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OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
2016 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

5 January 2016

Title: Acidification and Hypoxia in the Shallows: Patterns, Research Approaches, and Effects
Presenter(s): Denise Breitburg, Smithsonian Institution
Date & Time: 5 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Remote attendance only; register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7881966023265558529
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Denise Breitburg, Smithsonian Institution

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7881966023265558529

Sponsor(s):
Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network. Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Respiration-driven, co-occurring acidification and hypoxia is a natural phenomenon that is exacerbated by human influences on coastal ecosystems. On a local to regional scale, nutrient loads increase biomass, thus increasing respiratory release of CO2 and depletion of O2. Globally, increasing temperatures increase metabolic rates of aquatic organisms and can influence weather and current patterns that control rates of reaeration. In extreme shallow waters of estuaries and similar systems, light, temperature and tides influence the net balance of photosynthesis and respiration, creating diel and tidal fluctuations in dissolved oxygen and pCO2 (reflected in the much more common pH measurements). In shallow areas of Chesapeake Bay, for example, pH can vary by more than one full unit and dissolved oxygen can vary from near zero to supersaturated levels on a daily basis. The temporal patterns we've documented can be far more complex and spatially variable than classic diel cycles. We have developed a LabVIEW controlled experimental system to test the individual and simultaneous effects of cycling dissolved oxygen and pH on common estuarine species. Our experiments indicate that animals we tested (the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and the Atlantic and inland silversides, Menidia menidia and M. beryllina) can be affected by diel cycling acidification and hypoxia that occurs in their natural habitat. But at least in some cases, they also showed the ability to acclimate to or compensate for negative effects. Cycling, per se, sometimes had different effects than constant exposures. Among the effects of diel-cycling acidification we found were a slight stimulation of oyster filtration rates, altered immune responses of oysters, decreased growth of oyster spat in low salinity conditions, and an increased sensitivity of fish to hypoxia. About the speaker: Denise Breitburg is a marine ecologist and Senior Scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. She earned her MS and PhD degrees from UC Santa Barbara. Denise's current research includes studies of human influence on fisheries and food webs, environmental restoration and the ecology of gelatinous zooplankton. She is particularly interested in how multiple stressors affect coastal systems, and how factors that influence behavior, growth and survival of individuals scale up to community and ecosystem-level effects. She has served on the Chesapeake Bay Program Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee, the Governing Boards of the Estuarine Research Federation and American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, and NRC panels reviewing the Ocean Research Priority Plan and Corps of Engineers

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Title: Coral Reefs in a Changing Climate: Combining Indigenous Traditions and Western Science for Sustainable Coral Reef Management in the Micronesian Outer Islands
Presenter(s): Nicole L. Crane, Oceanic Society and Cabrillo College, Presenter, and Co-authors: Giacomo Bernardi, University of California Santa Cruz, Peter Nelson, HT Harvey and Associates, Michelle Paddack, Oceanic Society and Santa Barbara City College, Avigdor Abelson, Tel Aviv University, John Rulmal Jr. Local Science Lead, Ulithi Atoll, FSM, Kristin Precoda, Oceanic Society
Date & Time: 5 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Nicole L. Crane, Oceanic Society and Cabrillo College and Co-authors: Giacomo Bernardi, University of California Santa Cruz, Peter Nelson, HT Harvey and Associates, Michelle Paddack, Oceanic Society and Santa Barbara City College, Avigdor Abelson, Tel Aviv University, John Rulmal Jr. Local Science Lead, Ulithi Atoll, FSM, Kristin Precoda, Oceanic Society

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
The Yap outer islands (Federated States of Micronesia) encompass more than 250,000 Km2 of the tropical western Pacific. Outer Islanders depend on their coral reefs for food and other environmental services, but cultural and ecological change are compromising the reef ecosystems. In recognition of this, communities on Ulithi Atoll - the fourth largest atoll in the world, are working with a team of scientists to combine western science with traditional practices to address ecological and resource issues while strengthening communities and governance. It is a unique partnership to identify changes in resource extraction and management, and the impacts of those changes on the reef system"leading to depleted resources and in some cases poor reef health. Timely implementation of management has seen rapid results, and may well be key to reef recovery after the recent devastating typhoon Maysak. This successful model has inspired other outer island communities to model Ulithi, and has great potential to enhance adaptive management throughout the region. Nicole will present findings from the science team, the fisheries data team (Ulithi science team), and the local management plans.

Bio(s):
Nicole Crane is a faculty member in the Biology Department at Cabrillo College in Aptos, California. She is also a Senior Conservation Scientist with the Oceanic Society, and is the Principal Investigator for the Ulithi Marine Management and Conservation Project " One People One Reef, focusing on outer island communities to help with sustainable ocean management planning. Crane has more than 20 years of experience working with communities and conducting ecological assessments of reefs. She is dedicated to linking rigorous science with cultural knowledge and community leadership in conservation. Nicole has established several science education programs in the United States, with a focus on serving underrepresented students. She was the founder and Principal Investigator of the National Science Foundation Center for Excellence in Marine Advanced Technology Education (Monterey Peninsula College), and Principal Investigator and Director for Camp SEA Lab (California State University Monterey Bay). She was also a Principal Investigator on the National Science Foundation IScS Project (Integrated Science Semester) at Cabrillo College. She was nominated for a PEW fellowship, and is a Fellow National at the Explorers Club.

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6 January 2016

Title: Quantifying Lost Dolphin Years Resulting from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Field Studies, Analyses and Models Used to Determine Injury to Nearshore Dolphin Stocks
Presenter(s): Lori Schwacke, biostatistician for NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and Chief of the Oceans and Human Health Branch
Date & Time: 6 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lori Schwacke, Biostatistician for NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and Chief, Oceans and Human Health Branch

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill resulted in contamination of more than 1,000 kilometers of the Gulf of Mexico coast from western Louisiana to the Florida panhandle, an area inhabited by 9 bay, sound and estuary (BSE) and 2 coastal stocks of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Dolphins within the DWH oil footprint likely inhaled, aspirated, ingested, physically contacted, and absorbed oil components. In order to determine the injury to BSE and coastal dolphins, NOAA and collaborators conducted multiple field studies as part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA), and then synthesized data from these studies along with information from stranded carcasses collected by the Southeast Marine Mammal Stranding Network, historical data on marine mammal populations, NRDA toxicity studies, and the published literature. Collectively, the studies found that the DWHoil spill led to a constellation of adverse health effects in dolphins, including adrenal disease, lung disease, and poor body condition. Animals that succumbed to these adverse health effects contributed to the largest and longest lasting marine mammal unusual mortality event (UME) on record in the northern Gulf of Mexico. A number of models, including a spatial robust mark-recapture model to estimate post-spill survival, a Bayesian framework to estimate proportion of carcasses attributable to estuarine versus coastal stocks, the ADvancedCIRCulation (ADCIRC) hydrodynamic model to estimate carcass beaching probability, and a Bayesian model to estimate baseline age-specific survival from age-at-death data , contributed input to a population model that estimated population impact as lost dolphin years (LDY). LDY represents the difference between an estimated baseline population trajectory (had the oil spill not happened) and the DWH-injured population trajectory, integrated over time. The models suggest that the increased mortality and decreased reproductive potential documented in BSE and coastal dolphin stocks within the DWH oil footprint will have long-term impacts. It is estimated the Barataria Bay and Mississippi Sound bottlenose dolphin stocks, two of the best-studied populations, had injuries exceeding 30,000 and 75,000 LDYs,respectively, and that it will take approximately 40 to 50 years for these stocks to fully recover. Results from the BSE dolphin studies were also extrapolated to quantify injury to oceanic stocks of dolphins and whales, which are not as amenable to comprehensive sampling. About The

Presenter(s):
Lori Schwacke is a biostatistician for NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and Chief of the Oceans and Human Health Branch. She received a bachelor's degree in Computer Science from Florida State University in 1986 and after working as a computer engineer for nearly 10 years she changed her career track and received a PhD in Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Systems Science from the Medical University of South Carolina. Recognizing the parallels of studying disease in human populations and in populations of marine protected species, her research focuses on the application of statistical models developed for human medicine to assess the effects of environmental and anthropogenic stressors on marine animals. Her recent research has focused on the assessment of injuries to nearshore dolphin populations in the Gulf of Mexico following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and she is serving on the National Academies Committee on Assessment of Cumulative Effects of Anthropogenic Stressors on Marine Mammals.

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7 January 2016

Title: Integrating Multiple Experimental Approaches to Understand Climate Change Ecosystem Impacts: A Coral Reef Example
Presenter(s): Davey Kline, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Date & Time: 7 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Remote attendance only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Davey Kline, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9065536414496751105

Sponsor(s):
Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network. Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Ocean acidification (OA) research seeks to understand how marine ecosystems will respond to changes in seawater carbonate chemistry in combination with other environmental perturbations such as warming, eutrophication, and deoxygenation. I will discuss the effectiveness and limitations of current research approaches used to address this goal. A diverse combination of approaches is essential to decipher the consequences of OA to marine organisms, communities, and ecosystems. Consequently, the benefits and limitations of each approach must be considered carefully. I will discuss my own coral reef research and describe how a combination of aquarium, mesocosm, FOCE and in situ reef studies were used to determine how the balance between reef growth and dissolution would change in a high CO2 future. About the speaker: David is an associate project scientist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and a research associate of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. He is a coral reef biologist who studies the fate of coral reefs in a high CO2 future on molecular to ecosystem scales. In particular he collaborates with computer vision scientists, engineers, chemists and physiologists to develop new techniques for studying the impact of climate change on coral reefs.

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Title: Southern right whale calf mortality at Peninsula Valdes, Argentina: Are harmful algal blooms to blame?
Presenter(s): Cara Wilson, Research Scientist, Environmental Research Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, NMFS/NOAA, Monterey, CA
Date & Time: 7 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Cara Wilson, Research Scientist, Environmental Research Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, NMFS/NOAA, Monterey, CA

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
Peninsula Valdes (PV) in Argentina is an important calving ground for southern right whales (SRWs, Eubalaena australis). Since 2005, right whale mortality has increased at PV, with most of the deaths (~90%) being calves <3mo old. We investigated the potential involvement of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in these deaths by examining data that include: timing of the SRW deaths, biotoxins in samples from dead SRWs, abundances of the diatom, Pseudo-nitzschia spp., and the dinoflagellate, Alexandrium tamarense, shellfish harvesting closure dates, seasonal availability of whale prey at PV and satellite chlorophyll data. Evidence of the whales' exposure to HAB toxins includes trace levels of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) and domoic acid (DA) in tissues of some dead whales, and fragments of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. frustules in whale feces. Additionally, whales are present at PV during both closures of the shellfish industry (due to high levels of PSTs) and periods with high levels of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. and A. tamarense. There is a positive statistical relationship between monthly Pseudo-nitzschia densities (but not A. tamarense) and calf deaths in both gulfs of PV.

Bio(s):
Cara Wilson is a satellite oceanographer for the Environmental Research Division (ERD) at NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center in Monterey CA and is the PI of the West Coast node of NOAA's CoastWatch program which is housed at ERD. Her research interests are in using satellite data to examine bio-physical coupling in the surface ocean, with a particular focus on determining the biological and physical causes of the large chlorophyll blooms that often develop in late summer in the oligotrophic Pacific near 30°N. She received a Ph.D. in oceanography from Oregon State University in 1997, where she examined the physical dynamics of hydrothermal plumes. In her free time she leads Sierra Club service trips.

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12 January 2016

Title: Comparative Toxicity of Two Oil Spill Dispersants in Estuarine Organisms: Laboratory and Mesocosm Exposures
Presenter(s): Dr. Marie DeLorenzo, research ecologist with the NOAA's National Center for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research
Date & Time: 12 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Marie DeLorenzo, research ecologist with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research, Charleston, SC Authors: DeLorenzo, M.E., Key, P.B., Chung, K.W., Pisarski, E., Shaddrix, B., Moore, J.G., Dubick, J.D., Cooksey, C., Wirth, E.F., Pennington, P.L., Hyland, J., Fulton, M.H.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar: point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov or greg.piniak@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Chemical dispersants can be useful tools to mitigate oil spills, but the potential risks to sensitive estuarine species should be carefully considered. We determined the toxicity of two oil dispersants (Corexit® 9500 and Finasol® OSR 52) individually and in chemically-enhanced water-accommodated fractions (CEWAFs) of Louisiana Sweet Crude (LSC) oil. Acute toxicity thresholds and sublethal responses were determined in seven estuarine species (sheepshead minnow, grass shrimp, mysid, amphipod, polychaete, hard clam, mud snail). Dispersants were also assessed using a pathogenic bacterium. A chronic (45d) saltmarsh mesocosm exposure was used to assess fate and effects of each dispersant applied to weathered LSC under ambient conditions. Comparing median lethal values for dispersants alone, Finasol was generally more toxic than Corexit and had greater sublethal toxicity. Larval life stages were more sensitive than adult life stages. Comparing toxicity of the dispersed oil treatments, Corexit-CEWAF was more toxic than Finasol-CEWAF, most likely due to greater hydrocarbon concentrations measured in Corexit-CEWAF. In the mesocosms, both dispersed oil treatments caused hypoxia, altered microbial community structure, and reduced growth and survival of marsh grass, grass shrimp, clams, and polychaetes. These findings demonstrate the need to consider complex dispersant-oil interactions when making oil spill response decisions.

Bio(s):
Dr. DeLorenzo is a research ecologist with NOAA/NOS, Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research (CCEHBR) in Charleston, SC. She received a B.S. in Environmental Resource Management with a minor in Marine Science, followed by a M.S. degree in Ecology from Penn State University. She earned her Ph.D. at Clemson University in Environmental Toxicology. Within CCEHBR's Estuaries and Land Use Branch, Dr. DeLorenzo leads the Environmental Physiology and Microbiology Program. She serves on the graduate faculty at the College of Charleston, the Medical University of SC, and Florida A&M University. Dr. DeLorenzo has served as president of the Carolinas Chapter of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, program chair and president of the Southeastern Estuarine Research Society, and as board member of the Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation. Her research at NOAA includes environmental toxicology of estuarine species, climate change and multi-stressor assessments, and coastal resource management.
Title: Bering Strait Shipping: Sea Ice, Economics, and Governance
Presenter(s): Henry Huntington, Pew Charitable Trusts
Date & Time: 12 January 2016
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Henry Huntington, Pew Charitable Trusts

Sponsor(s):
ACCAP Climate Webinar

POC: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

Abstract:
Commercial vessel traffic through the Bering Strait is expected to increase in the coming years. Henry Huntington of the Pew Charitable Trusts will explore the role of reduced sea ice, the economics of shipping, and the potential for effective governance of maritime activity in the area. While uncertainties abound, there are several steps that can be taken--some already underway--to promote safe operations and cultural and environmental protection for the Bering Strait and its peoples.

About the speaker: Henry P. Huntington is a scientist with Pew's Arctic conservation efforts. Huntington's research activities include reviewing the regulation of subsistence hunting in northern Alaska, documenting traditional ecological knowledge of beluga and bowhead whales, examining Iñupiat Eskimo and Inuit knowledge and use of sea ice, and assessing the impacts of climate change on Arctic communities and marine mammals. He lives with his wife and two sons in Eagle River, Alaska.

13 January 2016

Title: POSTPONED to Feb. 10: Vulnerability of Early Life Stage Bivalves to Hypoxia and Ocean Acidification
Presenter(s): Christopher Gobler, Professor within the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University
Date & Time: 13 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

POSTPONED to Feb. 10 OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Christopher Gobler, Professor within the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) at Stony Brook University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar and NOS/NCCOS CSCOR: point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Highly productive and shallow coastal systems often experience metabolically-driven, diurnal variations in pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. It has been suggested that worsening acidification and eutrophication-driven hypoxia will intensify the magnitude of diurnal changes by decreasing baseline pH and DO levels. Few studies, however, have investigated the concurrent effects of low pH and low DO on ecologically and socioeconomically important marine organisms inhabiting coastal ecosystems. My thesis was designed to assess the effects of diurnal patterns in acidification and hypoxia on the survival, growth, and development of the early life stages of three bivalves indigenous to the East Coast of North America: bay scallops (Argopecten irradians), hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria), and Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica). Bivalves were exposure to both continuously and diurnally varying low levels of pH and DO. Continuously acidified conditions reduced survival of juvenile bay scallops as well as larvae of all three species studied, slowed growth of larval bay scallops and Eastern oysters, and delayed the development of bay scallop larvae, while continuously hypoxic conditions reduced the survival, growth, and development of larval bay scallops and development of larval hard clams. Though simultaneous exposure to both factors had significantly more negative effects than each factor independently, the effects on survival of bay scallop and hard clam larvae, hard clam development, and Eastern oyster growth were antagonistic. The effects of diurnal exposure to acidified and hypoxic conditions were more complex. In some cases, diurnally acidified conditions eliminated or mitigated the negative effects of survival for larval bivalves. These benefits were sometimes lost when both pH and DO varied diurnally suggesting the fluctuations in both factors at the same time was too energetically costly and/or occurred too rapidly for the bivalves to physiologically compensate without experiencing adverse effects. Collectively, this study provides a more accurate representation of the responses of early life stage bivalves to future acidification and hypoxia in shallow, coastal systems and demonstrates that diurnal fluctuations on pH and DO represent a significant threat to the North Atlantic bivalve populations.

Bio(s):
Christopher Gobler is a Professor within the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) at Stony Brook University. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. from Stony Brook University in the 1990s. He began his academic career at Long Island University (LIU) in 1999. In 2005, he joined Stony Brook University as the Director of Academic Programs for SoMAS on the Stony Brook " Southampton campus. In 2014, he was appointed as the Associate Dean of Research at SoMAS. In 2015, he was named co-Director of the New York State Center for Clean Water Technology. His research examines the functioning of aquatic ecosystems and how that functioning can be effected by man or can affect man. He investigates harmful algal blooms (HABs) caused by multiple classes of phytoplankton in diverse ecosystems as well as the effects of coastal ocean acidification on marine life. Another research focus within his group is the effects of climate change effects on coastal ecosystems. A final area of interest is investigating how anthropogenic activities such as eutrophication and the over-harvesting of fisheries alters the natural biogeochemical and/or ecological functioning of coastal ecosystems.
Title: Maritime Archaeology
Presenter(s): Shannon Ricles, Education Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 13 January 2016
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series:

Presenter(s):
Shannon Ricles, Education Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary Description: Join Shannon Ricles, Education Coordinator at Monitor National Marine Sanctuary to discover how to integrate STEM and social studies as your explore the underwater world of shipwrecks and the tools of maritime archaeologists. Free curriculum and resources provided. This webinar series will provide educators with educational and scientific expertise, resources and training to support ocean and climate literacy in the classroom. More information on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Point of Contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov; (805) 893-6429 Remote Access Information: Register for the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7078688115829824514 After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Important Notes for Participating in the Webinar 1. Plan to log into the webinar at least five (5) minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar is continually upgrading their software and we want to be sure that your computer has time to access any upgrades to enable you access to the webinar presentation. 2. When using the VOIP option for this webinar, you must use a headset or ear-bud headphones for the best quality audio. This will will also keep your output audio from re-entering your microphone, which causes distortion. 3. If you have difficulty logging in to this webinar, go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The Webinar ID is 147-323-371.

14 January 2016

Title: On the flow of Atlantic water and temperature anomalies in the Nordic Seas toward the Arctic Ocean
Presenter(s): Leon Chafik, graduate student at UMD
Date & Time: 14 January 2016
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 4817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Leon Chafik (graduate student at UMD)

Sponsor(s):
NCEI CCOG Seminar POC: tim.boyer@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Webex: 1-877-725-4068 (8634769#). For Webcast access within the US : 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.

Abstract:
The climatic conditions over the Arctic Ocean are strongly influenced by the inflow of warm Atlantic water conveyed by the Norwegian Atlantic Slope Current (NwASC). Based on sea surface height (SSH) data from altimetry, we develop a simple dynamical measure of the NwASC transport to diagnose its spatio-temporal variability. This supports a dynamical division of the NwASC into two flow regimes; the Svinøy Branch (SvB) in the southern Norwegian Sea, and the Fram Strait Branch (FSB) west of Spitsbergen. The SvB transport is well correlated with the SSH and atmospheric variability within the Nordic Seas, factors that also affect the inflow to the Barents Sea. In contrast, the FSB is influenced by regional atmospheric conditions around Svalbard and northern Barents Sea. Using a composite analysis, we further relate anomalous strong SvB flow events to temperature fluctuations along the core of Atlantic water. A warm composite anomaly is found to propagate northward, with a tendency to amplify enroute, after these events. A roughly 12 months delayed temperature signal is identified in the FSB. However, also in the Lofoten Basin interior a delayed temperature signal is found, which appears to originate from the NwASC. This study suggests that hydrographic anomalies both upstream from the North Atlantic, and locally generated in the Norwegian Sea, are important for the oceanic heat and salt transport that eventually enters into the Arctic. See http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015JC011012/full

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Title: The role of research in oyster restoration from larvae to adults: Two case studies in Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Dr. Jacob Goodwin, postodoctoral researcher, Rutgers University Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences
Date & Time: 14 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jacob Goodwin, postdoctoral researcher, Rutgers University Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
Part I larvae: A novel supervised image classification method was used with the objective to identify images of oyster (Crassostrea virginica) larvae taken under cross-polarized light. This novel accurate and rapid technique was developed to identify oyster larvae in the field. Field collections of eastern oyster larvae indicated that salinity appeared to be the dominant cue for swimming behavior. Both vertical life table and fisheries catch curve approaches were employed for the first time for bivalve species to calculate similar mortality rates for eastern oyster larvae (0.37-0.38 d^-1). These findings advance understanding of the larval ecology of oysters through the quantitative estimates of mortality and a better understanding of the physical conditions which cue larval behavior. The new techniques can be used to enhance image acquisition for other planktonic species and research results can be applied to validate larval transport models of eastern oysters which have application for locating marine protected areas. Part II adult: Current oyster restoration techniques in Chesapeake Bay include planting juvenile oysters (spat) on shell and spat on reef balls. Reef balls provide valuable three dimensional habitats for finfish and other species but little is known about the effect they may have on oyster growth, abundance, or disease tolerance. To assess this, measurements were made on reef balls that had been planted in the Chesapeake Bay in 2010. During the same year spat on shell was planted on and around the reef balls. Sampling was conducted by SCUBA divers in 2014. Results indicated that reef balls promoted abundance and recruitment of oysters. In addition, reef associated fauna were found in significantly higher abundances on reef balls.

Bio(s):
Dr. Jacob (Jake) Goodwin received his B.S. in Marine Biology at University of Maryland, College Park. He spent time working in Dr. Kennedy Paynter's oyster restoration lab assessing oyster reefs around Chesapeake Bay for 5 years. During that time he helped with underwater videography for films (Who killed Crassostrea virginica), advance studies on non-native oysters, and assess natural restoration techniques. After working for the Paynter lab, he pursued his M.S. in Environmental Policy at Johns Hopkins while working as a fellow at the EPA Chesapeake Bay Program office in Annapolis. Shortly after this, Jake went on to pursue a Ph.D. with Dr. Elizabeth North at the Horn Point Laboratory in Cambridge MD. The work presented here describes the projects that were worked on during his time as a Ph.D. student. Currently Jake is a postdoctoral researcher with Dr. Richard Lutz at Rutgers University researching bivalve larvae.
Title: A New Era of Cooperation Between Cuba and the U.S. Established through Marine Protected Areas
Presenter(s): Billy D. Causey, PhD. Director of Southeast, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Region of NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries; Pedro Ramos, Superintendent Everglades National Park and Dry Tortugas National Park, National Park Service, Daniel Whittle, JD. Director of EDF's Cuba Program; and Raimundo Espinoza Chirinos, Cuba Program Manager, The Nature Conservancy
Date & Time: 14 January 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - See event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Billy D. Causey, PhD. Director of Southeast, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Region of NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Pedro Ramos, Superintendent Everglades National Park and Dry Tortugas National Park, National Park Service Daniel Whittle, JD. Director of the Environmental Defense Fund's Cuba Program Raimundo Espinoza Chirinos, Cuba Program Manager, The Nature Conservancy Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4317775936194675969

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series which is co-sponsored with EBM Tools Network. The series is focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. For a list of upcoming webinars see: http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/ Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
On Nov 18, 2015, NOAA and the National Park Service signed a memorandum of understanding with Cuba's Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment to cooperate on the conservation and management of Marine Protected Areas " one of the first bilateral arrangements following the recent renewal of diplomatic relations between the US and Cuba. This groundbreaking accord follows years of work by EDF and others to bring together marine scientists, resource users and managers in both countries to develop joint conservation strategies for the marine ecosystem of the region. This presentation will highlight Cuba's spectacular marine environments, the development of the system of MPAs in Cuba and how the establishment of sister sanctuary programs under the agreement will facilitate greater understanding and protection of the marine resources our two countries share. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 January 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

19 January 2016

Title: El Nino Intensity and North American Climate During the Northern Winter
Presenter(s): Andy Hoell, ESRL/PSD
Date & Time: 19 January 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC III 12th floor fishbowl (just outside elevators)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Andy Hoell (ESRL/PSD) Seminar sponsors: OAR/CPO/MAPP Program, OAR/OWAQ Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov Where: Andy will be here in person, so please join us in NOAA HQ SSMC III, 12th floor fishbowl (just outside elevators).

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e042b8d54bc7c5b5202fc5ed5a587b193 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx

Abstract:
The monthly and seasonal sensitivity of North American climate to El Niño events of varying intensity during November-April 1948-2014 is investigated using observations and a multi-model ensemble of historical climate simulations driven by observed sea surface temperatures (SST). El Niño is separated into weak, moderate and strong events using a threshold exceedance of SST over the tropical east-central Pacific Ocean. Comparisons of the SST anomaly expressions of El Niño indicates that strong El Niño are of the eastern Pacific flavor while moderate and weak El Niño are of the central Pacific flavor. During November-April, strong and moderate El Niño force similar atmospheric circulation, near-surface air temperature and precipitation anomaly patterns across North America, though considerably larger anomalies are forced by strong El Niño. In contrast, weak El Niño does not force significant widespread North American climate anomalies. Precipitation departures across North America forced strong and moderate El Niño are caused by an increase in the number of precipitation days as opposed to the amount of precipitation that falls on a precipitation day. El Niño is related with important seasonally-varying impacts over North America, as the largest atmospheric circulation, near-surface air temperature and precipitation anomalies forced by strong and moderate El Niño occur during January-March. The seasonally-varying impacts over North America are primarily a result of the temporal sensitivity of the atmosphere to SST forcing, as evidenced by atmospheric simulations forced by an idealized SST anomaly expression that closely resembles El Niño with the magnitude of the SST anomalies held constant. Unfortunately, the latest coupled climate model forecast systems struggle to capture the seasonally-varying impacts of El Niño over North America.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body

20 January 2016

Title: Economics for Conservationists: A Field Guide
Presenter(s): Taylor H. Ricketts, Professor and Director, Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, University of Vermont, and Brendan Fisher, Associate Professor, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont
Date & Time: 20 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Taylor H. Ricketts, Professor and Director, Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, University of Vermont, and Brendan Fisher, Associate Professor, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars uses phone and internet. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688 and hit # key. For Webcast: go to http://www.mymeetings.com. And under "Participant Join" in lower right, click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code needed for web.

Abstract:
Economics is just as central to conservation as ecology or natural history, for two reasons. First, the economic decisions people make every day are at the core of the world's conservation issues: climate change, overfishing, Amazonian deforestation, coastal protection, tiger poaching, and countless others. Second, and more importantly, understanding the economic forces behind these decisions can help us safeguard biodiversity in a more sophisticated and effective way. We're so convinced of this that we wrote a short, irreverent, approachable field guide to the economic principles that everyone should know. In this talk we'll discuss some of these principles, relate them to work of NOAA and other federal agencies, and poke fun of the co-author who won't be on the webinar.

Bio(s):
Taylor H. Ricketts is a Professor and the Director of the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, University of Vermont. Taylor integrates natural and social sciences to address both fundamental scientific issues and real-world conservation problems. His recent work focuses on the economic benefits provided to people by forests, wetlands, reefs, and other natural areas. Taylor is co-founder of the Natural Capital Project, a partnership among universities and NGOs that maps and values natural benefits for different communities around the world. He has served as Convening Lead Author for the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, a 5-year, UN-sponsored effort to assess global ecosystems and their contributions to human wellbeing. These and other collaborations are part of Taylor's continuing effort to link rigorous research with practical conservation and policy efforts worldwide. Before arriving at UVM in 2011, he led World Wildlife Fund's Conservation Science Program for nine years and continues to serves as a Senior Fellow at WWF. Brendan Fisher is Associate Professor at the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont. Brendan's research interests lie in the nexus of biodiversity conservation, human livelihoods, and environmental economics. His current focus is on using the concept of ecosystem services and the tools of economics to understand tradeoffs between conservation and development in coastal East Africa and in Borneo. Recent academic posts include fellowships at the University of East Anglia and Princeton University. Prior to returning to UVM, he worked at World Wildlife Fund for three years. He used to fill his days with hiking, soccer, and rock-climbing but now spends all non-work time happily playing with his kids Sayre, Austen and Kellan and taking pictures of chickens - globally.
Title: Assessment of Three Sonars to Evaluate the Downstream Migration of American Eel in the St. Lawrence River
Presenter(s): Christopher, W.D. Gurshin, Normandeau Associates, Inc., Portsmouth, NH
Date & Time: 20 January 2016
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Clark Conference Room, NEFSC Aquarium, 166 Water St., Woods Hole, MA 02543
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Christopher W.D. Gurshin, Normandeau Associates, Inc., Portsmouth, NH. Co-authors: David J. Coughlan, Normandeau Associates, Inc; Don J. Degan and Anna-Maria Mueller, Aquacoustics, Inc., Sterling, AK.

Sponsor(s):
Northeast Fisheries Science Center and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Point of Contact: Mike Jech, michael.jech@noaa.gov Remote Access Info: Meeting Name: NEFSC/WHOI Seminar #7 URL: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/nefsc-whoi-7/ Teleconference No: 866-658-7997 (toll free, US), +1 517-833-7464 (toll, outside US), Participant code: 4319624. Audio through teleconference line only!

Abstract:
The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) collaboratively funded the Eel Passage Research Center (EPRC) to develop methods for providing effective downstream passage of out-migrating adult American eels at hydroelectric facilities. Based on previous studies, EPRC's preferred strategy to provide safe downstream eel passage is to guide out-migrating eels to a collection point, transport them downstream, and release them back into the St. Lawrence below Beauharnois Generating Station. To evaluate eel behavioral responses to cues such as light, electricity, sound, and other stimuli for guidance to a collection point, a suitable sampling technique is essential to effectively monitor eel abundance and movements. In this study, three phases of research assessed the feasibility of three sonar technologies to estimate eel abundance, determine distribution, and describe approach behavior. First, a Simrad EK60 split-beam echosounder (120 kHz), Sound Metrics ARIS Explorer multibeam sonar (1100/1800 kHz), and Mesotech M3 multi-mode multibeam sonar (500 kHz), each equipped with dual-axis rotators, were deployed from the nose piers at Iroquois Dam for testing multiple sampling configurations at detecting artificial targets and tethered live eels. The second phase focused on experimentally testing whether known numbers and sizes of live adult eels tethered to surface floats released upstream of the sonar beams and allowed to swim through at known locations and times could be detected by the sonars. These eel releases at multiple ranges in conjunction with randomized releases of other known targets allowed for their detectability and classification error to be preliminarily assessed. Lastly, the three sonars collected data continuously to monitor for wild, out-migrating eels from 15 through 22 July and 17 through 19 September 2015. Preliminary results highlight several challenges in acoustically monitoring eels in a large, fast-moving river with a few orders of magnitude higher abundance of other targets that can lead to a high false positive error rate as a result of motion artifacts causing non-eel echoes to mimic the distinctive pattern of eel echoes. Thus far, the ARIS multibeam sonar, operating with 48 beams, holds the most promise for correctly identifying eels out to 16-20 m in range, but the M3 multibeam sonar has some value for tracking previously identified targets over larger areas.

Bio(s):
Dr. Chris Gurshin is a principal fisheries scientist at the environmental consulting firm Normandeau Associates, Inc. At Normandeau, he manages a variety of multi-disciplinary fisheries studies on fish passage, environmental impacts to fish populations, and fish protection technologies in pond, lake, riverine and coastal environments. (http://www.normandeau.com/pages/services/hydroacoustics.asp) Archive of past seminars: An archive of past seminars can be found at the Cooperative Institute for the North Atlantic Region (CINAR) website: http://www.cinar.org/seminars.
Title: Status of Marine and Coastal EBM among the Network of US Federal Programs
Presenter(s): Andrea Dell'Apa, Adam Fullerton, Frank Schwing, and Peg Brady of NOAA
Date & Time: 20 January 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Andrea Dell'Apa, Adam Fullerton, Frank Schwing, and Peg Brady of NOAA.

Sponsor(s):
Webinar co-sponsored by MEAM, OpenChannels.org, and the EBM Tools Network.Please send your questions, comments and feedback to: sarah_carr@natureserve.org Remote Access Info: 1. Click and join at the specified time and date: https://global.gotowebinar.com/join/6814267664106323969/974791271 (https://global.gotowebinar.com/join/6814267664106323969/974791271) Note: This link should not be shared with others it is unique to you. 2. More webinar details: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/additionalInfo.tmpl?duplicate=false&webinar=6814267664106323969&aregistrantConfirmation=7607273933734439169 (https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/additionalInfo.tmpl?duplicate=false&webinar=6814267664106323969&aregistrantConfirmation=7607273933734439169) How To Join The

Remote Access:
Wed, Jan 20, 2016 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM EST Add to Calendar: Outlook® Calendar | Google Calendar™ | iCal® 1. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://global.gotowebinar.com/join/6814267664106323969/974791271 Note: This link should not be shared with others; it is unique to you. 2. Choose one of the following audio options: TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (562) 247-8422 Access Code: 629-948-143 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar

Abstract:
This webinar will provide an overview of the current state of practice among a number of US federal programs employing EBM approaches in the ocean, coastal zone, and the Great Lakes. The National Ocean Policy EBM-Subgroup recently conducted a study using social network analysis to explore similarities among programs in different topic areas (e.g., type of audience, partners, training, EBM best management practices and principles). The study found substantial differences in perceived and effective performances across programs, with Management programs showing a higher level of integration of EBM approaches than Non-Management programs. The use of EBM best management practices and principles among programs was unbalanced, with some key elements of EBM strategies less commonly employed in management planning. This analysis identified gaps in the implementation of EBM strategies that can inform natural resource managers and planners. Read the study at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X15002122.

21 January 2016

Title: Downscaling climate change predictions to ecologically-relevant spatial scales: a case study with brook trout
Presenter(s): Craig D. Snyder, PhD. Research Ecologist and Nathaniel Hitt, PhD. Research Fish Biologist, both with the Aquatic Ecology Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey's Leetown Biological Science Center, Kearneysville, West Virginia
Date & Time: 21 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Craig D. Snyder, PhD. Research Ecologist and Nathaniel (Than) Hitt, PhD. Research Fish Biologist, both with the Aquatic Ecology Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Leetown Biological Science Center, Kearneysville, West Virginia Co-Authors: Nathaniel P. Hitt, and John A. Young, USGS Leetown Science Center, Aquatic Ecology Laboratory, Kearneysville, WV 25430

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web. Abstract. Forecasting climate change effects on aquatic fauna requires an understanding of how local processes interact with atmospheric drivers to influence aquatic thermal regimes. Previous efforts to forecast climate effects on brook trout habitat have generally assumed uniform air"water temperature relationships over large areas that cannot account for groundwater inputs and other processes that operate at finer spatial scales. We developed regression models that accounted for groundwater influences on thermal sensitivity from measured air"water temperature relationships within forested watersheds in eastern North America. We used these reach-scale models to forecast climate change effects on stream temperature and brook trout thermal habitat, and compared our results to previous forecasts based upon large-scale models. Observed stream temperatures were generally less sensitive to air temperature than previously assumed, and we attribute this to the moderating effect of shallow groundwater inputs. Predictions of brook trout future habitat loss derived from our fine-grained models were far less pessimistic than those from prior models developed at coarser spatial resolutions. However, our models also revealed spatial variation in thermal sensitivity within and among catchments resulting in a patchy distribution of thermally suitable habitat. Habitat fragmentation due to thermal barriers therefore may have an increasingly important role for trout population viability in headwater streams. Our results demonstrate that simple adjustments to air"water temperature regression models can provide a powerful and cost-effective approach for predicting future stream temperatures while accounting for effects of groundwater.

Bio(s):
Dr. Craig D. Snyder is a Research Ecologist in the Aquatic Ecology Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Leetown Biological Science Center in Kearneysville, West Virginia. He holds a B.S. in Biology from Berry College (Georgia), and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Ecology from Virginia Tech University. Dr. Snyder's research focus is directed at understanding ecological responses of aquatic communities to landscape change in support of natural resource management. His previous efforts have emphasized fish and macroinvertebrate communities in the Appalachian highlands and have included studies of the effects of acid deposition, urbanization, and climate change. Dr. Nathaniel (Than) Hitt is a Research Fish Biologist in the Aquatic Ecology Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Leetown Science Center in Kearneysville, West Virginia. He holds a B.A. in Biology from the College of Wooster, an M.S. in Organismal Biology and Ecology from the University of Montana, and a Ph.D. in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences from Virginia Tech. Dr. Hitt's research investigates freshwater fish ecology and community ecotoxicology from a landscape perspective, focusing on climate and land use change in Appalachian streams.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: Balancing two worlds: Grounding marine science in a Native American context
Presenter(s): Marco Hatch, Ph.D., National Indian Center for Marine Environmental Research & Education Northwest Indian College
Date & Time: 21 January 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Marco Hatch, Ph.D. National Indian Center for Marine Environmental Research & Education Northwest Indian College

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM. POC for question: diane.tierney@noaa.gov (NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator)

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m74e0e6e266d2b8e293a866bbc545c0a7 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Abstract. Tribal communities have an interconnected relationship with nature and long-term view of ecological change. This perspective is vital to maintaining ecosystem resilience in the face of anthropogenic impacts and climate change. As a research center on the Lummi Reservation, in the Pacific Northwest staffed by Native American scientists, the Salish Sea Research Center is uniquely positioned to connect marine ecology with the cultures of the Northwest Coast to grow the resilience of communities and ecosystems. Northwest Indian College's Salish Sea Research Center brings the tools and technologies to Indigenous students, on the reservation, to ask the questions they find most compelling in a supportive, scientific environment. Through the SSRC, Indigenous people can ask the questions that matter most in their lives using a mixture of traditional and non-traditional methods. Generally, this research can be described under two umbrellas: environmental health and the history of human interaction in this area. To understand the human footprint on Salish Sea, we acknowledge that people have always been here and we ask what lessons can be learned about how the ancestors promoted sustainability and how they interacted with the Salish Sea in a respectful manner. Examples of our research include multiple projects to explore the natural and cultural context of traditional mariculture practices. Specifically, we are focusing on clam gardens, hand constructed rock walls built to expand suitable bivalve (clams and cockles) habitat seaward by increasing the sedimentation rate of suspended silt particles at low intertidal elevations. Grounded in Coast Salish culture, we weave marine ecology and place-based research to build the ecological and cultural resilience of the Salish Sea.

Bio(s):
Marco Hatch is the Director of the Salish Sea Research Center at Northwest Indian College, a Native American serving college located on the Lummi Reservation. His background is in marine ecology and he received his Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. Marco is a member of the Samish Indian Nation and at Northwest Indian College is charged with preparing the next generational of native environmental scientists and leaders through fostering respect for Indigenous knowledge and providing students with a solid background in scientific methods. His research focuses on the nexus of people and marine ecology, with a particular focus on the intertidal.

25 January 2016

Title: RESCHEDULED to 1/28: Understanding emissions and tropospheric chemistry using NUCAPS and VIIRS
Presenter(s): Gregory Frost, NOAA OAR Earth System Research Laboratory
Date & Time: 25 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building 8th Floor Conference Room 10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham, MD 20706 and Via Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Gregory Frost (NOAA OAR Earth System Research Laboratory)

Sponsor(s):
JPSS Science Seminar JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mdc2858ab4342a0ef2cc4aac8252686f6 Meeting number: 748 014 237 Meeting password: Jpss2016! JOIN BY PHONE Call-in toll-free number (Verizon): 1-877-401-9225 (US) Attendee access code: 533 397 16

Abstract:
The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) onboard the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership platform represent the next generation of US polar-orbiting operational sounding systems. Our JPSS Proving Ground project aims to use NOAA aircraft measurements and atmospheric models to deliver products to characterize NOAA-Unique CrIS/ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) retrieval quality, with the goal of improving the accuracy of NUCAPS daily global data for methane (CH4) and carbon monoxide (CO). JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) data help locate sources of CO and CH4, including active fires and oil and natural gas flares, and VIIRS aerosol optical depth data may assist in source attribution. NOAA OAR's Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) has made extensive aircraft observations of CH4 and CO during many US field campaigns (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/csd/field.html). With their high accuracy and precision, fine horizontal and vertical resolution, and repeated sampling, these aircraft data are the basis of our approach to inform and improve NUCAPS retrievals. Since our aircraft typically do not examine the full vertical extent of CrIS instrument sensitivity and measure only in specific regions and time periods, we use the aircraft measurements to systematically validate and improve our state-of-the-art chemical-transport models. The validated and improved models can then simulate the horizontal distribution, vertical profiles, and temporal variability of CH4 and CO over the US at high resolution, and these model outputs will then be used to evaluate the retrieved NUCAPS CH4 and CO data. The ultimate aim of this project is to assess the ability of JPSS datasets to provide constraints on the emissions, chemistry and transport of CH4 and CO.

26 January 2016

Title: POSTPONED TO 3/22: Coastal Erosion and Shoreline Conservation Practices in Maryland - Walking that Fine Line between Shoreline Protection and Habitat Enhancement
Presenter(s): Kevin M. Smith, Deputy Director, Chesapeake and Coastal Service, MD DNR, and Claudia Donegan - Chief, Community Restoration Program, MD DNR
Date & Time: 26 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kevin M. Smith, Deputy Director, Chesapeake and Coastal Service, MD DNR, and Claudia Donegan - Chief, Community Restoration Program, MD DNR

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar and NOS/NCCOS CSCOR: point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Tidal shorelines are incredibly dynamic natural systems which provide for a host of high value habitats critical to so many of our living resources Understanding the role of sediment process and shoreline erosion to the Chesapeake Bay's overall ecologic health is critical to proper shoreline conservation. As our coastal areas continue to be developed, the use of appropriate shore erosion control techniques is paramount to the protection, preservation and restoration of shallow water and intertidal habitats. This presentation will address the importance of maintaining natural physical processes and the appropriate use of shoreline erosion control techniques to help maintain, enhance and restore these important tidal habitats. Abouit the

Presenter(s):
Kevin M. Smith: A graduate of the University of Maryland, Kevin has worked on tidal and nontidal restoration programs with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources for over 30 years. Much of that time has been spent designing and implementing living shoreline projects in the Chesapeake and Coastal Bay areas. Claudia Donegan: With a degree in geology at Denison University in Ohio, Claudia honed her skills as a stream ecologist with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and has spent the last 15 years at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources working with communities, watershed and conservation organizations and local governments to address habitat and water quality issues.
Title: Why are there so many 'pH scales' for measuring seawater 'pH' - What do these scales mean for measuring or using seawater 'pH'?
Presenter(s): Andrew Dickson, SIO
Date & Time: 26 January 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Andrew Dickson (SIO)

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is hosted by the US Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification, a collaborative working group of 13 federal agencies that aims to coordinate and foster Federal research and monitoring on ocean acidification (http://oceanacidification.noaa.gov/IWGOA.aspx). Questions: noaa.oceanacidification@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register http://tinyurl.com/j4f4s4r

Abstract:
pH is an important property of aqueous solutions because it affects a wide variety of chemical and biochemical properties through its role in acid-base reactions. This importance and the ease of pH measurement are the reasons why pH is perhaps the most measured chemical parameter in many environmental systems. A primary rationale for pH measurements is to enable calculation of the speciation in acid-base systems such as the CO2 system in seawater. However, the notional definition of pH, pH = "lg a(H+) , does not lend itself to straightforward application to seawater systems, and, as a results a number of alternate seawater ‘pH' scales have been developed over the years. These various ‘pH' scales have different meanings, and incorporate differing assumptions and calibration approaches, yet each of the various measurements is often simply referred to as ‘pH', inviting confusion. In this webinar I will explain how these various ‘pH' scales arose; detail how they differ; and outline the perceived advantages and disadvantages of the various approaches. Finally, I shall discuss how to choose an approach that is suited to your scientific goals, and how best to implement it and use it. About the speaker: Andrew Dickson is a professor of marine chemistry in the Marine Physical Laboratory division at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Dickson's research focuses on improving our understanding of the chemistry of carbon dioxide in seawater, with a current emphasis on the effects of ocean acidification. He has played a key role in developing quality control standards for oceanic carbon dioxide measurements and leads a program to prepare, certify, and distribute CO2 reference materials to the world's marine scientists. Born in Nairobi, Kenya, Dickson received a B.Sc. degree and a Ph.D from the University of Liverpool. Prior to joining Scripps, Dickson served as a postdoctoral research associate at the Marine Biological Association Laboratory in Plymouth, England and as a postdoctoral associate in the University of Florida, Department of Chemistry. He joined Scripps as an assistant research chemistry, became an associate research chemist, a professor-in-residence of marine chemistry then a professor.

27 January 2016

Title: Introduction to Enterprise Risk Management
Presenter(s): Liz Ryan, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 27 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library / Remote Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Liz Ryan, on detail to the NOAA CFO Risk Office Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library; Contacts: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 ext. 140), or Albert.e.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (Skip) (301-713-2600 ext. 118).

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at http://www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts. Description: This is an introduction to Enterprise Risk Management. Learn what it is, why it is coming up in the federal sphere, and some best practices on how some agencies have approached it. We will highlight basic frameworks and stories from other agencies on how Enterprise Risk Management has helped their organizations.

Bio(s):
Liz Ryan is currently completing an assignment in Enterprise Risk Management for the NOAA CFO Risk Office. She is a member of the National Marine Fisheries Service Buyback Program and is currently participating in the Executive Leadership Development Program at the Department of Commerce. Note: This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Training and Capacity Building Committee

28 January 2016

Title: Northeast regional El Niño Information and Resources Webinar
Presenter(s): Jason Tuell, Director of the Eastern Region of the National Weather Service, Art Degaetano, Regional Climate Center Director, and David Vallee, Hydrologist-in-Charge at Northeast River Forecast Center, and information on El Nino resources and coordination from NART member Ellen Mecray, Eastern Regional Climate Service Director
Date & Time: 28 January 2016
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: webinar only - see login info below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
NE Regional Team Lead Jason Tuell, Director of the Eastern Region of the National Weather Service, brief presentations by Art Degaetano, Regional Climate Center Director, and David Vallee, Hydrologist-in-Charge at Northeast River Forecast Center, and information on El Niño resources and coordination from NART member Ellen Mecray, Eastern Regional Climate Service Director.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's North Atlantic Regional Team Point of Contact: Nicole.Barlett@noaa.gov Remote Access Only: To register for the North Atlantic El Niño Information and Resources Webinar please visit: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1393738012879946754 Webinar ID: 150-717-699 Participant Audio information: 203-369-7303 Passcode: 1993314 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email and instructions for joining the webinar. For those who have conflicts during this virtual meeting, recordings will be posted soon after the completion of the webinar.

Abstract:
The webinar will include an overview by Regional Team Lead Jason Tuell, Director of the Eastern Region of the National Weather Service, brief presentations by Art Degaetano, Regional Climate Center Director, and David Vallee, Hydrologist-in-Charge at Northeast River Forecast Center, and information on El Niño resources and coordination from NART member Ellen Mecray, Eastern Regional Climate Service Director. A brief discussion with webinar participants will follow.This is an opportunity for NOAA employees who might be asked about El Niño to better understand the NOAA national and in-region El Niño resources, activities and partners.
Title: Understanding emissions and tropospheric chemistry using NUCAPS and VIIRS
Presenter(s): Gregory Frost, NOAA OAR Earth System Research Laboratory
Date & Time: 28 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building 8th Floor Conference Room 10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham, MD 20706 and Via Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Gregory Frost (NOAA OAR Earth System Research Laboratory)

Sponsor(s):
JPSS Science Seminar JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mc4ce9a127dba727b85bfe11e15bb5460 Meeting number: 743 473 425 Meeting password: Jpss2016! JOIN BY PHONE Call-in toll-free number (Verizon): 1-877-401-9225 (US) Attendee access code: 533 397 16

Abstract:
The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) onboard the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership platform represent the next generation of US polar-orbiting operational sounding systems. Our JPSS Proving Ground project aims to use NOAA aircraft measurements and atmospheric models to deliver products to characterize NOAA-Unique CrIS/ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) retrieval quality, with the goal of improving the accuracy of NUCAPS daily global data for methane (CH4) and carbon monoxide (CO). JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) data help locate sources of CO and CH4, including active fires and oil and natural gas flares, and VIIRS aerosol optical depth data may assist in source attribution. NOAA OAR's Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) has made extensive aircraft observations of CH4 and CO during many US field campaigns (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/csd/field.html). With their high accuracy and precision, fine horizontal and vertical resolution, and repeated sampling, these aircraft data are the basis of our approach to inform and improve NUCAPS retrievals. Since our aircraft typically do not examine the full vertical extent of CrIS instrument sensitivity and measure only in specific regions and time periods, we use the aircraft measurements to systematically validate and improve our state-of-the-art chemical-transport models. The validated and improved models can then simulate the horizontal distribution, vertical profiles, and temporal variability of CH4 and CO over the US at high resolution, and these model outputs will then be used to evaluate the retrieved NUCAPS CH4 and CO data. The ultimate aim of this project is to assess the ability of JPSS datasets to provide constraints on the emissions, chemistry and transport of CH4 and CO.
Title: Turning from the Dark Side: Marine Microbial Toxins and Nature's Pharmacy
Presenter(s): Peter D. R. Moeller, Ph.D., Research Chemist, Toxin/Natural Products Chemistry Program, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS, Hollings Marine Laboratory, Charleston, SC
Date & Time: 28 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Peter D. R. Moeller, Ph.D., Research Chemist, Toxin/Natural Products Chemistry Program, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS, Hollings Marine Laboratory, Charleston, SC

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Historically, studies involving aquatic bloom organisms and their effects have focused on the principle or major organism of the bloom. Today, as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with AlgaeVenture Systems, Inc., we have the technology to harvest the entire community of organisms (“consortia”) associated with a bloom event in order to understand the interplay of that suite of organisms with a focus on isolating, purifying, and characterizing toxins that these microbes produce.

In this presentation I will explain the science behind these assessments and provide some examples that demonstrate the approach, and the potential impacts of this work (for example, on human health and potential commercial applications).

Microbial consortia in a bloom (bacteria, fungi, algae, viruses) all jostle to survive by developing chemical defense techniques designed to provide them a survival edge. Though designed for dealing with other microbes, these compounds can often be highly toxic to mammals, including humans. These chemicals can be produced on large scale, in some cases exhibiting toxicity far worse than those toxins reportedly produced by the “predominant bloom organism”. Harvesting the entire bloom consortia in real time provides a more complete picture of bloom dynamics and associated secondary metabolites (bioactive compounds). The CRADA research has already been responsible for the discovery a significant number of novel toxins in US lakes, rivers and oceans that could seriously impact environmental- as well as human health.

Ironically these toxic or highly active compounds also represent Mother Nature's pharmacy. Though often highly toxic in nature, such compounds also represent potential candidates for commercial products such as new antibiotics, chemo-therapeutics, and antifungal agents. In addition, they also show promise as alternative agricultural products such as natural insecticides, antifungal agents, and anti-germination compounds. Our focus on emerging toxins is part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with AlgaeVenture Systems, Inc. to isolate, purify, characterize these toxins for human health reasons, as well as to have them assessed for commercial viability. The CRADA represents a great example of science and commerce working together to meet common goals.

Bio(s):
Peter Moeller is trained in synthetic organic chemistry and molecular structural characterization. He spent most of my career as a natural products chemist focused on emerging naturally produced toxins isolated from marine micro-algae. Over the past 20 years I have developed funded research projects in areas of biofuel production, novel toxin ID in cases affecting US coast lines, novel analytical toxin detection, purification and monitoring tool development while mentoring undergraduate, graduate and post-doctoral students. This research has resulted in several compounds entering patent processes attempting to harness the unique chemistry of these novel toxins for anti-cancer applications.

Peter's current research at HML is focused on naturally produced bioactive compounds that affect marine environmental and/or human health. Many of these compounds exist as toxins that work up the food chain and affect carnivorous fishes, animals and ultimately, humans. Many of these novel toxins have the added value of exhibiting biological activity demonstrating promise for use as pharmaceuticals and bio-molecular probes. In addition, Peter's other research interests include quorum sensing agents involved in coral disease, novel anti-microbial compounds isolated from marine bacteria, fungi and micro-algae. Peter is greatly interested in the effects of mixtures of compounds and organisms and how they act on, degrade or are incorporate both natural and anthropogenic pollutants in the marine environment.
Title: The physical basis for decadal climate predictions and the GFDL decadal climate prediction system
Presenter(s): Thomas L. Delworth, PhD, NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ
Date & Time: 28 January 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC3, 2nd Floor, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Thomas L. Delworth, PhD, NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library; Contacts: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 ext. 140), or Albert.e.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (Skip) (301‐713‐2600 ext. 118).

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
There have been remarkable changes in the climate system over the last few decades, ranging from a rapid reduction in Arctic sea ice to changes in Atlantic hurricane activity to prolonged drought in the western U.S. These changes are a combination of the response of the climate system to anthropogenic forcing and natural climate variability. There is tremendous societal interest in understanding the nature of such decadal scale climate changes, and the extent to which they can be predicted in advance. In this talk we present the physical basis for making predictions of how the climate system will change over the next decade due to both natural variability and anthropogenic radiative forcing changes. We summarize what parts of the climate system may be predictable on such timescales, and the physical processes that create such predictability. We then describe a prototype decadal prediction system that has been developed at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), and present results from experimental decadal predictions that have been performed over the last several years.

Bio(s):
Dr. Delworth is a Research Scientist at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) and member of the GFDL Science Board. He is also on the faculty of the Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program at Princeton University.
Title: Scientists on call: How aquaculturists and scientists are working together in the face of ocean acidification
Presenter(s): Jan Newton, Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems and Terry Sawyer of Hog Island Oyster Company
Date & Time: 28 January 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Remote access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jan Newton, Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems and Terry Sawyer of Hog Island Oyster Company

Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6381457008013116929

Sponsor(s):
California Current Acidification Network Ocean Acidification Roundtable (C-CAN OAR) webinar series
Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The US West coast has led the way in understanding and adapting to current day ocean acidification impacts on aquaculture. There are a variety of innovative technologies and approaches being used in shellfish hatcheries from California to Alaska that allow this industry to persist despite changing ocean chemistry.

About the speakers:

Dr. Jan Newton is a Principal Oceanographer with the Applied Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington and affiliate faculty with the UW School of Oceanography and the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, both in the UW College of the Environment. She is the Executive Director of the Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems (NANOOS), the US IOOS Regional Association for the Pacific Northwest. Jan is a biological oceanographer who has studied the physical, chemical, and biological dynamics of Puget Sound and coastal Washington, including understanding effects from climate and humans on water properties. Currently she has been working with colleagues at UW and NOAA to assess the status of ocean acidification in our local waters.

Terry Sawyer grew up swimming, snorkeling and exploring the banks of the Indian River Estuary on Florida's Atlantic Coast. Farming and ranching are his family's heritage and from a young age Terry developed a keen understanding of stewarding the land and nurturing limited resources. Summers spent working at the Harbor Branch Gulf Stream Research Facility in nearby Fort Pierce gave him opportunities to explore his interests in research, growing food and farming the water. His first 'ah ha!' moment came to him while snorkeling through the estuary. "This is it," he thought "some day, somehow I am going to bring the two worlds together - the ocean and farming."

Marine Studies at UC Santa Cruz brought Terry to California, and he began work, first as
a volunteer and then as a full-time aquarist, with the brand new Monterey Bay Aquarium. There, he developed his expertise in collecting, husbandry, botany, and the methods critical for providing healthy environments for marine organisms. Terry left the Aquarium in 1988 to become a partner with the Hog Island Oyster Co. His experience made for a great fit as he pioneered Hog Island's first wet storage tanks to hold live oysters. This state-of-the-art system creates a natural, bay-like aquarium where harvested oysters purify and chill while waiting to head to market.

Today, Terry is in charge of all technical operations at Hog Island, including the design and implementation of seed hatchery operations along with ongoing site and building developments at Hog Island Oyster Farm in Marshall. Terry has focused his career on aquaculture policy development, working with regulatory agencies and multiple partners to ensure the long-term health of shellfish and Tomales Bay Watershed. He is also actively leading Hog Island's involvement in Ocean Acidification research with UC Davis Bodega Bay Marine Labs, CCAN and other Ocean conservation groups.
Title: The effects of reproduction and salmon abundance on contaminant levels in Southern Resident killer whales, biologic monitoring using scat samples
Presenter(s): Jessica Lundin, Ph.D., Ecotoxicology Program, Northwest Fisheries Science Center NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 28 January 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jessica Lundin, Ph.D., Ecotoxicology Program, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Northwest Fisheries Science Center Directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm WEBINAR Join WebEx meeting: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m74e0e6e266d2b8e293a866bbc545c0a7 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Global call-in numbers: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/globalcallin.php?serviceType=MC&ED=43758908&tollFree=0 ABSTRACT Wildlife are intimately associated with contaminated waters and polluted landscapes, serving as sentinels to the health of our shared environment. This project optimized trace analytic techniques for measuring toxicants in scat samples and evaluated contamination levels among Southern Resident killer whales (SRKWs; Orcinus orca) in the Salish Sea and Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou), moose (Alces americanus), and Grey wolf (Canis lupus) in the Alberta Oil Sands (AOS). Scat sampling provides an unprecedented opportunity to non-invasively monitor marine and terrestrial wildlife across broad geographic landscapes. Exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is a primary risk factor for the endangered SRKWs. POPs are lipophilic toxicants associated with adverse health effects including endocrine disruption and reproductive toxicity. Scat samples collected from 2010-2013 demonstrated that contaminant levels are highest, from endogenous lipid stores, are the most toxic when the whales are nutritionally compromised. Scat samples collected in 2009 from areas of the AOS with varying degrees of in situ oil production activity were evaluated for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Samples were from Woodland caribou, moose, and Grey wolf, terrestrial species with markedly different dietary preferences and resource utilizations. PAH levels varied by species based on land-use history of oil production and forest fire. The results from these studies provide meaningful information to promote conservation and support management objectives to improve and maintain the health of our marine and terrestrial ecosystems.

Bio(s):
Jessica joined the Ecotoxicology Program at the NWFSC in October 2015 as a National Research Council Postdoctoral Research Associate to investigate the impacts of toxic insults on salmon populations, and apply a predictive modeling tool to identify populations at increased risk from toxic stormwater in urban watersheds. Her previous research experience includes laboratory and field work, multivariate statistics, project management, and outreach efforts. Jessica earned a Ph.D. in Biology (2015) with a focus in environmental toxicology from the University of Washington for her work optimizing trace analytic tools to monitor environmental contaminants in marine (killer whale) and terrestrial (caribou, moose, and wolf) wildlife species across broad geographic landscapes. Jessica also received a Master of Public Health degree in Epidemiology (2006) from the University of Minnesota for her work evaluating cancer risk in production facility workers exposed to perfluorinated compounds, and worked for 6 years as an environmental epidemiologist. Her overall research goal is to use science to better understand the individual health and population-level effects of toxics in our environment and promote conservation goals to keep our marine and terrestrial environments healthy.

29 January 2016

Title: Frontiers and Challenges of Earth System Modeling
Presenter(s): Jean-François Lamarque, NCAR, Elena Shevliakova, NOAA GFDL, Ruby Leung, PNNL
Date & Time: 29 January 2016
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm ET
Location: SSMC III 12th floor fishbowl (just outside elevators)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jean-François Lamarque (NCAR), Elena Shevliakova (NOAA GFDL), Ruby Leung (PNNL) Seminar sponsors: OAR/CPO/MAPP Program, USGCRP Interagency Group on Integrative Modeling Seminar POC for questions: heather.archambault@noaa.gov Where: NOAA HQ SSMC III, 12th floor fishbowl (just outside elevators) or virtually (see below)

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e30f606cf41d321679aec3ea738c999a6 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: Jean-François Lamarque - Using recent simulation results and model developments, this talk will discuss the present challenges that Earth System modeling group are facing in creating and using the next generation of Earth system models, in particular in the light of the upcoming CMIP6. Elena Shevliakova - As anthropogenic emissions of CO2 are increasing, terrestrial systems continue to uptake about a quarter of those emissions, with another quarter going to the oceans. To understand the interplay between natural terrestrial and marine biosphere processes, land use land cover change (LULCC) and changing climate, NOAA/GFDL has developed fully coupled, comprehensive climate-carbon cycle models (i.e., an Earth System Model (ESM)), capable of prognostically simulating the transient physical climate, and the exchanges of CO2 among land, ocean and atmosphere, as well as feedbacks between the climate and carbon system. Previous studies indicate that enhanced vegetation growth under elevated atmospheric CO2 and LULCC are the key drivers of the future land carbon sinks. These sinks, in turn, will have implications for the 21st century evolution of the atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate warming. Here we present insights from the GFDL ESMs on the implications of enhanced vegetation growth and LULCC for the historical and future land sinks and how the two are interrelated. Ruby Leung - By controlling the partitioning of surface energy fluxes, terrestrial processes play an important role in the global and regional water cycle. To understand and quantify the terrestrial water cycle and its interaction with human activities that drive future changes in the coupled system, we have undertaken research to improve the representation of hydrologic processes in Earth system models. This presentation will discuss our efforts to improve hydrologic modeling, add new representations of human influence, and couple the human and hydrologic components in the framework of the Community Land Model (CLM). With our framework for modeling the impacts of climate change and water use on the water cycle, we evaluated the implications of climate change mitigation to water scarcity. Building on our capability, new development is focusing on extending our river transport model to represent inundation dynamics, riverine biogeochemistry, and coupled hydrology-vegetation system, with the goal for a flexible modeling framework useful for science discovery as well as addressing societally relevant questions.
Title: El Nino and Alaska Information and Resources for NOAA staff
Presenter(s): NOAA Alaska Collaboration Team
Date & Time: 29 January 2016
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Please note: Seminar is for NOAA staff only

Presenter(s):
NOAA Alaska Collaboration Team POC: Amy Holman, Coordinator NOAA Alaska Regional Collaboration Team amy.holman@noaa.gov To join the Alaska Regional El Niño Information and Resources Webinar please visit: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/171510205 to join the conference call, dial: 866-917-7572 passcode 1564306

Abstract:
The NOAA Alaska Collaboration Team invites you to participate in webinar for NOAA staff on what's going on with El Nino in Alaska this Friday, January 29, 2016 from 12:00 " 1:00pm (AKST). This is an opportunity for NOAA employees who might be asked or are curious about El Niño to better understand the NOAA national and in-region El Niño resources, activities and partners. A significant El Niño event is currently taking place and is very likely to continue through the 2015 " 2016 winter season. As NOAA continues to respond to this event, NOAA leadership has asked the regional collaboration network to increase awareness of ongoing regional activities in response to this El Niño, as well as NOAA resources, partner activities and points of contact. The webinar will include an overview of El Niño, impacts and outlooks for Alaska, as well as information on El Niño resources and coordination from Rick Thoman, our NWS Alaska Region Climate Program Manager, James Partain (Regional Climate Service Director), Kris Holderied (NOS) and Teri Rowles and Jamal Moss from NMFS. A brief discussion with webinar participants will follow.

2 February 2016

Title: Will climate change result in mismatches between fish and phytoplankton phenology? Empirical evidence from the California Current and earth system model projections
Presenter(s): Rebecca Asch, Postdoctoral Research Associate/Senior Nereus Fellow, Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University
Date & Time: 2 February 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rebecca Asch, Postdoctoral Research Associate/Senior Nereus Fellow, Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NOS Science Seminar Series; coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Phenology refers to the study of seasonal, biological cycles and how they are influenced by weather and climate. In many ecosystems, warming temperatures are causing phenological events to occur earlier in the year. However, temperature sensitivity varies across marine organisms, such that seasonal events that previously occurred synchronously are likely to become decoupled under climate change. In temperate, marine ecosystems, fishes often time reproduction to coincide with plankton blooms. Greater asynchrony between these events could increase larval fish mortality, reduce recruitment to fisheries, and result in declining fish catches. This seminar will investigate historical and future changes in phytoplankton and fish phenology using long-term oceanographic time series and the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamic Laboratory's Earth System Model (GFDL ESM2M). In the southern California Current, decadal changes in the phenology of 43 species of larval fishes were investigated between 1951-2008. 42% of the species exhibited increasingly early peaks in larval abundance. Species with long-term advances in phenology showed a similar response to warming at the interannual time scale associated with El Niño. Differences in habitat use were observed between species with long-term advances in phenology and a smaller subset of fishes with delayed phenology. In the second half of this seminar, the GFDL ESM2M model will be used to project changes in the phenology of fishes and phytoplankton globally throughout the 21st century. Under a high emissions climate change scenario, phytoplankton blooms at latitudes >40° N are projected to occur on average 16.5 days earlier by the end of the 21st century. For fishes whose spawning phenology is influenced by sea surface temperature (SST) and whose spawning grounds are delineated by fixed geographic features, shifts in phenology occurred twice as fast as phytoplankton. This resulted in fishes spawning before the start of the phytoplankton bloom across >85% of the region >40° N. Seasonal mismatches between fishes and phytoplankton were less widespread in simulations where fishes altered the location of their spawning grounds in response to changing temperatures. Nevertheless, sizable mismatches persisted across parts of the North Pacific, Arctic, and North Atlantic Drift. These results indicate that range shifts may increase the resiliency of fishes to climate change impacts associated with phenological mismatches, buffering against potential declines in larval survival and recruitment.

Bio(s):
Dr. Asch's career in marine science started at NCCOS's Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment (CCMA) where she worked on a project pinpointing gaps in coral reef monitoring efforts by designing a geographic information system (GIS) with data on >450 monitoring projects. Since then she has received a M.S. and Ph.D. in biological oceanography from the University of Rhode Island and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, respectively. Dr. Asch is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate and Senior Nereus Fellow at Princeton University's Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences. In addition to her research on the phenology of fishes, Dr. Asch's past and current work has addressed topics as diverse as the effects of bottom fishing disturbance on benthic invertebrates, the spread of an invasive tunicate species, plastic ingestion by mesopelagic fishes, the influence of oceanic conditions on the spawning habitat of forage fishes, and climate change effects on spawning aggregations of reef fishes.

3 February 2016

Title: Carbon choices determine US cities committed to futures below sea level
Presenter(s): Dr. Benjamin Strauss, Vice President for Sea Level and Climate Impacts at Climate Central
Date & Time: 3 February 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Benjamin Strauss, Vice President for Sea Level and Climate Impacts at Climate Central.

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use PHONE AND INTERNET. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
Besides discussion of the recent PNAS paper named in the title, abstract below, this webinar will also include a map-based tour of major US cities and regions; selected visualizations; and a brief discussion of the global extension of this work. Paper abstract: Anthropogenic carbon emissions lock in long-term sea-level rise that greatly exceeds projections for this century, posing profound challenges for coastal development and cultural legacies. Analysis based on previously published relationships linking emissions to warming and warming to rise indicates that unabated carbon emissions up to the year 2100 would commit an eventual global sea-level rise of 4.3"9.9 m. Based on detailed topographic and population data, local high tide lines, and regional long-term sea-level commitment for different carbon emissions and ice sheet stability scenarios, we compute the current population living on endangered land at municipal, state, and national levels within the United States. For unabated climate change, we find that land that is home to more than 20 million people is implicated and is widely distributed among different states and coasts. The total area includes 1,185"1,825 municipalities where land that is home to more than half of the current population would be affected, among them at least 21 cities exceeding 100,000 residents. Under aggressive carbon cuts, more than half of these municipalities would avoid this commitment if the West Antarctic Ice Sheet remains stable. Similarly, more than half of the US population-weighted area under threat could be spared. We provide lists of implicated cities and state populations for different emissions scenarios and with and without a certain collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Although past anthropogenic emissions already have caused sea-level commitment that will force coastal cities to adapt, future emissions will determine which areas we can continue to occupy or may have to abandon.

Bio(s):
Dr. Benjamin Strauss serves as Vice President for Sea Level and Climate Impacts at Climate Central. He is a national expert and author of numerous scientific papers and reports on sea level rise, as well as architect of the Surging Seas suite of maps, tools and visualizations. Strauss has testified before the U.S. Senate and presented to state and local elected officials, and the White House has highlighted his work. His research and Surging Seas have generated coverage across the U.S. and internationally by, among others, the New York Times, Washington Post, AP, Reuters, Bloomberg, The Guardian and USA Today, totaling more than 2,500 stories. He has appeared as an expert on national network news, nationally syndicated radio and documentary television.

4 February 2016

Title: Energetic Interactions in The Urban Boundary Layer
Presenter(s): Prathap Ramamurthy, Assistant Professor, CUNY/ City College of New York, Affiliated Faculty - NOAA Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center
Date & Time: 4 February 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Prathap Ramamurthy, Assistant Professor, CUNY/ City College of New York, Affiliated Faculty - NOAA Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
Although less than 1% of the World's land cover is urbanized, more than half of the World's total population reside in urbanized areas and nearly 75% of energy is consumed here. Hence understanding the energetic interactions in the urban boundary layer is central to issues related to human health, climate change, air quality and current & future energy sustainability. The three dimensionality and the large scale heterogeneity in physical and hygro-thermal properties of the built environment pose a considerable challenge to sensing and modeling the exchanges of momentum, mass and energy over urban areas. This talk will focus on some of the experimental and modeling work done in this area and will particularly highlight the role played by built surfaces in modifying the surface energy budget. The talk will also focus on the role played by local scale models that account for sub-facet level heterogeneity in capturing the urban energetic interactions. Finally the talk will summarize how these advances made through experimental and local scale models improve large scale numerical models that are overwhelmingly used in weather prediction and regional & global climate studies.

Bio(s):
Prathap Ramamurthy is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at City College of New York. He has nearly a decade worth of experience in the field of urban climatology, both observing and modeling urban scale fluxes. Throughout his career he has participated in numerous field experiments to understand the energetic interaction between the built environment and the atmosphere. Prior to his appointment at CCNY, he was an associate research scholar at Princeton University. He also serves in the science committee of New York City's Urban Heat Island initiative, run by the Mayor's Office of Resilience and Recovery.
Title: NANOOS: Delivering coastal ocean observations and a whole lot more
Presenter(s): Jan Newton, Ph.D., NANOOS Executive Director, Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington
Date & Time: 4 February 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Jan Newton, Ph.D. NANOOS Executive Director Applied Physics Lab University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m74e0e6e266d2b8e293a866bbc545c0a7 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 283 881 307

Abstract:
The Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems, NANOOS, is the Pacific Northwest Regional Association of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). Now over 10 years old, NANOOS has developed substantially thanks to its diverse partnerships and stakeholder-driven focus. Established by charter in 2003 to serve citizenry of the PNW, NANOOS has engaged representatives from a diverse set of stakeholders who are directly involved in the definition and execution of NANOOS within the region. Partners contribute to and help define our subsystems: observations, modeling and forecasts, data management and user products, outreach and engagement, and education. NANOOS members (now >60) have identified our six priority areas, with data and products accessible at www.nanoos.org. Climate: NANOOS provides climatology and anomaly products from regional buoy, satellite time series, and shoreline change statistics to improve understanding of climate variation and change. Ecosystem assessment: NANOOS provides time-series and real-time observations and data products used to evaluate, and in some cases forecast, HABs, hypoxia, ocean acidification, and water quality. Fisheries and biodiversity: NANOOS's forecasts and data on the bio-physical environment permit better-informed management decisions by fishers (from tuna fishers to shellfish growers) and regional managers. Mitigation of coastal hazards: NANOOS provides observations and analysis of topographic beach profiles, shoreline change, nearshore bathymetry, sea level change, and waves to improve planning and response to coastal hazards, to assist with engineering design, to enhance coastal resiliency, and to track local shoreline change in coastal communities. Maritime operations: NANOOS provides water, wave and weather observations and forecasts to ship and boat operators for safe operations and planning. Ocean literacy: NANOOS provides learning tools, real-time data lesson plans and other education materials to formal and informal educators to increase ocean literacy. I will introduce some of the features of the NANOOS Visualization System, NVS, which is the portal to this bounty of coastal ocean information.

Bio(s):
Dr. Jan Newton is a Principal Oceanographer with the Applied Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington and affiliate faculty with the UW College of the Environment. She is the Executive Director of the Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems (NANOOS), the US IOOS Regional Association for the Pacific Northwest US. Jan is a biological oceanographer who studies the physical, chemical and biological dynamics of Puget Sound and coastal Washington, including understanding effects from climate and humans on water properties. Jan was appointed to serve on the Washington state Blue Ribbon Panel on Ocean Acidification and the West Coast Panel on Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia. She is co-Director of the Washington Ocean Acidification Center at the University of Washington.
Title: Global warming, COP21 and coral reefs: global surveillance, research and conservation imperatives
Presenter(s): Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Global Change Institute, University of Queensland, Australia
Date & Time: 4 February 2016
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - NOAA Auditorium (behind the wave pool), remote access available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Global Change Institute, University of Queensland, Australia

Sponsor(s):
The NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program; Contact Alicia.Clarke@noaa.gov NOTE: In-person attendance at NOAA HQ is only available for NOAA federal and contract employees with a CAC card. Remote access information: Mymeetings webinars use phone and internet. 1. To join the web meeting, go to: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.phpsigKey=mymeetings&i=441497235&p=OCRMCCD&t=c; 2.Enter the required fields: Meeting No. 441497235; Passcode: OCRMCCD) 3. Indicate you have read the Privacy Policy; and Click on Proceed. The Audio is on the phone: Audio: USA: Toll Free No: 1-877-779-7421 Code: 50766 USA/International: Toll No. +1-312-470-7480 Code: 50766 For security reasons, the passcode and the leader's name, Mike Shelby, will be required to join the call.

Abstract:
The international commitments made at COP21 may be some of the most momentous in history. As part of the commitment made by over 190 countries at COP21 in Paris last month is to keep average global temperatures well below 2oC, and 1.5oC in the long-term, above the pre-industrial period. If achieved, the Paris agreement has enormous ramifications for the future of ocean ecosystems such as coral reefs. This talk will explore the future of ocean ecosystems under a fully implemented COP21 agreement, with reference to the short (next few decades) and long-term (2100 and beyond) horizons. It will also highlight the importance of understanding stress and the condition of marine ecosystems at global scales, with particular reference to the need for strong international partnerships and cooperation.

Bio(s):
Ove Hoegh-Guldberg is the Director of the Global Change Institute, Deputy Director of the Centre for Excellence in Coral reef Studies and Professor of Marine Science at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia. The Global Change Institute is focused on research, ideas and advice for solving the challenges of a rapidly changing world, and is focused in four main themes: healthy oceans, food security, sustainable water, and clean energy. Ove's research group focuses on the impacts of ocean warming and acidification on marine ecosystems,

9 February 2016

Title: Using an Environmental Intelligence Framework to Evaluate the Risk of Ocean Acidification in Alaska
Presenter(s): Jeremy T. Mathis, Ph.D., Director-Arctic Research Program, NOAA Climate Program Office
Date & Time: 9 February 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 10153, noaa.gov_494437393934@resource.calendar.google.com
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jeremy T. Mathis, Ph.D., Director-Arctic Research Program, NOAA Climate Program Office

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar: point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. For Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688 and hit # key. The Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com On the lower right of the main page find "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine). Abstract - The intensity, extent and duration of ocean acidification in the coastal areas around Alaska will increase as atmospheric CO2 levels continue to rise over the next century. These environmental changes could pose a significant threat to the Alaskan economy and the United States gross domestic product as important commercial and subsistence fisheries in Alaska are co-located in marine regions that have already undergone significant changes due to ocean acidification. Coastal human communities in southeast and southwest Alaska are highly reliant on fishery harvests and have relatively lower income and employment alternatives, and these locations face the highest risk from ocean acidification. New ways of collecting and integrating critical environmental intelligence will be discussed in the context of developing resilience and adaptation strategies for dealing with ocean acidification.

Bio(s):
Dr. Jeremy Mathis is the Director of the Arctic Research Program in NOAA's Office of Ocean and Atmospheric Research. He holds a B.S. in Chemical Engineering and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Miami. Dr. Mathis has worked in Alaska and the Arctic for more than 12 years and has published over 75 research articles on ocean acidification and the carbon cycle. In 2015, he was awarded a Silver Medal from the Department of Commerce for his work using groundbreaking technology to gather environmental intelligence in Alaska.
Title: 3D Estimates of Analysis and Short-Range Forecast Error Variances
Presenter(s): Jie Feng, NOAA/ESRL
Date & Time: 9 February 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Jie Feng (NOAA/ESRL) POC: Malaquias Mendez

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/320040021 (Meeting ID: 320-040-021) Conference call: 866-685-5896 (8108134#)

Abstract:
Accurate estimates of analysis and short-range forecast error variances are critical for successful data assimilation and ensemble forecasting applications. Peña and Toth (2014, PT14) introduced a statistical minimization algorithm for the unbiased estimation of the variance between “truth” interpolated to a Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model grid and the NWP analysis or forecast (i.e., “true” errors). The method uses variances between NWP forecasts and analyses (i.e., “perceived” forecast errors) and assumptions about the growth and correlation of errors. After demonstrating in simple model experiments that the method produced unbiased error variance estimates, PT14 estimated the mean of true analysis and forecast error variances for NWP systems over large domains. The present study expands on PT14 by (a) fitting variances between different lead-time forecasts valid at the same time as additional constraints of cost function, (b) using a suitable minimization algorithm, the L-BFGS (Byrd et al. 1995), and by (c) deriving 3-dimensional gridpoint-based error variance estimates via the L-BFGS algorithm. The 3-dimensional error variance estimates were examined in a simulated forecast environment with a quasi-geostrophic model where the analyses were generated using the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) scheme. It is found that the method can reproduce the area-average true analysis and forecast error within confidence intervals. Moreover, the estimated analysis errors at the gridpoint level has a high correlation with the distribution of the true analysis errors. The estimations were more accurate than those obtained from the EnKF ensemble spread. Based on these encouraging results, our next step is to apply this enhanced method to the Global Forecast System (GFS) and to compare with the error variances generated in operations.
Title: Town Hall Meeting on Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and Hypoxia in the Great Lakes
Presenter(s): Stacey Degrasse, FDA; and Tim Davis, Linda Novitski, and Caitlin.Gould, NOAA
Date & Time: 9 February 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: A webinar from NOAA/NCCOS, 1305 East West Hwy, Room 8150, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Meeting Leads: Stacey.Degrasse@fda.hhs.gov - FDA, and from NOAA/NCCOS: Timothy.Davis@noaa.gov, Linda.Novitski@noaa.gov and Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s):
Interagency Working Group on Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act (HABHRCA) Point of Contact: Caitlin Gould, Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov, 240-533-0290 Remote Access for webinar on Feb. 9, 2016 (different for Feb. 10 & 11 webinars) HAB and Hypoxia Experts, and Interested Parties "Go to https://fda.webex.com/fda/j.php?MTID=mbab594f49aa3fd9079e28d7fb0aac9ef Password is Habsnhypoxia To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link: https://fda.webex.com/fda/j.php?MTID=ma18e7fb8caad3a87838d169114ea5e9b. To join on the phone only: Provide your number when you join the meeting to receive a call back. Or, you can call one of the following numbers: Local: 1-301-796-7777. Toll free: 1-855-828-1770. Follow the instructions that you hear on the phone. Your Cisco Unified MeetingPlace meeting ID: 741 106 359.

Abstract:
The Interagency Working Group on HABHRCA* is pleased to announce a series of town hall-style discussions regarding harmful algal blooms (HABs) and hypoxia in the Great Lakes. A Federal Register Notice has been published:(https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2016/01/12/2016-00390/interagency-working-group-on-the-harmful-algal-bloom-and-hypoxia-research-and-control-amendments-act); The webinars will be held during the following dates and times. Please note that the times and dates have been updated since the original publication of the FRN, and that the information has been corrected. · Experts and interested parties: February 9, 2:00 - 3:00 PM EST · Interested parties: -- February 10, 1:00 - 2:00 PM EST -- (If needed to accommodate interest and volume) February 11, 1:00 - 2:00 PM EST Discussion information:  Regional, Great Lakes-specific priorities for ecological, economic, and social research on the causes and impacts of HABs and hypoxia; need for improved monitoring and early warning; new approaches to improving scientific understanding, prediction and modeling, and socioeconomic analyses of these events; and mitigating causes and impacts of HABs and hypoxia;  Communication and information dissemination methods that state, tribal, local, and international governments and organizations may undertake to educate and inform the public concerning HABs and hypoxia in the Great Lakes; and  Perceived needs for handling Great Lakes HAB and hypoxia events, as well as an action strategy for managing future situations. The purpose of these discussions is to initiate conversation between federal partners and their stakeholders regarding challenges, concerns, and needs related to HABs and hypoxia, and their impacts on Great Lakes regional interests and communities. Persons wishing to attend the meeting must register no later than 5 PM EST on the evening before each presentation by sending an email to Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov. Each meeting is limited to 500 participants and is on a first-come, first-served basis. Individuals are encouraged to submit comments and questions in advance of and following each webinar via e-mail (IWG-HABHRCA@noaa.gov), or to Caitlin Gould at NOAA, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, SSMC-4, #8237, 1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910.

10 February 2016

Title: ISO metadata online training: Introduction to Metadata, Current Metadata Policies
Presenter(s): Kathy Martinolich and Jaci Mize, NOAA NCEI
Date & Time: 10 February 2016
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kathy Martinolich and Jaci Mize (NOAA NCEI)

Abstract:
This course presents the concept, principles, and value of metadata utilizing the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 191** metadata in several online sessions. The "Intro to ISO Metadata" course will focus on how the ISO 19115-2 metadata standard is organized and will demonstrate how the different levels of metadata content (discovery, access, and understanding) are expressed in the ISO metadata standards. Though not tailored to specific audiences, additional training can be developed in cooperation with specific projects if desired. Reviews of basic data management topics in preparation of PARR requirements are also covered in the training. The course consists of six separate one-hour online modules using a GoToWebinar format. Course materials will be made available online as the course progresses. Please contact us for more information. To register for this course, please use this link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3167207386890813186 Introduction to Metadata, Current Metadata Policies February 10, 2016 Intro to XML and Intro to UML February 17, 2016 Discovery Level ISO 19115-2 Metadata, Overview of Data Catalogs February 24, 2016 Metadata Content for Access March 2, 2016 Metadata Content for Understanding March 9, 2016 ISO Metadata Creation Methods - Tools and Templates March 16, 2016
Title: Vulnerability of Early Life Stage Bivalves to Hypoxia and Ocean Acidification
Presenter(s): Christopher Gobler, Professor within the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University
Date & Time: 10 February 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Christopher Gobler, Professor within the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) at Stony Brook University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar and NOS/NCCOS CSCOR: point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Highly productive and shallow coastal systems often experience metabolically-driven, diurnal variations in pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. It has been suggested that worsening acidification and eutrophication-driven hypoxia will intensify the magnitude of diurnal changes by decreasing baseline pH and DO levels. Few studies, however, have investigated the concurrent effects of low pH and low DO on ecologically and socioeconomically important marine organisms inhabiting coastal ecosystems. My thesis was designed to assess the effects of diurnal patterns in acidification and hypoxia on the survival, growth, and development of the early life stages of three bivalves indigenous to the East Coast of North America: bay scallops (Argopecten irradians), hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria), and Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica). Bivalves were exposure to both continuously and diurnally varying low levels of pH and DO. Continuously acidified conditions reduced survival of juvenile bay scallops as well as larvae of all three species studied, slowed growth of larval bay scallops and Eastern oysters, and delayed the development of bay scallop larvae, while continuously hypoxic conditions reduced the survival, growth, and development of larval bay scallops and development of larval hard clams. Though simultaneous exposure to both factors had significantly more negative effects than each factor independently, the effects on survival of bay scallop and hard clam larvae, hard clam development, and Eastern oyster growth were antagonistic. The effects of diurnal exposure to acidified and hypoxic conditions were more complex. In some cases, diurnally acidified conditions eliminated or mitigated the negative effects of survival for larval bivalves. These benefits were sometimes lost when both pH and DO varied diurnally suggesting the fluctuations in both factors at the same time was too energetically costly and/or occurred too rapidly for the bivalves to physiologically compensate without experiencing adverse effects. Collectively, this study provides a more accurate representation of the responses of early life stage bivalves to future acidification and hypoxia in shallow, coastal systems and demonstrates that diurnal fluctuations on pH and DO represent a significant threat to the North Atlantic bivalve populations.

Bio(s):
Christopher Gobler is a Professor within the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) at Stony Brook University. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. from Stony Brook University in the 1990s. He began his academic career at Long Island University (LIU) in 1999. In 2005, he joined Stony Brook University as the Director of Academic Programs for SoMAS on the Stony Brook " Southampton campus. In 2014, he was appointed as the Associate Dean of Research at SoMAS. In 2015, he was named co-Director of the New York State Center for Clean Water Technology. His research examines the functioning of aquatic ecosystems and how that functioning can be effected by man or can affect man. He investigates harmful algal blooms (HABs) caused by multiple classes of phytoplankton in diverse ecosystems as well as the effects of coastal ocean acidification on marine life. Another research focus within his group is the effects of climate change effects on coastal ecosystems. A final area of interest is investigating how anthropogenic activities such as eutrophication and the over-harvesting of fisheries alters the natural biogeochemical and/or ecological functioning of coastal ecosystems.
Title: Town Hall Meeting on Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and Hypoxia in the Great Lakes
Presenter(s): Stacey Degrasse, FDA; and Tim Davis, Linda Novitski, and Caitlin.Gould, NOAA
Date & Time: 10 February 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA/NCCOS, 1305 East West Hwy, Room 9153, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Meeting Leads: Stacey.Degrasse@fda.hhs.gov - FDA, and from NOAA/NCCOS: Timothy.Davis@noaa.gov, Linda.Novitski@noaa.gov and Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s):
Interagency Working Group on Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act (HABHRCA) Point of Contact: Caitlin Gould, Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov, 240-533-0290

Remote Access:
Interested Parties (Webinar on February 10, 2016)"Go to https://fda.webex.com/fda/j.php?MTID=m1cab022ca28021cff02e6a4830ed26fd Password: Habsnhypoxia. To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link: https://fda.webex.com/fda/j.php?MTID=m492a55451b0adb8dc2ed1eb7d87137c5. To join on the phone only: Provide your number when you join the meeting to receive a call back. Or, call one of the following numbers: Local: 1-301-796-7777. Toll free: 1-855-828-1770. Follow the instructions that you hear on the phone. Your Cisco Unified MeetingPlace meeting ID: 746 444 650.

Abstract:
The Interagency Working Group on HABHRCA* is pleased to announce a series of town hall-style discussions regarding harmful algal blooms (HABs) and hypoxia in the Great Lakes. A Federal Register Notice has been published:(https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2016/01/12/2016-00390/interagency-working-group-on-the-harmful-algal-bloom-and-hypoxia-research-and-control-amendments-act); The webinars will be held during the following dates and times. Please note that the times and dates have been updated since the original publication of the FRN, and that the information has been corrected. · Experts and interested parties: February 9, 2:00 - 3:00 PM EST · Interested parties: -- February 10, 1:00 - 2:00 PM EST -- (If needed to accommodate interest and volume) February 11, 1:00 - 2:00 PM EST Discussion information:  Regional, Great Lakes-specific priorities for ecological, economic, and social research on the causes and impacts of HABs and hypoxia; need for improved monitoring and early warning; new approaches to improving scientific understanding, prediction and modeling, and socioeconomic analyses of these events; and mitigating causes and impacts of HABs and hypoxia;  Communication and information dissemination methods that state, tribal, local, and international governments and organizations may undertake to educate and inform the public concerning HABs and hypoxia in the Great Lakes; and  Perceived needs for handling Great Lakes HAB and hypoxia events, as well as an action strategy for managing future situations. The purpose of these discussions is to initiate conversation between federal partners and their stakeholders regarding challenges, concerns, and needs related to HABs and hypoxia, and their impacts on Great Lakes regional interests and communities. Persons wishing to attend the meeting must register no later than 5 PM EST on the evening before each presentation by sending an email to Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov. Each meeting is limited to 500 participants and is on a first-come, first-served basis. Individuals are encouraged to submit comments and questions in advance of and following each webinar via e-mail (IWG-HABHRCA@noaa.gov), or to Caitlin Gould at NOAA, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, SSMC-4, #8237, 1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910.

11 February 2016

Title: Upland Development & Shoreline Hardening Negatively Impact Estuarine Benthos, Fish and Waterbirds
Presenter(s): Rochelle Seitz, PhD., Benthic Community Ecologist and Research Professor at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science
Date & Time: 11 February 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rochelle Seitz, PhD., Benthic Community Ecologist and Research Professor at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science Seminar Hosts: NOS Seminar Coordinator Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov and Elizabeth Turner, NCCOS Oceanographer

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
Anthropogenic stressors such as upland development and shoreline hardening can affect economically and ecologically important species that use nearshore habitats. We examined the consequences of anthropogenic stressors on macro-faunal communities in 16 subestuaries of Chesapeake and Delaware Bays. We investigated how subestuary upland usage (e.g., forested, agricultural, developed) and shoreline development (riprap and bulkhead compared to marsh and beach) affected density and diversity of benthic infauna, fish assemblages, and waterbirds. Density of infauna was lowest in areas with heavy upland development and highest associated with large amounts of wetland in the subestuary. Infaunal benthic density tended to be lower adjacent to bulkhead shorelines, and benthic diversity was greatest at native marshes than at other habitats. Similarly, fish assemblages differed by shoreline type. Greater depth along developed shorelines provided access for large bodied species, but reduced shallow-water refuge habitat for small-bodied species, juvenile fishes, and crabs. In addition, several bottom-oriented species (including blue crab, Atlantic croaker, and spot) were more abundant in subestuaries with more wetlands and less shoreline hardening. Waterbirds followed similar trends with higher IWCI (index of waterbird community integrity) scores in subestuaries with less shoreline hardening. In the Delaware Coastal Bays, riprap and bulkhead shorelines had lower fish abundance than Spartina marsh shores. Construction of “living shorelines” (shorelines incorporating natural elements) improved benthic density and biomass over the long term. Given changes in macrofaunal communities associated with anthropogenic stressors, subestuary upland development and shoreline hardening should be considered in relation to maintain production and trophic transfer within the food web.

Bio(s):
Seitz is benthic community ecologist and Research Professor at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science; interests include changes in benthic invertebrate diversity with environmental stress, shoreline development and hypoxia, predator-prey dynamics, bottom-up control of benthic systems, and conservation biology. Education: B.A. Colgate University, M.S. and Ph.D. College of William & Mary.
Title: Town Hall Meeting on Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and Hypoxia in the Great Lakes
Presenter(s): Stacey Degrasse, FDA; and Tim Davis, Linda Novitski, and Caitlin Gould, NOAA
Date & Time: 11 February 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA/NCCOS, 1305 East West Hwy, Room 10348, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Meeting Leads: Stacey.Degrasse@fda.hhs.gov - FDA, and from NOAA/NCCOS: Timothy.Davis@noaa.gov, Linda.Novitski@noaa.gov and Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s):
Interagency Working Group on Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act (HABHRCA)

Point of Contact: Caitlin Gould, Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov, 240-533-0290

A Federal Register Notice has been published:(https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2016/01/12/2016-00390/interagency-working-group-on-the-harmful-algal-bloom-and-hypoxia-research-and-control-amendments-act);

The webinars will be held during the following dates and times. Please note that the times and dates have been updated since the original publication of the FRN, and that the information has been corrected.
· Experts and interested parties: February 9, 2:00 - 3:00 PM EST
· Interested parties:
-- February 10, 1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
-- (If needed to accommodate interest and volume) February 11, 1:00 - 2:00 PM EST

Discussion information:
Regional, Great Lakes-specific priorities for ecological, economic, and social research on the causes and impacts of HABs and hypoxia; need for improved monitoring and early warning; new approaches to improving scientific understanding, prediction and modeling, and socioeconomic analyses of these events; and mitigating causes and impacts of HABs and hypoxia; Communication and information dissemination methods that state, tribal, local, and international governments and organizations may undertake to educate and inform the public concerning HABs and hypoxia in the Great Lakes; and Perceived needs for handling Great Lakes HAB and hypoxia events, as well as an action strategy for managing future situations. The purpose of these discussions is to initiate conversation between federal partners and their stakeholders regarding challenges, concerns, and needs related to HABs and hypoxia, and their impacts on Great Lakes regional interests and communities.

Persons wishing to attend the meeting must register no later than 5 PM EST on the evening before each presentation by sending an email to Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov. Each meeting is limited to 500 participants and is on a first-come, first-served basis.

Individuals are encouraged to submit comments and questions in advance of and following each webinar via e-mail (IWG-HABHRCA@noaa.gov), or to Caitlin Gould at NOAA, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, SSMC-4, #8237, 1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910.
Title: Maps and Datasets for Blue Carbon Habitats
Presenter(s): Karen Richardson, Director of Programs at the Commission for Environmental Cooperation
Date & Time: 11 February 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - See event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Karen Richardson, Director of Programs at the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1174494291892307970

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series which is co-sponsored with EBM Tools Network.The series is focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. For a list of upcoming webinars see: http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/ Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Blue carbon denotes the long-term storage of carbon within plant habitats growing in coastal lands and nearshore marine environments. With support from the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC), maps of blue carbon habitats, seagrass, salt marsh, and mangroves, on the coasts of Canada, Mexico and the United States were collected, verified and compiled to create the first continent-wide collection of blue carbon habitat maps. These maps show that seagrasses grow coastally throughout North America, while mangroves are primarily tropical and salt marshes, primarily temperate/arctic. A geodatabase was established, metadata documented, data and methodological gaps were assessed along with challenges in identifying the extent of these habitats. The maps compiled for North America document 24,200 km2 of seagrass, 13,500 km2 of salt marsh and 10,100 km2 of mangrove. Only half of the continent's seagrasses have been mapped and priority sites were identified for future mapping. The area of blue carbon habitat within marine protected areas and terrestrial protected areas was also determined and an initial analysis of priority areas in all three habitats for blue carbon preservation, restoration and management was conducted.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 11 February 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Building Coastal Resilience by Accounting for Natural & Nature Based Defenses
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Beck, Lead Marine Scientist, The Nature Conservancy
Date & Time: 11 February 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Michael Beck, Lead Marine Scientist, The Nature Conservancy

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Katy.Doctor-Shelby@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m74e0e6e266d2b8e293a866bbc545c0a7 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 283 881 307 Global call-in numbers: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/globalcallin.php?serviceType=MC&ED=43758908&tollFree=0

Abstract:
The risks and the costs associated with coastal hazards are increasing both from coastal development and climate change. Coastal and marine habitats, particularly reefs and wetlands can substantially reduce exposure and vulnerability to coastal hazards, providing natural protection from risk. Yet the value of these systems as natural and nature-based defenses is still not fully recognized, and they continue to be lost and degraded. The presentation will provide participants with: (a) a synopsis from a World Bank Guidance Note (in press) on the coastal protection role of reefs and mangroves and the recommended approaches for better incorporating these services in coastal decision-making processes; (b) results from a global analysis that uses much of the recommended approaches to quantify the social and economic costs of flooding from coral reef loss for every country; (c) an understanding of how to apply similar approaches in an innovative reef restoration for risk reduction project in Grenville, Grenada; and (d) results from cost:benefit analyses with Swiss Re comparing natural and artificial defenses in the Gulf of Mexico.

Bio(s):
Mike Beck is the Lead Marine Scientist at TNC and an adjunct Professor at the University of California Santa Cruz. Mike works in marine science and conservation across science, business and policy to bring clear tools and results to decision-makers. Mike focuses on building coastal resilience in the interface between risk reduction and conservation. His approach is multi-disciplinary across ecology, engineering and economics. Mike has authored more than sixty peer-reviewed publications. His work covers topics from the role of coral reefs in reducing risks from storms to the effects of people on extinctions of Pleistocene mammals. He has also published numerous popular articles including Op-eds in the NY Times, Miami Herald, Huffington Post and the Caribbean Journal. He was a Fulbright Fellow at the University of Sydney and in 2012 Mike was also selected as a Pew Marine Conservation Fellow.

17 February 2016

Title: ISO metadata online training: Intro to XML and Intro to UML
Presenter(s): Kathy Martinolich and Jaci Mize, NOAA NCEI
Date & Time: 17 February 2016
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kathy Martinolich and Jaci Mize (NOAA NCEI)

Abstract:
This course presents the concept, principles, and value of metadata utilizing the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 191** metadata in several online sessions. The "Intro to ISO Metadata" course will focus on how the ISO 19115-2 metadata standard is organized and will demonstrate how the different levels of metadata content (discovery, access, and understanding) are expressed in the ISO metadata standards. Though not tailored to specific audiences, additional training can be developed in cooperation with specific projects if desired. Reviews of basic data management topics in preparation of PARR requirements are also covered in the training. The course consists of six separate one-hour online modules using a GoToWebinar format. Course materials will be made available online as the course progresses. Please contact us for more information. To register for this course, please use this link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3167207386890813186 Introduction to Metadata, Current Metadata Policies February 10, 2016 Intro to XML and Intro to UML February 17, 2016 Discovery Level ISO 19115-2 Metadata, Overview of Data Catalogs February 24, 2016 Metadata Content for Access March 2, 2016 Metadata Content for Understanding March 9, 2016 ISO Metadata Creation Methods - Tools and Templates March 16, 2016

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: The Impact of Lightning on Intensity Forecasts Using the HWRF Model: Preliminary Results
Presenter(s): Ms. Keren Rosado, Graduate Research and Training Scholar, NOAA EPP/MSI CSC.
Date & Time: 17 February 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Highway, SSMC3, 2nd Floor
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Jacqueline Rousseau and Audrey A. Trotman, OEd EPP and Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 ext. 140), or Albert.e.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (Skip) (301‐713‐2600 ext. 118), NOAA Central Library

Presenter(s):
Ms. Keren Rosado, Graduate Research and Training Scholar, NOAA EPP/MSI CSC. Keren Rosado is a doctoral candidate at Howard University's NOAA Center for Atmospheric Science.

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
In this research we are investigating the role of lightning during the life cycle of tropical cyclones using the HWRF hurricane model. The hypothesis is that an improvement in the forecast of lightning will lead to corresponding reductions in the HWRF hurricane model intensity bias. This research is designed to address the following two questions: "How well does the HWRF model forecast lightning spatial distributions before, during, or after tropical cyclone intensification?" and "What is the functional relationship between atmospheric moisture content, lightning, and intensity in the HWRF model?" In order to address these questions a lightning parameterization called the Lightning Potential Index (LPI) was implemented into the HWRF model. A 120 hours simulation of an Idealized tropical cyclones and Atlantic hurricane Earl 2010 was performed. Preliminary results from this investigation had shown: the correlation between lightning and intensity changes exists; the potential for lightning increase to its maximum peak hours prior to the tropical cyclone reach it maximum speed.

Bio(s):
Keren Rosado is a PhD candidate in Atmospheric Science at Howard University under the supervision of her academic advisor Dr. Gregory Jenkins. Miss Rosado is a fellow of the NOAA Educational Partnership Program (EPP) with Minority Serving Institutions (MSI) Graduate Research and Training Scholarship Program (GRTSP). Miss Keren Rosado research interest is tropical cyclone intensification and its correlation with lightning. Miss Rosado is currently doing her thesis research at NOAA NCEP under the supervision of Dr.Vijay Tallapragada. Her research involves the implementation of a lightning parameterization into the HWRF with the goal of use this tool as corroboration of the intensity forecast of the model.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: Why the reef is green: Effects of nutrient pollution on coral reefs
Presenter(s): Mike Gil, NSF Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of California at Davis
Date & Time: 17 February 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mike Gil (mikegil@sciall.org), NSF Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of California at Davis

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar and NOS/NCCOS CSCOR: point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Anthropogenic nutrient enrichment of natural systems is rapidly increasing around the world, stimulating fast-growing, weedy species that can elicit a suite of negative effects on foundation species in marine systems. However, despite the magnitude and immediacy of this environmental issue, we understand little of the specific conditions under which nutrient enrichment will control primary producers and, consequently, affect the greater community. In particular, nutrient enrichment can occur: at many different levels, in combination with other anthropogenic stressors, and over vastly different spatial scales and landscapes. Therefore, I used field experiments to: 1) examine how the magnitude of nutrient enrichment affects corals, and 2) test whether nutrient enrichment effects on reef communities depend on other pervasive environmental stressors. Additionally, using modeling and empirical approaches I examined the effects of enrichment scale and reef habitat configuration, on the relative importance of bottom-up (e.g., nutrient enrichment) vs. top-down (e.g., herbivory) effects on primary producers. I found that enrichment effects on primary producers in coral reefs depend strongly on a variety of factors, including the magnitude of enrichment, the co-occurrence of other prominent environmental stressors, and the scale and landscape over which enrichment takes place. My findings both support and refute the paradigm in marine systems that herbivores suppress enrichment effects, indicating that while small-scale experiments show herbivore control of enrichment, the mechanisms underlying these effects may fail to operate over more ecologically relevant scales of space and time. Collectively, my findings indicate that the vulnerability of aquatic systems to nutrient enrichment likely depends critically on long-term population dynamics of herbivores.

Bio(s):
Mike Gil grew up in Humble, Texas and attended the University of Texas at Austin, where he was named a Dean's Honored Graduate when he received his BS in biology in 2008. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Biology at the University of Florida in the fall of 2015. Dr. Gil uses empirical data from field studies combined with modeling approaches to better understand the ecological consequences of species interactions in a human-dominated world. In addition to his research, based primarily in French Polynesia and Mexico, Dr. Gil has broad interests in connecting the public with the process of scientific discovery and all that it offers humankind. To read more about his research, visit http://mikegil.com, and to read more out his mass science communication efforts, visit http://sciall.org. ​

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: Underwater Exploration in the NW Hawaiian Islands
Presenter(s): Daniel Wagner, Ph.D, Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument
Date & Time: 17 February 2016
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Daniel Wagner, Ph.D, Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries; POC for questions is claire.fackler@noaa.gov Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2305664161179859457 After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Important Notes for Participating in the Webinar 1. Plan to log into the webinar at least five (5) minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar is continually upgrading their software and we want to be sure that your computer has time to access any upgrades to enable you access to the webinar presentation. 2. When using the VOIP option for this webinar, you must use a headset or ear-bud headphones for the best quality audio. This will will also keep your output audio from re-entering your microphone, which causes distortion. 3. If you have difficulty logging in to this webinar, go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l ​ ​ The Webinar ID is 120-966-227.

Abstract:
Discover how you can connect to the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer in real-time during an expedition that will explore the deep-water habitats of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. The webinar will provide an overview of the science objectives of the expedition, as well as showcase the various exploration tools that are available for educators and students to participate in the expedition.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body

18 February 2016

Title: Training and Outreach to NMFS and NOS End-Users
Presenter(s): Dr Cara Wilson, Environmental Research Division, NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 18 February 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building 8th Floor Conference Room 10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham, MD 20706 and Via Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Dr Cara Wilson (Environmental Research Division, NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center)

Sponsor(s):
JPSS Science Seminar JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m5a3b612c5ded70f0bbe0be75a13e73a3 Meeting number: 743 098 740 Meeting password: Jpss2016! JOIN BY PHONE Call-in toll-free number (Verizon): 1-877-401-9225 (US) Attendee access code: 533 397 16

Abstract:
NOAA's goals and mandates include managing the nation's living marine resources and their habitat (NMFS), and increasing ocean and coastal 'intelligence' (NOS). Both of these objectives require the ability to characterize and monitor marine ecosystem and habitats. The continuity, global coverage, and high temporal and spatial resolution of environmental satellite data make these data an important component of this process. VIIRS ocean color and sea surface temperature sensors provide data that are critical for oceanographic research and marine resource management, yet these resources are underutilized within NOS and NMFS. A primary reason for this underutilization is that users are not aware of the data available, and lack the skills to easily obtain and analyze this data. The two primary user communities that this projects supports are NMFS and NOS scientists and resource managers. The SWFSC/ERD (Environmental Research Division) group is working to improve the utilization of VIIRS ocean color and sea surface temperature data within NMFS and NOS by (1) making the VIIRS datasets easily available on the ERD ERDDAP serve, (2) distributing powerful tools to improve data import, discovery and extraction and (3) conducting training sessions that demonstrate the easy accessibility of these datasets. Oceanographic satellite data is used is a wide array of activities throughout NMFS and NOS, and this will be demonstrated by a review of the projects that were worked on during the 2014 and 2015 NOAA satellite data courses.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: Ground control to Major Tom: Ensuring your information is more than an Internet oddity
Presenter(s): Lawrence I. Charters, Internet Projects Manager and Jennifer Coletta, both from NOAA's National Ocean Service, Office of Management and Budget
Date & Time: 18 February 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lawrence I. Charters, Internet Projects Manager, and Jennifer Coletta, Web Developer for NOS Communications and Education Division and Technical Manager for the National Ocean Service, both at NOAA's National Ocean Service, Office of Management and Budget Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Number 43 and the letter Q (or, the NOS Science Seminar Series) Points of Contact: lawrence.charters@noaa.gov and tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688 and hit # key. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
This presentation will feature a live demonstration of Google Search Console, a suite of online tools that help identify and fix problems with website content. If you want your precious information to be seen on the World Wide Web, you can't just create things that people want to see and hear and read. You also need to develop some of the skills of a publisher and librarian in the digital age. Google Search Console allows you to see your website the same way a search engine sees it. Instead of elegant prose and beautiful images, these tools see clusters of links and structural elements, and detect missing pieces of websites. They also show who links to your site, evaluate how "friendly" your site is to phone or tablet visitors, may uncover some security issues, and assist search engines in helping properly classify and catalog your content. This presentation is intended for managers, web content creators, and others who want not just to be published, but to be read.

Bio(s):
Lawrence is the Internet Projects Manager for NOAA's National Ocean Service and Co-Chair of the NOAA Web Committee. Over the past 20-odd years, he has been involved in creating, maintaining or administering over 500 websites, for NOAA as well as non-profits. He is very fond of penguins, science fiction, and numbers that paint pretty pictures. Jennifer Coletta has been a Web Developer and Technical Manager for the National Ocean Service since 2005. She maintains and manages web services and online communications through the NOS Web Admin Team and NOAA Web Committee.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: The Blob, El Nino, and Climate Change: Looking for a Hot Time in the Waters of the Pacific Northwest?
Presenter(s): Dr. Nicholas A. Bond, Research Meteorologist, Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean
Date & Time: 18 February 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Nicholas A. Bond, Research Meteorologist, Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm POC for questions: Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m74e0e6e266d2b8e293a866bbc545c0a7 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 283 881 307 Support: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/mc

Abstract:
Strongly positive temperature anomalies developed in the NE Pacific Ocean during the boreal winter of 2013-14. Relatively warm temperatures have persisted up to the present time, with significant evolution in magnitude and pattern on seasonal time scales. The winter of 2015-16 is featuring a very strong El Nino, with substantial impacts on air-sea interactions in the NE Pacific, and ultimately upper-ocean conditions. The factors responsible for the recent upper ocean anomalies are considered, from mechanistic and predictability perspectives. The present event is also placed in the context of the historical record, and climate model projections for the NE Pacific Ocean.

Bio(s):
Nick Bond is a principal research scientist with the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO) of the University of Washington (UW) and is affiliated with the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) of NOAA. He is the State Climatologist for Washington. He has a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Washington. His research is on a broad range of topics with a focus on the weather and climate of the Pacific Northwest and the linkages between the climate and marine ecosystems of the North Pacific. He cheerfully admits to being a weather geek, as evidenced by his preference to visit Alaska in winter, and steamy places like Florida in summer.

19 February 2016

Title: Scaling up Community-based Coral Reef Conservation in Hawai'i
Presenter(s): Ekolu Lindsey - Polanui Hiu Community Group, Maui, and past Chair of Maui Nui Makai Network; Manuel Mejia - TNC Hawaii Senior Advisor for Community-Based Marine Programs; and Kim Hum, TNC Hawaii Marine Program Director
Date & Time: 19 February 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 10153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ekolu Lindsey - Polanui Hiu Community Group (Maui), and past Chair of Maui Nui Makai Network, Manuel Mejia - TNC Hawaii Senior Advisor for Community-Based Marine Programs, and Kim Hum, TNC Hawaii Marine Program Director

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
In Hawai'i, coral reef conservation depends on local community and government partners working together to protect and sustainably manage marine resources. Through a six-year partnership with NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, The Nature Conservancy has helped build local community capacity and government and public support for improved coral reef management across Maui Nui " which includes the islands of Maui, Molokai Lāna'i and Kaho'olawe. Through conservation planning, biological monitoring, voluntary no-take areas, community outreach, local capacity building, and the development of a local learning network, we have helped communities develop and implement effective management strategies to protect and restore coral reefs across the islands. Our collective conservation approach is accessible and participatory, and grounded in Hawai'I's rich tradition of natural resource knowledge and sustainable management. Please Join us for this NOAA lunchtime science seminar to learn how NOAA's Coral Program is helping to scale-up and reinvigorate community-based marine management in Hawai'i to rebuild the fisheries and reef resilience upon which all of our communities depend.
Title: Persistent Flow Regimes and Extremes
Presenter(s): Tim Woollings, University of Oxford, Hailan Wang, NASA GMAO, Stan Benjamin, NOAA ESRL
Date & Time: 19 February 2016
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC III 12th floor fishbowl (just outside elevators)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tim Woollings (University of Oxford), Hailan Wang (NASA GMAO), Stan Benjamin (NOAA ESRL) Seminar sponsors: OAR/CPO/MAPP Program, Earth System Prediction Capability, OAR Office of Weather and Air Quality Seminar POC for questions: heather.archambault@noaa.gov Where: NOAA HQ SSMC III, 12th floor fishbowl (just outside elevators) or virtually (see below)

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e1c251789659250861c7ebc2e257767c1 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: Blocking impacts and climate change Tim Woollings University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Blocking events can lead to high-impact heat waves in summer and cold snaps in winter. Blocking is often cited as a problem area for climate models, raising questions over the confidence we should place in projected changes in extremes. Here we show that blocking is now reasonably well simulated by some current climate models. The models tend to agree on a reduction of blocking occurrence in response to climate change, and in addition there are robust changes in the impact of blocking events which can be linked back to well-understood changes in thermal advection. Warm Season Drought Development over North America: The Role of Stationary Rossby Waves Hailan Wang NASA Global Modeling Assimilation Office, Greenbelt, MD, USA Summertime quasi-stationary Rossby waves are known to play a key role in Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation and surface meteorology variability on subseasonal time scales. In particular, such waves have been crucial to the development of a number of recent short-term warm season heat waves and droughts over North America (e.g. the 1988, 1998 and 2012 summer droughts). Here we present a case study of a stationary Rossby wave event that developed during 20 May-15 June 1988 and led to the severe 1988 North American drought, based on simulations with the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model. Specifically, we investigate the roles of stationary Rossby wave sources, north Pacific mean jet stream and soil moisture feedback over North America in contributing to the development of stationary Rossby waves over North America and the subsequent rapid development of drought conditions there. Our results highlight the crucial importance of the north Pacific jet stream in guiding and constraining the path and speed of wave energy propagation. They also suggest that stationary Rossby waves can serve as a potential source of predictability for subseasonal development of droughts over North America. Identification of Predictability Processes Related to Atmospheric Blocking Toward the Goal of Improving Forecast Lead-Time of These Events Stan Benjamin NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory/Global Systems Division, Boulder, CO, USA Predictability of blocked and broader quasi-stationary hemispheric global circulation patterns is an important question even for multi-week and even medium-range forecasting. Three earth-system processes related to blocking onset, duration, and cessation with some longer time-scale are atmospheric MJO events, stratospheric wave breaking, and land-surface memory. We will describe some initial studies of predictability and frequency for blocking and these related processes from a 16-year retrospective period of 32-day runs using the coupled atmospheric-ocean FIM-HYCOM model compared to a similar record from the NOAA CFSv2 coupled model. Accurate frequency can be considered broadly as a necessary but not sufficient condition for actual prediction of these events. For instance, frequency of blocking (500 hPa Tibaldi-Molteni metric) is shown to be relatively constant over forecast duration from this study. This effort will be continued within the US coupled modeling community goal to improve week 3-4 forecast skill.

23 February 2016

Title: Introduction to Enterprise Risk Management
Presenter(s): Liz Ryan, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 23 February 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, 2nd Floor, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Liz Ryan, on detail to the NOAA CFO Risk Office Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library; Contacts: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 ext. 140), or Albert.e.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (Skip) (301-713-2600 ext. 118).

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at http://www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts. Description: This is an introduction to Enterprise Risk Management. Learn what it is, why it is coming up in the federal sphere, and some best practices on how some agencies have approached it. We will highlight basic frameworks and stories from other agencies on how Enterprise Risk Management has helped their organizations.

Bio(s):
Liz Ryan is currently completing an assignment in Enterprise Risk Management for the NOAA CFO Risk Office. She is a member of the National Marine Fisheries Service Buyback Program and is currently participating in the Executive Leadership Development Program at the Department of Commerce. Note: This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Training and Capacity Building Committee

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Title: POSTPONED to 4/6: Shifts in coral reef biogeochemistry and acidification linked to offshore processes
Presenter(s): Andreas J. Andersson, Associate Professor, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego
Date & Time: 23 February 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Andreas J. Andersson, Associate Professor, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web. Abstract and

Bio(s):
TBD
Title: Evaluating Scenario Planning to Understand Climate Change
Presenter(s): Dr. Nancy Fresco, Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning
Date & Time: 23 February 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Nancy Fresco, Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning

Sponsor(s):
ACCAP Climate Webinars (https://accap.uaf.edu/?q=webinars) POC: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu Webex: https://accap.uaf.edu/?q=Scenario_Planning Join a webinar: phone only Dial 1-877-248-7649 (US and Canada) Enter conference code: 1655320267 Please mute your phone during the presentation and do not put us on hold. *6 to mute and #6 to unmute (works from any phone, including Skype)

Abstract:
Our world is changing -- but it can be hard to predict the exact timing and extent of the impacts. One way to deal with the uncertainty associated with shifting climate and varied human responses is to explore a range of possible futures via scenarios planning, based on input and participation from a diverse group comprised of the people most affected. How and when can this method be used as a tool for long-term planning? A case study from the National Park Service and the Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning offers some insights into what works, how we can improve communication, and how we can move forward.

Bio(s):
Dr. Nancy Fresco is a research professor at UAF and SNAP's Network Coordinator. As such, she either leads or contributes to many of SNAP's projects. Her work focuses on forging effective collaborations, linking SNAP data to the needs of stakeholders, and interpreting the results of complex modeling efforts. Her background is in biology, forest ecology, and environmental education. Nancy has been an Alaska resident since 1999. She completed her undergrad work at Harvard in 1994, and earned a Masters from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies in 1999. She earned a PhD in Biology from UAF in 2006, as part of an interdisciplinary program in Regional Resilience and Adaptation. Her research focused on the carbon balance in Alaska's boreal forest. She spends as much time as possible outside, cross-country skiing, hiking, running, and bike-commuting to work in every variety of Fairbanks weather. Nancy and her husband Jay Cable have twin daughters.

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24 February 2016

Title: ISO metadata online training: Discovery Level ISO 19115-2 Metadata, Overview of Data Catalogs
Presenter(s): Kathy Martinolich and Jaci Mize, NOAA NCEI
Date & Time: 24 February 2016
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kathy Martinolich and Jaci Mize (NOAA NCEI)

Abstract:
This course presents the concept, principles, and value of metadata utilizing the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 191** metadata in several online sessions. The "Intro to ISO Metadata" course will focus on how the ISO 19115-2 metadata standard is organized and will demonstrate how the different levels of metadata content (discovery, access, and understanding) are expressed in the ISO metadata standards. Though not tailored to specific audiences, additional training can be developed in cooperation with specific projects if desired. Reviews of basic data management topics in preparation of PARR requirements are also covered in the training. The course consists of six separate one-hour online modules using a GoToWebinar format. Course materials will be made available online as the course progresses. Please contact us for more information. To register for this course, please use this link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3167207386890813186 Introduction to Metadata, Current Metadata Policies February 10, 2016 Intro to XML and Intro to UML February 17, 2016 Discovery Level ISO 19115-2 Metadata, Overview of Data Catalogs February 24, 2016 Metadata Content for Access March 2, 2016 Metadata Content for Understanding March 9, 2016 ISO Metadata Creation Methods - Tools and Templates March 16, 2016

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Title: Do Catch Shares End the Race to Fish and Increase Ex-Vessel Prices?
Presenter(s): Dr. Martin Smith, Duke University, Nicholas School of the Environment
Date & Time: 24 February 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Martin Smith (Duke University, Nicholas School of the Environment).

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Fisheries Quantitative Ecology and Socioeconomics Training (QUEST) Program's webinar series. Please see www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/quest for more information. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/quest/quest-webinars\ POC: Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov Webex: Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://noaaevents3.webex.com/noaaevents3/onstage/g.php?MTID=e182ad94a4b60f0baa409353bf1c584db

Abstract:
Catch shares appear to lower fishing costs by eliminating redundant capacity. Theory suggests that catch shares may also alter within-season behavior and generate revenue benefits through improved market timing, higher product quality, and changes in the fresh/frozen product mix. Do catch shares alter within-season behavior to end the race to fish? Do catch shares cause ex-vessel prices to increase? Despite compelling theory and anecdotal evidence, there is little systematic causal evidence to support these hypotheses. We test both hypotheses for all U.S. catch share fisheries using an individually matched control fishery for each treated fishery and a difference-in-differences estimation approach. We find strong evidence that catch shares cause season decompression consistent with the theory that rights-based management ends the race to fish. However, evidence for price increases is weak and heterogeneous across fisheries. To the extent that catch shares produce benefits on the revenue side, these benefits do not appear to manifest consistently in ex-vessel prices. We discuss potential confounding factors in fishing revenues and the need for a richer theoretical understanding of transitions to rights-based management

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25 February 2016

Title: Toward more efficient & effective web services: Google Analytics and the National Weather Service
Presenter(s): Noel “Shad” Keene, Forecaster, National Weather Service Medford, OR
Date & Time: 25 February 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Noel “Shad” Keene, Forecaster, National Weather Service Medford, OR Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Weather Service, Medford, Oregon Weather Forecast Office, and the NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688 and hit # key. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
The presentation will feature a live demonstration of Google Analytics and examples of actionable insights gained through using the service, which is provided to all government agencies as part of the White House's Digital Government Strategy. Methods and lessons learned are applicable to many government agencies. In today's digital age, web metrics are invaluable. They can help prove an agency's “digital worth,” broaden the reach of critical messaging, support the development of better digital services, and streamline workload priorities. High-impact weather events, such as the Blizzard of 2016, will be used to demonstrate the utility of web analytics. Additionally, the importance of leveraging infographics to communicate findings will be discussed.

Bio(s):
Shad Keene has been a National Weather Service forecaster and creator/evaluator of web pages since 2006. His latest web effort is the development of nationwide decision support web pages for the United States Coast Guard.

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Title: Top-down and bottom-up processes affecting marine survival of salmon in the Salish Sea
Presenter(s): Dr. Dave Beauchamp, Professor, UW School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences
Date & Time: 25 February 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Dave Beauchamp, Professor, UW School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences (davebea@u.washington.edu)

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m74e0e6e266d2b8e293a866bbc545c0a7 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 283 881 307 ABSTRACT Size-selective mortality (SSM) is a significant force regulating recruitment of salmon. The life stage(s) and habitat(s) when and where SSM occurs can vary considerably among species, stocks, and life history strategies. Moreover, the relationship between size, growth, and condition in freshwater and marine life stages to overall life cycle survival is unclear for most stocks of salmon. The first months of marine growth are commonly regarded as a critical period for growth and survival. For ESA-listed Puget Sound Chinook salmon, emergent bottom-up patterns have included: 1) at least one of the critical growth periods occur during early summer rearing in epi-pelagic marine habitats; 2) that growth is limited mostly by food supply rather than by energetic quality of the diet or thermal regime; 3) higher growth and survival correspond with higher contributions of key prey like crab larvae. Bottom-up processes can mechanistically link with top-down control of populations, and these interactions are mediated by environmental variability and human-induced changes in land and water use. Piscivorous fishes exhibit size-selective predation on juvenile salmon in Puget Sound, and resident forms of Chinook salmon are capable of imposing significant mortality on subyearling Chinook in Puget Sound. In addition, most piscivorous fish, marine mammals, and birds feed visually on prey fishes in pelagic environments. I will discuss the implications of how natural and anthropogenic changes in water transparency and artificial light pollution have significantly increased the predation threat environment for juvenile salmon in the Salish Sea. BIO Dave is currently a professor in the UW School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences and acting Unit Leader of the USGS Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. His primary areas of research include tactical food web ecology, bioenergetics modeling, and development and application of visual foraging models, all designed to address factors that limit survival and growth of salmonids in freshwater and marine environments. Dave will be moving to a new job as Ecology Branch Chief for the USGS Western Fisheries Research Center at Sand Point.

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26 February 2016

Title: Earth Engine: Google's Cloud Platform for Big Data Analytics
Presenter(s): Dr. Tyler A. Erickson, Senior Developer Advocate at Google
Date & Time: 26 February 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: online access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Tyler A. Erickson, Senior Developer Advocate at Google Seminar

Sponsor(s):
GOES-R Science Seminar; POC for seminar questions: ashton.armstrong@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=ede34a2a446d724c5b8d2fb156ec1977b Password: BigData Call-in information: 844-467-6272; PASSCODE: 585415 For those who cannot attend, we will be recording the seminar and will make it available on the GOES-R website (http://www.goes-r.gov/).

Abstract:
Earth Engine is Google's cloud platform for petabyte-scale analysis of satellite imagery and other geospatial data. Originally conceived in 2009 as a platform for global forest monitoring, today scientists, governments, and NGOs around the world are using Earth Engine in areas ranging from food and water security to disaster risk management, public health, biodiversity, and climate change adaptation. This talk will describe the trends and technologies that informed Google's development of the Earth Engine platform over the past six years, as well as our experiences helping partners apply the platform to these global challenges as we work towards our vision of a living, breathing dashboard of the planet.

Bio(s):
Dr. Tyler A. Erickson is a Senior Developer Advocate at Google, where his primary focus is on Earth Engine, a cloud-based geospatial analysis platform designed for massive global-scale analysis of environmental data.

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Title: Status and Future of the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS)
Presenter(s): Ward Appeltans, Project Manager OBIS, GOOS Biology & Ecosystems, IOC UNESCO
Date & Time: 26 February 2016
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - SmConf - 4702 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Ward Appeltans Project Manager OBIS, GOOS Biology & Ecosystems, IOC Capacity Development Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO IOC Project Office for IODE " Wandelaarkaai 7/61 - 8400 Oostende - Belgium | +32 59 340176 | @WrdAppltns | w.appeltans@unesco.org NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) and World Data Service for Oceanography Seminar POC: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Webex: 1-877-725-4068 (8634769#). For Webcast access within the US : 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.

Abstract:
The Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS) was initiated under the decade-long Census of Marine Life as its data and information dissemination platform and since 2011 operates under UNESCO's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission as part of the International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) programme. What is the status of OBIS 5 years after the completion of the Census? Is there still a need for OBIS? What role does OBIS play and what are the challenges? The manager of the international OBIS secretariat, Ward Appeltans, based at UNESCO's IOC project office for IODE in Oostende, Belgium, will give us first hand information on OBIS, its future plans and the relationship with US institutions, US projects and the US OBIS node.

Bio(s):
Mr Ward Appeltans has an MSc in Environmental Biology. He has nearly 10 years of professional experience in marine biological data management. He has been working as a project leader at the data centre of the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ), where he led data management and communication activities of several EU projects (e.g., MarBEF, PESI, ...). His main area is biogeographic and taxonomic information, being the manager of the European node of the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (EurOBIS) for three years and manager of the World and European Register of Marine Species (WoRMS and ERMS) databases. Ward was also Secretary of the Council of the Society for the Management of Electronic Biodiversity Data.

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1 March 2016

Title: AEMET-y-SREPS: convection-permitting EPS at the Spanish Meteorological Agency
Presenter(s): Alfons Callado Pallares, the Spanish Meteorological Agency
Date & Time: 1 March 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Alfons Callado Pallarès POC: Geoff DiMego Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/113029213 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 113-029-213

Abstract:
Since 2004 the Spanish Meteorological Agency (AEMET) has been running operationally a limited area ensemble prediction system (LAM-EPS) for the Iberian Peninsula. Until 2014 and nearly for a decade, this 25-km LAM-EPS called AEMET-SREPS (AEMET Short Range EPS) provided probabilistic products to forecasters with a performance which largely overcome ECMWF-EPS. Since 2014 a 2,5-km convection-permitting LAM-EPS named AEMET-γ-SREPS has been developing with the main goal to forecast mesoscale high impact events as heavy precipitations estimating their uncertainty. The AEMET-γ-SREPS, as its AEMET-SREPS predecessor, is a multi-model multi-boundary conditions EPS. This configuration has turned out to be the best EPS technique based on probabilistic verification when compared with other single-model techniques. AEMET-γ-SREPS initial and boundary conditions' synoptic uncertainties are dealt through analyses and forecasts coming from 5 deterministic global NWP models with independent assimilation processes: IFS from ECMWF, GFS from NCEP, ARPÈGE from MétéoFrance, GSM from JMA (Japanese) and GEM from CMC. Model errors and uncertainties are taken into account using HARMONIE (2 configurations), WRF-ARW and WRF-NMM convection-permitting models. As a result a 20 member EPS is achieved, combining 5 BCs with 4 NWP models. AEMET-γ-SREPS is currently daily running without assimilation and the work plan is to provide the first probabilistic forecast products during the forthcoming spring. Future improvement prospects for 2016 are to use LETKF (Local ensemble Kalman Filter) assimilation technique and complement model uncertainties with SPPT (Stochastic Perturbations of Parameterisations' Tendencies) and surface parameters perturbations.

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2 March 2016

Title: ISO metadata online training: Metadata Content for Access
Presenter(s): Kathy Martinolich and Jaci Mize, NOAA NCEI
Date & Time: 2 March 2016
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kathy Martinolich and Jaci Mize (NOAA NCEI)

Abstract:
This course presents the concept, principles, and value of metadata utilizing the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 191** metadata in several online sessions. The "Intro to ISO Metadata" course will focus on how the ISO 19115-2 metadata standard is organized and will demonstrate how the different levels of metadata content (discovery, access, and understanding) are expressed in the ISO metadata standards. Though not tailored to specific audiences, additional training can be developed in cooperation with specific projects if desired. Reviews of basic data management topics in preparation of PARR requirements are also covered in the training. The course consists of six separate one-hour online modules using a GoToWebinar format. Course materials will be made available online as the course progresses. Please contact us for more information. To register for this course, please use this link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3167207386890813186 Introduction to Metadata, Current Metadata Policies February 10, 2016 Intro to XML and Intro to UML February 17, 2016 Discovery Level ISO 19115-2 Metadata, Overview of Data Catalogs February 24, 2016 Metadata Content for Access March 2, 2016 Metadata Content for Understanding March 9, 2016 ISO Metadata Creation Methods - Tools and Templates March 16, 2016

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3 March 2016

Title: Epigenetics in Oysters and Steelhead: Why is it important in understanding environmental responses?
Presenter(s): Mackenzie Gavery, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Research Associate, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 3 March 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mackenzie Gavery, Ph.D. Postdoctoral Research Associate School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) Webex: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m74e0e6e266d2b8e293a866bbc545c0a7 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 283 881 307 ABSTRACT Environmentally induced epigenetic changes are increasingly acknowledged as important mechanisms underlying developmental plasticity and physiological responses of organisms to environmental change. Because epigenetic change can occur quickly in response to environmental change and, in certain cases, can be inherited by future generations, epigenetic variation has the potential to facilitate rapid evolutionary change. Therefore, understanding how epigenetics influences phenotypes, the extent of epigenetic variation in natural populations, and the heritability of these marks are all potentially important considerations for conservation and management of living marine resources. Basic concepts and challenges associated with epigenetic analysis in non-model organisms will be introduced. Additionally, the results from a current study investigating effects of hatchery rearing on genetic and epigenetic variation in Methow River steelhead will be presented. BIO Dr. Gavery graduated from Seattle University with a BS in Biology. After graduation she worked as an analyst in Seattle's biotech sector where she supported the development of biologic therapies for genetic diseases. She completed her PhD in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington, where she studied the role of epigenetics in mediating environmental responses in Pacific oysters. Currently, Dr. Gavery is a UW-JISAO post-doctoral researcher working on a joint project with NWFSC scientists investigating the impacts of hatchery rearing environments on the epigenome of Methow River steelhead trout.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

8 March 2016

Title: All-sky IR radiance for Himawari-8/AHI, Reflectivity profile of GPM-Core/DPR
Presenter(s): Kozo Okamoto, JMA-MRI
Date & Time: 8 March 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor JCSDA-EMC seminar Speaker Kozo Okamoto (JMA-/MRI, Visiting scientist ESSIC) POC: MIchiko Masutani (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/394403437 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 394-403-437

Abstract:
Although a wide variety of satellite have been used in data assimilation in NWP system, assimilating all-sky radiances and space-borne radars are still challenging. We have been studying the assimilation of all-sky IR radiances of the Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) onboard Himawari-8 satellite and reflectivity factor profiles of the Dual Precipitation Radar (DPR) onboard Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) " Core satellite using the regional JMA's non-hydrostatic model (JMA-NHM). Recent results of these two different studies will be presented in the seminar. Toward the all-sky AHI radiance assimilation, we are investigating the reproducibility of model simulation. The reproducibility depends on characteristics of observation, NWP model, radiative transfer model (RTM), and matching technique (e.g. interpolation, super-observation). Preliminary result on how two major fast RTMs, CRTM and RTTOV, reproduce cloud-affected radiances will be discussed. Regarding DPR, we developed an ensemble-based variational assimilation scheme that incorporated a radar simulator and a RTM for all-sky MW radiances. We implemented single-cycle assimilation experiments including DPR and GPM MW imager (GMI) in combination or separately in a tropical cyclone case, and found that a combined use brought most accurate analysis and forecast.

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Title: Automatic Near-Real-Time Flood Detection using Suomi-NPP/VIIRS Data
Presenter(s): Dr Donglian Sun, George Mason University
Date & Time: 8 March 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building 8th Floor Conference Room 10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham, MD 20706 and Via Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr Donglian Sun, George Mason University

Sponsor(s):
JPSS Science seminar Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 Webex: https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m61bc3286635ea88803fd4023b7bcb4d7 Meeting number: 740 222 028 Meeting password: Jpss2016!

Abstract:
Near real-time satellite-derived flood maps are invaluable to river forecasters and decision-makers for disaster monitoring and relief efforts. With the support from the JPSS (Joint-Polar Satellite System) Proving Ground and Risk Reduction Program (JPSS/PGRR), a flood detection package has been developed using SNPP/VIIRS (Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership/ Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) imagery to generate daily near real-time flood maps automatically for National Weather Service (NWS)-River Forecast Centers (RFC) in the USA. In this package, a series of algorithms have been developed including water detection, cloud shadow removal, terrain shadow removal, minor flood detection, water fraction retrieval and flooding water determination. The package has been running routinely with the direct broadcast SNPP/VIIRS data since 2014. Flood maps were carefully evaluated by river forecasters using airborne imagery and hydraulic observations. Offline validation was also made via visual inspection with VIIRS false-color composite images on more than 10,000 granules across a variety of scenes and comparison with river gauge observations year-round. Evaluation of the product has shown high accuracy and the promising performance of the package has won positive feedback and recognition from end-users.

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9 March 2016

Title: ISO metadata online training: Metadata Content for Understanding
Presenter(s): Kathy Martinolich and Jaci Mize, NOAA NCEI
Date & Time: 9 March 2016
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kathy Martinolich and Jaci Mize (NOAA NCEI)

Abstract:
This course presents the concept, principles, and value of metadata utilizing the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 191** metadata in several online sessions. The "Intro to ISO Metadata" course will focus on how the ISO 19115-2 metadata standard is organized and will demonstrate how the different levels of metadata content (discovery, access, and understanding) are expressed in the ISO metadata standards. Though not tailored to specific audiences, additional training can be developed in cooperation with specific projects if desired. Reviews of basic data management topics in preparation of PARR requirements are also covered in the training. The course consists of six separate one-hour online modules using a GoToWebinar format. Course materials will be made available online as the course progresses. Please contact us for more information. To register for this course, please use this link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3167207386890813186 Introduction to Metadata, Current Metadata Policies February 10, 2016 Intro to XML and Intro to UML February 17, 2016 Discovery Level ISO 19115-2 Metadata, Overview of Data Catalogs February 24, 2016 Metadata Content for Access March 2, 2016 Metadata Content for Understanding March 9, 2016 ISO Metadata Creation Methods - Tools and Templates March 16, 2016

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The Blue Carbon Potential of Living Shorelines
Presenter(s): Jenny Davis, Research Scientist, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Beaufort NC
Date & Time: 9 March 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jenny Davis, Research Scientist, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Beaufort NC

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Abstract:
Living shorelines are a type of estuarine shoreline erosion control that incorporates native vegetation and preserves native habitats. Because they provide the ecosystem services associated with natural coastal wetlands while also increasing shoreline resilience, living shorelines are gaining popularity as a shoreline stabilization strategy along low-energy estuarine shorelines. Marshes created as living shorelines are typically narrow (< 30 m) fringing marshes with sandy substrates that are well flushed by tides. These characteristics distinguish living shorelines from the larger meadow marshes in which most of the current knowledge about created marshes was developed. The value of living shorelines for providing both erosion control and habitat for estuarine organisms has been documented, but their capacity for carbon sequestration has not. The carbon sequestered in natural coastal marine ecosystems is referred to as blue carbon. Acre for acre, these systems sequester carbon at much higher rates than terrestrial ecosystems and thus have received a great deal of attention for their carbon uptake potential. We measured carbon sequestration rates in living shorelines and sandy transplanted Spartina alterniflora marshes in the Newport River Estuary, North Carolina. The marshes sampled here range in age from 12 to 38 years and represent a continuum of soil development. Carbon sequestration rates ranged from 58 to 283 g C m-2 yr-1 and decreased with marsh age. The data presented here are within the range of published carbon sequestration rates for S. alterniflora marshes and suggest that wide-scale use of the living shoreline approach to shoreline management may come with an important carbon benefit.

Bio(s):
Davis is a research scientist stationed at the NCCOS lab in Beaufort NC. Her interests include coastal wetland ecology and biogeochemistry. Her current research is focused on how coastal salt marshes respond to rising seas and adaptive management strategies for increasing wetland resilience to sea level rise. Education: B.S. Texas A &M University, M.S. Florida International University, PhD. University of South Carolina.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Human Rights and Climate Change in the Arctic
Presenter(s): Mark Trahant, Charles R. Johnson Endowed Professor of Journalism at the University of North Dakota
Date & Time: 9 March 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Date Change to 09 March

Presenter(s):
Mark Trahant, Charles R. Johnson Endowed Professor of Journalism at the University of North Dakota

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Policy & Climate Adaptation Webinar Series

Remote Access:
http://uaf.us4.list-manage2.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=41274ac60e&e=9097598e1a

Abstract:
Presentation by Mark Trahant who is the Charles R. Johnson Endowed Professor of Journalism at the University of North Dakota. Minimizing the impact of climate change will depend on our ability to move towards a low-carbon society. Altering the way in which our global economy functions is fundamental to this change. Governing individual and collective behavior, including the conduct of state and federal governments, is therefore central to addressing both the causes and the impacts of climate change. A critical understanding of the complexities, challenges and opportunities raised by the policy regime for mitigating and adapting to climate change will be highly relevant for tribal government's and communities who seeks to play a role in moving Alaska towards mitigating and adapting to change. Topics Include: 1) International human rights standards - guideline to address climate change; 2) Climate Change and International Law & Policy; 3) Equity and Adaptation; 4) Sustainable Energy Governance; 5) Climate Change and Litigation; 6) Universal Declaration of Human Rights; 7) Core Universal Human Rights Treaties; 8) The application of governmental policies to indigenous peoples right to land and natural resources.

10 March 2016

Title: Preserving the Working Waterfront: Stories from Around the Nation
Presenter(s): Stephanie Showalter-Otts, National Sea Grant Law Center and the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Legal Program at the University of Mississippi School of Law
Date & Time: 10 March 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC3, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Stephanie Showalter-Otts, National Sea Grant Law Center and the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Legal Program at the University of Mississippi School of Law, Email: sshowalt@olemiss.edu Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library; Contacts: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 ext. 140), or Albert.e.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (Skip) (301?713?2600 ext. 118).

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at http://www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts. Presentation

Abstract:
In 2014, the National Sea Grant Law Center, Maine Sea Grant, and NOAA's Office for Coastal Management received funding through the NOAA Preserve America Initiative to capture and preserve oral histories showcasing working waterfront preservation efforts. Ten working waterfront champions were invited to share the story of their community's working waterfront initiative. The resulting “Preserving the Working Waterfront” oral history collection, archived with NOAA's Voices of the Fisheries, includes audio recordings of the full interviews, transcripts of the interviews and audio slideshows highlighting key elements of their stories. This presentation will provide an overview of the project, discuss the value oral histories can add to working waterfront outreach efforts, and feature a screening of several audio slideshows. The presentation will also provide information on the related Sustainable Working Waterfronts Toolkit and its existing case studies and tools. For more information on the project and to view the slideshows, please visit the National Working Waterfront Network's website at: http://www.wateraccessus.com/oralhistory.cfm. Speaker Biography: Stephanie Showalter Otts is the Director of the National Sea Grant Law Center and the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Legal Program at the University of Mississippi School of Law. Stephanie received a B.A. in History from Penn State University and a joint J.D./Masters of Studies in Environmental Law from Vermont Law School. She is licensed to practice law in Pennsylvania and Mississippi. As Director, Stephanie oversees a variety of legal education, research, and outreach activities, including providing legal research services to Sea Grant constituents on ocean and coastal law issues. Her duties also include the supervision of law student research and writing projects and providing assistance to organizations and governmental agencies with interpretation of statutes, regulations, and case law. Stephanie also teaches a foundational course on ocean and coastal law at the University of Mississippi School of Law. Her research on natural resources, marine, and environmental law issues has been published in a variety of publications.
Title: Lost Whaling Fleets of the Western Arctic
Presenter(s): Brad Barr, PhD, NOAA/ONMS Maritime Heritage Program
Date & Time: 10 March 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - See event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Brad Barr, PhD, NOAA/Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Maritime Heritage Program Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5479241746917913857

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series which is co-sponsored with EBM Tools Network.The series is focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. For a list of upcoming webinars see: http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/ Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
NOAA archaeologists have discovered the battered hulls of two 1800s whaling ships nearly 144 years after they and 30 others sank off the Arctic coast of Alaska in one of the planet's most unexplored ocean regions.The shipwrecks, and parts of other ships, that were found are most likely the remains of 33 ships trapped by pack ice close to the Alaskan Arctic shore in September 1871. The whaling captains had counted on a wind shift from the east to drive the ice out to sea as it had always done in years past. The ships were destroyed in a matter of weeks, leaving more than 1,200 whalers stranded at the top of the world until they could be rescued by seven ships of the fleet standing by about 80 miles to the south in open water off Icy Cape. No one died in the incident but it is cited as one of the major causes of the demise of commercial whaling in the United States.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 10 March 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Canceled: Seagrass, climate, birds and seals: Understanding limits on Puget Sound herring recovery
Presenter(s): Dr. Tessa Francis, Lead Ecosystem Ecologist, Puget Sound Institute, University of Washington Tacoma
Date & Time: 10 March 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Tessa Francis, Lead Ecosystem Ecologist, Puget Sound Institute, University of Washington Tacoma

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m74e0e6e266d2b8e293a866bbc545c0a7 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 283 881 307

Abstract:
Forage fish such as Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) are ecological foundation species in many marine and estuarine ecosystems. Pacific herring play a critical role in the social-ecological system along the West Coast of North America, owing to their ecological, economic, and spiritual/cultural importance. In the Puget Sound estuary, Pacific herring are an indicator species, and the regional management agency has set recovery targets to guide herring management. Puget Sound herring are spatially and temporally segregated into individual subpopulations by their spawning behavior, and these individual subpopulations show asynchronous abundance trends over the past several decades. While the Puget Sound herring stock as a whole shows variable but largely stable biomass through time, some local spawning subpopulations have significantly declining trends. Efforts are underway to identify leading potential limitations on herring recovery to inform recovery targets and potential management strategies for reaching them. I will describe a range of research projects focused on some of the factors potentially limiting herring recovery at local and regional scales, including availability of high-quality spawning habitat, predation of herring eggs leading to Allee-type population effects, changes in herring spawn timing, and food-web interactions. I will also describe efforts underway by a working group to create a framework for integrating traditional ecological knowledge into herring fisheries assessments, and to develop social/cultural metrics of herring fishery sustainability. BIO Tessa is Lead Ecosystem Ecologist for the Puget Sound Institute at the University of Washington Tacoma. Dr. Francis is an aquatic ecologist, and she conducts research related to the impacts of climate and other environmental variables on aquatic species and food web dynamics. She is interested in the important associations between terrestrial and aquatic habitats, and how watershed dynamics impact aquatic food webs and populations. She is also interested in the science-policy interface, and science communication. Tessa is presently involved in projects related to ecosystem-based management of forage fish in Puget Sound and the West Coast of North America, including Pacific herring and Pacific sardine, and assessing trade-offs among trophically-linked recovery targets (e.g., salmon and herring). Tessa is also the Managing Director of the Ocean Modeling Forum, a joint project between the University of Washington and NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The Ocean Modeling Forum brings together working groups of modelers and managers to tackle ocean management issues using multi-model approaches. Tessa serves as the Ecosystem-based Management topic editor for the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound, and is on the Science Advisory Board of the Northwest Straits Commission. Tessa holds a BA in Political Science from UC Berkeley, a BS in Wildlife Science from the University of Washington, and a PhD in Zoology and Urban Ecology from the University of Washington. Tessa did her postdoctoral research as part of the CAMEO program at the NWFSC.

11 March 2016

Title: Discovery of a spawning ground reveals diverse migration strategies in Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus)
Presenter(s): Dr. David Richardson, Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 11 March 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, United States
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. David Richardson, Northeast Fisheries Science Center Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library; Contacts: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov 301-713-2600 ext. 140, or Albert.e.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (Skip) 301-713-2600 ext. 118.

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at http://www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug?in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Atlantic bluefin tuna are a symbol of both the conflict between preservationist and utilitarian views of top ocean predators, and the struggle to reach international consensus on the management of migratory species. Currently, Atlantic bluefin tuna are managed as an early-maturing eastern stock, which spawns in the Mediterranean Sea, and a late-maturing western stock, which spawns in the Gulf of Mexico. However, electronic tagging studies show that many bluefin tuna, assumed to be of a mature size, do not visit either spawning ground during the spawning season. Whether these fish are spawning in an alternate location, skip-spawning, or not spawning until an older age affects how vulnerable this species is to anthropogenic stressors including exploitation. We use larval collections to demonstrate a bluefin tuna spawning ground in the Slope Sea, between the Gulf Stream and northeast United States continental shelf. We contend that western Atlantic bluefin tuna have a differential spawning migration, with larger individuals spawning in the Gulf of Mexico, and smaller individuals spawning in the Slope Sea. The current life-history model, which assumes only Gulf of Mexico spawning, overestimates age-at-maturity for the western stock. Furthermore, individual tuna occupy both the Slope Sea and Mediterranean Sea in separate years, contrary to the prevailing view that individuals exhibit complete spawning-site fidelity. Overall, this complexity of spawning migrations questions whether there is complete independence in the dynamics of eastern and western Atlantic bluefin tuna and leads to lower estimates of the vulnerability of this species to exploitation and other anthropogenic stressors.

Bio(s):
David has been a Research Fisheries Biologist at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center since 2009. His research addresses the ecology of marine fishes, with a specific focus on the early life stages. Research at the NEFSC has addressed mechanisms underlying multi-decadal patterns in the abundance of small pelagic species, and the effects of these patterns on predator species such as Atlantic cod. Prior to joining the NEFSC, David was a PhD student at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. David's PhD research addressed the physical and biological characteristics of sailfish and marlin spawning grounds at both fine scales, such as sub-mesoscale eddies, and at larger regional scales.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 March 2016

Title: ISO metadata online training: ISO Metadata Creation Methods - Tools and Templates
Presenter(s): Kathy Martinolich and Jaci Mize, NOAA NCEI
Date & Time: 16 March 2016
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kathy Martinolich and Jaci Mize (NOAA NCEI)

Abstract:
This course presents the concept, principles, and value of metadata utilizing the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 191** metadata in several online sessions. The "Intro to ISO Metadata" course will focus on how the ISO 19115-2 metadata standard is organized and will demonstrate how the different levels of metadata content (discovery, access, and understanding) are expressed in the ISO metadata standards. Though not tailored to specific audiences, additional training can be developed in cooperation with specific projects if desired. Reviews of basic data management topics in preparation of PARR requirements are also covered in the training. The course consists of six separate one-hour online modules using a GoToWebinar format. Course materials will be made available online as the course progresses. Please contact us for more information. To register for this course, please use this link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3167207386890813186 Introduction to Metadata, Current Metadata Policies February 10, 2016 Intro to XML and Intro to UML February 17, 2016 Discovery Level ISO 19115-2 Metadata, Overview of Data Catalogs February 24, 2016 Metadata Content for Access March 2, 2016 Metadata Content for Understanding March 9, 2016 ISO Metadata Creation Methods - Tools and Templates March 16, 2016
Title: How Much Fish are We Really Catching?
Presenter(s): Daniel Pauly, PhD., Professor and Principal Investigator, Sea Around Us; The University of British Columbia; and Dirk Zeller, PhD., Senior Scientist and Executive Director of the Sea Around Us
Date & Time: 16 March 2016
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC4, Room 1W611
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Daniel Pauly, PhD., Professor and Principal Investigator, the Sea Around Us and The University of British Columbia and Dirk Zeller, PhD., Senior Scientist and Executive Director of the Sea Around Us

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. AUDIO IS ONLY OVER THE PHONE! For Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
How much fish are we really catching? Catch data are important in fisheries research but the availability of reliable catch data is often taken for granted. In a large number of countries, reliable catch data are not available. The catch data these countries submit to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are unreliable. Given the role of FAO in world fisheries, this means that many of the “big numbers” cited when talking or writing about global fisheries are erroneous. We present a “catch reconstruction” approach that we have applied to all maritime countries of the world to overcome this situation. We also document the first results of this decade-long effort, which is best summarized by the title of our recent paper presenting our result, i.e., “Catch reconstructions reveal that global marine fisheries catches are higher than reported and declining”.

Bio(s):
Daniel Pauly is a binational French and Canadian who completed his high school and university studies in Germany. After many years at the International Center for Living Aquatic Resources Management (ICLARM), in Manila, Philippines, Dr. Daniel Pauly became in 1994 a Professor at the Fisheries Centre of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, of which he was the Director from 2003 to 2008. Since 1999, he is also Principal Investigator of the Sea Around Us, devoted to studying, documenting and mitigating the impact of industrial fishing on the world's marine ecosystems (see www.seaaroundus.org). The concepts, methods and software Daniel Pauly (co-)developed, documented in over 1000, mostly well-cited publications, are used throughout the world, following multiple courses and workshops given in four languages on all five continents. This applies especially to the ELEFAN software for fish growth analysis, the Ecopath approach for modelling aquatic ecosystems, FishBase, the online encyclopedia of fishes and the catch reconstructions, catch maps and other products of the Sea Around Us. Dirk Zeller is a marine biologist and fisheries scientist, and is the Senior Scientist and Executive Director of the Sea Around Us (www.seaarounduis.org). He completed his early schooling in Germany, and his tertiary training in Australia, where he spend close on 20 years researching and teaching tropical marine biology and fisheries. He has been with the Sea Around Us since its inception year in 1999. Dirk Zeller directs the research activities and co-directs strategic research decisions with the Principle Investigator, Daniel Pauly. Dirk has over 200 scientific contributions, including over 80 papers in the peer-reviewed literature, with several highly cited papers, including contributions in Nature and Science. Dirk Zeller was (co-)awarded the Sustainability Science Award of the Ecological Society of America (2011) and the Innovative Dissemination of Research Award by the University of British Columbia (2012).

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

17 March 2016

Title: New York Opens the Gates on Geospatial Information used in Regional Marine Planning
Presenter(s): Jeff Herter, Coastal Resources Specialist III, Gateway Project Manager, Division of Community Resilience and Regional Programs, NY Department of State, Office of Planning & Development
Date & Time: 17 March 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jeff Herter, Coastal Resources Specialist III, Gateway Project Manager, Division of Community Resilience and Regional Programs, NY Department of State, Office of Planning & Development

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
New York's The Geographic Information Gateway (http://opdgig.dos.ny.gov/ ) provides public access to data, real-time information, interactive tools, and expert knowledge relevant to the Office of Planning and Development's activities throughout New York State. Interactive map viewers enable users to easily download, visualize, and explore nearly 500 datasets of geospatial data. A Latest Conditions page provides access to real-time information across the State, such as water quality, tide levels, and beach conditions. Also included on this site are illustrated stories, which highlight case studies, showcase community success stories, and demonstrate how the Office uses available geographic information to improve planning and decision-making. The Gateway's suite of information and tools serves as a valuable resource for New York communities, an educational resource for schools and universities, and a guide for the responsible development of the State's resources. The Gateway was developed to update and replace an earlier Atlas but has resulted in something much greater than the sum of its parts. Please visit the Gateway kick around and explore.

Bio(s):
Jeff Herter works for the NY Department of State's Office of Planning & Development. Some of his current responsibilities include coastal risk area mapping for use in resilience planning, supervising the State's coastal consistency program, managing the Gateway project and working with the Gateway development team. Jeff also participates in the State's offshore planning efforts by facilitating, acquiring and incorporating ocean & Great Lakes information into the planning process. He was GIS Unit Supervisor for the Office prior to his current position; he also served as a Coastal Development Specialist in upstate New York. Jeff received his MS in Natural Resources Management from SUNY's College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Robotic, In-Situ HAB Sensors: “Welcome to the Machine”…the ESP!
Presenter(s): Gregory Doucette, Ph.D., Research Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Charleston, SC
Date & Time: 17 March 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Gregory Doucette, Ph.D., Research Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Charleston, SC

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m74e0e6e266d2b8e293a866bbc545c0a7 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 283 881 307

Abstract:
The growth and toxicity of harmful algal blooms (HABs) can change rapidly over space and time, and are influenced by complex interactions with ocean processes and environmental factors that also exhibit variable spatio-temporal patterns. Although many molecular analytical techniques are available for characterizing HABs, their application has been largely restricted to the laboratory and the time required for sample processing/analysis can limit their usefulness. Such impediments motivated the development of an autonomous instrument called the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP), which provides for the in-situ molecular-level interrogation of HABs as well as other microbial populations and processes. The second-generation (2G) ESP, a robotic microbiology ‘lab-in-a-can', is capable of filtering a water sample, processing the material captured, conducting molecular analytical detection of target organisms or metabolites, and transmitting results to remote locations. The 2G ESP is being incorporated into ocean observing networks and coupled with observations from satellites, ships, profilers, and autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) to permit the near real-time description of HABs in the context of ecosystem variability, and provide resource managers with early warning of toxic bloom events. The data streams provided autonomously by the 2G ESP describing changes in species and toxin concentrations represent a uniquely powerful advance in HAB research, monitoring, and forecasting. Nonetheless, deployment in a fixed location, and thus an inability to follow a coherent water mass and sample it over space and time, limits the ESP's ability to assess fluctuations in growth and toxicity of a bloom population. This formidable challenge was addressed by completely re-engineering the 2G ESP for integration into a Tethys-class Long Range AUV. By coupling mobility with the means to track, sample intelligently, and characterize ‘on-the-fly' HABs and other microbes/processes at a molecular level, the 3G ESP represents an unprecedented technological advance in biological oceanography. This presentation will describe the ESP's development trajectory, highlight applications of this technology to HAB detection with a focus on the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia and its toxin, domoic acid, and consider the potential contribution of ESP data streams to HAB forecasting in the future. BIO Dr. Gregory Doucette is a Research Oceanographer with NOAA's National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science in Charleston, SC. He has over 25 years' experience in the area of marine biotoxins and harmful algae, and his research has covered a range of topics, including bacterial-algal interactions, toxin trophic transfer in marine food webs, phytoplankton ecophysiology, and development of in vitro assays and in-situ sensors for algal toxin detection. Greg has served on the Council of the International Society for the Study of Harmful Algae, the U.S. National HAB Committee, the UN-IAEA Scientific Advisory Committee on HABs, and advisory boards for EU Framework projects on food contaminant detection. He was recognized recently with the NOAA Administrator's Award for developing the first autonomous sensor to make near real-time, underwater measurements of HAB toxins. His group is currently engaged with multiple collaborators to design and deploy algal toxin sensors on current and future generations of the robotic Environmental Sample Processor.

22 March 2016

Title: Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) Review webinar
Presenter(s): GLERL various speakers
Date & Time: 22 March 2016
8:30 am - 3:15 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
GLERL various speakers

Sponsor(s):
Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) Point of contact is Laura Newcomb (laura.newcomb@noaa.gov) General Questions: Margaret Lansing (Margaret.lansing@noaa.gov; 734-741-2210) Remote Access (March 22): https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5825745139834313218 Agenda and presentations available here: http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/review2016/science_presentations.html NOAA Science Research Review of the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory March 22, 2016 (see http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/review2016/overview.html) Morning session 8:30 " 11:30 am (break for tour / lunch) Afternoon session 1:15 pm " 3:15 pm Laboratory science reviews are conducted every five years to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) laboratories. This review is for both internal OAR/NOAA use for planning, programming, and budgeting, and external interests. It helps the Laboratory in its strategic planning of its future science. These reviews are also intended to ensure that OAR laboratory research is linked to the NOAA Strategic Plan, is relevant to NOAA Research mission and priorities, is of high quality as judged by preeminence criteria, and is carried out with a high level of performance. This review will cover Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory research since 2010. The research themes are: Observing Systems and Advanced Technology (OSAT) Ecosystem Dynamics (EcoDyn) Integrated Physical and Ecological Modeling and Forecasting (IPEMF) Program Information The Science Presentations portion of the review will be broadcast live via webinar on Tuesday, March 22 and Wednesday, March 23. View the complete presentation schedule here (http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/review2016/science_presentations.html). To participate remotely by webinar, please register below. Please note: remote participants are in "listen-only" mode.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones
Presenter(s): Scott Glenn, Travis Miles, Greg Seroka, Rutgers University
Date & Time: 22 March 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Scott Glenn, Travis Miles, Greg Seroka (Rutgers University) POC: Hyun-Sook Kim (hyun.sook.kim@noaa.gov) Please join my meeting, Mar 22, 2016 at 11:30 AM EDT. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/370209557 Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (646) 749-3131 Access Code: 370-209-557 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 370-209-557

Abstract:
Hurricane intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during Hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward.
Title: Coastal Erosion and Shoreline Conservation Practices in Maryland - Walking that Fine Line between Shoreline Protection and Habitat Enhancement
Presenter(s): Kevin M. Smith, Deputy Director, Chesapeake and Coastal Service, MD DNR, and Claudia Donegan - Chief, Community Restoration Program, MD DNR
Date & Time: 22 March 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kevin M. Smith, Deputy Director, Chesapeake and Coastal Service, MD DNR, and Claudia Donegan - Chief, Community Restoration Program, MD DNR

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Tidal shorelines are incredibly dynamic natural systems which provide for a host of high value habitats critical to so many of our living resources Understanding the role of sediment process and shoreline erosion to the Chesapeake Bay's overall ecologic health is critical to proper shoreline conservation. As our coastal areas continue to be developed, the use of appropriate shore erosion control techniques is paramount to the protection, preservation and restoration of shallow water and intertidal habitats. This presentation will address the importance of maintaining natural physical processes and the appropriate use of shoreline erosion control techniques to help maintain, enhance and restore these important tidal habitats.

Bio(s):
Kevin M. Smith is a graduate of the University of Maryland and has worked on tidal and nontidal restoration programs with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources for over 30 years. Much of that time has been spent designing and implementing living shoreline projects in the Chesapeake and Coastal Bay areas. With a degree in geology from Denison University in Ohio, Claudia honed her skills as a stream ecologist with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and has spent the last 15 years at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources working with communities, watershed and conservation organizations and local governments to address habitat and water quality issues.
Title: Exploring ocean acidification through media with EarthEcho Expeditions: Shell Shocked
Presenter(s): Stacey Rafalowski, Director of Programs for EarthEcho Expeditions
Date & Time: 22 March 2016
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Stacey Rafalowski, Director of Programs for EarthEcho Expeditions

Sponsor(s):
Sharing Ocean Acidification Resources for Communicators and Educators (SOARCE) Webinar (noaa.oceanacidification@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8231578836875280387 After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. If you have difficulty logging in to the Webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 157-384-931

Abstract:
Young people are today's stakeholders and advocates for change. Using EarthEcho Expedition: Shell Shocked videos and project-based learning tools educators can activate students' critical thinking around this “wicked” global problem. This webinar will provide tools to embed best practices of service learning and project-based learning into a unit on OA for middle-grade level youth. It takes more than knowledge of environmental issues to equip young people with civic skills to solve the complex problems facing our planet. Through service learning, youth identify community needs, develop plans and partnerships and are inspired and motivated to take action. This webinar will explore the Five Stages of Service Learning"investigation, preparation, action, reflection, and demonstration" and connect that process to OA resources. In this way students become both environmentally literate and effective community changemakers.

23 March 2016

Title: Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) Review webinar
Presenter(s): GLERL various speakers
Date & Time: 23 March 2016
8:30 am - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
GLERL various speakers

Sponsor(s):
Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) Point of contact is Laura Newcomb (laura.newcomb@noaa.gov) General Questions: Margaret Lansing (Margaret.lansing@noaa.gov; 734-741-2210) Remote Access (March 23): https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1930266702089056770 Agenda and presentations available here: http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/review2016/science_presentations.html NOAA Science Research Review of the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory March 23, 2016 (see http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/review2016/overview.html) Morning session 8:30 " noon (break for lunch) Afternoon session 1:00 " 2:00 pm (break for tour) Afternoon session, continued 3:00 " 5:00 pm Laboratory science reviews are conducted every five years to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) laboratories. This review is for both internal OAR/NOAA use for planning, programming, and budgeting, and external interests. It helps the Laboratory in its strategic planning of its future science. These reviews are also intended to ensure that OAR laboratory research is linked to the NOAA Strategic Plan, is relevant to NOAA Research mission and priorities, is of high quality as judged by preeminence criteria, and is carried out with a high level of performance. This review will cover Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory research since 2010. The research themes are: Observing Systems and Advanced Technology (OSAT) Ecosystem Dynamics (EcoDyn) Integrated Physical and Ecological Modeling and Forecasting (IPEMF) Program Information The Science Presentations portion of the review will be broadcast live via webinar on Tuesday, March 22 and Wednesday, March 23. View the complete presentation schedule here (http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/review2016/science_presentations.html). To participate remotely by webinar, please register below. Please note: remote participants are in "listen-only" mode.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ecosystem and Fishery Impacts of Rapid Warming in the Gulf of Maine
Presenter(s): Andrew J. Pershing, Chief Scientific Officer, Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME
Date & Time: 23 March 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Andrew J. Pershing, Chief Scientific Officer, Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
The Gulf of Maine is currently warming faster than most other large marine ecosystems. Both the magnitude of the warming and the rate of change are altering the ecosystem and creating challenges for fisheries in the region. The long-term warming trend has led to a well-documented increase in the abundance of southerly species. It also contributed to the collapse of the lobster fishery in southern New England and the increase in landings in Maine. The very rapid warming between 2004 and 2013 led to a decline in the recruitment and growth of cod and an increase in mortality. The built-in feedbacks in the fishery management system could not keep pace with the rapid change in the stock, contributing to the economic collapse of this historic fishery. The recent experience in the Gulf of Maine underscores the need for long-term monitoring, for incorporating environmental drivers into stock assessments, and for using observing system assets to develop forecast products.

Bio(s):
Andy Pershing took over as GMRI's Chief Scientific Officer in 2014 and continues to run the Ecosystem Modeling Lab. His research focuses on the causes and consequences of changing conditions in the Gulf of Maine, and he is an expert on how climate variability and climate change impact the ecosystems in the northwest Atlantic. He uses a variety of techniques, including analysis of past changes in the physical and ecological conditions, as well as advanced mathematical and computer models of how marine populations change through time. Andy has worked primarily on zooplankton, especially rice grain-sized crustaceans called copepods, but he has also studied lobsters, herring, cod, salmon, bluefin tuna, and right whales. He is actively involved in regional efforts to understand and adapt to climate change and serves on the Scientific and Statistical Committee of the New England Fishery Management Council.

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Title: Seasonal Prediction of High Water Levels: State of the Science and Future Opportunities
Presenter(s): Arun Kumar, NOAA Climate Prediction Center, Stephen Griffies, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Elaine Miles, Australian Bureau of Meteorology, William Sweet, NOAA National Ocean Service
Date & Time: 23 March 2016
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC III 12th floor fishbowl (just outside elevators)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Arun Kumar (NOAA Climate Prediction Center), Stephen Griffies (NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory), Elaine Miles (Australian Bureau of Meteorology), William Sweet (NOAA National Ocean Service) Seminar sponsors: OAR/CPO/MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: heather.archambault@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e64cb33163ed2be723c5c83bb5671d946 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: Potential sources for oceanic predictability Arun Kumar NOAA Climate Prediction Center Variability in the oceans exists on multiple time-scales that can range from monthly to decadal and longer. Sources of predictability can be attributed to persistence of initial oceanic anomalies and their decay towards climatology; ocean dynamical process; or could be due to coupled air-sea interactions that can result in a modulation of oceanic predictability associated ocean dynamics. Another source of oceanic predictability on very long time-scales can be attributed to changes in external forcings, e.g., changes in atmospheric constituents, or due to changes in orbital forcings. In this talk a brief overview of various sources of oceanic predictability in the context of prediction of sea level will be given. USA East Coast sea level, the AMOC and the NAO Stephen Griffies NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory We summarize recent observational and modeling studies that connect sea level variations along the USA east coast to the AMOC and NAO. A reduction in AMOC strength is correlated to increases in sea level along the eastern US seaboard. Coastal sea level increases also arise when the atmospheric surface pressure reduces near the coast, as during a negative phase of the NAO. Mechanisms for these sea level changes are reviewed. Prediction of seasonal sea level anomalies within the Bureau of Meteorology Elaine Miles Australian Bureau of Meteorology Sea level rise as a result of human caused climate change poses a severe threat to Pacific Island Countries. Sea level rise in the Western Pacific region has been well above the global average (3.2 mm/year) over the last two to three decades, with impacts already evident through coastal erosion, damage to coastal infrastructure, contamination of ground water and salt water intrusion affecting agricultural land. In recognising that it is through natural variability that the early effects of climate change are most acutely felt, the Pacific-Australia Climate Change Science Adaptation Planning Program (PACCSAP) sought to assess the relationships between seasonal variability, regional sea-level and its predictability at a seasonal timescale. This study was the first attempt to quantitatively evaluate seasonal sea level anomaly (SLA) forecasts over the globe from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's dynamical seasonal coupled ocean"atmosphere multi-model system (POAMA). POAMA calculates SLA using a rigid lid ocean model (MOM2) that determines sea surface height based on temperature, salinity and wind gradients. As a dynamical model, POAMA has a distinct advantage over statistical models in being able to predict SLA under unprecedented changes to current physical forcings, such as those from climate change. The skill of POAMA SLA deterministic and probabilistic forecasts was assessed using satellite altimeter data over the period 1993"2010 and tide gauge records. These results were used to develop prototype seasonal forecast products and are available online. As global warming is likely to increase the frequency and severity of extreme SLA events the development of such products is crucial to combat problems due to climate change in the near future. Projections of “nuisance” tidal flooding William Sweet NOAA National Ocean Service Recurrent tidal flooding is now a serious problem in many U.S. coastal communities. Measured by NOAA tide gauges, annual frequencies of “nuisance” level impacts are today 300-900% greater than 50 years ago. Largely due to increasing mean sea level, the trends in tidal flooding are also compounded on an annual basis by El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) effects. The 2015 meteorological year (May 2015 " April 2016) was projected to be (and will be) a record-breaking year, with El Nino-related increases in daily flood frequencies ranging from 33% to 200% above local trends on the West and East Coasts based upon a bivariate statistical model approach.

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24 March 2016

Title: Life on Ice: Seasonal variation in antifreeze protein concentration from a species of Antarctic fish
Presenter(s): Lauren Fields, PhD. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow at NMFS Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection
Date & Time: 24 March 2016
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lauren Fields, PhD - Knauss Marine Policy Fellow at NMFS Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Knauss Brown Bag series; point of contact is alex.atkinson@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, is almost constantly at its freezing point of about -1.9°C but data from temperature loggers located at various locations throughout the Sound show some seasonal temperature variability depending on location. Blood samples from a species of fish collected from three locations within McMurdo Sound and at different times during the austral summer were analyzed to determine differences in antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) concentration and activity. Conductivity, temperature, depth (CTD) casts were performed at time of sampling to directly compare environmental temperature with blood antifreeze concentration and activity. Fish collected from a location where no seasonal warming occurs exhibited high concentrations of AFGP while fish collected from a location late in the season after the onset of seasonal warming possessed significantly less AFGP. High AFGP levels and activity were correlated with freezing temperatures while lower AFGP levels were observed in late-season specimens when warmer summer water temperatures were recorded via temperature loggers.

Bio(s):
Lauren Fields received her PhD in 2015 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her dissertation work focused on Antarctic fish physiology. A Massachusetts native, she did her undergraduate at Mount Holyoke College.

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Title: New insights on phytoplankton ecology from continuous automated Imaging Flow Cytometry
Presenter(s): Lisa Campbell, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Oceanography, Texas A&M University
Date & Time: 24 March 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Lisa Campbell, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Oceanography, Texas A&M University

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m74e0e6e266d2b8e293a866bbc545c0a7 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 283 881 307 NWFS directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm

Abstract:
Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB) combines flow cytometry and video technology to capture images of individual cells which, together with machine-learning technology, enables near real-time reporting of individual phytoplankton species abundance and community composition. Since 2007, the continuous and automated operation of the IFCB in the Gulf has provided a valuable time series used in the development of models to predict bloom origins. The time series data are also being used to examine trends in phytoplankton community structure, phenology of blooms and responses to environmental stress. Beginning in 2016, the IFCB network will be expanded with the addition of a second instrument, which will provide additional information for model development and validation. BIO Dr. Lisa Campbell is a Professor and William R. Bryant Chair in Oceanography at Texas A&M University. Her research focuses on phytoplankton ecology. She has conducted field work in all oceans, but her current research centers on harmful algal blooms in the Gulf of Mexico where she has deployed the Imaging FlowCytobot to obtain a high temporal resolution phytoplankton time-series. This continuous system has successfully provided early warning of harmful algal blooms seven times since 2007 and also allows a novel view of phytoplankton dynamics. RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS/WEBSITES: http://toast.tamu.edu/IFCB7

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Title: Winged Ambassador: Ocean Literacy through the Eyes of Albatross
Presenter(s): Jennifer Stock, Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 24 March 2016
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jennifer Stock, Education Coordinator, Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary

Abstract:
Albatrosses, charismatic and threatened seabirds, are ambassadors for a clean ocean. They traverse vast oceanic regions searching for floating food. Along their journeys, they ingest plastic trash and are hooked in fisheries. Learn about these five inquiry-based lessons for grades 6"8 with extensions for grades 9"12.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Point of contact for questions about this webinar: sanctuary.education@noaa.gov Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5820997448738447874 After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Important Notes for Participating in the Webinar 1. Plan to log into the webinar at least five (5) minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar is continually upgrading their software and we want to be sure that your computer has time to access any upgrades to enable you access to the webinar presentation. 2. When using the VOIP option for this webinar, you must use a headset or ear-bud headphones for the best quality audio. This will will also keep your output audio from re-entering your microphone, which causes distortion. 3. If you have difficulty logging in to this webinar, go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l ​ ​ The Webinar ID is 149-249-947.

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29 March 2016

Title: Invisible Plastics in the Ocean: Distribution of Anthropogenic Chemicals around Hawaii
Presenter(s): Rachel Lipsy, Oceanographer, Educator, and currently pursuing a job in marine science outreach and project management
Date & Time: 29 March 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rachel Lipsy, Oceanographer, Educator, and currently pursuing a job in marine science outreach and project management

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. AUDIO IS ONLY OVER THE PHONE! For Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Abstract:
Eddies are formed in the lee of the Hawaiian Islands when the Trade Winds blow across the steep topography. This study analyzed human-made (anthropogenic) chemicals found within and surrounding an eddy in the lee of Hawai'i. In most cases these chemicals were compounds used in plastics. In general, there was a greater number of anthropogenic chemicals found outside the eddy; however, the existence of anthropogenic chemicals both in- and outside the eddy may indicate that man-made compounds are more common in the ocean than previously recognized. This is concerning, as we are used to thinking of plastics as easily seen and filtered out of the water. If the chemical components of plastics are dissolved into the water column to the extent that they are virtually inseparable from the water itself, there may be previously unanticipated effects on the ecosystem. About The

Presenter(s):
Rachel Lipsy is a recent Master's graduate from the University of Cambridge, England, where she received her degree in Conservation Leadership. Prior to traveling to England, she worked as a Marine Educator on Educational Tall Ships on the east and west coasts of the USA. Her undergraduate degree is a B.S. in Physical Oceanography from the University of Washington, Seattle. Rachel has interned for BirdLife International, NOAA, and Oceana, and is interested in the intersection between humans and the marine ecosystem.

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Title: The Structure, Evolution, and Dynamics of a Nocturnal Convective System Simulated Using the WRF-ARW Model
Presenter(s): Benjamin Blake, NCEP/EMC
Date & Time: 29 March 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC Seminar

Presenter(s):
Benjamin Blake, NCEP/EMC POC: Geoff Dimego Remote Access GoToMeeting https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/986221013 Join the conference call: EMC 1st Line 866-685-5896 passcode: 8108134# Meeting ID: 986-221-013

Abstract:
Previous studies have documented a nocturnal maximum in thunderstorm frequency across the central United States. Forecast skill for nocturnal convection remains relatively low, and the explanation for this nocturnal maximum is still an area of active debate. This study utilized the WRF-ARW model Version 3.6.1 to simulate a nocturnal mesoscale convective system event that occurred over the southern Great Plains on 3-4 June 2013. The purpose of this study was to advance the knowledge of the dynamics, structure, and evolution of nocturnal convection through examining the structure of the simulated storm from the perspective of two dynamical frameworks. The structure and evolution of the storm was influenced by a strong horizontal gradient in CAPE and CIN corresponding to a narrow corridor of high mixing ratios associated with the low-level jet. These CAPE values in the jet exceeded the magnitude of CAPE observed in the daytime boundary layer. During the night, the source of convectively unstable parcels was almost entirely above 1 km, the storm was elevated with positive buoyancy limited to heights above ~4 km, and the cold pool became stronger aloft than at the surface. Significant variation in the depth and structure of the ascent was found around the cold pool. The reasons for this variation are examined via two frameworks: i) The RKW framework for vertical shear/cold pool interactions; ii) The dynamical framework of wave theory (e.g. Froude number, Scorer parameter). The application of these theories allowed insight into the three-dimensional structure of the convective system and provided a possible explanation for how convection is maintained at night in the presence of a low-level jet.

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30 March 2016

Title: Behavior, Hyperstability, and Population Declines in an Aggregating Marine Fish
Presenter(s): Brice Semmens, Assistant Professor, Marine Biology Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Date & Time: 30 March 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Brice Semmens (Assistant Professor, Marine Biology Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of the NOAA Fisheries Quantitative Ecology and Socioeconomics Training (QUEST) Program's webinar series. See: http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/quest/quest-webinars POC: Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov Webinar Details: Space is limited. Reserve your seat at: https://goo.gl/YPOfec

Abstract:
The Grouper Moon research program, a collaborative effort between the Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF) and the Cayman Islands Department of the Environment, uses a diverse array of field techniques in order to study the population and spatial biology of Nassau grouper (Epinephalus striatus). The Cayman Islands maintains a uniquely large (healthy) spawning aggregation of Nassau grouper (~4000 fish), in addition to several heavily depleted spawning aggregations of the species. Acoustic tagging studies on both the healthy and depleted the spawning aggregations indicate that all or nearly all reproductively mature individuals aggregate each year, and do not make abyssal migrations between islands. The acoustic data also suggest that individual grouper may visit multiple aggregation sites before ultimately coalescing at a single site. Finally, acoustic data revealed that larger (more fecund) fish aggregate longer than smaller fish, and that regardless of size, all fish appear to aggregate over a longer period of time at depleted spawning sites. Taken together, these findings suggest a set of behavioral characteristics that present a mechanistic underpinning to the apparent hyperstability in aggregating species; hyperstability refers to the fact that catch per unit effort remains relatively constant despite steep declines in catch. The fact that hyperstability is mediated by spawning behaviors suggests that efforts to harvest aggregating species during their spawning season will likely stymy traditional fisheries management and assessment approaches. See http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/Assets/quest/documents/QUEST_webinar_BriceSemmens.pdf

Bio(s):
Brice Semmens is an assistant professor in the Marine Biology Research Division at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. Semmens' research is equal parts computer time and fieldwork. In the lab he focuses on developing novel methods for analyzing ecological information. In the field he uses advanced sampling techniques to characterize the movements and behaviors of marine animals as a function of habitat and interactions among individuals. Semmens makes use of a broad suite of analytic tools, including multi-level models, time/space series analysis, state-space model formulations, and information theoretic approaches to model selection. He has worked with data from a number of different ecosystems, including coral reef fish, Pacific salmonids, coastal gray wolves, southern resident killer whales, and coastal groundfish. In all of these projects, his goal has been to bridge predictions about how the world works with observed patterns, and in so doing gain insight into the forces regulating marine populations and ecosystems. In the field, Semmens uses advanced tracking technologies to characterize marine fish behavior. Prior to joining Scripps, Semmens was a National Research Council postdoctoral fellow at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center. He received his Masters of Environmental Science and Management at the Bren School, UC Santa Barbara, and his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Washington.

4 April 2016

Title: Dr. Kathryn Sullivan: Building a resilient nation
Presenter(s): Dr. Kathryn D. Sullivan, Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans & Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator
Date & Time: 4 April 2016
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Webcast
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Kathryn Sullivan, Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans & Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator Seminar Host: American Planning Association (https://www.planning.org/) POC for questions: carol.kavanagh@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://www.planning.org/events/nationalconferenceactivity/9008094/ This session will be webcast live from Phoenix for free at 10:30 a.m. ET. No registration required.

Abstract:
As communities and businesses around the United States face increasing risks and vulnerability to natural disasters and long-term environmental changes, there is an increasing demand for information, data, products, and services to address these challenges. Dr. Kathryn Sullivan, Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Administrator, will outline how the nation's environmental intelligence agency is meeting these needs to build resilient communities and businesses. Every day, NOAA helps individuals, businesses, and governments make smart decisions that directly impact the future of society, the economy, and the environment. From investing in state-of-the-art observational infrastructure to evolving the U.S. Weather Service to meet the growing needs for more accurate and timely weather and climate information, Dr. Sullivan will describe the agency's efforts to improve its capacity to predict, respond to, and recuperate from high-impact weather and hydrologic events. Dr. Sullivan will also outline NOAA's new Integrated Water Initiative, a five-year vision to initiate a number of new products and services to strengthen the nation's water security, reduce water vulnerability, and enable greater efficiency and effectiveness in how we manage and utilize water resources. NOAA and APA have a long history of collaboration focused on helping communities cope with drought and floods, improve water quality, and reduce coastal inundation among other threats. Learn more about the work underway and how NOAA is working to build living and thriving communities. About the speaker: Dr. Kathryn Sullivan is Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator. An accomplished oceanographer, she was appointed NOAA's Chief Scientist in 1993. At NOAA her work has spanned weather and water services, climate science, integrated mapping, and more. Her impressive expertise reaches the frontiers of space as well as sea. In 1978 she became one of the first six women to join the NASA astronaut corps, and she was the first American woman to walk in space. During her 15-year tenure, she flew on three shuttle missions, including the one that deployed the Hubble Space Telescope. She holds a bachelor's degree in earth sciences from the University of California at Santa Cruz and a doctorate in geology from Dalhousie University in Canada. See http://www.noaa.gov/leadership/dr-kathryn-d-sullivan

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5 April 2016

Title: Valuing Natural Capital from Rhetoric to Reality
Presenter(s): Eli P. Fenichel, the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
Date & Time: 5 April 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 10153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Eli P. Fenichel, the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Seminar Host: NOS Seminar Coordinator Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
Natural resource management is about allocating a portfolio of resources through time. This implies that good, defensible management requires the value of that portfolio, which may include non-natural resource assets too, must be stable or increasing over time. Indeed, this is the definition that UNEP, the World Bank, and many others have used as a necessary condition for sustainability. However, it also provides a benchmark for assessing socio-ecological system wide management over time (e.g., ecosystem management). ‘Natural capital' is great rhetoric and a great metaphor, but if it is to be useful it must be much more " we must actually value natural assets as capital stocks. In this webinar I will discuss some new approaches that do just that, turning natural capital from rhetoric to reality. The approaches are grounded in economic theory, but also show the critical nature of coupling natural science with social science to assess the implied wealth stored in stocks of resources. I will discuss example applications including fish stocks and groundwater.

Bio(s):
Dr. Eli Fenichel is an assistant professor of bioeconomics and ecosystem management at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, http://environment.yale.edu/profile/eli-fenichel. Prior to joining Yale in 2012, he spent four years on the faculty at Arizona State University. He earned his bachelor's degree from the University of Maine in wildlife ecology. After two years in the Peace Corps and nearly a year working for WWF on conservation projects he realized that economic solutions were required for what seemed to be environmental problems. He then earned PhD and master's degrees from Michigan State University where he focused on integrating economics and ecology. He continues to work at the interface of ecology and economics with some applied math mixed in. His research applies capital theory to natural resources, and Dr. Fenichel views natural resource management problems as investment decisions. He has found this style of inquiry to lend itself to a wide range of natural resource questions related to the “feedback between humans and ecosystems and the management of coupled ecological-economic processes.” His research spans topics including invasive species and infectious disease (liability management), fisheries (asset management), and reforestation incentives in Panama (portfolio development). Though these topics may appear disparate, they are all linked by the central theme that framing resource management problems as investment decisions in natural capital or liability management provides novel insights for public policy and private decisions in a dynamic world. Increasingly, Dr. Fenichel is working on valuation of natural assets and how natural capital can and should be accounted for in national (and perhaps private) accounting systems. At Yale, Dr. Fenichel teaches graduate level courses in applied math, natural capital, natural resource economics and quantitative decision making.

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Title: Freshwater discharge into the Gulf of Alaska: historical conditions and future scenarios
Presenter(s): Dr. David Hill, Associate Professor, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 5 April 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. David Hill, Associate Professor, Oregon State University Seminar Host: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP). https://accap.uaf.edu/webinars

Remote Access:
http://accap.adobeconnect.com/freshwater_discharge_gulf_of_alaska/event/registration.html

Abstract:
Freshwater discharge into the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) is controlled by a complex set of meteorologic and hydrologic processes. We use high resolution energy-balance models to determine the timing, spatial distribution, and composition (rain, snow-melt, ice-melt) of runoff from the entire GOA watershed. Model results demonstrate good agreement with GRACE satellite data in terms of annual amplitudes and long term losses (ice loss). We use a set of climate models and future emissions scenarios in order to test the sensitivity of the hydrologic system to changes in precipitation and temperature patterns. Initial results demonstrate large changes in runoff characteristics.

Bio(s):
Dr. David Hill joined the Coastal and Ocean Engineering program at Oregon State in 2010 after 10 years as faculty at Penn State University. He teaches classes in wave mechanics, hydrology and hydraulics, and applied nearshore modeling. Dr. Hill was the group coordinate for Coastal and Ocean Engineering from 2010-2012. Dr. Hill's research portfolio includes numerous topics related to nearshore waters. Some recent examples include the linkages between tidal evolution and sea-level rise, the relationships between nearshore oceanographic conditions and biological and ecological processes, the role of coastal freshwater discharge in nearshore processes, and optical measurements of complex flow fields. His research has been supported over the years by the National Science Foundation, NOAA, the National Park Service, the North Pacific Research Board, the Oil Spill Research Institute, and the USGS.

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6 April 2016

Title: Shifts in coral reef biogeochemistry and acidification linked to offshore processes
Presenter(s): Andreas J. Andersson, Associate Professor, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego
Date & Time: 6 April 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Andreas J. Andersson, Associate Professor, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. For Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. In lower right corner of page, Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf. no: 744925156 and your info. No passcode needed for web.

Abstract:
Ocean acidification is hypothesized to have a negative impact on coral reef ecosystems, but to understand future potential impacts it is necessary to understand the natural variability and controls of coral reef biogeochemistry. Here I present a 5-year study from the Bermuda coral reef platform that demonstrates how rapid interannual acidification events on the local reef scaleare driven by shifts in reef biogeochemical processes toward increasing net calcification and net respiration. These biogeochemical shifts are possibly linked to offshore productivity that ultimately may be controlled by large-scale climatological and oceanographic processes. More at http://www.anderssonoceanresearch.com/

Bio(s):
Dr. Andersson is Associate Professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego. His research interests deals with global environmental change owing to both natural and anthropogenic processes, and the subsequent effects on the function, role, and cycling of carbon in marine environments. His current research is mainly concerned with ocean acidification in coral reefs and near-shore environments. Dr. Andersson received his PhD from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and spent several years as a researcher at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences before joining Scripps in 2011.

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7 April 2016

Title: Seagrass, climate, birds and seals: Understanding limits on Puget Sound herring recovery
Presenter(s): Tessa Francis, Ph.D., Lead Ecosystem Ecologist, Puget Sound Institute University of Washington Tacoma
Date & Time: 7 April 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Tessa Francis, Ph.D., Lead Ecosystem Ecologist, Puget Sound Institute University of Washington Tacoma.

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=mec5b6ae42a899f522136247f00a8b480 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 803 214 933 NWFS directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm

Abstract:
Forage fish such as Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) are ecological foundation species in many marine and estuarine ecosystems. Pacific herring play a critical role in the social-ecological system along the West Coast of North America, owing to their ecological, economic, and spiritual/cultural importance. In the Puget Sound estuary, Pacific herring are an indicator species, and the regional management agency has set recovery targets to guide herring management. Puget Sound herring are spatially and temporally segregated into individual subpopulations by their spawning behavior, and these individual subpopulations show asynchronous abundance trends over the past several decades. While the Puget Sound herring stock as a whole shows variable but largely stable biomass through time, some local spawning subpopulations have significantly declining trends. Efforts are underway to identify leading potential limitations on herring recovery to inform recovery targets and potential management strategies for reaching them. I will describe a range of research projects focused on some of the factors potentially limiting herring recovery at local and regional scales, including availability of high-quality spawning habitat, predation of herring eggs leading to Allee-type population effects, changes in herring spawn timing, and food-web interactions. I will also describe efforts underway by a working group to create a framework for integrating traditional ecological knowledge into herring fisheries assessments, and to develop social/cultural metrics of herring fishery sustainability. BIO Tessa is Lead Ecosystem Ecologist for the Puget Sound Institute at the University of Washington Tacoma. Dr. Francis is an aquatic ecologist, and she conducts research related to the impacts of climate and other environmental variables on aquatic species and food web dynamics. She is interested in the important associations between terrestrial and aquatic habitats, and how watershed dynamics impact aquatic food webs and populations. She is also interested in the science-policy interface, and science communication. Tessa is presently involved in projects related to ecosystem-based management of forage fish in Puget Sound and the West Coast of North America, including Pacific herring and Pacific sardine, and assessing trade-offs among trophically-linked recovery targets (e.g., salmon and herring). Tessa is also the Managing Director of the Ocean Modeling Forum, a joint project between the University of Washington and NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The Ocean Modeling Forum brings together working groups of modelers and managers to tackle ocean management issues using multi-model approaches. Tessa serves as the Ecosystem-based Management topic editor for the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound, and is on the Science Advisory Board of the Northwest Straits Commission. Tessa holds a BA in Political Science from UC Berkeley, a BS in Wildlife Science from the University of Washington, and a PhD in Zoology and Urban Ecology from the University of Washington. Tessa did her postdoctoral research as part of the CAMEO program at the NWFSC.

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Title: Seasonal Predictions of Fisheries
Presenter(s): Mike Alexander, NOAA ESRL, Sarah Gaichas, NOAA NMFS, Alistair Hobday, CSIRO/University of Tasmania, Isaac Kaplan, NMFS, Samantha Siedlecki, University of Washington
Date & Time: 7 April 2016
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mike Alexander (NOAA ESRL), Sarah Gaichas (NOAA NMFS), Alistair Hobday (CSIRO/University of Tasmania), Isaac Kaplan (NOAA NMFS) and Samantha Siedlecki (University of Washington) Seminar sponsors: OAR/CPO/MAPP Program, NOAA NMFS Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e35a15e3525250d62be95e777f0d3c665 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: TBD

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8 April 2016

Title: The California Underwater Glider Network
Presenter(s): Dr. Daniel L. Rudnick, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Date & Time: 8 April 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, 2nd Floor, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Daniel L. Rudnick, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library; Contacts: Contact Judith Salter (301-713-2600 ext. 135) or Library Reference (301-713-2600 ext.157)

Remote Access:
Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
The overarching goal of the California Underwater Glider Network is to sustain baseline observations of climate variability off the coast of California. The technical approach is to deploy autonomous underwater gliders in a network to provide real-time data. The CUGN uses Spray underwater gliders making repeated dives from the surface to 500 m and back, repeating the cycle every 3 hours, and traveling 3 km in the horizontal during that time. The CUGN includes gliders on three of the traditional cross-shore CalCOFI lines: line 66.7 off Monterey Bay, line 80 off Point Conception, and line 90 off Dana Point. The glider missions typically last about 100 days, and cover over 2000 km, thus providing 4-6 sections on lines extending 300-500 km offshore. Since 2005 the CUGN has covered 206,000 km over ground and 223,000 km through water in over 9900 glider-days, while doing 91,000 dives. The last two years have been unusually warm in the California Current System, starting with the warm anomaly of 2014-2015, and continuing through the El Nino that started in 2015 and is currently on the wane. The causes of the warming are studied using a climatology of glider data. In particular, the effects of atmospheric forcing and oceanic advection are addressed. NOAA support through the Climate Observation Division and the Integrated Ocean Observing System is gratefully acknowledged.

Bio(s):
Daniel L. Rudnick earned his Ph.D. in oceanography in 1987 from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and his B.A. in physics in 1981 at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Rudnick is currently a professor and director of the Climate Ocean Atmosphere Program at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Dr. Rudnick is an observational oceanographer whose research focuses on processes in the upper ocean. Topics of note include fronts and eddies, air-sea interaction, the stirring and mixing of physical and biological tracers, boundary currents and coastal circulation. Dr. Rudnick is keenly interested in observational instrumentation, having been involved in the use and/or development of moorings, towed and underway profilers, and autonomous floats and underwater gliders. Dr. Rudnick has sailed on over 25 oceanographic cruises, over half as chief scientist. Dr. Rudnick has authored over 80 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Rudnick was a member of the Ocean Studies Board of the National Research Council, and has served on various panels and committees for NSF, NOAA, and ONR. Dr. Rudnick is Chair of the Executive Steering Committee of the Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS), a component of the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS).

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12 April 2016

Title: Alaska River Break-up: Historic comparison and 2016 Spring Outlook - What can we expect?
Presenter(s): Crane Johnson and Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: 12 April 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Crane Johnson & Rick Thoman, National Weather Service Seminar Host: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP). https://accap.uaf.edu/webinars

Remote Access:
http://accap.adobeconnect.com/river_breakup_2016/event/registration.html

Abstract:
Each year the National Weather Service provides a breakup outlook for Alaska Rivers. This winter stands out as unusual with both temperature and precipitation anomalies observed throughout the state. We will present a brief overview of current conditions and provide our spring statewide flooding potential outlook for the 2016 spring break-up season. This will be followed by a comparison of historic breakup years and a spring/summer climate outlook.

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13 April 2016

Title: Puffins: Sentinel of Climate Change
Presenter(s): Derrick Z. Jackson, Co-Author, "Project Puffin: The Improbable Quest to Bring a Beloved Seabird Back to Egg Rock," published by Yale University Press. and Stephen Kress, Vice President, Bird Conservation, National Audubon Society, Cornell Ornithology Lab, Ithaca, NY
Date & Time: 13 April 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Derrick Z. Jackson, Co-Author, "Project Puffin: The Improbable Quest to Bring a Beloved Seabird Back to Egg Rock," published by Yale University Press. and Stephen Kress, Vice President, Bird Conservation, National Audubon Society, Cornell Ornithology Lab, Ithaca, NY

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and presenter host is Vernon.Smith@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
In 1902, there were only two puffins left on one island in Maine, due to hunting for their meat and eggs. In 1973, young Audubon bird instructor Steve Kress, against many odds and much skepticism, began bringing puffin chicks down from Newfoundland to raise them on a tiny jumble of boulders six miles out to sea. Kress's effort became the world's first successful restoration of a seabird. Today, there are 1,100 pairs of puffins on five islands in Maine and his unprecedented techniques have now been used to save about 50 species of birds in 14 countries. But after four decades of success, the puffins now face a threat Kress did not consider long ago -- climate change. The puffins are already delivering significant evidence of it.

Bio(s):
Derrick Z. Jackson is co-author and principal photographer of 'Project Puffin: The Improbable Quest to Bring a Beloved Seabird Back to Egg Rock', released in 2015 by Yale University Press. Jackson was a columnist at the Boston Globe from 1988-2015. He remains a contributing columnist and is a Fellow with the Union of Concerned Scientists. He was a 2001 finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in commentary. He is also a featured contributor to the 2009 book, "The Speech: Race and Barack Obama's 'A More Perfect Union,' "published by Bloomsbury. Jackson is also a photographer whose presidential campaign images of Barack Obama were exhibited in 2010 by Boston's Museum of African American History. His images of Obama, wildlife and landscapes earned a 2013 exhibit at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education. He was a 2013 and 2012 finalist in Outdoor Photographer magazine's The American Landscape Contest. A native of Milwaukee, Wis., Jackson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee. He was a Nieman Fellow in Journalism at Harvard University in 1984 and holds three honorary degrees from the Episcopal Divinity School, Salem State University and the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts. He also is an honoree of Curry College's Human Rights Award and UW-Milwaukee's Distinguished Alumni Community Service award for Scouting and Big Brothers.

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Title: Great Ships on the Great Lakes
Presenter(s): Sarah Waters, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 13 April 2016
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Waters, Education Coordinator, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Point of contact for questions about this webinar: sanctuary.education@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Take a journey through Great Lakes maritime history with a maritime archaeologist to explore the stories of shipwrecks now preserved in Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9103001172751561730 After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Important Notes for Participating in the Webinar 1. Plan to log into the webinar at least five (5) minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar is continually upgrading their software and we want to be sure that your computer has time to access any upgrades to enable you access to the webinar presentation. 2. When using the VOIP option for this webinar, you must use a headset or ear-bud headphones for the best quality audio. This will will also keep your output audio from re-entering your microphone, which causes distortion. 3. If you have difficulty logging in to this webinar, go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The Webinar ID is 118-361-395. Presentations that are part of the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series are archived at http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.htm

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14 April 2016

Title: Ocean Exploration & MPAs: Priorities, Technological Advances and Partnerships
Presenter(s): Alan Leonardi, PhD, Director NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research
Date & Time: 14 April 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - See event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Alan Leonardi, PhD, NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1376518561719910145

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series which is co-sponsored with EBM Tools Network.The series is focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. For a list of upcoming webinars see: http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/ Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Ocean exploration advances in technology are allowing us to reach new depths and areas previously unknown. As these doors open what does the interface between ocean exploration and the MPA community mean and how can state-of-the art ocean exploration support the research and policy decisions surrounding the nation's system of marine protected areas.

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Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 April 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Lamprey? Sturgeon? What can research on these suckers do for you?
Presenter(s): Mary Moser, Ph.D., Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 14 April 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Mary Moser, Ph.D., Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm POC for questions: Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m0d6a604678d61bd6f3268dfb7f8a1388 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code and meeting number: 283 881 307 NWFS directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm ABSTRACT Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) and green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris) are both imperiled anadromous species that co-occur with listed salmonids, groundfish, and marine mammals. I will make the case that research on these native, non-salmonids can help inform management of salmon and, in some cases, groundfish and marine mammals. The southern DPS of green sturgeon is the first ESA-listed anadromous species for which critical habitat was designated in the marine environment. These protections arose from a decade-long, coast-wide acoustic telemetry program, along with intensive monitoring of sturgeon habitat use in estuaries. Lamprey populations have also declined in recent decades. While lamprey are of great cultural importance to Native Americans, they enjoy no ESA protections. Unlike salmonids, adult lamprey do not home to natal streams and instead use chemical signaling to find spawning and rearing areas. Hence, establishing management units for this species and providing adequate conservation measures has been challenging. I will highlight behavior research that has led to improvements in lamprey passage at dams and recent work on lamprey propagation and genetics. BIO Dr. Mary Moser has worked at the NWFSC for over 15 years as a research fisheries biologist in the Fish Ecology Division. She specializes in the use of acoustic, radio, and PIT technologies to document migration behavior of both anadromous and marine species. Due to her expertise with sturgeon, Mary served as a member of the Shortnose Sturgeon Recovery Team, developed protocols for handling Atlantic and Shortnose Sturgeon, and served on the Green Sturgeon Biological Review, Critical Habitat, Recovery, and SAIL teams. In addition, she has worked closely with Native American tribes to investigate methods to recover Pacific lamprey, a species of great importance to tribal culture and ecosystem health. Mary leads two sub-committees of the Lamprey Technical Workgroup, and has researched methods to improve lamprey performance at dams, develop artificial propagation techniques, and foster a better understanding and appreciation of this ancient species.

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15 April 2016

Title: KIAPS next generation global model
Presenter(s): Young Kwon, Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems
Date & Time: 15 April 2016
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2890
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Young Kwon, Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems

Title:
KIAPS next generation global model Abstract The purpose of nine year project of Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems (KIAPS) is developing a next generation global model for operational use in Korea Meteorological Administration. After conducting basic research and development in the first stage of the project, KIAPS configured the beta-version NWP system from data assimilation to post-pocess (KIM: KIAPS Integrated Model). KIAPS has been running KIM on the semi-realtime basis since July 2015. KIM's dynamic core consists of non-hydrostatic governing equation set on cubed sphere and spectral element method. Physics packages are developed based on Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and Global-Regional Integrated Model system (GRIMS) physics packages. KIAPS scientists have implemented several vital aspects of physics parameterizations such as non-orographic gravity wave drag, gray-zone convection, top-down mixing method in PBL, prognostic cloudiness, and radiation-cloud interactions. The KIM is a self-cycled 3DVAR data assimilation system with its own data acquisition and quality control. In this talk, the performance of the KIM will be presented on top of the brief overview of KIM in terms of dynamics, physics, and data assimilation system.

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19 April 2016

Title: NOAA’s Digital Coast: Actionable Information for Coastal Communities
Presenter(s): Josh Murphy, Senior Spatial Analyst, NOAA's Office for Coastal Management
Date & Time: 19 April 2016
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Commerce Research Library – Room 1894 (or online via Webex - see login info below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Josh Murphy, Senior Spatial Analyst, NOAA's Office for Coastal Management

Sponsor(s):
Around the Dept. of Commerce Bureaus RSVP/

Remote Access:
: Register online at http://doc.libcal.com/event/2366927 (When registering, you will have the option to attend the event in person or via Webex.)

Abstract:
Please join Josh Murphy for an overview of NOAA's Digital Coast website and information resources. The presentation will also highlight Digital Coast's multi-faceted approach to providing actionable information to address coastal issues. The Digital Coast is an information resource developed for those who manage the nation's coasts. This web-based enabling platform provides access to the geospatial data, tools, training, and case studies that can be used by communities to address such issues as coastal hazards, land use planning, and climate change. The effort is supported by the Digital Coast Partnership, composed of national-level organizations representing coastal managers at the local, state, and national scales, who provide content for the website, information on priority issues, and feedback on decision support tools.

Bio(s):
Josh Murphy is a Senior Spatial Analyst with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Office for Coastal Management in Silver Spring, Maryland. In this position, he facilitates the use and application of geospatial information within federal efforts directed at enhancing the resilience of our nation's coastal landscapes, populations, and infrastructure. For the last seven years, Josh has played a key leadership role in the development of the Digital Coast, a community-driven platform focused on helping communities address coastal issues. An accomplished instructor, Josh has over a decade of experience in the development and delivery of courses that integrate GIS tools and methods. He currently holds an adjunct faculty position within the Urban and Regional Planning program at Georgetown University. For more information visit http://library.doc.gov, email us at research@doc.gov, or see our Calendar of Events.

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20 April 2016

Title: The first World Ocean Assessment: a major international effort that you never heard of
Presenter(s): Andrew A. Rosenberg, Director of the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists
Date & Time: 20 April 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Andrew A. Rosenberg, Director of the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists Seminar Host: NOS Seminar Coordinator - Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Title:
The first World Ocean Assessment " a major international effort that you never heard of

Abstract:
The United Nations recently completed the first assessment of the status of the world ocean, a process that was called for but the Johannesburg summit on sustainable development in 2002. This presentation will give an overview of the assessment report, which is now available online at worldoceanassessment.org. The presenter was involved in the three stages of this project beginning in 2003 and will talk about the process as well as a broadbrush presentation of the results.

Bio(s):
Andrew A. Rosenberg is director of the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists. He has more than 25 years of experience in government service and academic and non-profit leadership. He is the author of scores of peer-reviewed studies and reports on fisheries and ocean management and has published on the intersection between science and policy making. Previously, Dr. Rosenberg served as the northeast regional administrator of the National Marine Fisheries Service at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, where he negotiated recovery plans for New England and mid-Atlantic fishery resources, endangered species protections and habitat conservation programs. He later became deputy director of NOAA fisheries. He was a professor of natural resources and the environment at the University of New Hampshire, where he also served as dean of the College of Life Sciences and Agriculture for five years. He also served as chief scientist for Conservation International before joining UCS. Dr. Rosenberg is also the convening lead author of the oceans chapter of the US National Climate Assessment. He was a member of the Group of Experts for the UN World Ocean Assessment. He served on the National Academy of Sciences' Ocean Studies Board and the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy. Dr. Rosenberg received his Ph.D. in biology from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada and previously studied oceanography at Oregon State University and fisheries biology at the University of Massachusetts.

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Title: Operational National-Scale High-Resolution Hydrologic Modeling: WRF-Hydro and its Meteorological Inputs
Presenter(s): David Kitzmiller, National Water Center, National Weather Service, NOAA
Date & Time: 20 April 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, University Research Court, College Park, MD, United States - Conf. Room 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: David Kitzmiller, National Water Center, National Weather Service, NOAA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA / NESDIS / Center for Satellite Applications and Research http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Ralph.R.Ferraro@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=e9be5f8c769df0cd1bec012db853ea0a8 Event password: NWC-STAR Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 999 935 284 NCWCP Directions: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/contact.php

Abstract:
The National Weather Service's National Water Center (NWC) is collaborating with NCEP, NCAR, and NWS field offices to implement a new nationwide, high resolution, operational hydrologic and streamflow model--WRF-Hydro. Running on the NOAA WCOSS supercomputer system, and scheduled for implementation in late FY16, this model will provide revolutionary water resource prediction capabilities on a 1km/250m grid and across 2.6 million river basins. WRF-Hydro will form the core of the cross-agency NWC Centralized Water Forecasting Project. It will further the NWS' mission to protect lives and property by providing flood, drought and water resource forecast guidance and situational awareness to NWS field offices and Centers, and partner agencies like the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). This presentation features an overview of this research-to-operations effort, and the preparation of real-time meteorological inputs to the modeling processes. About David Kitzmiller: David Kitzmiller is a meteorologist in the Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Division of the National Water Center, National Weather Service. He served as group leader for hydrometeorology in the Hydrologic Science and Modeling Branch of the former Office of Hydrologic Development from 2002 to 2015. His career in the National Weather Service began in the Techniques Development Laboratory, now the Meteorological Development Laboratory, in 1984. He has worked in the development and implementation of applications of digital radar, satellite, and wind profiler observations, as applied to severe storm detection and precipitation estimation and prediction.

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21 April 2016

Title: The influence of environmental factors on the age, hatch dates, and growth of juvenile Atlantic menhaden in Choptank River, MD
Presenter(s): Alex Atkinson, M.S., Knauss Marine Policy Fellow at NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation
Date & Time: 21 April 2016
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Alex Atkinson, M.S. - Knauss Marine Policy Fellow at NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Knauss Brown Bag series; point of contact is laura.ferguson@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Since 1993 Atlantic menhaden has experienced sustained low juvenile production (recruitment) in the Chesapeake Bay. Factors controlling growth, abundance, and mortality of larval and juvenile menhaden change throughout ontogeny such that larval growth rates could carry over to juvenile growth and survival. The effects of winter thermal conditions on the hatch dates and growth of larval and juvenile Atlantic menhaden in Atlantic shelf and Chesapeake Bay habitats were examined using otolith (ear-stone) increment analyses and growth models. For 2010-2013, truncated hatch-date distributions provided evidence for a winter recruitment bottleneck in Atlantic menhaden caused by cold temperatures. Hatch-dates of surviving juveniles were skewed towards warmer months for years characterized by colder temperatures. Reduced larval growth rates, influenced by reduced temperature and food availability, carried over to juvenile growth rates. A growing degree-day model performed well in simulating observed juvenile growth rates in the Choptank River tributary of Chesapeake Bay.

Bio(s):
Alex is originally from a suburb of Chicago and completed her undergraduate biology degree at the University of Rochester. She gained exposure to marine science through SCUBA diving and internships researching gray whale populations in British Columbia and benthic communities in Florida. This past January, she completed my Masters degree in Fisheries science at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.

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Title: Benthic Nitrogen Cycling and Nutrient Bioextraction in a Chesapeake Bay Oyster Aquaculture Farm
Presenter(s): Abby Lunstrum, M.S., Knauss Marine Policy Fellow at NOAA Office of International Affairs
Date & Time: 21 April 2016
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Abby Lunstrum, M.S. - Knauss Marine Policy Fellow at NOAA Office of International Affairs

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Knauss Brown Bag series; point of contact is laura.ferguson@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Oyster aquaculture is recently being considered as a tool to mitigate coastal eutrophication via "Nutrient Bioextraction". While nutrients, for example, nitrogen (N), extracted directly by harvest are easily quantified, indirect removal by sediment denitrification and burial are poorly studied. These processes, along with related benthic N pathways, were measured seasonally at an off-bottom oyster (Crassostrea virginica) farm in a Chesapeake Bay tributary. Both enhanced denitrification and burial within the farm contributed to N extraction, but were small in comparison to harvested N, which accounted for 90% of total N extraction. Denitrification was limited by sediment anoxia and enhanced dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). As a result, sediment NH4 flux was the highest measured N emission from the farm, exceeding total N lost via bioextraction.

Bio(s):
Abby received a M.S. in Environmental Sciences from University of Virginia in 2015. Prior to that, she was a Fulbright fellow at Xiamen University, China, where she studied carbon sequestration in mangrove reforestation projects.

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Title: Geophysical Constraints on Antarctic Sea Ice Cover
Presenter(s): s):
S. V. Nghiema
Date & Time: 21 April 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: U.S. National/Naval Ice Center, Room 1770, NOAA Satellite Operations Facility, 4251 Suitland Road, Washington DC, 20395, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
S. V. Nghiema, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles. Research co-authors: include I. G. Rigor, P. Clemente-Colón, G. Neumanna, and P. P. Lia Location: U.S. National/Naval Ice Center, Room 1770, NOAA Satellite Operations Facility, 4251 Suitland Road, Washington DC, 20395, USA Point of contact: micki.ream@noaa.gov Conference Call: 877 326-9143, Participant Passcode: 1147157 No registration required.

Abstract:
The contrast between the slight increase of Antarctic sea ice and the drastic reduction of Arctic sea ice since the 1970s has been an ongoing conundrum. Ice trajectories reveal that sea ice formed earlier in the ice growth season drifts northward away from the Antarctic continent forming a circumpolar frontal ice zone (FIZ) behind the ice edge. The FIZ consists of sea ice that becomes rougher due to a longer exposure to wind and wave actions, and thicker over time by more ice growth and greater snow accumulation. This sea ice band, as wide as 1000 km, serves as a ‘Great Shield,' encapsulating and protecting younger and thinner ice that develops rapidly as winds continue opening interior areas. The products of these “ice factories” converge toward the existing circumpolar FIZ, sustaining the Antarctic sea ice cover by enhancing ridging and ice thickness there while making room for more ice to grow. As such, the behavior of Antarctic sea ice is not a paradox as some have suggested, but instead is consistent with the geophysical characteristics in the southern polar region that starkly contrast to those in the Arctic. (

Presente
Title: FishPath: A Decision Support System for Selection of Harvest Strategies in Data-and Capacity-Limited Fisheries
Presenter(s): Dr. Natalie Dowling, Senior Research Scientist, CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere Flagship Australia
Date & Time: 21 April 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presented by: Dr. Natalie Dowling, Senior Research Scientist, CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere Flagship
Australia

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm
Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

NWFS directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm

Abstract:
A majority of fisheries across the globe are data- and/or capacity-limited, in that they lack data and/or resources to generate statistical estimates of stock status, often leading to ineffective or non-existent management. Improving management actions and outcomes could be accomplished by using analytical methods and management measures that are effective even when data and capacity are limited, positively impacting the livelihoods of millions of people and generating significant conservation benefits. Cost-effective methods for analyzing and managing data-limited fisheries exist, but they are challenging to navigate due to the myriad options, different data requirements, unique outputs and a lack of understanding of the relative costs and advantages of each approach. There is also an increasing body of general guidance for the process of developing management strategies, i.e., the pre-agreed system of monitoring, assessment, and decision rules used to achieve management objectives for data-limited fisheries. However, this body of guidance has yet to be organized in a way that allows fishery management practitioners to apply it easily. Thus, there remains a disconnect between the development of assessment approaches and decision rule options, and their on-the-ground implementation in a management context. To fill this gap, we have developed FishPath: a decision support system that allows users to characterize their fishery with respect to i) available data; ii) biological/life history attributes of relevant species; iii) fishery operational characteristics; iv) socio-economic characteristics; and, v) governance context. FishPath allows users to identify a subset of management strategy options appropriate for the fishery based on this characterization. We are currently applying FishPath to a range of data-limited fisheries globally to evaluate its efficacy. FishPath is the first ever comprehensive and standardized approach to guiding the selection of monitoring, assessment and decision rule options for data-limited fisheries. If widely applied, FishPath will help ensure that more data-limited, capacity-limited fisheries, particularly those in developing countries, become assessed and managed, leading to improved conservation and fishery outcomes.

Bio(s):
Dr. Natalie Dowling a senior fisheries scientist with CSIRO in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. Her background is in management strategy evaluation modelling but her career has evolved to embrace two main interests: management strategies for data-limited fisheries, and understanding fisher behaviour in response to management changes via fleet dynamics models. She enjoys being able to engage with fishers and stakeholders at a grass roots level and, thorough effective communication, facilitating the uptake of highly technical modelling outcomes. She was responsible for developing data-limited management strategies for over half of Australia's Commonwealth managed fisheries, and subsequently led the development of data poor management strategy guidelines for the Food and Agriculture Organisation. She is currently working with The Nature Conservancy via a Science for Nature and People Working Group, developing a Decision Support System incorporating a Management Strategy Selection Process (“FishPath”) for data-limited fisheries globally. She is also leading Australian projects on low-cost management regimes for low-value fisheries, and triple-bottom line harvest strategies for multi-sector fisheries.

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22 April 2016

Title: Seminar Cancelled - Extending the High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) Data Stream to Continue More than ThreeReschedule to Fri 22 Apr Decades of Tracking Global Cloud and Moisture Properties
Presenter(s): Dr Paul Menzel
Date & Time: 22 April 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Bldg - 10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham MD 20706, 8th floor Conference Room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr W.Paul Menzel Seminar Cancelled

Sponsor(s):
JPSS May Science Seminar (http://www.jpss.noaa.gov/science-seminars.html). Please note: Only those with federal government-issued identification or prior approval can attend in person. Point of Contact: jpss.scienceseminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m3b10fd978f8140ecedd83cacfea854bc Meeting number: 740 863 598 Meeting password: Jpss2016! Phone 877-401-9225 passcode: 53339716

Abstract:
The High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) has been flown on sixteen satellites from TIROS-N through NOAA-19 and METOP-A and -B forming more than a 35-year record. Sensor to sensor radiance calibration differences have been mitigated using high spectral resolution infrared data from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) as a reference to adjust spectral response functions in the recent HIRS data (NOAA-15 through NOAA-19). Satellite Nadir Overpasses (SNOs) have been used to intercalibrate the HIRS sensors before IASI (NOAA-6 through NOAA-14). A thirty five year record in detection of high clouds and estimation of total column moisture has been reprocessed and studied; hemispheric trends will be compared. Continuation of the cloud and moisture property determinations with IASI and CrIS will also be discussed.

Bio(s):
Dr W. Paul Menzel received his doctorate in 1974 in Theoretical Solid State Physics at the University of Wisconsin (UW) " Madison. Thereafter he joined Verner Suomi's team at the Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) at UW to explore the possibilities for remote sensing of the earth's atmosphere from a geosynchronous satellite. In 1983, he went to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NOAA/NESDIS) to head the Advanced Satellite Products Project, where he was responsible for the development, testing, and evaluation of procedures for deriving new atmospheric products from space-borne observations, and also their transfer from the research laboratory to the operational weather forecaster. From 1999 to 2007, he served as Chief Scientist of the Office of Research and Applications of NOAA/NESDIS; he was responsible for providing guidance on science issues and initiating major science programs for the Office Director. Dr. Menzel has been a Principal Investigator of the MODIS Science Team where his primary responsibility was to develop algorithms for deriving cloud-top properties, atmospheric profiles, and column water vapor using infrared bands on MODIS. His current research is focused on studying cloud and moisture properties derived from 35 years of HIRS data and extending that record with CrIS and IASI data. Dr. Menzel served as the Verner Suomi Distinguished Professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science at UW-Madison from 2007 until 2011. He is presently a senior scientist at the SSEC.

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25 April 2016

Title: Blue Carbon:Blue Carbon: The Climate Mitigation Opportunity You've Never Heard Of
Presenter(s): Ariana Sutton-Grier, NOAA National Ocean Service
Date & Time: 25 April 2016
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Remote attendance only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ariana Sutton-Grier, National Ocean Service

Sponsor(s):
SOARCE webinar series; jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov Remote attendance only; Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3377626426821679617

Abstract:
There is growing interest nationally and internationally in leveraging the carbon benefits (termed "blue carbon") of coastal habitats in climate and coastal resilience policies. Coastal wetlands (specifically mangroves, salt marshes, and seagrass meadows) have unique characteristics that make them incredibly efficient, natural carbon sinks with most carbon stored belowground in soils. Protecting and restoring these ecosystems around the globe will help maintain all the societal benefits these ecosystems provide including the natural climate mitigation benefits, but also the food security, water quality, and storm protection benefits that enhance coastal communities and economies.This presentation will discuss the state of the science and policy of blue carbon including: (1) incorporation of coastal wetland carbon in U.S. national climate, resilience, and conservation efforts; (2) potential steps to incorporate coastal wetlands in national greenhouse gas inventories as suggested by the 2013 International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Wetlands Supplement; and opportunities to include coastal wetlands in voluntary carbon markets. The presentation will conclude by highlighting some of the most pressing blue carbon scientific gaps that need to be filled in order to support these developing policies.

Bio(s):
Dr. Ariana Sutton-Grier is an ecosystem ecologist with expertise in wetland ecology and restoration, biodiversity, biogeochemistry, climate change, and ecosystem services. Dr. Sutton-Grier is a research faculty member at the University of Maryland in the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center and is also the Ecosystem Science Adviser for the National Ocean Service at NOAA. She holds Bachelors degrees from Oregon State University in Environmental Science and International Studies and a doctoral degree from Duke University in Ecology. She leads the NOAA Coastal Blue Carbon Team as well as an interagency blue carbon group and is very involved with NOAA's efforts to support natural and nature-based coastal resilience strategies. She gets especially excited about seeking and discovering innovative opportunities to combine science and policy to solve environmental problems and promote ecosystem conservation. Her research has been published in many environmental and policy journals and featured in several news stories, as well as a children's science TV show.

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26 April 2016

Title: Low-cost and low-carbon electricity could be a reality in the near future
Presenter(s): Dr Christopher Clack Research Scientist at CIRES/NOAA, and CAPT Adam Dunbar, Operations Director NGS/NOAA
Date & Time: 26 April 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr Christopher Clack Research Scientist at CIRES/NOAA, and CAPT Adam Dunbar Operations Director NGS/NOAA

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
Global CO2 levels have pierced the 400ppm threshold in 2015. As CO2 levels continue to rise human civilization will face increasing penalties. In fact, even at today's levels the globe is undergoing changes at an unprecedented rate. The electric and energy sectors are gigantic emitters of green house gases (GHGs) and are an obvious target to reduce these GHGs. The main driver of emission reduction in the near future will be a transition of electricity from coal to a combination of wind, solar and natural gas. With these intermittent resources, can the grid be effective? To what extent do we know how the grid will operate with large amounts of variable generations? Are there steps we can take to better understand our options to reduce GHGs? The National Energy with Weather System (NEWS) Simulator was designed around incorporating high resolution (both spatially and temporally) of generators, transmission, weather and demand. The weather data is provided by NOAA and processed to give estimate of power for different technologies. With the NEWS simulator different scenarios can be performed to answer a wide variety of questions. In addition, it can be used to produce plans for expansion of the transmission and generators on the electric grid for utilities and ISOs. The NEWS simulator can also be run in dispatch mode to determine the most cost effective utilization of existing infrastructure in a market format. The present seminar will present details of the NEWS simulator, including the background to major concepts and details of datasets included. The seminar will also show results from several studies carried out within the NEWS framework to answer different questions and determine the robustness and sensitivity of the model.

Bio(s):
Dr Clack is a research scientist for the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado Boulder working with the Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) NOAA. Dr Clack received his first class BSc in mathematics and statistics at the University of Manchester in the UK. He then went on to research applied mathematics and plasma physics at the University of Sheffield in the UK. During his PhD, Dr Clack completed an area of study centered on nonlinear resonance theory within the framework of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). He now leads the development of the NEWS simulator and all its associated components. In the process of developing the model, Dr Clack has assisted in improvements of numerical weather predictions through insights into the model outputs used for the NEWS simulator. CAPT Adam Dunbar was commissioned as a NOAA Corps Officer in 1993. Since then he has served aboard NOAA ships and aircraft with a concentration in assignments related to aerial remote sensing. He is the Operations Director for NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. Previously, he served as the Deputy Director of NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory. During this assignment, CAPT Dunbar gravitated toward ESRL's emerging renewable energy research. The NEWS project was of particular interest due to its importance, multi-disciplinary nature, and because it drew on his educational background in engineering, including ocean wave energy conversion. He joined a team of researchers led by Dr. Alexander "Sandy" MacDonald and Dr. Christopher Clack investigating the potential of weather-driven variable electricity generation. CAPT Dunbar's work on this study was mainly in the areas of energy economics and electric power system limitations. CAPT Dunbar has a B.S. in Ocean Engineering from Virginia Tech, an M.S. in Hydrographic Science from the University of Southern Mississippi, and a Graduate Certificate in Energy Studies from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

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27 April 2016

Title: Resonance classification of swimbladder-bearing fish using broadband acoustics: 1-6 kHz
Presenter(s): Dr. Timothy K. Stanton, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA
Date & Time: 27 April 2016
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Clark Conference Room, NEFSC Aquarium, 166 Water St., Woods Hole, MA 02543
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Timothy K. Stanton, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Point of Contact: Michael Jech, michael.jech@noaa.gov Remote Access Info: Meeting Name: Joint NEFSC/WHOI Seminar URL: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/nefsc-whoi-8/ Teleconference No: 866-658-7997 (toll free, US), +1 517-833-7464 (toll, outside US), Participant code: 4319624. Audio through teleconference line only!

Abstract:
Broadband acoustics is an emerging technology in the use of echosounders to study distributions of fish. In a collaboration between the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), and U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), we have developed new broadband acoustic techniques to classify swimbladder-bearing fish through the resonance properties of their swimbladders. The resonances for common sizes of fish normally occur in the 100's Hz to low kHz frequencies. There are distinct advantages of this approach over use of the higher frequency systems, including 1) the ability to spectrally resolve the resonances from dominant size classes of mixed assemblages of fish even when the echoes are not spatially resolved and 2) the ability to classify fish echoes through their resonances at (horizontal) distances as great as 20 km even in the presence of reverberation from the seafloor and sea surface. These advantages and others are illustrated in this presentation of our studies in the Gulf of Maine where we deployed a combination of technologies: short-range downward-looking broadband echosounder (1-6 kHz) , long-range horizontal-looking broadband sonar (1.5-5 kHz), high frequency narrowband echosounders, and pelagic trawls.

Bio(s):
Dr. Tim Stanton has been conducting research in underwater acoustics for more than 40 years. After receiving his Ph.D. in Physics at Brown University, he worked at Raytheon Company, Portsmouth, RI where he developed advanced sonar systems. After that, he transitioned to acoustical oceanography, first at the University of Wisconsin and then at WHOI where he is currently a scientist. While the overall theme of his research has been scattering physics, he has been developing broadband acoustics techniques for bioacoustics applications for more than 25 years, beginning with laboratory studies of acoustic scattering by fish and zooplankton and, more recently, using broadband sound to study fish in the Gulf of Maine. He has long-term collaborations with scientists from NOAA Fisheries dating back to 1985 with Dr. Mike Jech (now at NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center) and 1987 with Dr. Dezhang Chu (now at NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center). Dr. Stanton is a recipient of the A.B. Wood Medal, is a Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America, and taught in the MIT/WHOI joint graduate education program and Friday Harbor Laboratories for 20 years. Stanton has also been Associate Editor or Guest Editor of three scientific journals (J. Acoustical Society of America, IEEE J. Ocean Engineering, and Deep Sea Research) and has been Chair or Co-Chair of two scientific conferences (meetings of The Oceanography Society and Oceanology International). Stanton's website: www.whoi.edu/people/tstanton Archive of past seminars: An archive of past seminars can be found at the Cooperative Institute for the North Atlantic Region (CINAR) website: http://www.cinar.org/seminars

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28 April 2016

Title: The struggle for existence - how competition reigns, especially when predation abounds
Presenter(s): Dr. Stuart Sandin, Assistant Professor, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego
Date & Time: 28 April 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presented by: Dr. Stuart Sandin, Assistant Professor, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM
http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm
Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

ABSTRACT
The seminal work of Gause and colleagues led us to consider the prominent role of competition in constraining the development of communities. When considering pairwise combinations of similar species in a closed environment, one species will exclude the other in the so-called "struggle for existence". In nature, though, we observe quite the contrary with countless species coexisting, challenging the strength of competitive dynamics in regulating community structure. Our group has been considering how complex ecological communities are organized, focusing on highly-diverse coral reef ecosystems and exploiting natural experimental conditions linked with human harvest and manipulation across replicate coral reef ecosystems (islands of the central Pacific). By including relatively untouched coral reef ecosystems as ecological end-members into the study, we have identified the profound importance of predator-prey dynamics in structuring communities. Critically, within the context of intensive predation we find a complementary increase of competitive dynamics -- both with prey competing with prey and predators competing with predators. These observations lead us to consider a new framework in which Gause's "struggle for existence" is brought into increasing focus in well-developed ecological communities, and in which predation and competition are synergistic processes that lose their rhythm as the trophic structure of ecosystems is perturbed.

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Title: Expanding Social Indicators for Fishing Communities: Climate Change and Business Diversity
Presenter(s): Lisa Colburn, Social Scientist, NOAA Fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, and Mike Jepson, Social Scientist, NOAA Fisheries, Southeast Regional Office
Date & Time: 28 April 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lisa Colburn (Social Scientist, NOAA Fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center), Mike Jepson (Social Scientist, NOAA Fisheries, Southeast Regional Office)

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of the NOAA Fisheries Quantitative Ecology and Socioeconomics Training (QUEST) Program's webinar series. See: http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/quest/quest-webinars POC: Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov Webex: TBD

Abstract:
TBD

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Title: Extreme Heat and Health: Creating Environmental Intelligence Through Science, Predictions, and Engagement
Presenter(s): Andrew Marshall, Australian Bureau of Meteorology and colleagues
Date & Time: 28 April 2016
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871
Description:



Presenter(s):
Andrew Marshall (Australian Bureau of Meteorology), Chidong Zhang (University of Miami), Augustin Vintzileos (University of Maryland), Bradfield Lyon (University of Maine, Orno), Chip Konrad (University of North Carolina) Seminar sponsors: OAR/CPO Programs -- MAPP, RISA, CVP, COD, NIHHIS Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e8c0d26e8b21cf65a49a228ece08edf88 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: Andrew Marshall - Connecting weather and climate forecasts, especially for extreme events, is highly desirable for meeting societal needs. There has been an increasing demand in Australia for subseasonal forecasts of extremes from various sectors, including health and agriculture. Here we assess the capability of POAMA, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's operational subseasonal-seasonal coupled model prediction system, to predict heatwaves and extreme heat over Australia. The Bureau has a weather forecast heatwave service (http://www.bom.gov.au/australia/heatwave/) that is based on a heatwave index that was developed primarily with human health in mind, although its usefulness extends to other sectors. We have recently extended the heatwave forecast from weather to subseasonal timescales and produced a trial forecast product. This presentation describes the index and demonstrates its application to retrospective and real-time forecasts for providing warnings of the chance of low-intensity, severe and extreme heatwaves occurring over Australia in the upcoming weeks or month. We show that there is significant potential to augment traditional weather forecast warnings for heatwaves to include guidance on longer timescales. We have also developed a number of other trial products for forecasting extreme heat on the subseasonal timescale. A major component of our research involves assessing the skill of these forecast products, as well as understanding the depiction and prediction of heat extremes in relation to key climate drivers (including the Madden-Julian Oscillation). Understanding the capability of the forecast system for predicting subseasonal extremes underpins the potential future delivery of appropriate forecast products. Chidong Zhang - Four years after the DYNAMO field campaign, roughly 100 published papers have provided a wide range of results on the MJO events and related variability during the DYNAMO field campaign. In this presentation, selected DYNAMO results that provide new knowledge directly relevant to the advancement of MJO prediction are briefly summarized: 1. Precipitating and non-precipitating shallow clouds are ubiquitous through the life cycle of the MJO but more during suppressed phases when low-mid troposphere is relatively dry. They provide a steady moisture supply to the lower troposphere through vertical transport, and they produce intercepting cold pools to force deeper convection during the transition from convectively inactive to active periods of the MJO. Implication: Shallow convection and its cold pools need to be well represented for MJO prediction. 2. The ocean warm layer is about 4-5 m deep and its diurnal cycle adds ~0.3˚C to daily mean SST and 4 Wm-2 to surface flux. It forces the diurnal cycle of atmospheric convection and related moistening, and thereby helps MJO prediction. Implication: High vertical resolution of the upper ocean is needed to resolve this diurnal warm layer and its effect on the MJO in coupled forecast models. 3. Strong wind-driven shear can persist after surface wind events cease to exist and continue to serve as an energy source for turbulent mixing across the bottom of the mixed layer. This serves as an ocean memory of the MJO. Implication: Wind-driven shear-generated turbulence must be adequately parameterized for accurate forecast of the upper-ocean heat budget associated with the MJO. 4. The radar polarimetric capability allows identification of hydrometeor types within convective systems and their association with mesoscale flows and the evolution of the MJO. Implication: We now are capable of producing 4-dimensional observations of cloud microphysics to help the development of cloud-permitting MJO forecast models. 5. The MJO prediction skill of ECMWF IFS is superior to that of NCEP GFS because IFS better captures synoptic-scale variability at the lead time of 5 " 15 days. The importance of synoptic perturbations is in their role of moisture transport. Implication: Synoptic variability is important to MJO prediction. Augustin Vintzileos - Resilience to adverse weather and climate conditions can be augmented by using multi-scale prognostic systems. We designed and developed a Subseasonal Excessive Heat Outlook System (SEHOS) to address excessive heat events at lead times beyond Week-1 (subseasonal time scales). The SEHOS consists of (a) a monitoring/verification component that is currently based on reanalyses or Day-1 forecasts and (b) a forecasting component which in its baseline version uses NOAA's GEFS ensemble 6-hourly predictions of temperature and relative humidity from Day-8 to Day-14. The SEHOS rests on the definition of heat events as the succession of at least two heat days; a heat day is defined as a day with maximum heat index exceeding a certain percentile (typically 90%, 95% and 98%). In this paper we present the SEHOS and discuss verification of forecast lead Week-2 within the GEFS reforecast period (1985-2014). Then, we discuss verification of forecasts when the SEHOS uses predictions from (a) the ECMWF model and (b) the combined ECMWF/GEFS multi-model ensemble. Finally, we present some first results from the extension of the SEHOS to Week-3 and 4 based on the CFS and ECMWF models. Bradfield Lyon - Summer heat waves have myriad impacts, ranging from deleterious effects on human health to sharp increases in water and energy demand, to stresses on crops. These impacts vary regionally and can display sensitivities to the character of the heat wave and hence, its definition. For example, is the heat wave primarily associated with extreme daily maximum or minimum temperature? What role does heat acclimation and the timing of the heat wave during a given season on the impact? How/does elevated atmospheric humidity also play a role? These questions point to the fact that there is no universal definition of a heat wave. This talk will be based on a larger NOAA-funded project that is examining spatial variations, regional persistence characteristics and trends in US summer heat waves. The emphasis will be on regional variations in heat wave characteristics and their definitional sensitivity. This will include examining different temperature variables, including daily maximum and minimum temperature, apparent temperature and equivalent temperature and their persistence characteristics. The connection of different types of heat waves to the large-scale atmospheric circulation will also be briefly discussed, as will some impacts of extreme temperatures. Chip Konrad - The HHVT (www.sercc.com/hhvt) is a web-based tool that predicts the daily number of emergency department visits for heat-related illness across North Carolina. The current version of the tool inputs 5-day NWS point forecasts of daily maximum temperatures and employs empirical relationships to translate these values into useful information regarding the probability of emergency department visits due to the heat. It is geared towards public health officials and emergency management personnel across the state of North Carolina. In this talk, I describe the empirical relationships used to generate the predictions, the user interface and graphical output of the model, and features of the second version of the model, which will be based on the daily maximum heat index. I will close with a few ideas on how the model might be incorporated into efforts to predict heat illness over longer time scales.

2 May 2016

Title: What’s New in Cetacean Assessment Research in the Pacific Islands Region
Presenter(s): Dr. Erin Oleson, Program Leader for the Cetacean Research Program and the Acting Director for the Protected Species Division at the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, NMFS
Date & Time: 2 May 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 5836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Erin Oleson, the Program Leader for the Cetacean Research Program and the Acting Director for the Protected Species Division at the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, NMFS

Sponsor(s):
NMFS Office of Science and Technology; point of contact is Jiihong.Dai@noaa.gov For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-327-1925. Enter code 2905388# For Webcast: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/st_brown_bag_seminar/

Abstract:
The Cetacean Research Program (CRP) at the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center is responsible for cetacean assessment research throughout the Pacific Islands Region. In the past 5 years, the CRP has grown and expanded its research capabilities and tools- including new passive acoustic technologies, Unmanned Aircraft Systems(UAS), and telemetry tools- and the geographic scope of its efforts- beyond Hawaii to include the Mariana Archipelago, Palmyra Atoll, and the other remote reaches of the region. Erin will discuss assessment research in the Mariana Archipelago, findings from the Pacific Islands Passive Acoustic Monitoring Network, acoustic monitoring of the Hawaii longline fishery for interactions with false killer whales, and plans for an upcoming assessment survey of the entire Hawaii EEZ.

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3 May 2016

Title: Early evidence of climate induced ecological transformation on the Kenai Peninsula – is there a need to respond?
Presenter(s): Dr. John Morton, Supervisory Fish & Wildlife Biologist, Kenai National Wildlife Refuge
Date & Time: 3 May 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. John Morton - Supervisory Fish & Wildlife Biologist, Kenai National Wildlife Refuge

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy ACCAP (https://accap.uaf.edu/?q=webinars)

Remote Access:
http://accap.adobeconnect.com/kenai_ecological_transformation/event/event_info.html

Abstract:
The impacts of a warming climate on the 6 million-acre Kenai Peninsula are already dramatic and forecasted to become even more so. The southern peninsula was the epicenter of a spruce bark beetle outbreak that culled 1 million acres of Sitka, white and Lutz spruce forest over a 15-year period. The fire regime appears to be changing from summer canopy fires in spruce to human-caused spring fires in Calamagrostis canadensis grasslands. As the climate has warmed and available water declined over the past half century, treeline has risen, wetlands have dried and the Harding Icefield has ablated. Climate envelope modeling portrays a future landscape with continuing afforestation of alpine tundra and lowland peatlands by advancing hemlock and spruce, but an uncertain forecast for lower elevations that range from more hardwood to deforestation. Dr. John Morton has been a biologist with the US Fish and Wildlife Service for 3 decades, working previously in the Mariana Islands, Maryland, Wisconsin, California and stints at Arctic NWR and Yukon Delta NWR in Alaska. He's been the supervisory biologist at Kenai National Wildlife Refuge since 2002, where he and his staff have been very involved in climate change research and adaptation. He represented the USFWS in the GAO's investigation of climate change impacts on Federal lands (2006) and on the DOI's Climate Change Task Force (2007). He served on teams that developed the USFWS strategic plan for responding to climate change (2008) and the National Fish, Wildlife and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy (2011). He co-led an interagency team that produced Connecting Alaska Landscapes into the Future (2010), an early project of the Scenarios Network for Alaska Planning. John is currently one of the leads developing the interagency Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for the Chugach National Forest and the Kenai Peninsula.

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4 May 2016

Title: Protecting Peru's Precious Ocean & Coastal Resources
Presenter(s): Ole Varmer, Attorney-Advisor, International Section Office of General Counsel, NOAA
Date & Time: 4 May 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Commerce Research Library – Room 1894 (or online via Webex)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Distribution: DOC Staff in the DC Metro Area Webex: http://doc.libcal.com/event/2519682 Spondor: DOC Around the Bureaus seminar series

Presenter(s):
Ole Varmer, Attorney-Advisor, International Section Office of General Counsel, NOAA Details: NOAA is well-regarded around the world for its scientific research and management as our nation's ocean agency. Working with the Department of State, NOAA has been providing technical assistance to Peru regarding its amazing coastal resources and the Humboldt Current Large Marine Ecosystem off the coast of Peru and Chile. Ole Varmer will be speaking about the recent opportunity he had to travel to Peru through our US Embassy in Lima and assist Peru's Ministry of Environment. His work on integrated coastal management and marine spatial planning, particularly plans for marine protected areas, highlight the importance to the world that these areas are preserved and sustainably developed, and thus the reason DoS and NOAA provide a lot of technical assistance and capacity building, including legal assistance. This presentation will include lots of great travel photos as well, focused on the coastal environment as well as the local cultural heritage!

Bio(s):
Ole Varmer started his legal career in 1981 and worked as a legal assistant at several law firms before graduating from Yeshiva University's Benjamin Cardozo School of Law in 1987. He joined the Department of Commerce Office of General Counsel in 1987 and later moved to NOAA's Office of General Counsel in 1990 where he became lead attorney in establishing a number of National Estuarine Research Reserves and National Marine Sanctuaries including the Florida Keys Sanctuary. He has been serving in his current position in the NOAA GC International Section since 1998. As an attorney-advisor he works on a variety of international issues and is primarily responsible for providing advice on the subject areas involving heritage resources, marine spatial planning, marine protected areas, jurisdiction and maritime zones. For more information visit http://library.doc.gov, email us at research@doc.gov, or see our Calendar of Events.
Title: POSTPONED TO JUNE 2: Effectively Communicating Climate Change to the American Public: Challenges and Opportunities
Presenter(s): Jennifer R. Marlon, Ph.D., Associate Research Scientist, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale Program on Climate Change Communication New Haven, CT
Date & Time: 4 May 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series POSTPONED TO JUNE 2 POSTPONED TO JUNE 2 POSTPONED TO JUNE 2

Title:
POSTPONED TO JUNE 2: Effectively Communicating Climate Change to the American Public: Challenges and Opportunities

Presenter(s):
Jennifer R. Marlon, Ph.D., Associate Research Scientist, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale Program on Climate Change Communication New Haven, CT. Email: jennifer.marlon@yale.edu

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
There is no one public response to climate change. Instead, there are different audiences or “interpretive communities” within society who each respond to the issue in their own distinct ways. One of the first rules of effective communication is “know thy audience” " including who they are, what they currently understand or misunderstand about climate change, their perceptions of the risks, their underlying values, attitudes, and emotions, where they get their information, whom they trust, etc. This presentation will explore national public opinion about different dimensions of climate change, and will identify “Six Americas,” an audience segmentation framework that has been widely used to develop effective education and communication tools focusing on climate change. An interactive mapping tool called “Yale Climate Opinion Maps” (YCOM) will also be presented. YCOM allows users to visualize and explore differences in public opinion about global warming in the United States in unprecedented geographic detail.

Bio(s):
Jennifer Marlon, Ph.D., is an Associate Research Scientist at Yale's School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication (YPCCC). She obtained her Ph.D. and M.S. in Geography from the University of Oregon. Dr. Marlon studies human-environment interactions " how geography, psychology, and social processes drive environmental changes, and how humans perceive and respond to those changes. Her current research focuses primarily on climate change communication, especially public perceptions of extreme weather, such as hurricanes, droughts, and heat waves. She also studies long-term climate-fire interactions using paleoenvironmental data.

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5 May 2016

Title: Session 1: Presenting DOC Talks: Your Stories. Our Stories
Presenter(s): DOC various speakers
Date & Time: 5 May 2016
10:00 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 and in Charleston, SC - HML Auditorium - A103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Three Multi-Talk Sessions: 10 am " 11:30 am; 12 pm " 1:30 pm; 2 pm " 3:30 pm (EST) Hoover Building Auditorium 1401 Constitution Ave NW Sessions: https://connection.commerce.gov/sites/connection.commerce.gov/files/media/files/2016/doc_talks_2016_teams_development_timeline_update_5-2-16.pdf At the 2 pm Session, Deputy Secretary Bruce Andrews will lead the audience in the Oath of Office as a recommitment to public service. Just what is it that Commerce employees…do? The short " and correct " answer is, of course, that we work to achieve the mission of the Department: to create the conditions for economic growth and opportunity. But it is how we go about advancing this mission that provides for some truly amazing, surprising stories. Stories that exemplify the contributions Commerce makes to the people and businesses that drive our Nation's economy. Presenting DOC Talks: Your Stories. Our Stories. Thursday, May 5, from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. (EDT) & Live Webcast (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKq-wU6YRZI) DOC Talks is a first-time initiative that honors and amplifies the contribution of our diverse, talented, and fiercely dedicated workforce in celebration of Public Service Recognition Week. Commerce employees serving in a wide range of positions and functions, from regional offices around the globe, will share inspiring stories of how they help American citizens, communities, and organizations. Across three 90-minute sessions, 22 speakers from 9 bureaus in 12 regions will deliver powerful 12-minute Talks. The lineup can be viewed here. DOC Talks will be presented live in the HCHB Auditorium, and the event will be also webcast live. You are welcome to attend one, two or all three sessions. You will hear how live telephone interviewers enthusiastically help customers use the Census Bureau's statistical information. A USPTO team will tell you about their program to assist inventors who don't have patent attorneys. You will hear what it is like to be an able-bodied seaman on a ship in the NOAA fleet. BIS analysts will talk about how they repurposed decommissioned high tech equipment for use in community college job training programs. An ITA Commercial Service officer in Ankara, Turkey will share his experience working with an American company to gainfully employ refugees. An EDA development specialist will recount the timely intervention that helped strengthen environmental and economic resilience in a Pennsylvania manufacturing town. A NOAA employee who flies into hurricanes, a NIST scientist who fosters innovation by using his lab's reactor to train private sector scientists from a wide variety of industries in neutron analysis, and other great examples of insight, purpose and ingenuity round out the program. The speakers have worked hard over the last four months to prepare their Talks for you. A supportive audience is the best way we can thank them for having the courage to get on stage and share their stories. Please plan to attend or watch some or all of this by-employees, for-employees event! Join us in connecting with each other and with those we serve. Appreciatively, The DOC Performance Team

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Title: Session 2: Presenting DOC Talks: Your Stories. Our Stories
Presenter(s): DOC various speakers
Date & Time: 5 May 2016
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 and in Charleston, SC - HML Auditorium - A103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Three Multi-Talk Sessions: 10 am " 11:30 am; 12 pm " 1:30 pm; 2 pm " 3:30 pm (EST) Hoover Building Auditorium 1401 Constitution Ave NW At the 2 pm Session, Deputy Secretary Bruce Andrews will lead the audience in the Oath of Office as a recommitment to public service. Sessions: https://connection.commerce.gov/sites/connection.commerce.gov/files/media/files/2016/doc_talks_2016_teams_development_timeline_update_5-2-16.pdf Just what is it that Commerce employees…do? The short " and correct " answer is, of course, that we work to achieve the mission of the Department: to create the conditions for economic growth and opportunity. But it is how we go about advancing this mission that provides for some truly amazing, surprising stories. Stories that exemplify the contributions Commerce makes to the people and businesses that drive our Nation's economy. Presenting DOC Talks: Your Stories. Our Stories. Thursday, May 5, from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. (EDT) & Live Webcast (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKq-wU6YRZI) DOC Talks is a first-time initiative that honors and amplifies the contribution of our diverse, talented, and fiercely dedicated workforce in celebration of Public Service Recognition Week. Commerce employees serving in a wide range of positions and functions, from regional offices around the globe, will share inspiring stories of how they help American citizens, communities, and organizations. Across three 90-minute sessions, 22 speakers from 9 bureaus in 12 regions will deliver powerful 12-minute Talks. The lineup can be viewed here. DOC Talks will be presented live in the HCHB Auditorium, and the event will be also webcast live. You are welcome to attend one, two or all three sessions. You will hear how live telephone interviewers enthusiastically help customers use the Census Bureau's statistical information. A USPTO team will tell you about their program to assist inventors who don't have patent attorneys. You will hear what it is like to be an able-bodied seaman on a ship in the NOAA fleet. BIS analysts will talk about how they repurposed decommissioned high tech equipment for use in community college job training programs. An ITA Commercial Service officer in Ankara, Turkey will share his experience working with an American company to gainfully employ refugees. An EDA development specialist will recount the timely intervention that helped strengthen environmental and economic resilience in a Pennsylvania manufacturing town. A NOAA employee who flies into hurricanes, a NIST scientist who fosters innovation by using his lab's reactor to train private sector scientists from a wide variety of industries in neutron analysis, and other great examples of insight, purpose and ingenuity round out the program. The speakers have worked hard over the last four months to prepare their Talks for you. A supportive audience is the best way we can thank them for having the courage to get on stage and share their stories. Please plan to attend or watch some or all of this by-employees, for-employees event! Join us in connecting with each other and with those we serve. Appreciatively, The DOC Performance Team

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Title: An Overview of Social Science Research within the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Presenter(s): NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Social Science Team
Date & Time: 5 May 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 and in Charleston, SC - HML Auditorium - A103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) Social Science Team: Maria Dillard, Social Scientist, NOAA NCCOS Theresa Goedeke, Social Scientist, NOAA NCCOS Angela Orthmeyer, Natural Resources Social Scientist, CSS-Dynamac for NOAA NCCOS Jarrod Loerzel, Environmental Social Scientist, JHT Inc. for NOAA NCCOS Sarah Gonyo, Natural Resource Economist, CSS-Dynamac for NOAA NCCOS Eric Messick, Geographer, JHT Inc. for NOAA NCCOS Matt Gorstein, Natural Resource Economist, JHT Inc. for NOAA NCCOS Chloe Fleming, Marine Policy Specialist, JHT Inc. for NOAA NCCOS Seann Regan, Geographer, JHT Inc. for NOAA NCCOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Abstract:
In recent years, NCCOS has actively grown its social science capacity in order to execute research that has helped institutions, managers and communities broaden their understanding of the connections that exist between humans and the coastal environment. This presentation will provide an overview of select projects that are currently underway or have been recently completed by the social science team at NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). The presentation will highlight a range of social science and integrated social-ecological projects, including: - social and non-market valuation of ecosystem services in National Marine Sanctuaries and National Estuarine Research Reserves; - community vulnerability assessments for climate impacts in coastal communities and Habitat Focus Areas; - valuation of natural infrastructure for the National Estuarine Research Reserves; - socioeconomic/biogeographic assessments of special places; - use of local knowledge in the assessment of coral reefs in the U.S. Virgin Islands; - recreational fishing assessment for St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands; and - social monitoring for the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program. In addition, this presentation will address ways that social science can be integrated into a broad range of research focused on coastal and marine ecosystems and resilient communities and economies. About the Team: The social science team at the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) consists of social scientists, resource economists, geographers and marine policy specialists located at the Hollings Marine Laboratory in Charleston, South Carolina, the Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment in Silver Spring, Maryland, and the Cooperative Oxford Laboratory in Oxford, Maryland. The various backgrounds and areas of specific expertise allow for effective collaboration on an array of projects that explore and highlight the connections between society and the environment. At NCCOS, this team strives to deliver ecosystem science solutions in order to sustain thriving coastal communities and economies through the innovative use of social science. Research priorities for this team include detecting socioeconomic and environmental changes, assessment of human use of coastal and marine environments, assessment of vulnerability and resilience for coastal communities, and valuation of ecosystem services.

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Title: Session 3: Presenting DOC Talks: Your Stories. Our Stories
Presenter(s): DOC various speakers
Date & Time: 5 May 2016
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 and in Charleston, SC - HML Auditorium - A103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Three Multi-Talk Sessions: 10 am " 11:30 am; 12 pm " 1:30 pm; 2 pm " 3:30 pm (EST) Hoover Building Auditorium 1401 Constitution Ave NW At the 2 pm Session, Deputy Secretary Bruce Andrews will lead the audience in the Oath of Office as a recommitment to public service. Sessions: https://connection.commerce.gov/sites/connection.commerce.gov/files/media/files/2016/doc_talks_2016_teams_development_timeline_update_5-2-16.pdf Just what is it that Commerce employees…do? The short " and correct " answer is, of course, that we work to achieve the mission of the Department: to create the conditions for economic growth and opportunity. But it is how we go about advancing this mission that provides for some truly amazing, surprising stories. Stories that exemplify the contributions Commerce makes to the people and businesses that drive our Nation's economy. Presenting DOC Talks: Your Stories. Our Stories. Thursday, May 5, from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. (EDT) & Live Webcast (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKq-wU6YRZI) DOC Talks is a first-time initiative that honors and amplifies the contribution of our diverse, talented, and fiercely dedicated workforce in celebration of Public Service Recognition Week. Commerce employees serving in a wide range of positions and functions, from regional offices around the globe, will share inspiring stories of how they help American citizens, communities, and organizations. Across three 90-minute sessions, 22 speakers from 9 bureaus in 12 regions will deliver powerful 12-minute Talks. The lineup can be viewed here. DOC Talks will be presented live in the HCHB Auditorium, and the event will be also webcast live. You are welcome to attend one, two or all three sessions. You will hear how live telephone interviewers enthusiastically help customers use the Census Bureau's statistical information. A USPTO team will tell you about their program to assist inventors who don't have patent attorneys. You will hear what it is like to be an able-bodied seaman on a ship in the NOAA fleet. BIS analysts will talk about how they repurposed decommissioned high tech equipment for use in community college job training programs. An ITA Commercial Service officer in Ankara, Turkey will share his experience working with an American company to gainfully employ refugees. An EDA development specialist will recount the timely intervention that helped strengthen environmental and economic resilience in a Pennsylvania manufacturing town. A NOAA employee who flies into hurricanes, a NIST scientist who fosters innovation by using his lab's reactor to train private sector scientists from a wide variety of industries in neutron analysis, and other great examples of insight, purpose and ingenuity round out the program. The speakers have worked hard over the last four months to prepare their Talks for you. A supportive audience is the best way we can thank them for having the courage to get on stage and share their stories. Please plan to attend or watch some or all of this by-employees, for-employees event! Join us in connecting with each other and with those we serve. Appreciatively, The DOC Performance Team

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Title: It's not about science - Electronic Compliance Monitoring on the US West Coast
Presenter(s): Dave Colpo, Program Manager, Fisheries Economics Data Program, Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission
Date & Time: 5 May 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dave Colpo, Program Manager, Fisheries Economics Data Program, Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov - NO Webinar for today's Monster JAM -

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m0d6a604678d61bd6f3268dfb7f8a1388 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 NWFS directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm ABSTRACT The U.S. West Coast groundfish trawl fishery, consisting of approximately 100 vessels, transitioned to an Individual Fishing Quota (IFQ) fishery starting in 2011. As a regulatory requirement, 100% at-sea human compliance monitoring was implemented to accurately monitor discards of IFQ species for vessel quota debiting. Human monitors can reduce flexibility in the fishery, increase costs, decrease safety and sometimes eliminate the opportunity to fish when monitors are not available on short notice. Electronic monitoring (EM) systems, were demonstrated to be a viable substitute for human monitoring, could resolve some of the limitations imposed by the need to monitor 100% of fishing activity. Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) has developed an EM program with pre-implementation exploration started in 2012. In order to successfully implement EM as a management tool, key players must be involved and systems must be in place. Beginning in May of 2015, EM was implemented in the IFQ fishery to a limited degree using exempted fishing permits to further explore EM as a management tool. This presentation will explore the U.S. West Coast electronic monitoring program. BIO Dave Colpo is a Senior Program Manager at the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Portland OR. In this role he and his staff assist in capturing, transmitting, storing, and maintaining data believed to be needed to support commercial fisheries management on the U.S. West Coast. Courtney Donovan is the Electronic Monitoring Project Lead at the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Portland OR. She is responsible for managing the video review process, training video reviewers, writing/implementing review protocols, and communicating with the EM service provider and NMFS/NOAA staff. Prior to her current role, Courtney was a NEFOP fisheries observer and at-sea monitor in New England.

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6 May 2016

Title: Status of the International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) of IOC/UNESCO
Presenter(s): Peter Pissierness, Head of the IODE Project Office and IOC capacity development coordinator
Date & Time: 6 May 2016
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 4817 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mr. Peter Pissierness, Head of the International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) Project Office and Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) capacity development coordinator.

Remote Access:
Phone (limited to 25 callers): 1-877-725-4068 (8634769#). For Webcast access within the US : 1) go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c; 2) type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ); 3) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy; 4) click on Proceed.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) and World Data Service for Oceanography (WDS-Oceanography) Seminar POC: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The "International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange" (IODE; http://www.iode.org/) of the "Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission" (IOC) of UNESCO was established in 1961. Its purpose is to enhance marine research, exploitation and development, by facilitating the exchange of oceanographic data and information between participating Member States, and by meeting the needs of users for data and information products. In order to respond to new challenges faced by the IODE Programme, an "IOC Project Office for IODE" has been established in Oostende, Belgium, with substantial support from the Government of Flanders (Belgium) and City of Ostend. With the opening of the IOC Project Office for IODE on 25 April 2005, the IODE programme entered a new era of capacity building and ocean data/information services. See http://www.iode.org/

Bio(s):
Peter Pissierness (Degree in marine biology) is the Head of the IOC Project Office for IODE, Oostende, Belgium with over 20 years of experience in project management related to ocean data and information exchange. After research experience in Belgium and field experience in Kenya working for the Kenya- Belgium development cooperation and at UNEP, he moved to UNESCO/IOC Headquarters in Paris, France in 1992 taking responsibility for marine information management activities, followed by data management, bathymetry and tsunami warning and mitigation. In November 2007 he moved to Belgium as the Head of the IOC Project Office for IODE in Oostende, which is the IODE Secretariat but also the global headquarters of the OceanTeacher Academy, a global training centre for ocean data and information management. The IODE network federates 82 oceanographic data centres in 80 countries. In 2015 the coordination IOC's capacity development activities was added to his responsibilities.

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10 May 2016

Title: The Group on Earth Observations Blue Planet Initiative
Presenter(s): Emily Smail, PhD, Scientific Coordinator, Blue Planet Secretariat
Date & Time: 10 May 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 4817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Emily Smail, PhD (Scientific Coordinator Blue Planet Secretariat, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction; Emily.Smail@noaa.gov)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/). POC: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov Seminar

Remote Access:
Webex: 1-877-725-4068 (8634769#). For Webcast access go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c

Abstract:
The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is a voluntary partnership of governments and organizations that strives to enhance informed decision making by increasing the availability and use of Earth observation data and information. GEO Membership includes 101 nations and the European Commission, and 92 Participating Organizations, comprised of international bodies with a mandate in Earth observations. The over-arching marine task in GEO, the Blue Planet Initiative, seeks to coordinate all the existing ocean observation programmes within GEO, to add new ones to the GEO portfolio, and to create synergies between them. Blue Planet also aims to identify gaps in user needs and develop end-to-end services to meet these needs.

Bio(s):
Based out of the NOAA NESDIS Satellite Oceanography and Climatology Division, Emily Smail is the Scientific Coordinator for the GEO Blue Planet Initiative and the GEO Water Quality Community of Practice. Prior to joining NOAA, Smail was the Acting Director of Education and resident scientist at the Waikiki Aquarium. She has also served as a Knauss policy fellow in the office of Senator Roger F. Wicker and has experience in environmental consulting. She received her Ph.D. in marine environmental biology from the University of Southern California where her research focused on trace metal chemistry and the cycling of B-vitamins in the marine environment.

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Title: Water Policy & Climate Change for Alaska Natives
Presenter(s): Hal Shepherd - Principal Consultant, Water Policy Consulting, LLC
Date & Time: 10 May 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: online access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Hal Shepherd - Principal Consultant, Water Policy Consulting, LLC

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy ACCAP is a NOAA Climate Program Office Climate & Societal Interactions RISA Program https://accap.uaf.edu/?q=policy_adaptation POC: accap@uaf.edu

Remote Access:
http://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=777750bfdc&e=9097598e1a Water Policy Consulting, LLC, ACCAP, and tribal environmental and climate change professionals throughout the country, together, are offering the Winter 2015-16 Policy & Climate Adaptation Mitigation and Planning for Alaska Natives webinars series. The series will demonstrate how Native Villages and other communities in Alaska can apply state, federal and tribal policies to address climate change impacts on water and subsistence resources through water resource management and protection, land and water rights, sovereignty and other resiliency and mitigation strategies. Presentation by Hal Shepherd, Water Policy Consulting, LLC. Provides Alaska Native Communities and environmental professionals with an overall understanding of how water policies, regulation, and laws apply to Alaska Native Communities and can be utilized to find solutions to environmental challenges including climate change. Topics include: 1) Alaska Native Water rights under state instream flow, Constitution, Public Trust and related laws; 2) The Application of the Federal Trust Duty to Native Alaskan Tribal water interests; 3) Water Privatization and how it applies to Alaska; 4) Alaska Native Federally Reserved Water Rights? 5) Tribal Water Codes; 6) The Application of water rights and management to Climate Change for Alaska Natives. Hal Shepherd is the principal consultant with Water Policy Consulting, LLC which focus on water, climate change and human rights issues in Alaska and the Arctic. Previous to his consulting business, Hal served for over 20 years as an environmental attorney working with conservation organizations and native communities in Alaska, Oregon, Washington, Utah and Colorado focusing on water, environmental and Indian law matters. Hal is the author of “Compromising Democracy, The Rise and Fall of the Second Conquest of Western Rangelands” and has authored multiple law review articles addressing human rights, water law and natural resource matters.

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11 May 2016

Title: Incorporating Ecosystem Services into Federal Decision Making: Perspectives from NOAA
Presenter(s): Doug Lipton, Senior Scientist for Economics at NOAA Fisheries and a member of the Council of NOAA Fellows; Tracy Rouleau, Deputy Chief Economist and Acting Social Science Chief in NOAA's Office of Performance, Risk, and Social Science; and Peter Wiley, Economist with NOAA's Office for Coastal Management
Date & Time: 11 May 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Doug Lipton, Senior Scientist for Economics at NOAA Fisheries (NMFS) and a member of the Council of NOAA Fellows; Tracy Rouleau, Deputy Chief Economist and Acting Social Science Chief in NOAA's Office of Performance, Risk, and Social Science; and Peter Wiley, an Economist with NOAA's Office for Coastal Management.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. For Audio, dial toll-free (in US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# The webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Ecosystem services are the benefits that nature provides to economic and social well-being. Incorporating ecosystem services allows managers to think through the environmental and societal implications of different management actions and to consider the tradeoffs inherent in their choices. A recent memorandum from the Obama Administration directed Cabinet Departments to describe how each Department incorporates ecosystem services into their work. This seminar will discuss NOAA's response to the memorandum within the broader context of inter-agency efforts. It will provide insight into the Agency's overarching policy and address application of an ecosystem services approach.

Bio(s):
Doug Lipton is the Senior Scientist for Economics at NOAA Fisheries (NMFS) and a member of the Council of NOAA Fellows. Lipton began his career at NMFS Headquarters as a fisheries biologist and he was an industry economist while obtaining his Ph.D. in Agricultural & Resource Economics (AREC) at the University of Maryland. He spent 25 years as faculty member in AREC at the University of Maryland and was Program Leader for the Maryland Sea Grant Extension Program for 20 of those years. Most of his work has focused on valuation of benefits related to improvements in water quality and the economics of ecosystem based fisheries management with specific application to the Chesapeake Bay. His current focus is on integrating economics with ecosystem-based fisheries management. Tracy Rouleau is NOAA's Deputy Chief Economist and the Acting Social Science Chief in NOAA's Office of Performance, Risk, and Social Science, which catalyzes, empowers, and coordinates integration of Social Science across NOAA. Her work focuses on Agency-wide priorities including advancing the integration of ecosystem services into management and policy; improving and maintaining the rigor of NOAA's high-profile economic data; transitioning research on risk communication and behavior to application; and measuring and communicating the value of NOAA's products and services. Previously, Rouleau worked as a Senior Advisor to the Director of the National Weather Service, as NOAA's Senior Policy Advisor for the National Ocean Policy, and on issues including hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico and Climate Ready Estuaries in EPA's Office of Water. Peter Wiley is an Economist with NOAA's Office for Coastal Management. In his 26 years in this role, Wiley has worked on a wide variety of issues related to the economics of coastal management. His early work included estimating market and non-market values in support of National Marine Sanctuary Regulations; estimates of participation in marine related outdoor recreation; and research to better understand the link between the economy and environment in coastal areas. Recently, Wiley's work has concentrated on the role of ecosystem services in coastal management decision-making. Wiley is also the National Coordinator for the National Estuarine Research Reserve Coastal Training Program.

12 May 2016

Title: UK Met Office JULES Land Model for Weather and Climate Models
Presenter(s): Martin Best, UK Met Office
Date & Time: 12 May 2016
10:00 am - 11:15 am ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2890
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Martin Best (UK Met Office)

Title:
UK Met Office JULES Land Model for Weather and Climate Models POC: Michael Ek michael.ek@noaa.gov 1. Please join my meeting, May 12, 2016 https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/370345877 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 370-345-877 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 370-345-877

Abstract:
JULES (the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator; jules.jchmr.org) is a community land surface model that has evolved from the Met Office Surface Exchange Scheme (MOSES). It is used both as a standalone model and as the land surface component in the Met Office Unified Model. JULES is a core component of both the Met Office's modelling infrastructure and NERC's Earth System Modelling Strategy, and hence is continually improving, placing it firmly at the cutting edge of land surface modelling. By allowing different land surface processes (surface energy balance, hydrological cycle, carbon cycle, dynamic vegetation, etc.) to interact with each other, JULES provides a framework to assess the impact of modifying a particular process on the ecosystem as a whole, e.g. the impact of climate change on hydrology, and to study potential feedbacks. JULES is available to any researcher, free of charge. This has led to a large and diverse community from across the globe, using JULES to study land surface processes on a wide variety of temporal and spacial scales.
Title: Eyes on the Seas Project - The Pew Charitable Trusts
Presenter(s): Mark Young, Senior Officer, Conservation Enforcement, PEW Charitable Trusts
Date & Time: 12 May 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - See event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mark Young, Senior Officer, Conservation Enforcement at the PEW Charitable Trusts Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5722975987119219457

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series which is co-sponsored by MEAM, OpenChannels.org, and the EBM Tools Network.The series is focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. For a list of upcoming webinars see: http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/ Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The Pew Charitable Trusts has partnered with the Satellite Applications Catapult to pioneer Project Eyes on the Seas, a cutting-edge technology platform that combines satellite monitoring and imagery data with other information, such as fishing vessel databases and oceanographic data, to help authorities detect suspicious fishing activity. Illegal fishing is a global concern that threatens the long-term health of our oceans, worsens the impact of overfishing on critical marine ecosystems, and costs up to an estimated $23.5 billion annually. It accounts for 1 of every 5 fish taken from the world's seas and jeopardizes the livelihoods of tens of millions of people who depend on the oceans' resources. http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/multimedia/video/2015/project-eyes-on-the-seas

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Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 May 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Rebuilding fish stocks: how successful has it been and the relationship between management methods and rebuilding success.
Presenter(s): Dr. Ray Hilborn, Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 12 May 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Ray Hilborn, Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Webex: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m0d6a604678d61bd6f3268dfb7f8a1388 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code and meeting number: 283 881 307 NWFS directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm ABSTRACT In the last 2 decades fisheries in several countries have seen major rebuilding of biomass, with US Gulf and Northeast stocks, and European stocks showing particular success. Some other areas such as the Mediterranean Sea have not shown any success at rebuilding stocks. However, in most regions there are examples of success and failure. In this talk I will evaluate the success of stock rebuilding in several regions of the world using data stored in the RAM Legacy Stock Assessment Database, and look at the relationship between how fisheries are managed, and rebuilding success. This evaluation draws on the data we have collected on how fisheries are managed in the 28 countries that catch most of the worlds fish. This work is the result of a working group at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. BIO Ray Hilborn is a Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington specializing in natural resource management and conservation. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in food sustainability, conservation and quantitative population dynamics. He authored several books including “Overfishing: what everyone needs to know” (with Ulrike Hilborn) in 2012, “Quantitative fisheries stock assessment” with Carl Walters in 1992, and “The Ecological Detective: confronting models with data” with Marc Mangel, in 1997 and has published over 250 peer reviewed articles. He serves on the Editorial Boards of numerous journals including 7 years on the Board of Reviewing Editors of Science Magazine. He has received the Volvo Environmental Prize, the American Fisheries Societies Award of Excellence, The Ecological Society of America's Sustainability Science Award and the American Institute of Fisheries Research Biologists Outstanding Achievement Award. He is a Fellow of the American Fisheries Society, the Washington State Academy of Sciences, the Royal Society of Canada and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

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13 May 2016

Title: Utility of Chemical Tracer Tags in the Delineation of Foraging Grounds of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna
Presenter(s): Ashok Deshpande, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Sandy Hook, NJ.
Date & Time: 13 May 2016
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Clark Conference Room, NEFSC Aquarium, 166 Water St., Woods Hole, MA 02543
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ashok Deshpande, NOAA Fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Sandy Hook, New Jersey

Sponsor(s):
Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) Seminar. Point of contact: Paula Fratantoni, NEFSC, paula.fratantoni@noaa.gov Remote Access Information: Meeting Name: NEFSC seminar URL: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/r9pwxjbhsua/ Teleconference No: 866-658-7997 (toll-free, US) or +1 517-833-7464 (toll, outside US) Participant Code: 4319624

Abstract:
Researchers have utilized chemical fingerprints in the determination of habitat utilization and movements of the aquatic animals. In the present effort, we analyzed polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and organochlorine pesticides in the samples of juvenile bluefin tuna caught offshore of Virginia, and in larger bluefin tuna from the Gulf of Maine and near Nova Scotia. For a given specimen, or a given location, PCB concentrations were highest, followed by DDTs, and chlordanes. Average contaminant concentrations from fish captured from the three locations were not significantly different; and PCBs, DDTs, and chlordanes correlated well with each other. Trans-nonachlor/PCB 153 ratios in bluefin tuna of eastern Atlantic (i.e., Mediterranean) origin are low compared to the corresponding ratios in fish in the western Atlantic. As the former migrate to the western Atlantic, these ratios gradually turnover due to the accumulation of biomass from forage contaminated with higher trans-nonachlor/PCB 153 ratio reflecting dissimilar use of chlordane pesticides on two sides of the Atlantic Ocean. The trans-nonachlor/PCB 153 ratio indicated that one juvenile bluefin tuna from offshore of Virginia and one large bluefin tuna from Gulf of Maine in the present study originated from foraging grounds in the Mediterranean Sea, and that they have made the trans-Atlantic migrations. The remaining individuals were determined to be either spawned in the Gulf of Mexico or the trans-nonachlor/PCB 153 ratio for the putative Mediterranean bluefin tuna was completely turned over to resemble the ratio characteristic to the western Atlantic. Based on the turnover time for trans-nonachlor/PCB 153 ratio previously determined, the residence time of juvenile bluefin tuna in offshore Virginia was estimated to be at least 0.8 to 1.6 years. A discriminant function analysis (DFA) plot of total PCB normalized signatures of PCB congeners showed three separate clusters, which suggested that bluefin tuna from offshore Virginia, Gulf of Maine, and Nova Scotia could have had extended residences and foraging within the areas of capture to be able to sustain the stable signatures of PCB congeners. The DFA cluster results supported the concept of metapopulation theory of spatial ecology comprising discrete aggregates of local populations of bluefin tuna where the desired prey species are likely to be abundant. Despite their highly migratory trait and endothermic advantage of foraging in broader and colder habitats, the movements and mixing across the aggregation ranges related to feeding did not appear to be extensive. Advancement in the understanding of bluefin tuna population dynamics beyond the coarse concept of trans-Atlantic migrations to the metapopulation hypothesis provides a novel exploratory tool in the stock assessment and resource management. As the chemical tracer tags are fortified naturally, and document the time- and space-integrated foraging history, they promise to serve as the low-cost alternatives to the high-cost electronic data recording tags employed for addressing the migratory movements of bluefin tuna. Between the different potential chemical tracer tags, a distinct advantage of PCB/pesticide analysis over the otolith micro-constituent analysis is that the muscle tissue of a given individual bluefin tuna can be sampled repeatedly for PCB/pesticide analysis over different spatial and temporal scales in a nonlethal manner.

Bio(s):
Ashok Deshpande works in the Marine Chemistry Branch at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Sandy Hook, NJ. Archive of Past Seminars: An archive of past seminars can be found at the Cooperative Institute for the North Atlantic Region (CINAR) website: http://www.cinar.org/seminars

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18 May 2016

Title: A Satellite Paradigm Shift: GOES-R and JPSS preparation shed new light on analyzing and forecasting heavy precipitation, marine weather, and tropical cyclones
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael J. Folmer, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites, ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park, MD
Date & Time: 18 May 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building 10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham MD 20706 8th Floor Conf Room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Michael J. Folmer, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites, ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Sponsor(s):
JPSS May Science Seminar

Remote Access:
Phone: 877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m6a6dd84e5137a4275d2362f63952abc1 Meeting number: 745 203 999 Meeting password: Jpss2016!

Abstract:
The GOES-R and JPSS Proving Ground (PG) Programs were conceived to demonstrate and familiarize forecasters with the next generation geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite products and capabilities that will be incorporated into National Weather Service (NWS) and National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information (NESDIS) operations. The Satellite Proving Ground for Marine, Precipitation, and Satellite Analysis (MPS PG) has been an active participant in the larger Satellite Proving Ground for about five years and consists of the NWS Ocean Prediction Center (OPC), Weather Prediction Center (WPC), Tropical Analysis and Forecast Branch (TAFB) of the National Hurricane Center, and the NESDIS Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB). Prior to the PG efforts, satellite usage was fairly basic, but since then, proxy products have demonstrated practical utility in the forecasters' arsenal of weather tools when analyzing and forecasting significant weather events. This presentation seeks to take you on a short journey through five year of integrating new satellite products and techniques into forecast operations, beginning with operations prior to the PG, the current status of the PG, and the future direction in the GOES-R and JPSS era.
Title: Mapping SubTidal Oyster Habitat in the Chesapeake Bay and Use of Spatial Data in Tributary Scale Oyster Restoration
Presenter(s): David G. Bruce, Ecologist with NOAA's Chesapeake Bay Office, Fisheries/Office Habitat Conservation
Date & Time: 18 May 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
David G. Bruce, Ecologist with NOAA's Chesapeake Bay Office, Fisheries/Office Habitat Conservation Host: NOS Seminar Coordinator Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
Since 2003 the NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office (Fisheries/Office of Habitat Conservation) and the Maryland Geological Survey have used acoustic survey techniques to map oyster habitat in the Chesapeake Bay. Survey data help characterize the distribution and quality of existing oyster habitat and are used for planning and implementing large-scale oyster restoration. This presentation will illustrate some of the unique morphologies of sub-tidal oyster habitat and demonstrate how oyster restoration is driven by spatial data and GIS.

Bio(s):
David Bruce, an ecologist with NOAA's Office of Habitat Conservation at the Chesapeake Bay Office. David has over 16 years of experience using seabed habitat mapping and GIS to support fisheries management in the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays. Prior to his current position, he worked for the States of Delaware and Maryland. He has BS in Wildlife from the University of Vermont and an MS in Fish Ecology from the University of Georgia. David has used seabed habitat mapping and GIS to support resource management/ restoration in the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays since 1999.

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19 May 2016

Title: Climate Change Related Impacts on Food Insecurity and Governance in the U.S. and Canadian Arctics
Presenter(s): Monique Baskin, M.S., M.A.I.A, Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in the Arctic Research Program, Climate Observation Division
Date & Time: 19 May 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Monique Baskin, M.S., M.A.I.A, Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in the Arctic Research Program, Climate Observation Division

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Knauss Brown Bag series; point of contact is katheryn.patterson@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Arctic communities have shifted from being relatively self-sufficient to being a mixed subsistence based community " relying on traditional and nontraditional food to survive. Dramatic physical impacts from climate change have rendered the region extremely vulnerable to food insecurity. The way governing organizations deal with food insecurity and other factors may directly affect food insecurity.

Bio(s):
Monique is a 12-yr Air Force veteran, she received her master's in International Affairs, with an Environmental focus and graduate certificate in Environmental Health, Science and Policy from The George Washington University.

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Title: Iron Fertilization in the Pacific Ocean, from Above and Below
Presenter(s): Kassandra Costa, Graduate Student, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
Date & Time: 19 May 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kassandra Costa, Graduate Student, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Iron is a critical micronutrient for global ocean productivity, but some regions, like the Southern Ocean, Equatorial Pacific, and North Pacific, do not have enough iron to fully utilize their macronutrient supply of nitrate and phosphate. It has been suggested that adding extra iron to these regions may stimulate surface productivity. During glacial periods, this increased productivity might be a positive feedback, pulling CO2 out of the atmosphere and pumping it into the deep ocean. Extra glacial iron may be sourced from above, via increased dust deposition, or below, via increased hydrothermal venting. I will explore these two avenues for iron fertilization in the Equatorial and North Pacific Ocean and the potential feedbacks on glacial-interglacial climate change.

Bio(s):
I am a third-year graduate student working with Jerry McManus at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. My research interests involve the application of major elements, trace elements and isotopes to investigate the interface between climate, biogeochemistry, and the environment. My current research focus is the relationship between volcanism and global climate change at orbital timescales, tracking changes in hydrothermal vent activity as recorded in marine sediment cores from the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

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Title: An Honest Appraisal of Stock Assessment
Presenter(s): Dr. Andre Punt, Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 19 May 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Andre Punt, Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m0d6a604678d61bd6f3268dfb7f8a1388 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 NWFS directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm ABSTRACT The “gold standard” for fisheries management is considered to be management controls developed using harvest control rules that are supported by stock assessments that integrate multiple sources of data and represent uncertainty using sensitivity analyses and Bayesian posteriors. The reality for most of the world's fisheries is quite different. Although quantitative assessments are available for many of the world's major stocks, this is seldom the case for less commercially-valuable stocks. The major impediments to developing ‘gold standard' stock assessments are identified based on a review of stock assessments in the US, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. The impediments include lack of data to index abundance, data that are insufficient informative about fishing mortality and absolute abundance, contradictory data when multiple data sources are available, a lack of information at the correct spatial and temporal scales, an inability to handle stocks for which biological and fishery parameters change over time and space, and the computational and personpower demands of conducting stock assessments and reviewing them. The talk will assess the likelihood to which the impediments could be addressed by the next World Fisheries Congress and approaches for overcoming these impediments in a way that not unduly costly. BIO André E. Punt is a Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University Washington, Seattle, USA and the currently the Director of the School. He received his B.Sc, M.Sc and Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. Before joining the University of Washington, Dr Punt was a Principal Research Scientist with the CSIRO Division of Marine and Atmospheric Research in Australia. Dr. Punt has been involved in stock assessment and fisheries management for over 30 years and has been recognized for his contributions in this area with awards from CSIRO, the University of Washington, the Australian Society for Fish Biology, and the American Fisheries Society. The research undertaken by Dr. Punt and the MPAM (Marine Population and Management) group at the University of Washington relates broadly to the development and application of fisheries stock assessment techniques, bioeconomic modelling, and the evaluation of the performance of stock assessment methods and harvest control rules using the Management Strategy Evaluation approach. Currently, projects that Dr. Punt is undertaking with his research group include ecosystem modelling, assessment and management methods for data-poor methods, and understanding the impact of climate change and environmental variation on the performance of assessment and management methods. Dr. Punt has conducted stock assessments for a wide range of species, ranging from anchovies and sardines, to groundfish, tunas, and cetaceans. Dr. Punt has published over 300 papers in the peer-reviewed literature, along with over 400 technical reports. He was a member of a National Research Council panel on evaluating the effectiveness of fish stock rebuilding in the United States. Dr Punt is currently a member of the Scientific and Statistical Committee of the Pacific Fishery Management Council, the advisory committee for Center for the Advancement of Population Assessment Methodology, the Crab Plan Team of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council, and the Scientific Committee of the International Whaling Commission. WEBSITE http://puntlab.washington.edu/

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20 May 2016

Title: Recent developments towards a seamless prediction in Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) global ensemble prediction system
Presenter(s): Yoichiro Ota, Japan Meteorological Agency
Date & Time: 20 May 2016
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Yoichiro Ota, Japan Meteorological Agency Sponsor EMC Seminar Rm 2155 is reserved from 9am for discussion with Yoichiro and Daisuke After the seminar medium conference Rm 2551 is reserved after 2pm. They may visit offices. If you are interested in meeting with them, please contact Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov or just come to the seminar to reserve the time. 1. Please join my meeting, May 20, 2016 https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/157484709 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (312) 757-3121 Access Code: 157-484-709 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 157-484-709 Abstract In Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), there are ongoing developments towards unifying existing three operational global ensemble prediction systems (EPS), i.e. Typhoon EPS, One-week EPS and One-month EPS into one global EPS. This new global EPS will cover the prediction of phenomena with various timescales from short-range to sub-seasonal. Among these developments, two topics will be mainly discussed in this talk. First topic will be the introduction of perturbations on Sea Surface Temperature (SST) as boundary conditions of the atmospheric model. The current operational EPS in JMA prescribes a common SST to all members which is derived as persistent anomaly from climatology. This could be a significant source of underdispersiveness in the ensemble forecasts. Statistically consistent way to generate perturbations on SST will be proposed and tested, with promising results leading to better spread-skill relations especially for lower-tropospheric fields in the Tropics and summer extra-tropics. Second topic will be the use of the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) for the generation of the initial perturbations. Current Typhoon EPS and One-week EPS use Singular Vectors (SVs) as the initial perturbations. After reviewing the characteristics of the EnKF perturbations, combined use of SVs and EnKF perturbations is proposed. Using the combination of the EnKF perturbations with SVs leads to improve the accuracy of short-range ensemble forecast than using only SVs, indicating that the EnKF perturbations approximate analysis error covariance better than SVs.

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Title: EFSO and DFS diagnostics for Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) global Data Assimilation system: their caveats and potential pitfalls
Presenter(s): Daisuke Hotta, Japan Meteorological Agency
Date & Time: 20 May 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Daisuke Hotta, Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Sponsor EMC Seminar Rm 2155 is reserved from 9am for discussion with Yoichiro and Daisuke After the seminar medium conference Rm 2551 is reserved after 2pm. They may visit offices. If you are interested in meeting with them, please contact Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov or just come to the seminar to reserve the time. Point of Contact: MIchiko Masutani, Michiko.Masutani@noaa.gov 1. Please join my meeting, May 20, 2016 https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/157484709 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (312) 757-3121 Access Code: 157-484-709 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 157-484-709 Abstract Diagnostic methods have recently been devised that allow estimation of observational impact on a Data Assimilation System (DAS). Such diagnostics not only enable quantification of the 'value' of observations but can also provide clues to improving the diagnosed DAS. Two such diagnostic methods, Ensemble Forecast Sensitivity to Observations (EFSO; Kalnay et al. 2012) and Degrees of Freedom for Signal (DFS; Liu et al. 2009), have been implemented to the EnKF component of JMA's pre-operational global hybrid DAS. This talk will present findings achieved through these diagnostics. Particular emphasis will be placed on caveats and potential pitfalls in interpreting their results. The first part of the talk will present EFSO implemented at JMA. It was found that the forecast error reduction estimated by EFSO accounts for only 20% of the actual forecast error reduction. In order to understand mechanism behind this underestimation, we conducted diagnosis where the forecast error vector is decomposed into the column and null space of the ensemble forecast perturbations, recognizing that portions of forecast errors that are in the null space are discarded during EFSO computation. The result indicated that 80% of the forecast errors are in fact in the null space, explaining the mechanism of the underestimation. Reasons for why so little of the forecast error is accounted for by the ensemble will also be discussed. In the second part, I will show that that the information content extracted from observations by EnKF as quantified by DFS is an order of magnitude smaller than that by 4D-Var. This underestimation is particularly conspicuous to dense observations. Theoretical consideration reveals that, this is because, in EnKF, DFS can never exceed the size of the background ensemble, limiting the amount of information extractable from observations if the number of observations is much larger than the ensemble size. Implications of this DFS underestimation on broad aspect of EnKF, including localization, inflation and observation thinning, will also be discussed.

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Title: May 2016 NWS Alaska Climate Forecast Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Climate Science and Services Manager, Environmental and Scientific Services Division, National Weather Service Alaska Region
Date & Time: 20 May 2016
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Online access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman Climate Science and Services Manager Environmental and Scientific Services Division National Weather Service Alaska Region

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy https://accap.uaf.edu/ POC: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

Remote Access:
http://uaf.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=8737626a2a&e=9097598e1a

Abstract:
Do you lie awake at nights wondering what the upcoming season will be like? Want to place bets with friends and family on next month's weather? If so, good news: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. Rick Thoman will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for June and the early summer season. Rick will also present a "Feature-of-the-Month" special addition in which each month he will highlight a topic relevant to the particular month.

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23 May 2016

Title: The Group on Earth Observations Blue Planet Initiative
Presenter(s): Emily Smail, PhD, Scientific Coordinator, Blue Planet Secretariat
Date & Time: 23 May 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 4817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Emily Smail, PhD (Scientific Coordinator Blue Planet Secretariat, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction; Emily.Smail@noaa.gov)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/). POC: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov Seminar

Remote Access:
Webex: 1-877-725-4068 (8634769#). For Webcast access go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c

Abstract:
The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is a voluntary partnership of governments and organizations that strives to enhance informed decision making by increasing the availability and use of Earth observation data and information. GEO Membership includes 101 nations and the European Commission, and 92 Participating Organizations, comprised of international bodies with a mandate in Earth observations. The over-arching marine task in GEO, the Blue Planet Initiative, seeks to coordinate all the existing ocean observation programmes within GEO, to add new ones to the GEO portfolio, and to create synergies between them. Blue Planet also aims to identify gaps in user needs and develop end-to-end services to meet these needs.

Bio(s):
Based out of the NOAA NESDIS Satellite Oceanography and Climatology Division, Emily Smail is the Scientific Coordinator for the GEO Blue Planet Initiative and the GEO Water Quality Community of Practice. Prior to joining NOAA, Smail was the Acting Director of Education and resident scientist at the Waikiki Aquarium. She has also served as a Knauss policy fellow in the office of Senator Roger F. Wicker and has experience in environmental consulting. She received her Ph.D. in marine environmental biology from the University of Southern California where her research focused on trace metal chemistry and the cycling of B-vitamins in the marine environment.

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24 May 2016

Title: Ocean Acidification: Past, Present, and Future Implications
Presenter(s): Pat Drupp, PhD, NOAA Office of Education
Date & Time: 24 May 2016
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Science On a Sphere - SSMC3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Pat Drupp, NOAA Office of Education

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of Education, Science On a Sphere Point of Contact: erik.macintosh@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
none

Abstract:
Ocean chemistry is rapidly changing due to the burning of fossil fuels and rise in anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Since the start of the Industrial Revolution, the global ocean has absorbed approximately 40-50% of the CO2 released to the atmosphere, resulting in a decline in ocean pH on a scale not seen in at least 1 million years. The change in pH reduces many calcifying organisms' (e.g., oysters, mussels, and corals) ability to create hard calcium carbonate shells, tests, and skeletons. This additional stressor, combined with warming oceans and rising sea levels, is causing some economically important organisms to struggle and could lead to the potential collapse of certain aquaculture industries and coral reefs. New global ocean acidification models from NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab, based on the latest IPCC CO2 Emissions Scenarios, predict a decrease of about 0.3 in average global surface ocean pH, drastically reducing viable habitats for many calcifying organisms. These models have been adapted for Science on a Sphere to visualize global changes in ocean pH, aragonite saturation state, and ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange from 1860-2100.

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Title: The Value of Non-Market Goods: Slowing ships can save whales and reduce air pollution
Presenter(s): Jennifer Bone, Elena Meza, Kendall Mills, Laura Lea Rubino, and Lily Tsukayama - All Master's Candidate at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara
Date & Time: 24 May 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jennifer Bone, Elena Meza, Kendall Mills, Laura Lea Rubino, and Lily Tsukayama - All Master's Candidate at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
The economic and ecological value of the Santa Barbara Channel is threatened by two persisting environmental problems, whale strikes and air pollution. Regional stakeholders have spent years addressing the issue of whale strikes - collisions between container ships and whales - as the channel is an important migratory pathway for several whale species, including endangered blue, fin, and humpback whales. The channel region is also a high-traffic route used by the commercial shipping industry. Air pollution emissions from container ships degrade onshore air quality and make it difficult for Santa Barbara County to meet air quality standards meant to protect human health. To date, existing legislation has not successfully mitigated these two problems; instead, managers are considering incentive-based and non-regulatory solutions. One such solution is vessel speed reduction (VSR), or the intentional slowing of ships, as they transit through the channel. Because slower ship speeds yield benefits for whales and air quality, VSR can simultaneously mitigate these two seemingly distinct problems. The purpose of this project was to identify and assess funding sources that can sustain a long-term, voluntary, and incentive-based VSR program. To meet this objective, we estimated the expected benefits of VSR by conducting three different valuations including: (1) improved human health, (2) increased whale conservation, and (3) existing market solutions. The results of our analyses suggest that VSR is a cost-effective and comprehensive mechanism for mitigating shipping industry externalities. Our results could be used as leverage to support the future implementation of a VSR program in the channel region and possibly other areas. About the Team: The WhaleStrikes team is comprised of Jen Bone, Elena Meza, Kendall Mills, Laura Lea Rubino, and Lily Tsukayama, all master's candidates at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at University of California Santa Barbara. The five members of this team all have diverse backgrounds, and over the last year, they have been working closely with NCCOS, the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, and the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District to address the issues of ship strikes and container ship-generated air pollution emissions in the Santa Barbara Channel. Through their research, they have identified potential funding sources for a long-term, incentivized vessel speed reduction program in the channel region, and they have developed economic arguments in support of this management strategy, which has the potential to generate tremendous human health and whale conservation benefits. The students are finishing up their final year of study at the Bren School and are excited to begin their careers as environmental managers!

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25 May 2016

Title: Seal Whiskers Inspire Marine Technology
Presenter(s): Heather Beem, Ph.D., Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Date & Time: 25 May 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Heather Beem, Ph.D., Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Harbor seals display the extraordinary ability to track the wake of an object several seconds after it has passed by. They do so despite having visual and auditory cues blocked, pointing to the use of their whiskers as sensors of minute water movements. In this work, the flow-induced vibration characteristics of artificial whiskers are measured and used to elucidate the basic fluid mechanisms that seals may employ to accomplish this detection.

Bio(s):
Heather completed her Ph.D. in Mechanical and Oceanographic Engineering through the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in 2015. There she researched marine biomimetics - studying how marine animals swim and sense, and using the underlying fluid mechanics to design new technologies. Heather now leads a STEM education organization that equips teachers to deploy hands-on learning regardless of material resource constraints.

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Title: Efforts to Develop a South Atlantic Fishery Management Council Citizen Science Program
Presenter(s): John Carmichael, Fishery Stock Assessment Scientist/SEDAR; Amber Von Harten, Outreach Specialist, SAFMC; Julia Byrd, SEDAR Coordinator, all at South Atlantic Fishery Management Council
Date & Time: 25 May 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
John Carmichael, Fishery Stock Assessment Scientist/SEDAR; Amber Von Harten, Outreach Specialist, SAFMC; Julia Byrd, SEDAR Coordinator, all at South Atlantic Fishery Management Council

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of the NOAA Fisheries Quantitative Ecology and Socioeconomics Training (QUEST) Program's webinar series. See: http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/quest/quest-webinars POC: Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov Webex: Reserve your seat at: https://goo.gl/3DZe46

Abstract:
The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council manages federal fisheries over a broad geographic range along the eastern U.S. from the Florida Keys to North Carolina. Management encompasses a wide range of habitats and species managed through seven fishery management plans, along with plans addressing habitat, sargassum, and corals. The South Atlantic Council has grappled for years with the challenge of providing timely and robust science to support decision making despite limited resources and a complex and diverse ecosystem. Recognizing the desire of fishermen to get involved and the data needs for the region, the South Atlantic Council is exploring development of a comprehensive fishery citizen science program. Citizen science can engage multiple stakeholders, including fishermen, scientists, and managers, in producing large-scale datasets to enhance the knowledge base for management to decrease scientific and management uncertainty. The presentation will highlight current data challenges in the South Atlantic region; examples of how researchers, resource managers, and fishermen can partner to enhance existing data collection, research, and monitoring efforts; and program recommendations developed by the recent Council-hosted Citizen Science Program Design workshop. See http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/Assets/quest/documents/QUEST_webinar_flyer_Carmichael-Byrd-and-Von-Harten.pdf Biographies: John Carmichael is the Deputy Executive Director for Science and Statistics at the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council. He has worked at the Council since 2003, originally as the Coordinator and then Program Manager for the Southeast Data, Assessment and Review process. Previous positions include serving as a stock assessment scientist with the NC Division of Marine Fisheries working with striped bass, red drum and river herring; an FMP coordinator with the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission; and a biologist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Julia Byrd has served as a SEDAR Coordinator for the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council since 2012. She coordinates stock assessments, primarily in the South Atlantic region, as well as other procedural workshops on special topics of concern to the SEDAR stock assessment process. Previously, she served for eight years as a biologist with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, where she worked on a variety of fishery management issues, including coordinating the Office of Fisheries Management's recreational fishery dependent data collection and biological sampling efforts. Amber Von Harten has served as the Fishery Outreach Specialist for the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, which manages federal fisheries from North Carolina to Key West, Florida, since 2012. She develops and delivers outreach programs aimed at connecting fisheries science, research, and policy to encourage stakeholder involvement in the federal fisheries management process. Previously, she served as the Fisheries Specialist for the SC Sea Grant Consortium for 9 years working directly with commercial fishermen and other stakeholders on cooperative research, fisheries management, and seafood business and marketing projects Presentation available here: https://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/Assets/quest/documents/QUESTwebinar_SAFMC_CitSciInitiative_FINAL_forPDFv3.pdf

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26 May 2016

Title: GLISA and the Great Lakes Adaptation Data Suite: Climate Data Focused on Adaptation Decision-Making
Presenter(s): Beth Gibbons, University of Michigan Climate Center and Omar Gates, University of Michigan Climate Center
Date & Time: 26 May 2016
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Lake Superior Hall
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Beth Gibbons, University of Michigan Climate Center and Omar Gates, University of Michigan Climate Center Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: margaret.lansing@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5798563015803255299

Abstract:
This presentation will provide an overview of the GLISA program (the Great Lakes Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments center (RISA), which is part of NOAA's Climate Program Office) and a new product that the GLISA team is developing to enable climate adaptation research and decision making across the region. GLISA is one of ten RISAs, which comprise a national network of centers focused on adaptation to climate change and variability. GLISA integrates information from a wide array of scientific fields, develops collaborations between entities with similar goals, and helps inform decision makers throughout the region with sound science. GLISA offers a unique approach to building climate literacy, long-term sustainability, and facilitating smart decision making across the eight states and province of Ontario. Inherent in preparing for existing and anticipated changes in our climate is a need for locally relevant and highly credible data and distilled information. A new effort through GLISA is integrating over-land observational data (National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI): Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN)-monthly, GHCN-daily, & Climate Division data) with over-lake and coastal observational data from Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS)/Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) observational data. Standardizing the timestep, variables, and data structure of these various data sets will increase understanding of lake, nearshore/coastal interactions for climate adaptation efforts. The development of this standardized data suite will reduce data acquisition and processing for future researchers, creating more opportunities for applying lessons from these data sets to policy decisions, and creating a single data suite available to climate adaptation practitioners and information providers across the region.

Bio(s):
Beth Gibbons is the director of the University of Michigan's Climate Center and the Program Manager of GLISA, NOAA's Great Lakes RISA. In both roles, her core responsibilities include fostering the transfer of information on climate change and resilience from the research community to stakeholders throughout the region and sharing best practices across practitioner communities. Beth holds a graduate degree in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Michigan. Omar Gates is a Climate Integration Associate at the University of Michigan's Climate Center. One of his roles is being the data programmer for the Great Lakes Adaptation Data Suite, which hosts multiple data sets pertaining to the Great Lakes region. Some of his primary tasks include data collection and processing through the use of different programming languages such as Python. Omar holds a graduate degree in Atmospheric Science from the University of Michigan.

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Title: The Transmission of Price Changes between Wholesale and Ex-vessel Markets in Alaska Fisheries
Presenter(s): Dr. Ben Fissel, Economist, AFSC, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 26 May 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Ben Fissel, Economist, AFSC, NOAA Fisheries

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m0d6a604678d61bd6f3268dfb7f8a1388 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code and meeting number: 283 881 307 NWFS directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm ABSTRACT This paper tests the existence of asymmetric price transmission between first-wholesale and ex-vessel (at the dock) markets in the Alaska pollock shoreside groundfish fleet. The theory of derived demand implies that price changes should be transmitted through different levels of the supply chain. This suggests a co-integrating relationship between prices at the first-wholesale (the first sale after processing onto the global market) and ex-vessel (the sale from harvesters to shoreside processors) levels. Asymmetries in the transmission of prices arise when price changes do not fully pass through or are delayed. A threshold error-corrections model is used to test for price asymmetries in the timing, direction and magnitude price changes between the two markets. This model is applied to the Alaska pollock fishery. BIO Benjamin E. Fissel is an economist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center in the Economic and Social Sciences Research program. He graduated from the University of California, San Diego, with a Ph.D. in Economics and a M.S. in Statistics in 2011. His professional research involves indices for tracking economic performance in fisheries, technological/technical change, bioeconomic modeling, wholesale market prices and forecasting. In addition to his research, Dr. Fissel produces the annual Economic Status Report of the Groundfish Fisheries Off Alaska serves as a primary resource for north pacific economic groundfish data, and analysis of economic performance in these fisheries.

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27 May 2016

Title: Challenges and progress in radar data quality control and assimilation
Presenter(s): Qin Xu, NOAA/NSSL, University of Oklahoma
Date & Time: 27 May 2016
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm2155
Description:

OneNOAA science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Qin Xu (NOAA/NSSL, University of Oklahoma)

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar POC: Geoff Dimego Geoff.Dimego@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
1. Please join my meeting https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/993462325 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Dial +1 (646) 749-3131 Access Code: 993-462-325 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 993-462-325

Abstract:
Radar observations have been very useful and often critical for forecasters to issue timely warnings and outlooks of severe weathers. Assimilating radar observations into a numerical weather prediction system can be more useful and critical for forecasting severe weathers, but the involved tasks are very challenging and require rigorous data quality controls (QCs). Toward this goal, dedicated efforts have been undertaken at NSSL to develop high-standard QCs for radar data assimilation at EMC. In particular, a suite of velocity dealiasing techniques has been developed adaptively for various scan modes applied to different weathers. In these techniques, each reference velocity field is produced by an alias-robust analysis in which the global minimization problem for analyzing aliased velocities is formulated in terms of Bayesian estimation by folding the domain of the non-aliased velocity probability density function into the Nyquist interval. The successively improved performances of these dealiasing techniques will be highlighted with discussions on remaining and newly encountered difficulties. Along with the aforementioned efforts, a radar wind analysis system has been also developed to process radar data, detect data quality problems, test radar data QC and assimilation techniques, and produce high-resolution vector winds for nowcast applications. On-going improvements to this system on tornadic mesocyclone wind analysis, multi-scale/multistep variational analysis, and variational-ensemble approach with time-expanded sampling will be discussed along with challenging issues in storm-scale data assimilation.

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1 June 2016

Title: Forbidding (for now) Fishing for Unfished Forage Fish: A West Coast Fisheries Policy Odyssey
Presenter(s): Yvonne deReynier, Senior Resource Management Specialist, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, West Coast Region
Date & Time: 1 June 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 10153, 1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Yvonne deReynier, Senior Resource Management Specialist, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), West Coast Region

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. For Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# The Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com In the lower right corner of the webpage, Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for web. Be sure to downoload and run the plug‐in/exe for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
On April 4, 2016, NMFS published a final rule to prohibit the development of directed fisheries for a suite of largely unfished lower trophic level fishes and squids. The subject of a long campaign by U.S. environmental organizations, this rule grew out of years of work on the U.S. West Coast to first develop a Fishery Ecosystem Plan and to then consider the role of unfished species within the U.S. portion of California Current Ecosystem. The premier U.S. fisheries law, the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA), does not explicitly protect lower trophic level species (a.k.a. “forage fish”). However, within certain conservation and management constraints, the MSA does allow for flexibility and regional differences in fisheries management practices. This presentation will discuss the development of the Pacific Coast Fishery Ecosystem Plan and MSA guidance and requirements for managing unfished species. The presentation will also address lessons learned from the process that NMFS and the Pacific Fishery Management Council used to provide new protections for a suite of species at the lower end of the California Current Ecosystem's food web.

Bio(s):
Yvonne deReynier is a Senior Resource Management Specialist with NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service's West Coast Region, specializing in Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act implementation. She chairs the Pacific Fishery Management Council's Ecosystem Workgroup and is part of the ongoing U.S. West Coast ecosystem-based fishery management policy development process.

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2 June 2016

Title: The North American Multi-Model Ensemble Seasonal Prediction System: Research, Operations, and Applications
Presenter(s): Ben Kirtman, University of Miami, Emily Becker, Climate Prediction Center, Gabriele Villarini, University of Iowa, Hyemi Kim, Stony Brook University
Date & Time: 2 June 2016
11:30 am - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ben Kirtman (University of Miami), Emily Becker (Climate Prediction Center), Gabriele Villarini (University of Iowa), Hyemi Kim (Stony Brook University) Seminar sponsors: OAR/CPO MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: heather.archambault@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e1ed7cfd5cbbc55cff315ea000e7cf199 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: TBD

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Title: Effectively Communicating Climate Change to the American Public: Challenges and Opportunities
Presenter(s): Jennifer R. Marlon, Ph.D., Associate Research Scientist, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale Program on Climate Change Communication New Haven, CT
Date & Time: 2 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jennifer R. Marlon, Ph.D., Associate Research Scientist, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale Program on Climate Change Communication New Haven, CT. Email: jennifer.marlon@yale.edu

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
There is no one public response to climate change. Instead, there are different audiences or “interpretive communities” within society who each respond to the issue in their own distinct ways. One of the first rules of effective communication is “know thy audience” " including who they are, what they currently understand or misunderstand about climate change, their perceptions of the risks, their underlying values, attitudes, and emotions, where they get their information, whom they trust, etc. This presentation will explore national public opinion about different dimensions of climate change, and will identify “Six Americas,” an audience segmentation framework that has been widely used to develop effective education and communication tools focusing on climate change. An interactive mapping tool called “Yale Climate Opinion Maps” (YCOM) will also be presented. YCOM allows users to visualize and explore differences in public opinion about global warming in the United States in unprecedented geographic detail.

Bio(s):
Jennifer Marlon, Ph.D., is an Associate Research Scientist at Yale's School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication (YPCCC). She obtained her Ph.D. and M.S. in Geography from the University of Oregon. Dr. Marlon studies human-environment interactions " how geography, psychology, and social processes drive environmental changes, and how humans perceive and respond to those changes. Her current research focuses primarily on climate change communication, especially public perceptions of extreme weather, such as hurricanes, droughts, and heat waves. She also studies long-term climate-fire interactions using paleoenvironmental data.

7 June 2016

Title: Adding Storm-Scale Forecasts over Nested Domains for High-Impact Weather
Presenter(s): Eli Dennis and Michael Colbert, PSU
Date & Time: 7 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Eli Dennis and Michael Colbert (PSU) Sponsor EMC seminar Please invite more people using One NOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occipants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted from facebook as well.

Remote Access:
Go To Meeting https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/994970005 Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 994-970-005 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 994-970-005 Click the link to join this meeting from your iPhone®, iPad®, Android® or Windows Phone® device via the GoToMeeting app. POC: Geoff Dimego (geoff.dimego@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Two severe weather cases (28 April 2014 and 6 May 2015) are simulated using both the 1.33-km NAM fire-weather nest and the 4-km NAM. On 28 April 2014, convection initiates along and ahead of a cold front that traverses across Mississippi causing over 450 severe weather reports (153 of which were tornado reports). On 6 May 2015, convection initiation (CI) occurs in the vicinity of a dryline across Oklahoma resulting in nearly 200 severe weather reports (65 of which were tornado reports). Comparisons are made between the simulations and observations to explore the effects of model resolution on CI and storm evolution. The analysis focuses on seemingly unphysical artifacts in the simulated composite reflectivity field, the influence of cold pool strength on the strength and evolution of convection, and the effects of differences between observed and modeled soundings on storm mode and evolution. This research is a part of the Next Generation Global Prediction System (NGGPS) Project.

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8 June 2016

Title: Phragmites -- Coming to your backyard: Can anything be done about it?
Presenter(s): Dennis Whigham, PhD, Senior Botanist with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, or SERC
Date & Time: 8 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dennis Whigham, PhD, Senior Botanist with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC). Dennis is also the Founding Director, North American Orchid Conservation Center

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
While development presents a constant man-made threat to water quality in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, there's another threat, created by Mother Nature, one that methodically chokes off and kills our precious wetland areas. The threat: Phragmites, a reedy wetland grass. It looks bucolic until you realize what it's doing to once-thriving wetland areas. It's here. What can we do about it? How do we identify it? How does it spread? Can it be controlled, stopped or eradicated? The reed takes over wetland areas, and it's root system is so dense and deep, it completely displaces native plants like wild rice, cattails and wetland orchids. Dennis will discuss the various ways governments and organizations have tried to control and remove Phragmites. He'll review the best ways to control its spread.

Bio(s):
The ecology of plants has been Dennis Whigham's primary interest and his research has resulted in journeys through forests, fields and wetlands around the world. Explorations have lead to studies of woodland herbs, including orchids, vines, wetland species, invasive species and studies of forests in the tropics, temperate and boreal zones. In recent years, studies of interactions between orchids and fungi have lead in new and exciting directions. Whigham's current focus is on wetlands, including the role of wetlands associated with juvenile salmon habitat in Alaska; the rarest terrestrial orchid in eastern North America; and invasive species. His current passion is to establish the North American Orchid Conservation Center (NAOCC), an initiative of the Smithsonian and the United States Botanic Garden. NAOCC will be based on continentally focused public-private collaborations that will result in the conservation of the genetic diversity of native orchids, initially in the U.S. and Canada. Whigham obtained an undergraduate degree from Wabash College and a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina. He joined the Smithsonian in 1977. Whigham and his collaborators have published more than 235 articles in journals and books and he has co-edited 10 books.

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Title: Flash Droughts over the United States
Presenter(s): Dr. Kingtse C. Mo, Climate Prediction Center, NOAA/NWS/NCEP
Date & Time: 8 June 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access or at NOAA's Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Conference Room 2890, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Kingtse C. Mo, Climate Prediction Center, NOAA/NWS/NCEP

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Climate Test Bed Point of Contact: Jin.Huang@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
GOTO meeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/714576893 Meeting ID: 714-576-893 Dial-in number: 1-877-680-3341, Participant passcode: 858747

Abstract:
Flash drought refers to relatively short periods of warm surface temperature and anomalously low and rapid decreasing soil moisture (SM). Based on the physical mechanisms associated with flash droughts, we classify these events into two categories: heat wave and precipitation (P) deficit flash droughts. We study flash droughts based on the UCLA/UW P and surface temperature (Tair) analyses and SM and evapotranspiration (ET) reconstructed using land surface models. The base period is from 1916 to 2013. Both types of flash droughts are manifested by SM deficits, which cause damage to crops. Therefore, both are agricultural droughts. The heat wave flash droughts are initialized by the warm air temperature, which increases ET, and decreases soil moisture (SM). The preferred regions for heat wave flash droughts to occur are the North Central, the Ohio Valley and the Pacific Northwest. They tend to occur in the vegetation dense areas. The P deficit drought is initialized by P deficits. The lack of P decreases SM. In the areas where SM and ET anomalies have a linear relationship, ET decreases. That leads to the increase of sensible heat and high temperature. In this sense, high temperatures are the consequence of P deficits. P deficit flash droughts are more common than heat wave flash droughts. They are most prevalent over the southern United States with maxima over the Southern Great Plains and the Southwest. The CFSv2 seasonal forecasts are able to capture the preferred regions for flash droughts to occur. However, the model over forecasts flash drought events of both types in comparison to analyses. Seminar flyer: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/ost/CTB/Forthcoming/CTB_KMo.pdf

Bio(s):
Dr. Mo is a senior physical scientist at the Climate Prediction Center/National Centers for Environmental Prediction (CPC/NCEP), having collaboratively worked with the hydro-climate community for 29 years. Her earlier research more focused on atmospheric sciences. She chaired the AMS Science and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) on Meteorology and Oceanography of the Southern Hemisphere for the 6th International Conference on Southern Hemisphere Meteorology and Oceanography in Santiago, Chile in 2000. She actively participated in the North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) and served on the Variability of the American Monsoon Systems (VAMOS) Panel. In 2006, CPC recognized the importance of the water resources management and started to build research activities to support Drought Monitoring and Outlook. Since the monthly drought briefing started in 2007, her work has more focused on drought monitoring and prediction. Dr. Mo is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society.

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9 June 2016

Title: Integrating Ecophysiology and Downscaled Climate Models to Forecast Climate Change Impacts on San Francisco Bay-Delta fishes
Presenter(s): Lisa Komoroske, Ecologist, NOAA/NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Protected Resources Division
Date & Time: 9 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lisa Komoroske, Ecologist, NOAA/NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Protected Resources Division, and University of California at Davis. Authors of paper: Lisa M Komoroske (1,2 below), Larry Brown (3), and Kenneth Jeffries (2), Richard Connon (2) and Nann Fangue, (2) Affiliations: 1 NOAA NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center 2 University of California at Davis 3 United States Geological Survey

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
Forecasting impacts on sensitive species and integrating them into climate change assessments is a substantial challenge for biological resource management. This is due to a multitude of factors, including differential sensitivities among species and life stages, detecting sublethal effects on fitness, and mismatches between global climate forecasts and local or regional conservation planning. Here, we discuss how we used ecophysiological and behavioral measures to quantify differential sensitivities to changes in environmental conditions among threatened estuarine native fishes in the San Francisco Estuary, California, and then coupled those results with downscaled climate model predictions to forecast future habitat suitability. Our results indicate certain species and life stages may be at higher risk for impact, providing guidance for management and restoration to focus efforts on mitigating these impacts, in combination with those from other anthropogenic threats. Collaboratively integrating tools and knowledge across disciplines offered a more comprehensive picture of climate impacts on these species. The application of this approach could be similarly useful for other systems and species of conservation concern, particularly those with active management and conservation initiatives.

Bio(s):
Lisa Komoroske is a National Research Council Post-Doctoral fellow at the NOAA/NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center in La Jolla, CA. Broadly, her research integrates ecological, quantitative, physiological and molecular approaches to study anthropogenic impacts on sensitive species, ultimately contributing to conservation goals. For her post-doctoral work, she is applying new genomic tools (RAD-Sequencing and capture arrays) to understand fine-scale population stock structure and fisheries bycatch impacts on leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) in the Pacific Ocean. She completed her dissertation in Ecology at the University of California at Davis, focused on climate change effects on threatened endemic fish in the San Francisco Estuary in California, and her Master'\'s in Biology at San Diego State University. During her PhD, she was a California Sea Grant-Delta Science Fellow and an NSF teaching fellow in the Coastal, Atmospheric, and Marine Environmental Observing Studies GK-12 program at Bodega Marine Laboratory (UC Davis).

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Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 June 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Down to Earth: Absolute Gravity at NGS
Presenter(s): Derek Van Westrum, Geodesist, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 June 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Derek Van Westrum, Geodesist, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NGS POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://global.gotowebinar.com/join/4531525393310386690/185818018. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (914) 614-3221 Access Code: 295-227-719 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar. Webinar ID: 125-467-339

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
Derek van Westrum is a Geodesist at NOAA's National Geodetic Survey focusing on gravity observations and instrumentation. Prior to his position at NGS, he spent 14 years at Micro-g LaCoste specializing in absolute gravimetry. He has a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Colorado.

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Title: A framework to evaluate changes in Pacific halibut bycatch quota allocation in Bering Sea Aleutian Islands groundfish fishery
Presenter(s): Kotaro Ono, Ph.D., Post-doctoral Research Associate, Alaska Fisheries Science Center &University of Washington through JISAO
Date & Time: 9 June 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Kotaro Ono, Ph.D., Post-doctoral Research Associate, Alaska Fisheries Science Center &University of Washington through JISAO

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m0d6a604678d61bd6f3268dfb7f8a1388 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code and meeting number: 283 881 307 NWFS directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm ABSTRACT Pacific Halibut is a commercially and economically important species in the Pacific northwest managed jointly by the US and Canada. Since the days of joint venture arrangements with foreign vessels fishing within the US exclusive economic zone, this species has constrained fisheries targeting other groundfish in Alaska. The limited amount of available bycatch quota (called “prohibited species catch” or PSC) available to these fisheries has resulted in fishermen developing measures to reduce the relative rate of Pacific halibut bycatch in order to improve yields from other stocks. Over the last decade, Pacifichalibut population has been declining and is presently stabilizing. However, during the same period, the PSC has been mostly constant (with a decrease that will go into effect in 2016). This disparity indicates that the proportional impact of the bycatch on the halibut stock was increasing. The extent of this effect on the directed Pacific halibut fishery is unknown but is of obvious concern. Consequently, there is a growing interest in evaluating the extent of this impact and also developing approaches which link Pacific halibut PSC to trends in the overall halibut population. In this talk, we present an analytical framework that will address the impacts of alternative PSC limits indexed to the trends in halibut abundance. These impacts include both the effect on the complex and tightly constrained and monitored BSAI groundfish fishery and the directed Pacific halibut fishery. The multispecies technical interaction model combines the extensive observer data available on species compositions for different “métiers” with the assessment and catch limit specification process so that alternative management measures can be more realistically evaluated. BIO Kotaro Ono is a post-doctoral research associate with a joint appointment at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center and the University of Washington through JISAO. He graduated from the University of Washington with a PhD and MS in Fishery Science in 2014. His primary research interests are focused on sustainable fisheries management practices and encompasses data analysis, statistical modelling, stock assessment, and management strategy evaluations.

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14 June 2016

Title: Evaluating the Accuracy of the High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) Model Using Satellite Infrared Brightness Temperatures
Presenter(s): Jason Otkin, CIMSS/SSEC/Univ.Wisc
Date & Time: 14 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jason Otkin (CIMSS/SSEC/University of Wisconsin-Madison) POC: Geoff Dimego geoff.dimego@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar: Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP , Seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars from EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook as well.

Remote Access:
Go To Meeting https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/579474421 Join the conference call: Call in via telecon: 866-685-5896 Pass code 8108134# Meeting ID: 579-474-421

Abstract:
Infrared sensors onboard geostationary satellites provide detailed information about cloud top properties and the water vapor distribution with high spatial and temporal resolutions that make them very useful as a numerical weather prediction model validation tool. To promote the routine use of these observations for this purpose, we developed a near real-time GOES-based verification system for the High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) model that provides operational forecasters objective tools to determine the accuracy of current and prior HRRR model forecasts when they are creating or updating short-range forecasts. This capability has become increasingly more important in recent years due to the implementation of rapidly updating numerical models with many overlapping forecast cycles. Besides serving as a useful forecaster model evaluation tool, long-term statistics accumulated using this system also provide an excellent means to assess the accuracy of the cloud and water vapor fields in the HRRR model forecasts. For this presentation, we will describe the capabilities of the near real-time verification system and present results from several ongoing model validation projects. Synthetic GOES 10.7 m infrared brightness temperatures are generated for each HRRR forecast cycle using the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and are then compared to real GOES observations using various statistical methods to assess the model accuracy at each model forecast time. These methods include dimensioned metrics such as root mean square error and bias, neighborhood-based metrics such as the Fractions Skill Score, and object-based verification tools using the Method for Object-Based Diagnostic Evaluation (MODE) system. The model accuracy was assessed for two one-month periods during August 2015 and January 2016. Overall, the results show that the simulated brightness temperatures are often too warm during the first hour of the forecast, indicating that the HRRR model initialization is deficient in upper-level clouds. This warm bias, however, is quickly replaced by a large cold bias due to the rapid generation of upper level clouds, with the negative bias often lasting for many hours into the forecast before the excessive cloud cover dissipates. Detailed analysis of the MODE results showed that the HRRR initialization contains too many small cloud objects, especially during August; however, the number of cloud objects becomes too low by forecast hour 2. This behavior is consistent with the changes in the brightness temperature bias and indicates that the simulated cloud objects become too large after a few hours.

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Title: Tracing Deepwater Horizon into Coastal Marine Bacterial Communities
Presenter(s): Tiffany C. Baskerville, PhD candidate, Florida A&M University, Environmental Cooperative Science Center/ NOAA Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions - EPP/MSI, Graduate Research & Training Program - GRTSP Fellow
Date & Time: 14 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tiffany C. Baskerville, PhD candidate, Florida A&M University, Environmental Cooperative Science Center/ NOAA Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI) Graduate Research & Training Program (GRTSP) Fellow

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web. Abstract. One year after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, samples were collected from Barataria Bay, LA (impacted), Pensacola Bay, FL (moderately-impacted), and Apalachicola Bay, FL (un-impacted) to evaluate spill effects on indigenous bacterial communities. Natural Delta 14 C and del 13 C abundances were used to trace in situ bacterial hydrocarbon remineralization to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Barataria Bay DIC samples were significantly deplete in Delta 14 C (-109.98‰ to +12.48‰) relative to that for Apalachicola Bay (+36.31‰) indicating hydrocarbon remineralization at the BaratariaBay site. Using dual isotope three endmember mixing models we estimate that between 1 to 12% of the respired DIC at Barataria Bay can be attributed to hydrocarbon remineralization. Bacterial abundances were an order of magnitude higher in Barataria Bay when compared to Apalachicola Bay which correlated with higher DOC concentrations at the Barataria Bay site. Clone libraries indicate distinct differences in bacterial community structure between sites due to the presence of known oil degrading bacteria in Barataria Bay and Pensacola Bay. Collectively, these results demonstrate that such a combined biogeochemical and biomolecular approach can be a powerful tool for evaluating oil intrusion into marine food webs. About the Speaker. Tiffany Baskerville is a PhD candidate at Florida A&M University, the lead institution of the NOAA Environmental Cooperative Science Center (ECSC). Tiffany graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology from Fort Valley State University and chose to forego her Master's Degree to enter directly into the FAMU Environmental Science Ph.D. program. Having been born and raised in the coastal community of Hampton Roads, Virginia, she was excited to have the opportunity to learn more about the coastal issues that impact the area she calls home while also integrating her love of science with her desire to serve her community by engaging in meaningful research. As a graduate research assistant in the Aquatic Sciences Laboratory at FAMU, Tiffany has collaborated in several research campaigns including a 3 week Deep Ocean Refractory Carbon Expedition in the Gulf of Alaska led by Dr. Dennis Hansell. Most recently, she was awarded the NOAA EPP-MSI Graduate Research & Training Program Fellowship in which she has partnered with the NCCOS Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research under the mentorship of Dr. Marie DeLorenzo.

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15 June 2016

Title: A unified approach to land modeling
Presenter(s): Martyn Clark, National Center for Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 15 June 2016
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Martyn Clark, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) POC: Youlong Xia youlong.xia@noaa.gov Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using One NOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP , Seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars from EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook as well. Remote Access by GoTo Meeting https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/963133205 Join the conference call: Call in via telecon: 866-685-5896 Pass code 8108134# Meeting ID: 963-133-205 Abstract This presentation will describe a unified approach to land modeling to enable a controlled and systematic evaluation of multiple model representations (hypotheses) of physical processes and scaling behavior. Our approach, which we term the Structure for Unifying Multiple Modeling Alternatives (SUMMA), formulates a general set of conservation equations, providing the flexibility to experiment with different spatial representations, different flux parameterizations, different model parameter values, and different time stepping schemes. In this paper, we introduce the general approach used in SUMMA, detailing the spatial organization and model simplifications, and how different representations of multiple physical processes can be combined within a single modeling framework. In particular, we discuss how SUMMA can help tackle major modeling challenges, including defining the appropriate complexity of a model, selecting among competing flux parameterizations, representing spatial variability across a hierarchy of scales, identifying potential improvements in computational efficiency and numerical accuracy as part of the numerical solver, and improving understanding of the various sources of model uncertainty.

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16 June 2016

Title: Finding Forced Trends in Oceanic Oxygen
Presenter(s): Matthew Long, Scientist,Oceanography Section of the Climate and Global Dynamics Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 16 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Matthew Long, Scientist,Oceanography Section of the Climate and Global Dynamics Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Co-authors are Curtis Deutsch and Taka Ito

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. For Audio, dial toll-free (in US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# The webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Dissolved oxygen is critical for marine life and plays an important role mediating biogeochemical cycles. There is very little doubt that human-driven climate warming will ultimately result in widespread oceanic deoxygenation; however, substantial natural variation in dissolved oxygen concentrations and sparse observational records make detection of this forced trend challenging. Here we present a novel Earth system modeling approach to address this detection problem. We analyzed a large ensemble of integrations conducted with the Community Earth System Model. The large ensemble enables us to precisely distinguish between natural and forced variability, thus permitting quantification of the point in time when human-influence is evident in oceanic oxygen. The model suggests that detection of human-driven changes in dissolved oxygen is possible in many oceanic regions now and will be widespread in the next 15 years, though in many cases, this requires better observational records than actually exist.

Bio(s):
Matthew Long is a scientist in the Oceanography Section of the Climate and Global Dynamics Laboratory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. He has two degrees in Environmental Engineering from Tufts University, and a PhD in Oceanography from Stanford. Matthew also served two years in the US Peace Corps, teaching high school Physics in Tanzania. His research interests include the interactions of biogeochemical cycles with climate. He works on the development and application of the Community Earth System Model, with a focus on problems related to ocean ecosystems.

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Title: Lessons from Cognitive Psychology to Guide Science Communication to Managers
Presenter(s): Josh Nowlis, Research Associate, Economic and Social Science Research Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring - FRAM Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA
Date & Time: 16 June 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see login info below) or at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112 Map and Directions
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Josh Nowlis, Research Associate, Economic and Social Science Research Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring (FRAM) Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Webinar Login Info: Join WebEx meeting https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m0d6a604678d61bd6f3268dfb7f8a1388 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code and meeting number: 283 881 307

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Jam, coordinator is Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Conventions can get in the way of good communication. Take this abstract as an example. I am expected to write something serious and scholarly, but to what purpose? The abstract is my main opportunity to convince you to attend my talk, and there are other ways to appeal to you besides serious/scholarly. Similar considerations can also improve our scientific advice to managers. Serious/scholarly is only one of several useful tools. This talk will explore the difference in mindset between scientists and managers, with particular emphases on conflicting objectives and on the cognition of uncertainty. And for those prefer them, I promise to include rigorous academic elements in the talk. I hope to see you there!

Bio(s):
For more than two decades, Dr. Nowlis has performed science and provided scientific advice to make environmental policies more effective and efficient. He has a doctorate in Ecology from Cornell University, a Master's Degree in Economics from Stanford University, and a Bachelor's Degree in Biology from Brown University. He has worked as an academic, a scientific adviser to diverse interest groups, and more recently, a government scientist. Dr. Nowlis seeks out opportunities to bridge the gap between scientific and policy worlds, and has served in that capacity, both formally and informally, to management bodies throughout the U.S., Caribbean, and Latin America. He is currently a Research Associate on contract to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Northwest Fisheries Science Center, where he collaborates with economists and stock assessment scientists to assess the economic and ecological consequences of recreational fishing policies in Oregon and Washington.

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17 June 2016

Title: Responses of Alaskan Groundfishes to Ocean Acidification
Presenter(s): Thomas Hurst, Research Fisheries Biologist with the NOAA-NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in the Fisheries Behavioral Ecology Program, located at Oregon State University's Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, OR
Date & Time: 17 June 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 10153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Thomas Hurst, Research Fisheries Biologist with the NOAA-NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in the Fisheries Behavioral Ecology Program, located at Oregon State University's Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, OR

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. For Audio, dial toll-free (in US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# The webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
In this talk, I will review a series of experimental studies of the effects of elevated CO2 levels on the early life stages of commercially-important Alaskan groundfish. Experiments have been conducted with walleye pollock, Pacific cod, northern rock sole,and speckled sand dab. Initial work examined the direct effects of elevated CO2 on growth, survival, and energetic condition of fish. More recent work has expanded to look at the behavioral impacts of ocean acidification (OA) and the potential interactions between nutritional and physiochemical stress on larvae. These results are being incorporated into analyses of the risk that OA plays to Alaskan communities.

Bio(s):
Thomas Hurst is a Research Fisheries Biologist with the NOAA-NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in the Fisheries Behavioral Ecology Program located at Oregon State University's Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, OR. Tom also holds an appointment as a Courtesy Assistant Professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. His research blends field studies and laboratory experimentation to examine the ecology of early life stages of marine species and the constraints imposed on this ecology by the environment. Much of this work focuses on the pervasive influence of temperature variation and ocean acidification on aspects of behavior, habitat selection, growth energetics, and larval ecology. His research is focused on species of commercial importance in Alaska: walleye pollock, Pacific cod, northern rock sole, and Pacific halibut.

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20 June 2016

Title: CIMSS Near-Real-Time Satellite Data Assimilation and Forecast System for Improving JPSS and GOES-R Applications
Presenter(s): Jun Li, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Date & Time: 20 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building 10210 Greenbelt Rd, Lanham MD 8th Floor Conference Room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series:

Presenter(s):
Jun Li, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Sponsor(s):
JPSS Science Seminar - Jun 2016 POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mc0be6ca415ef75d2870470aec5dc584e Meeting number: 811 961 830 Meeting password: Jpss2016! Telecon 877-401-9225 pc: 53339716

Abstract:
Under the NOAA JPSS and GOES-R program support, scientists from Cooperative Institute of Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) at University of Wisconsin-Madison have recently developed a near realtime regional Satellite Data Assimilation system for Tropical storm forecasts (SDAT). With its core system built with GSI/WRF, SDAT can assimilate GOES, AMSUA/AMSUB, HIRS, MHS, ATMS, AIRS and IASI radiances. In addition, SDAT is able to assimilate satellite-derived total precipitable water (TPW), the layered precipitable water (LPW) and atmospheric motion vector (AMV) products into the system. Using SDAT as a research testbed, studies have been conducted on improving the use of JPSS/GOES-R satellite data in NWP models, for example, how to better perform cloud detection for hyperspectral IR sounder radiance assimilation and assimilate CrIS radiances in cloudy skies, how to better use the high temporal resolution moisture in NWP for local storm forecasts. Since the fall of 2013, the SDAT system has been running in near real time. The 2015 hurricane forecasts in the Northern Atlantic Ocean are analysed for the whole season and compared with other operational models.

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21 June 2016

Title: Scientific Review for NOAA/OAR's Air Resources Laboratory Day 1
Presenter(s): NOAA/OAR Air Resources Laboratory
Date & Time: 21 June 2016
8:30 am - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Public access via webinar - see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR's Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) in College Park, MD will be holding their periodic science review on June 21-22, and those who wish to join online can do so by using the link below. Webinar thru GotoMeeting: https://docs.google.com/a/noaa.gov/forms/d/106huB67HC7uu-nF-rJhXQk4Zl6gsmRFs3ez7ZBT2yfA/viewform?c=0&w=1 Point of contact: Shanie Gal-Edd, OAR Office of Policy, Planning & Evaluation, shanie.gal-edd@noaa.gov, 301-792-1704 Description: Scientific reviews are conducted every 4-5 years to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted at the OAR laboratories. These reviews help to strategically position laboratories in their planning of future science and are intended to ensure that OAR laboratory research is linked to the NOAA Next Generation Strategic Plan, remains relevant to the NOAA research mission and its priorities, and is consistent with NOAA planning, programming, and budgeting processes. Agenda: http://www.arl.noaa.gov/LR2016_Agenda.php

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Title: Science on a Sphere (SOS) Cafe: El Nino is dead
Presenter(s): Tom DiLiberto, Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 21 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Science On a Sphere (SOS) room, 1315 East-West Hwy., Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tom DiLiberto (Climate Prediction Center)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of Education, Science On a Sphere Point of Contact: erik.macintosh@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
none - in-person only

Abstract:
El Niño is dead. Long live El Niño The El Niño of 2015-2016 will go down as one of the three strongest on record dating back to 1950. And it's dead. Come learn about how El Niños form, grow and end, looking specifically at how this El Niño became the behemoth that it did. The talk will make sure to highlight El Niños impacts across the world from drought to floods, and heat waves to cyclones. And we'll even talk about some expected impacts that never arose. If El Niño is over, what's next? A discussion will be had focusing on what the latest ocean observations and climate models are currently telling us. For in El Niños ashes might arise its counterpart, La Niña. Science On a Sphere is a room-sized, global display system that uses computers and video projectors to display planetary data onta a six foot diameter sphere, analagous to a giant animated globe. For more information, visit sosinssmc.education.noaa.gov.

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22 June 2016

Title: Scientific Review for NOAA/OAR's Air Resources Laboratory Day 2
Presenter(s): NOAA/OAR Air Resources Laboratory
Date & Time: 22 June 2016
8:30 am - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Public access via webinar - see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR's Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) in College Park, MD will be holding their periodic science review on June 21-22, and those who wish to join online can do so by using the link below. Webinar thru GotoMeeting: https://docs.google.com/a/noaa.gov/forms/d/106huB67HC7uu-nF-rJhXQk4Zl6gsmRFs3ez7ZBT2yfA/viewform?c=0&w=1 Point of contact: Shanie Gal-Edd, OAR Office of Policy, Planning & Evaluation, shanie.gal-edd@noaa.gov, 301-792-1704 Description: Scientific reviews are conducted every 4-5 years to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted at the OAR laboratories. These reviews help to strategically position laboratories in their planning of future science and are intended to ensure that OAR laboratory research is linked to the NOAA Next Generation Strategic Plan, remains relevant to the NOAA research mission and its priorities, and is consistent with NOAA planning, programming, and budgeting processes. Agenda: http://www.arl.noaa.gov/LR2016_Agenda.php

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Use Of Satellites To Detect Flooding And Water Inundation
Presenter(s): Dr. Xiaofeng Li, GST at NESDIS/STAR/SOCD, College Park, MD; Donglian Sun & Sanmei Li, Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA; Mitch Goldberg & William Sjoberg, JPSS Program Office, Lanham MD
Date & Time: 22 June 2016
1:00 pm - 2:15 pm ET
Location: SSMC2, Room 8246, 1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Xiaofeng Li, GST at NESDIS/STAR/SOCD, College Park, MD; Donglian Sun & Sanmei Li, Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA; Mitch Goldberg & William Sjoberg, JPSS Program Office, Lanham MD From NWC-STAR Science Seminars: Use Of Satellites To Detect Flooding And Water Inundation This is a 2 part seminar: Part 1: Coastline Detection and Coastal Zone Type Classification From Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery, by Dr. Xiaofeng Li

Slides:
http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2016/Li20160622.pdf Part 2: Automatic Near-Real-Time Flood Detection using Suomi-NPP/VIIRS Data by Dr. Donglian Sun

Slides:
http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2016/Sun20160622.pdf Please register for the NWC/NESDIS seminar: Water flooding and inundation from satellites on Jun 22, 2016 1:00 PM EDT at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8787576579837249283 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Contact: David.Kitzmiller@noaa.gov Part 1

Abstract:
Near real-time satellite-derived flood maps are invaluable to river forecasters and decision-makers for disaster monitoring and relief efforts. With the support from the JPSS (Joint-Polar Satellite System) Proving Ground and Risk Reduction Program (JPSS/PGRR), a flood detection package has been developed using SNPP/VIIRS (Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership/ Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) imagery to generate daily near real-time flood maps automatically for National Weather Service (NWS)-River Forecast Centers (RFC) in the USA. In this package, a series of algorithms have been developed including water detection, cloud shadow removal, terrain shadow removal, minor flood detection, water fraction retrieval and flooding water determination. The package has been running routinely with the direct broadcast SNPP/VIIRS data since 2014. Flood maps were carefully evaluated by river forecasters using airborne imagery and hydraulic observations. Offline validation was also made via visual inspection with VIIRS false-color composite images on more than 10,000 granules across a variety of scenes and comparison with river gauge observations year-round and NOAA flood outlook and warning products. Evaluation of the product has shown high accuracy, and the promising performance of the package has won positive feedback and recognition from end-users. Part 2

Abstract:
Near real-time satellite-derived flood maps are invaluable to river forecasters and decision-makers for disaster monitoring and relief efforts. With the support from the JPSS (Joint-Polar Satellite System) Proving Ground and Risk Reduction Program (JPSS/PGRR), a flood detection package has been developed using SNPP/VIIRS (Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership/ Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) imagery to generate daily near real-time flood maps automatically for National Weather Service (NWS)-River Forecast Centers (RFC) in the USA. In this package, a series of algorithms have been developed including water detection, cloud shadow removal, terrain shadow removal, minor flood detection, water fraction retrieval and flooding water determination. The package has been running routinely with the direct broadcast SNPP/VIIRS data since 2014. Flood maps were carefully evaluated by river forecasters using airborne imagery and hydraulic observations. Offline validation was also made via visual inspection with VIIRS false-color composite images on more than 10,000 granules across a variety of scenes and comparison with river gauge observations year-round and NOAA flood outlook and warning products. Evaluation of the product has shown high accuracy, and the promising performance of the package has won positive feedback and recognition from end-users.

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23 June 2016

Title: Alternative Livelihood Opportunities for Coastal Communities in the Eastern Caribbean by Eastern Caribbean Marine Managed Areas Network (ECMMAN)
Presenter(s): Joan Norville, Programme Officer, OECS; Roland Baldeo MPA Coordinator, Grenada Fisheries Division; and Michael Savarin, President, Tan Tan Development Corporation, Dominica
Date & Time: 23 June 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - See event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Joan Norville (Programme Officer, OECS), Roland Baldeo (MPA Coordinator, Grenada Fisheries Division) and Michael Savarin (President, Tan Tan Development Corporation, Dominica). Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6950682974112616961

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by MPA News, OpenChannels.org, and the EBM Tools Network. Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
To relieve fishing pressure and provide supplementary income to coastal communities surrounding MPAs, the Eastern Caribbean Marine Managed Areas Network (ECMMAN) is implementing sustainable, alternative livelihood projects on six islands. Supported by the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), small livelihood grants were made available to qualified applicants selected by a regional committee. Projects range from eco-tourism cooperatives, agriculture projects, mooring sites, and training a network of fishers and vendors to catch and market invasive lionfish. The projects have effectively equipped displaced fishers and community members with the skills and investment needed to launch micro-enterprises. In this webinar we will hear about the Livelihood Support Fund concept and implementation, as well as from the facilitators of two national projects.

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Title: Tropical cyclones, derelict fishing gear, and the future of the south Florida commercial lobster fishery
Presenter(s): Amy V. Uhrin, Chief Scientist, NOAA, NOS, OR&R, Marine Debris Division
Date & Time: 23 June 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Amy V. Uhrin, Chief Scientist, NOAA, NOS, OR&R, Marine Debris Division

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Abstract:
Derelict commercial spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) traps may move hundreds of meters during high wind events, resulting in tissue abrasion, breakage, and often complete removal of critical habitat elements such as seagrass, sponge, and coral. Ghost traps continue to confine lobsters, often resulting in mortality. The legacy of trap debris in the Florida Keys (USA) combined with possible increased inputs of trap debris resulting from tropical cyclone intensification presents an immediate challenge for this fishery where social, economic, and ecological vulnerabilities to disturbance are intrinsically linked. Predictions of percent monthly trap loss in relation to maximum wind speed (km/hr) under three scenarios of tropical cyclone intensification were evaluated across four levels of fishing effort (number of traps used). The scenarios suggest that were Existing fishing effort to be maintained in the coming decades, tropical cyclone-related trap loss could exceed 11 million over 60 years depending upon the rate of storm intensification. The net increase in derelict traps and debris generated from their degradation will only be exacerbated under potential tropical cyclone intensification. This study underscores the need for using scenarios for future exploration of these issues, particularly incorporation of fisher responses to changes in climatic, economic, and management drivers (i.e., storms, market demand, gear reduction) that may affect trap deployment patterns.

Bio(s):
Amy joined the Marine Debris Division (NOS/ORR) in June 2015 and serves as the Division's Chief Scientist. Previously, Amy spent 15 years with NOS/NCCOS conducting original applied research focusing largely on seagrass restoration ecology and the role of hydrodynamic drivers in shaping seagrass spatial patterns as well as marine debris issues, specifically derelict fishing gear impacts to benthic and coastal habitats. She holds a BS in Biology from St. Bonaventure University, a MS in Marine Science - Biological Oceanography from the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, and is currently working towards her PhD (Ecosystem and Landscape Ecology) at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

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24 June 2016

Title: NWS Alaska Region Climate Forecast Briefing
Presenter(s): Richard Thoman,Climate Science and Services Manager, NWS Alaska Region
Date & Time: 24 June 2016
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: 407 Akasofu Building, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Richard Thoman, Climate Science and Services Manager, NWS Alaska Region Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, Point of Contact: accap@uaf.edu

Remote Access:
Register at https://events-na11.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1083313451/en/events/event/shared/1178050388/event_registration.html?sco-id=1487801699&_charset_=utf-8

Abstract:
This webinar will review recent conditions and current state of the climate system in and near Alaska and the status of important global climate drivers, review guidance available for the monthly and seasonal scale outlooks and finish up with the official outlooks by NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.

Bio(s):
Richard Thoman works as the Climate Science and Services Manager, for NWS Alaska Region Headquarters. He works closely with NOAA line offices and partners throughout Alaska providing information on climate monitoring, analysis and forecasting at the two week to one year time frame

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27 June 2016

Title: Sea Ice Back to 1850: A Longer Observational Record for Assimilation By Models and Use In Reanalyses
Presenter(s): Florence Fetterer, National Snow and Ice Data Center, CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder
Date & Time: 27 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 - SmConf - 4702
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Florence Fetterer (National Snow and Ice Data Center, CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder)

Sponsor(s):
NCEI Arctic Team (POC: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Phone: 1-877-725-4068 (8634769#). Number of callers is limited to 25 on a first come first served basis. For Webcast access go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c

Abstract:
Gridded Monthly Sea Ice Extent and Concentration, 1850 Onward is the title of a new data set available from the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center. Observations from 13 historical sources such as whaling ship logs, compilations by naval oceanographers, and analyses by national ice services cover 1850 through 1978, while 1979-2013 ice concentration fields are derived from satellite passive microwave data. The sea ice concentration and source variables are provided in a NetCDF-4 file. The observation-based data product meets a need for longer records to use in reanalysis and climate diagnostic applications. It extends the record of an earlier version of this pan-Arctic data set that is heavily used by modelers, and improves upon it by incorporating newly available historical sources, using a more accurate data set for the satellite era, and by filling temporal gaps using an analog method. The resulting sea ice concentration fields have realistic values and variability throughout the record; in earlier versions, unvarying climatological values often fill gaps. The historical data vary greatly in their observational methods and came to us as both original data (e.g. a transcription of shipboard ice observations), or as observations to which some synthesis or analysis has already been applied (e.g. the Danish Meteorological Instituted yearbooks of charts). Each required different treatment before it could be used in our product, ranging from simple regridding to digitization and interpretation. The current version spans 1850-2013. With it, we can more confidently address questions like "Is the present reduction of sea ice coverage indeed unique relative to the historical record extending back to 1850?" And "Is the rapidity of the retreat of ice in the years since 2000 unique in the longer historical record?" We hope to continue improving the product with refinements to the gap filling method, additional historical sources, and assessment of the consistency of pre and post satellite period data, and yearly updates. About the speaker: Florence Fetterer is with the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and has been NSIDC's liaison to NOAA since 1996. With support from NOAA NESDIS NCEI she manages NOAA@NSIDC, where many of NSIDCs non-satellite and pre-satellite era data sets reside. She is especially interested in developing sea ice data products that can be used by the general public as well as by researchers. Florence has an M.S. in Physical Oceanography from Old Dominion University. See http://nsidc.org/noaa, http://nsidc.org/noaa/news.html and http://nsidc.org/research/bios/fetterer.html for more information.

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28 June 2016

Title: The Chemical Aquatic Fate and Effects (CAFE) Database: Past, Present and Future
Presenter(s): Jim Farr, PhD, Chemist, NOAA/NOS/OR&R Western Regional Center, Emergency Response Division; Adriana Bejarano, PhD, Aquatic Toxicologist, Research Planning, Inc. and Valerie Chu, Staff Informational Specialist, Genwest Systems, Inc./NOAA Western Regional Center, Emergency Response Division
Date & Time: 28 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars Series

Presenter(s):
Jim Farr, PhD, Chemist, NOAA/NOS/OR&R Western Regional Center, Emergency Response Division; Adriana Bejarano, PhD, Aquatic Toxicologist, Research Planning, Inc. and Valerie Chu, Staff Informational Specialist, Genwest Systems, Inc./NOAA Western Regional Center, Emergency Response Division

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
Every year, more than a hundred large oil and chemical spills occur in aquatic environments. These spills can severely impact ecosystems by compromising the health of aquatic plants and animals, and their surroundings. The Chemical Aquatic Fate and Effects (CAFE) Database was designed to aid responders in their assessment of the environmental fate and relative toxicity of the spilled chemical or oil. Toxicity data are summarized in the form of Species Sensitivity Distributions (SSDs), which can be used to characterize the potential risks of the spilled chemical to aquatic communities. CAFE recently released version 1.2 in June 2016, which includes updated fate and toxicity data and the presenters will comment on the planned future direction of the project.

Bio(s):
Dr. James K. Farr is a chemist and advises the Scientific Support Team to the U.S. Coast Guard provided by NOAA's Emergency Response Division for oil and chemical spills. He has provided on-site and off-site emergency consultation and scientific support related to the potential consequences associated with oil and hazardous chemical incidents , including hazard characterization and potential risks of chemicals released to the environment. He has been the Team Lead for several software projects including The Chemical Reactivity Worksheet, CAMEO Chemical Database, as well as The CAFE software. Dr. Adriana C. Bejarano is an aquatic toxicologist affiliated with Research Planning Inc. (RPI), and the University of South Carolina where she is an Adjunct Professor at the Department of Environmental Health Sciences. Through RPI, Dr. Bejarano has been part of the Scientific Support Team to the U.S. Coast Guard provided by the NOAA's Emergency Response Division for oil and chemical spills. She has provided on-site and off-site emergency consultation and scientific support related to the potential environmental consequences associated with oil and hazardous chemical incidents, including risk characterization and potential toxicological effects to aquatic receptors, and quantitative reports and analyses of potential levels of concern. Valerie Chu is an environmental scientist and provides software and scientific support for NOAA's Emergency Response Division through Genwest Systems, Inc. She has served as the data manager for the CAFE database and has provided extensive quality assurance/quality control for the CAFE database and other software projects. She has also provided environmental assessments

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Title: Arctic 2020: Building a Sustained Observing System
Presenter(s): Jeremy Mathis, Director NOAA Arctic Research Program
Date & Time: 28 June 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presented by: Jeremy Mathis, Director NOAA Arctic Research Program (ARP)

Sponsor(s):
ACCAP Climate Webinars (https://accap.uaf.edu/webinars)
Tina Buxbaum via e-mail (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu) or call (907) 474-7812.

DIAL-OUT (Audio Option 1) if your computer has a slower Internet connection, no speakers and/or no microphone, OR you would like to ask questions via voice this option will allow the webinar to call you so you can hear the meeting via your phone. - Preferred Phone Option
DIAL-IN (Audio Option 2) if your phone service does not accept incoming calls or you will not be using the adobe connect interface to see the slides or will be listening only. Dial 1-877-248-7649 (US and Canada). Enter conference code: 1655320267 Use this option only if the other two options do not work or if you are only listening to the webinar and not viewing online
USING MICROPHONE (Audio Option 3) if your computer has a fast (DSL, LAN) Internet connection and speakers. Note you will not be able to ask questions via voice (only via chat) with this option.

ABSTRACT
With critical past, and potential future environmental changes affecting Alaska and the Arctic Region, the United States needs to rapidly expand long-term observing of the ice and marine environment across the greater Arctic Ocean Basin, as well as conditions across the state of Alaska. This will allow us to better monitor changes across the region, and support stakeholders with improving prediction capabilities for weather, marine ecosystems, sea-ice, and climate.

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29 June 2016

Title: Valuing Ecosystem Services Following Superstorm Sandy: Restoration and Coastal Protection in New Jersey and New York
Presenter(s): Lou Nadeau, PhD, Vice President/Sr. Economist, Eastern Research Group, Inc.- ERG
Date & Time: 29 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lou Nadeau, PhD, Vice President/Sr. Economist, Eastern Research Group, Inc. (ERG)

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
This presentation will focus on work that Dr. Nadeau and ERG performed for NOAA's Office for Coastal Management to assess the economic trade-offs in ecosystem services related to restoration work in the wake of Superstorm Sandy. The project had four main components. First, the project looked at post-Sandy salt marsh restoration work being performed at Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (FNWR) in New Jersey using a choice experiment survey. The choice experiment allowed ERG to estimate how people value salt marsh ecosystem services, but also to assess the value trade-offs that people make between salt marsh ecosystem services. Second, ERG used a contingent valuation method to look at the preferences people have between living shorelines and hardened structure for shoreline protection on Jamaica Bay in New York City. Third, ERG developed a series of guidelines to use applying benefit transfers for valuing restoration decisions and applied the guidelines in two case studies reflecting post-Sandy restoration decisions in Jamaica Bay. Finally, ERG also developed an estimate for the value of carbon-related benefits of the FNWR salt marsh restoration projects.

Bio(s):
Lou Nadeau is a PhD economist with Eastern Research Group, Inc. (ERG) in Lexington, MA. For the past seven years, Dr. Nadeau has been assisting NOAA's Office for Coastal Management with using social science to explore coastal and other issues of interest to NOAA. Overall, Dr. Nadeau has 20+ years of experience in applying economic and other social science methods to federal government projects related to the environment.

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30 June 2016

Title: CILER and GLERL's alliance studying the Great Lakes: Where have we been, and where to from here?
Presenter(s): Bradley Cardinale, Director, Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research, CILER
Date & Time: 30 June 2016
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Lake Superior Hall - Also via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Bradley Cardinale, Director, Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research (CILER) Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: margaret.lansing@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/952290694780898307

Abstract:
This seminar will be part introduction, part reflection, and part anticipation. As the new Director of the Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystem Research (CILER), I will take this opportunity to first introduce myself and tell you a bit about my background, interests, and why I am excited to lead CILER in its partnership with GLERL. I will then spend time reflecting on some of the successes we've had meeting sustainability challenges in the Great Lakes, focusing on the role that interactions between academia and government have played in success. I will then turn attention towards the future, and discuss some of the contemporary challenges we face on Great Lakes sustainability, as well as how a new era of collaboration between CILER and GLERL can meet these challenges more holistically that any group of researchers could do alone.

Bio(s):
Dr. Brad Cardinale is an ecologist who uses mathematical models, novel experiments, observational studies and meta-analyses of existing data to examine how human activities impact biological diversity, and to predict how changes in biodiversity affect the goods and services ecosystems provide to humanity. His research, teaching, and professional service are all tied together by a common thread, which is to produce and distribute the knowledge needed to conserve and restore the variety of life on Earth. He works mostly in freshwater ecosystems, but frequently extends into marine and terrestrial habitats to gain new insight and find generalities. His research program features two primary branches. The first seeks to identify how changes in biodiversity impact ecological processes that are essential to the functioning of ecosystems, and the goods and services ecosystems provide to society. A second branch of his research focuses on restoration of species and the processes they perform to ecosystems that have been degraded.

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Title: Marine Planning off British Columbia: The Great Bear Sea
Presenter(s): Karen Anspacher-Meyer, Executive Director of Green Fire Productions
Date & Time: 30 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Karen Anspacher-Meyer, Executive Director of Green Fire Productions

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
Ocean planning is taking off around the world! In the US, the Northeast just released a draft plan, the Mid-Atlantic will do the same at the end of June, and the West Coast has recently started their planning. Come get inspired about this wave of ocean stewardship by watching the new documentary film The Great Bear Sea, which focuses on British Columbia's marine plans. The Great Bear Sea is a wild expanse of ocean where whales, wolves, bears and humans thrive in rich coastal ecosystems. It's also a place where worlds collide - a place full of historic conflicts, emerging struggles over ocean resources, and now, globally leading solutions.

Bio(s):
Karen Anspacher-Meyer is the executive director of Green Fire Productions, a nonprofit media production company. Green Fire uses the power of film to move audiences to action and influence decision makers and the public on conservation issues. Karen has produced dozens of award-winning films and implemented effective film distribution and outreach campaigns.

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Title: Observations, Ray-tracing, and Data Assimilation in Aerosol Assessment
Presenter(s): Steve Albers, NOAA/ESRL
Date & Time: 30 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Conference Center
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Steve Albers, NOAA/ESRL POC: Jeff McQueen Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP , Seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars from EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook as well. Remote Access Go To Meeting Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/356895621 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 356-895-621

Abstract:
Observations, Ray-tracing, and Data Assimilation in Aerosol Assessment S. Albers(1,2), Y. Xie(2) and Z. Toth(2) 1 Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80521; 303-497-6057, E-mail: steve.albers@noaa.gov 2NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Systems Division (GSD), Boulder, CO 80305

Abstract:
By tracing rays from natural (Sun, Moon, and other astronomical objects) and artificial (city) light sources and assessing how they are affected by the atmosphere, aerosols, and land / ocean surface, full-color visually realistic images of the environment can be created based on 3D Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) analyses or model forecasts. Simulated Weather IMagery (SWIM) can be compared with observed images (camera or other photometric measurements) to (1) validate existing ray tracing and NWP analyses / forecast algorithms, or (2) assimilate observed images affected by atmospheric, aerosol, and surface variables into numerical analyses (NWP Data Assimilation, DA). As for (1), in clear daytime skies, radiance patterns depend on the aerosol optical depth (AOD, see Fig. 1) and size distributions. The appearance of the sky during twilight, on the other hand, is most sensitive to the presence of stratospheric aerosols. Other relationships and observation platforms will be discussed in the presentation. Since aerosols affect both simulated and observed weather images, we will use DA techniques to synthesize all aerosol related observational information into analysis states expanded by aerosol related 'control' variables. AOD, scale height, single scattering albedo, and other aerosol parameters that are currently manually prescribed using a subjective estimation of visibility will be variationally estimated as 2- or 3D control variables, influenced by aerosol related observations (e.g., camera, photometer, LIDAR, AERONET, aerosonde, satellite) and a 'first guess' forecast from an aerosol resolving numerical model such as GSD's WRF- or FIM-Chem.

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Title: Biofouling - Mitigation approaches and current solutions
Presenter(s): Hank Lobe, Severn Marine Technologies
Date & Time: 30 June 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 - 2504.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Hank Lobe, Severn Marine Technologies

Sponsor(s):
U.S. IOOS (POC: Gabrielle.Canonico@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Instant Net Conference Details: ------------------------------- Meeting Number: 747742192 Meeting Passcode: IOOS Meeting Host: IOOS PROGRAM Join Instructions for Instant Net Conference: 1. Join the meeting now: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=747742192&p=IOOS&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed.

Abstract:
The presentation would introduce problems with biofouling and approaches tried to date to deal with it. It will address the limits of present mitigation techniques and technologies and provide an overview of emerging technologies. It will include case studies of deployments and results as they relate to various oceanographic applications. One of the technologies covered will be the ClearSignal passive foul release coating (the speaker represents the developers of ClearSignal), but the presentation will cover other emerging techniques such as UV, liquid sterilization and overall best practices such as streamlining.

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7 July 2016

Title: Hanging by a thread: Seasonal weakening of mussel attachment strength is predicted by high temperature and low pH
Presenter(s): Dr. Laura Newcomb, Program Analyst Fellow, NOAA Research Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes
Date & Time: 7 July 2016
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Laura Newcomb, Program Analyst Fellow with NOAA Research Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes (NOAA Knauss Fellow) Seminar Sponsors/POC: NOAA Knauss Fellow Program and the NOAA Central Library. Contact(s): Judith Salter, Librarian, NOAA Central Library (judith.salter@noaa.gov) or library.reference@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at http://www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract:
Hanging by a thread: Seasonal weakening of mussel attachment strength is predicted by high temperature and low pH. Mussel aquaculture is an economically important industry worldwide, where mussels are commonly farmed on lines suspended beneath rafts or long lines. Mussels mold individual tethers, known as byssal threads, forming stretchy attachments to the aquaculture rope or other mussels. These byssal threads are critical in keeping mussels attached to the lines. Weakened byssal threads increase the chance of "fall-off" from aquaculture lines, reducing farm yields. We use laboratory studies to identify two environmental conditions, low pH (below 7.6) and high temperature (above 18° C), that weaken byssal threads in the mussel M. trossulus (native to the eastern Pacific). However, it is unknown whether these conditions are encountered in the field, or if they lead to weak mussel attachment. Therefore, we measure mussel attachment strength and a suite of water conditions including temperature and pH. We find mussel tenacity is stronger in the winter than in the summer. We find high temperature (> 14° C) and low pH (< 7.5) best predict periods where attachment strength is weak. These results suggest ocean warming and ocean acidification may increase fall-off and threaten mussel aquaculture. Monitoring these conditions near farms can identify periods when attachment is expected to be weak and adapting alternative farming practices could produce higher yields.

Bio(s):
Laura Newcomb is a Knauss Fellow in the NOAA Research Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes. Dr. Newcomb received her PhD in Biology from the University of Washington in 2015.

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Title: Mesopelagic fish responses to environmental discontinuities in the California Current Ecosystem: oxygen minimum zones and oceanic fronts (Amanda Netburn)
Presenter(s): Amanda Netburn Ocean Exploration Fellow, NOAA Research Office of Ocean Exploration and Research
Date & Time: 7 July 2016
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Amanda Netburn, Ocean Exploration Fellow with NOAA Research Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (NOAA Knauss Fellow) Seminar Sponsors/POC: NOAA Knauss Fellow Program and the NOAA Central Library. Contact(s): Judith Salter, Librarian, NOAA Central Library (judith.salter@noaa.gov) or library.reference@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at http://www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract:
Mesopelagic fish responses to environmental discontinuities in the California Current Ecosystem: oxygen minimum zones and oceanic fronts. Throughout the ocean, there are abundant and diverse fishes aggregated at mesopelagic (200-1000 m) depths that are critical for pelagic food webs and carbon transport. Understanding their vulnerabilities to predicted environmental changes can inform ecosystem-based management efforts.These animals encounter environmental gradients, including reduced oxygen at depth and oceanic fronts. There is evidence that mesopelagic fish habitat is limited by hypoxia at depth, and studies have shown that fronts can influence abundance, composition, and reproduction of marine animals. For the first study I will present, I measured activities of metabolic enzymes in mesopelagic fish in varied oxygen conditions throughout the southern California Current Ecosystem to investigate response to declining oxygen. For the second study, I compared the abundance, compositions, and reproduction of mesopelagic fish assemblages at frontal systems. My results suggest that deoxygenation may cause metabolic suppression, while fronts can alter the assemblage structure and reproduction of mesopelagic fishes.

Bio(s):
Amanda Netburn is a Knauss Fellow in the NOAA Research Office of Ocean Exploration and Research where she leads the effort to develop water column priorities and sampling protocols within the exploration context. Dr. Netburn also provides policy, engagement, and scientific support to the program. Netburn received her PhD in Oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego in 2016 and her Masters in Marine Conservation and Biodiversity in 2010.

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11 July 2016

Title: Insights into Earth's energy imbalance from multiple sources
Presenter(s): Dr. Kevin E Trenberth, Distinguished Senior Scientist, NCAR
Date & Time: 11 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kevin E Trenberth, Distinguished Senior Scientist (NCAR) Seminar sponsors: NOAA OAR and the NOAA Central Library. Contact(s): Judith Salter, Librarian, NOAA Central Library (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Dr. Emily A. Smith, OAR, Climate Observations Division, Program Manager and Communications Lead (emily.a.smith@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at http://www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract:
The current Earth's energy imbalance (EEI) is mostly caused by human activity, and is driving global warming. The absolute value of EEI represents the most fundamental metric defining the status of global climate change, and can best be estimated from changes in ocean heat content (OHC), complemented by radiation measurements from space. Sustained observations from the Argo array of autonomous profiling floats and further development of the ocean observing system to sample the deep ocean, marginal seas and sea ice regions are crucial to refining future estimates of EEI. New estimates of EEI and corresponding rates of change of OHC will be presented to highlight major outstanding issues that include lack of sufficient continuity in many OHC estimates. The energy imbalance problem can also be done locally and the framework provides a new way of dealing with surface fluxes in the context of a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere system. For instance, we can estimate observed meridional ocean heat transports observed by the Rapid Array indirectly. Combining multiple measurements in an optimal way holds considerable promise for estimating EEI and thus assessing the status of global climate change, improving climate syntheses and models, and testing the effectiveness of mitigation actions. Progress can be achieved with a concerted international effort. About the speaker: Dr. Kevin E. Trenberth is a Distinguished Senior Scientist in the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. He was a lead author of the 1995, 2001 and 2007 Scientific Assessment of Climate Change reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize which went to the IPCC. Recently his primary research has focused on the global energy and water cycles and how they are changing. His work mainly involves empirical studies and quantitative diagnostic calculations. Trenberth is a primary advocate for the need to develop a climate information system that is an imperative for adaptation to climate change.

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Title: Diversity and evolution of genetic sex determination in fish
Presenter(s): Yann Guiguen, Ph.D., Fish Physiology and Genomics Institute, Rennes, France Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, INRA
Date & Time: 11 July 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) Montlake Auditorium
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Yann Guiguen, Ph.D., Fish Physiology and Genomics Institute, Rennes, France Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, INRA

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar Jam: Special seminar at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center Contact: Diane Tierney, NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator (Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov) ABSTRACT Sexual reproduction is one of the most highly conserved processes in evolution. However, the genetic and cellular mechanisms making the decision of whether the undifferentiated gonad of animal embryos develops either towards male or female are manyfold and quite diverse. In vertebrates, sex-determining mechanisms range from environmental to simple or complex genetic mechanisms and different mechanisms have evolved repeatedly and independently. In species with simple genetic sex determination, master sex-determining genes lying on sex chromosomes drive the gonadal differentiation process by switching on a developmental program, which ultimately leads to testicular or ovarian differentiation. So far very few sex-determining genes have been identified in vertebrates and apart from mammals and birds, these genes are apparently not conserved over a larger number of related orders, families, genera or even species. To fill this knowledge gap and to better understand genetic sex determination we propose a strategy (RAD-Sex) that makes use of next generation sequencing technology to identify genetic markers that define sex-specific segments of the male or female fish genome. We applied this RAD-Sex strategy in more than 40 rayfin fish species and were able in some of them to delineate sex-specific chromosomal regions and to identify candidate sex determining genes. BIO Yann Guiguen is a fish physiologist working at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA, Rennes, France). He received a PhD (1992) in Physiology from the University of Rennes on sex inversion in the Asian seabass, Lates calcarifer and was recruited as a research scientist at INRA in 1994. He is currently the team leader of the “Sex, Oogenesis and Behavior” team at the Fish Physiology and genomics INRA Institute, where he is involved in the development of pan-genomic approaches to understand the evolution of sex-determination and sex-differentiation mechanisms in fish. He is a recognized scientist in the fish field for his work on the implication of steroid hormones in the gonadal sex differentiation process, for providing many fish genomic resources including the first genome of the rainbow trout and for the discovery of a conserved sex-determining gene in salmonid species. He is Co-Principal Investigator with Manfred Schartl (University of Wurzburg, Germany) and John H. Postlethwait (University of Oregon, Eugene, USA) of the Phylosex* Project «Evolution of Sex Determining genes in Fishes».

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13 July 2016

Title: Species in the Spotlight Series, Part 1 of 9: Species and Overview
Presenter(s): Therese Conant, Fisheries Biologist, Endangered Species Conservation Division, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA
Date & Time: 13 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Therese Conant, Fisheries Biologist, Endangered Species Conservation Division, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov Note: A PDF copy of the presentation is now available; send request to tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
In May 2015, NOAA Fisheries released the Recovering Threatened and Endangered Species FY 2013-2014 Report to Congress and launched 'Species in the Spotlight', an initiative focused on stabilizing populations of eight endangered species at very high risk of extinction. With this effort we are marshaling our resources to turn around the decline towards extinction of these eight species by focusing efforts to stabilize their populations by 2020 and put them on the road to recovery. In just one year, the initiative has resulted in benefits for the Spotlight Species. Examples of success include California's commitment to extend their Fisheries Restoration Grants Program to the Central Valley to support projects that may benefit Sacramento Winter-Run Chinook and an increase in funding from Maine for culvert removals to increase passage for fish, including Atlantic Salmon.

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Title: Science On a Sphere (SOS) Cafe: Crowd-sourcing weather reports with mPING
Presenter(s): Kim Elmore, National Severe Storms Laboratory
Date & Time: 13 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SOS room, 1315 East-West Hwy., Silver Spring, Md
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kim Elmore (National Severe Storms Laboratory) Sponser: NOAA Office of Education, Science On a Sphere Point of Contact: erik.macintosh@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
none - in-person only

Abstract:
Crowd-sourcing weather reports with mPING Weather forecasters have a difficult time depicting, analyzing, and predicting surface precipitation during winter weather events. The National Severe Storms Laboratory has a major initiative to help better classify precipitation based on numerical model and dual polarization radar data. Such a task requires many observations, and too gather these observations, the University of Oklahoma in concert with NSSL hosts the meteorological Phenomena Identification Near the Ground (mPING) project, which uses a smartphone app to collect a large number surface precipitation type observations from “citizen scientists.” This history of this app and some of its characteristics will be presented. Along the way, the quality of mPING observations is addressed because, if the observations aren't any good there's no point in continuing. A straightforward mPING application is to assess numerical model precipitation type performance, which will be shown, but a more comprehensive application is to use the observations to drive a winter surface precipitation classification algorithm. A candidate approach is presented that explicitly uses these observations to drive an “artificial intelligence” or “machine learning” classification technique called a random forest. Random forests are very fast, resistant to over-fitting and are among the most powerful and general artificial intelligence classification tools available. Some random forest results will be shown. Science On a Sphere is a room-sized, global display system that uses computers and video projectors to display planetary data onta a six foot diameter sphere, analagous to a giant animated globe. For more information, visit sosinssmc.education.noaa.gov.

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Title: Runaway Change in the Arctic? Extreme 2016 Temperatures
Presenter(s): James Overland, Oceanographer, NOAA Research Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory and Muyin Wang, Meteorologist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Oceans
Date & Time: 13 July 2016
4:30 pm - 5:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Western Regional Center, Building 3, Room 2104 (Oceanographer Room), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
James Overland, Oceanographer, NOAA Research Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory and Muyin Wang, Meteorologist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Oceans

Sponsor(s):
PMEL Seminar POC: Adi Hanein, adi.hanein@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/653131781 You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (571) 317-3122

Abstract:
There were extensive record Arctic temperature extremes in January and February 2016 that continued into April. For January, the Arctic-wide averaged temperature anomaly was 2.0 °C above the previous record of 3.0 °C based on four Reanalysis products. Two regions of low geopotential height were seen as a major split in the tropospheric polar vortex over the Arctic. Warm air advection north of Alaska and central Eurasia reinforced the ridge that split the flow near the North Pole and contributed to the persistence. 2016 shows that there can be major Arctic contributions from midlatitudes. Whether Arctic amplification feedbacks are accelerated by the combination of recent thinner, more mobile Arctic sea ice and occasional extreme atmospheric circulation events from midlatitudes is an interesting conjecture.

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14 July 2016

Title: The Impacts of Numerical Schemes on Asymmetric Hurricane Intensification
Presenter(s): Steve Guimond, Univ.of Maryland/ESSIC and NASA/GSFC
Date & Time: 14 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Steve Guimond, Univ.of Maryland/ESSIC and NASA/GSFC POC: Avichal Mehra Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP , Seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars from EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook as well. Remote Access Go To Meeting 1. GoToMeeting - https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/703126781 Meeting ID: 703-126-781 2. Dial-in Number: 1-866-685-5896 Passcode: 8108134

Abstract:
The fundamental pathways for tropical cyclone (TC) intensification are explored by considering axisymmetric and asymmetric impulsive thermal perturbations to balanced, TC-­‐like vortices using the dynamic cores of three different nonlinear numerical models. Attempts at reproducing the results of previous work, which used the atmospheric science community model WRF (Nolan and Grasso 2003; NG03), revealed a discrepancy with the impacts of purely asymmetric thermal forcing. The current study finds that thermal asymmetries can have an important, largely positive role on the vortex intensification whereas NG03 and other studies find that asymmetric impacts are negligible. Analysis of the spectral energetics of each numerical model indicates that the vortex response to asymmetric thermal perturbations is significantly damped in WRF relative to the other models. Spectral kinetic energy budgets show that this anomalous damping is primarily due to the increased removal of kinetic energy from the vertical divergence of the vertical pressure flux, which is related to the flux of inertia-­‐gravity wave energy. The increased kinetic energy in the other two models is shown to originate around the scales of the heating and propagate upscale with time from nonlinear effects. The results of this research indicate that the numerical treatment of small-­‐scale processes that project strongly onto inertia-­‐gravity wave energy can lead to significant differences in asymmetric TC intensification. Sensitivity tests with different time integration schemes suggest that diffusion entering into the implicit solution procedure may be responsible for the anomalous damping of energy. Extensions of this work to analyze the effects of various physical parameterizations will be discussed.
Title: Takeaways from the 13th Int'l Coral Reef Symposium
Presenter(s): Paulo Maurin, NOAA Coral Program, Hawaii Management Liaison; Jason Philibotte, NOAA Coral Program, International Coordinator for Pacific Region; and Bob Richmond, Kewalo Marine Laboratory Director, and ICRS Meeting Organizer
Date & Time: 14 July 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Paulo Maurin, NOAA Coral Program, Hawaii Management Liaison Jason Philibotte, NOAA Coral Program, International Coordinator for Pacific Region Bob Richmond, Kewalo Marine Laboratory Director, and ICRS Meeting Organizer Register at: TBA

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The MPA Center series is co-sponsored by MPA News, OpenChannels.org, and the EBM Tools Network. Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
ICRS is the primary international meeting focused on coral reef science and management. The Symposium will bring together an anticipated 2,500 coral reef scientists, policy makers and managers from 70 different nations in a forum to present the latest research findings, case histories and management activities, and to discuss the application of scientific knowledge to achieving coral reef sustainability. This 13th iteration of ICRS expands outside its traditional science realm to also include policy and management, with the overall theme of "Bridging Science to Policy." Alongside the symposium, a concurrent Leadership Forum with heads of state from the Pacific are convening to talk about the most pressing issues their local reefs are facing. The presentation will cover outcomes from the Leadership Forum, as well as share the high-level scientific findings highlighted at the conference, drawing direct links to management and policy.

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Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 July 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: VDatum: NOAA's Vertical Datum Transformation Tool
Presenter(s): Stephen White, Cartographer, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 July 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Stephen White, Cartographer, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NGS POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to register for the webinar or join at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8994030776353733377. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (213) 929-4232 Access Code: 226-023-755 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar

Abstract:
VDatum is a free software tool being developed jointly by NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS), Office of Coast Survey (OCS), and Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). VDatum is designed to vertically transform geospatial data among a variety of tidal, orthometric and ellipsoidal vertical datums - allowing users to convert their data from different horizontal/vertical references into a common system and enabling the fusion of diverse geospatial data in desired reference levels.

Bio(s):
Stephen White is the Program Manager for VDatum, serving as the lead for NOAA's cross-office effort to develop the Vertical Datum Transformation Tool (VDatum). In addition, he works on projects that involve evaluating new remote sensing technologies/systems for integration into NOAA programs, such as the Coastal Mapping Program. A primary focus, has been utilizing topobathy lidar, with the assistance of a vertical datum transformation tool, for extracting consistent, non-interpreted shoreline vectors and shallow water bathymetry.

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18 July 2016

Title: Motivation for a Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) SO2 Initiative
Presenter(s): Mike Pavolonis, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 18 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building - Greenbelt MD, 8th Floor Conference Room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mike Pavolonis, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR

Sponsor(s):
JPSS Science Seminar POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov 877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m40770ded58b2b649f88045e76e9977b8 Meeting number: 747 039 241 Host key: 425213 Meeting password: Jpss2016!

Abstract:
SO2 is an abundant volcanic gas that is hazardous to human health, infrastructure and the environment, and is often a very effective tracer for volcanic ash, which is a major aviation hazard. In addition, regular monitoring of volcanic SO2 emissions can help scientists better characterize volcanic unrest, forecast eruptions, and assess the climate impacts of very large eruptions. Despite the importance of SO2 monitoring, JPSS is underutilized for this application, and the existing single sensor JPSS SO2 products from OMPS and CrIS have several important limitations. The UV-based OMPS SO2 loading product is very useful, especially in the presence of dense cloud cover, but is limited by solar zenith angle restrictions (sufficient sunlight is required), a relatively large spatial footprint, and noise. Currently the IR-based CrIS is only being used to generate a yes/no flag when SO2 is suspected. While the spatial footprint of the CrIS is also fairly large, CrIS is capable of providing much more information than a yes/no flag. CrIS can be used to retrieve SO¬2 mass loading and height, independent of solar zenith angle. Further, VIIRS is capable of quantitatively mapping SO2 with revolutionary spatial detail for a meteorological satellite sensor, but is not being utilized for that application at the present time. VIIRS, however, lacks the spectral resolution and coverage needed to accurately retrieve SO2 mass loading and cloud height, and the detection capabilities are particularly limited in the presence of background cloud cover. Given the limitations of each sensor, JPSS SO2 products should be derived using a combination of VIIRS, CrIS, and OMPS measurements. Fusing information from VIIRS, CrIS, and OMPS will help ensure that NOAA can provide high quality, objectively derived, environmental intelligence on SO2. The SO2 information is critical for volcano monitoring, volcanic ash tracking, and understanding the impacts of volcanic aerosols on weather and climate in the wake of a large eruption. A significant collaborative effort is needed to ensure that an “optimal” JPSS based SO2 product suite can be created, validated, and utilized in weather, dispersion, and climate models.

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Title: New Techniques in Bathymetric Mapping and Coastal Change Analysis: from UAVs to Satellites
Presenter(s): Christopher Parrish, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geomatics in the School of Civil and Construction Engineering at Oregon State University
Date & Time: 18 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: