All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

December 11, 2018

Title: Interaction of commercial fishing gears and long-lived structure forming invertebrate species in the Aleutian Islands: A risk assessment
Presenter(s): John Olson, Fisheries Biologist, Habitat Conservation Division, Alaska Regional Office
Date & Time: December 11, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: John Olson, Fisheries Biologist, Habitat Conservation Division, Alaska Regional Office

Sponsor:
NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access via WebEx:

 
2018 AFSC Groundfish Seminar Series - John V. Olson
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
10:00 am  |  Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00)  |  1 hr
Meeting number: 902 266 463
Meeting password: noaa


When it's time, join the meeting.
Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-888-456-5038, Attendee passcode:8480290#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
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See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: NOAA Research and Development Database (NRDD): Project Management Data for NOAA’s R&D
Presenter(s): Meka Laster & Shanie Gal-Edd, OAR
Date & Time: December 11, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar 
Presenters: Meka Laster, Director and Shanie Gal-Edd, Program Manager, for the NOAA Research & Development Database


POC: Outreach Librarian, Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)


Remote access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6001639534869668609  Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Introduction to the NOAA Research and Development Database (NRDD). NRDD is a secure, web-based enterprise performance management / business intelligence tool, designed to contain information about the R&D projects conducted and funded by NOAA.

About The Speaker: Meka Laster works in the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and joined the NRDD team in 2016. Shanie Gal-Edd also works in the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and joined the NRDD team in 2017. Shanie worked at NOAA since her Knauss Fellowship year in 2016. 

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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December 12, 2018

Title: Analyses of multi species ichthyoplankton data along the US west coast as indicators of ecosystem changes
Presenter(s): Jens Nielsen Ph.D., NRC postdoctoral researcher, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA.
Date & Time: December 12, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s):
Jens Nielsen Ph.D., NRC postdoctoral researcher, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA.

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101 

You can also dial in using your phone. 
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311 
Access Code: 891-851-101 

Abstract: Do different fish larvae communities have shared responses to climatic changes?

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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Title: Ecosystem-based fisheries management in the Southern Ocean: Antarctic krill
Presenter(s): Jefferson Hinke, Research Fish Biologist, NMFS/SWFSC/AERD
Date & Time: December 12, 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Speaker: Jefferson Hinke, Research Fishery Biologist, Southwest Fisheries Science Center (Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division)

Sponsors: NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov); Webinar host: Librarian Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Remote access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://goo.gl/fddvsB Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Formed from the desire to minimize ecosystem-level impacts of harvesting, the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Living Marine Resources provided an early form of ecosystem-aware fisheries management. It specified ecosystem-level considerations for management and was implemented with a desire for a form of feedback management system that accounted for the status and trends of harvested and indicator species. Over the three decades since its inception, a precautionary approach to fisheries management has prevailed while approaches to a feedback-based approach have been developed and considered. This talk overviews contributions by AERD and general progress toward EBFM in the Antarctic krill fishery in the Southern Ocean.

About the Speakers: Jefferson Hinke is a Research Fishery Biologist at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center. He coordinates seabird research at two small field camps in the Antarctic Peninsula region with research centered on Antarctic penguin responses to environmental changes and fisheries effects. Jefferson holds a BS and MS from the University of Wisconsin and the PhD from the University of California- San Diego. He Joined the SWFSC Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division in 2009.

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December 13, 2018

Title: Dynamic Responses of Coastal Wetlands to Sea Level Rise
Presenter(s): Karim Alizad, PhD, Research Assistant Professor, Belle W. Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences. University of South Carolina. Presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring
Date & Time: December 13, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Dynamic Responses of Coastal Wetlands to Sea Level Rise

Speaker: Karim Alizad, PhD, Research Assistant Professor, Belle W. Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences. University of South Carolina. Presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring. 

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session,  go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ , click "guest", and please enter your first and last names. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm  Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Coastal wetlands are one of the valuable ecosystems that are significantly vulnerable to sea level rise and climate change. These systems are prone to lose their productivity and inundation under increasing rates of sea level rise. That highlights the imperative need for researchers to assess the response of susceptible coastal wetlands under projected sea level rise scenarios. Research outcomes such as maps, tools, and possible restoration activities contribute to well-informed  decisions of coastal managers. 

In order to quantify the evolution of marsh systems, an integrated hydrodynamic-marsh model, the Hydro-MEM model, was developed. This model couples a hydrodynamic (ADCIRC) and salt marsh (MEM) model and analyzes the complex interrelation between physics and biology in wetlands within a large-scale domain. The Hydro-MEM produced spatial maps of projected marsh productivity, hydrodynamics, and marsh migration possibility under sea level rise scenarios. The results are used in multiple states over the past few years by National Estuarine Research Reserves, Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA. 

About the Speaker: Karim Alizad is a research assistant professor in the Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences at the University of South Carolina. His research is focused on the effects of climate change and sea level rise on coastal ecosystems and coupling field collected data with large-scale numerical modeling. He received his PhD in civil engineering at University of Central Florida (UCF) and worked two years as a postdoctoral research associate in the Center for Coastal Resiliency (CCR) at Louisiana State University (LSU). He has earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Semnan University; an M.S. in energy conversion from the University of Tehran; and completed his second M.S. in mechanical engineering at the University of California, Riverside. Dr. Alizad has served as a reviewer for more than 15 peer-reviewed journals and conferences, and currently is a guest editor of the “Advances in Coastal Hydrodynamics and Wetland Modeling” special issue in the Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (JMSE). He founded and led the International Association of Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research (IAHR) student chapter at UCF and participated in the leading committee of LSU Postdoctoral Society,  UCF and UCR Graduate Student Associations, and UCR International Education Committee of Academic Senate.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website,
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December 17, 2018

Title: Fishing for Solutions: A Science Briefing on Ocean Change and Fisheries
Presenter(s): Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor in Dept.of Ecology, Evolution & Natural Resources, Rutgers University; Michael Luisi, Monitoring and Assessment Division Director, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chair of the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Roger Griffis, Climate Coordinator, NOAA's Fisheries Service; Heather Mannix, Assistant Director of Policy Engagement, COMPASS; and Stephen Posner, Assistant Director of Policy Engagement, COMPASS
Date & Time: December 17, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Fishing for Solutions: A Science Briefing on Ocean Change and Fisheries 

Speakers:
Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor in Department of Ecology, Evolution & Natural Resources, Rutgers University;
Michael Luisi, Monitoring and Assessment Division Director, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, and Chair of the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council;
Roger Griffis, Climate Coordinator, NOAA's Fisheries Service;
Heather Mannix, Assistant Director of Policy Engagement; COMPASS; and 
Stephen Posner, Assistant Director of Policy Engagement with COMPASS

Sponsors: COMPASS and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; contacts are Jacob.Robertson@compassscicomm.org and  Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Webinar Access: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/4615410924533/WN_cFozyDw2QfytHHWi0pvLOg 
Questions? Email Jacob.Robertson@compassscicomm.org

Abstract: Ocean warming and a host of related stressors - including ocean acidification, hypoxia, and sea-level rise - have profound implications for marine life and human communities worldwide. The rate and scale of change that we see now is impacting fish, the ecosystems that fish depend on, and the communities, businesses, and economies that a rich fishing culture supports. As fisheries change, society needs to effectively respond to interconnected ecological, social, and economic challenges - including: how the ocean is changing, what this means for fisheries and for people, what is at risk, and how management systems can respond.

This webinar will discuss science, policy and management gaps and opportunities across fisheries, marine ecology, social science, policy, law, and management fields that arose from a 2-day roundtable convened by COMPASS in 2018. Aligning the capabilities of science with the mounting challenges of a changing ocean is about gaps in current knowledge, and also about how to mobilize people based on the knowledge we have now. Productive dialogue among scientists, decision makers, non-governmental organizations, and ocean resource managers can support the development and implementation of effective fisheries policies based on relevant scientific evidence.

About the Speakers:
Malin Pinsky is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources at Rutgers University. He leads a research group studying the ecology and evolution of global change in the ocean, including conservation and management solutions. He developed and maintains the OceanAdapt website to document shifting ocean animals in North America, a resource used by governments and NGOs for climate adaptation planning. He has published articles in Science, PNAS, and other journals, and his research has received extensive coverage in the press. He has received early career awards and fellowships from the National Academy of Sciences, American Society of Naturalists, and the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. Previously, he was a David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellow at Princeton University. He has a Ph.D. from Stanford University, an A.B. from Williams College, and grew up along the coast of Maine.

Michael Luisi serves as the director of monitoring and assessment with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources fishing and boating services. He was appointed to the Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management Council as Maryland's State Official Designee in June 2010 and was elected as Council Chairman in 2016. Mike also serves as one of Maryland's administrative representatives on the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission. His career in fisheries began at the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries while working as a technician on the Statewide Stream Survey Project. Since joining MDNR in 2000, he has held multiple positions in the department, including the management of the State's Commercial Striped Bass Fishery and the Coastal Fisheries Program. Mike has a B.S. degree from Mary Washington College and a M.S. from Tennessee Technological University.

Roger Griffis is a marine ecologist with 20 years of experience advancing science and management of marine and coastal resources with NOAA. As Climate Coordinator for NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), he works with many partners to increase the production, delivery and use of climate-related information to fulfill NMFS mandates in a changing world. Past positions include Manager of NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program and Policy Advisor in NOAA's Office of Policy and Strategy Planning.

Heather Mannix is an Interim Co-Director of Policy Engagement at COMPASS, where she works to facilitate constructive discussion and interaction between scientists and decision makers. Before coming to COMPASS, she spent over seven years at the Consortium for Ocean Leadership in Washington D.C. working with large ocean research programs such as the Census of Marine Life and the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative. Heather also managed the Ocean Research Advisory Panel, a science advisory body to the Federal Government. She received her B.A. from Hood College in Environmental Science and Policy and my M.A. from American University in Global Environmental Policy.
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December 18, 2018

Title:
New
Resilience Dialogues: Connecting communities with experts via online dialogues to lay the groundwork for long-term climate resilience
Presenter(s): Sarah Zerbonne, Resilience Dialogues team et al. see description
Date & Time: December 18, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Sarah Zerbonne & Rachel Jacobson (Resilience Dialogues team); Catherine Kemp & Alexandra Long (Anchorage Mayor's Office)

Seminar sponsor: NOAA / OAR / CPO / RISA Program

Remote access: https://accap.uaf.edu/Resilience_Dialogues

Abstract: Using a facilitated online dialogue process, Resilience Dialogues enables communities to engage with scientists and resilience practitioners to identify challenges, locate relevant resources, and prioritize achievable action steps towards resilience. A public-private collaboration launched in 2016, the Resilience Dialogues is led by the American Society of Adaptation Professionals (ASAP), in close coordination with the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and several other public and private entities. Nearing the end of its third year of implementation, the Resilience Dialogues has supported over 20 US communities on their journey to build community resilience to a changing climate.

Seminar POC for questions: sean.bath@noaa.gov

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Additional presenters field: 
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December 19, 2018

Title: A New Diet Index: Predicting fish length from diet composition
Presenter(s): Nissa C. Ferm, Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Contractor with Lynker Inc., Seattle, WA
Date & Time: December 19, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s):
Nissa C. Ferm, Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Contractor with Lynker Inc., Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access: Please join our meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101 

You can also dial in using your phone. 
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311 
Access Code: 891-851-101 

Abstract: What did the fish eat? On the surface this seems to be a relatively simple question. However, when diet data are incorporated into models, there are both logistical and ecological limitations. Understanding the methodologies of how diet data are generated, combined with an understanding of the underlying predator-prey ecology, can help generate more informed models.  I will present an overview of diet data methodologies used to investigate feeding of young of the year Walleye Pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus). Based on this knowledge, I will describe a Random Forest model, built upon the scaffold of predator-prey ecology that was designed to predict Walleye Pollock condition. The model I developed predicts fish length from consumed prey taxa weight and composition. Fish length is related to known ontogentic shifts in diet that are important milestones for juvenile Pollock survival and ability to overwinter. Using the difference between the actual length of the fish and the modeled length gives us a metric. This metric tells us how far away a fish is from an average diet for its specific length. The metric was determined to have a significant non-linear relationship with dry energy density.  When modeled fish size was much larger than observed, dry energy density declined. I concluded that fish were not consuming their optimal prey for their particular size in order to meet energetic demands. One possible mechanism for not meeting these energetic demands is a spatial mismatch between the fish and optimal prey.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Sendan email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
Using Satellite Climate Data Records to Study the Shortwave Radiation Budget of Snow vs Sea Ice and Arctic vs Antarctic
Presenter(s): Jeff Key, Center for Satellite Applications and Research
Date & Time: December 19, 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Jeff Key (Center for Satellite Applications and Research, NOAA/NESDIS)

Seminar sponsor: OAR / CPO / RISA Program

Remote access: https://accap.uaf.edu/VAWS_Dec2018

Abstract: The AVHRR Polar Pathfinder Extended (APP-x) climate data record provides cloud properties, surface temperature and albedo, sea ice thickness, and radiative fluxes over the Arctic and Antarctic from 1982 through the present. APP-x was recently used in two studies of absorbed solar radiation at the surface. One study compares changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic and Antarctic and examines their effects on the shortwave radiation budget. It was found that increasing shortwave absorption over the Arctic Ocean is not balanced by trends in the Antarctic. The second study compares the ice-albedo and snow-albedo feedbacks in the Arctic. The positive trend of solar absorption over the Arctic Ocean is more than double that over Arctic land, and the magnitude of the ice-albedo feedback is four times that of the snow-albedo feedback in summer. Therefore, decreasing sea ice cover, not changes in terrestrial snow cover, has been the dominant radiative feedback mechanism over the last few decades.

Seminar POC for questions: sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

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Title: RESCHEDULED: New technology support for remote sensing of lake water quality using automated field radiometers
Presenter(s): Dr. Timothy S. Moore, Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory
Date & Time: December 19, 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room #3555, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

STAR Seminars Series

with SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group


This seminar was originally scheduled for 12/5/2018.

Presenter:
Dr. Timothy S. Moore - Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory
Institute for Earth, Oceans and Space
University of New Hampshire

Sponsor:

SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group
The NOCCG is a NOAA organization founded in 2011 by Dr. Paul DiGiacomo, Chief of the Satellite Oceanography and Climatology Division at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR.  The purpose of the NOCCG is to keep members up to date about developments in the field of satellite ocean color and connect ocean color science development with users and applications.  We have representatives from all the NOAA line offices, including National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, National Ocean Service, National Weather Service and from several levels of the National Environmental and Satellite Data and Information Service (where Paul is housed).  Dr. Cara Wilson of South East Fisheries Science Center is our current chair. We meet bi-weekly on Wednesday afternoons, 3 PM Eastern Time in room 3555 at the National Center for Weather and Climate Prediction building in College Park, MD with teleconferencing and Webex for out of town members and guests.  We host a guest speaker, usually about once a month.

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:    907 721 095
Password: NOCCG
Event address for attendees:

https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=mf7555abe45f0f5eb592ac618bd9b38b1


Audio:  
USA participants: 866-564-7828 Passcode: 9942991



Abstract:


 In the summer of 2016, a robotic sun photometer called the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurements (SeaPRISM), was deployed at a Coast Guard channel marker in western Lake Erie, measuring atmospheric properties and spectral water-leaving radiance. The instrument was deployed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to support remote sensing validation and harmful algal bloom (HAB) satellite products. The Lake Erie SeaPRISM is also part of the international federated AERONET program maintained by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and more specifically is part of the AERONET Ocean Color (AERNOET-OC) network. The main purpose of this component of AERONET is specific to calibration/validation efforts for ocean color. In the summer of 2017, a new 12-channel version was deployed at the same site with additional channels in the red and near-infrared. This unit is the first ‘lake' version of the SeaPRISM. In this webinar, the data collected by the SeaPRISM at this site over the last three years (2016-2018) will be examined in the context of HABs and remote sensing validation. The SeaPRISM observations in relation to remote sensing validation and on cyanobacteria blooms from hourly to weekly time scales will be highlighted in this presentation.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Moore has been working with ocean color remote sensing for over 25 years. Throughout that time, he has been involved with bio-optical algorithm development, application, and satellite validation. He was worked with ocean color imagery in marine and freshwater systems. He was a member of the NASA MODIS Science Team and NASA PACE Science Team. For the past six years, he has been working extensively in the western Lake Erie system collaborating with NOAA GLERL and other regional entities. Under a collaborative project between NOAA NESDIS, NOAA GLERL and UNH, Dr. Moore led the effort to introduce an autonomous, robotic radiometer to Lake Erie with a unique band configuration, which will be the subject of his presentation. 


POC:
Nolvia Herrera, 301-683-3308, Nolvia.Herrera@noaa.gov
NOCCG Coordinator: Veronica P. Lance, PhD, NOAA, 301-683-3319, Veronica.Lance@noaa.gov
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December 20, 2018

Title: The JCSDA Community Radiative Transfer Model: From Development to Operations
Presenter(s): Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson - JCSDA
Date & Time: December 20, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553 , NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson - JCSDA

Sponsor: STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx
Event Number: 905 776 033 
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=md8d79cffbe41f5b7949986d2b669c0ed

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416

Abstract:
The Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) is a fast, 1-D radiative transfer model designed to simulate top-of-the-atmosphere radiances consistent with a wide variety of satellite based sensors. The CRTM was primarily developed by JCSDA-funded scientists with essential contributions from NOAA/STAR and NOAA/EMC scientists. The primary goal of CRTM is to provide fast, accurate satellite radiance simulations and associated Jacobian calculations under all weather and surface conditions. CRTM supports all current operational and many research passive sensors, covering wavelengths ranging from the visible through the microwave. The model has undergone substantial improvement and expansion, since the first version in 2004. The CRTM has been used in the NOAA/NCEP and U.S. Navy operational data assimilation systems and by many other JCSDA partners such as NOAA/NESDIS/STAR, NOAA/OAR, NASA/GMAO, Naval Research Laboratory, Air Force Weather, and within multiple university environments. Over the past 14 years, both external research groups and operational centers alike have made essential contributions to the continued development and growth of CRTM.
A major goal of the CRTM core team is to ensure that CRTM becomes a true community radiative transfer model for all users. The CRTM official baseline code is developed and maintained based on internal and community-wide inputs, consisting of both improvements and externally contributed codes.
This presentation will briefly review the scientific and technical basis of CRTM, including its many strengths and limitations. There will also be an overview of the current status of the recently released CRTM version 2.3.0; and the future planned release of CRTM version 3.0.0 - which will represent a major milestone in CRTM's development and capabilities.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson joined NOAA/NESDIS/STAR (via AER, Inc.) in support of JCSDA in July 2015.  In January 2017, he was hired through UCAR as the JCSDA project lead for the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM).  Dr. Johnson's primary responsibilities are to ensure that the CRTM project continues to be proactively developed and managed to meet operational user requirements.   This involves coordinating efforts and support for a large number of users and developers across a wide range of agencies and universities, both domestic and international.

 Dr. Johnson received a B.S. in Physics from Oklahoma State University, with an emphasis on hard-sphere sedimentation crystallization and photonics.  Combining his interest in weather, computing, and physics, he studied Atmospheric Science at Purdue University, where he received a M.S. degree. The next stop was the University of Wisconsin, where he completed his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science advised by Dr. Grant Petty.
Before completing his Ph.D. in 2007, Dr. Johnson started working at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in 2004 on the Global Precipitation Measurement mission, primarily focused on precipitation retrieval algorithm development and satellite observation simulations. During the intervening years, he has coordinated multiple NASA field campaigns as a mission scientist, and actively participates in the CGMS/WMO International Precipitation Working Group (IPWG), International TOVs Working Group (ITWC), and the International Workshop on Space-based Snowfall Measurement (IWSSM).   He is a member of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), and the American Meteorological Society (AMS).   
Dr. Johnson's primary areas of expertise are measuring and simulating cloud microphysical processes, theoretical and applied atmospheric radiative transfer, satellite remote sensing of clouds and precipitation, and satellite-based radar simulations in cold-cloud precipitating scenes.

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December 21, 2018

Title: December 2018 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: December 21, 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminr Series

Speaker: Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) 
Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and  National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov or rthoman@alaska.edu)
Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/December2018
Abstract:The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for January 2019! and the winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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January 15, 2019

Title:
New
Protecting Blue Whales and Blue Skies - Vessel Speed Reduction in California
Presenter(s): Jessica Morten, Resource Protection Specialist, contractor to NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary & Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary through the Greater Farallones Association
Date & Time: January 15, 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series Speaker: Jessica Morten, Resource Protection Specialist, contractor to NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary & Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary through the Greater Farallones Association Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6328440779544053004 Abstract: California's nutrient-rich coastal waters are home to several species of large whales, including gray whales and endangered blue, humpback, and fin whales. The state is also home to four major shipping ports - San Diego, Long Beach, Los Angeles, and Oakland - that result in thousands of large container and tanker transits taking place within California national marine sanctuary waters. In the past decade, over 10 whale fatalities have been recorded along the California coast as a result of ship and whale collisions, and recent research suggests that many more of these ship strikes are going undetected each year. To address this global issue, learn more about how west coast national marine sanctuaries have been working with a number of partners to better understand the issue of ship strikes and slow vessels down to reduce harmful air emissions and protect endangered whales. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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January 17, 2019

Title: RESCHEDULED: Initial Geostationary Lightning Mapper Observations
Presenter(s): Scott Rudlosky  - NESDIS/STAR/CoRP
Date & Time: January 17, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

This talk was originally scheduled for 11/15/2018
and 12/5/2018

Presenter: Scott Rudlosky  - NESDIS/STAR/CoRP

Sponsor: STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:    903 126 314
Password: STARSeminar

Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=m58ef2c99eed604b36781eae3ac7eb228

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416


Download slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/20181115_Rudlosky.pdf

https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/20181115_Rudlosky.pptx

Abstract:
The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) is the first sensor of its kind, and this technological advancement now allows continuous operational monitoring of lightning on time and space scales never before available. This has led to a golden age of lightning observations, which will spur more rapid progress toward synthesis of these observations with other meteorological datasets and forecasting tools. This study documents the first nine months of GLM observations, illustrating that the GLM captures similar spatial patterns of lightning occurrence to many previous studies. The present study shows that GLM flashes are less common over the oceans, but that the oceanic flashes are larger, brighter, and last longer than flashes over land. The GLM characteristics also help diagnose and document data quality artifacts that diminish in time with tuning of the instrument and filters. The GLM presents profound possibilities, with countless new applications anticipated over the coming decades. The baseline values reported herein aim to guide the early development and application of the GLM observations.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Scott Rudlosky is a NOAA/NESDIS physical scientist in the Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) Cooperative Research Program (CoRP). He is co-located with the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites (CICS) in College Park, Maryland. Scott is the NESDIS Subject Matter Expert on lightning and science lead for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). He originally joined CICS as a Research Associate in January 2011 following completion of his M.S. (2007) and Ph.D. (2011) in Meteorology at Florida State University. He obtained his B.S. (2004) in Geography with a specialization in Atmospheric Science from Ohio State University.

POC:

Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
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February 5, 2019

Title: Home Front Hawai`i: A Naval Legacy beneath the Sea
Presenter(s): Dr. Hans van Tilburg, Maritime Heritage Program Coordinator, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: February 5, 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Hans van Tilburg, Maritime Heritage Program Coordinator, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1125812340237400321

Abstract: Shipwrecks and other submerged properties tell stories of the past, and some of those stories are about WWII in the Pacific. The Hawaiian Islands were very different during the war period, a plantation territory suddenly witness to the initial attack on Pearl Harbor and subsequent years of intensive combat training both on land and sea. The events of this critical period have left a legacy of sites that act as windows on history, a heritage landscape to be shared in the present.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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May 21, 2019

Title: Estimating Coral Feeding Habits from Space
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Fox, Former Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar
Date & Time: May 21, 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Michael Fox, Postdoctoral Scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6762138742323434253

Abstract: Reef-building corals rely on a symbiosis with microscopic algae for much of their energetic needs. Rising ocean temperatures threaten this symbiosis and can cause it to break down in a process known as coral bleaching, which is one of the primary threats to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems globally. Corals are not helpless, however, as they are also excellent predators and if they can capture food to maintain their energy budgets while bleached they may have a greater chance for survival. Learn more how natural variation in food availability on reefs around the world and how this may influence coral resilience and recovery from bleaching events.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Developer - Lori K. Brown