region may increase in the future, unless current management measures can adapt.\

About the Speaker: Barbara Muhling is currently a fisheries oceanographer working with NOAA through the Cooperative Institute for Marine Ecosystems and Climate (CIMEC) in California. She completed her PhD through Murdoch University in Western Australia, and her post-doc at the University of Miami in Florida. From 2015-2016, she was an associate research scholar at Princeton University, and worked with scientists at NOAA GFDL, NMFS and NOS to complete the research described in this seminar.

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Title:
New
Feeding ecology in wild-caught early stage Sablefish
Presenter(s): Alison L. Deary, Research Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: December 6, 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Alison L. Deary, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAAs EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/). 

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
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You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Feeding dynamics of early stage Sablefish and how developmental patterns may influence feeding ability and prey selectivity.

Seminar POC for questions: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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Title: What is Coral Bleaching?
Presenter(s): Kelly Drinnen, NOAA Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: December 6, 2017
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Kelly Drinnen, NOAA Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries 

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/696223242835034627

Abstract: Coral bleaching is one of the side effects of an increasingly warmer ocean. Episodes of coral bleaching are happening more regularly and with greater severity as the years progress. But, what exactly is coral bleaching? Is bleached coral, dead coral? Is bleaching preventable? Can coral recover from bleaching? Join us to look at the biology of corals to understand what coral bleaching is and its potential long-term effects on coral reefs.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ 

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December 7, 2017

Title: Arkansas River Instream Habitat Restoration Project: How Can Monitoring be Used to Inform Adaptive Management?
Presenter(s): Eric Richer, Colorado Parks and Wildlife
Date & Time: December 7, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Eric Richer, Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Seminar Sponsors: NOAA and USFWS; NOAA Points of Contact are NOAA's Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov, and US Fish and Wildlife Service's Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Seminar Registration: https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e3y9wv1gvm1o/event/registration.html
Invitations to register for the webinar will be emailed a week or two prior to the event. For the best viewing experience, please use Internet Explorer. 

Abstract: Eric Richer will provide an overview of the project design, goals, and long-term monitoring of the Upper Arkansas River in-stream restoration to rehabilitate and enhance aquatic habitat for a five mile reach with the primary goals of increasing trout population density and to improve age and size class structure.

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Title: Considering economic efficiency in ecosystem-based management: the case of horseshoe crabs in Delaware Bay
Presenter(s): Jacquline Padilla-Gamino, Ph.D.; Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: December 7, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Sunny Jardine	Ph.D.; Assistant Professor, University of Washington, School of Marine and Environmental Affairs

Join Webex  
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Meeting number and Access Code: 804 755 712
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
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Host: Monster Seminar (https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm)
POC: vicky.krikelas@noaa.gov

ABSTRACT: TBD

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December 13, 2017

Title:
New
Shifting spawn timing in Gulf of Alaska walleye Pollock
Presenter(s): Lauren Rogers, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: December 13, 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Lauren Rogers, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAAs EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/). 

Remote Acess: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
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You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Larval otoliths provide evidence of past shifts in spawn timing linked to climate and demographics.

Seminar POC for questions: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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December 14, 2017

Title: Positioning in a Multi-global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) World
Presenter(s): Jacob Heck, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: December 14, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Jacob Heck, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor: NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9128878192824215811. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States:  +1 (415) 930-5321 ; Access Code: 465-664-973; Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar; Webinar ID: 204-791-819.

Abstract: By 2020, three other complete global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) will be in operation alongside GPS, providing new observables that could improve positioning solutions. This webinar will discuss NGS plans on incorporating these newly available signals in its next generation positioning software, which would also be integrated into tools like OPUS.

About the Speakers: Jacob Heck works within the Geodetic Research Division at NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.

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December 20, 2017

Title:
New
Bering Canyon: Physics, Flow and Zooplankton
Presenter(s): Colleen Harpold, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA and Carol Ladd, Physical Oceanographer, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: December 20, 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Colleen Harpold, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA and Carol Ladd, Physical Oceanographer, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAAs EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/). 

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Zooplankton of Bering Canyon and how the physics and flow of the region affect their distribution.

Seminar POC for questions: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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December 21, 2017

Title:
New
Economic Valuation of Natural Infrastructure Provided by the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve
Presenter(s): Jarrod Loerzel, Social Scientist, Matt Gorstein, Resource Economist, Chloe Fleming, Social Scientist, Sarah Gonyo, Resource Economist, all from NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science - NCCOS
Date & Time: December 21, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Jarrod Loerzel, Social Scientist, Matt Gorstein, Resource Economist, 
Chloe Fleming, Social Scientist, Sarah Gonyo, Resource Economist, all from NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science - NCCOS

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: For this project, we estimated the economic value of shoreline protection provided by natural habitats (such as marshes) to areas in and around the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve (JC NERR) using a combination of storm, coastal wave, and marsh migration models (i.e. ADCIRC+SWAN and SLAMM). The economic value of natural infrastructure in the area was estimated by first identifying and mapping shoreline habitats in relation to developed land areas vulnerable to environmental threats such as storm surge and sea level rise. Then, researchers estimated the amount of shoreline protection provided to those areas by existing shoreline habitats in a select number of storm and marsh migration scenarios. Finally, we articulate the calculated value of damages avoided (e.g., from storm surge and sea level rise) to coastal communities due to the presence of natural infrastructure using three storm scenarios coupled with current and future marsh migration. Using the assembled data and results, additional analyses may help determine locations for future nature-based infrastructure projects to increase any coastal communitys resilience to future environmental or climate-based disturbances.
 
About the Speakers:
Jarrod Loerzel is a social scientist with NOAA NCCOS and works at the Hollings Marine Lab in Charleston, SC. Among other things, Jarrods work is focused on the development, theory, and application of a variety of survey methods. He is interested in the spatial aspects of social phenomena, particularly as they relate to place attachment and environmental resource condition.

Matt Gorstein is a natural resource economist with NOAA NCCOS sitting at the Hollings Marine Lab in Charleston, SC. Much of his work is focused on economic valuation and statistical analysis, as well as data collection and data management. Matt is interested in indicator development, ecosystem service valuation, and in using numbers to tell stories.

Chloe Fleming is a marine and coastal social scientist and policy specialist with NOAA NCCOS at the Hollings Marine Lab in Charleston, SC. Her work is focused on the interactions between communities and coastal and marine environments. Among other things, Chloe is interested in community vulnerability and resilience to climate change impacts, sustainable use and management of coastal resources, and scientific writing and communication.

Sarah Gonyo is an economist with NOAA NCCOS in Silver Spring, MD. Her work is focused on economic valuation, survey development, and statistical analysis. Sarah is interested in ecosystem service valuation, particularly non-market valuation, and how humans use and interact with nature.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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January 10, 2018

Title:
New
Synthesis​ ​of​ ​public​ ​water​ ​supply​ ​use​ ​in​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States: Spatio-temporal patterns and socio-economic controls
Presenter(s): Sankar Arumugam, Ph.D., Professor and University Faculty Scholar, Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
Date & Time: January 10, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Sankar Arumugam, Ph.D., Professor and University Faculty Scholar, Dept. of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. 
 
Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Recent U.S. Geological Survey water-use report suggests that increasing water-use efficiency could mitigate the supply-and-demand imbalance arising from changing climate and growing population. However, this rich data have neither analyzed to understand the underlying patterns, nor have been investigated to identify the factors contributing to this increased efficiency. A national-scale synthesis of public supply withdrawals (withdrawals) reveals a strong Northsouth gradient in public supply water use with the increasing population in the South contributing to increased withdrawal. Contrastingly, a reverse Southnorth gradient exists in per capita withdrawals (efficiency), with northern states consistently improving the efficiency, while the southern states' efficiency declined. Our analyses of spatial patterns of per capita withdrawals further demonstrate that urban counties exhibit improved efficiency over rural counties. Improved efficiency is also demonstrated over high-income and well-educated counties. Given the potential implications of the findings in developing long-term water conservation measures (i.e., increasing block rates), we argue the need for frequent updates, perhaps monthly to annual, of water-use data for identifying effective strategies that control the water-use efficiency in various geographic settings under a changing climate.

About the Speaker: Dr. Sankar Arumugam is a  Professor in the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering at NCSU. He is also a University Faculty Scholar (2013-2018). He is primarily associated with the Environmental, Water Resources, and Coastal Engineering and Computing and Systems groups within the department.
Dr. Arumugam currently teaches CE 383  Hydrology and Urban Water Systems, CE 586  Engineering Hydrology, CE 777  Stochastic Methods in Water and Environmental Engineering and CE 786  Hydroclimatology.

Dr. Arumugam currently serves as the associate editor for the Journal of Hydrology (Elsevier) and for the Journal of Hydrometeorology (AMS). He also served as the associate editor for  Water Resources Research (AGU), Journal of Hydrologic Engineering (ASCE) and as the editor of Journal of Water and Climate Change (IWA). Dr. Arumugam is also a member of American Geophysical Union, American Meteorological Society and Environmental Water Research Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers.
He earned his B.S. in agricultural engineering in 1991, his M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering in 1996, and his Ph.D. in Water Resources Engineering in 2001.

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January 16, 2018

Title: Bloom and Bust: Algae Takes a Toll on the Housing Market
Presenter(s): Tingting Liu, Ph.D., Drought Policy & Impact Analyst, National Drought Mitigation Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Presenting remotely from Lincoln.
Date & Time: January 16, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Tingting Liu, Ph.D., Drought Policy & Impact Analyst, National Drought Mitigation Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Presenting remotely from Lincoln.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: We examine the impact of water quality in Narragansett Bay on housing prices in coastal towns and municipalities using a hedonic housing-price model. Unlike other hedonic studies of water quality, we test whether housing market responds to average water quality or more to extreme events. We also test the spatial and temporal extent of effects of water quality on housing prices. We find that poor coastal water quality, measured in terms of the concentration of chlorophyll, has a negative impact on housing prices that diminishes with distance from the shoreline. Furthermore, our finding suggests that housing prices are most influenced by the extreme environmental conditions, which may be accompanied by unpleasant odors, discoloration and even fish kills. We further predict potential increases in home values associated under water quality improvement scenarios and find an increase in the values of homes in coastal communities along Narragansett Bay of about $18 million up to $136 million.   

About the Speaker: Tingting Liu joined the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) at University of Nebraska-Lincoln in September 2017 as a Drought Policy and Impact Analyst following a three-year appointment as an Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) Postdoc Fellow with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. She received a Ph.D. degree in Environmental and Natural Resource Economics from University of Rhode Island in 2014, M.A. degree in Economics from Guangxi Normal University in 2006 and a B.S. in Information Management and Information System at Shanxi University in 2003. She had been an assistant professor at the Guangxi Normal University School of Economics and Management in Guilin, China prior to coming to the U.S. in 2009. Her research focuses on valuation of ecosystem goods and services, land use change, watershed management. She will focus on the impact analysis of drought and valuation of drought early warning at NDMC.
 
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January 17, 2018

Title: Building a Twenty First Century Heavy Icebreaker: Balancing Security and Science Capabilities
Presenter(s): Commander Kenneth J. Boda, Chief of Aids to Navigation and Icebreaking Capabilities, Office of Cutter Forces, Commandant -CG-751, U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, DC. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: January 17, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150, but may change
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Commander Kenneth J. Boda, Chief of Aids to Navigation and Icebreaking Capabilities, Office of Cutter Forces, Commandant (CG-751), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, DC. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
 .
Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: The United States Coast Guard is designing and building new heavy polar icebreakers to replace aging and increasingly obsolescent ships. We have developed and evaluated icebreaker operational requirements, seeking the greatest capability within the bounds of affordability. These ships must conduct the missions of U.S. Coast Guard (which include safety, security, and stewardship of U.S. waters) while serving the survey and science needs of our partner agencies across the federal government. In this presentation, Boda will outline the icebreaker acquisitions process, highlighting USCG outreach with the U.S. Navy, NOAA, industry and international partners. He will discuss the concept of icebreaker operations in both the Arctic and Antarctic, and will present the key performance capabilities required of the vessel in terms of icebreaking, endurance, and interoperability, and the resulting design implications. He will also discuss the capabilities that support U.S. Coast Guard maritime missions such as boat and aviation operations.  Finally, he will detail the survey and science capabilities required of these icebreakers to increase our knowledge of the remote Polar Regions.

About the Speaker: Commander Ken Boda is the Aids to Navigation and Icebreaker Policy and Capabilities Division Chief in the Office of Cutter Forces at Coast Guard Headquarters (CG-751). He is a career icebreaker sailor having served eight years afloat as Communications Officer and Operations Officer in USCGC POLAR SEA (WAGB 11), Supply/Training Officer in USCGC EAGLE (WIX 327), and Executive Officer in USCGC POLAR STAR (WAGB 10). His staff tours include Marine Science Instructor at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, Analyst in the Office of Strategic Analysis at Coast Guard Headquarters (CG- 095), and leader of the interagency Operational Science Advisory Team (OSAT-2) for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill response.

Commander Boda is a 1997 graduate of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy with a degree in
Marine and Environmental Sciences (with high honors). He holds masters degrees from
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University in Physical Oceanography,
and from the Naval War College in National Security and Strategic Studies (with
distinction). Commander Boda is a 2016 Massachusetts Institute of Technology Seminar
XXI Fellow. He is a native of Fairfield, Connecticut, and is married to the former Alison Baikal of Kensington, Connecticut; they have a five year old son, Patrick, and reside in Crofton, MD.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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January 25, 2018

Title: Decision Support Tools and a Framework for Climate-smart Restoration
Presenter(s): Isaiah Thalmayer and Thomas Gardali, Point Blue Conservation Science
Date & Time: January 25, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Isaiah Thalmayer and Thomas Gardali, both with Point Blue Conservation Science

Seminar Sponsors: NOAA and USFWS; NOAA Points of Contact are NOAA's Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov, and US Fish and Wildlife Service's Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Seminar Registration: https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e3y9wv1gvm1o/event/registration.html
Invitations to register for the webinar will be emailed a week or two prior to the event. For the best viewing experience, please use Internet Explorer. 

Abstract: This month will feature two presentations by Isaiah Thalmayer and Thomas Gardali: Isaiah will discuss a web-based decision support tool designed to help select plants for restoration projects and Thomas will present a framework designed to guide incorporation of the impacts of climate change in restoration plans.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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January 31, 2018

Title:
New
Well below 2 °C: Mitigation strategies for avoiding dangerous to catastrophic climate changes
Presenter(s): Yangyang Xu, Assistant Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences , College of Geosciences, Texas A&M University. Presenting from Texas.
Date & Time: January 31, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Yangyang Xu, Assistant Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences , College of Geosciences, Texas A&M University. Presenting from Texas.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#  
For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com  Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract and About the Speaker: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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March 13, 2018

Title: Understanding Ocean Acidification - Using NOAA’s New Educational Tools
Presenter(s): Amy Dean, National Estuarine Research Reserve System
Date & Time: March 13, 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Amy Dean, National Estuarine Research Reserve System 

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries 

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/690023097051840771

Abstract: Data in the Classroom (https://dataintheclassroom.noaa.gov/) is designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional and global scale. In this presentation, participants will dive deep into Data in the Classroom's Ocean Acidification Module to explore the processes that cause acidification, examine data from across the globe and take a virtual tour of the new web-based curricular modules and data tools.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word `subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ 

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Hosted at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR for the OneNOAA Seminar Series
Developer - Lori K. Brown