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OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
2014 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

8 January 2014

Title: Evaluating the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer Lidar Bathymetry Data for NOAA Charting Requirements
Presenter(s): Gretchen Imahori, Dr. Shachak Pe'eri and Dr. Chris Parrish
Date & Time: 8 January 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA, SSMC4, Room 8150, Silver Spring, MD, Remote Access available - see below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Gretchen Imahori , Dr. Shachak Pe'eri and Dr. Chris Parrish

Sponsor(s):
NOS Seminar Series and NOS Office of Coast Survey

Abstract:
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) acquires hydrographic data around the coasts of the U.S. and its territories using in-house surveys and contracting resources. Hydrographic data are primarily collected using sonar systems, while a small percent is acquired via Airborne Lidar Bathymetry (ALB) for nearshore areas. NOAA has an ongoing requirement, per the Coast and Geodetic Survey Act of 1947, to survey nearshore areas as part of its coastal mapping activities, including updating nautical charts, creating hydrodynamic models, and supporting coastal planning and habitat mapping. NOAA has initiated a project to investigate the potential use of ALB data from non-hydrographic survey programs (i.e., programs designed to support objectives other than nautical charting and with specifications and requirements that differ from those of NOAA hydrographic surveys) in order to increase the amount of data available to meet these nearshore mapping requirements. This presentation presents an evaluation of ALB data from the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP) for use by NOAA's Office of Coast Survey (OCS). These NCMP datasets were evaluated through a statistical comparison to bathymetric surfaces derived from hydrographic NOAA surveys.

Bio(s):
Gretchen Imahori works for the National Geodetic Survey supporting the GRAV-D Program and Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping Initiative. She worked for the Office of Coast Survey for 14 years and has supported hydrographic operations, researched sound speed and lead OCS's budget formulation. She has a B.S. in Chemistry from SUNY at Buffalo and a M.S. in Earth Science with a focus in Ocean Mapping from the University of New Hampshire.

Shachak Pe'eri is a research assistant professor at the Center of Coastal and Ocean Mapping, University of New Hampshire. His research focus is in airborne remote sensing with a focus on experimental and theoretical studies of airborne lidar bathymetry, topographic lidar, and terrestrial laser scanning and hyperspectral remote sensing.

Christopher Parrish is the Lead Physical Scientist in the Remote Sensing Division of NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and affiliate professor of Ocean Engineering and Earth Sciences at the NOAA-University of New Hampshire Joint Hydrographic Center & Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (JHC-CCOM).

Questions? Contact Tracy Gill (tracy.gill@noaa.gov), up to 11:15 before the seminar,or if it is within 15 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

Copy of the presentation? A PDF of the presentation is sometimes available; email your request to tracy.gill@noaa.gov

9 January 2014

Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 January 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: https://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Socioeconomic Monitoring of US Coral Reef Jurisdictions
Presenter(s): Peter Edwards, Social Scientist, Coral Reef Conservation Program Maria Dillard, Social Scientist, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Susan Lovelace, Social Scientist, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Arielle Levine, Social Scientist, Coral Reef Conservation Program Jarrod Loerzel, Social Scientist, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 9 January 2014
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Large Conference Room 11153 / Online Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Peter Edwards, Social Scientist, Coral Reef Conservation Program Maria Dillard, Social Scientist, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Susan Lovelace, Social Scientist, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Arielle Levine, Social Scientist, Coral Reef Conservation Program Jarrod Loerzel, Social Scientist, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Coral Collaboration Seminar:

Abstract:
NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, in partnership with the Hollings Marine Laboratory, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science is leading a new effort to incorporate social and economic monitoring into the national monitoring plan for US coral reef jurisdictions. The National Coral Reef Monitoring Plan (NCRMP) is a strategic framework for conducting sustained observations of biological, climate and (for the first time) socioeconomic indicators in US coral reef areas across the U.S and its territories. The socioeconomic component will include gathering a wide variety of information, including population demographics, use of coral reef resources, and knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of coral reef resources and management. The overall goal of the socioeconomic monitoring component is to track relevant information regarding each jurisdiction's social and economic structure in order to investigate both the impacts of society on coral reefs, and the contributions of healthy corals to nearby communities. The resulting information will be valuable for jurisdictional resource managers, educators, and other key partners. Data on societal changes, support and/or opposition to management strategies, and perceptions of resource conditions can improve the effectiveness of management, education/outreach, and conservation programs. The NCRMP Social Team will present prioritized indicators, monitoring methods, and examples from the field in order to highlight the role of social monitoring in resource management. Point of contact for this seminar: jon.corsiglia@noaa.gov

14 January 2014

Title: Transition to ISO Metadata Online Training
Presenter(s): Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, National Coastal Data Development Center
Date & Time: 14 January 2014
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online Training Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

Transitioning from FGDC CSDGM Metadata to ISO 191** Metadata, an Online Training Series Date and Time: Every Tuesday beginning January 14 until February 25, 2014 from 10:30-11:30 AM Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/course-four/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

Presenter(s):
Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, National Coastal Data Development Center OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center

Abstract:
NOAA's National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC), a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is pleased to announce the new schedule of its popular free online metadata training series beginning in November 2013. Registration is now open for the next series of one-hour weekly webinars, which will begin January 14 and be taught each Tuesday through February 25, 2014. The “Transition to ISO” course is designed for data managers who have a need to transition from the use of Federal Geographic Data Committee CSDGM metadata to ISO 191** metadata. The series will cover topics such as XML and UML basics and ISO creation methods. All materials will be made available online, and instructors will be available by request for special one-on-one “My Metadata” sessions to answer specific questions for individual participants NCDDC set out to meet the increased needs of data managers as many organizations transition from FGDC to ISO standards. Working with other metadata trainers within the community, the NCDDC Metadata Team has developed a complete package of training materials for the transition to ISO metadata standards. Conducting this training online is an innovative way to meet the increased demand for this training while controlling travel expenses. NCDDC conducted its first metadata training series online in 2012 to help data managers meet the challenge of keeping up-to-date on the latest metadata standards and tools for implementing these standards. In an environment of declining budgets and travel limitations, online training has proven to be a successful avenue to meet these needs. So far in 2013, NCDDC has held five training series with 822 individuals from 42 countries on six continents participating. About The

Presenter(s):
NCDDC's Metadata Team, Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, are experts in metadata creation, management and publication. The NCDDC Metadata Team has years of experience in Metadata Training, holding classes for federal, state, and academic organizations across the U.S. NCDDC has led the development of new materials for ISO metadata, including the creation of the first online ISO training in 2012. Remote Access and Notes: Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/course-four/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.
Title: Next-generation climate and Earth system models
Presenter(s): Chris Bretherton, University of Washington; Mike Ek, NCEP/EMC; Isaac Held, GFDL; Steven Krueger, University of Utah; Olga Sergienko, GFDL
Date & Time: 14 January 2014
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Chris Bretherton (University of Washington), Mike Ek (NCEP/EMC), Isaac Held (GFDL), Steven Krueger (University of Utah), Olga Sergienko (GFDL); MAPP Webinar

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=629460697 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Point of contact for this seminar: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov Abstracts: Chris Bretherton (University of Washington) -- Planned activities for this CPT will be reviewed, focusing on ongoing testing of a GFS eddy-diffusion mass-flux boundary-layer parameterization and the upcoming implementation of a moist version of this scheme, as well as related activities at GFDL. -- Mike Ek (NCEP/EMC) -- Abstract TBD -- Isaac Held (GFDL) -- I will describe our strategy for the development of a next-generation climate model at GFDL, which we are planning as a 4-5 year process of which we are currently finishing the first year. This is not meant to subsume all of the development efforts at GFDL, but it is an opportunity for the lab as a whole to get together to construct a new "trunk" model that builds on past efforts and provides coherence to the variety of future branches to our model tree that we expect will evolve from this effort. Available results are necessarily preliminary, but I will mention one or two from the atmospheric working group. The oceanic working group is currently focused on finalizing the new MOM6 code for CM4 development. I will focus in this talk on our overall goals and our vision for what this model will probably look like, and on some of the issues that we are discussing intensively. -- Steven Krueger (Utah State University) -- Global models parameterize the effects of processes that occur on scales near or below the horizontal grid spacing, including turbulence, convection, and associated cloud and radiation processes. Current global forecast models use grid spacings of a few tens of kilometers; in the next few years the mesh size is expect to be less than ten kilometers. Conventional parameterizations of deep convection rely on assumptions that are fundamentally inconsistent with such high-resolution models. Smaller clouds such as shallow cumuli, however, will not be even partially resolved in the foreseeable future. Developing parameterizations that work well across a range of parameterized and explicit phenomena is a significant challenge. Our hypothesis is that the NCEP global models can be improved by installing an integrated, self-consistent description of turbulence, clouds, deep convection, and the interactions between clouds and radiative and microphysical processes. We therefore proposed a CPT to unify the representation of turbulence and SGS cloud processes and to unify the representation of SGS deep convective precipitation and grid-scale precipitation as the horizontal resolution decreases. Both of these unifications are physically based and both have been extensively tested against LES and CRM results. We hope to improve the representation of small-scale phenomena by implementing a PDF-based subgrid-scale turbulence and cloudiness scheme that would replace the boundary layer turbulence scheme, the shallow convection scheme, and the cloud fraction schemes in the GFS and CFS. We hope to improve the treatment of deep convection by introducing a unified parameterization that scales continuously between the simulation of individual clouds when and where the grid spacing is sufficiently fine and the behavior of a conventional parameterization of deep convection when and where the grid spacing is coarse. We hope to improve the representation of the interactions of clouds, radiation, and microphysics in the GFS/CFS by using the additional information provided by the PDF-based SGS cloud scheme. The team will evaluate the impacts of the model upgrades with metrics used by the NCEP short-range and seasonal forecast operations. -- Olga Sergienko (GFDL) -- Iceberg calving is a major mode of mass loss from the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets (the other one is sub-ice-shelf melting). This process affects ice-shelf and ice-sheet flow, in some circumstances triggering additional discharge of ice from the grounded parts to the surrounding ocean. Once calved, icebergs drift in the open ocean, sometimes traveling large distances to mid-latitudes. During their lifetime, they melt causing redistribution of freshwater in the ocean and changes in the properties of water masses. Despite significance of both, the calving process and iceberg-ocean interaction, there is no consistent representation of them in the continental-scale ice-sheet models and global ocean models. To fill this gap, we will (1) develop parameterizations of calving processes suitable for the continental scale ice sheet models, (2) include realistic representation of dimensional icebergs into the GFDL climate model, and (3) compile available observations to test and validate the developed parameterizations and the iceberg model component.
Title: The North Slope Decision Support System: Multi-stakeholder Ice Road Planning under Climate Change
Presenter(s): Bill Schnabel, University of Alaska Fairbanks & Steve Bourne, Atkins Engineering
Date & Time: 14 January 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy

Presenter(s):
Bill Schnabel (University of Alaska Fairbanks) & Steve Bourne (Atkins Engineering)

Online remote access: http://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=0c4c78a44b&e=9097598e1a

Abstract:
For energy companies exploring the Alaskan Tundra, ice roads are often the only way to travel. But, building these roads is complex, often dangerous, and could have long term impacts on the environment. Under a grant from the U.S. Dept. of Energy, the NSDSS was developed by the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Texas A&M University, and Atkins Engineering to help the various stakeholders of the ice road planning process to collaboratively design ice roads. Incorporating optimal route finding methods and climate change-aware lake water quantity and quality modeling, the NSDSS provides critical information in support of the annual ice road planning process.

15 January 2014

Title: Science Talk: Why Being a Scientist Isn't Enough?
Presenter(s): Jana Goldman, Science Communicator
Date & Time: 15 January 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 8150, Silver Spring, MD. Remote access available - see below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar: Science Talk: Why Being a Scientist Isn't Enough Date/Time: Wed, Jan. 15, 2014, 12 - 1pm, ET Location: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 8150, Silver Spring, MD. Remote access login info is below.

Presenter(s):
Jana Goldman, Science Communicator, Press Here Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series and Press Here Instructions for Remote Access Participants: Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through a combination of phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet. Important: If you have not used Mymeeting on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c . Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

Abstract:
Many scientists say “let the facts speak for themselves,” but many people don't understand what those facts are or what they mean. To be a scientist today is more than doing great work, it's being able to talk about it understandably and to a variety of different audiences.Some scientists just don't want to do this " and that's fine. But for the many who do, there are many ways they can get help to learn to talk to the public " including YouTube videos and a special “toastmasters” group just for scientists. The presenter is a former NOAA public affairs officer for the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research. She left NOAA in March and now runs Press Here, a science communication firm of one.

Bio(s):
Jana Goldman has been a daily newspaper reporter and editor, a deputy press secretary for a U.S. Senator, and the communications director for two Washington-area non-profit organizations. In March 2013, she retired from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), where she was the public affairs officer for NOAA's research office for 14 years. She launched Press Here (www.presshereJG.com) in May, specializing in science-related press events and plain language and media training. Jana lives in Silver Spring, Md., with her husband, anthropologist and author Michael French Smith, and their mixed Airedale, Zoe. Instructions for Remote Access Participants: Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through a combination of phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet. Important: If you have not used Mymeeting on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c . Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions
Title: Decision Making into Local/Regional Planning
Presenter(s): Latham Stack, Syntectic International, and Michael Simpson, Antioch University - New England; Vikram Mehta, Center for Research on the Changing Earth System
Date & Time: 15 January 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC 3, 12th Floor, Fishbowl
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Brought to you by The NOAA Sectoral Applications Research Program (SARP), US National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Water Research Foundation, Water Environment Federation (WEF), Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF), and American Water Works Association (AWWA). Please click below in order to register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2398992890309387521 Please see below for speakers and presentation titles: 1. Latham Stack (Syntectic International) and Michael Simpson (Antioch University " New England), et al. - Stakeholder Driven Decision Making for Adaptation: Design and Implementation of a Water Infrastructure Adaptation Plan 2. Vikram Mehta (Center for Research on the Changing Earth System)- Interannual to Decadal Climate Variability Information for Risk Assessment, Urban Water Policy, and Decision Support: Case Studies of Kansas City, Lincoln, and Great Falls Urban Areas within the Missouri River Basin
Title: National Science Foundation Long-Term Observing Management and Governance
Presenter(s): Erica Key - NSF
Date & Time: 15 January 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 4817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Erica Key (NSF); ekey@nsf.gov Please note: Speaker will present remotely Remote Access ------------------------------------------------------- Meeting information ------------------------------------------------------- Topic: OneNOAA Webinar Date: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 Time: 1:00 pm, Eastern Standard Time (New York, GMT-05:00) Meeting Number: 743 725 100 Meeting Password: noaa ------------------------------------------------------- To start or join the online meeting ------------------------------------------------------- Go to https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/j.php?ED=230573707&UID=501959372&PW=NODNmNTJmZWVh&RT=MiMxMQ%3D%3D ------------------------------------------------------- For assistance ------------------------------------------------------- 1. Go to https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/mc 2. On the left navigation bar, click "Support". To add this meeting to your calendar program (for example Microsoft Outlook), click this link: https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/j.php?ED=230573707&UID=501959372&ICS=MS&LD=1&RD=2&ST=1&SHA2=8f6NWLyHKJuu3rRUxhY6ijcSyvTQFHbN/eotVjHvPBY= To check whether you have the appropriate players installed for UCF (Universal Communications Format) rich media files, go to https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/systemdiagnosis.php.

Abstract:
To instigate distributed discussions that will develop best practices, NSF is hosting a series of webinars focused on 8 areas of management and governance for integrated long-term observing. An overview webinar will be presented to the oneNOAA community on January 15th to share details about this activity and introduce an accompanying funding activity to support discussion beyond the confines of the webinar. The overview will detail the 8 thematic areas and introduce some of the 35 questions that have been developed from input from a range of agencies and observing experts. To view the questions in advance of the webinar, please visit either http://www.arctichub.net and click on Long-Term Observing Management Discussion Group or http://www.arcus.org/search/aon/funding-discussion-form. Participants from all latitudes and disciplines are encouraged to attend the webinar and apply for discussion support funding at the ARCUS website. The discussion funding support is open to all US applicants. Funded discussion leaders will only need to complete a short template of recommendations at the end of their funded activity; these completed templates will be archived publicly on www.arctichub.net for reading and general comment. We appreciate the opportunity to engage with NOAA leaders and practitioners of long-term observing and monitoring and hope to see you online on January 15th.
Title: Using Ensemble Forecasts to Improve Data Assimilation for Weather Prediction
Presenter(s): Dr. Jeffrey S. Whitaker, Research Meteorologist, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory
Date & Time: 15 January 2014
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: ESRL; David Skaggs Research Center (DSRC) Room GC402, Boulder, CO
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Sustainable Energy and Atmospheric Sciences Seminar Brought to you by NOAA, NREL, and CU-Boulder Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute (RASEI) Dr. Jeffrey S. Whitaker, Research Meteorologist, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/250375522

Abstract:
Since the early 1970's, weather forecast models have been initialized using data assimilation algorithms based on approximations to the Kalman filter equations. The accuracy of the analyses produced by these schemes has steadily improved as these approximations have been relaxed. The most challenging part of implementing a full Kalman filter for high dimensional systems is accurately modelling the background-error covariance. Over the past decade, many operational centers have begun to use ensembles of short-range forecasts for this purpose. I will show how these ensemble-based estimates of the background-error covariance are used in operational data assimilation systems, with a particular emphasis on the hybrid ensemble-variational approach now used operationally in NOAA. The limitations of current systems will be discussed, as well as approaches currently under development for addressing them. Jeff Whitaker is a research meteorologist at the Physical Sciences Division of the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado. His research is focused on the use of ensembles in weather forecasting and data assimilation. The Sustainable Energy and Atmospheric Sciences seminar series is designed to enhance communication and collaboration among scientists at NREL, NOAA, and others in the community working on issues related to renewable energy. Scientists at the University of Colorado, School of Mines, Colorado State University, National Center for Atmospheric Research, and the private sector are encouraged to participate. If you plan to attend and do not work at NOAA, please contact Rhonda Lange (Rhonda.K.Lange@noaa.gov) at least one day in advance, so that she can give your name to the security office to facilitate your entrance to the campus. Visitors must have photo identification. International attendees are required to present a passport. We will have additional staff to hand out badges to visitors who call ahead. If security personnel asks for a point of contact, please use Rhonda Lange (x6045) or Holly Palm (x6000). If you are a foreign national without permanent residency, please call or email so security can be notified in advance.

16 January 2014

Title: Managing Risks of Climate Impacts on Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Dr. Daniel Schindler, Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Science, University of Washington
Date & Time: 16 January 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NWFSC Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
WINTER 2014 Monster Seminar JAM Schedule Questions?: Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov Directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm Dr. Daniel Schindler Professor School of Aquatic & Fishery Science University of Washington WEBINAR: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=245579647&UID=1707396137&RT=MiM0 For audio conference only, call toll number 1-650-479-3207. Access code: 804 235 020. For Assistance: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/mc. On the left navigation bar, click "Support” or Contact Helpdesk nwfsc.helpdesk@noaa.gov (206)860-3256 ABSTRACT Most approaches to planning for impacts of climate change on ecosystems assume that we can develop reasonable forecasts about future states of ecosystems under new environmental conditions. These forecasts then form the basis for developing prescriptions for what needs to be done in management and conservation to minimize impacts. These assumptions have become the rallying cries used to motivate research intending to improve ecological forecasts by developing a richer understanding of ecological systems. It is critical that science is honest about the limitations of our capacity to fully understand ecosystems and to improve ecological forecasts that will be useful over reasonable time frames. I will argue that we should be placing more emphasis on developing strategies for conservation and management that are robust to the huge uncertainties that will always exist in our forecasts. BIO Daniel Schindler is the Harriet Bullitt Endowed Chair of Conservation in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington. Most of his research focuses on understanding the functioning of watersheds that support Pacific salmon in western Alaska, and the dynamics of fisheries that operate in these ecosystems. He is a principal investigator of the UW-Alaska Salmon Program that has studied salmon ecosystems in Alaska since the 1940s, and he spends several months of the year in the field in the Bristol Bay region. Schindler has been a recipient of the Distinguished Research Award from the UW College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences, and of the Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award that was awarded to the UW-Alaska Salmon Program from the American Fisheries Society in 2012. He has provided service to a wide variety of governmental and non-governmental organizations, and serves on the editorial board of the journals Ecology and Ecosystems. He earned a B.Sc. with Honours from the University of British Columbia (1990), and a M.S. (1992) and Ph. D. (1995) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was hired onto the faculty at the University of Washington in 1997 and teaches undergraduate and graduate students in Limnology, Aquatic Sciences, and Ecology. PUBLICATIONS Schindler, DE, DE Rogers, MD Scheuerell, CA Abrey. 2005. Effects of changing climate on zooplankton and growth of juvenile sockeye salmon in southwestern Alaska. Ecology 86:198-209. Schindler, DE, X Augerat, E Fleishman, NJ Mantua, B Riddell, M Ruckelshaus, J Seeb, M Webster. 2008. Climate change, ecosystem impacts, and management for Pacific salmon. Fisheries 33:502-506. Schindler, DE, R Hilborn, B Chasco, CP Boatright, TP Quinn, LA Rogers, MS Webster. 2010. Population diversity and the portfolio effect in an exploited species. Nature 465:609-613. Schindler, DE, Armstrong, JB, Bentley, KT, Jankowski, K, Lisi, PJ, Payne, LX. 2013. Riding the crimson tide: mobile terrestrial consumers track phenological variation in spawning of an anadromous fish. Biol Lett 9(3).

21 January 2014

Title: Transition to ISO Metadata Online Training
Presenter(s): Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, National Coastal Data Development Center
Date & Time: 21 January 2014
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online Training Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

Transitioning from FGDC CSDGM Metadata to ISO 191** Metadata, an Online Training Series Date and Time: Every Tuesday beginning January 14 until February 25, 2014 from 10:30-11:30 AM Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/course-four/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

Presenter(s):
Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich (National Coastal Data Development Center) OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center

Abstract:
NOAA's National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC), a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is pleased to announce the new schedule of its popular free online metadata training series beginning in November 2013. Registration is now open for the next series of one-hour weekly webinars, which will begin January 14 and be taught each Tuesday through February 25, 2014. The “Transition to ISO” course is designed for data managers who have a need to transition from the use of Federal Geographic Data Committee CSDGM metadata to ISO 191** metadata. The series will cover topics such as XML and UML basics and ISO creation methods. All materials will be made available online, and instructors will be available by request for special one-on-one “My Metadata” sessions to answer specific questions for individual participants NCDDC set out to meet the increased needs of data managers as many organizations transition from FGDC to ISO standards. Working with other metadata trainers within the community, the NCDDC Metadata Team has developed a complete package of training materials for the transition to ISO metadata standards. Conducting this training online is an innovative way to meet the increased demand for this training while controlling travel expenses. NCDDC conducted its first metadata training series online in 2012 to help data managers meet the challenge of keeping up-to-date on the latest metadata standards and tools for implementing these standards. In an environment of declining budgets and travel limitations, online training has proven to be a successful avenue to meet these needs. So far in 2013, NCDDC has held five training series with 822 individuals from 42 countries on six continents participating. About The

Presenter(s):
NCDDC's Metadata Team, Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, are experts in metadata creation, management and publication. The NCDDC Metadata Team has years of experience in Metadata Training, holding classes for federal, state, and academic organizations across the U.S. NCDDC has led the development of new materials for ISO metadata, including the creation of the first online ISO training in 2012. Remote Access and Notes: Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/course-four/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

22 January 2014

Title: NOAA Ocean Acidification Program update
Presenter(s): Dwight Gledhill, Deputy director OAR OAP
Date & Time: 22 January 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 4817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Dwight Gledhill (Deputy director OAR OAP) Online web access: Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio / conference call: Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#" Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone Phone access limited to the first 50 callers only

Abstract:
The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) was established in 2010 in response to the Federal Ocean Acidification and Monitoring Act (FOARAM) to oversee and coordinate NOAA research and monitoring efforts intended to further the understanding of the potential impacts to marine resources and dependent societies. Although housed within NOAA's Office of Oceanic & Atmospheric Research, the program supports more than fifty projects carried out across the agency. A key priority of the program as called for under FOARAM includes the establishment of a long-term ocean acidification monitoring network comprised of hydrographic surveys, mooring time-series sites, ship-based and autonomous underway observations, and repeated ecological surveys. To date, these efforts have been primarily focused on documenting the complex dynamics of carbonate chemistry within the nations coastal margins and coral reef ecosystems and have been executed in close partnerships with multiple NOAA programs including OAR/CPO, NOS/IOOS and NOS/CRCP. Additionally, the NOAA OAP supports a broad range of interdisciplinary biological response studies and modeling activities carried through at several NMFS science centers. These studies investigate how species survival, growth, and physiology are impacted by ocean acidification and explore how free-living species may respond to ocean acidification. NOAA researchers use these data to improve our understanding of how aquaculture, wild fisheries, and food webs may change as ocean chemistry changes. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the state-of-the-program to date and discuss emergent challenges.

23 January 2014

Title: ISIIS: A new window to assess the predator/prey environment for larval stages of fish
Presenter(s): Dr. Robert Cowen, Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 23 January 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
WINTER 2014 Monster Seminar JAM Schedule Questions?: Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov Directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm Dr. Robert Cowen, Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University WEBINAR: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=245579647&UID=1707396137&RT=MiM0 For audio conference only, call toll number 1-650-479-3207. Access code: 804 235 020. For Assistance: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/mc. On the left navigation bar, click "Support” or Contact Helpdesk nwfsc.helpdesk@noaa.gov (206)860-3256 ABSTRACT Our understanding of dynamic processes in the ocean has improved with advances in the resolution of oceanographic sampling, but many questions remain, especially with respect to relatively rare meso-zooplankton, such as ichthyoplankton and jellies. While common planktonic organisms are well studied by existing systems, there is a need to quantify relatively rare meso-zooplankton within the same spatio-temporal context of more abundant zooplankton. ISIIS is a towed, high-resolution digital imaging system using a shadowgraph illumination scheme with a line-scan camera, capable of sampling water volumes sufficient for accurate quantification of meso-zooplankton in situ. The images enable the clear identification of meso-zooplankters (e.g. ichthyoplankton, jellies, chaetognaths, euphausiids and even copepods), often to family or genus, with identification of small, transparent jellies often to species. I will present several case studies from various environments: Monterey Bay, Southern California, Georges Bank and Stellwagen Bank, to demonstrate the ability of this system to resolve the fine-scale distribution and orientation of zooplankton. I will also discuss how the continuous ISIIS image can be used to resolve fine-scale details in multiple trophic levels for a better understanding of plankton dynamics in the ocean. BIO Robert K. Cowen is Director of the Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University and Professor in the College of Earth, Oceans and Atmosphere Science. Prior to coming to OSU, he was the Robert C. Maytag Professor of Ichthyology at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science where he also served as Chair of the Division of Marine Biology and Fisheries, and as Associate Dean for Research. He earned his B.A. at University of California, Santa Barbara, M.S. at the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories and Ph.D. in biological oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He has authored or co-authored over 110 publications on topics ranging from coastal fish ecology and early life history, to fishery oceanography, larval transport, population connectivity, and ocean acidification. His research has included both field-intensive empirical approaches and biophysical modeling to resolve the mechanisms and population consequences of larval dispersal, with a focus on spatial relationships as they pertain to marine reserves. He has also worked on development of new technologies for plankton sampling and image processing. This research has included the mentoring of 28 graduate and 37 undergraduate students. His external activities include serving on the U.S. Ocean Research and Resource Advisory Panel (ORRAP), the Partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans (PISCO) External Advisory Committee, NOAA/NSF CAMEO Steering Committee, JOI Ocean Observatory Interim Steering Committee, and as CLIOTOP/GLOBEC/IMBER Steering Committee and Early Life History Working Group chair. His other service activities have included ICCAT Technical Advisor, Marine Reserve Consensus Panel, hosting and participating in various workshops on the topic of marine population connectivity and management of reef ecosystems. PUBLICATIONS Cowen RK and Guigand CM. 2008. In situ Ichthyoplankton Imaging System (ISIIS): system design and preliminary results. Limnol. Oceanogr. Methods. 6:126-132 (PDF) http://fishbull.noaa.gov/1111/cowen.pdf http://plankt.oxfordjournals.org/content/35/5/939.abstract

24 January 2014

Title: Inter-decadal variability of the Asian summer monsoon and its projection
Presenter(s): Ding Yihui, Si Dong, Sun Ying, National Climate Center, China Meteorological Administration
Date & Time: 24 January 2014
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: NCWCP EMC Conference Room 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar EMC CPC Seminar Remote Access https://global.gotomeeting.com/meeting/join/494779949 United States: +1 (312) 878-3078 Access Code: 494-779-949 Meeting ID:494-779-949 Inter-decadal variability of the Asian summer monsoon and its projection Ding Yihui, Si Dong, Sun Ying National Climate Center, China Meteorological Administration Due to weakening of the Asian summer monsoon, the major monsoonal rain belt has experienced an inter-decadal southward shift, thus leading to the anomalous precipitation pattern of droughts in north and floods in south. The inter-decadal variability of the land-sea thermal contrast between heat sources affected by the winter and spring snow over the Tibetan Plateau and SSTA variations in surrounding oceans is the dominating factor leading to weakening of the Asian summer monsoon. In recent 10-15years, the enhancement of land-sea thermal contrast has caused the northward advance of the monsoon rain belt from the Yangtze River basin to the Yellow- Huaihe river basins. This is related to a similar northward shift of positive correlation region between the winter and spring snow over TP and summer precipitation in East China. Under the forcing of greenhouse gases with inclusion of sulfate aerosols, the monsoon in India and some regions of China would weaken and related precipitation would decrease by 10%.The main reason involves with decreasing land-sea thermal contrast due to cooling effect of hazy clouds and decrease in water vapor content. In the future, the East Asian summer monsoon will continue to enhance and the precipitation amount in North China will significantly increase, whereas the South Asian monsoon will continue to weaken, with precipitation patterns to change considerably. Go To Meeting 1. Please join my meeting. https://global.gotomeeting.com/meeting/join/494779949 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. United States: +1 (312) 878-3078 Access Code: 494-779-949 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID:494-779-949 GoToMeeting Online-Meetings made easy ================================================= Direction and Security for NCWCP http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/note/Direction-NCWCP.Aug2013.html Task and procudure to set up EMC seminars http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/note/Seminar_task_list.Aug2013.html ================================================= EMC Seminars are posted from EMC seminar website http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/pages/NOAA-NWS-Environmental-Modeling-Center/151823641556512 (Usually posted one or two days before the seminars.) OneNOAA Science Seminars web site http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (Seminars with short notice may not be posted in time.)

28 January 2014

Title: Transition to ISO Metadata Online Training
Presenter(s): Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, National Coastal Data Development Center
Date & Time: 28 January 2014
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online Training Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

Transitioning from FGDC CSDGM Metadata to ISO 191** Metadata, an Online Training Series Date and Time: Every Tuesday beginning January 14 until February 25, 2014 from 10:30-11:30 AM Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/course-four/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

Presenter(s):
Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich (National Coastal Data Development Center) OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center

Abstract:
NOAA's National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC), a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is pleased to announce the new schedule of its popular free online metadata training series beginning in November 2013. Registration is now open for the next series of one-hour weekly webinars, which will begin January 14 and be taught each Tuesday through February 25, 2014. The “Transition to ISO” course is designed for data managers who have a need to transition from the use of Federal Geographic Data Committee CSDGM metadata to ISO 191** metadata. The series will cover topics such as XML and UML basics and ISO creation methods. All materials will be made available online, and instructors will be available by request for special one-on-one “My Metadata” sessions to answer specific questions for individual participants NCDDC set out to meet the increased needs of data managers as many organizations transition from FGDC to ISO standards. Working with other metadata trainers within the community, the NCDDC Metadata Team has developed a complete package of training materials for the transition to ISO metadata standards. Conducting this training online is an innovative way to meet the increased demand for this training while controlling travel expenses. NCDDC conducted its first metadata training series online in 2012 to help data managers meet the challenge of keeping up-to-date on the latest metadata standards and tools for implementing these standards. In an environment of declining budgets and travel limitations, online training has proven to be a successful avenue to meet these needs. So far in 2013, NCDDC has held five training series with 822 individuals from 42 countries on six continents participating. About The

Presenter(s):
NCDDC's Metadata Team, Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, are experts in metadata creation, management and publication. The NCDDC Metadata Team has years of experience in Metadata Training, holding classes for federal, state, and academic organizations across the U.S. NCDDC has led the development of new materials for ISO metadata, including the creation of the first online ISO training in 2012. Remote Access and Notes: Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/course-four/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.
Title: Integrating Management Needs to Advance Sea Level Rise Tool Development
Presenter(s): Scott C. Hagen, Denise E. DeLorme, & Sonia Stephens, University of Central Florida
Date & Time: 28 January 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 8150, Silver Spring; remote access available-see below.
Description:

One NOAA Seminar: Integrating Management Needs to Advance Sea Level Rise Tool Development: The EESLR-NGOM Management Committee Date/Time: 1/28, 12-1pm Eastern Time Location: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 8150, Silver Spring, MD. Remote access available; see below.

Presenter(s):
Scott C. Hagen, Denise E. DeLorme, & Sonia Stephens, University of Central Florida

Sponsor(s):
NOS/NCCOS Seminar Series and NCCOS/CSCOR

Abstract:
The Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (EESLR-NGOM) NOAA / NCCOS / CSCOR project is now in its fourth year. A Management Committee (MC) has been integrally involved since the first year. Membership of the MC spans agencies and NGOs from the full modeling region, including the Florida panhandle, Alabama and Mississippi coastal plains. This presentation will discuss the development of the Mapping Interface for Research Applications (MIRA) for Coastal Dynamics of Sea Level Rise (CDSLR), a major tool for displaying and eventually disseminating research results to a broad audience. The talk will describe how the MC has substantially influenced successful research for EESLR-NGOM in general and the MIRA/CDSLR tool in particular through annual workshops, focus groups, webinars, and in-depth surveys. In the context of the presentation the research results will be limited to pre-casts, hindcasts, and projections of sea level change for tides, wind-waves and hurricane storm surge in the northern Gulf. The presentation will conclude with a live demonstration of the online MIRA/CDSLR tool. ABOUT THE SPEAKERS and Co-PIs:

Presenter(s):
Scott Hagen is Director of the University of Central Florida's Coastal Hydroscience Analysis, Modeling & Predictive Simulations (CHAMPS) Laboratory (http://champs.cecs.ucf.edu), and on the Governing Board of the ASCE / Coast, Ocean, Ports and Rivers Institute. Co-PI: Denise is professor at UCF in the Nicholson School of Communication Co-PI: Dr. Hagen is Principal Investigator of a five-year grant on Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise, funded by NOAA/NCCOS/CSCOR. Co-PI: Sonia Stephens is a science communication post-doc at UCF in the CHAMPS lab. REMOTE ACCESS INSTRUCTIONS To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet: 1) Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688#. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields " First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. To access the sound of the presentation, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. Questions? Contact Tracy Gill (tracy.gill@noaa.gov), up to 11:15 before the seminar,or if it is within 15 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.
Title: Using GOES-14 to Showcase GOES-R ABI Scan Scenarios
Presenter(s): Timothy J. Schmit, NOAA / NESDIS / STAR / ASPB, Madison, WI
Date & Time: 28 January 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP Conference Center, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740
Description:



Presenter(s):
Timothy J. Schmit, NOAA / NESDIS / STAR / ASPB, Madison, WI

Abstract:
The GOES-14 imager has been operated in a number of special scan modes. This includes data both during the GOES-14 Post-Launch Test (PLT) in 2009/10 and data during the summers of 2012 and 2013 when GOES-14 Imager was operated by NOAA in an experimental super rapid scan mode to emulate the high temporal resolution sampling of the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) on the next generation GOES-R series. Imagery with a refresh rate of 1-minute of many phenomena were acquired during parts of 2012 and 2013, including clouds, convection, fires, smoke, and hurricanes. NOAA had never before operated a GOES in nearly continuous 1-minute mode for such an extended period of time, thereby making this a unique dataset to explore the future capabilities possible with GOES-R. The ABI will be able to routinely scan mesoscale (1,000 km x 1,000 km) images every 30 seconds (or two separate locations every minute). These high time-resolution images from the GOES-14 Imager are being used to better prepare for the GOES-R era and its advanced imager.

Remote Access:
For the visual part of the presentation, you can access the web meeting by going to: Event name: STAR Seminar - Tim Schmit Webex address: https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=735970301 Webex password: STARseminar2014 To dial into the conference number: U.S. participants: 866-832-9297 International participants: 203-566-7610 Passcode: 6070416 Contact: Ana.Carrion@noaa.gov Download presentations and animations at: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php#Schmit20140128

30 January 2014

Title: Assessing ecological responses to marine climate change and developing adaptation pathways for associated fisheries in south-east Australia
Presenter(s): Dr. Gretta Pecl, Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania
Date & Time: 30 January 2014
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC 9836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Dr. Gretta Pecl, Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania (Gretta.Pecl@utas.edu.au ) Recording of seminar: https://noaaevents2.webex.com/noaaevents2/lsr.php?RCID=403e8d73436a877684ba1b416cfe5257

Remote Access:
https://noaaevents2.webex.com/noaaevents2/onstage/g.php?d=999116300&t=a Event number: 999 116 300 Event password: NOAA ------------------------------------------------------- Teleconference information ------------------------------------------------------- Dial-In #: 1-800-779-0718 Participant passcode: 5793166 NOAA Contact: Roger.b.griffis@noaa.gov (301-980-4694)

Abstract:
Over the next century, marine ecosystems off the coast of south-eastern Australia are expected to exhibit some of the largest climate-driven changes in the Southern Hemisphere, impacting both fisheries and conservation management. Major distributional shifts have already been recorded for several dozen taxa. Rapid ecological changes throughout the world's oceans, like those experienced in this region, present major challenges for resource managers and policy makers. However, species only respond physiologically and behaviorally to the characteristics of their local environment, yet the science needed for regional-scale ecological understanding is immature. The likely magnitude and extent of ecological changes, and an understanding of the key mechanistic drivers behind these, remains largely unknown. Here, we outline a multi-level approach for evaluating likely impacts of climate change, stretching over biological scales from genetics and life history traits, through to single species and ecosystems. dditionally, although changes in climate are already impacting marine ecosystems, the development of adaptation options has lagged considerably behind that of terrestrial systems. Regions experiencing high exposure to key climate drivers, like south-east Australia, represent prime locations for assessing impacts and developing, evaluating and implementing adaptation options to cope with a changing future. Institutes within the five jurisdictions of the south-east have been proactive in establishing a formal collaborative structure (the South East Australia Program) to facilitate linkages between biophysical, socio-economic and governance domains, providing solid foundations to develop and implement adaptation options. Using rock lobster, abalone, snapper and blue grenadier fisheries as case studies, we detail how climate change may intersect with the specific management tools and structures for each fishery and use a combination of stock projections, scenario development and identification of critical thresholds to generate likely future scenarios. Development of adaptation pathways, in close consultation with industry and resource managers, will allow a balanced combination of management responses that can be introduced now, through to medium and longer-term responses. Central to our approach is the development of a clear understanding of what values the fisheries are being managed for by identifying objectives of management and understanding how different groups of stakeholders weight these. This will allow adaptation options to be ranked, highlight where stakeholder conflict may arise, and enable relevant performance indicators and metrics to be identified, in a transparent and contextually relevant framework.
Title: An Undercurrent of Change in the Pacific: Implications for Tropical Marine Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Dr. Kristopher B. Karnauskas, kk@whoi.edu, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Date & Time: 30 January 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 8150, Silver Spring, MD. Remote access available.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Date/Time: Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, 12-1pm ET Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 8150. Remote access available-see below.

Presenter(s):
Dr. Kristopher B. Karnauskas, kk@whoi.edu, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NOS Seminar Series

Abstract:
Among the countless islands in the Pacific Ocean, few are lucky enough to be within a Rossby radius of the equator. For such islands, the local physical and biogeochemical setting is profoundly influenced by large-scale climatic and oceanographic processes. In some cases, islands themselves play a role in shaping the marine environment through direct interaction with equatorial ocean currents. Observations reveal significant changes in equatorial ocean circulation over the past decades and century, and IPCC climate models project those changes to continue through the present century. The range of possible impacts, particularly concerning temperature stress and nutrient supply, are investigated using a novel combination of in situ measurements, satellite observations, high-resolution ocean models, and IPCC/CMIP global simulations.

Bio(s):
Kris Karnauskas received his B.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science from the Universities of Wisconsin-Madison and Maryland-College Park, respectively, and carried out a postdoctoral fellowship within the Ocean and Climate Physics group at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Kris is currently an Associate Scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod, MA. Kris is interested in tropical climate dynamics along with connections to ecosystems and higher latitudes, spanning a wide range of spatial scales (from tiny coral atolls to the Hadley circulation) and temporal scales (from intraseasonal to paleoclimate). Kris also teaches courses on climate at Boston College and in the MIT-WHOI Joint Program

Remote Access:
To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet: 1) Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688#. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. 2) To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields " First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. To access the sound of the presentation, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. Questions? Contact Tracy Gill (tracy.gill@noaa.gov), up to 11:15 before the seminar,or if it is within 15 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions. Copy of the presentation? A PDF of the presentation is sometimes available; email your request to tracy.gill@noaa.gov
Title: IPCC Fifth Assessment Report
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 30 January 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series, SSMC2, Room 14316 or via Webinar (see below for registration detials)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar NWS Climate Services Seminar Series -- The Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, released September 2013, provides a comprehensive, thoroughly-reviewed synthesis of the state of climate science. Chapters in the report cover observed change, evaluation of models, understanding observed change, and projections of future change. This talk covers the main findings of the report and highlights both the conclusions that are solid and well-supported and those where the science remains unsettled. Register at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/608762864 For information contact judy.koepsell@noaa.gov

31 January 2014

Title: REDMAP: an online database and mapping resource for observational marine species data - marine monitoring, community engagement and collaborative research effort
Presenter(s): Dr. Gretta Pecl, Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania
Date & Time: 31 January 2014
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: NOAA SSMC3 Rm 9836 (1315 East West Hywy, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Remote Access:
Event number: 999 058 971 Event password: NOAA Event address for attendees: https://noaaevents2.webex.com/noaaevents2/onstage/g.php?d=999058971&t=a ------------------------------------------------------- Teleconference information ------------------------------------------------------- Dial-In #: 1-800-779-0718 Participant passcode: 5793166 NOAA Contact: Roger.b.griffis@noaa.gov (301-980-4694)

Presenter(s):
Dr. Gretta Pecl, Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania (Gretta.Pecl@utas.edu.au )

Abstract:
Climate driven changes in the distribution of marine species are being reported from around the globe, however, the rate of range extension or contraction varies in both space and time. To minimise negative impacts and maximize opportunities, we need monitoring infrastructure in place to capture distributional changes within reasonable time frames and with a degree of certainty. Redmap (Range Extension Database and Mapping project, www.redmap.org.au) is an online database and mapping resource allowing members of the public to submit observational data (including photographs) of marine species occurring outside their known distribution (i.e. species that may be undergoing range shifts). A successful pilot in Tasmania recently expanded to an Australia-wide long-term biodiversity monitoring system, designed to be a low-cost and sustained approach to assess changing marine species distributions. Australia has over 3.5 million fishers and divers - many equipped with consumer electronics and the capacity to record verifiable observations. However, one challenge to the adoption of such datasets is the perception of bias or low quality. In addition to extracting geo-tag information from photographs (validating location), species identifications are verified by essentially 'crowd-sourcing' from a large panel of expert scientists using a semi-automated validation workflow. This initiative has the potential to generate large amounts of valuable information for researchers and engage communities in climate science (using their own data), raising awareness of climate change impacts and consequences. Redmap is an early warning system for changes occurring in the marine environment, and has the potential to play a pivotal role in directing management decisions and actions.

4 February 2014

Title: Transition to ISO Metadata Online Training
Presenter(s): Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, National Coastal Data Development Center
Date & Time: 4 February 2014
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online Training Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

Transitioning from FGDC CSDGM Metadata to ISO 191** Metadata, an Online Training Series Date and Time: Every Tuesday beginning January 14 until February 25, 2014 from 10:30-11:30 AM Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/course-four/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

Presenter(s):
Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich (National Coastal Data Development Center) OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center

Abstract:
NOAA's National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC), a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is pleased to announce the new schedule of its popular free online metadata training series beginning in November 2013. Registration is now open for the next series of one-hour weekly webinars, which will begin January 14 and be taught each Tuesday through February 25, 2014. The “Transition to ISO” course is designed for data managers who have a need to transition from the use of Federal Geographic Data Committee CSDGM metadata to ISO 191** metadata. The series will cover topics such as XML and UML basics and ISO creation methods. All materials will be made available online, and instructors will be available by request for special one-on-one “My Metadata” sessions to answer specific questions for individual participants NCDDC set out to meet the increased needs of data managers as many organizations transition from FGDC to ISO standards. Working with other metadata trainers within the community, the NCDDC Metadata Team has developed a complete package of training materials for the transition to ISO metadata standards. Conducting this training online is an innovative way to meet the increased demand for this training while controlling travel expenses. NCDDC conducted its first metadata training series online in 2012 to help data managers meet the challenge of keeping up-to-date on the latest metadata standards and tools for implementing these standards. In an environment of declining budgets and travel limitations, online training has proven to be a successful avenue to meet these needs. So far in 2013, NCDDC has held five training series with 822 individuals from 42 countries on six continents participating. About The

Presenter(s):
NCDDC's Metadata Team, Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, are experts in metadata creation, management and publication. The NCDDC Metadata Team has years of experience in Metadata Training, holding classes for federal, state, and academic organizations across the U.S. NCDDC has led the development of new materials for ISO metadata, including the creation of the first online ISO training in 2012. Remote Access and Notes: Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/course-four/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

5 February 2014

Title: Semi-automated classification of acoustic imagery to inform coral reef ecosystem management
Presenter(s): Bryan Costa and Tim Battista, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment, Biogeography Branch
Date & Time: 5 February 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4 Rm 8150, Silver Spring, MD. Remote access available, see below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
The semi-automated classification of acoustic imagery to inform coral reef ecosystem management When: Wed., Feb. 5, 2014, 12-1pm ET Where: NOAA, SSMC4, Rm 8150; remote access is available; see below.

Presenter(s):
Bryan Costa and Tim Battista, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment, Biogeography Branch

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series and NOS' National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment, Biogeography Branch

Abstract:
Coral reef habitat maps describe the spatial distribution and abundance of tropical marine resources, making them essential for ecosystem-based approaches to planning and management. Typically, these habitat maps have been created from remotely sensed imagery using manual, pixel- and object-based classification methods. However, past studies have shown that none of these classification methods alone are optimal for characterizing coral reef habitats for multiple management applications. To address these deficiencies, a novel, semi-automated object and pixel-based technique was applied to multibeam echo sounder imagery to determine its utility for characterizing coral reef ecosystems. This study is not a direct comparison of these different methods but rather, a first attempt at applying a new classification technique to acoustic imagery. This technique used a combination of principal components analysis, edge-based segmentation, and Quick, Unbiased, and Efficient Statistical Trees (QUEST) to successfully partition the acoustic imagery into 35 distinct and highly accurate habitat classes. Approximately half of the habitat polygons were manually edited (hence the name 'semi-automated') due to a combination of misclassifications by QUEST and noise in the acoustic data. While this method did not generate a map that was entirely reproducible, it does show promise for increasing the amount of automation with which thematically accurate benthic habitat maps can be generated from acoustic imagery. ABOUT THE SPEAKERS: Bryan Costa: Bryan graduated from Middlebury College with a joint degree in Biology and Environmental Studies, and from the University of Maryland, College Park with a Masters in Geospatial Sciences. He joined NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science as an affiliate in 2005. Since joining NOAA, he has worked on a variety of mapping, monitoring and modeling projects in the coastal waters, territories and flag islands of the United States. Tim Battista: Tim graduated from Middlebury College with a degree in Biology, and from the University of Maryland, Horn Point, with a Masters in Oceanography. He joined NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science in 2000. He works on various projects throughout the U.S., focusing on developing products that can be used to inform and assist resource management decisions. REMOTE ACCESS INSTRUCTIONS: Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through a combination of phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet. Important: If you have not used Mymeeting on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c . Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions
Title: Southern Right Whale mortality at Península Valdés, Argentina - What can satellite data tell us?
Presenter(s): Cara Wilson, NOAA/NMFS Environmental Research Division
Date & Time: 5 February 2014
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, in Conference Room 4552
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Southern Right Whale mortality at Península Valdés, Argentina - What can satellite data tell us?

Presenter(s):
Cara Wilson (NOAA/NMFS Environmental Research Division) Seminar sponsor: NESDIS/STAR Seminar POC for questions: Lecia.Salerno@noaa.gov When: Thurs., Feb. 13, 2014, 10:00-12:00h Eastern Time Where: 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, in Conference Room 4552; remote access is available. Audio: USA participants: 1-866-817-2596, Passcode: 6309436 International: 517-966-7132

Abstract:
The Península Valdés (PV) region of Argentina is an important calving ground for southern right whales (Eubalaena australis). Mothers give birth and raise their calves in its two gulfs, Golfo San José (GSJ) and Golfo Nuevo (GN) annually from May through December and sporadically feed on spring zooplankton patches in September and October. Since 2005 there has been a significant increase in right whale mortality at PV, with most of the deaths (89%) being calves less than 3 months old [Rowntree et al., 2013a]. In 2010 the International Whaling Commission proposed three hypothetical causes to investigate these deaths: (1) a decrease in food abundance (2) biotoxins from harmful algal blooms (HABs) and (3) infectious disease. Here we investigate the biotoxin hypothesis by examining a variety of datasets: the timing of the right whale deaths (1971-2012), abundances of potentially harmful algae Pseudo-nitzchia and Alexandrium tamarense (2000-2012), shellfish closure dates (2004-2012), availability of whale prey at PV (2004, 2005, 2010), biotoxin data in tissue samples from dead whales (2004-2009) and satellite chlorophyll data (1997-2012). Evidence of the whales' exposure to HAB toxins include their presence in the PV region during closures of the shellfish industry due to high STX levels, periods with high levels of Pseudo-nitzchia and Alexandrium tamarense, trace levels of saxitoxin and domoic acid in tissue samples collected from dead whales, and fragments of Pseudo-nitzschia in the feces collected from living at PV. However, no definitive statement can be made about the role of these toxins in the deaths of the whales. In 2004 PV began to experience unusually large chlorophyll blooms in the later part of the calving season, coincident with the rise in whale deaths. About the speakers:

Remote Access:

6 February 2014

Title: Spine-based ageing methods in the spiny dogfish shark: how they measure up?
Presenter(s): Dr. Vlada Gertseva, Fisheries Resource Analysis and Monitoring Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 6 February 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
WINTER 2014 Monster Seminar JAM Schedule Questions?: Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov Directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm Dr. Vlada Gertseva, Fisheries Resource Analysis and Monitoring Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center WEBINAR: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=245579647&UID=1707396137&RT=MiM0 For audio conference only, call toll number 1-650-479-3207. Access code: 804 235 020. For Assistance: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/mc. On the left navigation bar, click "Support” or Contact Helpdesk nwfsc.helpdesk@noaa.gov (206)860-3256 ABSTRACT The second dorsal spine has historically been used for age determination in the spiny dogfish shark. The dorsal spines are located on the external surface of the body and are subjected to natural wear and breakage. Two methods have been developed to account for the worn portion of the spine and extrapolate the lost annuli. We compared the performance of these methods using a large data collection assembled from multiple sources, and evaluated their utility for stock assessment and management of the spiny dogfish shark Squalus suckleyi in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Our results showed that the two methods produced very different age estimates for older fish with worn spines. Both methods raised significant questions about some aspects of the age estimates produced, and further exploration of techniques to account for worn spine annuli is needed. It is therefore important to develop alternative methods for shark age determination, including those using stained vertebrae. BIO Dr. Vlada Gertseva joined NOAA Fisheries Service in 2008. Prior to joining NOAA, Vlada worked as a professor at Oregon State University, teaching quantitative fisheries classes for the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, and Extended Campus. Vlada was born in St. Petersburg, Russia. She received her joint B.S. and M.S. degree in Biology at Yaroslavl State University in Russia. She also received her M.S. in Environmental Science and Policy at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary, after being awarded a fellowship from George Soros' Open Society Institute. She then completed her Ph.D. at Clemson University in Forest Resources. Her dissertation focused on the dynamics of stream biota. She did her postdoc on salmon ecology at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, Oregon. Vlada is certified translator between English and Russian. PUBLICATIONS Cheng, Y.W. 2012. Modeling the missing annuli count in North Pacific spiny dogfish (Squalus suckleyi) by nonlinear mixed effects models. IJAMAS 25: 20-28. Ketchen, K.S. 1975. Age and growth of dogfish (Squalus acanthias) in British Columbia waters. J. Fish. Res. Board Can. 32: 13"59. WINTER 2014 Monster Seminar JAM Schedule JAN 16 DANIEL SCHINDLER (University of Washington) “Managing risks of climate impacts on ecosystems” JAN 23 ROBERT COWEN (Oregon State University) “ISIIS: A new window to assess the predator/prey environment for larval stages of fish” JAN 30 MARY O'CONNOR (University of British Columbia) “The temperature dependence of herbivory: implications of warming for communities and ecosystems” FEB 6 VLADA GERTSEVA (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) “Spine-based ageing methods in the spiny dogfish shark: how they measure up?” FEB 13 RYAN KELLY (University of Washington) “Environmental DNA and its potential for species- and ecosystem-level monitoring” FEB 20 ISABELLE C"TÉ (Simon Fraser University) “Predatory aliens: Indo-Pacific lionfish on Atlantic coral reefs” FEB 27 ANDREW RASSWEILER (University of California Santa Barbara) “Spatial Dynamics in Marine Ecosystems: Regulations, Fisheries and Feedbacks” MAR 6 ANNE BEAUDREAU (University of Alaska Fairbanks) “Transdisciplinary approaches for examining social and environmental change in coastal fisheries of the Northeast Pacific” MAR 13 MARK NOVAK (Oregon State University) “Food webs and interaction strengths: how ignoring generalists leads us astray” MAR 20 JODIE TOFT (The Nature Conservancy) “From Belize to Washington State: keeping habitat at the core of marine conservation”

11 February 2014

Title: Transition to ISO Metadata Online Training
Presenter(s): Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, National Coastal Data Development Center
Date & Time: 11 February 2014
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online Training Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

Transitioning from FGDC CSDGM Metadata to ISO 191** Metadata, an Online Training Series Date and Time: Every Tuesday beginning January 14 until February 25, 2014 from 10:30-11:30 AM Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/course-four/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

Presenter(s):
Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich (National Coastal Data Development Center) OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center

Abstract:
NOAA's National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC), a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is pleased to announce the new schedule of its popular free online metadata training series beginning in November 2013. Registration is now open for the next series of one-hour weekly webinars, which will begin January 14 and be taught each Tuesday through February 25, 2014. The “Transition to ISO” course is designed for data managers who have a need to transition from the use of Federal Geographic Data Committee CSDGM metadata to ISO 191** metadata. The series will cover topics such as XML and UML basics and ISO creation methods. All materials will be made available online, and instructors will be available by request for special one-on-one “My Metadata” sessions to answer specific questions for individual participants NCDDC set out to meet the increased needs of data managers as many organizations transition from FGDC to ISO standards. Working with other metadata trainers within the community, the NCDDC Metadata Team has developed a complete package of training materials for the transition to ISO metadata standards. Conducting this training online is an innovative way to meet the increased demand for this training while controlling travel expenses. NCDDC conducted its first metadata training series online in 2012 to help data managers meet the challenge of keeping up-to-date on the latest metadata standards and tools for implementing these standards. In an environment of declining budgets and travel limitations, online training has proven to be a successful avenue to meet these needs. So far in 2013, NCDDC has held five training series with 822 individuals from 42 countries on six continents participating. About The

Presenter(s):
NCDDC's Metadata Team, Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, are experts in metadata creation, management and publication. The NCDDC Metadata Team has years of experience in Metadata Training, holding classes for federal, state, and academic organizations across the U.S. NCDDC has led the development of new materials for ISO metadata, including the creation of the first online ISO training in 2012. Remote Access and Notes: Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/course-four/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.
Title: The Eventual Threat Index: A new tool for predicting overfishing threats and monitoring trends in threat potential
Presenter(s): Matthew G. Burgess, Department of Ecology, Evolution & Behavior, University of Minnesota
Date & Time: 11 February 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Rm 9153, Silver Spring, MD. Remote access available-see below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
The Eventual Threat Index: A new tool for predicting overfishing threats and monitoring trends in threat potential Date/Time: 2/11/14, 1-2pm ET (Rescheduled from 1/22/14) Location: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 9153; Remote access available - see below.

Presenter(s):
Matthew G. Burgess, Department of Ecology, Evolution & Behavior, University of Minnesota, mgburgess@umn.edu

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NOS Seminar Series

Abstract:
Threats to species from overfishing are commonly assessed by estimating past population decline rates or current harvest rates. This type of approach tends to identify already declining or collapsed populations, whose recoveries can be slow and costly. Many of the species most threatened by fishing are caught in multispecies fisheries, which can remain profitable even as populations of some species collapse. I present and discuss the 'Eventual Threat Index', which predicts future overfishing threats to a weak stock or by-catch species of interest by measuring the degree to which its population growth is impacted by its fisheries relative to species that are likely to exert the greatest influence on its fisheries' maximal effort. I demonstrate the application of this approach in case studies of tunas and billfish, finding that threats to several populations recently identified by stock assessments as overfished and declining could have been predicted as early as the 1950s using the Eventual Threat Index. I also discuss possibilities for using the Eventual Threat Index as a tool for setting management goals and monitoring threat potentials of fishing practices. http://www.cbs.umn.edu/lab/tilman/matthewburgess ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Matt Burgess is a PhD Candidate in the University of Minnesota's Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, co-advised by Dr. David Tilman (EEB) and Dr. Stephen Polasky (EEB and Applied Economics). His dissertation uses combinations of ecological and economic theory to develop empirically applicable tools for fisheries management and conservation of threatened species. He also works on a number of other projects combining ecological and socioeconomic data and analysis to tackle issues related to global food security. He previously received a B.Sc. in Ecology from the University of Toronto in 2009. INSTRUCTIONS FOR REMOTE ACCESS: Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through a combination of phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet. Important: If you have not used Mymeeting on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c . Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions

12 February 2014

Title: Southern Right Whale mortality at Peninsula Valdes, Argentina - What can satellite data tell us?
Presenter(s): Cara Wilson, NOAA/NMFS Environmental Research Division
Date & Time: 12 February 2014
10:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA CWCP, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, in Conference Room 2552
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Southern Right Whale mortality at Península Valdés, Argentina - What can satellite data tell us?

Presenter(s):
Cara Wilson, NOAA/NMFS Environmental Research Division Seminar sponsor: NOAA STAR Science Forum Seminar POC: Lt. Lecia Salerno " 301-683-3334 or Nolvia Herrera -301-683-3308 When: February 12, 2014 at 10:00 AM " 12:00 PM, ET Where: 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, in Conference Room 2552

Abstract:
The Península Valdés (PV) region of Argentina is an important calving ground for southern right whales (Eubalaena australis). Mothers give birth and raise their calves in its two gulfs, Golfo San José (GSJ) and Golfo Nuevo (GN) annually from May through December and sporadically feed on spring zooplankton patches in September and October. Since 2005 there has been a significant increase in right whale mortality at PV, with most of the deaths (89%) being calves less than 3 months old [Rowntree et al., 2013a]. In 2010 the International Whaling Commission proposed three hypothetical causes to investigate these deaths: (1) a decrease in food abundance (2) biotoxins from harmful algal blooms (HABs) and (3) infectious disease. Here we investigate the biotoxin hypothesis by examining a variety of datasets: the timing of the right whale deaths (1971-2012), abundances of potentially harmful algae Pseudo-nitzchia and Alexandrium tamarense (2000-2012), shellfish closure dates (2004-2012), availability of whale prey at PV (2004, 2005, 2010), biotoxin data in tissue samples from dead whales (2004-2009) and satellite chlorophyll data (1997-2012). Evidence of the whales' exposure to HAB toxins include their presence in the PV region during closures of the shellfish industry due to high STX levels, periods with high levels of Pseudo-nitzchia and Alexandrium tamarense, trace levels of saxitoxin and domoic acid in tissue samples collected from dead whales, and fragments of Pseudo-nitzschia in the feces collected from living at PV. However, no definitive statement can be made about the role of these toxins in the deaths of the whales. In 2004 PV began to experience unusually large chlorophyll blooms in the later part of the calving season, coincident with the rise in whale deaths. About the speakers: Free text

Remote Access:
Event address for attendees: https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=734322839 Date and Time: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM Event Password: satellite Audio: USA participants: 1-866-832-9297, Passcode: 6070416 International: 203-566-7610 Additional information: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php
Title: Sea Grant: Greater than the Sum of Our Parts
Presenter(s): Elizabeth Ban and Kathryn McDonald
Date & Time: 12 February 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 8150, Silver Spring, MD. Remote access available - see below.
Description:

One NOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Sea Grant: Greater than the Sum of Our Parts Date/Time:February 12, 2014, 12:00-1:00pm Eastern Time; Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Room 8150 (Add to Google Calendar)

Presenter(s):
Elizabeth Ban and Kathryn McDonald

Sponsor(s):
NOS/NCCOS Seminar Series and NOAA Se Grant

Abstract:
The National Sea Grant College Program is a network of 33 university-based programs that serve the needs of their local communities through research, education and outreach. Creating a national story from such a diverse network can be challenging. Through the use of virtual tools such as a new website, social media, and reporting database, as well as the efforts of over 80 communicators across the network, Sea Grant has gained visibility across NOAA and among our varied program audiences. This seminar will share the challenges and successes of our recent communication efforts.

Bio(s):
Elizabeth Ban is the Acting Director of Communication with the National Sea Grant Program Office. Elizabeth received her Master's degree from Yale University, with advanced study areas in conservation biology of coral reef ecosystems and social ecology of natural resource users. She has worked with the NOAA Ocean Service International Programs Office on socioeconomic issues relating to Caribbean MPAs and also as a Sea Grant Extension Agent in the U.S. Virgin Islands, focusing on engagement with the local fishermen. Prior to joining Sea Grant's National Office, Elizabeth most recently worked as the COSEE Senior Ocean Science Education Specialist for the Smithsonian's Museum of Natural History Sant Ocean Hall. She is currently working on her Ph.D. at George Mason University in climate change outreach and engagement. Kathryn MacDonald is the Communication Specialist for the National Sea Grant Office. Kathryn completed her master's degree in geochemical oceanography from the University of Hawaii, Manoa in 2013. Her research focused on identifying and quantifying phosphate release in Native Hawaiian Fishponds during hypoxic and anoxic events. Prior to joining the National Sea Grant Office in August of 2013 Kathryn worked as an environmental scientists on projects such as Hawai'i's section of the National Coastal Condition Assessment and the Hawai'i Under Sea Military Munition Assessment. Kathryn is an avid open water swimmer and in her spare time coordinates an open water swim race in her home town of Falmouth, MA to benefit a local charity. Instructions for Remote Access Participants: Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through a combination of phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet. Important: If you have not used Mymeeting on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c . Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For more information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions

13 February 2014

Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 13 February 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 13 February 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

Each month, a speaker will give a presentation on various topics related to NGS programs, projects, products and services to educate constituents about NGS activities. Visit the Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/. Future webinars will be held on the second Thursday of every month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.
Title: Environmental DNA and its potential for species- and ecosystem-level monitoring
Presenter(s): Dr. Ryan Kelly, School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, University of Washington
Date & Time: 13 February 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
WINTER 2014 Monster Seminar JAM Schedule Questions?: Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov Directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm Dr. Ryan Kelly, School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, University of Washington WEBINAR: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=245579647&UID=1707396137&RT=MiM0 For audio conference only, call toll number 1-650-479-3207. Access code: 804 235 020. For Assistance: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/mc. On the left navigation bar, click "Support” or Contact Helpdesk nwfsc.helpdesk@noaa.gov (206)860-3256 Environmental DNA and its potential for species- and ecosystem-level monitoring Dr. Ryan Kelly Assistant Professor University of Washington School of Marine and Environmental Affairs ABSTRACT The ocean is a soup of its resident species' genetic material, cast off in the forms of metabolic waste, shed skin cells, or damaged tissue. Sampling this environmental DNA (eDNA) is a potentially powerful means of assessing whole biological communities, a significant advance over the manual methods of environmental sampling that have historically dominated marine ecology and related fields. In this presentation, I will discuss recent results and survey the landscape of eDNA techniques with respect to species- and community-level monitoring, concluding that eDNA has substantial potential to become a core tool for environmental monitoring, but that a variety of challenges remain before reliable quantitative assessments of ecological communities in the field become possible. BIO Ryan Kelly is an assistant professor at the University of Washington's School of Marine and Environmental Affairs. He has a broad set of interests, focused both on hard scientific data and policymakers' use of those data. From the science side, he studies the interplay among geography, ecology, and genetics in marine species. His more applied research joins genetic and ecological research with real-world implementation in law and policy, particularly with respect to environmental monitoring, resource management, endangered species, and ocean acidification. He received his Ph.D. from Columbia University, and his J.D. from UC Berkeley (Boalt Hall). WINTER 2014 Monster Seminar JAM Schedule JAN 16 DANIEL SCHINDLER (University of Washington) “Managing risks of climate impacts on ecosystems” JAN 23 ROBERT COWEN (Oregon State University) “ISIIS: A new window to assess the predator/prey environment for larval stages of fish” JAN 30 MARY O'CONNOR (University of British Columbia) “The temperature dependence of herbivory: implications of warming for communities and ecosystems” FEB 6 VLADA GERTSEVA (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) “Spine-based ageing methods in the spiny dogfish shark: how they measure up?” FEB 13 RYAN KELLY (University of Washington) “Environmental DNA and its potential for species- and ecosystem-level monitoring” FEB 20 ISABELLE C"TÉ (Simon Fraser University) “Predatory aliens: Indo-Pacific lionfish on Atlantic coral reefs” FEB 27 ANDREW RASSWEILER (University of California Santa Barbara) “Spatial Dynamics in Marine Ecosystems: Regulations, Fisheries and Feedbacks” MAR 6 ANNE BEAUDREAU (University of Alaska Fairbanks) “Transdisciplinary approaches for examining social and environmental change in coastal fisheries of the Northeast Pacific” MAR 13 MARK NOVAK (Oregon State University) “Food webs and interaction strengths: how ignoring generalists leads us astray” MAR 20 JODIE TOFT (The Nature Conservancy) “From Belize to Washington State: keeping habitat at the core of marine conservation”

18 February 2014

Title: Transition to ISO Metadata Online Training
Presenter(s): Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, National Coastal Data Development Center
Date & Time: 18 February 2014
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online Training Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

Transitioning from FGDC CSDGM Metadata to ISO 191** Metadata, an Online Training Series Date and Time: Every Tuesday beginning January 14 until February 25, 2014 from 10:30-11:30 AM Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/course-four/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

Presenter(s):
Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich (National Coastal Data Development Center) OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center

Abstract:
NOAA's National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC), a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is pleased to announce the new schedule of its popular free online metadata training series beginning in November 2013. Registration is now open for the next series of one-hour weekly webinars, which will begin January 14 and be taught each Tuesday through February 25, 2014. The “Transition to ISO” course is designed for data managers who have a need to transition from the use of Federal Geographic Data Committee CSDGM metadata to ISO 191** metadata. The series will cover topics such as XML and UML basics and ISO creation methods. All materials will be made available online, and instructors will be available by request for special one-on-one “My Metadata” sessions to answer specific questions for individual participants NCDDC set out to meet the increased needs of data managers as many organizations transition from FGDC to ISO standards. Working with other metadata trainers within the community, the NCDDC Metadata Team has developed a complete package of training materials for the transition to ISO metadata standards. Conducting this training online is an innovative way to meet the increased demand for this training while controlling travel expenses. NCDDC conducted its first metadata training series online in 2012 to help data managers meet the challenge of keeping up-to-date on the latest metadata standards and tools for implementing these standards. In an environment of declining budgets and travel limitations, online training has proven to be a successful avenue to meet these needs. So far in 2013, NCDDC has held five training series with 822 individuals from 42 countries on six continents participating. About The

Presenter(s):
NCDDC's Metadata Team, Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, are experts in metadata creation, management and publication. The NCDDC Metadata Team has years of experience in Metadata Training, holding classes for federal, state, and academic organizations across the U.S. NCDDC has led the development of new materials for ISO metadata, including the creation of the first online ISO training in 2012. Remote Access and Notes: Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/course-four/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.
Title: Historical Sea Ice Atlas for Alaska Waters
Presenter(s): John Walsh, University of Alaska Fairbanks & Lena Krutikov, Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning
Date & Time: 18 February 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Historical Sea Ice Atlas for Alaska Waters Tuesday, February 18, 2014; 10-11am AKST John Walsh (University of Alaska Fairbanks) & Lena Krutikov (Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning) Register here: http://uaf.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=2110e0d343&e=9097598e1a

Remote Access:
https://accap.uaf.edu/?q=webinars Coastal communities, marine navigation, industry (fishing, tourism, offshore resource extraction), the military, and Earth/Arctic system science research have all expressed a clear need for an Alaska sea ice atlas. Indeed, many requests for historical and climatological sea ice information for Alaska coastal waters presently go unanswered because such an atlas does not exist. The availability of GIS software, in-house expertise and historical databases extending back to the 1850s makes the construction of an Alaska sea ice atlas timely and feasible. The atlas consists of digitally-stored sea ice concentration data on a grid covering all Alaska coastal waters to a distance of ~500 km (300 mi) from shore, with a spatial resolution of 25 km. The time resolution is monthly for the period 1850s-1950s, and weekly for the period from the early 1950s to 2010 with the allowance of subsequent updates. Questions: Tina Buxbaum via e-mail (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu) or by phone at (907) 474-7812.
Title: A Perspective on the Steepness Parameter and Its Implications for Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Dr. Marc Mangel, Distinguished Research Professor of Mathematical Biology and Director of the Center for Stock Assessment Research at the University of California Santa Cruz
Date & Time: 18 February 2014
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
A Perspective on the Steepness Parameter and Its Implications for Fisheries Management

Presenter(s):
Dr. Marc Mangel (Distinguished Research Professor of Mathematical Biology and Director of the Center for Stock Assessment Research at the University of California Santa Cruz) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology Seminar POC for questions: Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov When: Tue., Feb. 18, 2014, 3:00-4:00 p.m. Eastern Time Where: Online webinar format only. To register go to: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/232239232.

Abstract:
Steepness (h) is an important parameter used to help measure the productivity and resilience of a fish stock, but is one of the more difficult model parameters to estimate. This presentation will provide a perspective and overview on steepness, reference points for fishery management, and stock assessment. It will show new results demonstrating that key reference points are fixed when steepness and other life history parameters are fixed in stock assessments using a Beverton"Holt stock"recruitment relationship. The presentation will also review the underpinning theory, using both production and age-structured models to explore these patterns. For the production model, Dr. Mangel will derive explicit relationships between steepness, life history parameters, and major reference points. For the age-structured model, Dr. Mangel will provide numerical examples to complement the analytical results of the production model. He will cover what it means to set steepness equal to 1 and how to construct a prior for steepness. Difficulties can arise by fixing steepness and life history parameters. Solutions include not fixing them at all, using a more complicated stock"recruitment relationship, and being more explicit about the information content of the data and what that means for policy makers. Strengths and limitations of each approach will be discussed. About the speaker: Dr. Marc Mangel is the Distinguished Research Professor of Mathematical Biology and Director of the Center for Stock Assessment Research at the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC). At UCSC, Dr. Mangel served as Associate Vice Chancellor, Planning and Programs (1997-1999) and chaired the Departments of Applied Mathematics and Statistics (2007-09) and Technology and Information Management (2010-2012). From 1980-1996, Mangel was at the University of California Davis. There he was founding Director of the Center for Population Biology (1989-1993) and chair of the Department of Mathematics (1984-88). His research in mathematical and theoretical biology focuses on ecology, evolution and behavior and the broad goal of combining first-rate basic science with important applied questions. A current research focus is on quantitative methods for fishery management. This includes developing the tools that will be needed to make Ecosystem Based Fishery Management a practicable approach for fishery management in the 21st century. Dr. Mangel has authored numerous journal publications and books that include Decision and Control in Uncertain Resource Systems (1985, Academic), Dynamic Modeling in Behavioral Ecology (with Colin Clark, 1988, Princeton), The Ecological Detective. Confronting models with data (with Ray Hilborn, 1997, Princeton University Press), Dynamic State Variable Models in Ecology: Methods and Applications (with Colin Clark, 2000, Oxford University Press), and The Theoretical Biologist's Toolbox. Quantitative Methods for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (2006, Cambridge, University Press).

Remote Access:
Register at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/232239232 Notes: Webinar system requirements: PC: Windows® 8, 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server Mac: Mac OS® X 10.6 or newer

19 February 2014

Title: Applications of Weather and Climate Information for Disaster Risk Reduction
Presenter(s): Sezin Tokar, USAID/OFDA
Date & Time: 19 February 2014
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: NCWCP RM 3159 (CPC training Room), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Applications of Weather and Climate Information for Disaster Risk Reduction Sezin Tokar, USAID/OFDA NOAA/NCEP/CPC Seminar February 19, 2014 10am MCWCP Rm 3159 Climate and weather-induced disasters account for the largest number of natural disasters and affect more people than any other type of natural hazards, globally. Extreme weather and climate events often have severe socioeconomic impacts, such as loss of lives and livelihoods; food, water, and energy scarcity; and adverse impacts on human health and the environment. Disaster statistics indicate that the number of natural disasters has been doubled during the last decade. Trends on number of disasters indicate significant increase in hydrometeorological (climate and weather induced) disasters while the trends of other natural disasters remain almost unchanged during the last two decades. Monitoring and forecasting climatic factors in weeks, months, season to years into the future will help reduce the adverse impact of climate-induced disasters while taking advantage of favorable conditions to better manage natural resources. Decision makers in various sectors need the climate data and forecasts, and products to be accurate, timely, and relevant with specificity in a format that can be understood by non-climatic users and accessed easily. This presentation focuses on the disaster risk reduction program of the USAID Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) and how this program utilizes weather and climate information to make informed decision on humanitarian assistance worldwide. Questions: Contact Huug Vandendool huug.vandendool@noaa.gov
Title: National Marine Sanctuaries: Your New Favorite Travel and Tourism Destination
Presenter(s): Chiara Zuccarino-Crowe, Sea Grant Fellow, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 19 February 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 8150, Silver Spring, MD. Remote access also available.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Chiara Zuccarino-Crowe, Sea Grant Fellow, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Where: NOAA, SSMC4, Room 8150; remote access is also available; see info below. When: Wed., Feb. 19, 2014, 12-1pm ET

Sponsor(s):
NOS Seminar Series and Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Instructions for Remote Access Participants: Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through a combination of phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet. Important: If you have not used Mymeeting on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c . Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions

Abstract:
National Marine Sanctuaries - America's ocean playgrounds and your new favorite travel and tourism destination! Travel and tourism is a vital part of the United States economy. Ensuring the future vitality of this industry, and its role in the international market, is a major component of the 2012 National Travel and Tourism Strategy. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration joined other federal agencies within DOC and DOI on the Tourism Policy Council in working towards the Strategy's overarching goal of drawing 100 million international visitors annually by 2021, and encouraging more Americans to travel within the United States as well. The National Ocean Service's representation on this council has primarily focused on promoting the United States and providing world-class customer service to visitors, and the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) has made significant contributions to these efforts. National Marine Sanctuaries (NMS) not only protect America's iconic natural and cultural resources, but are also centers for strong local economies and living classrooms. As a travel destination, few places on the planet can compete with the diversity found within the NMS System. With implementation of the newly-released ONMS Travel & Tourism Strategic Plan, the NMS System has inventoried current programs and is developing action plans to better fill gaps in reaching its goal of increased travel and tourism to NMS through increased visibility and responsible visitation to the system and partner institutions.

Bio(s):
Chiara Zuccarino-Crowe recently joined the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (OMNS) as a Sea Grant Fellow through the John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship. Originally from the Great Lakes region, Chiara has always enjoyed living, working, and playing within a few miles of a major body of fresh or salt water. Chiara's background is in aquatic ecosystem assessments and environmental education/outreach, and she holds a M.S. in Fisheries and Wildlife from Michigan State University, where she researched the effects of lake trout refuges on both target and non-target fish species in Lake Superior. Her long-term research interests relate to the integration of outreach, ecosystem modeling, and citizen science programs in supporting adaptive management of marine and freshwater protected areas " therefore promoting conservation efforts that can be sustained while providing educational services. Chiara is excited to draw on these interests and experiences as she continues the great work started by ONMS in implementing the National Travel and Tourism Strategy and raising the profile of sanctuaries as must-see destinations!

20 February 2014

Title: Google Analytics, Part 1: Getting started with measuring web traffic
Presenter(s): Lawrence Charters, Webmaster for NOAA's National Ocean Service
Date & Time: 20 February 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150. Remote access is available - see login in below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar NOS Communications Series: Google Analytics, Part 1: Getting started with measuring web traffic Date/Time: Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014, 12-1pm ET, Remote access available-see below.

Presenter(s):
Lawrence Charters, Webmaster for NOAA's National Ocean Service

Sponsor(s):
The NOS Communications and Education Division and the NOS Science Seminar Series

Abstract:
Google Analytics is the world's most popular service for analyzing website usage. Google Analytics can provide webmasters, content providers, and program and project managers easy to use, browser-based tools for examining website traffic, discovering where visitors come from, what they looked at and what topics they found of interest. In Part 1 of this presentation, two topics will be covered: an overview of what Google Analytics offers and how you can share that information with interested parties, and then an overview of how to set up a NOAA site to use Google Analytics. The presentation is open to program managers, communications specialists, technical specialists and people who just want a warm place to sit. Seminar Series Description: This presentation is part of the NOS Communications Seminar Series. Our quarterly presentations are geared to all staff across NOS, not only those staff who have communications as part of their job descriptions. Presentations include design tips, social media, website content, and much more. To see an archive of past presentations, visit https://inside.nos.noaa.gov/commstoolkit/noscomms/nosced.html#seminar

Bio(s):
Lawrence Charters is the National Ocean Service representative to the NOAA Web Committee, and serves as the NOS Webmaster. Lawrence wrote the Web server software used for the first National Ocean Service Web site. Written in Microsoft BASIC, the server ran on an Apple Macintosh SE/30. It was perfect for the Web circa 1993: gray pages with black text and blue links, with daily visits soaring into the tens. Analyzing traffic consisted of manually counting log entries. Instructions for Remote Access Participants: There is no pre-registration for this seminar. Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through a combination of phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 100 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet. Important: If you have not used Mymeeting on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c . Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions
Title: Predatory aliens: Indo-Pacific lionfish on Atlantic coral reefs
Presenter(s): Dr. Isabelle Côté, Biology, Simon Fraser University
Date & Time: 20 February 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
WINTER 2014 Monster Seminar JAM Schedule Questions?: Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov Directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm Dr. Isabelle Côté, Biology, Simon Fraser University WEBINAR: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=245579647&UID=1707396137&RT=MiM0 For audio conference only, call toll number 1-650-479-3207. Access code: 804 235 020. For Assistance: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/mc. On the left navigation bar, click "Support” or Contact Helpdesk nwfsc.helpdesk@noaa.gov (206)860-3256 Predatory aliens: Indo-Pacific lionfish on Atlantic coral reefs Dr. Isabelle Côté Professor Marine Ecology Department of Biological Sciences Simon Fraser University

Abstract:
An invasion is currently unfolding at a rate and magnitude never before documented in a marine system. Indo-Pacific lionfish, first reported on western Atlantic coral reefs in 2004, have since spread around the region. My group was the one of the first 'in the water' to quantify the ecological impacts of this invader on native fauna. Here, I present some of our results, including comparisons with the native range, estimates of predation rates and prey decline, predictions of future impacts, and effectiveness of potential mitigation strategies. The lionfish invasion is likely to have long-term ecological and economic implications.

Bio(s):
Isabelle Côté is a professor of Marine Ecology in the Department of Biological Sciences at Simon Fraser University, in Vancouver, BC. She did her BSc at McGill University in Montreal, her MSc at the University of Alberta, and PhD at the University of Toronto. She spent 15 years in the UK (Oxford, East Anglia) before returning to her native Canada in 2005. Her group pioneered the use of meta-analyses of large datasets to reconstructs trajectories of ecological change on coral reefs, measure the global effectiveness of marine protected areas (MPAs) in protecting fish and their habitats and assess the impacts of multiple stressors on natural ecosystems. Although much of her work is on tropical habitats, she is actively involved in MPA research and establishment on the coast of British Columbia. She was part of the core group of experts advising Parks Canada on National Marine Conservation Areas and was on the Royal Society of Canada panel on ocean climate change and marine biodiversity. She was awarded the Marsh Award for Conservation Biology of the Zoological Society of London in 2009, for contributions of fundamental science to the conservation of animal species and habitats. She's a keen communicator of science who loves to tweet! Website: http://www.sfu.ca/biology/faculty/cote/tmel/Home.html Twitter: @redlipblenny PUBLICATIONS Côté I.M. & Maljković A. (2010). Predation rates of Indo-Pacific lionfish on Bahamian coral reefs. Marine Ecology-Progress Series, 404, 219-225. Darling E.S., Green S.J., O'Leary J.K. & Côté I.M. (2011). Indo-Pacific lionfish are larger and more abundance on invaded reefs: a comparison of Kenyan and Bahamian lionfish populations. Biological Invasions, in press. Green S.J., Akins J.L. & Côté I.M. (2011). Foraging behavior and prey consumption in the Indo-Pacific lionfish on Bahamian coral reefs. Marine Ecology-Progress Series, 433, 159-167. Hackerott, S., Valdivia, A., Green, S.J., Côté, I.M., Cox, C.E., Akins, L., Layman, C.A., Precht, W.F., and Bruno, J.F. 2013. Native predators do not influence invasion success of Pacific lionfish on Caribbean reefs. PLOS One 8, e68259. Côté, I.M., Green, S.J. and Hixon, M.A. 2013. Predatory fish invaders: Insights from Indo-Pacific lionfish in the western Atlantic and Caribbean. Biological Conservation 164, 50-61. Green, S.J, Dulvy, N.K., Brooks, A.L.M., Akins, J.L., Cooper, A.B., Miller, S., and Côté, I.M. 2014. Linking removal targets to the ecological effects of invaders: a predictive model and field test. Ecological Applications, in press WINTER 2014 Monster Seminar JAM Schedule JAN 16 DANIEL SCHINDLER (University of Washington) “Managing risks of climate impacts on ecosystems” JAN 23 ROBERT COWEN (Oregon State University) “ISIIS: A new window to assess the predator/prey environment for larval stages of fish” JAN 30 MARY O'CONNOR (University of British Columbia) “The temperature dependence of herbivory: implications of warming for communities and ecosystems” FEB 6 VLADA GERTSEVA (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) “Spine-based ageing methods in the spiny dogfish shark: how they measure up?” FEB 13 RYAN KELLY (University of Washington) “Environmental DNA and its potential for species- and ecosystem-level monitoring” FEB 20 ISABELLE C"TÉ (Simon Fraser University) “Predatory aliens: Indo-Pacific lionfish on Atlantic coral reefs” FEB 27 ANDREW RASSWEILER (University of California Santa Barbara) “Spatial Dynamics in Marine Ecosystems: Regulations, Fisheries and Feedbacks” MAR 6 ANNE BEAUDREAU (University of Alaska Fairbanks) “Transdisciplinary approaches for examining social and environmental change in coastal fisheries of the Northeast Pacific” MAR 13 MARK NOVAK (Oregon State University) “Food webs and interaction strengths: how ignoring generalists leads us astray” MAR 20 JODIE TOFT (The Nature Conservancy) “From Belize to Washington State: keeping habitat at the core of marine conservation”

25 February 2014

Title: Transition to ISO Metadata Online Training
Presenter(s): Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, National Coastal Data Development Center
Date & Time: 25 February 2014
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online Training Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

Transitioning from FGDC CSDGM Metadata to ISO 191** Metadata, an Online Training Series Date and Time: Every Tuesday beginning January 14 until February 25, 2014 from 10:30-11:30 AM Eastern Time Zone [Check U.S. Time clock for your local time] Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/course-four/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

Presenter(s):
Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich (National Coastal Data Development Center) OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center

Abstract:
NOAA's National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC), a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is pleased to announce the new schedule of its popular free online metadata training series beginning in November 2013. Registration is now open for the next series of one-hour weekly webinars, which will begin January 14 and be taught each Tuesday through February 25, 2014. The “Transition to ISO” course is designed for data managers who have a need to transition from the use of Federal Geographic Data Committee CSDGM metadata to ISO 191** metadata. The series will cover topics such as XML and UML basics and ISO creation methods. All materials will be made available online, and instructors will be available by request for special one-on-one “My Metadata” sessions to answer specific questions for individual participants NCDDC set out to meet the increased needs of data managers as many organizations transition from FGDC to ISO standards. Working with other metadata trainers within the community, the NCDDC Metadata Team has developed a complete package of training materials for the transition to ISO metadata standards. Conducting this training online is an innovative way to meet the increased demand for this training while controlling travel expenses. NCDDC conducted its first metadata training series online in 2012 to help data managers meet the challenge of keeping up-to-date on the latest metadata standards and tools for implementing these standards. In an environment of declining budgets and travel limitations, online training has proven to be a successful avenue to meet these needs. So far in 2013, NCDDC has held five training series with 822 individuals from 42 countries on six continents participating. About The

Presenter(s):
NCDDC's Metadata Team, Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, are experts in metadata creation, management and publication. The NCDDC Metadata Team has years of experience in Metadata Training, holding classes for federal, state, and academic organizations across the U.S. NCDDC has led the development of new materials for ISO metadata, including the creation of the first online ISO training in 2012. Remote Access and Notes: Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/course-four/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.
Title: Long-term Climate Outlooks for North America: Understanding Models to Interpret Projections and Early Plans for CMIP6
Presenter(s): Eric Maloney, Colorado State University); Justin Sheffield, Princeton University; Ron Stouffer, NOAA GFDL
Date & Time: 25 February 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Long-term Climate Outlooks for North America: Understanding Models to Interpret Projections and Early Plans for CMIP6

Presenter(s):
Eric Maloney (Colorado State University); Justin Sheffield (Princeton University); Ron Stouffer (NOAA GFDL) Seminar sponsor: OAR, CPO, MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov When: Tuesday, February 25, 2014, 1:00-2:00 p.m. Eastern Time Where: Remote access suggested, but some seats available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=625859045 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: Eric Maloney -- The NOAA MAPP CMIP5 Task Force Process-Oriented Diagnostics Effort -- Efforts are underway by the NOAA MAPP CMIP5 Task Force to develop process-oriented model diagnostics to explain why some models produce better simulations of weather, climate, and climate variability. This effort aims not only to inform model development, but also to aid the applications community in interpreting the results of CMIP models. Examples of process-oriented diagnostics will be presented, including those relevant to simulating tropical convection and its variability. The talk will also discuss a couple of pilot projects between the task force and modeling centers designed to integrate more extensive process-level information into the diagnostics packages that inform model development. -- Justin Sheffield -- Highlights and Outstanding Questions from the NOAA CMIP5 Task Force Analysis of N. American Climate -- The goal of the NOAA CMIP5 Task Force is to bring together scientists working on evaluating simulations of 20th century climate and the uncertainties in long-term predictions and projections of 21st century climate over North America. The Task Force has contributed a set of individual and overview papers to a recent special collection of the Journal of Climate on model evaluations and projections across a broad set of climate processes. These include basic surface climate variables, climate extremes, intra-seasonal to decadal variability and teleconnections, and regional climate processes such as the North American monsoon, Arctic sea ice, and tropical cyclones. Feedback on these results from national programs such as the National Climate Assessment (NCA) has instigated further analysis and review of the results, especially with respect to the qualitative and quantitative changes since CMIP3, and ongoing issues with model evaluation. This talk will summarize these results and provide examples of the highlights and outstanding issues. Examples of changes from CMIP3 to CMIP5 include shifts in the line between future wetting and drying in the Southwest, better representation of ENSO variability but not teleconnections, and better representation of precipitation extremes. The results will be published as a NOAA technical report that will form a foundational report for the NCA, and may be of particular interest to the community interested in the results from CMIP5 to address specific questions on climate impacts, adaptation and vulnerability that are of high interest. -- Ron Stouffer -- Preparing for Phase 6 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6) -- The Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, CMIP, is a large climate community effort that seeks to better understand past, present and future climate changes arising from either natural, unforced variability or in response to changes in radiative forcing in a multi-model context. This understanding includes assessments of model performance during the historical period and quantifications of the causes of the spread in future projections. Idealized experiments are also used to increase understanding of the model responses. In addition to these long time scale responses, experiments are performed to investigate the predictability of the climate system on various time and space scales as well as making predictions from observed climate states. CMIP has a long history and started in 1995. The third version of CMIP, CMIP3, was used in support of the IPCC 4th Assessment Report (AR4). CMIP5 was used in support of the recently released IPCC AR5. CMIP consists of a very large database of mainly climate model output which is produced through a set of specified integrations using a common data format. An important part of CMIP is to make the multi-model output publically available in a standardized format. The database is open to all scientific based inquiries. After CMIP5 the modeling and user communities of the CMIP databasewere surveyed. Based on that survey and our experience, the framework for CMIP will be changed for CMIP6. The details are not finalized. What follows is our current thinking. CMIP6 will be much more science driven with a focus on the World Climate Research Program's six Grand Challenge questions plus important carbon questions. The CMIP Panel which in the past controlled the whole process and all of the details of CMIP, will now just oversee much of the process. The various model intercomparison projects (MIPs) will be responsible for designing and maintaining their part of CMIP6. The role of the Panel will be to approve the various MIP proposed experiments, help coordinate experiments with other MIPs and approve the variable lists to be archived. The Panel will also be responsible for the details of a small core set of common integrations called the DECK (Design, Evaluation, and Characterization of Klima). The talk will provide additional details of the current proposal for CMIP6.

26 February 2014

Title: Microphysics in Multi-scale Modeling System with Unified Physics
Presenter(s): Wei-Kuo Tao, head of the Mesoscale Dynamics and Modeling Group at NASA/GSFC
Date & Time: 26 February 2014
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - EMC Large Conf Rm - 2155
Description:

EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Wei-Kuo Tao, head of the Mesoscale Dynamics and Modeling Group at NASA/GSFC Title Microphysics in Multi-scale Modeling System with Unified Physics Go To Meeting 1. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/250013205 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (786) 358-5417 Access Code: 250-013-205 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 250-013-205 Abstract Recently, several major improvements of ice microphysical processes (or schemes) have been developed for cloud-resolving models (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble, GCE, model), regional scale (Weather Research and Forecast, WRF) model and a coupled GCM-CRM model (called multi-scale modeling Framework or MMF). These improvements include an improved 3-ICE (cloud ice, snow and graupel) scheme (Lang et al. 2011); a 4-ICE (cloud ice, snow, graupel and hail; Lang et al. 2013) scheme and a spectral bin microphysics scheme and two different two-moment microphysics schemes. These models have improved the radiative processes and their interactions with cloud and aerosol. The performance of these schemes has been evaluated by using observational data from TRMM/CloudSat and major field campaigns. In this talk, we will present high-resolution GCE, WRF and MMF model simulations and compare the model results with observations [i.e., Anvil and Aerosol (AMMA 2006); MCSs (MC3E; 2010; and IFloodS; 2013, diurnal variation), three snow events (cold-season campaigns (Canadian CloudSAT/CALIPSO Validation Project (C3VP), GPM Cold-season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx) and Light Precipitation Validation Experiment (LPVEx), and CloudSat/TRMM]. In addition, the main issues of the microphysics schemes in high-resolution (1-6 km grid spacing) numerical models and issues during two real-time forecasts during MC3E and IFloodS will be discussed.

4 March 2014

Title: Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Science Review
Presenter(s): AOML leadership and research scientists
Date & Time: 4 March 2014
8:30 am - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Science Review

Presenter(s):
AOML leadership and research scientists with questions from panel of expert reviewers. Seminar sponsor: OAR/AOML Seminar POC for questions: michael.uhart@noaa.gov When: Tuesday March 4, 2014, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm Eastern Time Where: AOML (webcast only)

Abstract:
The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) periodically conducts laboratory science reviews to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted within each OAR laboratory and to provide strategic advice to the laboratory. As part of this process, the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) will be reviewed March 4-5, 2014, in Miami, Florida. The review will examine the following research areas: (1) Oceans and Climate Research (including ocean observations); (2) Coastal Oceans and Ecosystems; and (3) Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology. OAR and AOML leadership will provide overviews of the programs, followed by sessions of presentations from scientists in each of the above research areas. The review agenda and all review materials are posted on the AOML Laboratory Review website: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/review/ .

Remote Access:
Remote access via GoToMeeting will be available. Please register using the following link as space is limited. https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/697774386 Notes: This is a broadcast only webinar. All time for questions is reserved for the review panel to conduct their business. See agenda at Review website for the speaker and topic of individual presentations to the review panel. Sessions 1,2, and 3 will be webcast. Final review panel report to OAR, including findings, recommendations, and ratings will be available on the Review website approximately 3 months after the review.

5 March 2014

Title: Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Science Review
Presenter(s): AOML leadership and research scientists
Date & Time: 5 March 2014
8:30 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Science Review

Presenter(s):
AOML leadership and research scientists with questions from panel of expert reviewers. Seminar sponsor: OAR/AOML Seminar POC for questions: michael.uhart@noaa.gov When: Tuesday March 4, 2014, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm Eastern Time Where: AOML (webcast only)

Abstract:
The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) periodically conducts laboratory science reviews to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted within each OAR laboratory and to provide strategic advice to the laboratory. As part of this process, the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) will be reviewed March 4-5, 2014, in Miami, Florida. The review will examine the following research areas: (1) Oceans and Climate Research (including ocean observations); (2) Coastal Oceans and Ecosystems; and (3) Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology. OAR and AOML leadership will provide overviews of the programs, followed by sessions of presentations from scientists in each of the above research areas. The review agenda and all review materials are posted on the AOML Laboratory Review website: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/review/ .

Remote Access:
Remote access via GoToMeeting will be available. Please register using the following link as space is limited. https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/697774386 Notes: This is a broadcast only webinar. All time for questions is reserved for the review panel to conduct their business. See agenda at Review website for the speaker and topic of individual presentations to the review panel. Sessions 1,2, and 3 will be webcast. Final review panel report to OAR, including findings, recommendations, and ratings will be available on the Review website approximately 3 months after the review.

6 March 2014

Title: Effective Watershed and Fish Habitat Restoration: Guidance Based on Three Decades of Restoration Science
Presenter(s): Dr. Phil Roni, Watershed Program Manager, NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 6 March 2014
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 8150; remote access available - see login info below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Effective Watershed and Fish Habitat Restoration: Guidance Based on Three Decades of Restoration Science

Presenter(s):
Dr. Phil Roni, Watershed Program Manager, NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NMFS/NWFSC & NOS Seminar Series Seminar Point of Contact: tracy.gill@noaa.gov When: Thursday, March 6, 2014, 12:30-1:30pm Eastern Time Remote access available " see login info below. Where: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Rm 8150 Remote access is available; see login info below.

Abstract:
Hundreds of millions of dollars are spent annually to restore watersheds and fish habitat. Unfortunately, many of these well-intentioned efforts fail to meet their objectives because they ignore watershed processes or do not follow key steps needed to adequately plan, implement and evaluate restoration. Here I provide an overview of the key factors needed to plan restoration, assess watershed conditions, identify restoration actions, select and prioritize restoration techniques and evaluate restoration projects. I provide examples of successful methods, analysis or models used to address each of these key steps. Before assessing conditions or identifying restoration opportunities, it is important to have a clearly defined restoration or recovery goal. Assessment of watershed processes and habitat conditions should include assessment of potential and current rates or conditions, and identify the causes of habitat degradation and loss. In selecting appropriate restoration actions, it is important to be aware of whether the actions restore underlying processes or simply improve habitat as well as the longevity and likelihood of success. Several approaches exist for prioritizing restoration actions and these largely depend on the goals of restoration. Monitoring of restoration projects needs to be designed well before the projects are implemented and have clear testable hypotheses and rigorous study design. Unfortunately, many monitoring programs fail not because of inadequate design, but because of poor implementation, quality control and management " all factors that can usually be overcome by diligent project management. The steps and considerations outlined above, if followed, will help assure that restoration actions are effective at restoring watersheds and recovering anadromous fish populations.

Bio(s):
Dr. Roni has 25 years of experience as a fisheries scientist and currently leads the Watershed Program at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center, where he directs the research of 20 scientists conducting habitat research. His research for the last 18 years has concentrated on planning, prioritizing, and evaluating various watershed restoration techniques. He has published numerous papers on restoration including the books “Stream and Watershed Restoration: a guide to restoring riverine processes and habitat” (2013 Wiley-Blackwell) and “Monitoring Stream and Watershed Restoration” (2005 American Fisheries Society). His current research projects include programmatic evaluation of restoration in the Columbia Basin, evaluating response to whole watershed restoration, and estimating salmonid survival in various habitats types. He received a Presidential Early Career Award (2004) from the U.S. Government and a Certificate of Achievement (2012) from the American Fisheries Society for his contributions to restoration science. He has an M.S. and a Ph.D. from the University of Washington and is an Affiliate Assistance Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences.

Remote Access:
Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through a combination of phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet. Important: If you have not used MyMeetings on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Internet Explorer or google chrome is a good browser to use. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar. Go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c . Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.
Title: Transdisciplinary approaches for examining social and environmental change in coastal fisheries of the Northeast Pacific
Presenter(s): Dr. Anne Beaudreau, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 6 March 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
WINTER 2014 Monster Seminar JAM Schedule Questions?: Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov Directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm Dr. Anne Beaudreau, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=245579647&UID=1707396137&RT=MiM0 For audio conference only, call toll number 1-650-479-3207. Access code: 804 235 020. For Assistance: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/mc. On the left navigation bar, click "Support” or Contact Helpdesk nwfsc.helpdesk@noaa.gov (206)860-3256 ABSTRACT There has been a movement in fisheries science towards approaches that transcend disciplinary boundaries to address issues in coupled social-ecological systems. For example, local ecological knowledge of resource users has been increasingly used in combination with contemporary fisheries data to identify temporal changes in population structure, reconstruct historical abundance trends of fish and invertebrates, and facilitate ecological modeling of past systems. To address information needs for management of data-poor species in Puget Sound, Washington, I used methods from ecology and anthropology to develop time series of relative abundance for 22 marine species over the last 70 years from interviews with resource users and quantify variation in respondents' perceptions of population change related to their age and experience in the marine environment. In this talk, I will use examples from my work in Puget Sound to highlight important considerations for natural scientists seeking to use interview methods to collect fisheries data. Among these is the development of interview approaches that facilitate good communication between interviewer and respondents and provide quantifiable information while avoiding inappropriate reductionism of respondents' knowledge. I found that a key challenge was to achieve rigor in multiple disciplines while addressing the expectations of diverse audiences, including fisheries ecologists, social scientists, and the interview respondents themselves. I will conclude with thoughts on opportunities and challenges in interdisciplinary fisheries research and invite discussion from the audience. BIO Anne Beaudreau is an Assistant Professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Fisheries Center in Juneau. Her research focuses on the ecology of marine and anadromous fishes and the human dimensions of fisheries in the northeast Pacific. Anne is an instructor for an NSF-funded interdisciplinary graduate training program in Marine Ecosystem Sustainability in the Arctic and Subarctic (MESAS) at UAF. She received a Ph.D. in fisheries from the University of Washington and completed her post-doctoral work at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle. Beaudreau Lab website: https://sites.google.com/site/annebeaudreau/home WINTER 2014 Monster Seminar JAM Schedule JAN 16 DANIEL SCHINDLER (University of Washington) “Managing risks of climate impacts on ecosystems” JAN 23 ROBERT COWEN (Oregon State University) “ISIIS: A new window to assess the predator/prey environment for larval stages of fish” JAN 30 MARY O'CONNOR (University of British Columbia) “The temperature dependence of herbivory: implications of warming for communities and ecosystems” FEB 6 VLADA GERTSEVA (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) “Spine-based ageing methods in the spiny dogfish shark: how they measure up?” FEB 13 RYAN KELLY (University of Washington) “Environmental DNA and its potential for species- and ecosystem-level monitoring” FEB 20 ISABELLE C"TÉ (Simon Fraser University) “Predatory aliens: Indo-Pacific lionfish on Atlantic coral reefs” FEB 27 ANDREW RASSWEILER (University of California Santa Barbara) “Spatial Dynamics in Marine Ecosystems: Regulations, Fisheries and Feedbacks” MAR 6 ANNE BEAUDREAU (University of Alaska Fairbanks) “Transdisciplinary approaches for examining social and environmental change in coastal fisheries of the Northeast Pacific” MAR 13 MARK NOVAK (Oregon State University) “Food webs and interaction strengths: how ignoring generalists leads us astray” MAR 20 JODIE TOFT (The Nature Conservancy) “From Belize to Washington State: keeping habitat at the core of marine conservation”

11 March 2014

Title: Variability of Mass Transport into the Upper Polar Atmosphere and Near-Surface Winter Cold Air Outbreaks in Mid-latitudes
Presenter(s): Ming Cai, Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science, Florida State University
Date & Time: 11 March 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - EMC Large Conf Rm - 2155,
Description:

Variability of Mass Transport into the Upper Polar Atmosphere and Near-Surface Winter Cold Air Outbreaks in Mid-latitudes Ming Cai, Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 1. Please join my meeting, Mar 11, 2014 at noon EST. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/490481749 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (626) 521-0014 Access Code: 490-481-749 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 490-481-749 Abstract We have developed indices measuring the total poleward mass transport into the upper troposphere and stratosphere above the Arctic and total equatorward air mass transport out of the lower polar troposphere on a daily basis using ERA-Interim reanalysis for the period of 1979-2011. These two indices are very highly positively correlated with little lead/lag, implying that a stronger poleward warm air mass circulation in the polar region tends to be compensated by a stronger equatorward mass transport by the cold air branch below and vice versa. We have also developed various indices that measure the continental-scale near surface warmness and coldness in high latitudes and mid-latitudes. It is shown that a lack of warm air mass flux into polar region is accompanied by weaker equatorward advancement of cold air near the surface. And, as a result, the cold air mass is largely imprisoned within polar circle, responsible for general warmness in mid-latitudes and below normal temperature in high latitudes. Conversely, a stronger warm air transport into polar upper atmosphere is accompanied by a stronger equatorward advancement of cold air near the surface, resulting in massive cold air outbreaks in mid-latitudes and anomalous warmth in high latitudes. We have also identified two dominant geographical patterns of cold air surge associated with strong mass circulation crossing 60N. One is massive cold air surges over both North America and Eurasian continents and the other is the dominance of cold air surges only over one of the two continents with the abnormal warmness over the other continent in the time periods of 1-10 days after a stronger mass circulation cross the polar circle. The first pattern explains the first and forth leading EOFs of winter season surface temperature anomalies whereas the second mode is related the second leading EOF modes.
Title: What Do Alaskans Need?: A Review of Documents Addressing Research needs Related to Climate Change
Presenter(s): Corrie Knapp, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 11 March 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only
Description:



Title:
What Do Alaskans Need?: A Review of Documents Addressing Research needs Related to Climate Change Tuesday, March 11, 2014; 10-11am AKST Corrie Knapp (Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy) Webinar Information & Instructions here: http://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=e9744af850&e=9097598e1a

Abstract:
Climate change is complicating the variables that Alaskans consider when planning for the future. Communities, agencies and other entities have begun to grapple with both the information that they need to adapt to a changing climate and how the processes and practices of science should change to make science more useful. We reviewed and coded sixty-three documents that expressed practical research needs related to climate change in Alaska. Our goals were to document stakeholder-defined research needs, assess whether there are spatial or topic-related gaps in needs assessment, and understand what stakeholders suggest about how science might be more relevant and useful in a changing climate. Overarching themes include the need for more baseline data to understand change, an interest in the social impacts of climate change, and a need to incorporate local perspectives. Research needs that were most frequently mentioned related to infrastructure, economics costs of climate change, adaptation planning, policy, and impacts to subsistence. Gaps included inadequate engagement of local perspectives and few examples of community-level assessments. Documents nearly unanimously expressed that science, as it is currently practiced, is unable to meet the challenges of climate change. They call for processes that are more transparent, collaborative, and accessible. They recommend changed practices including maintaining accessible data-sharing archives, building networks for knowledge sharing, and creating place-based long-term partnerships with communities. This review complements the climate-change literature by providing concrete suggestions about stakeholder relevant research needs as well as how to increase the utility of science from a region that is experiencing some of the most dramatic climatic change on the planet.

12 March 2014

Title: RESCHEDULED to 4/30/14: NOW is the Time to Look at Future Flood Risk
Presenter(s): Doug Marcy, NOAA/NOS/CSC/Coastal Geospatial Services Division
Date & Time: 12 March 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Room 8150, Silver Spring, MD, Remote access is available.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
NOW is the Time to Look at Future Flood Risk

Presenter(s):
Doug Marcy, NOAA/NOS/CSC/Coastal Geospatial Services Division Seminar sponsor: NOS Science Seminar Series and CSC Seminar Point of Contact for questions: tracy.gill@noaa.gov When: Wed., RESCHEDULED TO 4/30/14 , 12:00-13:00h Eastern Time Where: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Rm 8150; remote access is available

Abstract:
We have all heard the expressions “things happen for a reason” and “no better time than the present” and “good timing,” right? Well it seems the stage has been set, by either happenstance or by destiny, for the U.S. to finally start looking at our future flood risk. This presentation will discuss how many events came together, between summer of 2012 and summer of 2013, to create the right environment for the U.S. to really start to evaluate future flood risk. NOAA tools and data to evaluate sea level rise and coastal flooding impacts for the coastal U.S. will be demonstrated. New inter-agency pilot efforts to incorporate projected sea level rise into the National Flood Insurance Program mapping will be discussed.

Bio(s):
Doug Marcy is a Coastal Hazards Specialist at the NOAA National Ocean Service / Coastal Services Center (CSC), Charleston, SC. He has been with NOAA for 12 years working on enhancing flooding forecast products and GIS capability, storm surge assessments, sea level level rise visualization, and coastal hazards assessment projects contributing to more disaster resilient communities. NSTRUCTIONS FOR REMOTE ACCESS: Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through a combination of phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet. Important: If you have not used MyMeetings on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Internet Explorer is currently the best browser to use for now (1/14). Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar. To access the webex meeting, Internet Explorer work best. Go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c . Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

13 March 2014

Title: Offshore Wind in America: A Report on Recent Development Efforts and the Latest Environmental Science
Presenter(s): Doug Pfeister, Offshore Wind Development Coalition
Date & Time: 13 March 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Offshore Wind in America: A Report on Recent Development Efforts and the Latest Environmental Science

Presenter(s):
Doug Pfeister, Offshore Wind Development Coalition - http://offshorewinddc.org/ When: 3/13/14, 12-1pm ET. Remote access available; see below. Where: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 8150, Silver Spring, MD. Remote access available; see below. Seminar

Sponsor(s):
National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series Point of Contact: tracy.gill@noaa.gov INSTRUCTIONS FOR REMOTE ACCESS: Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through a combination of phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet. Important: If you have not used MyMeetings on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Internet Explorer is currently the best browser to use for now (1/14). Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar. To access the webex meeting, Internet Explorer work best. Go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c . Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. To access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, try the toll free number above.

Abstract:
While the U.S. takes steps every year to build offshore wind energy off the country's coasts, and Europe has been operating offshore wind farms for more than 20 years, there is still no commercial offshore wind project in the U.S. This talk will discuss the latest efforts to launch offshore wind in America and the environmental science behind much of this work. The presentation will also look ahead to 2014 and beyond to see what strides can be taken both in terms of policy and science to getting the country closer delivering large-scale renewable energy from our oceans to our coastal cities. ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Doug Pfeister is the Interim President of the Offshore Wind Development Coalition. From 2010-2013, Doug was Senior Vice President at the Coalition focusing on federal regulatory affairs. Previously, Doug worked at the offshore wind developer NRG Bluewater Wind, where he managed siting and permitting activities across the company, authored major sections of proposals and other public filings, and participated in negotiations for the first offshore wind power purchase agreement, in Delaware. Doug was responsible for the development of an offshore wind project in New Jersey and successfully advocated for progressive offshore wind policies, including, the New Jersey Offshore Wind Economic Development Act of 2010, one of the most significant state laws supporting establishment of the U.S. offshore wind industry. Doug earned his undergraduate degree from Stanford and Master's in Environmental Management from the Yale University School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. He also has experience working for General Electric and various energy and consulting firms, including MCEnergy, Trigen Energy, and Trieste Associates, on onshore wind energy; demand-side electricity management; district power, heating, and cooling; and corporate environment, health, and safety. As an official with the New York City Parks Department in the 1990s, Doug supervised the street tree division and created a citywide streetscape greening program called Greenstreets.
Title: Global Ocean Refuge System to Protect Marine Life Worldwide (GLORES)
Presenter(s): Lance Morgan of the Marine Conservation Institute
Date & Time: 13 March 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only, See Registration Information Below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Global Ocean Refuge System to Protect Marine Life Worldwide (GLORES)

Presenter(s):
Lance Morgan of the Marine Conservation Institute Seminar sponsor: NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, OpenChannels.org, MPA News and the EBM Tools Network. Seminar POC for questions: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center When: Thurs., March 13, 2014, 1:00-2:00 p.m. Eastern Time Where: Remote access only. Reserve your seat at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/335597824

Abstract:
Global Ocean Refuge System (GLORES) is a science-based strategy for advancing marine protected areas worldwide. GLORES expands existing efforts by: 1) using a scientifically sound biogeographic framework for protecting ecosystems; 2) establishing clear, transparent criteria for the best locations, strong protection, effective management, and credible enforcement to save species and their habitats from preventable harm; 3) fostering improved cooperation among nonprofit and for-profit organizations to achieve GLORES goals; and 4) incentivizing competition among countries and international governmental organizations for the prestige and economic benefits of earning Global Ocean Refuge status for the best existing and new marine protected areas. GLORES will incorporate the best thinking of marine biologists, oceanographers, fisheries scientists, geographers, economists, market researchers, business people, and others, and it will support governments with marine jurisdictions to save at least 10% of every ocean biogeographic region by 2020, and 20% by 2030. Learn more about GLORES at http://globaloceanrefuge.org.

Remote Access:
Reserve your Webinar seat at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/335597824 After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. System Requirements: PC-based attendees Required: Windows® 8, 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server Mac®-based attendees Required: Mac OS® X 10.6 or newer Mobile attendees Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 13 March 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 13 March 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

Each month, a speaker will give a presentation on various topics related to NGS programs, projects, products and services to educate constituents about NGS activities. Visit the Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/. Future webinars will be held on the second Thursday of every month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.
Title: Using food web models to predict population dynamics: how ignoring generalists leads us astray
Presenter(s): Dr. Mark Novak, Zoology, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 13 March 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
WINTER 2014 Monster Seminar JAM Schedule Questions?: Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov Directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm Dr. Mark Novak, Zoology, Oregon State University WEBINAR: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=245579647&UID=1707396137&RT=MiM0 For audio conference only, call toll number 1-650-479-3207. Access code: 804 235 020. For Assistance: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/mc. On the left navigation bar, click "Support” or Contact Helpdesk nwfsc.helpdesk@noaa.gov (206)860-3256

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
TBD WINTER 2014 Monster Seminar JAM Schedule JAN 16 DANIEL SCHINDLER (University of Washington) “Managing risks of climate impacts on ecosystems” JAN 23 ROBERT COWEN (Oregon State University) “ISIIS: A new window to assess the predator/prey environment for larval stages of fish” JAN 30 MARY O'CONNOR (University of British Columbia) “The temperature dependence of herbivory: implications of warming for communities and ecosystems” FEB 6 VLADA GERTSEVA (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) “Spine-based ageing methods in the spiny dogfish shark: how they measure up?” FEB 13 RYAN KELLY (University of Washington) “Environmental DNA and its potential for species- and ecosystem-level monitoring” FEB 20 ISABELLE C"TÉ (Simon Fraser University) “Predatory aliens: Indo-Pacific lionfish on Atlantic coral reefs” FEB 27 ANDREW RASSWEILER (University of California Santa Barbara) “Spatial Dynamics in Marine Ecosystems: Regulations, Fisheries and Feedbacks” MAR 6 ANNE BEAUDREAU (University of Alaska Fairbanks) “Transdisciplinary approaches for examining social and environmental change in coastal fisheries of the Northeast Pacific” MAR 13 MARK NOVAK (Oregon State University) “Food webs and interaction strengths: how ignoring generalists leads us astray” MAR 20 JODIE TOFT (The Nature Conservancy) “From Belize to Washington State: keeping habitat at the core of marine conservation”

18 March 2014

Title: Developing Predictive Maps of Coral in Alaska for Use in Ecosystem Management
Presenter(s): Dr. Christopher Rooper, Research Fishery Biologist, for the NOAA/NMFS/Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Resource Assessment & Conservation Engineering Division
Date & Time: 18 March 2014
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 8150. Remote Access is also available - see below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Developing Predictive Maps of Coral in Alaska for Use in Ecosystem Management

Presenter(s):
Dr. Christopher Rooper, Research Fishery Biologist, for the NOAA/NMFS/Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Resource Assessment & Conservation Engineering (RACE) Division When: Tuesday, March, 18, 2014, 12:30-1:30 pm Eastern Time Where: SSMC4,Room 8150, Silver Spring, MD. Remote access login info below. Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series Seminar Point of Contact: tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Deep-sea coral and sponge ecosystems are widespread throughout most of Alaska's marine waters. Deep-sea coral and sponge communities are associated with many different species of fishes and invertebrates in Alaska and can be vulnerable to the effects of commercial fishing activities and climate change. The challenges facing management of deep-sea coral and sponge in Alaska begin with the lack of knowledge of where these organisms occur in high abundance and diversity. Because of the size and scope of Alaska's continental shelf and slope, the vast majority of the area has not been surveyed for deep-sea coral and sponge abundance. In 2011, NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center initiated a three-year field research program funded by the Deep Sea Research and Technology Program in Alaska to better understand the location, distribution, ecosystem role, and status of deep-sea coral and sponge habitats. One of the diverse array of projects that was initiated will produce distribution maps for deep-sea coral and sponge in all regions of Alaska. This project and the associated fieldwork groundtruthing the predictions will be presented. Additionally, since 2012 a number of issues surrounding corals and sponges in Alaska have arisen, including a petition to close two submarine canyons in the eastern Bering Sea to commercial fishing, and a re-visitation of an environmental impact statement for essential fish habitat. The predictive maps have proved useful in the evaluation and discussion of these management issues by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council and the Alaska Regional Office of NMFS. For additional information, visit: http://coralreef.noaa.gov/deepseacorals/ and http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/Quarterly/OND2013/ond13featurelead.htm

Bio(s):
Originally from Oregon, Christopher Rooper went to undergraduate school at Oregon State University (think Harvard of the west coast), completed a M.S. at the University of Alaska Fairbanks in Juneau AK, and completed his Ph.D. at the University of Washington. He began work for the NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC) in the bottom trawl survey group in 2002. To date, most of his research has focused on rockfish ecology and assessment. Chris and and his colleagues are actively pursuing methods to assess rockfish, using alternate sampling gears in areas of untrawlable seafloor, such as combinations of acoustics and optics. In 2011, Chris was given the lead in Alaska's coral and sponge research program. Remote Access Instructions: Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you need both phone and internet. Important: If you have not used MyMeetings on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your web administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Internet Explorer is currently the best browser to use for now (Jan. 2014), although we use google chrome and it works well. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar. To access the internet/visual part of the meeting, Internet Explorer work best. Go the to the webcast site at: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.
Title: Warming Arctic and Potential Shifts in Mid-latitude Weather: Faster than Expected
Presenter(s): Dr. James Overland, NOAA/PMEL
Date & Time: 18 March 2014
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA, PMEL Seminar Room, Building 3, Room 2104, remote instructions below, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Warming Arctic and Potential Shifts in Mid-latitude Weather: Faster than Expected Dr. James Overland NOAA/PMEL An apparently increasing number of record-breaking meteorological events have occurred in mid-latitudes during the past decade as well as a large number of recent abrupt climate changes in the Arctic. Opinions differ on whether such recent extreme weather events were related to recent global or Arctic climate change, Pacific or tropical forcing, or simply chaotic random events. Record negative values of the early winter Arctic Oscillation atmospheric circulation index, high pressures over Greenland and warm temperatures (increased geopotential thickness west of Greenland) have been observed in four of the last five early winters, with cold air penetrating into the southeastern United States and a southern location of the jet stream across the Atlantic. So far we have a tantalizing array of possible drivers based on observed correlations, theoretical reasoning and limited model work. Given the recent run of Greenland high pressures and the potential for scientific breakthroughs for improved seasonal forecasting, one should not rule out a possible emergence of a combination of Arctic change, Pacific influences, and chaotic long-wave patterns impacting mid-latitude extreme weather as an important research challenge, but one that will be dominated by uncertainty for the foreseeable future. To participate remotely you must connect to WEBEX and listen via the PHONE with the following instructions: PHONE: 1-888-567-7995 Passcode - 56817 WEBEX: Instant Net Conference Details: ------------------------------- Meeting Number: 746443948 Meeting Passcode: PMELSeminar Meeting Host: MS LAUREN KOELLERMEIER Join Instructions for Instant Net Conference: 1. Join the meeting now: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=746443948&p=PMELSeminar&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed.
Title: Understanding Climate Predictability and Advancing Predictions
Presenter(s): Arun Kumar, NOAA NCEP CPC; Ben Kirtman, University of Miami; Bin Wang, University of Hawaii
Date & Time: 18 March 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Understanding Climate Predictability and Advancing Predictions

Presenter(s):
Arun Kumar (NOAA NCEP CPC), Ben Kirtman (University of Miami), Bin Wang (University of Hawaii) Seminar sponsor: OAR, CPO, MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov When: Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 2-3 p.m. Eastern Time Where: Remote access suggested, but some seats available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=628707661 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: Not yet available

19 March 2014

Title: Know Your Audience: The Golden Rule of Science Communication Applied to Ocean Acidification Outreach
Presenter(s): Sarah Cooley and Julia Roberson, The Ocean Conservancy, Ocean Acidification Program
Date & Time: 19 March 2014
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 8150. Remote Access is also available - see below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Know Your Audience: The Golden Rule of Science Communication Applied to Ocean Acidification Outreach

Presenter(s):
Sarah Cooley and Julia Roberson, The Ocean Conservancy, Ocean Acidification Program When: March 19th, 3-4pm Eastern Time. Where: Remote access available; see below. Seminar

Sponsor(s):
The Sharing Ocean Acidification Resources for Communicators and Educators (SOARCE) series sponsored by NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries and Ocean Acidification Program Point of Contact: jennifer.bennett@noaa.gov, laura.francis@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The most fundamental and critical component of any communications strategy is to consider who is listening. Are you speaking to specialists? Science translators? Or the interested public? In this talk we will discuss the development of key ocean acidification (OA) communications resources that target different audiences. The first, “Frequently Asked Questions about Ocean Acidification,” was designed by OA scientists for other scientists, and contains detailed information derived from the primary literature, along with discussions of uncertainty. The second, “20 Facts about Ocean Acidification,” was developed from the FAQs to provide brief, accurate overview statements for science communicators working in structured environments, such as formal educators and science journalists. The third, “Ocean Acidification Talking Points for General Audiences” was developed from these documents and public opinion polling, to guide communicators and educators' efforts to convey information on the ocean, ocean acidification, its impacts, and possible opportunities for action. We will compare and contrast the origins and nuances of each document to show how communications around ocean acidification need to be tailored to audiences. If time permits, we will work through a new example to demonstrate how main messages are developed. Remote Access Info: Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/765690138 The Fine Print: Important Notes for participating in the

Remote Access:
1. Plan to log into the Webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar is continually upgrading their software. We want to be sure that your computer has time to access any upgrades and you are able to access the presentation and meeting. 2. Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this Webinar. If you elect to use the phone number provided for audio, you will be charged for a long distance call.Toll:+1 (415) 655-0051,Access code: 965-026-371.Be sure to note and enter the Participant Code you receive when you sign in to the Webinar. You will need this code to dial in to the meeting. 3. When using the VOIP option for this Webinar, You must use a headset or ear bud-speakers. This will keep your output audio from re-entering your microphone, causing distortion 4. If you have difficulty logging in to the Webinar go to:http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=lThe ID Number for this Webinar is:765-690-138

20 March 2014

Title: From Belize to Washington State: keeping habitat at the core of marine conservation
Presenter(s): JODIE TOFT, The Nature Conservancy
Date & Time: 20 March 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
WINTER 2014 Monster Seminar JAM Schedule Questions?: Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov Directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm JODIE TOFT (The Nature Conservancy) WEBINAR: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=245579647&UID=1707396137&RT=MiM0 For audio conference only, call toll number 1-650-479-3207. Access code: 804 235 020. For Assistance: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/mc. On the left navigation bar, click "Support” or Contact Helpdesk nwfsc.helpdesk@noaa.gov (206)860-3256 ABSTRACT As the conservation dialogue continues to evolve from saving the last great places, scientists, ENGOs, industry members and policy-makers are finding creative ways to understand and advance a conservation strategy inclusive of places and people. Two elements of a successful strategy are 1) understanding how habitats support human well-being, and 2) innovatively thinking about and acting to conserve habitat. In this talk, I will highlight projects that my colleagues and I are doing at the Natural Capital Project (NatCap) and The Nature Conservancy (TNC). I will discuss NatCap's marine spatial planning work in Belize, including our approach to including habitat in our model of the Caribbean spiny lobster population and fishery. I will then turn to the US West Coast to discuss TNC's approach of habitat conservation through collaborative, co-management projects with fishers in California and Washington. BIO Jodie Toft is a Marine Ecologist at the Washington State chapter of The Nature Conservancy (TNC) in Seattle, WA. She provides science capacity and strategic thinking on a variety of projects on the Washington Coast and in Puget Sound including gear-innovation research with fishermen, coastal and marine spatial planning with Tribes and coastal communities, and multiple benefit assessment across the land-sea interface. Prior to joining TNC in 2013, she was a member of the Natural Capital Project (NatCap). At NatCap, she specialized in development and application of spatially-explicit models to quantify how ecosystem services linked to fish and shellfish change in response to different management regimes, upland activities and potential impacts of climate change. Toft received her doctoral degree from the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington and her bachelor's degree in biology and public policy analysis from Pomona College in California. WINTER 2014 Monster Seminar JAM Schedule JAN 16 DANIEL SCHINDLER (University of Washington) “Managing risks of climate impacts on ecosystems” JAN 23 ROBERT COWEN (Oregon State University) “ISIIS: A new window to assess the predator/prey environment for larval stages of fish” JAN 30 MARY O'CONNOR (University of British Columbia) “The temperature dependence of herbivory: implications of warming for communities and ecosystems” FEB 6 VLADA GERTSEVA (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) “Spine-based ageing methods in the spiny dogfish shark: how they measure up?” FEB 13 RYAN KELLY (University of Washington) “Environmental DNA and its potential for species- and ecosystem-level monitoring” FEB 20 ISABELLE C"TÉ (Simon Fraser University) “Predatory aliens: Indo-Pacific lionfish on Atlantic coral reefs” FEB 27 ANDREW RASSWEILER (University of California Santa Barbara) “Spatial Dynamics in Marine Ecosystems: Regulations, Fisheries and Feedbacks” MAR 6 ANNE BEAUDREAU (University of Alaska Fairbanks) “Transdisciplinary approaches for examining social and environmental change in coastal fisheries of the Northeast Pacific” MAR 13 MARK NOVAK (Oregon State University) “Food webs and interaction strengths: how ignoring generalists leads us astray” MAR 20 JODIE TOFT (The Nature Conservancy) “From Belize to Washington State: keeping habitat at the core of marine conservation”

25 March 2014

Title: 20-years of ensemble prediction at ECMWF
Presenter(s): Roberto Buizza, Head of Predictability Division, ECMWF
Date & Time: 25 March 2014
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: NCWCP Auditorium
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
"20-years of ensemble prediction at ECMWF" Author: Roberto Buizza (Head of Predictability Division, ECMWF)

Sponsor(s):
EMC-CPC Seminar 1. Please join my meeting, Mar 25, 2014 at 11:30 AM EST. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/588328565 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (213) 289-0010 Access Code: 588-328-565 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 588-328-565 Abstract The first operational run of the ECMWF Ensemble Prediction System (EPS) was completed twenty years ago, on the 24th of November 1992. At that time, the EPS included a representation of initial uncertainties based on initial-time singular vectors, had 33 members and was run three-times a week at approximately a 200 km resolution with 19 vertical levels, for up to 10 days. Today, the system includes a more sophisticated simulations of initial perturbations based on singular vectors and an ensemble of data assimilations. Model uncertainties are also simulated using two stochastic schemes. Its size has been enlarged to 51 members. It is run twice a day for up to 15 days, coupled to a wave model, with a resolution of approximately 30 km up to forecast day 10 and 60 km afterwards. Twice a week the system is extended with a coupled dynamical ocean to 32 days. It includes a re-forecast suite used to compute the model climate and to generate calibrated forecast products such as the extreme forecast index. During this talk, the EPS development is reviewed, recent changes are presented and plans for future improvements are discussed. Michiko Masutani - NOAA Affiliate - creator Mary Hart - NOAA Affiliate Yuejian Zhu - NOAA Federal roberto.buizza@ecmwf.int Jin Huang - NOAA Federal Bill Lapenta - NOAA Federal Huug Vandendool - NOAA Federal

26 March 2014

Title: Warming Arctic and Potential Shifts in Mid-latitude Weather: Faster than Expected
Presenter(s): Dr. James Overland, Research Oceanographer, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
Date & Time: 26 March 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar When: Wednesday, March 26, 12 noon EDT

Presenter(s):
Dr. James Overland, Research Oceanographer, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Host: NOAA Climate Connection Webinar

Abstract:
The mid-latitudes have experienced an apparent increase in the number of record-breaking meteorological events during the past decade. These coincide with a large number of recent abrupt climate changes in the Arctic. Dr. Overland will discuss the possibilities that extreme events in the mid-latitudes are related to recent global or Arctic climate change, Pacific or tropical forcing, or simply chaotic random events.

Remote Access:
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/981305729 Immediately after you submit the registration form, you'll receive an email with a link to connect to the session. During the Webinar, you can receive audio directly through your computer speakers for free, or dial in to the number displayed when you sign in (long-distance charges may apply). The session will be recorded, and can be accessed at the NWS CSD Seminar site within a few days following the event (http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/csd/index.php?section=seminar).
Title: Tidal Current Predictions from High Frequency Radar: The science behind a new NOAA web product
Presenter(s): Dr. Gregory Dusek, NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic Products & Services [CO-OPS]
Date & Time: 26 March 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Rm 8150, Remote Access also available - see below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Tidal Current Predictions from High Frequency Radar: The science behind a new NOAA web product

Presenter(s):
Dr. Gregory Dusek, NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic Products & Services (CO-OPS) When: Wed., March 26, 2014, 12:00-1:00pm Eastern Time Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Room 8150; Remote access available - see login info below

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series and CO-OPS Point of Contact: tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
High Frequency Radar (HF Radar) is an increasingly popular way to measure surface currents in the coastal ocean. This technology enables near real time measurement of surface currents at hundreds of points up to 200 km away and at resolutions ranging from 500 m to 6 km. Partnering with the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), CO-OPS has created a web product that displays both near real time surface current observations and tidal current predictions in an easily accessible platform. Two initial locations, lower Chesapeake Bay and San Francisco Bay, were chosen for implementation with additional locations to follow. It is expected that the product will be utilized for both commercial and recreational navigation, though additional uses like oil spill response or search and rescue are possible. This seminar will focus on the science behind the High Frequency Radar Surface Currents web product. Two more NOAA seminars (on 4/1 and 4/9) will be offered that only provide a demonstration of the product's functionality; see the NOAA seminar google calendar at http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ for more info on these seminars, or contact greg.dusek@noaa.gov .

Bio(s):
Dr. Gregory Dusek is an oceanographer for NOAA's NOS Center for Operational Products and Services. Dr. Dusek is a member of the Coastal and Estuarine Circulation Analysis Team, and his work focuses on the study of near shore currents and tidal currents. He has been with CO-OPS since 2011 " following the completion of his PhD in physical oceanography at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Remote Access:
Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until ~ 10 minutes before the seminar. To access the webex meeting, Internet Explorer work best. Go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c . Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through a combination of phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet. Important: If you have not used MyMeetings on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Internet Explorer is currently the best browser to use for now (1/14). Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

31 March 2014

Title: Model Infrastructure Efforts Toward Improved Model Performance and Interoperability
Presenter(s): Cecelia Deluca, NOAA ESRL; Mark Iredell, NOAA NCEP EMC; V. Balaji, NOAA GFDL
Date & Time: 31 March 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Model Infrastructure Efforts Toward Improved Model Performance and Interoperability

Presenter(s):
Cecelia Deluca (NOAA ESRL), Mark Iredell (NOAA NCEP EMC), V. Balaji (NOAA GFDL) Seminar sponsor: OAR, CPO, MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov When: Friday, April 4, 2014, 2-3 p.m. Eastern Time Where: Remote access suggested, but some seats available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=624414027 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: Not yet available

2 April 2014

Title: World Bank Report: FISH TO 2030 - Prospects for Fisheries and Aquaculture
Presenter(s): Dr. James L. Anderson, World Bank, Advisor on Oceans, Fisheries and Aquaculture, and Dr. Mimako Kobayashi, World Bank, Natural Resources Economist
Date & Time: 2 April 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Room 8150, Silver Spring, MD. Remote access available - see below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
World Bank Report: FISH TO 2030 - Prospects for Fisheries and Aquaculture

Presenter(s):
Dr. James L. Anderson, World Bank, Advisor on Oceans, Fisheries and Aquaculture, and Dr. Mimako Kobayashi, World Bank, Natural Resources Economist Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science (NOS) Science Seminar Series Seminar Point of Contact: tracy.gill@noaa.gov When: Wed., April 2, 2014, 12:00-1:00pm Eastern Time Where: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Rm 8150; remote access is available; see below

Abstract:
The Fish to 2030 study is the result of a collaborative effort between International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, and the World Bank. This study offers a global view of fish supply and demand. Based on trends in each country or group of countries for the production of capture fisheries and aquaculture and those for the consumption of fish, driven by income and population growth, IFPRI's newly expanded International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT model) simulates outcomes of interactions across countries and regions and makes projections of global fish supply and demand into 2030. The outlook of the global fish markets into 2030 is projected under the scenario considered most plausible given currently observed trends. The model projects that the total fish supply will increase from 154 million tons in 2011 to 186 million tons in 2030. Aquaculture's share in global supply will likely continue to expand to the point where capture fisheries and aquaculture will be contributing equal amounts by 2030. However, aquaculture is projected to supply over 60 percent of fish destined for direct human consumption by 2030.

Bio(s):
James L. Anderson is Advisor for Oceans, Fisheries and Aquaculture and leader of the Global Program on Fisheries and Aquaculture (PROFISH). Prior to joining the World Bank in 2010, he chaired the Dept.of Environmental & Natural Resource Economics at the University of Rhode Island. He has published numerous articles related to environmental and natural resource management, fisheries and aquaculture economics, seafood markets and international trade, including The International Seafood Trade (2003) and The Great Salmon Run: Competition between Wild and Farmed Salmon (2007). Recent work has focused on the role of seafood in food security, constraints to aquaculture development, and evaluating how aquaculture and well-designed public-private partnerships are changing the global seafood sector in both developed and developing nations. He was co-director for the Blue Ribbon Panel study “Indispensable Ocean: Aligning Ocean Health and Human Well-being” (BRP, 2013). He was the editor of the international journal, Marine Resource Economics 1999 through 2011 and he has served on three National Academy Sciences/NRC committees. He earned his B.S. in biology and economics from The College of William and Mary and his Ph.D. in agricultural and natural resource economics from the University of California, Davis. Mimako (Mimi) Kobayashi is a Natural Resources Economist in the Department of Agriculture and Environmental Services at the World Bank. Prior to joining the Bank in 2012, she was Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at the University of Nevada, Reno. She has published articles related to natural resource management, economics of animal production and health, and quantitative economic modeling. She earned a B.A. in Language and Regional Studies from Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, an M.A. in Economics from Kobe University, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from the University of California, Davis.

Remote Access:
Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter code 7028688# Go the to the webcast site at: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.phpsigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. Important: If you have not used MyMeetings on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your web administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Internet Explorer is currently the best browser to use for now (Jan. 2014), although we use google chrome and it works well. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar. To access the internet/visual part of the meeting, Internet Explorer work best. Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.
Title: Communicating ocean acidification around the world: Stories & strategies of using narratives to communicate across barriers
Presenter(s): Alexis Valauri-Orton
Date & Time: 2 April 2014
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Room 8150, Silver Spring, MD. Remote access available - see below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar "Communicating ocean acidification around the world: Stories & strategies of using narratives to communicate across barriers" When: Wednesday, April 2nd, 4pm EDT

Presenter(s):
Alexis Valauri-Orton Host: SOARCE webinar series, co-hosted by NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries and Ocean Acidification Program

Abstract:
Between July 2012-2013, Alexis traveled on a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship studying how human communities in Norway, Hong Kong, Thailand, New Zealand, the Cook Islands and Peru might be affected by ocean acidification. She interviewed, lived and worked with hundreds of members of marine dependent communities, investigating how they valued resources threatened by ocean acidification. The vast majority of the community members she worked with had no knowledge of ocean acidification and poor ocean literacy. Over the year, she developed tools to communicate and contextualize this complex science issue across language and cultural barriers. She found the most effective method of communication was to explain the science of ocean acidification in a personalized, narrative format, drawing from the lives of her audience to make connections between ocean acidification and resources and practices they value. In this webinar, she will share examples of how she listened and learned from her audiences and structured communication platforms for diverse communities, ranging from Seventh Day Adventists in the Cook Islands to scallop farmers in Peru. She will explain her methodology and discuss how formal and informal educators can design narrative tools suited for their own audiences.

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve you webinar seat here https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/719056762

3 April 2014

Title: Telling the Ocean's Stories through Art
Presenter(s): ROBI SMITH, Blue Lantern Studio
Date & Time: 3 April 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NW Fisheries Science Center, 2725 Montlake Blvd E, Seattle, WA, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
ROBI SMITH, Blue Lantern Studio "Telling the ocean's stories through art" Seminar sponsor: NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM Location: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm POC: Diane Tierney (diane.tierney@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=25224058&UID=61391358&RT=MiM0 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 282 627 017 ABSTRACT The oceans cover 70% of the planet and perform essential, life supporting functions such as regulating temperatures and providing oxygen and food to land-based systems. However, the industrialized world is having a disproportionately negative impact on ocean health, from high carbon emissions leading to ocean acidification, to severe over fishing, plastic pollution, oil spills, habitat loss from human development, and more. In order to address these issues and develop buy-in on the changes we need to make in order to live more sustainably, scientists and policy makers need to find effective ways to communicate the latest scientific research and understanding about the ocean to decision makers and the public. Part of this strategy is increasing basic ocean literacy, but perhaps more important is the need to connect people with the ocean in a meaningful way so they care about what's happening under water. In the end, people are much more likely to take action to save something that they care about personally than an abstract concept that they feel they should care about but have no real connection to. In this presentation, I'll explore how art can be used as a means of connecting people to the ocean, sharing information, deepening awareness and inspiring action. I'll draw from my own work as well as provide examples from other artists who are effective ocean communicators. I'll also provide examples of how scientists and artists can collaborate together to create meaningful and inspiring work. BIO Robi Smith is a professional artist and writer based in Vancouver, BC. Her paintings and mixed media collages are rooted in science and reflect her passion for coastal marine ecosystems from the Baja peninsula to Alaska. They also speak to her concerns about the impacts of climate change, ocean acidification, over fishing, habitat loss and pollution on marine life. Her current project, From Plankton to Whales: Stories of Interconnection, is a combination of artwork and writing that reveals the interconnections between key marine species and how our actions on land impact marine ecosystems, sometimes for the better. In addition to her work as an artist, Robi has more than 15 years' experience as a writer and editor translating the work of scientists and policy makers in the environmental health field to diverse audiences. Her clients include Health Canada, the Canadian Council of Ministers of Environment and the World Health Organization. She is a member of the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Commission on Education and Communication (IUCN CEC). PUBLICATIONS You can find out more about Robi and her artwork at www.blue lantern.ca/studio.

8 April 2014

Title: The Ecosystem Impacts of Habitat Loss in the Chesapeake Bay, predicted by an Atlantis Model
Presenter(s): Drs. Tom Ilhde, and Howard Townsend, NOAA/NMFS Chesapeake Bay Field Office
Date & Time: 8 April 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
The Ecosystem Impacts of Habitat Loss in the Chesapeake Bay, predicted by an Atlantis Model

Presenter(s):
Drs. Tom Ilhde, and Howard Townsend, NOAA/NMFS Chesapeake Bay Field Office Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NMFS Chesapeake Bay Field Office and the NOS Science Seminar Series Seminar POC for questions: tracy.gill@noaa.gov When: Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 12:00 - 1:00pm ET; Remote access available " see login info below. Where: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Rm 8150. Remote access is available; see login info below.

Abstract:
The Atlantis ecosystem modeling approach is an end-to-end simulation, integrating system information from array of disciplines and data at a variety of scales. The approach complements existing stock assessment approaches by linking geophysical information, watershed nutrient dynamics, habitat studies, fish and invertebrate population dynamics to fisheries production. Full-system models like Atlantis are important because they are able to capture non-linear and cumulative effects that simpler approaches are unable to predict. Consequently, these types of models are useful for quantifying the relative effects of system stressors like climate change, water quality change, or habitat loss. With results from simulations of the Chesapeake Atlantis Model, we discuss how the loss of marsh habitat in the Chesapeake Bay is predicted to affect living marine resources. We specifically focus on the consequences for ocean production of those species that rely on the rich habitats and natural resources of the largest estuary in the US.

Bio(s):
Dr. Tom Ihde leads NCBO's Ecosystem Modeling Team efforts to apply a spatially-explicit ecosystem-based fisheries management model for the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed using the Atlantis software. This work provides resource managers of the Bay with a science-based comparison of trade-offs for different management choices. Tom holds both a PhD in marine fisheries stock assessment and a Master's in Marine Science from the College of William & Mary, and completed his post-doctoral work on stakeholder engagement in fisheries management while with the University of Maryland at the Chesapeake Biological Lab. Dr. Howard Townsend leads the NOAA - Chesapeake Bay Office modeling team. The team's goal is to support holistic, ecosystem-based fisheries management by developing and implementing ecosystem models and other analytical tools. These tools help managers understand the trade-offs in ecosystem services under different management scenarios. Howard also provides administrative coordination of NCBO programs at the Cooperative Oxford Laboratory. Prior to joining the office, he conducted statistical analysis for the health care industry. Howard has a Ph.D. in biology from Wake Forest University. His dissertation work at Wake Forest was focused on the population ecology of Galápagos seabirds. Remote Access Instructions: 1. For audio, dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# 2. To access the webex meeting, go the to the webcast mymeeting site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c . If needed, enter meeting number 744925156 ; no passcode is required for web part of meeting. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through a combination of phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet. Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until ~ 10 minutes before the seminar. Important: If you have not used MyMeetings on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Internet Explorer is currently the best browser to use for now (1/14). Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.
Title: Climate Extremes: Understanding and Predicting High-Impact Conditions
Presenter(s): Kingtse Mo, NOAA NCEP CPC; Chris Thorncroft, University at Albany; Gabe Vecchi, NOAA GFDL; Scott Weaver, NOAA NCEP CPC
Date & Time: 8 April 2014
1:00 pm - 2:15 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl., NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Climate Extremes: Understanding and Predicting High-Impact Conditions

Presenter(s):
Kingtse Mo (NOAA NCEP CPC), Chris Thorncroft (University at Albany), Gabe Vecchi (NOAA GFDL), Scott Weaver (NOAA NCEP CPC) Seminar sponsor: OAR/CPO/ESS and MAPP Programs Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov When: Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 1:00-2:15 p.m. Eastern Time Where: Remote access suggested, but some seats available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=620993723 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: Kingtse Mo -- Two Types of Flash Drought over the United States -- Flash drought characterized by a sudden onset of high temperatures and reductions of soil moisture was investigated using the gridded station precipitation, surface temperature data and soil moisture (SM) and evapotranspiration (ET) from the North American Data Assimilation Systems. The study period is 1979-2011. There are two types of flash drought. The type 1 flash drought prefers to occur in the areas that have dense vegetation cover in spring and summer. These are temperature driven events. The establishment of anti- cyclone centered over the North Central or the Northeast enhances heat waves. High temperature increases transpiration from vegetation and the increase of ET reduces SM. The heat waves persist only 1 to 2 pentads, but negative SM anomalies persist from one month to one season. The type 1 flash drought occurs most often in the crop-growing season and has high impact on agricultural products. The type 2 flash drought is more common and can occur over areas east of 110oW with maxima over the Great Plains where the correlations between P and Tsurf are strong negative. The atmospheric circulation anomalies support dry conditions. The lack of rain reduces SM and decreases ET. The reductions of ET are balanced by the increases of sensible heat. That leads to heat waves. In this case, heat waves are caused by meteorological drought. This type of flash drought persists longer than the type 1 flash drought. -- Chris Thorncroft -- Variability of African Easterly Waves and their relationship with Atlantic Tropical Cyclones -- Atlantic tropical cyclone variability varies substantially on intraseasonal-to-interannual timescales. This talk will show how variations in AEW structure and AEW-activity may play a role in determining this variability. The talk will first highlight how AEW structures can vary and influence the probability of downstream cyclogenesis on synoptic timescales. This will be followed by a consideration of how AEW-activity varies on intraseasonal timescales and the extent to which this can be an important influence on tropical cyclone variability. The significant roles played by the MJO and convectively coupled Kelvin waves will be emphasized. -- Gabe Vecchi -- Towards Seasonal Prediction of Regional Tropical Cyclone Activity and Hydroclimate -- We explore results from GFDL-FLOR, a new high-resolution (50km atmospheric/land resolution) global coupled climate model, targetted to the understanding, intraseasonal-to-decadal prediction and near-term projection of regional and extreme climate. The high-resolution model produces skillful simulation and prediction of tropical cyclone activity. Initialized predictions of global hurricane activity show skill on regional scales, including in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, comparable to the skill on basin-wide scales, suggesting that regional seasonal TC predictions may be a feasible target. We find that mean-state errors are a key constraint on the simulation and prediction of variations of regional climate and extremes, and methodologies for overcoming model biases are explored. Improvements in predictions of regional climate are due both to improved representation of local processes, and to improvements in the representation of large-scale climate and variability from improved process representation. -- Scott Weaver -- Climatic Role of North American Low-Level Jets on U.S. Regional Tornadic Activity -- Variability of springtime tornadic activity over the U.S. is assessed through the connectivity of preferred modes of North American low-level jet (NALLJ) variability. The link between regional tornado activity and NALLJ variability as diagnosed from a consistent reanalysis system (i.e., NCEP/NCAR) serves as dynamical corroboration in light of an inhomogeneous tornado database. The analysis reveals a multidecadal variation in the strength of the NALLJ-tornado connection, especially over the southern Great Plains. Locally, this is a result of a southward shift of NALLJ variability modes during recent decades. Given the importance of NALLJ variability to the severe weather environment, seasonal predictability of NALLJ modes is further assessed in the NCEP Climate Forecast System Version 2.

9 April 2014

Title: High Frequency Radar Surface Currents: A new web tool for real time surface currents and tidal current predictions
Presenter(s): Greg Dusek, NOAA's Center for Operational Ocean Products & Services [CO-OPS]
Date & Time: 9 April 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 ; remote access also available
Description:

Seminar

Title:
High Frequency Radar Surface Currents: A new web tool for real time surface currents and tidal current predictions. (This is a repeat of the April 1 seminar).

Presenter(s):
Greg Dusek, NOAA's Center for Operational Ocean Products & Services (CO-OPS) Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOS CO-OPS and the NOS Science Seminar Series Seminar POC for questions: tracy.gill@noaa.gov When: Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 1:00 - 2:00pm ET; Remote access login info is below. Where: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Rm 8150, Silver Spring, MD

Remote Access:
Dial 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# To access the webex meeting, go the to the Mymeetings webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields. Check box that you have read the Privacy Policy, click Proceed.

Abstract:
The NOAA Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) and the NOAA U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) have developed a new High Frequency Radar web product which provides near real time surface current observations and tidal current predictions in estuarine and coastal locations. The web product offers broad spatial coverage of surface currents in areas vital for both commercial and recreational marine navigation. Two initial locations, lower Chesapeake Bay and San Francisco Bay, were chosen for implementation with additional locations to follow. It is expected that the product will be utilized for both commercial and recreational navigation, though additional uses like oil spill response or search and rescue are possible.

Bio(s):
Dr. Gregory Dusek is an oceanographer for NOAA's NOS Center for Operational Products and Services. Dr. Dusek is a member of the Coastal and Estuarine Circulation Analysis Team, and his work focuses on the study of near shore currents and tidal currents. He has been with CO-OPS since 2011 " following the completion of his PhD in physical oceanography at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. More Login Info: Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through a combination of phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet. Important: If you have not used MyMeetings on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Internet Explorer is currently the best browser to use for now (1/14). Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.

10 April 2014

Title: A Toolkit for Engaging Local Communities in MPA Management
Presenter(s): Matt Ferris-Smith, Samantha Miller, Joe Otts and Michelle Zilinkskas of the University of Michigan
Date & Time: 10 April 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only, See Registration Information Below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
A Toolkit for Engaging Local Communities in MPA Management

Presenter(s):
Matt Ferris-Smith, Samantha Miller, Joe Otts and Michelle Zilinkskas of the University of Michigan Seminar sponsor: NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, OpenChannels.org, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network. Seminar POC for questions: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center When: Thurs., April 10, 2014, 1:00-2:00 p.m. Eastern Time Where: Remote access only. Reserve your seat at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/886880984

Abstract:
This webinar will present a toolkit to enhance the capacity of marine protected areas to effectively engage with local communities. Based on interviews with MPA managers, staff and community members from across the United States, the toolkit addresses topics including building trust and understanding with community members, increasing collaboration with communities, increasing awareness and knowledge of protected areas and fostering stewardship behavior. It was developed by graduate students from the University of Michigan's School of Natural Resources and the Environment, in collaboration with NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. You will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. Audio: Toll: +1 (415) 363-0079 Access Code: 448-398-058 Webinar ID: 886-880-984 System Requirements: PC-based attendees Required: Windows® 8, 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server Mac®-based attendees Required: Mac OS® X 10.6 or newer Mobile attendees Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet This Webinar will be archived at: http://openchannels.org/webinars/2014 and on Vimeo at: https://vimeo.com Search using the webinar title.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 10 April 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 10 April 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

Each month, a speaker will give a presentation on various topics related to NGS programs, projects, products and services to educate constituents about NGS activities. Visit the Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/. Future webinars will be held on the second Thursday of every month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.
Title: Free-flowing rivers and their diversity, stability, and conservation
Presenter(s): Dr. Jonathan W. Moore, Liber Ero Chair and Assistant Professor, Centre for Coastal Science and Management; Biological Sciences; and School of Resource and Environmental, Simon Fraser University
Date & Time: 10 April 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NW Fisheries Science Center, 2725 Montlake Blvd E, Seattle, WA, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Free-flowing rivers and their diversity, stability, and conservation

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jonathan W. Moore, Liber Ero Chair and Assistant Professor, Centre for Coastal Science and Management; Biological Sciences; and School of Resource and Environmental, Simon Fraser University Seminar sponsor: NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM Location: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm POC: Diane Tierney (diane.tierney@noaa.gov) WEBINAR: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=25224058&UID=61391358&RT=MiM0 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 282 627 017 ABSTRACT Movements of water, materials, and animals can connect dendritic river networks. These connections occur in both upstream and downstream directions. Gravity moves water and the materials it carries downstream from headwaters towards the ocean. In addition, migratory fishes such as anadromous salmon can connect downstream habitats to upstream habitats. These connections can operate on large spatial scales; especially so in Canada that contains many of the remaining large intact river systems in the world. In many watersheds, First Nations, commercial, and recreational fisheries harvest migratory salmon whose life-history cycle unfolds over hundreds if not thousands of kilometers. My research group has been studying the Skeena River and Fraser River systems; large free-flowing watersheds in British Columbia, Canada. In these watersheds, we have been examining the implications of these bi-directional linkages for the stability and productivity of salmon and their fisheries. Our research suggests that the dendritic structure of river networks may confer stability to river populations. However, anthropogenic alterations are poised to degrade habitats throughout these watersheds. Conserving the productivity and stability of natural resources in watersheds may necessitate aligning scales of policy and management with the scale of watershed dynamics. BIO Jonathan Moore is the Liber Ero Chair of Coastal Science and Management and is an Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences and Resource and Environmental Management at Simon Fraser University. His research focuses on the ecology and conservation of freshwater systems. He has studied salmonids and their watersheds from Alaska to California and has been most recently been focusing on salmon biodiversity in large rivers of British Columbia such as the Skeena and Fraser. Other research topics include invasive species, biodiversity and ecosystem function, landscape disturbances, and analytical methods in stable isotopes. He was recently awarded the Stevenson Lectureship as an emerging leader in Canadian aquatic sciences. He received his BA from Carleton College and his PhD from the University of Washington. He has held positions at University of California and at NOAA fisheries. PUBLICATIONS Moore, J.W., M. McClure, L.A. Rogers, and D.E. Schindler. 2010. Synchronization and portfolio performance of threatened salmon. Conservation Letters 3: 340-348.

14 April 2014

Title: Biological Invasions in Freshwaters: Science, Economics, and Policy
Presenter(s): David M. Lodge, University of Notre Dame
Date & Time: 14 April 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 = Remote access login below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Biological Invasions in Freshwaters: Science, Economics, and Policy

Presenter(s):
David M. Lodge (University of Notre Dame) Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series Seminar POC for questions: tracy.gill@noaa.gov When: Monday, April 14, 2014, 12:00-1:00h ET. Remote access login info below. Where: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Rm 8150; if you are not with NOAA, contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov in 3 days advance to attend in person. Remote access webinar login info is below.

Remote Access:
Webinars (thru mymeetings.com) are available remotely through a combination of phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. If you have not used MyMeetings on your computer, you need to download some files; you may need your system admin to do this, so do it well before the seminar. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# Go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed

Abstract:
Biological invasions have damaged all sorts of ecosystems, but impacts on freshwater biodiversity and ecosystem services have been especially great. Where unmanaged, the risks from biological invasions have increased dramatically in recent decades as a function of increased global commerce. Research advances in ecological forecasting, biological surveillance, risk assessment of species and pathways, and bioeconomic analysis of invasions have documented this growing risk in increasingly quantitative and accurate terms. Knowledge about invasive species has therefore increased dramatically among scientists and the public, and consequently management of invasive species has improved in many countries. Scientific and technological advances have been incorporated into voluntary practices or government policies, producing environmental and economic benefits. Many opportunities remain, however, for the policy and management of invasive species to catch up to the scientific and technological capacity. Research topics poised for rapid progress and application include forecasting the delivery of species in space and time by major vectors and pathways; the design and implementation of systematic environmental surveillance programs that include eDNA detection; species risk assessment tools to identify species likely to be harmful before they are imported; and increased number and selectivity of eradication and control technologies. The last 25 years has seen rapid progress in invasion biology and management, but humankind would benefit from greater use in management of the rapid knowledge growth in invasion biology. Further research and development would pay great dividends in both increased understanding and improved protection of ecosystem services and human welfare.

Bio(s):
Dr. David M. Lodge is the Ludmilla F. and Stephen J. Galla Professor at the Department of Biological Sciences in University of Notre Dame. He also serves at the Director of the Notre Dame Environmental Change Initiative. Dr. Lodge's world renowned research focuses on the impacts of global environmental changes on biodiversity, biological community structure, and the function of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The work cuts across disciplines, in particular freshwater ecology; invasive species biology and bioeconomics; ecological risk analysis; and environmental ethics and policy. Along with his students and postdocs, Dr. Lodge has performed this work in the inland lakes and streams of the Midwest U.S., the Great Lakes, and the coastal plain of North Carolina; as well as in Denmark and Kenya.

16 April 2014

Title: Trends and Challenges in Communicating Science Effectively
Presenter(s): Vicki Loe, Communications and Outreach Lead, NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration
Date & Time: 16 April 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4, room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Seminar

Title:
Trends and Challenges in Communicating Science Effectively

Presenter(s):
Vicki Loe, Communications and Outreach Lead, NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration Date/Time: Wed., April 16, 2014, 12-1pm Eastern Time Location: SSMC4, Room 8150; and remote access login info below.

Sponsor(s):
NOS Seminar Series and Office of Response and Restoration Point of Contact: tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The Outreach and Communications Team at the Office of Response and Restoration (NOS) strives to make OR&R's work stand out, making the consumers of our information want to learn more about the work we do and remain interested. Like many other communications teams at NOAA, we provide information on our program's services and products to legislative and academic audiences, to other government agencies and NGOs that we partner with, to NOAA leadership and partner programs, and to the public. We highlight our program's work and accomplishments within the context of the NOAA framework. I recently attended the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting on February 13"17, in Chicago. Alongside the thousands of scientists, journalists, and other professionals, I was there mostly to learn about the latest technology and trends in science communications, but was pleased to discover that the need for better communication was a theme throughout this science conference, even in sessions that had little to do with communications per se. It inspired me to write a blog on some of what struck me as most relevant to what we as scientists and science communicators can take into consideration to make our messages more powerful. In this talk, which will expand on the theme of my blog post, I will discuss current trends in communication and how they apply to communications challenges that we face in OR&R, using a few examples of our work, and adaptations we are making. I will also highlight examples of what I feel are current successful science communications efforts in challenging areas such as climate change and crisis communications to potentially stimulate discussion and inspire new ideas.

Bio(s):
Vicki Loe is the Communications and Outreach Lead of NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration. Vicki has worked in NOAA for 15 years doing communications strategy and implementation. Prior to working at NOAA she was a science communicator at the University of Washington Sea Grant Program. Instructions for

Remote Access:


Remote Access:
Cisco Webex meetings are available remotely through phone (U.S. & Canada only) & internet webcast. Please note that phone access is limited to 50 connections on a first-come-first served basis, so we cannot guarantee participation. To participate remotely, you must connect via the phone and internet. Important: If you have not used MyMeetings on your computer, you will need to download some files; you might need your web administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. Internet Explorer is currently the best browser to use for now (Jan. 2014), although we use google chrome and it works well. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. When prompted enter passcode 7028688# Please use your phone's mute button (*6 toggles on or off) during the presentation until you are ready to ask questions. The phone conference does not start until about five minutes before the seminar. To access the internet/visual part of the meeting, Internet Explorer work best. Go the to the webcast site at: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed; no passcode is required. Enter other required fields - First and last name. Check the box that that you have read the Privacy Policy, and click Proceed. Remember, to access the sound of the meeting, you must dial in using the instructions in #1, above. For further information about this seminar please contact tracy.gill@noaa.gov; or if it is within 10 minutes of the seminar start, call the toll free number above and she will try to answer your questions.
Title: OCEAN FRONTIERS II: A New England Story for Sustaining the Sea
Presenter(s): Introduction of film by the NOAA Fisheries Office of Habitat Conservation
Date & Time: 16 April 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-3, Rm 4527, (remote access is not available)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
FILM PREMIERE: “OCEAN FRONTIERS II: A New England Story for Sustaining the Sea”

Presenter(s):
Introduction of film by the NOAA Fisheries Office of Habitat Conservation Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Fisheries Office of Habitat Conservation, Habitat Protection Division Seminar POC: Brenda Rupli (brenda.rupli@noaa.gov) When: Wed., April 16, 2014, 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. EDT Where: NOAA HQ SSMC-3, Rm 4527, (remote access is not available)

Abstract:
Recently premiered at the D.C. Environmental Film Festival, “Ocean Frontiers II: A New England Story for Sustaining the Sea” is an inspiring story of citizens working together for healthier economies and healthier seas across New England. A modern wave of big ships, energy industries and a changing climate, now test the limits of an already crowded sea. But in a pioneering trial of far-sighted planning--pushed by blueprints for offshore wind energy--old residents and new are coming together to keep their ocean and livelihoods alive. Ocean Frontiers II is the second in the highly-acclaimed film series featuring stories from across the country where businesses, scientists and conservationists are working together to find solutions that benefit our economy and the ocean. These initiatives illustrate how collaboration and shared approaches to ocean stewardship can generate solutions that support sustainable ocean use, economies and conservation. See film trailer: http://ocean-frontiers.org/the-films/ocean-frontiers-2/. About the speakers: Introduction of film by the NOAA Fisheries Office of Habitat Conservation

Remote Access:
Not available.
Title: Impacts of Climate Change on Marine Fisheries
Presenter(s): Dr. Jonathan Hare, Narragansett Laboratory Director, Oceanography Branch Chief, NOAA Fisheries Service
Date & Time: 16 April 2014
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Impacts Of Climate Change On Marine Fisheries: Identification of range of responses of environment, fisheries, and ecosystems to climate change over the next 5-20 years with specific examples from the Northeast United States

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jonathan Hare (Narragansett Laboratory Director, Oceanography Branch Chief, NOAA Fisheries Service) Seminar sponsor: NOAA, OAR, Sea Grant Seminar POC for questions: Tammy Newcomer Johnson, tammy.newcomer@noaa.gov When: Wed., Apr. 16, 2014, 3:00-4:00pm Eastern Time Where: To join the webinar, go to: https://connect.extension.iastate.edu/marine (call-in number will be provided after you join the webinar as a 'guest')

Abstract:
Understanding climate change and the associated impacts on the ocean environment has emerged as one of the major challenges facing fishery science and management. The purpose of this webinar is to describe and discuss: •Global climate models at a regional scale •Scientific uncertainty associated with global & Northwest Atlantic regional climate models •Climate change projections for the next two decades for Northeast Shelf Ecosystems & the scientific uncertainty associated with those projections (5-20 years) •Major oceanographic features of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (with emphasis on Northeast shelf ecosystems & MAB in particular) •Changes in the physical oceanography of Northeast Shelf Ecosystem & multidecadal changes in atmospheric patterns & associated oceanographic features (NAO, AMO, etc) •Linkage between models for climate, local oceanographic, & living marine resource •Observed/expected effects on species distributions, production, & assemblages within Northeast Shelf Ecosystems About the speakers: Dr. Jonathan Hare is the Director of the NOAA Fisheries Narragansett Lab and the Chief of the Oceanography Branch

Remote Access:
https://connect.extension.iastate.edu/marine Notes: Call-in number will be provided after you join the webinar as a 'guest'
Title: Assessing the vulnerability of fish stocks to climate change: methods explanation and discussion
Presenter(s): Wendy Morrison, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, NMFS; Roger Griffis, Office of Science & Technology, NMFS
Date & Time: 16 April 2014
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3, Library; remote access is available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Assessing the vulnerability of fish stocks to climate change: methods explanation and discussion

Presenter(s):
Wendy Morrison (Office of Sustainable Fisheries, NMFS) and Roger Griffis (Office of Science & Technology, NMFS) Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA, OAR, Sea Grant Seminar POC for questions: tammy.newcomer@noaa.gov When: Wed., Apr. 16, 2014, 3:00-4:00pm Eastern Time Where: NOAA HQ SSMC3, Library; remote access is available

Abstract:
The aim of this webinar is to share the methodology of the vulnerability assessment and have a discussion with the Sea Grant Extension Network so that they can be prepared to help with outreach and extension when the full results of the vulnerability assessment become available later this summer. NOAA Fisheries is collaborating with NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research - Earth System Laboratory to finalize a methodology to rapidly assess the vulnerability of U.S. marine stocks to climate change. About the speakers: Wendy Morrison is a Fisheries Ecologist with the Domestic Fisheries Division. Roger Griffis is the Climate Change Coordinator for NOAA Fisheries Service.

Remote Access:
https://connect.extension.iastate.edu/marine Notes: Call-in number will be provided after you join the webinar as a 'guest'

17 April 2014

Title: Effective Practices for Communicating About Ocean Acidification
Presenter(s): Shallin Busch and Jennifer Bennett Mintz, NOAA OAP
Date & Time: 17 April 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ, SSMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 4817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Where: SSMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 4817

Presenter(s):
Shallin Busch and Jennifer Bennett Mintz (NOAA OAP)

Title:
Effective Practices for Communicating About Ocean Acidification

Abstract:
Ocean acidification is a rapidly emerging field of study, and potentially a large threat to ocean ecosystems. Educators, communicators, and scientists are working together to effectively communicate ocean acidification, raising awareness of our ocean's changing ocean chemistry and increasing the public's understanding of the impacts of this change. Given the difficulties inherent in presenting this complex topic and the importance of accurate and compelling messaging on this emerging topic, a number of workshops and research studies have focused on identifying how to communicate about ocean acidification effectively. During this presentation, we will share the community's understanding of how to communicate about ocean acidification. We will frame some of this discussion around principles developed on the psychology of communicating about climate change, illustrating them with some humorous examples of slides that have helped a research scientist communicate well and slides that have been unsuccessful tools for communicating effectively. About the speakers: Shallin Busch works for NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program on interagency collaboration related to ocean acidification and for National Marine Fisheries Service's Office of Science and Technology on issues related to climate change. Prior to this position, Shallin was a research ecologist at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. She helped develop the Center's state-of-the-art laboratory for studying the impacts of ocean acidification, hypoxia, and temperature change on coastal marine organisms. Busch used the laboratory to conduct experiments on species that are economically and ecologically important. She also used ecological models to explore potential impacts of ocean acidification on entire food webs and fisheries harvest. In 2012, Busch served as a member of the Washington State Blue Ribbon Panel on Ocean Acidification. She earned her Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Washington and an undergraduate degree in ecology and evolutionary biology from Princeton University. Jennifer Bennett Mintz coordinates outreach and education for NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program from Hollings Marine Laboratory in Charleston, SC. Here she serves as a liaison between the research, education and stakeholder communities. She works to translate current ocean acidification research in a way that is relevant and understood by a variety of audiences. She earned her B.S. in marine biology at University of California Santa Cruz. After years working as an informal educator, she returned to the east coast to continue her formal education and earn an M.S. in marine biology from College of Charleston. Her research focused on polar phytoplankton physiology and biogeochemistry, which afforded her the opportunity to do fieldwork in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Upon graduating, Jenn was awarded the John D. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship, where she worked in NOAA's Ocean Acidification program at the intersection of science and policy. During her time as a fellow, she worked closely with program scientists nationally to coordinate the program's research and monitoring effort, while also developing the program's outreach and education endeavors. A surfer and outdoor adventurer, she spends as much time on the water as she can. Online web access: Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio / conference call: Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#" Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone Phone access limited to the first 50 callers only
Title: Estimating the Cost of Trading Restrictions in Catch Share Programs
Presenter(s): Dr. Jim Sanchirico, University of California Davis
Date & Time: 17 April 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/328434457; SSMC3 12836 (Silver Spring)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Estimating the Cost of Trading Restrictions on Catch Share Programs

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jim Sanchirico (University of California Davis) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Fisheries QUEST Program Seminar POC for questions: Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov When: Thurs., Apr. 17, 2014, 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time Where: Limited seating will be available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, Rm 12836; Remote access is primary format, available at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/328434457

Abstract:
Catch shares are a policy instrument used to manage catch allocation in fisheries. Increasingly catch share programs are being designed to meet multiple objectives. For example, programs are often designed to meet community and cultural goals as well as to increase economic efficiency. During the presentation Dr. Sanchirico will explain how placing restrictions on trade, a common mechanism used to address non-economic goals, can impact the economic efficiency of the program. In addition to discussing the theoretical impacts of restrictions, Dr. Sanchirico will present empirical estimates of economic efficiency losses associated with the Alaskan Halibut and Sablefish IFQ program. The results are based on models that utilize data on quota transfer prices, vessel characteristics, vessel landings, stock, and economic variables including fuel price and ex-vessel price. Furthermore, the models take into account the changes in the fishery that result from a new policy regime, allowing economic gains following implementation to depend on initial conditions as well as restrictions. In the talk Dr. Sanchirico will discuss how these results can inform the design of catch shares in the future. For example, armed with this information managers can decide whether the costs of restrictions are outweighed by the associated benefits. The latter is possible when they are intended to appease opposition to the tradable permit program, so that the program is adopted sooner than it otherwise would have been without the restrictions. About the speaker: James N. Sanchirico received his Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California at Davis in 1998. After working nine years at Resources for the Future in Washington D.C. (an independent, non-profit environmental policy think-tank), he returned to University of California Davis where he is currently a Professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy. His main research interests include the economic analysis of policy design and implementation for marine and terrestrial species conservation, the development of economic-ecological models for forecasting the effects of resource management policies, and the control and prevention of invasive species. Twice his research has been honored with Quality of Research Discovery awards from the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, and in 2012, he was the 38th recipient of the Rosenstiel Award for Oceanographic Sciences, which honors scientists who, in the past decade, have made significant and growing impacts in their field. Past public service includes a National Research Council (NRC) committee evaluating the effectiveness of the fish stock rebuilding requirements in the 2006 Fishery Conservation and Management Reauthorization Act, six years on NOAA's Science Advisory Board, the editorial board of Ecology Letters, and an NRC committee to review the U.S. Ocean Acidification Research Plan.

Remote Access:
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/328434457
Title: Do I stay or do I go? Genomic, genetic, and gene expression signatures associated with ecological life history diversity in Oncorhynchus mykiss
Presenter(s): Dr. Krista Nichols, CB Division, NWFSC
Date & Time: 17 April 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NW Fisheries Science Center, 2725 Montlake Blvd E, Seattle, WA, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Dr. Krista Nichols, CB Division, NWFSC Seminar sponsor: NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM Location: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm POC: Diane Tierney (diane.tierney@noaa.gov) Remote access TBD

22 April 2014

Title: From ArcGIS Online to GIS Software: Benefits of the New NOAA ESRI License Agreement
Presenter(s): Tony LaVoi, Kim Jenkins, and Randy Warren
Date & Time: 22 April 2014
11:30 am - 1:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 11153
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar

Title:
From ArcGIS Online to GIS Software: Benefits of the New NOAA ESRI License Agreement

Presenter(s):
Tony LaVoi, Kim Jenkins, and Randy Warren Date: Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 12-1pm ET Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 11153; remote access login below.

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series, POC: tracy.gill@noaa.gov REMOTE ACCESS: Mymeeting Webinars are available through a combination of phone & internet webcast. If you have not used MyMeetings on your computer, you need to download some files; you may need your system admin to do this, so do it well before the seminar. Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# Go the to the webcast site at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.phpsigKey=mymeetings&i=744925156&p=&t=c Enter meeting number 744925156 if needed

Abstract:
Tony LaVoi will kick it off with an overview of NOAA's Enterprise License Agreement (ELA) with ESRI. Kim Jenkins will then walk the audience through the major benefits of the ELA as well as provide information on accessing these benefits. Finally, Randy Warren will give an overview and demonstration of the NOAA GeoPlatform using ESRI's ArcGIS Online software. ABOUT THE SPEAKERS: Tony LaVoi: Geospatial Information Officer for NOAA; Tony has been with NOAA for 17 years. Kim Jenkins: NOS Data Manager; Kim has been with NOAA for 12 years. Randy Warren: NOS Geospatial Coordinator and NOAA GeoPlatform Technical Lead; Randy has been a contractor for NOAA for 8 years.
Title: NOAA Climate.gov: An Audience-Focused Approach to Public Communication
Presenter(s): David Herring, Director of Communications & Education, NOAA Climate Program Office
Date & Time: 22 April 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
NOAA Climate.gov: An Audience-Focused Approach to Public Communication Date/Time: April 22, 2014 10:00-11:00 AKDT Seminar Location: Online Access or at ACCAP (3352 College Rd, Fairbanks AK)

Presenter(s):
David Herring (Director of Communications & Education, NOAA Climate Program Office) OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
OneNOAA Science Seminar, ACCAP Alaska Climate Webinars

Abstract:
Americans' health, security, and economic well-being are closely linked to climate and weather. People want and need information to help them make decisions on how to manage climate-related risks and opportunities they face. How can we balance our interests in tailoring our online communications to particular audiences with our needs to collaborate and integrate our climate data and information into a cohesive, contextualized presentation? Climate.gov is NOAA's primary online source of science and information for a climate-smart nation. The site is a source of public-friendly, timely, and authoritative scientific data and information about climate. It is designed to promote public understanding of climate science and climate-related events, to make our data products and services easy to access and use, to provide climate-related support to the private sector and the Nation's economy, and to help people manage climate-related risks and opportunities. This presentation will feature a high-level overview of the site, lessons learned, and plans for its future evolution.Climate.gov is NOAA's primary online source of science and information for a climate-smart nation. Seminar Remote Access and Notes: For further information and to register, see https://accap.uaf.edu/node/1057, or contact Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu)

23 April 2014

Title: Bringing ocean acidification research to the classroom: A systems thinking approach
Presenter(s): Claudia Ludwig, Institute of Systems Biology
Date & Time: 23 April 2014
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: remote access available- see below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar "Bringing ocean acidification research to the classroom: A systems thinking approach" When: Wednesday, April 23rd, 6pm EDT

Presenter(s):
Claudia Ludwig, Institute of Systems Biology Host: SOARCE webinar series, co-hosted by NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries and Ocean Acidification Program

Abstract:
Ocean acidification is a complex phenomenon with profound consequences. Understanding complexity and the impact of ocean acidification requires systems thinking and collaboration, both in research and in education. Scientific advancement will help us better understand the problem and devise more effective solutions, but executing these solutions will require widespread public participation to mitigate this global problem. In an effort to help high school students understand today's science, we have translated current systems-level ocean acidification research into a 5 week classroom module. We will present this curriculum and provide guidance for easy implementation in high schools. Thus far 13 different schools and over 1200 students have field tested this work " we have seen dramatic increases in engagement, and in students' abilities to use inquiry and to challenge their mental models. The lessons are hands-on, interdisciplinary, and specifically focus on systems thinking which has been shown to enable behavioral change. In this curriculum, students take on the roles of scientists and delegates as they investigate the consequences of the changing carbon cycle on the chemistry and biology of the oceans. Students begin by critically assess different pieces of information through news articles and real-time data. They combine their findings into a network diagram that interconnects key players of this system. Students align themselves with stakeholders and design collaborative, cohesive experiments to test hypotheses and network properties. They explore how carbon dioxide is produced as well as the consequences of increased CO2levels on the pH of water, the integrity of seashells, and the lifecycle of diatoms. In the culminating activity, students act as delegates when reconvening to discuss the systems consequences of ocean acidification. They make recommendations for further research, policy, and lifestyle changes. The module connects to other pertinent lessons being developed locally and globally and provides a clear connection to the Next Generation Science Standards and Ocean Literacy standards. Authors: Claudia Ludwig, Monica V. Orellan, Nitin Baliga. Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/229162946 About the speaker: Claudia Ludwig is the Education Program Manager for the Baliga Lab and a National Board Certified Teacher. Her research focuses on instilling higher level thinking skills in students through systems biology research. To accomplish this, she establishes interdisciplinary teams of scientists, engineers, teachers and students to learn about current systems research. The team then translates that research into curricula, activities, lab kits, and training experiences. In the summer of 2004, Ludwig began working at Institute for Systems Biology (ISB). During the academic year, she taught Biology and Chemistry at International School in Bellevue, WA. She began incorporating the interdisciplinary systems thinking and research she learned at ISB into her coursework and noticed huge gains in student learning. ISB, Ludwig, and Bellevue School District continued to collaborate, and published the program's first curriculum module, Ecological Networks. Shortly thereafter, this program extended to other local school districts resulting in the creation of a second curriculum module, Environmental Influence on Gene Networks. This active and growing program, coined Systems Education Experiences, quickly became a necessity for many teachers. In response, in 2007, Ludwig joined ISB formally to advance these vital efforts. Since that time, hundreds of teachers have received training and two new modules have been published " Observing Beyond our Senses: Inquiry Drives Technology and Ocean Acidification: A Systems Approach to a Global Problem. Currently, two new modules are in development. In addition to managing Systems Education Experiences and establishing interdisciplinary teams, Ludwig also creates and edits content on the widely used Systems Education Experiences website. She also leads curriculum dissemination efforts and trains students and teachers around the world through courses, workshops, webinars, presentations, direct correspondence, and internships. Ludwig graduated from Loyola University of Chicago, earning a Bachelor's Degree in Biology and a Master's Degree in Education with additional emphases in chemistry, curriculum and instruction. She currently serves on University of Washington's Biotech Advisory Board. Prior to teaching in Washington State, Ludwig taught in the Chicagoland area and worked as a social worker for people with developmental disabilities.

24 April 2014

Title: Human-Induced Climate Change and Projections for the Future
Presenter(s): Prof. Dennis L. Hartmann, Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 24 April 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NW Fisheries Science Center, 2725 Montlake Blvd E, Seattle, WA, United States, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Prof. Dennis L. Hartmann, Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington Seminar sponsor: NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM Location: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm POC: Diane Tierney (diane.tierney@noaa.gov) WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=25224058&UID=61391358&RT=MiM0 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 282 627 017 ABSTRACT The current scientific understanding of why humans have changed the global climate of Earth and how we are likely to change it more dramatically in the future will be presented. Observational analyses of change along with model simulations of likely future climates will be presented. Conclusions from the recently completed assessment of the science of climate change by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate change will be reviewed. Critical uncertainties more recent developments will be discussed. BIO Hartmann received his Ph.D. in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics from Princeton University. After post-doctoral appointments at McGill University and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, he joined the faculty of the University of Washington, where he is currently professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Senior Fellow and Council Member of the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean. He served as Chair of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences from 2002-2007. He served as Interim Dean during the first two years of the College of the Environment from 2008-2010. Hartmann's research interests include dynamics of the atmosphere, atmosphere-ocean interaction, and climate change. His primary areas of expertise are atmospheric dynamics, radiation and remote sensing, and mathematical and statistical techniques for data analysis. Current research includes the study of climate feedback processes involving clouds and water vapor, which is approached using remote sensing data, in situ data and models, and attempts to take into account radiative, dynamical and cloud-physical processes. Another focus of his research is observational and modeling studies of the intraseasonal and interannual variability of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system, especially the role of eddy-zonal flow feedbacks and annular modes of variability. Another current interest is the stratosphere and its role in climate Hartmann has published more than 140 articles in refereed scientific journals and published a textbook on Global Physical Climatology in 1994, for which he is currently preparing a second edition. He is a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was awarded the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal in 2005. He was the 2011 Haurwitz Memorial Lecturer for the American Meteorological Society. In 2013 he was awarded the Carl Gustav Rossby Research Medal of the American Meteorological Society, its highest award for research excellence. He has served on numerous advisory, editorial and review boards for the NRC, NSF, NASA and NOAA, and was the Chair of the Board of Trustees of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research from 2011-2013. He served as a Coordinating Lead Author for the Fifth Assessment of The Physical Science Basis of Climate Change for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) from 2010-2014. He currently serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Climate of the American Meteorological Society, is co-editor of the International Geophysics Series of Academic Press. PUBS IPCC, 2013: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Stocker, T.F., D. Qin, G.-K. Plattner, M. Tignor, S.K. Allen, J. Boschung, A. Nauels, Y. Xia, V. Bex and P.M. Midgley (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.

30 April 2014

Title: Building climate-ready fisheries: lessons from the rapidly changing Gulf of Maine
Presenter(s): Andrew J. Pershing, Chief Scientific Officer, Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Katherine E. Mills, Associate Research Scientist, Gulf of Maine Research Institute
Date & Time: 30 April 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3, Rm 9836; remote access is available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Building climate-ready fisheries: lessons from the rapidly changing Gulf of Maine

Presenter(s):
Andrew J. Pershing, Chief Scientific Officer, Gulf of Maine Research Institute (apershing@gmri.org), Katherine E. Mills, Associate Research Scientist, Gulf of Maine Research Institute (kmills@gmri.org) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Fisheries Service, Office of Science and Technology Seminar POC for questions: roger.b.griffis@noaa.gov When: Wed., April 30, 2014, 12:00-13:00h Eastern Time Where: NOAA HQ SSMC3, Rm 9836; remote access is available

Abstract:
Over the last 10 years, the Gulf of Maine has warmed faster than 99.8% of the global. This warming has led to direct impacts on the ecosystem and on the fisheries that depend upon it. The impact of rising water temperatures was especially acute during the "ocean heat wave" of 2012. During this year, mid-Atlantic species such as longfin squid and black sea bass moved rapidly into the Gulf of Maine. The inshore migration of lobsters occurred a month earlier than expected, leading to a price collapse in one of the region's most important fishery. This event highlighted limitations in the adaptive capacity in both the fisheries and fisheries management in the region, but also helped bring into focus opportunities to increase climate-readiness. We are developing a coupled socio-ecological framework to assess the vulnerability of fisheries to climate variability and climate change. We have also identified key steps that fisheries managers can use to build resilience into fish populations. Finally, we highlight opportunities to use observing system assets to support forecasts and other information tools to enable adaptive decisions within fisheries.

Remote Access:
Please register now to receive remote access information. https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7825064084186021890 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Call in: 1-888-577-8993
Title: NOW is the Time to Look at Future Flood Risk (rescheduled from 3/12/14)
Presenter(s): Doug Marcy, NOAA/NOS/CSC/Coastal Geospatial Services
Date & Time: 30 April 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4 8150, Remote access also available - see below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
NOW is the Time to Look at Future Flood Risk

Presenter(s):
Doug Marcy, NOAA/NOS/CSC/Coastal Geospatial Services When: Wed., April 30 2014, 12:00-13:00h Eastern Time (rescheduled from 3/12/14) Where: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Rm 8150; remote access is available; see login info below. Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series and Coastal Services Center Seminar Point of Contact: tracy.gill@noaa.gov REMOTE ACCESS: Mymeeting Webinars use PHONE & INTERNET. If you have not used MyMeetings, you need to download files; you may need your system admin to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. DIAL TOLL FREE (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# WEBCAST URL: Go to www.mymeetings.com and under "Participant Join", click on "Join an Event". Then enter meeting number 744925156 along with your name, email, etc

Abstract:
We have all heard the expressions “things happen for a reason” and “no better time than the present” and “good timing,” right? Well it seems the stage has been set, by either happenstance or by destiny, for the U.S. to finally start looking at our future flood risk. This presentation will discuss how many events came together, between summer of 2012 and summer of 2013, to create the right environment for the U.S. to really start to evaluate future flood risk. NOAA tools and data to evaluate sea level rise and coastal flooding impacts for the coastal U.S. will be demonstrated. New inter-agency pilot efforts to incorporate projected sea level rise into the National Flood Insurance Program mapping will be discussed.

Bio(s):
Doug Marcy is a Coastal Hazards Specialist at the NOAA National Ocean Service / Coastal Services Center (CSC), Charleston, SC. He has been with NOAA for 12 years working on enhancing flooding forecast products and GIS capability, storm surge assessments, sea level level rise visualization, and coastal hazards assessment projects contributing to more disaster resilient communities.

1 May 2014

Title: Deciphering sixty years of environmental data to understand recent change in the world's largest lake - Lake Baikal, Siberia
Presenter(s): Dr. Stephanie Hampton, Director and professor, Director of Center for Environmental Research, Education and Outreach; Professor of School of the Environment, Washington State University
Date & Time: 1 May 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NW Fisheries Science Center, 2725 Montlake Blvd E, Seattle, WA, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Dr. Stephanie Hampton, Director and professor, Director of Center for Environmental Research, Education and Outreach; Professor of School of the Environment, Washington State University Location: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm POC: Diane Tierney (diane.tierney@noaa.gov) WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=25224058&UID=61391358&RT=MiM0 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 282 627 017 ABSTRACT Lake Baikal in Siberia is the world's largest freshwater lake (by volume) and the most biologically diverse lake, with many endemic cold-adapted species. The distinctive seasonal structure of the community may exhibit particularly strong responses to changes in average temperature and timing of seasonal transitions associated with climate change. A 58-year record of Lake Baikal temperature and plankton has been collected by three generations of researchers at Irkutsk State University in Siberia, allowing our Russian-American research team to examine dynamics of temperature and biota over the past half century. Long-term warming has been rapid and especially pronounced in summer, and seasonal temperature patterns have shifted in a manner that reveals climate teleconnections consistent with dynamics of the jet stream trajectory and associated storm track variability in central Asia. The abundance of cosmopolitan biota has increased in summer, while endemic taxa show complex dynamics over time, including changes in vertical distribution that suggest stronger stratification in summer months, potentially altering flow of energy through the food web. BIO Dr. Stephanie Hampton is a Professor and Director of the Center for Environmental Research, Education and Outreach at Washington State University. Her research ranges from basic investigations in aquatic science using statistical analysis of large databases to broader applications of empirical evidence in environmental issues and policy. Working with long-term ecological data sets from globally distributed lakes as diverse as Lake Baikal in Siberia and Lake Washington in Seattle, her research collaborations have revealed the nature of lake responses to municipal management actions such as sewage diversion and the effects climate change on plankton which form the base of lake food webs. Prior to joining WSU, she was the Deputy Director of the National Science Foundation's flagship synthesis center, the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, where data-intensive collaborative research efforts crossed the spectrum of environmental sciences - from economic impacts of invasive forest insects to developing novel statistics for stream research to evaluating marine fisheries management strategies. She is an advocate for data sharing and open science, leading efforts to improve computational literacy and accessibility of robust cyberinfrastructure in the environmental sciences. PUBS Hampton, S.E., D.K. Gray, L.R. Izmest'eva, M.V. Moore, and T. Ozersky. 2014. The rise and fall of plankton: long-term changes in the vertical distribution of algae and grazers in Lake Baikal, Siberia. PLoS ONE: 9(2): e88920. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0088920

5 May 2014

Title: FKWs and Fisheries seminar
Presenter(s): Robin Baird, Cascadia Research Collective
Date & Time: 5 May 2014
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 Room 13836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
False killer whales and fisheries interactions in Hawaiian waters: implications for management

Presenter(s):
Robin Baird (Cascadia Research Collective) Seminar sponsor: NOAA NMFS, Office of Protected Resources, Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Conservation Division Seminar POC for questions: lisa.white@noaa.gov When: Mon., May 5, 2014, 11:00-12:00h Eastern Time Where: NOAA HQ SSMC3, Rm 13836; remote access is available

Abstract:
There are three populations of false killer whales in Hawaiian waters. One of these, the pelagic population, has bycatch levels in the tuna longline fishery that exceed the Potential Biological Removal level. The main Hawaiian Islands insular population was listed as endangered in 2012, and in the status review, interactions with nearshore fisheries were ranked as one of the most important current and future threats. Since there is no observer coverage in nearshore fisheries, we assessed the frequency of individual false killer whales with scarring patterns that are consistent with fisheries interactions for the three populations in Hawaiian waters. Results suggest that individuals from the endangered main Hawaiian Islands population have higher rates of fisheries interactions than individuals from the pelagic or northwestern Hawaiian Islands populations. Furthermore, females appear to be disproportionately involved in fisheries interactions, with important implications for population recovery. Implications for management and population monitoring will be discussed. About the speakers: Robin Baird is a Research Biologist with Cascadia Research Collective in Olympia, Washington, and a member of the Committee of Scientific Advisors on Marine Mammals for the Marine Mammal Commission. Robin has been undertaking research on false killer whales and other odontocetes in Hawaiian waters since 1999.

Remote Access:
Webex link below Topic: False killer whale lecture Date: Monday, May 5, 2014 Time: 11:00 am, Eastern Daylight Time (New York, GMT-04:00) Meeting Number: 992 090 466 Meeting Password: whale ------------------------------------------------------- To join the online meeting (Now from mobile devices!) ------------------------------------------------------- 1. Go to https://noaa-meets.webex.com/noaa-meets/j.php?MTID=m8fa030eb1bd8280976503b6efb7cf243 2. If requested, enter your name and email address. 3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: whale 4. Click "Join". To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link: https://noaa-meets.webex.com/noaa-meets/j.php?MTID=mbe6de3fb4c161b06523db77c7baefb06 ------------------------------------------------------- To join the audio conference only ------------------------------------------------------- US TOLL: 1-650-479-3207 Access code:992 090 466 -------------------------------------------------------
Title: Emissions Implications of Future Natural Gas Production and Use in the U.S. and Rocky Mountain Region
Presenter(s): Jeff McLeod, Research Associate, University of Colorado Boulder
Date & Time: 5 May 2014
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: ESRL, David Skaggs Research Center (DSRC) Room GC402 (No online access)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Monday, May 5, 2014, 2:00 - 3:30 pm Boulder, CO David Skaggs Research Center (DSRC) Room GC402

Presenter(s):
Jeff McLeod, Research Associate (University of Colorado Boulder) Emissions Implications of Future Natural Gas Production and Use in the U.S. and Rocky Mountain Region

Sponsor(s):
Earth System Research Laboratory Global Monitoring Division and Sustainable Energy and Atmospheric Sciences Seminar Brought to you by NOAA, NREL, and CU-Boulder Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute (RASEI) POC for questions: Rhonda.K.Lange@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The recent increase in U.S. natural gas production made possible through advancements in extraction techniques including hydraulic fracturing has transformed the U.S. energy supply landscape while raising questions regarding the balance of environmental impacts associated with natural gas production and use. Impact areas at issue include emissions of methane and criteria pollutants from natural gas production, alongside changes in emissions from increased use of natural gas in place of coal for electricity generation. In the Rocky Mountain region, these impact areas have been subject to additional scrutiny due to the high level of regional oil and gas production activity and concerns over its links to air quality. Here, the MARKAL (MArket ALlocation) least-cost energy system optimization model in conjunction with the EPA-MARKAL nine-region database has been used to characterize future regional and national emissions of CO2, CH4, VOC, and NOx attributed to natural gas production and use in several sectors of the economy. The analysis is informed by comparing and contrasting a base case, business-as-usual scenario with scenarios featuring variations in future natural gas supply characteristics, constraints affecting the electricity generation mix, carbon emission reduction strategies and increased demand for natural gas in the transportation sector. Emission trends and their associated sensitivities are identified and contrasted between the Rocky Mountain region and the U.S. as a whole. The modeling results of this study illustrate the resilience of the short term greenhouse gas emission benefits associated with fuel switching from coal to gas in the electric sector, but also call attention to the long term implications of increasing natural gas production and use for emissions of methane and VOCs, especially in the Rocky Mountain region. This analysis can help to inform the broader discussion of the potential environmental impacts of future natural gas production and use by illustrating links between relevant economic and environmental variables. About The

Presenter(s):
Jeff McLeod is a Masters candidate at the University of Colorado at Boulder in the Mechanical Engineering department. At CU Boulder Jeff's research focus is on assessing the air quality and climate change impacts of natural gas production and use using energy system modeling. His other academic and professional interests include renewable energy systems, energy markets, energy engineering, and development & deployment of new energy technologies from an engineering perspective. He also has extensive teaching and tutoring experience, and takes an interest in education in general and in particular reforming and rethinking traditional pedagogical approaches in the STEM fields. Visitor information: The Sustainable Energy and Atmospheric Sciences seminar series is designed to enhance communication and collaboration among scientists at NREL, NOAA, and others in the community working on issues related to renewable energy. Scientists at the University of Colorado, School of Mines, Colorado State University, National Center for Atmospheric Research, and the private sector are encouraged to participate. If you plan to attend and do not work at NOAA, please contact Rhonda Lange (Rhonda.K.Lange@noaa.gov) at least one day in advance, so that she can give your name to the security office to facilitate your entrance to the campus. Visitors must have photo identification. International attendees are required to present a passport. We will have additional staff to hand out badges to visitors who call ahead. If security personnel asks for a point of contact, please use Rhonda Lange (x6045) or Holly Palm (x6000). If you are a foreign national without permanent residency, please call or email so security can be notified in advance. For more visitor information http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/about/visiting.html

6 May 2014

Title: A coupled energy & air quality model for lowest cost energy solutions, respecting air quality constraints: development and initial results
Presenter(s): Daniel S. Zachary
Date & Time: 6 May 2014
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP Conference Center
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC-CPC seminar 1. Please join my meeting. https://global.gotomeeting.com/meeting/join/181315461 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. United States: +1 (312) 878-3078 Access Code: 181-315-461 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting

Title:
A coupled energy & air quality model for lowest cost energy solutions, respecting air quality constraints: development and initial results

Presenter(s):
Daniel S. Zachary

Abstract:
This presentation describes the development and initial results of an integrated assessment model for the urban scale (< 150 miles). The model uses a full database of energy sources, devices, and their emissions for the four broad sectors of the energy economy: transportation, industrial, residential, and commercial. We study national energy scenarios for Luxembourg using a detailed energy description and transition methodology, based on an urban adaptation of the MARket ALlocation (MARKAL) Model. Emissions are geo-spatially distributed via a land cover interface and fed to an efficient urban scale air quality transport model. A function representing ozone levels based on primary NOX and VOC emissions are used to produce optimal energy scenarios satisfying air quality regulatory limits. This coupled approach called the LEAQ (Luxembourg Energy Air Quality) model is suitable to address sustainable urban infrastructure and policy questions by exploring future (≈ 50 year horizon) air quality snap shots for different emissions and climate scenarios. We show initial validation and results and compare with ground station measurements. POC: Contact Michiko.Masutani@noaa.gov
Title: Uncertainties in forward passive microwave brightness temperatures and what to do about them
Presenter(s): Jeff Steward, UCLA, Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering
Date & Time: 6 May 2014
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Conference Center, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
JCSDA Seminar Series

Title:
Uncertainties in forward microwave brightness temperatures and what to do about them

Presenter(s):
Jeff Steward UCLA, Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering

Abstract:
Forward simulations of cloudy satellite radiances are fraught with uncertainty especially in the microwave regime. The scattering parameters that determine satellite brightness temperatures critically depend on complex, unknown size and shape distributions of liquid and solid hydrometeors. These uncertainties can lead to differences of 50 K or more in forward calculations alone, and therefore this issue must be addressed before attempting to assimilate this data into operational models. In this talk, I will quantify some of the various sources of uncertainty in passive microwave radiances (e.g. TRMM/TMI). I will also present an elegant method we have developed at UCLA and JPL to assimilate these uncertain observations. This method is based upon statistical inference using the directions of the most certain correlations. The uncertain directions can be neglected, thus reducing the order of the problem as well as regularizing the mapping. The observation error covariance formulation also becomes straightforward and elegant. We present the encouraging results of our microwave brightness temperatures simulation in both 1D-Var and Ensemble Kalman Filter frameworks. WebEx and Audio information available at: http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php POC: Kevin.Garrett@noaa.gov

8 May 2014

Title: Are deep-sea corals & sponges protected from commercial bottom fishing by the marine protected area network in Southern California?
Presenter(s): Peter Etnoyer, Enrique Salgado, Kevin Stierhoff, Stephanie Nehasil
Date & Time: 8 May 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Are deep-sea corals and sponges protected from commercial bottom fishing by the marine protected area network in Southern California?

Presenter(s):
Peter Etnoyer, Enrique Salgado, Kevin Stierhoff, Stephanie Nehasil Where: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 8150, and remote access login info below. When: Thursday, May 8, 2014, 12-1pm ET

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; Point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov REMOTE ACCESS: Mymeeting webinars use PHONE & INTERNET. You may need to download MyMeetings files; you may need your system admin to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. FOR AUDIO: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# FOR WEBCAST: go to mymeetings.com Under Participant Join, click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting number: 744925156 NO PASSCODE is required.

Abstract:
Deep-sea corals and sponges thrive between 45-500 meters depth in the cold, upwelling waters and complex benthic topography of the Southern California Bight (SCB). Corals and sponges are vulnerable to bottom-contact fishing, so there is a need to understand the spatial overlap of commercial fishing activities with these deep-water coral habitats. This study characterized fishing intensity, marine debris, corals, and sponges on 25 deep-water banks in SCB. Fishing intensity was estimated using commercial fisheries landings (2007-2011) from California Department of Fish and Game with observations of marine debris, corals, and sponges in images from 350 remotely operate vehicle dives conducted by NOAA since 2003. Survey sites were ranked using a novel algorithm that weighs richness, abundance, frequency, and fishing intensity (RAFFi) to prioritize sites for conservation. Priorities were compared to protections offered by existing essential fish habitat (EFH) and other marine protected areas in Southern California.
Title: Listening to our Sanctuaries: Understanding & Reducing the Impacts of Underwater Noise in Marine Protected Areas
Presenter(s): Leila Hatch, Ph.D. " Gerry E. Studds Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 8 May 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 11153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Listening to our Sanctuaries: Understanding and Reducing the Impacts of Underwater Noise in Marine Protected Areas Where: Remote access and SSMC4, Rm. 11153 Large Conference Room To register, visit: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/916410096 Toll: +1 (480) 297-0021 Access Code: 126-444-677 Webinar ID: 916-410-096

Presenter(s):
Leila Hatch, Ph.D. " Gerry E. Studds Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary Increasing levels of human activity are contributing increasing levels of underwater noise to the world's aquatic places. In the U.S., the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is the federal agency most responsible for preventing harm to aquatic animals and their habitats. This presentation will discuss NOAA's interest in conserving acoustic habitat quality in addition to minimizing adverse physical and behavioral impacts of noise to specific species. It will also focus on the role that National Marine Sanctuaries are playing in NOAA's ocean noise strategy through both science and management initiatives. When: May 8, 2014 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. Eastern Seminar POC for questions: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center This webinar is co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, EBM Tools Network, OpenChannels.org, MPA News and EcoAdapt. http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 8 May 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 8 May 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

Each month, a speaker will give a presentation on various topics related to NGS programs, projects, products and services to educate constituents about NGS activities. Visit the Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/. Future webinars will be held on the second Thursday of every month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.
Title: Pacific Climate Variability: Dynamical processes affecting the ocean-atmosphere system along the U.S. West coast
Presenter(s): Dr. Arthur Miller, University of California, San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Date & Time: 8 May 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Dr. Arthur Miller, University of California, San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography Location: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm POC: Diane Tierney (diane.tierney@noaa.gov) WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=25224058&UID=61391358&RT=MiM0 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 282 627 017 ABSTRACT The dynamical mechanisms associated with climate variations such as PDO, NPGO and ENSO will be discussed in the context of their influence on the California Current and the regional climate of the U.S. West Coast, with particular emphasis on their ability to organize patterns of ecosystem response in the ocean. Elements of this physical variability that have the largest potential for exploiting predictable signals will be highlighted. BIO Dr. Art Miller is currently a Research Oceanographer and a Senior Lecturer in Climate Sciences at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (UCSD). He is also Director of the Climate, Atmospheric Science, and Physical Oceanography (CASPO) Division. He is a physical oceanographer who studies oceanic influences on climate variability using a combination of computer simulation models and observational analysis. His research extends from basic issues in physical oceanography to a variety of topics in climate dynamics, atmospheric dynamics, data assimilation, regional impacts of global climate change, and oceanic ecosystem response to physical forcing. He also serves on the U.S. CLIVAR Phenomena Observations and Synthesis (POS) Panel, and has served on the U.S. GLOBEC Scientific Steering Committee, the PICES Evaluations of Climate Change Working Group, the Bering Ecosystem Study (BEST) Scientific Steering Committee, and the U.S. CLIVAR Pacific Sector Implementation Panel. PUBLICATIONS http://horizon.ucsd.edu/miller/download/CCE_Modeling/CCE_Modeling.pdf http://horizon.ucsd.edu/miller/download/CCE_Climate-Physics/CCE_Climate-Physics.pdf http://horizon.ucsd.edu/miller/download/NPGO/NPGO.pdf http://horizon.ucsd.edu/miller/download/jgofs/JO_60-1-11.pdf http://horizon.ucsd.edu/miller/download/pices/prog_oc_text.pdf

14 May 2014

Title: What is “blue” carbon?? A win win for habitat conservation and climate mitigation
Presenter(s): Dr. Ariana Sutton-Grier, NOS Office of the Administrator and Amber Moore, NMFS Office of Habitat, Habitat Protection Division
Date & Time: 14 May 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Rm 8150
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
What is “blue” carbon?? A win-win for habitat conservation and climate mitigation

Presenter(s):
Dr. Ariana Sutton-Grier, NOS Office of the Administrator and Amber Moore, NMFS Office of Habitat, Habitat Protection Division Date/Time: Wed., May 14, 2014, 12-1pm ET Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 8150, Remote access login info. below.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series Point of Contact: tracy.gill@noaa.gov (301-713-3028x150) REMOTE ACCESS: Mymeeting webinars use PHONE & INTERNET. You may need to download MyMeetings files; you may need your system admin to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. FOR AUDIO: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# FOR WEBCAST: go to mymeetings.com Under Participant Join, click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting no: 744925156 NO PASSCODE is required.

Abstract:
“Blue carbon,” the carbon taken up and stored by coastal and marine ecosystems, represents a vast, previously unrecognized natural carbon sink. Coastal blue carbon habitats, including salt marshes, mangroves, and seagrasses, sequester carbon at rates 10 times higher than forested ecosystems and store carbon in their soil that is often hundreds or thousands of years old. As such, in addition to giving other important climate adaptation benefits to coastal communities like storm protection, nursery habitats for fish, and water purification, this coastal blue carbon reserve is a crucial part of natural climate mitigation. This discussion will describe NOAA's current efforts, with partners, to support blue carbon science and policy as well as describing potential opportunities for future engagement.
Title: What Can Ecosystem Models Add to the Stock Assessment Process?
Presenter(s): Dr. Cameron Ainsworth, University of South Florida
Date & Time: 14 May 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
What Can Ecosystem Models Add to the Stock Assessment Process?

Presenter(s):
Dr. Cameron Ainsworth (University of South Florida) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Fisheries QUEST Program Seminar POC for questions: Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov When: Thurs., May. 14, 2014, 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time Where: Limited seating will be available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, Fishbowl Conference Room; Remote access is primary format, available at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/557154833

Abstract:
Ecosystem and multispecies models account for a variety of factors not typically modeled in single species stock assessment. These include trophic and behavioral interactions between species and potentially also habitat effects, climate variation and directional climate change, and interactions with various marine-use industries. Dr. Ainsworth will highlight recent case studies from the United States, Mexico, Indonesia and Australia where ecosystem models were used to supplement single-species management. Typical applications of ecosystem models include producing time series of natural mortality for use in single species models, development of equilibrium catch and biomass curves that account for species interactions (modifying optimal fishing mortality rate ([Fopt] and MSY), producing multi-species yield per recruit plots for help in gear specifications and setting basket quotas, quantifying ecosystem services provided by one fishery target species to another, and use of management strategy evaluation " a closed loop simulation-based procedure for optimizing harvest control rules. Dr. Ainsworth will discuss obstacles in achieving broader use of ecosystem models in fisheries management and conclude with new directions for NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment program such as the use of a model ensemble approach. About the speaker: Dr. Ainsworth's research is focused on understanding how human activities and climate influence the structure and functioning of marine communities and developing new tools and methodologies to support ecosystem-based management. As part of this research, Dr. Ainsworth and his students employ a variety of statistical and numerical simulation models to characterize trophic linkages in marine ecosystems, habitat use by fish and invertebrates, and the influence of physical oceanography on the distribution of marine life. His ongoing studies include a management strategy evaluation (MSE) of Gulf of Mexico marine protected area design. The MSE approach is a type of closed-loop policy analysis that simulates each part of Holling's adaptive management cycle (stock assessment, implementation of harvest rules, and policy evaluation). Key to this approach is recognizing feedbacks from the ecosystem that occur in response to management actions and evaluating tradeoffs with respect to socioeconomic and ecological policy objectives. This work is being done in collaboration with NOAA as part of their Integrated Ecosystem Assessment for the Gulf of Mexico, and other Gulf-area agencies. Another major project ongoing in the Ainsworth lab is the evaluation of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. This study focuses on the short and long-term impacts of oil toxicity in the ecosystem, as well as the impacts of mediation actions like the use of dispersants and fishery closures.

Remote Access:
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/557154833

15 May 2014

Title: From Climate Projections to Freshwater Impacts: Considerations and Approaches
Presenter(s): Dr. Guillaume Mauger, University of Washington, Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean
Date & Time: 15 May 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Dr. Guillaume Mauger, University of Washington, Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean Location: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm POC: Diane Tierney (diane.tierney@noaa.gov) ABSTRACT Recently developed analyses of historical and future climate and hydrology for the Pacific Northwest can be used to assess variations in impacts of climate change across the landscape, uncertainty in projections, and extreme events. I will provide an overview of a variety of hydrological models and current modeling results for this region under different climate scenarios. Using wolverines as an example, I will show recent projections from a downscaled ensemble climate model (i.e., snow cover within the Columbia, Upper Missouri and Upper Colorado River Basins), and how we used this information with dispersal modeling to show indications of increasingly smaller and more fragmented populations by the late 21st century. I will also clarify how to access various data products. BIO Dr. Guillaume Mauger is currently a Research Scientist with the Climate Impacts Group (CIG) at the College of the Environment, UW. He received his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA. His research interests include Climate Change Impacts, Climate Monitoring, Statistical analysis of large-scale datasets, and Cloud-Climate interactions. WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=25224058&UID=61391358&RT=MiM0 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 282 627 017

19 May 2014

Title: Science to support ecosystem-based management of coral reef ecosystems and fisheries in the Pacific Islands and Coral Triangle
Presenter(s): CRED), Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, NMFS
Date & Time: 19 May 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NMFS - HQ - ST4 Conf Line, SSMC3-9836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Rusty Brainard, PhD, Chief of the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, NMFS

Sponsor(s):
Joint NMFS/NOS Seminar:

GoToMeeting: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/r5d878xe6lf/
Call-in
number: 877-984-9436 Passcode: 8591340

Abstract:
The seminar will be providing an overview of the interdisciplinary mapping, assessment, long-term monitoring, and research of the coral reef ecosystems of the U.S. Pacific Islands conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science since 2000 as part of NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) and the National Coral Reef Monitoring Plan (NCRMP). Our team conducts systematic integrated ecosystem observations of the reef fishes, corals, other invertebrates, algae, and microbes in the context of their benthic habitats and varying oceanographic conditions across diverse biogeographic, environmental, and human-impact gradients from the main and Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in the North Pacific to Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands in the Western Pacific to American Samoa in the South Pacific to the Pacific Remote Island Areas in the central equatorial Pacific. These observations are specifically designed to better understand and predict the impacts of fishing, land-based sources of pollution, and climate change and ocean acidification on reef systems to support informed decision making and implementation of ecosystem-based management. The work to monitor the ecological impacts of ocean acidification on reef systems is also supported by NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program.

The talk will also briefly discuss efforts over the past 3+ years to provide technical assistance and capacity building on an ecosystem approach to fisheries management (EAFM) and incorporating considerations of climate and ocean change into an EAFM to the countries of the Coral Triangle and Southeast Asia with support from the U.S. Agency for International Development.

POC: jihong.dai@noaa.gov

GoToMeeting: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/r5d878xe6lf/

Call-in number: 877-984-9436 Passcode: 8591340

(Rusty Brainard, PhD, Chief of the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division

20 May 2014

Title: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Science Review
Presenter(s): Michael Uhart, moderator
Date & Time: 20 May 2014
8:00 am - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Science Review Dates:May 20 - 21, 2014

Presenter(s):
Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory leadership and research scientists POC for questions: michael.uhart@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) periodically conducts laboratory science reviews to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted within each OAR laboratory and to provide strategic advice to the laboratory. As part of this process, the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) will be reviewed May 20-21, 2014, in Princeton, New Jersey. The review will examine the following research areas: (1) Modeling the Earth System; (2) Climate Variability and Change: Understanding and Prediction; and (3) Chemistry, Carbon, Ecosystems, and Climate. OAR and GFDL leadership will provide overviews of the programs, followed by sessions of presentations from scientists in each of the above research areas. The review agenda and supporting materials are posted on the GFDL Laboratory Review website: http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/2014review. Remote access via GoToWebinar will be available. Please register using the links below. Note there is a different link for each day. This meeting will be in broadcast mode only. All time for questions is reserved for the review panel to conduct their business. Date: Tuesday, May 20, 2014 Time: 8:00 AM " 4:00 PM EDT Link: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/694630874 Date: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 Time: 8:15 AM " 4:00 PM EDT Link: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/225439130
Title: Moose and Caribou in the Face of Climate Change: Winners or Losers?
Presenter(s): Kris Hundertmark, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 20 May 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Moose and Caribou in the Face of Climate Change: Winners or Losers? When: Tuesday, May 20, 2014; 10-11am AKDT

Presenter(s):
Kris Hundertmark, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Abstract:
Climate change will have impacts on animals living in northern environments that go far beyond shifting habitats, and some species may fare better than others. This presentation looks at factors involved in evaluating the impact of future climate change on moose and also presents the results of a recent study that predicts changes in the genetic diversity of caribou relative to changing climate. POC: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu WEBINAR: https://accap.uaf.edu/?q=webinars

21 May 2014

Title: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Science Review
Presenter(s): Michael Uhart, moderator
Date & Time: 21 May 2014
8:00 am - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Science Review Dates:May 20 - 21, 2014

Presenter(s):
Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory leadership and research scientists POC for questions: michael.uhart@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) periodically conducts laboratory science reviews to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted within each OAR laboratory and to provide strategic advice to the laboratory. As part of this process, the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) will be reviewed May 20-21, 2014, in Princeton, New Jersey. The review will examine the following research areas: (1) Modeling the Earth System; (2) Climate Variability and Change: Understanding and Prediction; and (3) Chemistry, Carbon, Ecosystems, and Climate. OAR and GFDL leadership will provide overviews of the programs, followed by sessions of presentations from scientists in each of the above research areas. The review agenda and supporting materials are posted on the GFDL Laboratory Review website: http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/2014review. Remote access via GoToWebinar will be available. Please register using the links below. Note there is a different link for each day. This meeting will be in broadcast mode only. All time for questions is reserved for the review panel to conduct their business. Date: Tuesday, May 20, 2014 Time: 8:00 AM " 4:00 PM EDT Link: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/694630874 Date: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 Time: 8:15 AM " 4:00 PM EDT Link: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/225439130

22 May 2014

Title: Findings from the 3rd National Climate Assessment: Implications for Water Utility Management, Planning and Decision Making
Presenter(s): Paul Fleming, Seattle Public Utilities and Aris Georgakakos, Georgia Institute of Technology Co-Convening Lead Authors, Water Resources Chapter of the Third National Climate Assessment
Date & Time: 22 May 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars When: Thursday, May 22, 2014; 1:00 - 2:00 pm EDT Where: Online access only

Presenter(s):
Paul Fleming, Seattle Public Utilities and Aris Georgakakos, Georgia Institute of Technology Co-Convening Lead Authors, Water Resources Chapter of the Third National Climate Assessment Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/738393186 Seminar sponsor: SARP Webinar Series (May) Seminar POC for questions: amrith.sagar@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The NOAA Sectoral Applications Research Program (SARP), US National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Water Research Foundation, Water Environment Federation (WEF), Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) and American Water Works Association (AWWA) announce our next joint webinar as part of our series on “Climate Information for Managing Risks In Water Resources.” This month's presentation will be focused on "Findings from the 3rd National Climate Assessment: Implications for Water Utility Management, Planning and Decision Making". This presentation is being made by Paul Fleming (Seattle Public Utilities) and Aris Georgakakos, (Professor and Director, Georgia Water Resources Institute at the School of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology). They were the co-Convening Lead Authors of the Water Resources Chapter of the National Climate Assessment. The description of the talk is below. Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/738393186
Title: Science journalism in a changing media landscape
Presenter(s): Ms. Hannah Hickey
Date & Time: 22 May 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Ms. Hannah Hickey Location: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm POC: Diane Tierney (diane.tierney@noaa.gov) WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=25224058&UID=61391358&RT=MiM0 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 282 627 017 ABSTRACT Love it or hate it, most people get their science news through the popular media. That landscape has shifted dramatically as digital information takes over from print. We'll talk about changes in the news media, the role of an institutional press office, how best to communicate your research, and how to preserve your time and sanity during the process. When should you reach out to the media? What should you do when a reporter calls? How do you avoid being misquoted? Where does social media fit in? Why do it at all? The talk will include anecdotes from the science-communication trenches, and will invite audience members to share their own experiences in working with the media. BIO Hannah Hickey is a science writer in the UW's News Office, where she writes press releases on oceanography, polar research, atmospheric science and climate research. She previously covered the UW College of Engineering. She earned a certificate in science writing from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and did internships at the Monterey County Herald newspaper and in Stanford University's news office, and a fellowship at the Idaho National Laboratory. She also worked as a freelance science writer. PUBS "Hack the planet? Geoengineering research, ethics, governance explored" http://www.washington.edu/news/2013/12/17/hack-the-planet-geoengineering-research-ethics-governance-explored/ "Pollution in Northern Hemisphere helped cause 1980s African drought" http://www.washington.edu/news/2013/06/06/pollution-in-northern-hemisphere-helped-cause-1980s-african-drought/ "Using earthquake sensors to track endangered whales" http://www.washington.edu/news/2013/05/13/using-earthquake-sensors-to-track-endangered-whales/ "Smartphones, tablets help UW researchers improve storm forecasts" http://www.washington.edu/news/2013/02/06/smartphones-tablets-help-uw-researchers-improve-storm-forecasts/

23 May 2014

Title: The development and application of long-range forecasting of extreme events across Australia
Presenter(s): Dr Chris White " University of Tasmania
Date & Time: 23 May 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP EMC large conference room, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
CPC-EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Dr Chris White " University of Tasmania Tittle: The development and application of long-range forecasting of extreme events across Australia When: May 23, 2014, Rm 2155 at noon Join the GoTomeeting https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/402415997 The conference call 866-685-5896 passcode: 8108134# Meeting ID: 402-415-997

Abstract:
There is increasing demand for more skilful, long"range predictions of extreme events across Australia. Recent extreme events, such as flooding in Queensland and New South Wales in 2011 and the record"breaking heat waves and bushfires in early 2013 experienced across much of Australia, mean that many sectors " particularly the emergency management, agriculture and health communities " are endeavouring to find strategies to cope with such increasingly long and intense extremes. These events have highlighted the need for improved weather forecasts beyond the typical one"week weather forecast. With the improvement of numerical prediction models based on coupled general circulation models (GCMs), ensemble prediction techniques and initialization methods, there is now increasing international focus on the sub"seasonal (i.e. multi"week) to seasonal prediction timescales. In Australia, the Bureau of Meteorology is actively investigating the use of its operational dynamical seasonal forecast model POAMA for providing multi"week forecasts to fill the gap in prediction capability between weather forecasts and seasonal outlooks and beyond. This seminar explores some of the recent extreme weather events experienced across Australia and looks at some of the key large"scale climatic processes that drive them, such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), and examine the ability of POAMA to simulate and forecast these processes in relation to extreme heat waves. The analysis of the climate drivers determines where the POAMA system provides skilful forecasts of extreme events on various timescales and identifies important 'windows' of forecast opportunity and guides future model development.

27 May 2014

Title: High Winds in Extratropical Cyclones
Presenter(s): David M Schultz, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
Date & Time: 27 May 2014
9:00 am - 10:00 am ET
Location: NCWCP Media Center, 5830 University Research Ct, College Park, MD
Description:



Title:
High Winds in Extratropical Cyclones: What We Know and What We Don't

Presenter(s):
David M Schultz (University of Manchester, United Kingdom Seminar sponsor: NWS, NCEP, Ocean Prediction Center Seminar POC for questions: joseph.sienkiewicz@noaa.gov When: Tuesday, May 27, 2014, 9:00-10:00h Eastern Time Where: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), University Research Ct, College Park, MD; Media Center. Remote access is not available.

Abstract:
Strong windstorms in extratropical cyclones occurring at the tail end of bent-back fronts in Shapiro"Keyser cyclones often are attributed to the sting jet, a descending airstream from the midtroposphere. However, not all strong winds around the low center are due to the sting jet, as is sometimes incorrectly assumed. Another airstream responsible for such strong winds is the cold conveyor belt, the airstream passing under the warm front and around the cyclone at low levels. To help discriminate between the sting jet and the cold conveyor belt, two cases of extratropical cyclones with hurricane-force surface winds are presented. One possessed a strong sting jet but weak winds in the cold conveyor belt; the other possessed a strong cold conveyor belt but no sting jet. Diagnostics to distinguish between these two types of windstorms are presented. Horizontal maps and vertical cross sections illustrate the distinct characteristics of the sting jet and cold conveyor belt, providing guidance to aid their discrimination and serving as two endpoints along a spectrum of possible extratropical cyclone structures. This presentation will also discuss what more remains to be learned about such windstorms.

Remote Access:
Remote access is not available.
Title: Predicting the future? Comparative Forecasting and a Test for Persistence in the El Nino Southern Oscillation and new ideas
Presenter(s): Daniel Zachary
Date & Time: 27 May 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP conference center
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
CPC-EMC seminar 1. Please join my meeting. https://global.gotomeeting.com/meeting/join/201479885 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. United States: +1 (213) 493-0622 Access Code: 201-479-885 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID:201-479-885

Title:
Predicting the future? Comparative Forecasting and a Test for Persistence in the El Nino Southern Oscillation and new ideas

Presenter(s):
Daniel Zachary https://sites.google.com/site/dszacharyprofessionalsite/home

Abstract:
We present a statistical analysis on El Nino. Analysis is done for two single-indicator forecasting methods for the El Nino Southern Oscillation based on oscillation persistence. We use the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) to produce short term 5 month forecasts and a Bayesian approach to explore SOI persistence, with results compared to a benchmarking Taylor Series expansion. We find signal persistence is important when forecasting more than a few months and the models presented may provide a relatively simple approach to environmental risk forecasting in situations where the underlying phenomenon exhibits substantial persistence. We update the analysis with new results for 2014. We supplement the discussion with some new ideas and initial results that are expected to improve the analysis and strengthen the statistical forecasting method.
Title: Low Cost and Low Carbon Emission: Wind and Solar Energy Systems are Feasible for Large Geographic Domains
Presenter(s): Alexander E. MacDonald, Ph.D, Director, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory
Date & Time: 27 May 2014
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: ESRL, David Skaggs Research Center (DSRC) Room GC402, Boulder, Colorado 80305
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Low Cost and Low Carbon Emission: Wind and Solar Energy Systems are Feasible for Large Geographic Domains When: Tuesday, May 27, 2014, 1:30 - 3:00 pm Where: David Skaggs Research Center (DSRC) Room GC402, Boulder, Colorado 80305

Presenter(s):
Alexander E. MacDonald, Ph.D, Director NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Christopher Clack, Ph.D, Research Scientist CIRES/NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/455275386 Seminar POC for questions: rhonda.k.lange@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The importance of weather-driven renewable energies for the United States energy portfolio is growing. The main perceived problems with weather-driven renewable energies are their intermittent nature, low power density, and high costs. In 2009 we began a large-scale investigation into the characteristics of weather-driven renewables. The project utilized the best available weather data assimilation model to compute high spatial and temporal resolution power datasets for the renewable resources of wind and solar PV. The weather model used is the Rapid Update Cycle for the years of 2006-2008. The team also collated a detailed electrical load dataset for the contiguous USA from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for the same three-year period. The coincident time series of electrical load and weather data allows the possibility of temporally correlated computations for optimal design over large geographic areas. In the past two years, the team have designed and built a sophisticated mathematical optimization tool that is based upon linear programming with an economic objective. The tool has been constructed to include salient features of the electrical grid, such as; transmission, construction and siting constraints, reserve requirements, electrical losses due to transmission, asynchronous regions, "reliability" enforcement, capital costs, fuel costs, and many others. One important test included existing US carbon free power sources, natural gas power when needed, and a High Voltage Direct Current power transmission network. This study shows that the costs and carbon emissions from an optimally designed national system decrease with geographic size. It shows that with achievable estimates of wind and solar generation costs, that the US could decrease its carbon emissions by up to 80% by the early 2030s, without an increase in electric costs. The key requirement would be a 48 state network of HVDC transmission, creating a national market for electricity not possible in the current AC grid.

Sponsor(s):
Sustainable Energy and Atmospheric Sciences Seminar Brought to you by NOAA, NREL, and CU-Boulder Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute (RASEI)

28 May 2014

Title: Advances in Extratropical Cyclones: 1979 Presidents' Day Storm
Presenter(s): Dr. Louis Uccellini, Director, National Weather Service, and others
Date & Time: 28 May 2014
8:30 am - 5:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP) Conference Center
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Advances in Extratropical Cyclone Understanding and Prediction Since the 1979 Presidents' Day Storm: Past, Present, and Future Perspectives on Extratropical Cyclone Prediction Where: Remote access and NCWCP Conference Center/Auditorium, College Park, Maryland To register, visit: http://www.opc.ncep.noaa.gov/35th.php Toll: TBD Access Code: TBD Webinar ID: TBD

Presenter(s):
Dr. Louis Uccellini (Director, National Weather Service), Dr. Lance Bosart (Professor, SUNY Albany), Dr. John Gyakum (Professor, McGill University), Dr. Clifford Mass (Professor, University of Washington), Dr. Melvyn Shapiro (UCAR), Mr. Paul Kocin (NWS Weather Prediction Center), and more Four to eight inches of snow was forecast for the nation's capital… when the snow ended 18.7 inches was recorded at DCA with a large area of 20” or more blanketing the eastern suburbs of Washington, D.C. and eastern Maryland. The impact was paralysis. The rapid intensification, excessive snow rates, and snowfall totals of the 1979 Presidents' Day Snowstorm exposed the limitations of the predictive capabilities of the time for extratropical cyclones. This coming February will mark the thirty-fifth anniversary of that momentous storm. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) will host a one day colloquium on May 28, 2014 to: - Reflect on the challenges of that time - Discuss the advances in understanding and prediction of extratropical cyclones - Recognize those that contributed to those advancements - Discuss today's challenges predicting varying aspects of extratropical cyclones - Contemplate future challenges of extratropical cyclones. Please join us at the NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction to honor this anniversary and hear from the featured speakers who helped to advance our understanding of extratropical cyclones, apply that understanding, and improve prediction and services. When: May 28, 2014 8:45 a.m. - 5:15 p.m. Eastern Seminar POC for questions: Christine.Schultz@noaa.gov NOAA/NWS/NCEP/Ocean Prediction Center
Title: Natural Resource Management in the Gulf of California - Collaboration between Peace Corps and the Gov't of Mexico
Presenter(s): Denise Rennis
Date & Time: 28 May 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Natural Resource Management in the Gulf of California: Collaboration between Peace Corps and the Government of Mexico

Presenter(s):
Denise Rennis, dsrennis@gmail.com When: Wednesday, May 28, 2014, 12-1pm ET Where: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 8150; Remote access info below.

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; POC is tracy.gill@noaa.gov REMOTE ACCESS: Mymeeting webinars use PHONE & INTERNET. You may need to download MyMeetings files; you may need your system admin to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. FOR AUDIO: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# FOR WEBCAST: go to mymeetings.com Under Participant Join, click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting no: 744925156 NO PASSCODE is required.

Abstract:
Building scientific capacity in the government agency responsible for the management of three protected areas in the Gulf of California was less about training counterparts in scientific methodology and more about collaboration to facilitate the implementation of good management ideas. Over a 3-year service, the principal Peace Corps project, to train counterparts in monitoring nesting seabird populations, branched into island reforestation as part of the REDD+ program, minimizing stress to coral reefs as an adaptation to climate change pressure, developing a strategy for a climate change adaptation plan, and training in geographical information systems. This presentation is an example of one Volunteer's Peace Corps experience in Mexico.

Bio(s):
Denise Rennis joined the Peace Corps in 2010 and was one of the first but growing number of PhD environmental scientists heading to Mexico to help build scientific capacity in the government agencies responsible for natural protected areas. Denise has a PhD in botany from the University of London and an MS in marine studies from the University of Delaware. Her global career has included environmental work in the United States, Mexico, US Virgin Islands, United Kingdom, Australia, Indonesia, Yemen, and Cyprus. Her focus is on natural resource management in the coastal zone, impacts from port development activities on the coastal and marine environment, wetland management and restoration, and climate change-related issues.
Title: National Climate Assessment Report
Presenter(s): Dr. Gary W. Yohe
Date & Time: 28 May 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC2 - Conference Room - 14316, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Highlights of the Third National Climate Assessment

Presenter(s):
Dr. Gary W. Yohe Seminar sponsor: NOAA, National Weather Service, Climate Services Division, Office of Climate, Weather, and Water Services Seminar POC for questions: Judy.Koepsell@noaa.gov When: Wed., May 28, 2014, 13:00-14:00h Eastern Time Where: NOAA HQ SSMC2, Rm 14316; remote access is available

Abstract:
This presentation will review new insights highlighted in the most recent National Climate Assessment Report (NCA3), in comparison to some degree with IPCC WGII AR5 North America. It will also report on the events of the release week, and provide context within the President's Climate Action Plan. About the speakers: Dr. Gary W. Yohe is the Huffington Foundation Professor of Economics and Environmental Studies at Wesleyan University. He is the author of more than 100 scholarly articles; most of his recent work has focused attention on the risk-management approach to the mitigation and adaptation sides of the climate change issue. He has been a senior member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change since the mid 1990s. Dr. Yohe also served as a member of the New York City Panel on Climate Change. He served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on America's Climate Choices (Panel on Adapting to the Impacts of Climate Change Adaptation) and the National Research Council Committee on Stabilization Targets for Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Concentrations. He continues to serve as a co-editor (along with Michael Oppenheimer) of Climatic Change and a Vice-Chair of the National Climate Assessment Development and Advisory Committee for the current Administration; and he is Convening Lead Author and he advises the Core Writing Team for the Synthesis Report for the Fifth Assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Remote Access:
Register at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/301103616 Notes: This will be a GoToWebinar presentation

Title:
National Climate Assessment Report

Presenter(s):
Dr. Gary W. Yohe When: Wed., May 28, 2014, 13:00-14:00h Eastern Time Where: NOAA HQ SSMC2, Rm 14316; remote access is available

Abstract:
This presentation will review new insights highlighted in the most recent National Climate Assessment Report (NCA3), in comparison to some degree with IPCC WGII AR5 North America. It will also report on the events of the release week, and provide context within the President's Climate Action Plan. About the speakers: Dr. Gary W. Yohe is the Huffington Foundation Professor of Economics and Environmental Studies at Wesleyan University. He is the author of more than 100 scholarly articles; most of his recent work has focused attention on the risk-management approach to the mitigation and adaptation sides of the climate change issue. He has been a senior member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change since the mid 1990s. Dr. Yohe also served as a member of the New York City Panel on Climate Change. He served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on America's Climate Choices (Panel on Adapting to the Impacts of Climate Change Adaptation) and the National Research Council Committee on Stabilization Targets for Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Concentrations. He continues to serve as a co-editor (along with Michael Oppenheimer) of Climatic Change and a Vice-Chair of the National Climate Assessment Development and Advisory Committee for the current Administration; and he is Convening Lead Author and he advises the Core Writing Team for the Synthesis Report for the Fifth Assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Remote Access:
Register at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/301103616 Notes: This will be a GoToWebinar presentation
Title: DYNAMO Webinar Series - Supporting the Field Campaign
Presenter(s): Augustin Vintzileos, NCEP; and Simon P. de Szoeke, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 28 May 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 12th Floor Fishbowl, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Real-time Monitoring and Forecast Support for DYNAMO, and Collaborative Research: Ship-based Measurement of Air-sea Fluxes, the Atmospheric Boundary Layer, and Clouds During MJO Development

Presenter(s):
Augustin Vintzileos (NCEP) and Simon P. de Szoeke (Oregon State University) Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR CPO Climate Variability and Predictability Program Seminar POC for questions: hunter.jones@noaa.gov When: Wed., May 28, 2014, 2:00-3:00pm Eastern Time Where: NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th Floor Fishbowl; remote access is available. About this Series: The Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program is hosting monthly webinars to share the results of the Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) field campaign. This field campaign, held in the Indian Ocean from 2011-2012, sought to improve our understanding of the Madden-Julian Oscillation and to improve prediction skill of climate and weather models. It was a large international collaborative effort involving 14 countries and many U.S. agencies and research universities. These webinars represent the results of NOAA-funded researchers and are intended to inform a broad scientific audience of the research outcomes and ongoing efforts and questions related to understanding the Madden-Julian Oscillation. For more information visit: http://cpo.noaa.gov/ClimatePrograms/EarthSystemScience/ClimateVariabilityandPredictability/CVPWebinars.aspx

Remote Access:
Register for

Remote Access:
https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/375256962 Abstracts: Realtime Monitoring and Forecast Support for DYNAMO Socio‐economic benefits from skillful prediction of the Madden‐Julian Oscillation (MJO) cannot be overemphasized and are well documented. Understanding the atmosphere " ocean processes behind the MJO, however, still remains a large scientific challenge. DYNAMO is an observational campaign that will address atmospheric and oceanic processes relevant to the genesis and growth of the MJO in the central equatorial Indian Ocean. Observations are planned for aircraft, research vessels, buoys and radars. This project focuses on three major tasks: (i) Investigat the quality of past NCEP GFS and CFS forecasts, both deterministic and probabilistic, over the DYNAMO area as well as the quality of forecasts from the newly implemented GFS T574L64 during the period of October 2010 to March 2011. (ii) Develop and/or modify protocols for the transmission of both oceanographic and atmospheric data to the GTS, allow these data through quality control procedures, and finally ingestthem into NCEP data assimilation schemes in real‐time as a crucial component of the DYNAMO field campaign. (iii) Provide operational atmospheric and oceanic monitoring and forecast data to support (i) and (ii) above. For example, this will include real‐time information for planning intensive observing periods, including aircraft missions and downtime for flight crews, tied to spells of enhanced or suppressed organized convective activity that are crucial to the success of DYNAMO. The oceanographic component of the campaign also requires guidance on which depths the different instruments should be deployed with a lead time of one to two weeks. NCEP has a rich history of operational support for field campaigns (NAME, AMMA, VOCALS, TPARC). We will establish an operational website that will provide the necessary information for the decision making process during the DYNAMO campaign. Collaborative research: Ship-based measurement of air-sea fluxes, the atmospheric boundary layer, and clouds during MJO development In order to improve daily to seasonal forecasts, numerical weather prediction models require better representation of the interactions among the upper ocean, the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL), and tropospheric convection. Tropical weather and midlatitude teleconnections are driven by latent heat released by precipitating clouds. While individual convective clouds are essentially unpredictable, the eastward-propagating convective envelope of the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) is predictable on intraseasonal time scales. The MJO dominates variability of zonal wind and outgoing longwave radiation in the tropics, especially over the Indian Ocean. Though the MJO offers the potential for improved predictability, few numerical weather prediction models presently simulate the eastward propagation of the MJO; even fewer simulate MJO development in the central Indian Ocean. The predictability gap in the developing stage of the MJO coincides with a dearth of observations and a corresponding lack of understanding of air-sea interaction and dynamical and convective processes in the Indian Ocean. The Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) program combines observations and modeling to address these problems. We propose to make a suite of observations from a ship in the Indian Ocean during DYNAMO, to measure surface air-sea fluxes, MABL turbulent mixing, and cloud and precipitation development. Our strategy seamlessly measures processes, from the surface to the MABL and the free troposphere, contributing to tropical convection constituting the MJO. We will equip a US research vessel with radiative sensors and turbulent flux sensors that observe covariances of near-surface temperature, humidity, and velocity; and measure below-cloud mixing and turbulent velocities in the MABL with a scanning Doppler lidar. We also propose to install a cloud observing system consisting of a lidar ceilometer, a multi-channel microwave radiometer measuring integrated liquid and vapor, and a W-band (3.17 mm) Doppler cloud radar, which provides a sensitive vertical profile of cloud liquid water drops, in-cloud turbulence, and precipitation over the life cycle of the cloud. Our direct observations of surface evaporation, vertical mixing, and cloud formation will complement mesoscale precipitation structure from a scanning C-band (5.3 cm) radar; and largescale tropospheric heat and moisture budgets from rawinsondes released frequently from an array of stations (proposed separately). Flux, turbulence, and cloud data we collect from DYNAMO will be used for testing gridded flux analyses, MABL mixing and cumulus parameterizations, and air-sea interactions in models.

29 May 2014

Title: A climate-to-fish-to-fishers model for the Eastern Pacific sardine and anchovy system
Presenter(s): Enrique Curchitser, Associate Professor, Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University
Date & Time: 29 May 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Enrique Curchitser, Associate Professor, Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University Location: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm POC: Diane Tierney (diane.tierney@noaa.gov) WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=25224058&UID=61391358&RT=MiM0 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 282 627 017 ABSTRACT An ecosystem approach to understanding large-scale patterns in exploited systems caused by both climate change and human activity increasingly relies on the use of numerical models. In the past, physical, lower and higher trophic level models were developed, tested, and implemented independently of each other. Recently, the advances in physics and biology have created the needed pieces for a comprehensive (end-to-end) ecosystem model, including humans as a dynamical component. The challenge is to integrate all the components, and examples of fully-coupled end-to-end models are still relatively rare. This is partly due to the perception that blending separate yet complex sub-models is impractical because of demanding computational requirements and partly due to the respective communities working independently. This talk will present an example of an end-to-end dynamic modeling framework that links climate and multitrophic oceanic ecosystems including human fishing activity. Results will presented from a testbed application developed to study the low-frequency fluctuations of sardine and anchovy in the California Current.

30 May 2014

Title: Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop
Presenter(s): Katie Thomas, National Academies and David Robinson, Rutgers University
Date & Time: 30 May 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop

Presenter(s):
Katie Thomas, National Academies David Robinson, Rutgers University Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Connection, Climate Program Office Seminar POC for questions: luann.dahlman@noaa.gov When: Friday, May 30, 12 noon to 12:30 PM EDT Where: Remote access only https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/446265817

Abstract:
Atmospheric and polar researchers are actively exploring possible linkages between Arctic warming and mid-latitude weather patterns. To promote communication among researchers of this relatively young topic, the National Research Council held a workshop in September 2013 to discuss gaps in understanding and to explore future research needs. In this presentation, Katie Thomas, Study Director, and David Robinson, Chair of the workshop committee, will present an overview of the publication. About the speakers: Katie Thomas, National Academies David Robinson, Rutgers University

Remote Access:
Register for the session at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/446265817 Immediately after you submit the registration form, you'll receive an email with a link to connect to the session. During the Webinar, you can receive audio directly through your computer speakers for free, or dial in to the number displayed when you sign in (long-distance charges may apply). The session will be recorded, and can be accessed at the NWS CSD Seminar site within a few days following the event.
Title: Drought Research: Improved Understanding, Monitoring, and Prediction of Drought
Presenter(s): Rong Fu, University of Texas at Austin; Chunzai Wang, NOAA AOML; Christa Peters-Lidard, NASA GSFC
Date & Time: 30 May 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Drought Research: Improved Understanding, Monitoring, and Prediction of Drought

Presenter(s):
Rong Fu (University of Texas at Austin), Chunzai Wang (NOAA AOML), Christa Peters-Lidard (NASA GSFC) Seminar sponsor: OAR, CPO, MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov When: Friday, May 30, 2014, 2-3 p.m. Eastern Time Where: Remote access suggested, but some seats available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=621954687 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: Not yet available.

4 June 2014

Title: History at 716 Fathoms: The Mystery of the Gulf Wrecks
Presenter(s): Dr. James Delgado, Director of Maritime Heritage in NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 4 June 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
History at 716 Fathoms: The Mystery of the Gulf Wrecks

Presenter(s):
Dr. James Delgado, Director of Maritime Heritage in NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Date/Time: Wednesday, June 4, 2014, 12-1pm ET Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 8150; Remote access instructions below.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series and the NOS Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Point of Contact: tracy.gill@noaa.gov (301-713-3028x150)

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use PHONE & INTERNET. You may need to download MyMeetings files; you may need your system admin to do this, so do it before the seminar. FOR AUDIO: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# FOR WEBCAST: go to www.mymeetings.com and under “Participant Join”, click "Join an Event",then enter conference meeting number: 744925156 - NO PASSCODE is required.

Abstract:
In 2011, a survey of a proposed oil and gas lease in the Gulf of Mexico encountered three possible shipwrecks off Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. In three missions that have since followed in 2012, 2013 and 2014, the wrecks were revealed to be early 19th century, well-preserved time capsules with guns, navigational instruments, weapons, and bottles still filled with medicinal products. The three expeditions represent a unique partnership between four Federal agencies, two states, three universities and several non-profits to unlock the mystery of the three vessels. Preliminary indications are that one of the vessels is a privateer or pirate from the period around the War of 1812, and the other two vessels are likely its captives, all lost together with all hands in a violent storm. The old adage of "Dead Men Tell No Tales," doesn't always hold true.

Bio(s):
Dr. James Delgado is the Director of Maritime Heritage in NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. An underwater archaeologist with close to four decades of experience in his field, his work on some of history's most famous sites also included being chief scientist on the 2010 mapping of the Titanic wreck site. One of the key participants in the Gulf Wreck project, he will share the latest discoveries and provide a full, illustrated look at these three amazing wrecks.

5 June 2014

Title: The Met Office Global and Regional Ensemble Prediction System, MOGREPS - recent and future developments
Presenter(s): Richard Swinbank, UK Met Office
Date & Time: 5 June 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP Auditorium
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Richard Swinbank UK Met Office

Title:
The Met Office Global and Regional Ensemble Prediction System (MOGREPS) - recent and future developments Webex https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=eeb55a567ed0a3595b4d22056351b46c9 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 992 134 192
Title: The recent R&D activities on regional ensemble ALADIN-LAEF
Presenter(s): Yong Wang, ZAMG
Date & Time: 5 June 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP Auditorium
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Yong Wang Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG)

Title:
The recent R&D activities on regional ensemble ALADIN-LAEF WebEx https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=eeb55a567ed0a3595b4d22056351b46c9 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 992 134 192 Abstract

Abstract:
Within the NWP consortium LACE/ALADIN, we have developed the regional ensemble system ALADIN-LAEF (Limited Area Ensemble Forecasting). In the recent years, there have been some R&D activities on ALADIN-LAEF, for example, different experiments have been conducted on: 1. Studies on surface initial perturbation in a regional ensemble: impact of surface ensemble data assimilation, and its comparison with other methods. e.g. NCSB (Non-Cycling Surface Breeding) technique. 2. Investigation on the surface stochastic physics perturbation. 3. Uncertainties coming from the initial LBC. 4. Impact of the resolution and ensemble size on high resolution regional EPS 5. Convection resolving EPS (2.5km) vs. mesoscale EPS (11km) 6. Coupling convection resolving EPS (2.5km) with different ECMWF EPS resolution T1279 and T639. In the talk, I will present the results and analysis of those experiments.

6 June 2014

Title: Detection of XXth century temperature and salinity changes in the Global Ocean from historical hydrographic data
Presenter(s): Dr. Viktor Gouretski, University of Hamburg, Integrated Climate Data Centre, Germany
Date & Time: 6 June 2014
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 - SmConf - 4702
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars This will be a two seminar sessions. Seminar 1 from 2-2:30 and seminar 2 (2:30-3:00 pm) Seminar 1: Detection of XXth century temperature and salinity changes in the Global Ocean from historical hydrographic data

Presenter(s):
Dr. Viktor Gouretski (University of Hamburg, Integrated Climate Data Centre, Germany)

Abstract:
Global near-surface (0-20m layer) and upper ocean (0-400m layer) temperature time series are extended back to 1900 with the former being compared with the independent sea-surface temperature time series. Similar to the sea-surface the subsurface time series is characterized by two periods of temperature increase between 1900 and 1940-45 and between 1970 and 2003, separated by a period of little change. The hydrographic data set of the German Atlantic Expedition (1925-27) supported by selected historical data between 1874 and 1911 is compared with the contemporary data to reveal temperature and salinity changes in the Atlantic Ocean south of 19N over the last 80 years. The observed warming is consistent with climate model simulations over the 20th century, suggesting attribution to anthropogenic forcing. Comparison with pre-1920s data reveals no descernible warming between the 1870s and 1906/1911. POC for questions: tim.boyer@noaa.gov, hernan.garcia@noaa.gov Audio / conference call: Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#" Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone Phone access limited to the first 50 callers only Online web access: Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen.
Title: The EN4 dataset of quality controlled ocean temperature and salinity profiles and monthly objective analyses
Presenter(s): Simon Good - MetOffice, UK
Date & Time: 6 June 2014
2:30 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 - SmConf - 4702
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars This will be a two seminar sessions. Seminar 1 from 2-2:30 and seminar 2 (2:30-3:00 pm) Seminar 2: The EN4 dataset of quality controlled ocean temperature and salinity profiles and monthly objective analyses.

Presenter(s):
Simon Good (metoffice, UK)

Abstract:
EN4 and its predecessors are datasets containing ocean temperature and salinity profiles. These are sourced from collections such as the World Ocean Database (WOD) and then are put through a series of automated quality control tests. Monthly objective analyses of the ocean state are then formed from the data. The series of datasets originated from two European Commission programs ENACT (Enhanced ocean data Assimilation and Climate predicTion) and ENSEMBLES, which gave the datasets their name. Further improvements have been made since then, resulting in first EN3 and now the latest version of the dataset, EN4, which covers the period 1900-present. The data are made freely available for scientific research and private study in NetCDF files from www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs and are used for a variety of purposes including ocean reanalysis and ocean heat content change estimation. In this presentation I will talk more about the history of the dataset and then focus on EN4 including how the dataset is constructed and the quality checks that are performed. I will also talk about a novel method that was developed for EN4 to quantify the uncertainty in the objective analyses. POC for questions: tim.boyer@noaa.gov, hernan.garcia@noaa.gov Audio / conference call: Toll free dial 877-725-4068 using a touch-tone phone when prompted enter participant code 8634769 followed by a "#" Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6 otherwise it produces a sound feedback and we will disconnect everyone Phone access limited to the first 50 callers only Online web access: Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

10 June 2014

Title: The Arctic Open Water Season Conflict Avoidance Agreement and the Management of Development Impacts in the Marine Environment
Presenter(s): Jessica S. LeFevre
Date & Time: 10 June 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Silver Spring Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
The Arctic Open Water Season Conflict Avoidance Agreement and the Management of Development Impacts in the Marine Environment

Presenter(s):
Jessica S. LeFevre Seminar sponsor: NOAA International Affairs Council Law of the Sea Convention Working Group Seminar POC for questions: Peter.Oppenheimer@noaa.gov When: Tuesday, June 10, 12:00-13:00h Eastern Time Where: NOAA HQ Library SSMC3, 2nd Floor; remote access if available (details below)

Abstract:
Ocean management experts, along with development experts in other fields, increasingly recognize the need for mechanisms to reduce user conflicts and address trade offs among competing uses of coastal zones, land, and natural resources. The terms “ecosystem-based management” and “marine spatial planning” express the awareness that we are in an age where decision-makers need tools to help them balance development demands against adverse impacts to local ecosystems and economies. These issues are especially prevalent where energy development and commercial activities are expanding in our coastal waters and the oceans beyond. Offshore oil and gas development in arctic Alaska carries a high risk of interference with nutritionally and culturally critical bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) subsistence hunting. Since the mid-1980s, the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission has engaged offshore oil and gas exploration and development companies, including oil majors, in an annual process of collaboration and negotiation to create mitigation measures capable of avoiding adverse impacts to bowhead whales, habitat, and hunting opportunities. The process, founded on local ecological knowledge and western science, has become a staple of offshore oil and gas development in arctic Alaska. In addition to avoiding adverse impacts to subsistence uses that are protected under federal law, this highly efficient process also reduces conflicts that might otherwise slow offshore permitting. This system of collaboration provides useful insights into how the general concepts of ecosystem-based management and marine spatial planning might be implemented in practice in other settings. About the speaker: Jessica S. Lefevre is an attorney in private practice specializing in natural resource issues, including the mitigation of local impacts resulting from resource development. She has served as counsel to the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission since 1985 and also serves as counsel to the Arctic Marine Mammal Coalition and the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. She recently published "A Pioneering Effort in the Design of Process and Law Supporting Integrated Arctic Ocean Management in the Environmental Law Reporter", 43 ELR 10893 (October 2013) (available at http://eli-ocean.org/arctic/files/ELR-Article-4.pdf).

Remote Access:
For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form at https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings&netId=742656968&netPass=&netType=conference&acceptTerms=on&sigKey=mymeetings a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.
Title: The Sea Grant Network Responds To Tourism Opportunities In Fishing and Aquaculture
Presenter(s): Dana Morse, Maine Sea Grant; Natalie Springuel, Maine Sea Grant; Bryan Fluech, Florida Sea Grant; Susanna Muscik, Virgina Institute of Marine Science marine Advisory Program
Date & Time: 10 June 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
The Sea Grant Network Responds To Tourism Opportunities In Fishing and Aquaculture

Presenter(s):
Dana Morse (Maine Sea Grant), Natalie Springuel (Maine Sea Grant), Bryan Fluech (Florida Sea Grant), Susanna Muscik (Virgina Institute of Marine Science marine Advisory Program). Seminar sponsor: Sea Grant Fisheries Extension Network Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.bevan@noaa.gov (301-734-1287) When: Tuesday, June 10, 2014, 13:00-14:00 Eastern Time

Remote Access:
go to https://learn.extension.org/events/1610#.U4X51-ZdXsU (call-in number will be provided after you join the webinar as a 'guest')

Abstract:
This webinar will focus on the Sea Grant network's activities in this area and provide a forum in which to facilitate connections for future collaborations.

11 June 2014

Title: CANCELLED: What is Ocean Today: Videos and More
Presenter(s): Katie Snider, Executive Producer, Ocean Today, National Ocean Service
Date & Time: 11 June 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar: CANCELLED:

Title:
What is Ocean Today? Videos and More

Presenter(s):
Katie Snider, Executive Producer, Ocean Today, National Ocean Service (NOS) When: Wednesday, June 11, 2014, 12-1pm ET Where: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 8150; remote access login info below Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series and NOS Communications and Education Division Point of Contact: tracy.gill@noaa.gov (301-713-3028x150) REMOTE ACCESS: Mymeeting webinars use PHONE & INTERNET. You may need to download MyMeetings files; you may need your system administrator to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. FOR AUDIO: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# FOR THE WEBCAST: go to www,mymeetings.com Under Participant Join, click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting number: 744925156 NO passcode is required.

Abstract:
Ocean Today is an exciting, multimedia kiosk that features 150+ videos on all aspects of the ocean realm -- exploration and discoveries, marine life and science. It was originally designed for the Sant Ocean Hall in the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, which opened in September 2008. Due to the popularity of the videos, Ocean Today kiosks are now located in dozens of aquariums, museums, and learning centers throughout the world. In addition, Ocean Today videos are available online to reach even more audiences. In this seminar, you will learn more about the Ocean Today program, the videos that are available for use by your office, and how you can participate.

Bio(s):
Katie Snider is the Executive Producer for Ocean Today. She is responsible for the overall management, editorial direction, and video production of Ocean Today content. Prior to Ocean Today, Katie worked in television production on shows for The Discovery Channel, Animal Planet, HGTV, and The Smithsonian Network. She lives in Arlington, Virginia, with her husband Scott and daughter Lily and loves to garden.

12 June 2014

Title: Preparing for Disaster at MPAs
Presenter(s): Will Underwood, Stewardship Coordinator, Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Mississippi Department of Marine Resources
Date & Time: 12 June 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only, See Registration Information Below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Preparing for Disaster at MPAs

Presenter(s):
Will Underwood, Stewardship Coordinator, Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Mississippi Department of Marine Resources

Abstract:
The presentation will focus on the need to consider disaster response planning for marine protected areas using the example of the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) in Mississippi. Natural and anthropogenic disasters will be discussed, with emphasis on impacts associated with hurricanes and oil spills. Proper identification and ranking of hazards and risks to personnel, environmental resources, and infrastructure will be covered as well as discussion on how to integrate with the response community and crosswalk concepts of environmental sensitivity to responders. Examples of formal disaster response plans recently developed within the NERR system will be presented and a template for plan preparation will be made available. When: June 12, 2014 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. Eastern Where: Remote access only. Reserve your seat at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/817007440 Toll: +1 (702) 489-0003 Access Code: 299-489-875 Webinar ID: 817-007-440 Seminar POC for questions: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, EBM Tools Network, OpenChannels.org, MPA News and EcoAdapt. http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 June 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 12 June 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

Each month, a speaker will give a presentation on various topics related to NGS programs, projects, products and services to educate constituents about NGS activities. Visit the Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/. Future webinars will be held on the second Thursday of every month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.
Title: Toxic Contaminants in Puget Sound's Food Web: Where it's Hot and Where it's Not
Presenter(s): Mr. Jim West, Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife
Date & Time: 12 June 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Mr. Jim West, Senior Research Scientist, Marine Resources Division, Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=25224058&UID=61391358&RT=MiM0 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 282 627 017

Abstract:
Puget Sound is a hot spot of persistent bioaccumulative and toxic contaminants in northeastern Pacific waters, as illustrated by the levels of contaminants in its living organisms. For example, legacy contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in Puget Sound herring are roughly 15 times higher than their oceanic coastal counterparts. Puget Sound's biota also tell a story of exposure to other contaminants, including hydrocarbons, endocrine disrupting compounds and a large number of contaminants of emerging concern. Measuring contaminants in, and observing the health of species spanning a wide range of life histories and trophic levels have shown us unexpected occurrence and impacts of some of these toxic chemicals that may not have been predicted from approaches targeting abiotic measures such as sediments or water. WDFW began monitoring toxics in the Puget Sound ecosystem 1988, as part of the Puget Sound Ecosystem Monitoring Program. Since that time we have partnered with NOAA's Ecotox and Environmental Chemistry Programs to develop a toxics-focused Biological Observation System, or tBiOS, which focuses on where biota are exposed to toxics, and where the harm to biota is occurring. In this talk, we provide four examples of contaminant exposure and harmful effects in several species across a wide range of habitats. These narratives, combined with detailed analysis of contaminant patterns in biota, also help us understand the fate and transport of these chemicals, the anthropogenic source of the chemicals, and how they are changing through time. Seminar POC: Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

17 June 2014

Title: Precipitation trends in Alaska: Data limitations and complex controls
Presenter(s): Stephanie A McAfee, University of Nevada, Reno
Date & Time: 17 June 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Stephanie A McAfee, University of Nevada, Reno

Abstract:
Changes in precipitation are important drivers of many observed hydrological and ecological processes, and precipitation is a key component of many studies. However, existing studies of precipitation trends in Alaska simply did not agree about the magnitude or even direction of trends. We revisited the question, analyzing homogeneity and trends in station data and three commonly used gridded precipitation data sets. We identified numerous inhomogeneities in both the station data and the gridded products and discovered that the three gridded products displayed very dissimilar patterns of trend. Finally, we will present some suggests for moving forward despite the imperfect data. POC: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu WEBINAR: https://accap.uaf.edu/?q=webinars

18 June 2014

Title: Coastal Marine Ecological Classification Standard: From Document to Data
Presenter(s): Jay Lazar, NOAA/NMFS Chesapeake Bay Office
Date & Time: 18 June 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar PRESENTER Jay Lazar, NOAA/NMFS Chesapeake Bay Office SPONSOR: NOS Science Seminar Series, Point of Contact: tracy.gill@noaa.gov REMOTE ACCESS: Mymeeting Webinars use PHONE & INTERNET. If you have not used MyMeetings, you need to download files; you may need your system admin to do this for you, so do it well before the seminar. DIAL TOLL FREE (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# WEBCAST URL: Go to www.mymeetings.com and under "Participant Join", click on "Join an Event". Then enter meeting number 744925156 along with your name, email, etc.

Abstract:
Having turned two years old, the Coastal Marine Ecological Classification Standard has a lot to report on and even more left to do. The original implementation group continues to provide strong guidance and leadership on the details of the standard while the NOAA-based implementation group builds internal momentum for maintenance and programmatic integration. Examples from Oregon to the Chesapeake Bay provide early stories of CMECS success as we work to develop acceptance across federal and state agencies, regional ocean councils and internal line offices. ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Jay Lazar is a Hydrographer and the Field Program Coordinator for the OHC Chesapeake Bay Office. Jay has been working with CMECS in various forms since 2006 and has been involved with implementation of the Standard for over a year. Significant contributions to the presentation have been made by Mark Finkbeiner (CSC).
Title: Unmanned Maritime Systems: Regulatory Initiatives
Presenter(s): Dr. Rand D. LeBouvier
Date & Time: 18 June 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 Library (2nd Floor);
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dr. Rand D. LeBouvier Seminar sponsor: NOAA International Affairs Council Working Group on the Law of the Sea Convention Seminar POC for questions: Peter.Oppenheimer@noaa.gov When: Wednesday, June 18, 12:00-1300h Eastern Time Where: NOAA HQ SSMC3 Library (2nd Floor); remote access is available.

Abstract:
Recent efforts to engage the legal and safety ramifications of these technologies operating within territorial waters and on the high seas are similar to those experienced in the unmanned air vehicle industry operating in controlled airspace. Fortunately, lessons learned from the air domain may prevent a recurrence of the issues encountered with regulatory agencies such as the FAA that have caused inhibitive delays and missed opportunities in the development of unmanned air systems. Industry has a duty to ensure it anticipates and addresses safety, legal and even ethical concerns properly before uninformed popular perception drives response. Early mutual engagement between industry and these agencies can eliminate misunderstanding and can inform unmanned systems manufacturers and operators as to best practices and procedures. Adopting a cooperative stewardship approach to the environment in which they operate and with the agencies that watch over it will stand the unmanned maritime systems industry in good stead. This presentation will review key regulatory and standardization efforts currently underway.

Remote Access:
For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form at https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings&netId=742656968&netPass=&netType=conference&acceptTerms=on&sigKey=mymeetings a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.

19 June 2014

Title: Algicidal bacteria: Ubiquitous distribution and implications for ecosystem balance
Presenter(s): Ichiro Imai, Professor, Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University
Date & Time: 19 June 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Ichiro Imai, Professor, Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=25224058&UID=61391358&RT=MiM0 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 282 627 017

Abstract:
The interplay of phytoplankton and bacteria in our coastal oceans is the cornerstone of ecosystem health. Bacteria possessing killing and growth-inhibiting activities against phytoplankton have been increasingly studied as a means to control phytoplankton dynamics, in particular, harmful algal blooms (HABs) in coastal environments. Algicidal activities are divided into two types, i.e. direct attack, specifically targeting algal cells, and indirect attack that involves production of compounds that can inhibit the growth of targeted phytoplankton. For harmful algal bloom species, such as the raphidophytes, Heterosigma akashiwo and Chattonella spp., field observations indicate that bacteria play an important role in bloom termination. Recent evidence has shown that a large number of algicidal bacteria that target HAB species (dinoflagellates and raphidophytes) are attached to the surface of seaweeds, such as the green alga Ulva pertusa, the red alga Gelidium sp., and the brown algae Sargassum muticum and S. thunbergii. The densities of these algicidal bacteria can reach 106 g-1 wet weight. Numerous algicidal bacteria have also been found in the biofilm of the seagrass Zostera marina with maximum densities of 107 g-1 wet blade. In the case of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, growth-inhibiting bacteria with strong activities were found and isolated from the blades of Z. marina in coastal waters of Japan and Puget Sound, WA. In many countries around the world, seagrass- and seaweed beds have been lost through reclamation processes for commercial land uses. We propose that restoration of seagrass- and seaweed beds will not only increase nursery grounds for marine wildlife but will also create prevention strategies for HAB occurrences. This is an activity that conforms to the recently-proposed Japanese concept of Sato-Umi, meaning “Integration of productivity and biodiversity in the coastal sea with human health and economic well-being” Seminar POC: Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

24 June 2014

Title: Reanalysis Research: Laying the Groundwork for the Next Generation of NOAA Reanalyses
Presenter(s): Arun Kumar, NOAA CPC, Gil Compo, U of Colorado/CIRES & NOAA/ESRL, Tom Hamill, NOAA ESRL
Date & Time: 24 June 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.
Description:

Reanalysis Research: Laying the Groundwork for the Next Generation of NOAA Reanalyses Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl. OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Reanalysis Research: Laying the Groundwork for the Next Generation of NOAA Reanalyses

Presenter(s):
Arun Kumar (NOAA CPC), Gil Compo (U of Colorado/CIRES & NOAA/ESRL), Tom Hamill (NOAA ESRL) Seminar sponsor: OAR, CPO, MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov When: Tuesday, June 24, 2-3 p.m. Eastern Time Where: Remote access suggested, but some seats available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=627630379 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: Arun Kumar -- Research Towards the Next Generation of NOAA Climate Reanalyses -- Reanalysis of various components of the Earth System provides global data sets to advance our understanding of climate variability and trends, and helps place the state of current climate system in a historical context. One important aspect of reanalyses efforts is to understand causes of spurious climate trends and discontinuities that arise due to changes in observational data platforms, and to develop data assimilation and bias correction techniques that can minimize those. The latest generation of NOAA's reanalysis " the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) " was plagued by various such discontinuities. A joint research effort across NOAA involving NCEP, ESRL, and NCDC plans to advance data assimilation techniques to reduce the influence of changes in the observational data platforms in the context of climate reanalysis. A unique aspect of the proposed approach is to use a hierarchy of reanalysis of increasing complexity where analysis based on a simpler approach can be used to inform bias correction procedures for an analysis involving higher complexity. Gil Compo -- The NOAA Climate Reanalysis Task Force: Activities and Examples from Stratospheric Ozone and the Pacific Walker Circulation -- The NOAA Climate Reanalysis Task Force: Activities and Examples from Stratospheric Ozone and the Pacific Walker Circulation -- An introduction to the new NOAA Climate Reanalysis Task Force will be given. The Task Force addresses outstanding issues in atmospheric, oceanic and land reanalysis and develops a greater degree of integration among Earth system reanalysis components. Two examples of outstanding issues will be discussed. The first example is the representation of stratospheric ozone in current and planned NOAA reanalyses spanning 1850 to present. The current stratospheric ozone representation in NOAA's Global Forecast System atmosphere/land model uses a linearized parameterization of ozone production and loss from the Naval Research Laboratory. The linearization is taken about a climatology representing late 20th Century chemistry, which includes ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Its success in representing ozone variability before CFCs, and plans to improve the parameterization for representation of 19th to 21st century ozone variability, will be discussed. The second example addresses whether the Pacific Walker Circulation (PWC) has weakened or strengthened since 1900. Some researchers have suggested that observations of the PWC spanning the last century provide evidence that the global convective mass flux is decreasing. Global coupled climate models show a decrease in the PWC from the last century extending into the next. The debate surrounding this issue is complicated by different investigators using different indices to define the PWC, with some based on using both the rotational and divergent components of the tropical winds to diagnose what is in essence a divergent overturning circulation. The influence and effect of tropical sea surface temperatures (SST) is also a confounding issue. We find that, in contrast to coupled climate models, most observed aspects of the PWC show no trend or a strengthening over the last 120 years. Tom Hamill -- Weather reforecasting and statistical post-processing as drivers for reanalysis -- Statistical post-processing of weather forecasts is the process of adjusting the current forecast using discrepancies between past forecasts and analyses (or observations). Post-processing skill and reliability are generally improved with large training sample sizes, especially the post-processing of uncommon events such as heavy precipitation or longer-lead events such as a two-week forecast. In the talk we will consider some of the evidence for how large training sample sizes can improve post-processed forecast guidance and will review the recommendations of a recent white paper on reforecasting. A notable recommendation from this white paper is on the strong need for an updated modern-era global reanalysis.
Title: Ocean Acidification Data Visualizations: How to access and use IOOS data
Presenter(s): Jan Newton, Director, Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems [NANOOS] & Amy Sprenger, Education and Outreach Coordinator, NANOOS
Date & Time: 24 June 2014
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl. - (map)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Ocean Acidification Data Visualizations: How to access and use IOOS data

Presenter(s):
Jan Newton (NANOOS), Amy Sprenger (NANOOS) Seminar sponsor: NOS National Marine Sanctuaries & OAR Ocean Acidification Program, SOARCE Webinar Series (http://go.usa.gov/9ghe) Seminar POC for questions: jennifer.bennett@noaa.gov When: Tuesday, June 24, 3-4p.m. Eastern Time Where: Remote access suggested, but some seats available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl

Remote Access:
https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/365818706 Audio available through VOIP; headset or ear bud speakers recommended

Abstract:
Ocean acidification has the potential to fundamentally change the ocean, its habitats, food webs and marine life. In support of the shellfish industry, resource managers, researchers and citizens potentially affected by ocean acidification, the U.S. IOOS (Integrated Ocean Observing System), the Regional Associations of IOOS, and the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (NOAA OAP) are working to provide critical real time data of ocean water conditions related ocean acidification to anyone with an internet connection. In this presentation we will share information about IOOS, and demonstrate how the Regional Associations of IOOS along the West Coast are working to meet the data and information needs of shellfish growers and others for monitoring for ocean acidification. We will demonstrate the new IOOS Pacific Region Ocean Acidification data portal and sharehow to access information and data related to ocean acidification. The ability to monitor in real time parameters such as pH, dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, water level, wind speed and direction can provide an early warning system to shellfish growers about the approach of acidified seawater, helping the growers to take action to save crops. In addition, a robust ocean acidification monitoring program over time will provide necessary information to scientists and resource managers on the status and trends in ocean parameters related to OA, and thus aid decisions in light of ocean change. About the speakers: Dr. Jan Newton is a Principal Oceanographer with the Applied Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington (UW) and affiliate faculty with the UW School of Oceanography and the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, both in the UW College of the Environment.She is the Executive Director of the Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems (NANOOS), the US IOOS Regional Association for the Pacific Northwest. Jan is a biological oceanographer who studies the physical, chemical, and biological dynamics of Puget Sound and coastal Washington, including understanding effects from climate and humans on water properties. Currently she has been working with colleagues at UW and NOAA to assess the status of ocean acidification in our local waters. Newton served on the Governor's Blue Ribbon Panel on Ocean Acidification and was appointed as Co-Director of the new Washington Ocean Acidification Center at UW. Amy Sprenger is Education and Outreach Coordinator for the Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems (NANOOS).

25 June 2014

Title: Conserve our Resources, Harvest Invasives: What's being done about Northern Snakehead in the mid-Atlantic region
Presenter(s): Joseph Love, PhD., Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Date & Time: 25 June 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Joseph Love, PhD., Maryland Department of Natural Resources

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; Point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov REMOTE ACCESS: Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet You may need to download MyMeetings files, and you may need your system admin. to do this, so do it well before. AUDIO: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# WEBCAST: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting number: 744925156 - NO PASSCODE is required.

Abstract:
Northern Snakehead (Channa argus) was first reported in Maryland in 2002. Since then, movies and media spotlights have highlighted the infamous species. Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has worked to prevent the spread of Northern Snakehead and develop early detection and response procedures with U.S. Fish and Wildlife (USFWS), Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, and Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Once introduced to Potomac River, there was a lag time of at least 2 to 3 years until populations began growing and expanding rapidly. Through natural expansion, the species has spread from Potomac River into the adjacent, Patuxent River. The species, also introduced into Delaware, has spread among other rivers of the Chesapeake Bay. In order to promote early detection of the species into areas where it has naturally expanded, Maryland DNR has developed a cost-effective infrastructure for reporting by anglers and provided incentives for those reports and harvesting the animal. The effects of establishment and expansion of Northern Snakehead have not contributed to native species extinctions as originally speculated. Because Northern Snakehead has been widely regarded as invasive, its biomass has been controlled by anglers via Maryland DNR promoting initiatives that encourage recreational and commercial harvest. While there is still debate regarding the effectiveness of this strategy and concern over its leading to human-induced spread of the species, a current mantra is slowly being adopted: “if you can't beat them, then eat them.” ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Dr. Joseph W. Love is the tidal bass manager for Maryland Department of Natural Resources. He also is a member of the Invasive Species Matrix Team and is currently working on an Aquatic Nuisance Species Plan for the State. He has been studying biology and taxonomy of fish (particularly sharks) since he was 10, but academically since earning his Bachelor's of Science from Southeastern Louisiana University. He conducted his Master's of Science with Dr. Robert Cashner at University of New Orleans (UNO) where he surveyed bayous and canals to learn more about the natural history of Spotted Gar (Lepisosteus ocualtus). He then studied with Dr. Christopher Taylor at Mississippi State University to obtain his Ph.D. The dissertation work addressed the effects of habitat fragmentation on freshwater fish and macroinvertebrate communities in intermittent, headwater streams in Ouachita Mountains (Arkansas). He then took a post-doctoral position for Dr. Eric May and with NOAA Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center at University of Maryland Eastern Shore. There, he engaged in several collaborative projects with NOAA biologists and research scientists along the eastern Atlantic coast. That work included training graduate students and developing courses in fish biology and multivariate statistics. In 2009, he took a stable position with Maryland Department of Natural Resources where he has ultimately succumbed to the challenges of fishery management. His current responsibilities include managing fisheries for Largemouth Bass in the tidal rivers of Chesapeake Bay. His work with Largemouth Bass ultimately led him to work with Northern Snakehead, another top predator in tidal freshwater.
Title: Remote inference of biological parameters using broadband acoustic color
Presenter(s): Dr. Andone Lavery, WHOI
Date & Time: 25 June 2014
12:15 pm - 1:15 pm ET
Location: Online Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Joint NEFSC WHOI seminar series POC for questions: michael.jech@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Dr. Andone Lavery of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) will be the inaugural speaker for the joint NOAA NEFSC and WHOI seminar series on using underwater acoustic technology for fisheries and ecosystem studies and monitoring. Her presentation will be "Remote inference of biological parameters using broadband acoustic "color". To join the meeting: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/nefsc-whoi-seminar/ Conference Number(s): 866-836-6169; Participant Code: 5443237
Title: A Temporal Perspective on Recent Arctic Sea Ice Changes and Their Impacts
Presenter(s): Dr. John E. Walsh, Research Professor at the International Research Center/University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Date & Time: 25 June 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series, SSMC2 - Conference Room - 14316
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Dr. John E. Walsh (Research Professor at the International Research Center/University of Alaska, Fairbanks) Seminar sponsor: National Weather Service, Climate Services Division, Office of Climate, Weather, and Water Services Seminar POC for questions: Judy.Koepsell@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/770334161

Abstract:
Attribution and impact assessments of the recent reduction of Arctic sea ice require a longer temporal perspective than can be provided by the satellite record of the past several decades. We will examine longer-term sea ice variations deduced from a NOAA-supported synthesis of historical sea ice data spanning nearly two centuries, supplemented by a review of relevant paleo reconstructions. The impacts of sea ice on climate variations in the Arctic and lower latitudes will also be addressed by examining the robustness of widely-publicized linkages to extreme weather and climate variations in middle latitudes.
Title: DYNAMO Webinar Series - Ship-based Observations and Model Improvement
Presenter(s): Timothy S. Bates - PMEL and Shuyi Chen - University of Miami - RSMAS
Date & Time: 25 June 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th Floor Fishbowl
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Shipboard measurements of aerosol chemical, physical, optical and cloud nucleating properties during the DYNAMO field campaign; Convective Structure and Environmental Conditions in the MJO Initiation over the Indian Ocean

Presenter(s):
Timothy S. Bates (PMEL) and Shuyi Chen (University of Miami " RSMAS) Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR CPO Climate Variability and Predictability Program Seminar POC for questions: hunter.jones@noaa.gov When: Wed., Jun. 25, 2014, 2:00-3:00pm Eastern Time Where: NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th Floor Fishbowl; remote access is available. About this Series: The Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program is hosting monthly webinars to share the results of the Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) field campaign. This field campaign, held in the Indian Ocean from 2011-2012, sought to improve our understanding of the Madden-Julian Oscillation and to improve prediction skill of climate and weather models. It was a large international collaborative effort involving 14 countries and many U.S. agencies and research universities. These webinars represent the results of NOAA-funded researchers and are intended to inform a broad scientific audience of the research outcomes and ongoing efforts and questions related to understanding the Madden-Julian Oscillation. For more information visit: http://cpo.noaa.gov/ClimatePrograms/EarthSystemScience/ClimateVariabilityandPredictability/CVPWebinars.aspx

Remote Access:
Register for

Remote Access:
https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/544998594 Abstracts: Shipboard measurements of aerosol chemical, physical, optical and cloud nucleating properties during the DYNAMO field campaign We propose to participate in the DYNAMO field campaign during the IOP aboard the US funded ship. Our objective is to improve the understanding of the effects of aerosol particles on clouds and radiation transfer over the equatorial Indian Ocean. Aerosols in this region have both natural (ocean-derived) and anthropogenic (continental) sources as the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) can extend well south of the equator during the dry winter monsoon season (Bates et al., 2002_ allowing for transport of air masses from the Indian subcontinent to the DYNAMO region. The Indo-Asian haze that spreads over the region north of the ITCZ has a major impact on the regional radiative forcing (Ramanathan et al., 2002). During INDOEX the low-level heating induced by the aerosol haze led to enhanced moist convection and strengthened the rainfall along the ITCZ (Ramanathan et al., 2001). Aerosol data are thus essential to understanding the radiation budget and evolution of the cloud population (DYNAMO hypothesis II) in this region. The proposed aerosol physical measurements will include number-size distributions from 20nm to 10 µm diameter using mobility separation condensation particle counting and aerodynamic particle sizing. Chemical analysis will include 2-stage impactors (above and below 1 µm) that will be analyzed for major ions via ion chromatography (IC), trace metals via XRF, and organic and elemental carbon via optical/thermal techniques. Non-refractory chemical composition will be measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) potential at supersaturations in the range 0.2% to 2% will be measured with a continuous flow, thermal diffusion CCN counter. Aerosol optical parameters, light scattering and absorption coefficient, will be determined by nephelometry and filter-based absorption, respectively, at three visible wavelengths for sub-10µm and sub 1-µm size ranges at 60% relative humidity. The size distribution, AMS, optical parameters and CCN will have a time resolution of 15 minutes or less. The impactor-based mass and chemistry will have 12 to 24 hour resolution. The time series of these parameters will be analyzed in the context of the larger set of meteorological, oceanographic, and satellite data to investigate the processes and cause-effect relation shops between aerosols, radiative transfer, cloud physics and precipitation. Multivariate statistical analysis will be used to determine relationship between aerosol parameters (e.g., concentration, size distribution, composition) and cloud physics parameters, (e.g., thermodynamic profiles; cloud albedo and effective radius; vertical mixing; cloud base, top and precipitation rate). The products, time series of aerosol parameters and derived empirical relationships will be archived on the PMEL Atmospheric Chemistry data server (http://saga.pmel.noaa.gov/data/) as well as the NCAR DYNAMO data server. Convective Structure and Environmental Conditions in the MJO Initiation over the Indian Ocean The proposed research addresses two of the Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) science hypotheses: i) interaction between environmental moisture and convection and ii) the dynamic evolution of the cloud population, which is key to MJO initiation over the tropical Indian Ocean. The main objectives are to better understand the structure of convective cloud systems and their large-scale environment in the MJO initiation process and to improve MJO forecasts. It includes three components: 1) cloud cluster tracking analysis using hourly satellite IR data along with observations of environmental water vapor and SST as well as the global analysis of wind and temperature data, 2) aircraft observation of convective cloud systems during the DYNAMO field campaign, and 3) model evaluation and verification for improving operational MJO monitoring and forecasting. The PI team will first conduct pre-DYNAMO field campaign data analysis using existing METEOSAT data to compile a cloud system statistics that can be used to diagnose developing and non-developing MJO convection. The cloud cluster tracking combined with global model forecast guidance will be used for operations during the DYNAMO field campaign including planning of daily aircraft missions. A comprehensive post-DYNAMO data analysis will be provided for model evaluation and verification. This research fits well with NOAA's interests in improving the MJO prediction that will have a direct impact on seasonal and weather forecasts over the North American continent as well as the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Seas. This proposed research builds on results from the prior NOAA, NSF, and NASA supported projects (e.g., TOGA COARE and TRMM) and the expertise of PIs on satellite data analysis, aircraft observation of tropical convective systems over the western Pacific, global modeling of tropical circulation and prediction, and operational forecasting of MJO. It brings together a research team with scientists from the University of Miami, NOAA/National Severe Storm Lab (NSSL), the University of Maryland and NOAA/Climate Prediction Center (CPC). It will address one of the most challenging and unresolved science questions related MJO: what determines the onset of convective activity leading up to the initiation of MJO over the tropical Indian Ocean. The proposed project will contribute to the NOAA ESS Program FY2011 research theme of Understanding and Improving Prediction of Tropical Convection. Specifically it will address science questions related to cloud processes and interaction with their large-scale environment associated with MJO and the field campaign of DYNAMO. The outcome of this study is expected to improve MJO prediction through a better understanding of the physical processes and a unique data set for model evaluation, verification and data assimilation.

27 June 2014

Title: The Transition to ISO Metadata
Presenter(s): Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich - National Coastal Data Development Center
Date & Time: 27 June 2014
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Online metadata training http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Remote Access and Notes: Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

Presenter(s):
Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich (National Coastal Data Development Center) OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center

Abstract:
NOAA's National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC), a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is pleased to announce the new schedule of its popular free online metadata training series. The “Transition to ISO” course is designed for data managers who have a need to transition from the use of Federal Geographic Data Committee CSDGM metadata to ISO 191** metadata. The series will cover topics such as XML and UML basics and ISO creation methods. All materials will be made available online, and instructors will be available by request for special one-on-one “My Metadata” sessions to answer specific questions for individual participants NCDDC set out to meet the increased needs of data managers as many organizations transition from FGDC to ISO standards. Working with other metadata trainers within the community, the NCDDC Metadata Team has developed a complete package of training materials for the transition to ISO metadata standards. Conducting this training online is an innovative way to meet the increased demand for this training while controlling travel expenses. NCDDC conducted its first metadata training series online in 2012 to help data managers meet the challenge of keeping up-to-date on the latest metadata standards and tools for implementing these standards. In an environment of declining budgets and travel limitations, online training has proven to be a successful avenue to meet these needs. About The

Presenter(s):
NCDDC's Metadata Team, Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, are experts in metadata creation, management and publication. The NCDDC Metadata Team has years of experience in Metadata Training, holding classes for federal, state, and academic organizations across the U.S. NCDDC has led the development of new materials for ISO metadata, including the creation of the first online ISO training in 2012.
Title: Washington Chapter of IEEE/Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society Technical Seminar: NASA's Earth Science Data Systems
Presenter(s): H.K. Rama Ramapriyan, Assistant Project Manager, Earth Science Data and Information System Project NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Date & Time: 27 June 2014
10:00 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NCWCP - 5830 University Research Court, in the Conference Center 1604, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
H.K. Rama Ramapriyan, Assistant Project Manager, Earth Science Data and Information System Project NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Sponsor(s):
NOAA / NESDIS / STAR Seminars - http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/seminars.php

Remote Access:
Audio only: USA participants: 866-832-9297, Passcode:6070416 International: 203-566-7610

Abstract:
One of NASA's three strategic goals is to “Advance understanding of Earth and develop technologies to improve the quality of life on our home planet.” Earth observation and science are fundamental to achieving this goal. Collecting the data from Earth observing missions, deriving information from them, preserving and providing the data and information to all users are Core components. Core components provide the basic operational capabilities to process, archive, manage and distribute data from NASA missions. Community components provide a path for peer-reviewed research in Earth Science Informatics to feed into the evolution of the core components. The earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a core component consisting of twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) and eight Science Investigator-led Processing Systems spread across the U.S. EOSDIS manages a growing archive of over 10 Petabytes, with more than 22 Terabytes of data being distributed each day to a diverse user community. The presentation will provide an overview of EOSDIS and its evolution. Point of Contact: Xiaofeng Li, STAR / SOCD / MECB: xiaofeng.li@noaa.gov

8 July 2014

Title: The Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS) Using Satellite Rainfall Information and a Hydrological Model
Presenter(s): Mark Mullusky, Chief, Hydrologic Services Division, NWS Office of Climate, Water and Weather Services
Date & Time: 8 July 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Robert Adler and Huan Wu, Earth Science System Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC), University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland

Sponsor(s):
NWS Office of Hydrologic Development

Remote Access:
Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/503212177 FOR AUDIO: Number will be provided upon registration.

Abstract:
The Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS), has been developed, tested and improved to provide real-time flood detection, streamflow estimates and inundation mapping information at high resolution (as fine as 1 km) and forecasts (out to five days) using global NWP precipitation. Images and output data are available for use by the international disaster response community with updates available every three hours (http://flood.umd.edu). The system uses satellite-based rainfall information, other satellite and conventional information and a combination hydrological and routing model, the Dominant river Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) system. The surface hydrological calculations are carried out at 0.125 latitude-longitude resolution with streamflow calculations done at that resolution and at 1km resolution. Flood inundation maps are calculated at 1 km resolution quasi-globally every three hours and are compared with MODIS-based flood inundation estimates. Details of the system will be presented along with examples of results for recent flood events along with validation statistics against a global flood event archive. Point of Contact: ken.pavelle@noaa.gov (301-713-0640x183)

10 July 2014

Title: Building Capacity to Sustainably Manage Increasing Recreational Use in MPAs
Presenter(s): Priscilla Brooks - Conservation Law Foundation and MPA Federal Advisory Committee and Charlie Wahle, NOAA Marine Protected Areas Center
Date & Time: 10 July 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only, See Registration Link Below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Building Capacity to Sustainably Manage Increasing Recreational Uses in MPAs

Presenter(s):
Priscilla Brooks - Conservation Law Foundation and MPA Federal Advisory Committee and Charlie Wahle, NOAA Marine Protected Areas Center Where: Remote Access only. Reserve your seat at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/295848472 Toll: +1 (646) 307-1708 Access Code: 341-973-824 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the Webinar Webinar ID: 295-848-472

Abstract:
Recreational uses of MPAs are expanding rapidly in the US and around the globe. While promising many benefits to users and the sites, this trend has also raised concerns about the sustainability of increased use and about the capacity of most MPAs to manage and facilitate these diverse and often novel activities. To that end, the U.S. Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee, working with the NOAA MPA Center, has examined this challenge and has developed a suite of recommendations and best practices for managers to consider in addressing this trend. Seminar POC for questions: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, EBM Tools Network, OpenChannels.org, MPA News and EcoAdapt. http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 10 July 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 10 July 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

Each month, a speaker will give a presentation on various topics related to NGS programs, projects, products and services to educate constituents about NGS activities. Visit the Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/. Future webinars will be held on the second Thursday of every month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

11 July 2014

Title: The Transition to ISO Metadata
Presenter(s): Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich - National Coastal Data Development Center
Date & Time: 11 July 2014
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Online metadata training http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Remote Access and Notes: Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

Presenter(s):
Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich (National Coastal Data Development Center) OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center

Abstract:
NOAA's National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC), a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is pleased to announce the new schedule of its popular free online metadata training series. The “Transition to ISO” course is designed for data managers who have a need to transition from the use of Federal Geographic Data Committee CSDGM metadata to ISO 191** metadata. The series will cover topics such as XML and UML basics and ISO creation methods. All materials will be made available online, and instructors will be available by request for special one-on-one “My Metadata” sessions to answer specific questions for individual participants NCDDC set out to meet the increased needs of data managers as many organizations transition from FGDC to ISO standards. Working with other metadata trainers within the community, the NCDDC Metadata Team has developed a complete package of training materials for the transition to ISO metadata standards. Conducting this training online is an innovative way to meet the increased demand for this training while controlling travel expenses. NCDDC conducted its first metadata training series online in 2012 to help data managers meet the challenge of keeping up-to-date on the latest metadata standards and tools for implementing these standards. In an environment of declining budgets and travel limitations, online training has proven to be a successful avenue to meet these needs. About The

Presenter(s):
NCDDC's Metadata Team, Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, are experts in metadata creation, management and publication. The NCDDC Metadata Team has years of experience in Metadata Training, holding classes for federal, state, and academic organizations across the U.S. NCDDC has led the development of new materials for ISO metadata, including the creation of the first online ISO training in 2012.

14 July 2014

Title: Invasive Blue and Flathead Catfish in the Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Bruce Vogt, Ecosystem Science and Synthesis Manager at NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office
Date & Time: 14 July 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Bruce Vogt (Ecosystem Science and Synthesis Manager at NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office) Seminar sponsor: NOAA HQ Aquatic Invasive Species Team

Remote Access:
Remote access is available: FOR AUDIO: in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. FOR WEBCAST: For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form at the website below a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the passcode is brownbag. https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings&netId=742656968&netPass=&netType=conference&acceptTerms=on&sigKey=mymeetings

Abstract:
Blue and flathead catfish are considered invasive species in the Chesapeake Bay, as they have rapidly expanded into nearly every major tributary in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Blue and flathead catfish have the potential to comprise a highly valued recreational fishery as well as negatively affecting native species and the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office funds research on invasive catfish to help further understand their basic biology and potential negative effects on native species and human health. Research findings will help inform management and mitigation strategies. A report from the Invasive Catfish Task force is currently being drafted to develop recommendations to slow and reduce the spread of invasive catfish populations, minimize ecological and economic impacts, and improve public awareness. Seminar POC for questions: clarence.fullard@noaa.gov (301-427-8773)

16 July 2014

Title: Balance and Connect: OAR's Strategy for Improving Understanding and Applications
Presenter(s): Avery Sen, PhD., NOAA/OAR's Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation
Date & Time: 16 July 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4, Room 8150; remote access available - see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Avery Sen., PhD, Oceanic and Atmospheric Research's (OAR's) Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation

Sponsor(s):
NOS Seminar Series; Point of Contact: tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet You may need to download MyMeetings files, and you may need your system admin. to do this, so do it well before. AUDIO: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# WEBCAST: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting number: 744925156 NO PASSCODE for the webinar is required.

Abstract:
OAR does great science, but science -- per se -- is only part of OAR's mission to perform research, develop new capabilities, and transition knowledge and technology into useful applications. To meet this mission, OAR's approach is to balance and connect the forces of "push" from the research community with "pull" from the applications community, as well as science at global, long-term scales with science at local, short-term scales. I provide an overview of OAR's organization and portfolio. Then, using examples of projects at OAR and NOS, I explore challenges and opportunities of collaborative innovation at NOAA.

Bio(s):
Avery Sen is the acting Strategic Planning Lead in Oceanic and Atmospheric Research's (OAR's) Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation. He has 11 years of experience in NOAA developing strategic plans, business processes, and performance management schema to direct R&D organizations and enable them to learn from experience. Avery has led the writing and editing of numerous strategic plans at NOAA, including the Next Generation Strategic Plan, the 5-Year R&D Plan, and the OAR Strategic Plan. Avery has a PhD in Public Administration and an MA in International Science & Technology Policy, both from The George Washington University, as well as a BA in Science and Technology Studies from Cornell University.
Title: Proactive Quality Control based on Ensemble Forecast Sensitivity to Observation, EFSO (Daisuke Hotta, UMD)
Presenter(s): Daisuke Hotta, UMD
Date & Time: 16 July 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP Conference Center
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Daisuke Hotta (UMD-JMA) Go To Meeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/736634797 Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (571) 317-3112 Access Code: 736-634-797 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 736-634-797

Abstract:
Despite recent major improvements in numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems, operational NWP forecasts occasionally suffer from an abrupt drop in forecast skill, a phenomenon called ''forecast skill dropout.'' Recent studies have shown that the ''dropouts'' occur not because of the model's deficiencies but by the use of flawed observations that the operational quality control (QC) system failed to filter out. Thus, to minimize the occurrences of forecast skill dropouts, we need to detect and remove such flawed observations. A diagnostic technique called Ensemble Forecast Sensitivity to Observation (EFSO) enables us to quantify how much each observation has improved or degraded the forecast. A recent study (Ota et al., 2013) has shown that it is possible to detect flawed observations that caused regional forecast skill dropouts by using EFSO with 24-hour lead-time and that the forecast can be improved by not assimilating the detected observations. Inspired by their success, in the first part of this study, we propose a new QC method, which we call Proactive QC (PQC), in which flawed observations are detected 6 hours after the analysis by EFSO and then the analysis and forecast are repeated without using the detected observations. This new QC technique is implemented and tested on a lower-resolution version of NCEP's operational global NWP system. The results we obtained are extremely promising; we have found that we can detect regional forecast skill dropouts and the flawed observations after only 6 hours from the analysis and that the rejection of the identified flawed observations indeed improves 24-hour forecasts. In the second part, we show that the same approximation used in the derivation of EFSO can be used to formulate the forecast sensitivity to observation error covariance matrix $\R$, which we call EFSR. We implement the EFSR diagnostics in both an idealized system and the quasi-operational NWP system and show that it can be used to tune the matrix so that the utility of observations is improved. We also point out that EFSO and EFSR can be used for the optimal assimilation of new observing systems.
Title: A 34-Year Nearshore Wave Hindcast for Ireland, Atlantic and Irish Sea coasts: Wave Climate and Energy Resource Assessment
Presenter(s): Frederic Dias, the University College of Dublin
Date & Time: 16 July 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar EMC Seminar

Presenter(s):
Frederic Dias (the University College of Dublin) POC: Arun Chawla (arun.chawla@noaa.gov) GoToMeeting® https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/961599485 Dial +1 (571) 317-3112 Access Code: 961-599-485 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 961-599-485

Abstract:
The Northeast Atlantic possesses some of the highest wave energy levels in the world. The recent years have witnessed a renewed interest in harnessing this vast energy potential. Due to the complicated geomorphology of the Irish coast, there can be a significant variation in both the wave and wind climate. Long-term hindcasts with high spatial resolution, properly calibrated against available measurements, provide vital information for future deployments of ocean renewable energy installations. These can aid in the selection of adequate locations for potential deployment and for the planning and design of those marine operations. A 34-year (from 1979 to 2012), high-resolution wave hindcast was performed for Ireland including both the Atlantic and Irish Sea coasts, with a particular focus on the wave energy resource. The wave climate was estimated using the third-generation spectral wave model WAVEWATCH III version 4.11, the unstructured grid formulation. The wave model was forced with directional wave spectral data and 10-m winds from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim reanalysis, which is available from 1979 to the present. The model was validated against available observed satellite altimeter and buoy data, particularly in the nearshore, and was found to be excellent. A strong spatial and seasonal variability was found for both significant wave heights, and the wave energy flux, particularly on the north and west coasts. A strong correlation between the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) teleconnection pattern and wave heights, wave periods, and peak direction in winter and also, to a lesser extent, in spring was identified.

18 July 2014

Title: The Transition to ISO Metadata
Presenter(s): Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich - National Coastal Data Development Center
Date & Time: 18 July 2014
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Online metadata training http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Remote Access and Notes: Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

Presenter(s):
Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich (National Coastal Data Development Center) OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center

Abstract:
NOAA's National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC), a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is pleased to announce the new schedule of its popular free online metadata training series. The “Transition to ISO” course is designed for data managers who have a need to transition from the use of Federal Geographic Data Committee CSDGM metadata to ISO 191** metadata. The series will cover topics such as XML and UML basics and ISO creation methods. All materials will be made available online, and instructors will be available by request for special one-on-one “My Metadata” sessions to answer specific questions for individual participants NCDDC set out to meet the increased needs of data managers as many organizations transition from FGDC to ISO standards. Working with other metadata trainers within the community, the NCDDC Metadata Team has developed a complete package of training materials for the transition to ISO metadata standards. Conducting this training online is an innovative way to meet the increased demand for this training while controlling travel expenses. NCDDC conducted its first metadata training series online in 2012 to help data managers meet the challenge of keeping up-to-date on the latest metadata standards and tools for implementing these standards. In an environment of declining budgets and travel limitations, online training has proven to be a successful avenue to meet these needs. About The

Presenter(s):
NCDDC's Metadata Team, Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, are experts in metadata creation, management and publication. The NCDDC Metadata Team has years of experience in Metadata Training, holding classes for federal, state, and academic organizations across the U.S. NCDDC has led the development of new materials for ISO metadata, including the creation of the first online ISO training in 2012.

21 July 2014

Title: Atmospheric Precipitation-Cloud-Radiative Biases and their Impacts on Fully Coupled GCMs
Presenter(s): Jui-Lin Li, NASA/JPL
Date & Time: 21 July 2014
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NCWCP Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC Seminar Speaker Jui-Lin (Frank) Li, NASA/JPL https://science.jpl.nasa.gov/people/JLi POC: Fanglin Yang fanglin.yang@noaa.gov GoToMeeting® https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/842185509 Dial +1 (646) 749-3131 Access Code and Meeting ID: 842-185-509

Abstract:
Significant systematic clouds, radiation and moist biases are found in the CMIP3/CMIP5 models ensemble average in sub- and tropical Pacific regions in conjunctions with biases of upward motion, eastward low-level wind with moist convergence north of SPCZ and south of ITCZ " referred to as the V-Shaped regions. We characterize the impacts of precipitating snow and radiation effects, which are not included in most of the CMIP3/CMIP5 models, by using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)-coupled GCM that the model includes diagnostic snow for radiation calculation. A number of differences associated with snow-radiation effect off are found consistent with the biases in CMIP3/CMIP5 simulations. With snow-radiation off, there excessive longwave radiative cooling at the top of atmosphere while shortwave radiative warming at the surface resulting in net radiative cooling near the cloud top, triggering compensating upward motion in the heavily precipitating regions of the tropics such as ITCZ, SPCZ and warm pool. This leads to local subsidence at the north edge of SPCZ and south edge of ITCZ, generating low-level eastward/southeastward wind (i.e., weakening mean northwestward trade wind) and moist convergence from the warm pool, SPCZ and ITCZ and resulting increase total precipitable water and column of moisture. This further leads to the model's biases of local and remote areas of sea surface temperatures (SSTs), sea surface height, and surface wind stress and large-scale circulations.
Title: Upscale effects of deep convection during the North American monsoon
Presenter(s): David Stensrud, Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University
Date & Time: 21 July 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
David Stensrud (Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University) POC: Glenn White GoToMeeting® https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/337042309 Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (571) 317-3131 Access Code: 337-042-309 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 337-042-309

Abstract:
The ability of deep monsoon convection to influence the larger-scale circulation over North America is investigated for a 6-day long case study during the 2006 North American monsoon season. Results from Rossby wave ray tracing and numerical simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting model indicate that North American monsoon convection provides a source region for stationary Rossby waves. Two wave trains are seen in the numerical model simulations, with behaviors that agree well with expectations from theory and ray tracing. The shorter and faster moving wave train moves eastward from the source region in Mexico and reaches the western Atlantic within 4 days. The longer and slower moving wave train travels northeastward and reaches the coastal New England region within 6 days. An upstream tail of anticyclonic vorticity extends westward from the source region into the central Pacific Ocean. The monsoon convection appears to help cut off the low-level anticyclonic flow by developing low-level southerly flow in the Gulf of Mexico and northerly flow in the eastern Pacific, as suggested in earlier global model studies. However, the stationary Rossby wave trains further alter the location and intensity of deep convection in locations remote from the monsoon. Implications of these results for operational forecasting and regional climate will be discussed.

23 July 2014

Title: Hollings Scholar Maps and Analyzes the Distribution of Corals Proposed for Listing under the Endangered Species Act that occur in Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Katharine Egan, Hollings Scholar at NOS/NCCOS Biogeography Branch
Date & Time: 23 July 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 8150; remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Katharine Egan, Hollings Scholar at NOS/NCCOS

Sponsor(s):
NOS Seminar Series;Point of Contact: tracy.gill@noaa.gov or jennifer.j.johnson

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet You may need to download MyMeetings files, and you may need your system admin. to do this, so do it well before. AUDIO: Dial toll-free (U.S.)1-877-708-1667. Passcode is 7028688# WEBCAST: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting no: 744925156 NO PASSCODE is required for the internet part of.the webinar

Abstract:
Numerous threats are affecting coral reefs around the world. In recent years, NOAA has proposed that a number of coral species be designated as Threatened or Endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), due to the fragility of the corals in question along with habitat threats that limit their growth and distribution. NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) and several partners have been working together to develop long-term monitoring programs of U.S. coral reef ecosystems. The monitoring data and related products will be used to increase our understanding of coral reef ecosystems for improved decision making on the conversation of coral reefs. One set of coral reefs under study are located in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary, in the western Gulf of Mexico, about 100 miles off the coasts of Texas and Louisiana. Research has shown there is a high abundance of coral species there proposed for inclusion under the Endangered Species Act. Using mostly suba diving to collect the data, maps were created in Geographic Information Systems to show the distribution, presence/absence, and demographics of ESA corals in the Sanctuary collected in 2013. These maps will ultimately help with management decisions and protect the delicate reefs of the Sanctuary. Correlations were examined between site depth, rugosity, relief type, study areas (East and West banks), and percent cover of benthic species and ESA coral using statistical methods.

Bio(s):
Katharine Egan is an undergraduate at the University of Rhode Island (URI) and her research interest is coral reef ecology and ecosystem studies. She received the NOAA Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship, a program that provides a scholarship and internship to undergraduate students. For her internship this summer, Katharine is working for the NCCOS Biogeography Branch on the National Coral Reef Monitoring Plan (NCRMP) project in Silver Spring, MD. She is participating in the NOAA Diving Program, analyzing data from previous NCRMP projects, and helping to collect data for this summer's Puerto Rico mission. Prior to joining NOAA, she worked as a researcher at URI in a coastal wetlands ecology lab and an algal/marine community ecology lab. She has studied abroad at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences where she first became fascinated with coral reef ecology. Katharine plans to graduate in May, 2015 with her B.S. in Marine Biology.
Title: DYNAMO Webinar Series - Madden-Julian Oscillation Model Improvement
Presenter(s): Joshua Fu, University of Hawaii and Guang Zhang, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Date & Time: 23 July 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th Floor Fishbowl
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Joshua Fu (University of Hawaii) and Guang Zhang (Scripps Institution of Oceanography) Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR CPO Climate Variability and Predictability Program Seminar POC for questions: hunter.jones@noaa.gov About this Series: http://cpo.noaa.gov/ClimatePrograms/EarthSystemScience/ClimateVariabilityandPredictability/CVPWebinars.aspx

Remote Access:
Register for

Remote Access:
https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/890763210 Abstracts: Application of DYNAMO/AMIE observations to validate and improve the representation of MJO initiation and propagation in the NCEP CFSv2 The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the dominant mode of tropical convection variability on the intraseasonal time scale. The MJO initiates in the western equatorial Indian Ocean and propagates eastward as a couplet between multi-scale convection and large-scale circulation. Though upscale/downscale modulations and tropical "extratropical teleconnections, the MJO influences the weather activity and climate variability around the globe. The recurrent nature of the MJO influences the weather activity and climate variability around the globe. The recurrent nature of the MJO with a period of 30-60 days offers an opportunity to bridge the gap between weather forecasting and seasonal prediction. However, current state-of-the-art global models are significantly challenged in realistically simulating the MJO, which severely hampers our capability of predicting its global impacts. Great efforts have been made to improve the prediction skill of the MJO at NOAA NCEP. Dynamical forecasts from the NCEP Climate Forecast System (CFSv1) have been produced in real-time since 2004. A new Climate Forecast System (CFSv2) is being developed and will replace the earlier version (CFSv1). Additionally, a new Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) has recently been completed. The CFSR is superior in capturing intraseasonal convective variability as compared to the previous NCEP reanalyses and is used to initialize the CFSv2. Despite these efforts, outstanding problems in the MJO forecast still remain. Preliminary analysis shows that while the CFSv2 has a better overall skill than the CFSv1, it consistently forecasts too slow eastward propagation. The proposed research aims to take advantage of the unprecedented data that will be collected during DYNAMO/AMIE field campaigns and the CFSR to advance our understanding of the MJO initiating and propagation, and to explore the pathway to improve the representation of the MJO in the CFSv2. To achieve the above objectives, the following steps will be taken: 1) Relevant processes revealed from previous studies on MJO initiation and propagation will be documented with the CFSR, outputs of the CFSv2 and a model at UH. 2) Results from the CFSR, CFSv2, and the UH model will be carefully compared and further validated with DYNAMO/AMIE observations and possible relationships between errors in the MJO forecasts and errors in associated atmospheric (e.g., heating and moistening profiles, low-level convergence, etc.) and oceanic (e.g., SST) fields will be examined to assess the impacts of atmospheric model physics and oceanic surface variability. 3) Numerical experiments with the CFSv2 and UH model will be conducted to assess the impact of atmospheric model physics (e.g., detrainment of shallow convection and trigger of deep convection). 4) Further numerical experiments with atmosphere-only components of the CFSv2 and UH model will be performed to assess the impact of forecast SST errors and to test the use of a high-resolution 1-dimensional mixed-layer ocean model. This activity is expected to improve the overall prediction skill of the MJO in the NCEP mode. This project directly responds to the priority 3 of FY2011 ESS program “understanding and Improving Prediction of Tropical Convection”. The proposed study will further our understanding of the physical processes governing the initiation and propagation of the dominant tropical convection variability on the intraseasonal time scale: the MJO. The main accomplishment of this project will be to improve the prediction skill of the MJO and the associated weather and climate variability in the CFSv2, contributing to the economic and societal well-being of the Nation. A Global Model Investigation of MJO Initiation for DYNAMO The DYNAMO field campaign in the Indian Ocean provides an unprecedented opportunity to study MJO initiation. In this project, the PI proposes to investigate the MJO initiation in the Indian Ocean using the NCAR CAM3 and the DYNAMO observations. The objective is to improve MJO simulation, and ultimately MJO prediction using global models. As part of the DYNAMO modeling effort, the project aims to answer the following scientific questions relevant to Hypotheses I and II in the DYNAMO Science Planning Overview (SPO) document: I. What are the factors determining the initiation of MJO in the Indian Ocean? II. How does the cloud population interact with the MJO circulation during MJO initiation? Can the NCAR CAM3 reproduce the observed cloud population? The basic research tools used in this work are the NCAR CAM3 and the improved Zhang-McFarlane convection scheme. The data used for model evaluation and improvement will be DYNAMO field observations from sounding array, radar and satellites, ECMWF reanalyses products, and other data assembled by the Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) project. The combination of model and observations will allow us to test new ideas using models and evaluate them using observations. To answer the above questions, we will perform a series of simulations using the CAM3 and its single column version in both prediction mode and the traditional climate simulation mode. Simulation tests will be conducted to determine what factors affect the MJO initiation the most. In particular, shallow convection preconditioning, convective sensitivity to environmental moisture through lateral entrainment, sea surface temperature and surface evaporation, among others, are deemed critical to MJO initiation. We will investigate each of them in the proposed research. The model output will be compared with DYNAMO observations and reanalyses products. For each observed and simulated MJO, budgets of heat and moisture will be computed to determine the sources and sinks of moisture during different stages of MJO initiation over the Indian Ocean. The cloud population, as measured by cloud top heights and optical depth, during the MJO life cycle from model simulations and satellite observations will be compared and related to MJO circulation. We will also participate in the inter-model comparisons to identify sensitivity of different models to parameters in convection scheme. Intellectual merit: MJO simulation is a challenging scientific problem in GCMs. Using an improved version of the convection scheme developed by the PI, the NCAR CAM3 can simulate MJOs realistically. Thus, the model can be used as a tool together with DYNAMO observations to understand MJO initiation in the Indian

24 July 2014

Title: Social Media and Severe Weather: What Do We Know and Where are We Going?
Presenter(s): Joe Ripberger, CIMMS, National Severe Storms Laboratory
Date & Time: 24 July 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC#3, 2nd Floor, NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Joe Ripberger, CIMMS, National Severe Storms Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Access: For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 ext. 140) or Albert (Skip) Theberge (301-713-2600 ext. 118) for further information or to set up a Brown Bag.

Abstract:
According to a recent report by the Department of Homeland Security, "social media and collaborative technologies have become critical components of emergency preparedness, response, and recovery" (2013). These technologies are critical because they provide a centralized mechanism for two-way communication before, during, and after disasters that allows the National Weather Service, Emergency Managers, the media, and affected communities to disseminate and receive information about a hazard in near real-time. As yet, however, we know relative little about who participates in this exchange of information and how it transpires throughout the course of an event. In this presentation, I will address this void by answering three basic yet important research questions: (1) Who uses social media to get information about severe weather and how has this evolved over time? (2) How does social media usage evolve throughout the course of a severe weather event? (3) What do meteorologists and forecasters think about social media and how has it changed the way they approach their jobs?

25 July 2014

Title: The Transition to ISO Metadata
Presenter(s): Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich - National Coastal Data Development Center
Date & Time: 25 July 2014
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Online metadata training http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Remote Access and Notes: Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

Presenter(s):
Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich (National Coastal Data Development Center) OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center

Abstract:
NOAA's National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC), a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is pleased to announce the new schedule of its popular free online metadata training series. The “Transition to ISO” course is designed for data managers who have a need to transition from the use of Federal Geographic Data Committee CSDGM metadata to ISO 191** metadata. The series will cover topics such as XML and UML basics and ISO creation methods. All materials will be made available online, and instructors will be available by request for special one-on-one “My Metadata” sessions to answer specific questions for individual participants NCDDC set out to meet the increased needs of data managers as many organizations transition from FGDC to ISO standards. Working with other metadata trainers within the community, the NCDDC Metadata Team has developed a complete package of training materials for the transition to ISO metadata standards. Conducting this training online is an innovative way to meet the increased demand for this training while controlling travel expenses. NCDDC conducted its first metadata training series online in 2012 to help data managers meet the challenge of keeping up-to-date on the latest metadata standards and tools for implementing these standards. In an environment of declining budgets and travel limitations, online training has proven to be a successful avenue to meet these needs. About The

Presenter(s):
NCDDC's Metadata Team, Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, are experts in metadata creation, management and publication. The NCDDC Metadata Team has years of experience in Metadata Training, holding classes for federal, state, and academic organizations across the U.S. NCDDC has led the development of new materials for ISO metadata, including the creation of the first online ISO training in 2012.
Title: Law and Policies that Apply to NOAA International Agreements
Presenter(s): Hugh C. Schratwieser, Attorney Advisor, NOAA Office of General Counsel Weather, Satellites and Research Section
Date & Time: 25 July 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 Library (2nd Floor)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Hugh C. Schratwieser, Attorney Advisor, NOAA Office of General Counsel Weather, Satellites and Research Section Seminar sponsor: NOAA International Affairs Council Working Group on the Law of the Sea Convention Seminar POC for questions: Peter.Oppenheimer@noaa.gov

Abstract:
This brown bag presentation will address the law and policies regarding international agreements and memoranda of understanding between NOAA and counterparts in foreign nations. Hugh Schratwieser of the NOAA Office of General Counsel Weather, Satellites and Research Section will provide an overview of the Case- Zablocki Act and its implementation by NOAA GC. Authority for making most determinations under the Case-Zablocki Act for NOAA international agreements is delegated to the NOAA General Counsel by the Department of Commerce General Counsel. Additional information on the Case-Zablocki Act and its implementation by the Department of Commerce and NOAA is available at http://www.gc.noaa.gov/gc_case_zablocki.html. NOAA GC guidance on legal determinations under the Case-Zablocki Act is available at http://www.gc.noaa.gov/documents/082604-faq-case-act-2p.pdf.

Remote Access:
For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form at https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings&netId=742656968&netPass=&netType=conference&acceptTerms=on&sigKey=mymeetings a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.

29 July 2014

Title: Meaningful Evaluation Strategies for Numerical Model Forecasts using MET
Presenter(s): Tara Jensen, NCAR
Date & Time: 29 July 2014
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm ET
Location: NCWCP 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Tara Jensen (NCAR) Seminar POC for questions: Dave DeWitt Join WebEx https://ncep-events.webex.com/ncep-events/onstage/g.php?MTID=e5ca8ff9df028f0a6dcd9df96a467f273 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 998 732 015

Abstract:
http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/abstract.2014/Jensen.html

31 July 2014

Title: Hurricane Sandy and SWATH Network
Presenter(s): Robert Mason and Harry Jenter, USGS, John Fulton, NOAA
Date & Time: 31 July 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 2nd Floor NOAA Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Robert Mason and Harry Jenter, USGS, John Fulton, NOAA

Remote Access:
FOR AUDIO: in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. FOR WEBCAST: For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form at the website below a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the passcode is brownbag. https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings&netId=742656968&netPass=&netType=conference&acceptTerms=on&sigKey=mymeetings

Abstract:
Understanding the evolution and dissipation of overland storm tides and waves as they move across natural and manmade landscapes is critical to increasing coastal resilience and establishing early warning systems for coastal storm hazards. In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, the USGS is building an overland Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics (SWaTH) network along the Atlantic Coast from Virginia through Maine to provide more timely storm-surge and wave data to enhance public awareness, help forecasters predict surge impacts, and inform emergency responders. During this brown-bag presentation the presenters will describe plans for implementation of the SWaTH and discuss collaborative opportunities and user needs and solicit input from NOAA scientists and engineers. POC for questions: mary.lou.cumberpatch@noaa.gov
Title: Diagnosing the Prediction of Tropical Cyclones and their Environments in Global Models, GFS and MPAS
Presenter(s): Chris David, NCAR
Date & Time: 31 July 2014
1:15 pm - 2:15 pm ET
Location: NCWCP 2890
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Chris Davis (NCAR) POC: David DeWitt Join WebEx https://ncep-events.webex.com/ncep-events/onstage/g.php?MTID=e120ce82493436f74b027f145d6e45de2 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 997 430 896

Abstract:
ropical cyclone prediction at lead times of 5-10 days is challenging because it requires accurate prediction of organized, deep convection across a range of scales. Related to this, the formation and decay of tropical cyclones contribute significantly to medium range TC prediction. This talk examines the prediction of northern hemisphere TCs and their large-scale environments during 2012, 2013 and 2014. Results from both the Global Forecast System (GFS) and the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) are considered. It is shown that the GFS exhibits episodic large-scale moisture errors over the Western Pacific Ocean that can inhibit TC formation. Regional errors in deep convection are also shown to affect the forecast track of TCs. In contrast, MPAS exhibits more false alarms than GFS, especially after forecast day 7. These false alarms appear sensitive to dissipation in the model. Despite differences between the representation of TCs in the two models, they exhibited similar overall track and intensity forecast skill during August and September of 2013. Plans for MPAS development are summarized, with emphasis on facilitating comparison with the GFS for tropical cyclone prediction.

1 August 2014

Title: The Transition to ISO Metadata
Presenter(s): Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich - National Coastal Data Development Center
Date & Time: 1 August 2014
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Online metadata training http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Remote Access and Notes: Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

Presenter(s):
Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich (National Coastal Data Development Center) OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center

Abstract:
NOAA's National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC), a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is pleased to announce the new schedule of its popular free online metadata training series. The “Transition to ISO” course is designed for data managers who have a need to transition from the use of Federal Geographic Data Committee CSDGM metadata to ISO 191** metadata. The series will cover topics such as XML and UML basics and ISO creation methods. All materials will be made available online, and instructors will be available by request for special one-on-one “My Metadata” sessions to answer specific questions for individual participants NCDDC set out to meet the increased needs of data managers as many organizations transition from FGDC to ISO standards. Working with other metadata trainers within the community, the NCDDC Metadata Team has developed a complete package of training materials for the transition to ISO metadata standards. Conducting this training online is an innovative way to meet the increased demand for this training while controlling travel expenses. NCDDC conducted its first metadata training series online in 2012 to help data managers meet the challenge of keeping up-to-date on the latest metadata standards and tools for implementing these standards. In an environment of declining budgets and travel limitations, online training has proven to be a successful avenue to meet these needs. About The

Presenter(s):
NCDDC's Metadata Team, Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, are experts in metadata creation, management and publication. The NCDDC Metadata Team has years of experience in Metadata Training, holding classes for federal, state, and academic organizations across the U.S. NCDDC has led the development of new materials for ISO metadata, including the creation of the first online ISO training in 2012.
Title: Using the Science of Story to Enhance Climate Writing
Presenter(s): Kendall Haven, Story Consultant, Author, & Master Storyteller
Date & Time: 1 August 2014
12:00 pm - 12:40 pm ET
Location: Online access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Climate Connection

Remote Access:


Presenter(s):
Kendall Haven, Story Consultant, Author, & Master Storyteller, www.kendallhaven.com Online access: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/916585992 Immediately after you submit the registration form, you'll receive an email with a link to connect to the session. During the Webinar, you can receive audio directly through your computer speakers for free, or dial in to the number displayed when you sign in (long-distance charges may apply). The session will be recorded. It will be available at the NWS CSD Seminar site within a few days after the event. Summary : Kendall Haven conducts research on cognitive and neural aspects of storytelling and its influence on engagement. In this presentation, he will discuss how climate communicators can apply some of his recent findings to their efforts. The session will feature information on: Narrative Tension (As goes tension, so goes attention.) * informational elements that establish, maintain, and control reader tension * elements that satisfy the sense-making needs of a reader's internal neural processing Reader Engagement (Engagement is the essential gateway to influence.) * research findings that reveal the neural process of engagement and the creation of meaning * informational elements that control reader engagement Narrative Influence (The goal of every article is to change reader attitudes, beliefs, values, knowledge, and behavior.) * story elements that form the new influence models * the central role of three narrative character positions Presenter

Bio(s):
The only West Point graduate to turn professional storyteller, Kendall Haven also holds a Doctorate in Oceanography. Now a master storyteller, Haven has performed for over 6.8 million adults and children around the world. He has also has led research efforts on effective story structure at the National Storytelling Association. An internationally recognized Subject Matter Expert on the cognitive and neuro-science of story, Haven created the first detailed, tested model of dynamic story architecture that accounts for the neurology of how narrative material is processed, understood, remembered, and recalled in a receiver's mind. Read more about Kendall Haven
Title: Aerosols, ice clouds and climate
Presenter(s): Ulrike Lohmann, ETH Zurich, Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science
Date & Time: 1 August 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: ESRL Room 2A305, DSRC, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO; Online access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Ulrike Lohmann, ETH Zurich, Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
ESRL Chemical Sciences Division

Remote Access:
Webinar Registration https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/744682002 and view system requirements. Space is limited. Confirmation of registration includes information about joining the GoToMeeting.

Abstract:
Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation and ice nuclei and with that influence the microstructure of clouds. Due to anthropogenic emissions, the abundance of sulfate, nitrate and carbonaceous aerosol particles has been increased. This causes water clouds to have on average more smaller cloud droplets and to reflect more solar radiation back to space. Changes in the number and size of ice crystals changes are much more uncertain because of competing mechanisms and fewer observations. In my talk, I will therefore concentrate on measurements of ice nuclei, in-situ observations of mixed-phase clouds and the aerosol radiative forcing associated with clouds containing ice. Aerosols, ice clouds and climate POC for questions: barbara.ervens@noaa.gov Additional information: http://esrl.noaa.gov/csd/seminars/2014/Lohmann.html Directions: http://esrl.noaa.gov/csd/seminars/index.html#directions ALL Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or ESRL CSD.

6 August 2014

Title: Aerosol formation and growth in coal-fired power-plant plumes: Linking plume-scale processes to global aerosols and climate
Presenter(s): Robin Stevens, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia
Date & Time: 6 August 2014
5:30 pm - 6:30 pm ET
Location: ESRL Room 2A305, DSRC, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO; Online access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Robin Stevens, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia Seminar

Sponsor(s):
ESRL Chemical Sciences Division

Remote Access:
Webinar Registration https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/330175346 and view system requirements. Space is limited. Confirmation of registration includes information about joining the GoToMeeting®.

Abstract:
New-particle formation in the plumes of coal-fired power plants and other anthropogenic sulphur sources may be an important source of particles in the atmosphere. These particles may grow to sizes where they can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and thereby increase cloud reflectivity and lifetime, resulting in a cooling of surface temperatures. It has been unclear how best to reproduce this plume-scale new-particle formation in global and regional aerosol models with grid-box lengths that are tens of kilometres and larger. The predictive power of these models has thus been limited by the resultant uncertainties in aerosol size distributions. We have implemented online TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics into the System for Atmospheric Modelling (SAM), a Large-Eddy Simulation/Cloud-Resolving Model (LES/CRM). This model is evaluated against aircraft observations of new-particle formation in two different power-plant plumes from the 2006 TexAQS campaign and the 2004 ICARTT campaign. and reproduces the major features of the observations. We show how the downwind plume aerosols can be greatly modified by both meteorological and background aerosol conditions. Based on the results of the SAM-TOMAS model, we develop the Predicting Particles Produced in Power-Plant Plumes (P6) parameterization: a computationally-efficient, but physically-based, parameterization that predicts the characteristics of aerosol formed within sulphur-rich plumes based on large-scale mean meteorological parameters, emissions directly from the source, and mean background pollutant concentrations. Finally, we implement the P6 parameterization in the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS global chemical-transport model in order to evaluate the contribution of coal-fired power plants globally to particle number and CCN concentrations. Globally, use of the P6 parameterization resulted in predicted CCN concentrations smaller than or similar to previous sub-grid sulphate schemes depending on the model configuration. We find that the sub-grid scale new-particle formation predicted by P6 is most sensitive to uncertainties in the model-predicted aerosol condensation sink. For constant SO2 emissions, fewer new particles are formed in more polluted regions. This spatial heterogeneity in new-particle formation cannot be resolved by previous treatments of sub-grid sulphate but is captured by P6. POC for questions: barbara.ervens@noaa.gov Additional information: http://esrl.noaa.gov/csd/seminars/2014/Stevens.html Directions: http://esrl.noaa.gov/csd/seminars/index.html#directions ALL Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or ESRL CSD.

8 August 2014

Title: The Transition to ISO Metadata
Presenter(s): Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich - National Coastal Data Development Center
Date & Time: 8 August 2014
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Online metadata training http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Remote Access and Notes: Register at: http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/metadata-standards/metadata-training/ Additional Access Information given upon registration.

Presenter(s):
Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich (National Coastal Data Development Center) OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center

Abstract:
NOAA's National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC), a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is pleased to announce the new schedule of its popular free online metadata training series. The “Transition to ISO” course is designed for data managers who have a need to transition from the use of Federal Geographic Data Committee CSDGM metadata to ISO 191** metadata. The series will cover topics such as XML and UML basics and ISO creation methods. All materials will be made available online, and instructors will be available by request for special one-on-one “My Metadata” sessions to answer specific questions for individual participants NCDDC set out to meet the increased needs of data managers as many organizations transition from FGDC to ISO standards. Working with other metadata trainers within the community, the NCDDC Metadata Team has developed a complete package of training materials for the transition to ISO metadata standards. Conducting this training online is an innovative way to meet the increased demand for this training while controlling travel expenses. NCDDC conducted its first metadata training series online in 2012 to help data managers meet the challenge of keeping up-to-date on the latest metadata standards and tools for implementing these standards. In an environment of declining budgets and travel limitations, online training has proven to be a successful avenue to meet these needs. About The

Presenter(s):
NCDDC's Metadata Team, Jacqueline Mize and Kathy Martinolich, are experts in metadata creation, management and publication. The NCDDC Metadata Team has years of experience in Metadata Training, holding classes for federal, state, and academic organizations across the U.S. NCDDC has led the development of new materials for ISO metadata, including the creation of the first online ISO training in 2012.

12 August 2014

Title: Recent progress with the integration of new verification methods into operations at the Met Office
Presenter(s): Marion Mittermaier, UK Met Office
Date & Time: 12 August 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Marion Mittermaier, UK Met Office Contact person: Yuejian Zhu GoTo meeting 1. Please join my meeting. https://global.gotomeeting.com/meeting/join/834301357 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. United States: +1 (213) 289-0012 Access Code: 834-301-357 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID:834-301-357 Visit EMC facebook for any update http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook Abstract Our modelling systems are continually evolving. New dynamical cores, higher horizontal resolution for global models as well as convection-permitting km-scale NWP are presenting unique challenges in the way we interpret and verify our forecasts. The way we verifying must keep pace with these changes. In this talk I will be presenting some notable verification changes that are in the process of being implemented operationally or have been applied in the operational model upgrade process, which we call trialling. At the km-scale we are introducing the High Resolution Assessment (HiRA) framework which enables us to assess the benefit of our 1.5 km deterministic forecasts with our 2.2 km 12-member MOGREPS-UK ensemble. At the global scale we have been using the Method for Diagnostic Evaluation (MODE) to evaluate the impact of changing the dynamical core of the Met Office Unified Model on the evolution of jet cores, mid-latitude lows and highs, and tropical lows. I will also touch on the work the Met Office has been doing as part of the WMO CBS global deterministic verification in considering the skill of surface parameters, which will also become a standard part of trialling from the autumn.

13 August 2014

Title: Upper Ocean Processes and the HYCOM Ocean Model
Presenter(s): Toshiaki Shinoda - Texas A&M Corpus Christi
Date & Time: 13 August 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th Floor Fishbowl
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Upper Ocean Processes Associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation in the Indian Ocean

Presenter(s):
Toshiaki Shinoda (Texas A&M Corpus Christi) Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR CPO Climate Variability and Predictability Program Seminar POC for questions: hunter.jones@noaa.gov When: Wed., Aug. 13, 2014, 2:00-3:00pm Eastern Time Where: NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th Floor Fishbowl; remote access is available. About this Series: The Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program is hosting monthly webinars to share the results of the Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) field campaign. This field campaign, held in the Indian Ocean from 2011-2012, sought to improve our understanding of the Madden-Julian Oscillation and to improve prediction skill of climate and weather models. It was a large international collaborative effort involving 14 countries and many U.S. agencies and research universities. These webinars represent the results of NOAA-funded researchers and are intended to inform a broad scientific audience of the research outcomes and ongoing efforts and questions related to understanding the Madden-Julian Oscillation. For more information visit: http://cpo.noaa.gov/ClimatePrograms/EarthSystemScience/ClimateVariabilityandPredictability/CVPWebinars.aspx

Remote Access:
Register for

Remote Access:
https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/885392378 Abstracts: Upper Ocean Processes Associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation in the Indian Ocean “Dynamics of Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO)” is a US research program with the goal of expediting our understanding of the physical and dynamical processes key to MJO initiation in the Indian Ocean. The proposed research aims at contributing to testing one of the hypotheses in the DYNAMO program. The primary goal of this proposed study is to improve our understanding of upper ocean processes that control sea surface temperature variability in the central Indian Ocean on the diurnal to intraseasonal time scales, which may play an important role in the initiation of the MJO. We propose to conduct ocean general circulation model (OGCM) and one-dimensional ocean model experiments forced with satellite-derived surface forcing fields. An important difference from previous ocean modeling work is an emphasis on upper ocean processes during MJO initiation. The primary OGCM to be used is the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), which has been successfully used for examining the oceanic response to the MJO. In advance of the field phase of DYNAMO, we will first analyze the existing model outputs of global and Indo-pacific basin HYCOM experiments. The analysis will include the computation of upper ocean heat, momentum and salinity budgets, which is expected to provide useful information for the further improvement of the current plan of field observations. We will then conduct OGCM experiments which cover the period of filed programs of DYNAMO during 2011-2012 using surface fluxes derived from a variety of recent satellite measurements. The performance of the OGCM will be evaluated based on the comparison with in-situ data of the upper ocean and satellite observations including those obtained during the intensive field measurements. A particular emphasis of the analysis is given to the role of surface freshwater flux and barrier layer, mixed layer entrainment, Wyrtki Jets, diurnal cycle, and oceanic equatorial waves in diurnal to intraseasonal SST variations. We will also use high vertical resolution one-dimensional ocean models to examine the impact of upper ocean mixing processes on SST variability, in conjunction with the OGCM experiments, to help understand the relative importance of vertical versus horizontal oceanic processes.

14 August 2014

Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 August 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 14 August 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

Each month, a speaker will give a presentation on various topics related to NGS programs, projects, products and services to educate constituents about NGS activities. Visit the Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/. Future webinars will be held on the second Thursday of every month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.
Title: Ocean for Life - Evaluation of a Program to Increase Cultural Understanding through Ocean Science
Presenter(s): Claire Fackler, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 14 August 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series, NOS - ONMS - Ed Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Short Description: Ocean for Life is an ocean science program for multicultural teens to discover marine science, conservation, cultural understanding and how the ocean connects us all. Learn about the profound impacts of this unique program through formative and long-term summative evaluation.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Remote Access:
This presentation will only be available remotely through GoToMeeting by using the following link: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/128208218 FOR AUDIO: We will be using VoIP (voice over internet protocol) for audio through the webinar. So simply sign in the webinar using the link above. If you have head phones or a head set, please plan to use them to connect to the audio.

Abstract:
On September 11, 2001, three sixth-grade students, their teachers and two National Geographic staff boarded a flight in Washington, D.C., bound for a week of exploration and discovery in Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary. They never reached California. American Airlines flight 77 was hijacked and hit the Pentagon at 9:37 a.m. In honor of the three young students and all of the lives lost on that significant day in our nation's history, an inspiring program emerged that promotes cultural understanding and acceptance in the context that we are one world connected by one ocean. This program " Ocean for Life " brings together Middle Eastern and North American high school students of diverse cultures and backgrounds to study ocean science, breaking down stereotypes and strengthening our global relationships. During summer 2013, 15 high school students from the Near East and North Africa region joined 15 students from the United States to participate in this international ocean science and cultural exchange program. The program is sculpted around three main themes: 1) sense of place, 2) interconnectedness, and 3) ocean conservation and stewardship. These students use America's national marine sanctuaries as living classrooms, where they discover how one ocean connects us all and how, by connecting to the ocean, we enrich our lives together. The 2013 Ocean for Life students gained a sense of place by learning about the temperate Pacific Ocean off the coast of California, the kelp forest ecosystem and the marine life found within our local waters. Students participated in several stewardship activities, such as beach cleanups and sand crab monitoring. The Ocean for Life students acted as ambassadors and mentored local elementary and middle school students about the issues of plastic pollution and marine debris. At the end of the field study, each student developed an Ocean for Life Action Plan highlighting how they plan to enhance cultural understanding and increase ocean conservation and stewardship at their schools and in their local communities. A total of 114 students from 17 countries in the Greater Middle East, Europe, Australia, Canada and locations throughout the United States are now Ocean for Life alumni and considered ambassadors of change. By sharing their experiences with others around the globe, these students are laying the foundation for a safer, more tolerant society and a healthy, more sustainable world. Since Ocean for Life began in 2009, NOAA has conducted formative and summative evaluations of the Ocean for Life program with periodic follow-up of alumni. These evaluations have determined that this unique international ocean science and cultural exchange program has lasting effects on the student participants, their classmates, schools and local communities in terms of enhanced cultural understanding and increased ocean awareness, conservation and stewardship. Throughout the Ocean for Life experience, students' stereotypes, attitudes and misconceptions of different cultures and backgrounds vanish before our eyes. The positive impact of Ocean for Life can be seen in the lasting commitment of its alumni to be a force for change in each of their communities. We invite teachers to learn more about this free program and how they can recommend students for involvement. http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/ofl.
Title: The Audacity of an Ocean Prediction System
Presenter(s): Dr. Nicholas Bond, OAR/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 14 August 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: via Webinar only (see Registration link in the "Description" area)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Dr. Nicholas Bond, OAR/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA Seminar

Sponsor(s):
National Weather Service/Office of Climate, Water, and Weather Services (OCWWS)/Climate Services Division Seminar POC for questions: Judy.Koepsell@noaa.gov

Abstract:
A seasonal ocean prediction system (J-SCOPE, JISAO's Seasonal Coastal Ocean Prediction of the Ecosystem) has been developed for the coastal waters of the Pacific Northwest, with funding provided by the NOAA FATE program. J-SCOPE has been designed to provide quantitative forecasts of physical, chemical and biological ocean properties under the auspices of the California Current Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA). The goal has been to provide seasonal (six to nine month) predictions of ocean condition that are testable and relevant to management decisions for fisheries, protected species and ecosystem health components. The J-SCOPE forecasts are based on numerical ocean model simulations using a high-resolution (grid spacing ~1.5 km) version of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) with a biochemical component that simulates nutrient and oxygen concentrations and plankton distributions. The initial and boundary conditions for the ROMS runs are from the Coupled Forecast System (CFS), which is a global coupled atmosphere-ocean model that is run operationally by NOAA/NCEP/CPC for use in seasonal weather prediction. The presentation will review some early results from J-SCOPE.

Bio(s):
Nick Bond is a principal research scientist with the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO) of the University of Washington (UW) and also holds an appointment as an affiliate associate professor with the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the UW. He is the State Climatologist for Washington. He has a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Washington. His research is on a broad range of topics with a focus on the weather and climate of the Pacific Northwest and the linkages between the climate and marine ecosystems of the North Pacific. He cheerfully admits to being a weather geek, as evidenced by his preference to visit Alaska in winter, and steamy places like Florida in summer.

Remote Access:
This presentation will be given via Webinar only. Please register at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/554280585

15 August 2014

Title: Ten Years of Southern Resident Killer Whale Research and Conservation Efforts
Presenter(s): Lynne Barre, WCR
Date & Time: 15 August 2014
11:45 pm - 12:45 am ET
Location: SSMC3, room 4527
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Lynne Barre, NOAA-NMFS WCR Seminar sponsor: NOAA NMFS, Office of Protected Resources Seminar POC for questions: lisa.white@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Southern Resident killer whales are an icon of the Pacific Northwest and were listed under the Endangered Species Act in 2005. These endangered whales face multiple threats that are challenging to understand and address- Do they have enough salmon to eat? How are high contaminant levels affecting their health? How do whales respond to vessels and sound? With a decade of focused effort on filling data gaps we have come a long way in our understanding and ability to protect this unique population. NOAA's recent ten year report details collaboration with the killer whale community and implementing protections to secured a strong foundation for recovering the whales, however, the population has not shown strong signs of recovery. In this presentation Lynne will provide an overview of the status of Southern Residents, share what we have learned about the threats facing the whales, highlight the conservation efforts underway, and identify some of the mysteries and challenges that still remain. The report and supporting videos, photos, and graphics are available at: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/features/killer_whale_report/index.cfm About the speakers: Lynne Barre has a background in marine mammal research and first started working on killer whales in 2002 when she went to Seattle to help with the successful rescue and reintroduction of a Northern Resident killer whale calf know as Springer. She joined the West Coast Region in 2003 and has worked on the endangered listing of the Southern Resident killer whales, designated critical habitat, developed and finalized a Recovery Plan and is implementing actions to conserve and recover the whales. In addition to the killer whale program Lynne supports other aspects of the marine mammal program, such as helping coordinate the stranding network. Lynne also works on ESA-listed rockfish species and coordinates with Puget Sound salmon recovery efforts.

Remote Access:
Topic: Brown Bag - 10 Year Anniversary Report on Southern Resident Killer Whale Research & Conservation Efforts Date and Time: Friday, August 15, 2014 12:00 pm, Eastern Daylight Time (New York, GMT-04:00) Event number: 396 618 868 Event password: NOAA Panelist password: The Event has no Panelist Password Host key: 958313 (Use this to reclaim host privileges.) Event address for attendees: https://noaaevents2.webex.com/noaaevents2/onstage/g.php?d=396618868&t=a Event address for panelists: https://noaaevents2.webex.com/noaaevents2/onstage/g.php?d=396618868&t=p ------------------------------------------------------- To start the online event ------------------------------------------------------- At least 30 minutes before the starting time: 1. Go to https://noaaevents2.webex.com/noaaevents2/onstage/g.php?d=396618868&t=h 2. Log in to your host account if you have not yet done so. 3. On the Event Information page that appears, click "Start Now". ------------------------------------------------------- Teleconference information ------------------------------------------------------- US TOLL: 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 396 618 868 http://www.webex.com IMPORTANT NOTICE: This WebEx service includes a feature that allows audio and any documents and other materials exchanged or viewed during the session to be recorded. You should inform all meeting attendees prior to recording if you intend to record the meeting. Please note that any such recordings may be subject to discovery in the event of litigation.

20 August 2014

Title: Taking the Temperature of Urban Streams
Presenter(s): Kayleigh Somers, Ph.D., Pacific States Marine Fisheries Association
Date & Time: 20 August 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 11153
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Taking the Temperature of Urban Streams

Presenter(s):
Kayleigh Somers, Ph.D., Pacific States Marine Fisheries Assn

Sponsor(s):
NOS Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. At first you may need to download MyMeetings files. AUDIO: Dial toll-free U.S.1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# WEBCAST: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", add conf. meeting no: 744925156; no code required

Abstract:
Cities comprise 52% of the Earth's land surface, with this number expected to continue to grow over the next four decades. These urban areas necessarily concentrate food, energy, and construction materials, and as a result tend to be hotter and more polluted than the surrounding landscape. All urban ecosystems are thus quite altered from their pre-urban state, but urban streams are particularly impacted. As low lying points on the landscape, streams are subject to degradation caused by urban stormwaters, which are transmitted rapidly from the surfaces of pavements, roofs, and lawns through stormwater infrastructure to streams. Runoff scours and incises channels while flooding the system with large amounts of contaminants and nutrients, and, the focus of this talk, heat surges. At baseflow, streams are contaminated by sanitary sewage leakages and are warmer due to canopy loss and urban heat island effects. These thermal changes at both baseflow and stormflow can alter ecosystem processes and basic morphological features of biota, such as size and growth rates. This seminar will explore the timing, magnitude, and pattern of temperature changes in urban streams, with the goal of understanding which aspects of watershed development most strongly influence the thermal regimes of streams.​

Bio(s):
Kayleigh Somers completed her doctoral degree in May 2013 at Duke University, in the University Program in Ecology, with co-advisors Drs. Emily Bernhardt and Dean Urban. Her research focused on the effects of urbanization on stream ecosystems, exploring the connections between development and changes in the thermal regimes of streams. Currently, Kayleigh is exploring the world of marine fisheries management as a Data Analyst for the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Association in conjunction with NOAA's Fisheries Observation Science Program.
Title: Monitoring Atmospheric Composition by GEO-KOMPSAT-1 and 2
Presenter(s): Jhoon Kim, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
Date & Time: 20 August 2014
5:30 pm - 6:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA David Skaggs Research Center, Room 2A305, Boulder CO
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series NOAA ESRL CSD Seminar, POC: carsten.warneke@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Jhoon Kim, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea To view this seminar remotely, reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/905183298 Abstract GEO-KOMPSAT is a geostationary program of the Korea Aerospace Research Institute(KARI)'s Korea Multi-Purpose SATellite(KOMPSAT) to observe atmosphere and ocean. GEO-KOMPSAT-1, also known as COMS(Communication, Oceanography and Meteorology Satellite) was launched in June 27, 2010, with conventional 5-channel MI(Meteorological Imager) and 8-channel GOCI(Geostationary Ocean Color Imager). GOCI is the first ocean color imager in geostationary orbit, with the spatial resolution of 500 m. These two instruments have provided information on aerosol in high temporal and spatial resolution over East Asia in terms of optical depth, size and type classification. Algorithm uses clear-sky composite to estimate surface reflectance, and takes dynamic aerosol model and nonsphericity into consideration. GEO-KOMPSAT-2 is planned for launch in 2018 as twin satellites, 2A as weather and 2B as atmospheric environment and ocean satellite, with a 16-channel AMI(Advanced Meteorological Imager), a UV-Visible scanning spectrometer, GEMS(Geostationary Environment Spectrometer), and GOCI-2 (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager-2). GEMS measures ozone, aerosol and their precursors including NO2, and SO2. Synchronous measurements of atmospheric composition together with the meteorological variables and ocean color information are expected to contribute to better understanding on the distribution and transboundary transportation of air pollution, and on interactions between meteorology and air chemistry in the Asia-Pacific region. This mission is expected to improve the accuracy of air quality forecasting and reduce current discrepancy between the model and observation. Furthermore, the constellation of the GeoKOMPSAT with the NASA Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollutions(TEMPO) over North America and the ESA Senteniel-4 UV-Visible-NIR(UVN) spectrometer over Europe in 2017- 2020 time frame can result in great synergistic outcomes including enhancing significantly our understanding in globalization of tropospheric pollution. All Seminar attendees agree not to cite, quote, copy, or distribute = material presented without the explicit written consent of the seminar = presenter. Any opinions expressed in this seminar are those of the = speaker alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NOAA or = ESRL CSD. Visitor Information All seminar attendees, including pedestrians and bike riders, are = required to check in at the Visitor Center of the Boulder Department of = Commerce facilities to receive a visitor badge. Seminar attendees need = to present a valid photo ID (revised July 2014, only certain forms of = identification will be acceptable for entry to NOAA facilities) and = mention the seminar title or the speaker's name to obtain a visitor = badge. If security personnel ask for a point of contact please use Barbara = Ervens (x 4396), Carsten Warneke (x3601), Jane August (x4165) or Jeanne = Waters

25 August 2014

Title: World Ocean Assessment
Presenter(s): David Halpern, US Member of the WOA Bureau; Bonnie Ponwith, Co-Chair of the WOA Wider Caribbean Region Workshop; Andrew Rosenberg, US Member of the WOA Group of Experts; Richard Spinrad, NOAA Chief Scientist; Elizabeth Tirpak, Chair of the WOA Review Coordination Team
Date & Time: 25 August 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3, Room 12872 (aka Fish Bowl)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Remote Access:
Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/833709130 After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

Presenter(s):
David Halpern, US Member of the WOA Bureau Bonnie Ponwith, Co-Chair of the WOA Wider Caribbean Region Workshop Andrew Rosenberg, US Member of the WOA Group of Experts Richard Spinrad, NOAA Chief Scientist Elizabeth Tirpak, Chair of the WOA Review Coordination Team ABSTRACT The United Nations has embarked on a regular process for global reporting and assessment of the state of the marine environment, including socioeconomic aspects, the product of which is called the World Ocean Assessment (WOA). Similar to other global assessments, the WOA is created by State-nominated experts using published literature, and it will be generated every five years in order to document trends in the state of the marine environment and socioeconomic aspects. The United States has been involved with the design and production of the first WOA since its origins at the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development. Thus far, over 240 American experts have volunteered their time and expertise; additional experts are needed and encouraged to participate in this and subsequent WOAs. Experts are invited now to contribute to the U.S. Government review of the first WOA, to be conducted in September; see https://federalregister.gov/a/2014-13224 for details. Through this webinar, NOAA leadership, American scientists involved in the first WOA, and U.S. policy experts will provide further background on the origins, rationale, methodology, and anticipated results of the first WOA. Q&A will follow the presentation. REFERENCES • WOA Website " www.WorldOceanAssessment.org • WOA Workshop for the Wider Caribbean (Miami, Nov 2012) - www.WOAwcr.org • Call for Reviewers of the First WOA - https://federalregister.gov/a/2014-13224 POC: alan.lowther@noaa.gov, denise.hill@noaa.gov

26 August 2014

Title: A Real-time Multi-source Flash Flood Verification Database in Support of WPC Research and Operations
Presenter(s): Brian Cosgrove, NOAA/NWS/OHD
Date & Time: 26 August 2014
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: NCWCP 4th floor media center, Room 4140
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
WPC seminar

Presenter(s):
Brian Cosgrove (NOAA/NWS/OHD) Abstract http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/abstract.2014/Flash_flood_verification_Cosgrove.pdf
Title: The Spectrum of Progressive Derecho Formation Environments
Presenter(s): Corey Guastini, SUNY Albany
Date & Time: 26 August 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: The NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP) Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Corey Guastini, SUNY Albany

Remote Access:
1. Please join my meeting. https://global.gotomeeting.com/meeting/join/977333021 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. United States: +1 (312) 757-3121 Access Code: 977-333-021 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID:977-333-021 POC: David DeWitt David.DeWitt@noaa.gov Visit EMC facebook and seminar website for any update http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html Abstract http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/abstract.2014/Guastini.html Progressive derechos are severe mesoscale convective systems that often form during the warm season (May"August) in benign synoptic environments east of the Rocky Mountains and cause, by definition, straight-line wind damage along paths upwards of 400 km long. This presentation will expand upon existing derecho climatologies with a warm season, 1996"2013 progressive derecho climatology highlighting spatial and temporal frequencies of progressive derechos over the 18-year span. The presentation will also include results from the application of a subjective, seven-category classification scheme for progressive derecho synoptic initiation environments including derecho-relative composites of fields pertinent to progressive derecho formation. Finally, case studies will be presented of two progressive derechos on opposite ends of the progressive derecho formation spectrum, one forming on the evening of 12 June 2013 ahead of a well defined upper-level trough and surface cyclone, and the other along a weak, east-west oriented surface boundary on the morning of 29 June 2012 in the absence of substantial large-scale forcing for ascent. Maintenance and demise of the two derechos will be linked to the distinct synoptic classes they represent.
Title: Informing coral bleaching prediction algorithm development through the use of physiological experiments
Presenter(s): School of Biological Sciences) and the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology
Date & Time: 26 August 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: 5830 University Research Court, 2nd Floor, Room 2554-2555; College Park, MD 20740
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Dr. C. Mark Eakin, NOAA Coral Reef Watch, 301-683-3320, Mark.Eakin@noaa.gov POC for questions: Gretchen Taylor, 301-683-3493, Gretchen.Taylor@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Robert Mason, University of Queensland (School of Biological Sciences) and the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology

Remote Access:
Dial in: USA participants: 866-832-9297 International: 203-566-7610 Passcode: 6070416 WebEx: Event Number: 994 591 776 Event address for attendees: https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?d=994591776&t=a

Abstract:
Coral bleaching, the expulsion of symbiotic dinoflagellates from corals during stress, threatens tropical coral reef ecosystems. The scientific consensus is that recent large-scale coral bleaching events (over the past three decades) are the result of elevated ocean temperature, frequently in combination with high irradiance. Together these factors cause photosynthetic dysfunction in the dinoflagellates within corals, leading to an inability to process excess incoming light energy and a subsequent build-up of photoinduced toxins in both symbiotic partners. Real-time prediction methods for coral bleaching have utilized sea surface temperatures detected by satellite-mounted radiometers, but until recently have not incorporated irradiance. In addition, the thresholds used by real-time bleaching prediction algorithms are based on correlations of thermal events with field-observed bleaching patterns rather than on physiological experimentation. In this talk I will present experimental work to quantify the relationships between light, temperature, bleaching severity and the timing of bleaching onset in three species of corals from the Great Barrier Reef. I will discuss how these data, and physiological experiments broadly, can be used to inform the development of remote sensing algorithms for the prediction of coral bleaching. (Robert Mason, University of Queensland
Title: El Nino and Alaska - Past, Present, and Future
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service & Jon Gottschalk, NOAA Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 26 August 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, National Weather Service & Jon Gottschalk, NOAA Climate Prediction Center OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
OneNOAA Science Seminar, ACCAP Alaska Climate Webinars

Abstract:
Variations in the tropical Pacific ocean and atmosphere are an important contributor to seasonal weather and climate variability over large portions of the globe, including Alaska. The warm phase of this variation, El Niño, is favored to be in place for the the upcoming fall and winter seasons. We will review the current state of El Niño and expected development over the next several months and examine how variations in the tropical Pacific can effect high latitude regions such as Alaska. We finish up with a look at how past El Niño falls and winters have turned out and review the forecast for this coming cold season for Alaska. Seminar Remote Access and Notes: For further information and to register, see https://accap.uaf.edu/node/1155, or contact Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu)

27 August 2014

Title: Sky Cover
Presenter(s): Jordan Gerth, The Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies
Date & Time: 27 August 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: The NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP) Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Jordan Gerth, The Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies

Remote Access:
POC: Jacob Carley jacob.carley@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Of all of the standard meteorological parameters collected and observed daily, sky cover is not only one of the most complex, but the one that is fairly ambiguously defined and difficult to quantify. Despite that, the implications of how cloud fraction and sky cover are understood not only impact daily weather forecasts, but also present challenges to assessing the state of the earth's climate system. Part of the reason for this is the lack of observational methods for verifying the skill of clouds represented and parameterized in numerical models. While human observers record sky cover as part of routine duties, the spatial coverage of such observations in the United States is relatively sparse. There is greater spatial coverage of automated observations, and essentially complete coverage from geostationary weather satellites that observe the Americas. A good analysis of sky cover reconciles differences between manual observations, automated observations, and satellite observations, through an algorithm that accounts for the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset. This work describes the decision structure for trusting and weighting these similar observations. Some of the issues addressed include: human and instrument error resulting from approximations and estimations, a deficiency in high cloud detectability using surface-based ceilometers, poorly resolved low cloud using infrared channels on space-based radiometers during overnight hours, and decreased confidence in satellite-detected cloud during stray light periods.
Title: Safety Assessment of Subsistence Seafood in Kachemak Bay, Alaska
Presenter(s): Dennis Apeti, Ph.D., National Status & Trends Program of NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCMA/COAST
Date & Time: 27 August 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 Room 8150; remote access login info is below
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Safety Assessment of Subsistence Seafood in Kachemak Bay, Alaska

Presenter(s):
Dennis Apeti, Ph.D., National Status & Trends Program of NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCMA/COAST

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series and NCCOS; point of contact: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone and internet. If you have not used MyMeetings, you must download files; you may need your system admin to do this for you. Dial Toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast URL: Go to www.mymeetings.com and under "Participant Join", click on "Join an Event". Then enter meeting number 744925156 along with your name, email, etc

Abstract:
In Alaska, subsistence activities are a large part of traditional culture, as well as a means of providing protein for Tribal members. However, fish and wildlife resources commonly used for subsistence food are not routinely monitored for persistent bioaccumulative contaminants and pathogens. Since the Exxon Valdez oil spill, Tribes in south-central Alaska have been concerned about contamination in their subsistence seafood. We have assessed the overall health condition (contamination levels and histopathology) of two species of salmon (chum and sockeye) and shellfish (softshell clams and cockles) commonly used for subsistence food by Native Alaskan Tribes of Nanwalek, Port Graham and Seldovia. The project combined partners from the Chugach Regional Resources Commission, North Pacific Research Board, local tribal organizations, NOAA's Northwest Fishery Science Center, and NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. While a major finding is that the fish and shellfish are healthy with very low incidences of diseases, parasite infection and contamination, the mere presence of the synthetic contaminants at detectable levels in the tissues suggested some exposure from remote sources. Chemistry and histopathology data from this study represent useful information for concerned native community members and state coastal resource managers in Alaska. The data from this study were georeferenced and incorporated into the NCCOS National Status and Trends Data Portal and are available to the public.

Bio(s):
Dennis Apeti has been with the NCCOS COAST-NS&T team conducting coastal pollution assessments and monitoring since 2005. Dennis earned a BS degree in Natural Science from the University of Benin, Togo; a BS in chemistry from Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida; and an MS and Ph.D. in environment science from Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, Florida.
Title: Ecological Impacts of Climate-Related Ichthyofaunal Shifts and Invasive Lionfish on the Northern Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Community
Presenter(s): Tony Marshak, 2014 Knauss Sea Grant Fellow/Office of Science and Technology, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 27 August 2014
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

RESCHEDULED from 7/29: OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Tony Marshak (2014 Knauss Sea Grant Fellow/Office of Science and Technology, NOAA Fisheries) Seminar sponsor: 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series Remote access is available: FOR AUDIO in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. FOR WEBCAST: For remote access via webinar, please fill out the registration form at the website below a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the passcode is brownbag. https://www.mymeetings.com/emeet/join/index.jsp?customHeader=mymeetings&netId=742656968&netPass=&netType=conference&acceptTerms=on&sigKey=mymeetings

Abstract:
Large and apparently unprecedented increases in the abundance of juvenile gray (Lutjanus griseus) and lane snapper (L. synagris) within northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM) seagrasses have been recently documented. Although previously occurring infrequently within the nGOM, their increased abundance coincides with regional warming trends, and may result in higher offshore presence. Additionally, recent invasion by the Indo-Pacific red lionfish (Pterois volitans) into nGOM offshore habitats has been documented. Increases in tropically-associated confamilials, and invasive lionfish, could result in pronounced competitive interactions with nGOM reef fishes, such as juvenile red snapper (L. campechanus), and cause shifts in the species composition of offshore fish assemblages. We experimentally investigated the intensity of these interactions between increasingly abundant tropical snapper species, red lionfish, and indigenous members of the nGOM reef fish community. Compared to tropical counterparts, red snapper demonstrated increased roving behavior, aggression, and predatory activity, suggesting greater ability to exploitatively outcompete lower latitude snappers. However, lionfish were significantly more active than red snapper and range-shifting reef fishes, suggesting their potential to competitively displace nGOM fish species. Our findings contribute to the assessment of the potential impacts of warming-related species shifts and marine invasions upon the nGOM reef-associated fish community. Seminar POC for questions: tony.marshak@noaa.gov
Title: Weather Forecasting Tournaments: Performance of different Models and MOS Technologies
Presenter(s): Philip Lorenz and Klaus Knuepffer, Meteo Service, Germany
Date & Time: 27 August 2014
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: The NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP) Rm 2890
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor CPC/EMC Seminar Visit EMC facebook for any update http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook

Presenter(s):
Philip Lorenz and Klaus Knuepffer, Meteo Service, Germany POC: David Unger David.Unger@noaa.gov Remote Access by WebEx https://ncep-events.webex.com/ncep-events/onstage/g.php?MTID=e355fabe99681a308f28cd49d48b7654b Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 997 856 122 Abstract Weather forecasting contests are an efficient tool to prove the skills of forecasters and forecasting algorithms. The results provide real-time comparative verification response immediately after the observations are present. The Berlin Weather Forecasting Contest (www.wetterturnier.de) is running for more than 14 years now: Each Friday more than 100 participants make their forecasts for 12 weather elements for Saturday and Sunday for 5 locations in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The German National Weather Service (Deutscher Wetterdienst) and the most important private weather forecasting companies in the area take part in the contest as well as enthusiastic individuals (from amateurs to professionals) as well as more than 10 different MOS forecasts - from different MOS developers, based on different models. Verification of the results allows interesting insights regarding - the performance of different numerical models as basis for MOS - the performance of MOS of different providers and - the positive effect of mixing of two or more Models in a MOS-Mix. - the performance of human and machine forecasts. MOS-Mix forecasts are typically ahead of the single-model MOS forecasts, and only a few forecasters are able to score better than the best MOS-Mix forecasts which are available to them a few hours before deadline (Friday 15 UTC). Participation is free for anyone. It could be interesting to see a NWS-MOS system participating or, if a similar contest would be running in the US, to take part with our MOS forecasts in this.

3 September 2014

Title: Development and Implementation of a San Francisco Bay Operational Forecast System
Presenter(s): Machueng Peng, Ph.D, NOAA, NOS, Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services - CO-OPS
Date & Time: 3 September 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 8150; remote access available - login info below
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Machuan Peng, Ph.D, NOAA/NOS/Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. At first you may need to download MyMeetings files, and your system admin. may need to do this, so do this in advance. AUDIO: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# WEBCAST: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf. number: 744925156; No web passcode is required.

Abstract:
San Francisco Bay Operational Forecast System (SFBOFS) has been recently developed and implemented to support Center for Operational Products and Services Physical Oceanographic Real Time System. This forecast system was developed with the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) as its backbone. The model has shown its high stability since it initiated the operational run. Model skill assessment indicates that most statistical parameters of the water level, currents, water temperature and salinity pass the National Ocean Service's corresponding skill assessment criteria. By comparison, salinity has more room to be improved.

Bio(s):
Machuan Peng, Ph.D had been a research associate and a research assistant professor for many years at North Carolina State University before he moved to NOAA/CSDL as a UCAR visiting scientist. He became a physical scientist at CO-OPS in 2012. His former research focused on hurricane-related storm surge and inundation modeling. Now he is working as a coastal hydrodynamic modeler for NOS's Operational Forecast System.
Title: Herbivory and the resilience of Caribbean coral reefs
Presenter(s): Thomas Adam, Florida International University, NOAA/NMFS/SEFSC
Date & Time: 3 September 2014
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 11153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Thomas Adam (Florida International University) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program

Remote Access:
GoToWebinar 1. Click this link to start or to join the

Remote Access:
https://www4.gotomeeting.com/register/291519847 2. Choose one of the following audio options: a. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the Webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. b. TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select “Use Telephone” after joining the Webinar and call in using the numbers below. Toll: +1 (415) 655-0055 Access Code: 883-410-938 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting

Abstract:
In recent decades, many coral reefs throughout the Caribbean have experienced large and persistent declines in corals and increases in algae. Herbivorous fishes and sea urchins can prevent the establishment and proliferation of algae that impede coral recruitment and negatively impact the growth and survivorship of adult corals, and the loss of key herbivores has been implicated as a primary factor preventing coral recovery on Caribbean reefs. I will briefly review the evidence that increases in herbivory promote coral recovery on Caribbean reefs and discuss contingencies that will modify the ability of herbivores to control algae and facilitate coral persistence and recovery. Discussion will be focused around three main topics: 1) the potential for feedbacks to slow or prevent coral recovery, 2) the extent that herbivore identity and diversity influence the ability of an herbivore assemblage to control algae and maintain habitat suitable for coral settlement and growth, and 3) spatial variation in the biological and physical factors that impact herbivore, algae, and coral distributions. Finally, I will conclude by discussing how knowledge of each these factors can facilitate management and by suggesting fruitful avenues for future research. Seminar POC for questions: tauna.rankin@noaa.gov

4 September 2014

Title: "Growing the Vision -- NWS Climate Services in Alaska"
Presenter(s): NWS AR Climate Science and Services Manager
Date & Time: 4 September 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC2, Room 14316
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Richard L. Thoman (NWS AR Climate Science and Services Manager) Seminar sponsor: NOAA NWS, OCWWS, Climate Services Division Seminar POC for questions: Judy.Koepsell@noaa.gov

Abstract:
In March 2013 NWS Alaska region created a Climate Science and Services position, and since then, the Alaska region has focused on developing climate services for Alaska that strive to meet the present day needs of the agency and Alaskans. Like the rest of the Nation, Alaska has become increasingly sensitive to the weather and other environmental hazards. In particular, weather, water, and ice conditions play a central role in operations and daily life in Alaska, and the climate is an ever-present concern. With a forecast area of responsibility almost one third that of the lower 48 states, and with dozens of isolated communities and a limited infrastructure, the need for baseline climate information and weekly-to-seasonal-scaled forecasts are more important than ever. In this presentation we'll explore some of the products and services Alaska Region Climate Services provides to a wide variety of users, including NWS forecasters; academia; local, state, and federal agencies; and private partners. These products and services are all geared toward providing decision support services and enabling Alaska to be an active part of our Weather Ready Nation. About the speaker: Richard L. Thoman, Jr., has a BS degree in meteorology from Penn State University and an MA degree in Linguistics and Alaska Native Languages from the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Richard has worked for the National Weather Service since 1988, first at Nome, Alaska, and since 1990, at Fairbanks, Alaska. He is currently the Alaska Region's Climate Science and Services Manager.Free text

Remote Access:
Register at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/195689673 (Richard L. Thoman

8 September 2014

Title: Balanced and unbalanced aspects of secondary eyewall formation
Presenter(s): Dr. Sergio Abarca, Naval Postgraduate School
Date & Time: 8 September 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: The NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP) Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor EMC Seminar Speaker Dr. Sergio Abarca, Naval Postgraduate School. POC: Malaquias Mendez Malaquias.Pena.Mendez@noaa.gov Presentation http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2014/Abarca_2014-09-EMC.pptx Visit EMC facebook and EMC seminar for any update http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

Abstract:
Secondary eyewall formation (SEF) is widely recognized as an important research problem in the dynamics of mature tropical cyclones, but as of yet there is not a consensus on the phenomenon's fundamental physics. Recent research suggests that, from a system scale perspective, both balanced and unbalanced dynamics play an important role in SEF. However, there is no complete quantification of the extent to which the evolution of the fields during SEF deviate from those diagnosed assuming balanced dynamics. To address this question, we solve the Eliassen balanced equation using the vortex structure and forcing functions (diabatic heating rate and tangential momentum source) diagnosed from convection-permitting models undergoing SEF. The resulting secondary circulation and tangential wind tendency is compared with the azimuthal averages of the three-dimensional simulations. In this presentation, we show such comparisons and describe to what extent, and in which parts of the storm, the evolution of azimuthally- averaged fields departs from balanced dynamics.
Title: Why do ensemble prediction systems so often possess an apparent under-dispersiveness ?
Presenter(s): Ake Johansson, SMHI
Date & Time: 8 September 2014
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor EMC Seminar Speaker Ake Johansson, Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) Norrköping, Sweden POC Suru Saha suranjana.saha@noaa.gov Presentation: http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2014/Johansson_EMC.Seminar.AJ.pptx

Abstract:
The relationship between spread and skill is an important indicator of the quality of an ensemble prediction system (EPS). When the commonly used spread-skill condition is used to quantify whether an EPS is under- or over-dispersive, there has historically been a clear bias towards under-dispersiveness. Arguments are given that suggests that an alternative to the commonly used spread-skill condition is needed to properly address the true relationship between spread and skill. Such a relationship is derived and given the name U2I spread-skill condition. Its properties are described both analytically and geometrically and the relationship to the commonly used condition is demonstrated and discussed. It is argued that it would provide not only a more appropriate and sharper tool to assess the spread-skill relationship, but also that it indicates how to improve upon the present design of an EPS. In particular, the presently prevalent practice of centering the perturbed ensemble members around the control analysis is shown to be substantially detrimental to the performance of an EPS and therefore should be replaced by a methodology that constructs equally likely ensemble members with the same quality as the control member. A recent experiment with a limited area ensemble prediction system is used to quantify the differences in perceived quality that is obtained by employing the two different spread-skill conditions. The differences are found to be substantial.

9 September 2014

Title: Pacific Environmental Laboratory Science Review
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Uhart, Executive Director of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes in NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 9 September 2014
11:30 am - 7:40 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory leadership and research scientists

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research " Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes and the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use PHONE & INTERNET. You may need to download MyMeetings files; you may need your system admin to do this, so please do it before the seminar. This meeting will be in broadcast mode only. All time for questions is reserved for the review panel to conduct their business. FOR AUDIO: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-927-9227. Enter passcode 3977938# FOR WEBCAST: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=741580571&p=PMELREVIEW&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. Meeting Number: 741580571 Meeting Passcode: PMELREVIEW Meeting Host: MS LAUREN KOELLERMEIER

Abstract:
The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) periodically conducts laboratory science reviews to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted within each OAR laboratory and to provide strategic advice to the laboratory. As part of this process, the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) will be reviewed September 9-11, 2014, in Seattle, Washington. The review will examine the following research areas: (1) Climate; (2) Marine Ecosystems; (3) Oceans and Coastal Processes; and (4) Research Innovation. OAR and PMEL leadership will provide overviews of the programs, followed by sessions of presentations from scientists in each of the above research areas. The review agenda and supporting materials are posted on the PMEL Laboratory Review website: http://pmel.noaa.gov/2014-pmel-lab-review. Point of Contact: michael.uhart@noaa.gov
Title: When, Where, and How Much: How Scenario Planning is Helping Marine Resource Managers Prepare for an Uncertain Future
Presenter(s): Robert Glazer, Associate Research Scientist, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Fish and Wildlife Research Institute; Dr. Michael Flaxman, Geodesign Technologies, Inc.; Dr. Juan Carlos Vargas, GeoAdaptive, LLC
Date & Time: 9 September 2014
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3, Rm 10836; remote access is available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Robert Glazer, Associate Research Scientist, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Marathon, FL bob.glazer@myfwc.com Dr. Michael Flaxman, Geodesign Technologies, Inc., San Francisco, CA mflaxman@geodesigntech.com Dr. Juan Carlos Vargas, GeoAdaptive, LLC. Boston, MA jcvargas@geoadaptive.com Seminar sponsor: NOAA Fisheries Service, Office of Science and Technology Seminar POC for questions: roger.b.griffis@noaa.gov (301-980-4694) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Fisheries Service, Office of Science and Technology

Remote Access:
Webex Event address for attendees: https://noaaevents2.webex.com/noaaevents2/onstage/g.php?d=992894208&t=a ------------------------------------------------------- Teleconference information ------------------------------------------------------- Dial-In #: 1-888-577-899 Participant passcode: 8741214

Abstract:
In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists. --- Eric Hoffer If there is one word that best describes the future that awaits us, it is likely 'uncertainty'. Yet, how we approach uncertainty can, in itself, help reduce that very unpredictability. One approach, adopted by such diverse groups as the U.S. military, oil exploration companies, and the National Park Service, is the application of 'alternative futures scenario planning'. Using this methodology, a suite of alternative futures is envisioned based upon, for example, the range of economic, political, social, and environmental conditions that may occur at a predetermined time in the future. In a pilot project, we applied this approach to envision a future Florida Keys marine and coastal environment under varying climate change scenarios. We examined three habitats (beaches, mangroves, and coral reefs) and three marine species (Goliath grouper, loggerhead turtles, and spiny lobsters) to develop adaptation strategies associated with a range of possible climate futures. In a workshop, managers identified the scenarios they felt were most valuable to consider. Within these scenarios, we modeled habitat changes including sea level rise using SLAMM under IPCC AR4 scenarios, and sea surface temperatures using the NOAA developed Modular Ocean Model (MOM) in corresponding AR5 scenarios. The effects were then modeled to anticipate future species distribution and stress profiles in a spatially explicit framework. The outputs of the models were validated in subsequent workshops with scientists. The resource managers were reconvened to interpret the results in a management context and to develop possible adaptation strategies for the habitats and species under each scenario. Resource monitoring programs were associated with each adaptation strategy and triggerpoints were further identified that inform when to actuate the strategy. This approach has become useful as a method to visualize the future status of resources, develop strategies that may not otherwise be obvious, and tie specific and measurable monitoring methods to specific strategies. We discuss the value of this approach, the scientific methodologies, the structure of the workshops, and how the lessons learned will be applied in future marine projects.
Title: Climate Change Adaptation for an at Risk Community - Shaktoolik Alaska
Presenter(s): Terry Johnson, Alaska Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program
Date & Time: 9 September 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Terry Johnson, Alaska Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program

Abstract:
The Norton Sound village of Shaktoolik faces serious threats of erosion and flooding resulting from climate change. University of Alaska Sea Grant agent Terry Johnson and consultant Glenn Gray worked with the community over a two-year period to develop an adaptation plan. The community-driven plan positions Shaktoolik to work with Alaska's Division of Community and Rural Affairs to begin implementation, with funding through the Alaska Climate Change Impact Mitigation Program. Johnson explains how the plan was developed and how reality differs from theory in climate adaptation planning. POC: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu WEBINAR: https://accap.uaf.edu/?q=webinars
Title: Tropical Cyclones: Predictions and Projections
Presenter(s): SJ Lin, NOAA GFDL, Kerry Emanuel, MIT, Suzana Camargo, Columbia University
Date & Time: 9 September 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.
Description:

Tropical Cyclones: Predictions and Projections Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl. OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Tropical Cyclones: Predictions and Projections

Presenter(s):
Shian-Jiann Lin (NOAA GFDL), Kerry Emanuel (MIT), Suzana Camargo (Columbia University) Seminar sponsor: OAR, CPO, MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov When: Tuesday, September 9, 2-3 p.m. Eastern Time Where: Remote access suggested, but some seats available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=620601470 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: SJ Lin: Recent advancement in high-resolution climate modeling, in particular, the dramatic improvement in the simulations of hurricane and Madden-Julian Oscillations within global climate models has motivated us to explore the feasibility of using climate models for extended-range (from 1-week to 4-week) weather predictions in general, and hurricane predictions in particular. We will use two recent high-impact tropical cyclones, Hurricane Sandy and Typhoon Haiyan, as case studies. We will show that, despite lacking a state-of-the-art data assimilation system, the genesis of these intense tropical cyclones, can be skillfully predicted weeks in advance using GFDL's high-resolution climate modeling systems. Kerry Emanuel: We rely mostly on global climate models to simulate future climate states. But the horizontal resolution of such models is insufficient to resolve the important inner cores of tropical cyclones, and there is some question whether they adequately resolve the disturbances that serve to trigger such storms. One way to deal with the first issue is to embed in the larger scale model a detailed, high resolution tropical cyclone model, driven by the large-scale conditions generated by the climate model. In my talk, I will briefly describe the technique and then show the results of applying it to the current and to future projected climate states. Suzana Camargo: In this talk we'll discuss recent results on tropical cyclone projections. First, we will show the our analysis of future changes of North Atlantic potential intensity (PI) in the historical and future multi-model CMIP5 simulations using a signal-to-noise (S/N) maximizing empirical orthogonal function (EOF), as described in Ting et al. 2014. We will show that by the mid-21st century under both rcp4.5 and rcp8.5 scenarios, the anthropogenically induced warming would put the North Atlantic PI largely above the historical mean, even considering multi-decadal natural variability. During the historical period, both aerosols and greenhouse gases contribute to forced changes in PI. The decrease in PI caused by aerosol forcing and the increase due to greenhouse gas forcing largely canceled each other, and the sharp increase in PI in the recent 30 years was dominated by the multi-decadal natural variability. We will also discuss the projected changes in the length of tropical cyclone season, which were obtained in Dwyer et al. 2014. We considered 2 sets of simulations: (i) high-resolution climate model (HiRAM) forced with SST anomalies from the CMIP3 and CMIP5 models and (ii) dynamical downscaling of the CMIP3 and CMIP5 model outputs that generates synthetic TC tracks. We measured season length using 3 different metrics. While the HiRAM model projects shorter seasons in most basins, the CMIP5 downscaling projects longer seasons. The changes in the length of TC season by basin can be largely explained by the annual mean TC frequency changes in each basin. Furthermore, while in most cases there is a projection for a timing shift of the TC annual cycle to later in the year in the North Atlantic, in the western North Pacific, the projections are opposite, i.e. a shift towards earlier in the year.

10 September 2014

Title: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Science Review
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Uhart, Executive Director of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes in NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 10 September 2014
11:00 am - 7:40 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory leadership and research scientists

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research " Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes and the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use PHONE & INTERNET. You may need to download MyMeetings files; you may need your system admin to do this, so please do it before the seminar. This meeting will be in broadcast mode only. All time for questions is reserved for the review panel to conduct their business. FOR AUDIO: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-927-9227. Enter passcode 3977938# FOR WEBCAST: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=741580571&p=PMELREVIEW&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. Meeting Number: 741580571 Meeting Passcode: PMELREVIEW Meeting Host: MS LAUREN KOELLERMEIER

Abstract:
The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) periodically conducts laboratory science reviews to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted within each OAR laboratory and to provide strategic advice to the laboratory. As part of this process, the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) will be reviewed September 9-11, 2014, in Seattle, Washington. The review will examine the following research areas: (1) Climate; (2) Marine Ecosystems; (3) Oceans and Coastal Processes; and (4) Research Innovation. OAR and PMEL leadership will provide overviews of the programs, followed by sessions of presentations from scientists in each of the above research areas. The review agenda and supporting materials are posted on the PMEL Laboratory Review website: http://pmel.noaa.gov/2014-pmel-lab-review. Point of Contact: michael.uhart@noaa.gov
Title: Impacts of Climate Change on the Ecotoxicology of Pesticides to Estuarine Organisms
Presenter(s): Dr. Marie DeLorenzo, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCEHBR, Estuaries & Land Use Branch
Date & Time: 10 September 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150; remote access available - see login info below.
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Marie DeLorenzo, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCEHBR, Estuaries & Land Use Branch

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; Seminar coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. At first you may need to download MyMeetings files, and your system admin. may need to do this, so do this in advance. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting number: 744925156; NO PASSCODE is required for the webinar.

Abstract:
Pesticides enter estuaries via runoff and aerial drift from applications to crops, turf grass, and home lawns; aerial drift and overspray from mosquito control operations; and by leaching from antifoulant paints. Regulatory testing is used in pesticide risk assessment to determine safe thresholds of chemicals, and it is conducted under standard conditions. Environmental conditions are variable, particularly in estuaries, and may be affected by climate change. Predicted increases in water temperature and rising sea level may result is an increase in estuarine salinity. Hypoxia events may become more spatially and temporally extensive and rising atmospheric carbon dioxide may lead to ocean acidification, or a decrease in pH. With these changing environmental factors, we expect the physiology of organisms to change in response. Since insect, weed and fungal pests thrive under warmer, wetter conditions, there may be an increase in pesticide applications. Climate change may lead to increased pesticide run-off due to higher precipitation levels and may affect the distribution of chemical contaminants in the coastal zone. To assess how changes in climate will affect estuarine organism response to pollution, we compared pesticide toxicity under elevated temperature and salinity, and lower dissolved oxygen and pH conditions to those of standard testing conditions with phytoplankton, clams, and adult and larval grass shrimp. We found that pesticides were generally more toxic under climate stress conditions, but the extent and direction of toxicity change depended on the specific pesticide, species, and life stage involved. To improve risk assessment of pesticides in estuarine environments it is essential to consider toxicity in relation to climate change and land use change. By expanding toxicity testing conditions, we may be better posed to protect sensitive estuarine ecosystems.

Bio(s):
Dr. Marie DeLorenzo is a research ecologist with the NOAA, National Ocean Service, Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research (CCEHBR) laboratory in Charleston, SC, where she has worked for 16 years. Dr. DeLorenzo received a B.S. in Environmental Resource Management with a minor in Marine Science from Penn State University, followed by a M.S. degree in Ecology from Penn State. She earned her Ph.D. at Clemson University in Environmental Toxicology. Within the CCEHBR laboratory's Estuaries and Land Use Branch, Marie is the Program Lead of the Environmental Physiology and Microbiology Program. Dr. DeLorenzo serves on the graduate faculty at the College of Charleston in the Marine Biology master's program and the Environmental Studies master's program. She is also a member of the graduate faculty at the Medical University of South Carolina in the Marine Biomedicine and Environmental Sciences Ph.D. program and Florida A&M University's School of the Environment. She has mentored 24 undergraduate and 26 graduate student researchers, and has published 45 scientific journal articles and book chapters. Dr. DeLorenzo has served as president of the Carolinas Chapter of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. She has also served as president of the Southeastern Estuarine Research Society and as board member of the Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation. Dr. DeLorenzo's research at NOAA includes environmental toxicology of estuarine species, physiological mechanisms of contaminant effects, climate change and multi-stressor assessments, and coastal resource management.

11 September 2014

Title: Extend UK forecast model up to the thermosphere and the benefits for thermosphere and ionosphere forecasts
Presenter(s): David Jackson, UK Met Office
Date & Time: 11 September 2014
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - EMC Large Conf Rm - 2155, NWS - EMC - GTM
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
David Jackson

Remote Access:
1. Please join my meeting. https://global.gotomeeting.com/meeting/join/576807341 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. United States: +1 (646) 749-3131 Access Code: 576-807-341 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID:576-807-341 Contact: Jun Wang Visit EMC facebook for any update http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook
Title: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Science Review
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Uhart, Executive Director of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes in NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 11 September 2014
11:30 am - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory leadership and research scientists

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research " Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes and the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use PHONE & INTERNET. You may need to download MyMeetings files; you may need your system admin to do this, so please do it before the seminar. This meeting will be in broadcast mode only. All time for questions is reserved for the review panel to conduct their business. FOR AUDIO: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-927-9227. Enter passcode 3977938# FOR WEBCAST: 1. Go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=741580571&p=PMELREVIEW&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. Meeting Number: 741580571 Meeting Passcode: PMELREVIEW Meeting Host: MS LAUREN KOELLERMEIER

Abstract:
The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) periodically conducts laboratory science reviews to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted within each OAR laboratory and to provide strategic advice to the laboratory. As part of this process, the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) will be reviewed September 9-11, 2014, in Seattle, Washington. The review will examine the following research areas: (1) Climate; (2) Marine Ecosystems; (3) Oceans and Coastal Processes; and (4) Research Innovation. OAR and PMEL leadership will provide overviews of the programs, followed by sessions of presentations from scientists in each of the above research areas. The review agenda and supporting materials are posted on the PMEL Laboratory Review website: http://pmel.noaa.gov/2014-pmel-lab-review. Point of Contact: michael.uhart@noaa.gov
Title: Marine Wilderness 10+10 Project: Bringing Back the Wild
Presenter(s): Julie Randall, Vice President of Programs, The WILD Foundation
Date & Time: 11 September 2014
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only - See Registration Information Below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Julie Randall, Vice President of Programs, The WILD Foundation Where: Remote access only. To register, visit: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/760284472 Toll: +1 (626) 544-0058 Access Code: 187-687-735 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the Webinar Webinar ID: 760-284-472

Abstract:
Marine Wilderness is a powerful vision of functional, healthy and resilient marine life that regenerates populations of wild species interconnected to form productive food webs. It also provides a picture of what wild nature looks like and does compared to places with more significant human impacts. The Marine Wilderness 10+10 Project is a collaborative effort of 10 partners led by The WILD Foundation to reverse marine life depletion and habitat decline by applying a science-based strategy to halt overfishing and destructive human use. For 20 sites around the world (a quarter in the United States), organized teams of stakeholders equipped with project tools and visuals will chart, assess, and act to expand and deepen protections that consider livelihood, cultural and recreational concerns while ensuring ecological needs are met. Through WILD's partnership with the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP), the project will help change public values concerning marine life toward an active constituency for marine wilderness. This webinar is co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, OpenChannels.org, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network. Seminar POC for questions: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center This webinar is co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, EBM Tools Network, OpenChannels.org, and MPA News. http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 11 September 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 11 September 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

Each month, a speaker will give a presentation on various topics related to NGS programs, projects, products and services to educate constituents about NGS activities. Visit the Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/. Future webinars will be held on the second Thursday of every month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

15 September 2014

Title: Ocean Acidification and its potential affects on Alaska fisheries and communities
Presenter(s): Dr. Jeremy Matthis, oceanographer at NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, and the director of the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences Ocean Acidification Research Center
Date & Time: 15 September 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Highway, 2nd Floor, Silver Spring - Remote access info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Ocean Acidification and its potential affects on Alaska fisheries and communities.

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jeremy Matthis, oceanographer at NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, and the director of the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences Ocean Acidification Research Center.

Abstract:
Dr. Matthis' research is quite unique in that it assesses the risk of ocean acidification to fisheries and the communities that depend on them. His research also involved a broad partnership with NOAA Fisheries, University of Alaska and other institutions

Remote Access:
For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the a href="http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.

Bio(s):
Dr. Jeremy Matthis, oceanographer at NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, and the director of the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences Ocean Acidification Research Center.

16 September 2014

Title: Ocean Obs and Ecological Forecasting Webinar
Presenter(s): Allison Allen, host
Date & Time: 16 September 2014
1:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: 5 W 4th Ave, Federal Building, Room 552, Anchorage, Alaska or participate remotely – see login info below.
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Ocean Obs and Ecological Forecasting Webinar Seminar Host is Allison Allen, Allison.Allen@noaa.gov and Point of Contact is Ellen Tyler, tyler@aoos.org Date/Time: Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014, 1-4pm ET, 9am-12pm Alaska Daylight Time Location: 605 W 4th Ave, Federal Building, Room 552, Anchorage, AK or participate remotely " see login info below.

Remote Access:
Webex Topic: Ecological Forecasting Webinar - Meeting Number 623 464 011. Meeting Password: roadmap To join the online meeting (Now from mobile devices!) Go to: https://aoos-nprb.webex.com/aoos-nprb/j.php MTID=mfb01fe4dd9c18cfff60163e296602f64 If requested, enter your name and email address. If a password is required, enter the password: roadmap. Click “Join”. To join audio, Dial 1-866-779-5968 and enter pin no. 1694 About the

Remote Access:
NOAA is developing an Ecological Forecasting Roadmap and program manager Allison Allen will be in Anchorage on Tuesday Sept. 16 to hear from key researchers and stakeholders about existing efforts and needs across Alaska. Please join us in person or remotely (log-in info above) to hear the latest state of the science on Harmful Algal Blooms, pathogens and other environmental change. Discussion will focus on identifying priorities for developing operational tools in Alaska, scenario modeling, early warning systems and forecasts of marine events. We invite you to join us for lunch following the formal presentation for an opportunity to continue the conversation informally with Allison. Please RSVP to tyler@aoos.org by Sept 10. AGENDA  What is the NOAA Ecological Forecasting Roadmap & what does it mean for Alaska? - Allison Allen  HABs in the Ecological Forecasting Roadmap, Rick Stumpf  State of the Science/ HAB Forecasts in Southeast and Southcentral AK, Kris Holderied  Discussion: Is forecasting for HABs different in AK than elsewhere in the lower 48? If so, how can the roadmap be both inclusive and standardized?  Pathogens in the Ecological Forecasting Roadmap, John Jacobs  State of the science/ pathogen monitoring, TBD  Discussion: When do you move from research and monitoring to developing a forecast and taking action?  Species distribution and habitat change in the Ecological Forecasting Roadmap, Howard Townsend  Invasive species and range changes"overview of trends and research in AK, Gary Freitag  Downscaling climate projections and relevance through the food web, Nick Bond  Discussion: How to prioritize ecological research and forecasting efforts?  Brief overview of “infrastructure” in the roadmap, Chris Brown  Final discussion and wrap-up “The health of our coastal communities, economy, and ecosystems depend upon our understanding of complex and constantly changing conditions. Hazards such as pollution, extreme weather events, and climate variability are daily realities for the growing number of Americans who live in U.S. coastal shoreline counties. At NOAA, we're taking proactive steps to prepare for future conditions to help our nation become more resilient.” " NOAA Ecological Forecasting Service __________________________________________________________ FAQs: What is an Ecological Forecast? “An ecological forecast predicts changes in ecosystems and ecosystem components in response to an environmental driver such as climate variability, extreme weather conditions, pollution, or habitat change. It also provides information about how people, economies, and communities may be affected. Local authorities and members of the public use these early warnings to make decisions to protect the health and well-being of a particular area.” - oceanservice.noaa.gov/ecoforecasting Where can I learn more about the NOAA Roadmap for Ecological Forecasting? www.oceanservice.noaa.gov/ecoforecasting

17 September 2014

Title: Using passive acoustics to improve management and conservation of marine mammals in the western North Atlantic
Presenter(s): Dr. Danielle Cholewiak, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole
Date & Time: 17 September 2014
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA/NEFSC Stephen Clark Conference Room, Woods Hole Science Aquarium
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Dr. Danielle Cholewiak, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) Point of contact is michael.jech@noaa.gov Remote Access info: Time is Eastern Daylight Savings Teleconference line: 866-802-5322 (toll free) +1 517.600.4898 (toll; international callers) Participant code: 5050895 and/or Adobe Connect Meeting: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/jwns-2/

Abstract:
Passive acoustic monitoring is an essential tool for scientists and managers to better understand the distribution, abundance and ecology of marine species. This talk will highlight some of the current passive acoustic research at the NEFSC.

Bio(s):
Dr. Danielle Cholewiak is a research scientist who specializes in using passive acoustic methods to study marine mammals.
Title: Analysis and Prediction of Clouds Using Satellite All-Sky Radiances: Lessons Learned and Perspectives
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 17 September 2014
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP Conference Center, 5830 University Research Ct., College Park, MD
Description:

Presenter (s): Thomas Auligné NCAR, Earth System Laboratory Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division Date & Time: September 17, 2014, 2:00pm-3:00pm

18 September 2014

Title: NOAA's Become More Geospatial--ESRI Enterprise License Agreement (ELA) and You
Presenter(s): Jack Settelmaier, Digital Techniques Meteorologist, NOAA/NWS/SRH
Date & Time: 18 September 2014
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: The NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP) 4th floor media center, Room 4140
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
WPC Seminar

Presenter(s):
Jack Settelmaier,NOAA/NWS/SRH/Science and Technology Services Division/Science and Training Branch

Title:
NOAA's Become More Geospatial--ESRI Enterprise License Agreement (ELA) and You Contact: Mark Klein, Acting Science and Operations Officer, NCEP/Weather Prediction Center Remote participants: GoTo

Remote Access:
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/826609225 Conference #: 1-866-763-1213, Passcode: 524234#

Abstract:
This presentation will provide an overview of the ELA ("What is the NOAA/ESRI ELA, Where Can I Learn More, What Can I Do?") as well as share numerous visual examples of NWS datasets within web maps and services that Jack worked on as part of a Summer 2014 remote NRAP with WPC.
Title: Geospatial Data Sharing and Collaborative Decision Making: Addressing Climate Resilience, Extreme Weather and National Preparedness
Presenter(s): Dave Jones, Founder and CEO, Applications Futurist, StormCenter Communications, Inc
Date & Time: 18 September 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Highway, 2nd Floor, Silver Spring - Remote access info below
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Geospatial Data Sharing and Collaborative Decision Making: Addressing Climate Resilience, Extreme Weather and National Preparedness

Presenter(s):
Dave Jones, Founder and CEO, Applications Futurist, StormCenter Communications, Inc

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. At first you may need to download MyMeetings files, and your system admin. may need to do this, so do this in advance. For remote access via webinar please fill out the Registration Form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.

23 September 2014

Title: OSSEs in Support of Improving Ocean Model Initialization for Coupled Hurricane Intensity Prediction
Presenter(s): George Halliwell, NOAA/AOML
Date & Time: 23 September 2014
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: The NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP) Conference Cneter
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
George Halliwell, NOAA/AOML

Title:
OSSEs in Support of Improving Ocean Model Initialization for Coupled Hurricane Intensity Prediction POC: Hyun-Sook Kim Hyun.Sook.Kim@noaa.gov 1. Please join my meeting. https://global.gotomeeting.com/meeting/join/135992885 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. United States: +1 (872) 240-3301 Access Code: 135-992-885 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID:135-992-885 Visit EMC facebook for any update http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook

Abstract:
A new ocean Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) system has been set up in the tropical and subtropical Atlantic Ocean with the initial goal of determining the impact of existing and planned ocean observing systems on improving hurricane intensity forecasts. The capability of the system to provide credible impact assessments is demonstrated by comparing Observing System Experiments to OSSEs. Two types of OSSEs are being performed for the purpose of improving ocean model initialization in coupled hurricane forecast models: seasonal and storm-relative. Design characteristics of these OSSE types are presented along with a summary of early results during the 2009 hurricane season including Hurricane Bill. Future plans will be summarized.
Title: Observational and Analysis Requirements for Reducing Ocean Model Uncertainties in Coupled Hurricane Prediction
Presenter(s): George Halliwell, NOAA/AOML