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OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
2017 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

5 January 2017

Title: A systematic, regional approach to predictive modeling of habitat suitability for deep-sea corals in U.S. waters
Presenter(s): Brian Kinlan, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Biogeography Branch
Date & Time: 5 January 2017
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Brian Kinlan, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Biogeography Branch Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8236288050617849092

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of a NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program webinar series to highlight research, exploration, and management of deep-sea corals and sponges around the U.S. Seminar POC: Heather.Coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract:
Recently, predictive modeling has emerged as an essential tool to inform researchers and policy-makers involved in conservation, management, and exploration of deep-sea coral (DSC) habitats throughout U.S. waters. From 2011-2016, NCCOS and its partners have developed a series of regional-scale predictive models of habitat suitability for several taxonomic (e.g., Lophelia pertusa, Gorgonian Alcyonacea) and functional (e.g., framework-forming corals) groups. These models have resulted in a comprehensive, consistent series of predictive maps spanning four U.S. regions - Northeast/Mid-Atlantic, Southeast Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Main Hawaiian Islands - with a spatial resolution of ~400 m. Multiple measures of model performance, including cross-validation statistics and novel metrics of model fit and stability, and maps of spatial uncertainty were generated to support decision-making. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) models were fit to coral presence records and spatial environmental predictors, including topographic, oceanographic, and geographic variables. We enhanced the standard MaxEnt approach in several ways to improve model selection, performance assessment, consistency and interpretability. We implemented a stepwise model selection process to identify models that balanced predictive power (via cross-validation statistics) with complexity (via information criteria). Using the selected models, we predicted the relative likelihood of occurrence of suitable habitat within each model grid cell. To allow consistent comparisons across coral groups and regions, we converted the standard MaxEnt 'logistic' predictions, which are uncalibrated, into habitat suitability likelihood classes calibrated by a cross-validation procedure. Finally, we compared and contrasted environmental predictor relationships across coral groups and regions, yielding insights into correlates of DSC distributions at a range of spatial scales. We are presently engaged in field model groundtruthing and validation efforts, and are working on a new generation of high-resolution (~25m) models based on the most accurate field survey and seafloor mapping data available. These new models will use both presence and absence data, in combination with measures of survey effort based on area of seafloor searched, to generate probabilistic models of occurrence probability and genus-level diversity (richness) measures.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Deep-Sea Coral Webinar Series - Ongoing Efforts and Challenges for Managing Deep-sea Corals in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Morgan Kilgour, Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council
Date & Time: 5 January 2017
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Morgan Kilgour, Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8236288050617849092

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of a NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program webinar series to highlight research, exploration, and management of deep-sea corals and sponges around the U.S. Seminar POC: Heather.Coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract:
Currently, U.S. Fishery Management Councils have two major avenues for protecting deep-sea corals, via establishment of habitat areas of particular concern (HAPCs) or through the discretionary deep-sea coral authority outlined under the Magnuson-Stevens Act. While both avenues protect corals from fishing, only the HAPC designation requires a consultation with NMFS regarding any non-fishing activity. The Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) Fishery Management Council is in the initial stages of determining if additional areas in the Gulf warrant HAPC status for deep-sea corals. Currently, the Gulf has 11 individual HAPCs, sanctuaries or reserves that have fishing regulations totaling just over 4100 square kilometers. There are an additional 10 areas that have been defined as HAPCs but do not have fishing restrictions. The Gulf Council has convened several working groups to discuss new areas for consideration of HAPC status. Additionally, the Gulf Council is developing a new data management tool on our data portal to assist managers with management decisions. This presentation discusses the process, challenges, and type of the protection needed for deep-sea corals while working collaboratively with stakeholders.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

10 January 2017

Title: Can the United States Have Its Fish and Eat It Too?
Presenter(s): Mark Helvey, NOAA/NMFS,West Coast,Long Beach, CA, retired;,Sustainable Seafood Consultants, Foothill Ranch, CA; Caroline Pomeroy, California Sea Grant Extension Program, University of California, Long Marine Lab, Santa Cruz, CA; Naresh C. Pradhan, New England Fishery Management Council, Newburyport, MA; Dale Squires, NOAA/NMFS, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla, CA; and Stephen Stohs, NOAA/NMFS, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla, CA
Date & Time: 10 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presenting: Mark Helvey, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, West Coast Region, Long Beach, CA (retired), Sustainable Seafood Consultants, Foothill Ranch, CA (presenting remotely) Co-authors: - Caroline Pomeroy, California Sea Grant Extension Program, University of California, Long Marine Lab, Santa Cruz, CA - Naresh C. Pradhan, New England Fishery Management Council, Newburyport, MA - Dale Squires, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla, CA - Stephen Stohs, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla, CA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts, the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
As domestic affluence increases, nations advocate for conservation policies to protect domestic biodiversity that often curtail natural resource production activities such as fishing. If concomitant consumption patterns remain unchanged, environmentally conscious nations with high consumption rates such as the U.S. may only be distancing themselves from the negative environmental impacts associated with consuming resources and commodities produced elsewhere. This unintended displacement of ecosystem impacts, or leakage, associated with conservation policies has not been studied extensively in marine fisheries. This presentation examines this topic, drawing on case studies to illustrate the ways in which unilateral marine conservation actions can shift ecosystem impacts elsewhere, as has been documented in land use interventions. The authors argue that the U.S. should recognize these distant ecological consequences and move toward greater self-sufficiency to protect its seafood security and minimize leakage as well as undertake efforts to reduce ecosystem impacts of foreign fisheries on which it relies. Six solutions are suggested for broadening the marine conservation and seafood consumption discussion to address leakage induced by U.S. policy.

Bio(s):
Mark Helvey has an extended career in fishery issues first as a research associate with Occidental College followed by 30-years at NOAA Fisheries before retiring in 2015. He was the last Assistant Regional Administrator for Sustainable Fisheries in the former Southwest Region. He currently advises the fishing industry operating on the U.S. West Coast. Dr. Carrie Pomeroy is a Specialist with the California Sea Grant Extension Program and a Research Social Scientist with the Institute of Marine Sciences at UC Santa Cruz. Her work focuses on the human dimensions of fisheries as they affect and are affected by environmental, regulatory and socioeconomic factors. Her current research focuses on the opportunities and challenges of climate change for California fisheries and fishing communities, interdependencies between ports and fisheries, and alternative approaches to seafood marketing. Dr. Naresh Pradhan is a staff economist with the New England Fishery Management Council. Prior to that, he carried out research studies on endangered marine animals such as sea turtles that are subject to rare-event interactions with pelagic U.S. fisheries in the Pacific Islands and U.S West Coast. As the regional economist (contractor) with NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region, he prepared economic analyses of proposed federal regulations affecting the day to day operations of both the commercial and recreational fishing fleets off the U.S. west coast. Dr. Dale Squires is Senior Scientist at NOAA Fisheries Southwest Fisheries Science Center and Adjunct Professor of Economics at the University of California San Diego. He serves on the Scientific and Advisory Committees of the International Seafood Sustainability Foundation and the International Pole and Line Foundation. Dr. Stephen Stohs is an economist in the Fisheries Resources Division at NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla Laboratory. He serves as economist on the Pacific Fishery Management Council's Highly Migratory Species Management Team. He also recently served on NOAA's Leatherback Turtle Critical Habitat Designation Review Team. His research interests include the economic impacts of unilateral regulation on transboundary fisheries and statistical inference of rare event protected species bycatch risk.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

11 January 2017

Title: Introducing the NOAA Institutional Repository
Presenter(s): Stanley Elswick, Sarah Davis, and Jennifer Fagan-Fry, NOAA Central Library, IR Team
Date & Time: 11 January 2017
11:00 am - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Stanley Elswick, Sarah Davis and Jennifer Fagan-Fry, NOAA Central Library IR Team

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library; library.reference@noaa.gov For remote access: The 11:30AM webinar will be recorded and archived on the NOAA Central Library website. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract:
Join us to learn about the newest NOAA Library service: the NOAA Institutional Repository (IR). Attend a special presentation and demo at 11:30 ET or get one-on-one assistance at any time between 11AM-2PM ET on January 11th to get your NOAA IR questions answered. Who Should Attend: Anyone interested in NOAA research and scientific literature Refreshments will be served

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Functional implications of changes in seagrass species composition: A case study in two shallow coastal lagoons in Northern Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Bart Christiaen, Washington State Dept.of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA
Date & Time: 11 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Bart Christiaen, Washington State Dep't.of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA. Presenting remotely. Presentation co-authors: John C Lehrter, Josh Goff, Rachel B. McDonald, Just Cebrian; University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL / Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Dauphin Island, AL

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts, the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
While the consequences of losing seagrass meadows are well known, there is less information on the functional implications of changes in seagrass species composition. Using 10 years of data from a long-term monitoring project in shallow lagoons on the Florida Gulf Coast, we assess changes in the functional attributes of seagrass beds during a shift in seagrass species composition. We compare seagrass beds in 2 neighboring lagoons with different trends: one where the composition changed from 100% Halodule wrightii to a mixed bed with up to 60% Ruppia maritima, and one where the species composition remained the same. Our results indicate that the partial replacement of H. wrightii by R. maritima did not alter seagrass biomass m⁻², detrital biomass m⁻², benthic gross primary production, or benthic respiration. While seagrass biomass m⁻² declined at both sites, the emergence of R. maritima increased the amount of available habitat through rapid expansion. Differences in seagrass cover did not influence the abundance of fish, macro-invertebrates and epifauna in these shallow lagoons, which may be due to habitat redundancy between seagrass beds and fringing marshes. The small differences in seagrass biomass and benthic metabolism indicate that R. maritima provided similar habitat to H. wrightii. This pattern suggests that changes in the dominant seagrass species do not always have a large effect on ecosystem services provided by seagrass beds. Despite their different life strategies, H. wrightii and R. maritima may be functionally equivalent when growing in suboptimal conditions. About the speaker: Originally from Belgium, Bart Christiaen completed a MS in Oceanography at the University of Liege. He earned his PhD at the University of South Alabama, studying how natural and anthropogenic drivers impact seagrass ecosystems in shallow lagoons on the Gulf of Mexico. He currently works as Natural Resource Scientist for the Washington State Department of Natural Resources.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Vulnerability of U.S. Coral Reefs to Climate Change under the COP21 Paris Agreement
Presenter(s): Dr. Jeffrey Maynard, SymbioSeas and the Marine Applied Research Center, Wilmington, NC. Presentation co-authors include Ruben van Hooidonk, Jerker Tamelander, Jamison Gove, Gabby Ahmadia, Laurie Raymundo, Gareth Williams, Scott Heron, Serge Planes, and Britt Parker.
Date & Time: 11 January 2017
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jeffrey Maynard, SymbioSeas and the Marine Applied Research Center, Wilmington NC. Presentation Co-authors: Ruben van Hooidonk, Jerker Tamelander, Jamison Gove, Gabby Ahmadia, Laurie Raymundo, Gareth Williams, Scott Heron, Serge Planes, and Britt Parker.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar hosts are tracy.gill@noaa.gov and britt.parker@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts, the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
Increasingly frequent severe coral bleaching is among the greatest threats to coral reefs posed by climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) project great spatial variation in the timing of annual severe bleaching (ASB) conditions; a point at which reefs are certain to change and recovery will be limited. However, previous model-resolution projections (~1x1°) are too coarse to inform conservation planning. To meet the need for higher-resolution projections, we generated statistically downscaled projections (4-km resolution) for all coral reefs; these projections reveal high local-scale variation in ASB. Timing of ASB varies >10 years in 71 of the 87 countries and territories with >500km2 of reef area. ASB timing under RCP8.5 varies >30 years among U.S. coral reefs. Emissions scenario RCP4.5 represents lower emissions mid-century than will eventuate if pledges made following the 2015 Paris Climate Change Conference (COP21) become reality. These pledges provide reefs with more time to adapt and acclimate prior to severe bleaching conditions occurring annually; the amount of time varies greatly among U.S coral reefs from 2->40 years. Reefs in central Florida and NW Hawaii benefit most from the emissions reductions pledges becoming reality with a projected ASB timing >30 years later projected under business-as-usual RCP8.5). We are generating climate impact summaries for all U.S. coral reef jurisdictions that will describe the downscaled bleaching projections along with thermal history, and projected sea level rise and ocean acidification. Coral reef futures clearly vary greatly among and within the U.S. and other countries, indicating the projections warrant consideration in most reef areas during conservation and management planning.

Bio(s):
Dr. Jeffrey Maynard is the Manager of SymbioSeas (www.symbioseas.org) and the Marine Applied Research Center, in Wilmington, NC. Jeffrey assembles and co-leads teams that develop decision-support tools that help managers maximize coral reef and coastal community resilience. Tools his teams have developed use remote sensing, climate modeling, and resilience and vulnerability assessment methodologies to identify action options for managers.Those options are then prioritized in collaboration with managers, built into management planning and frequently become on-ground action. Jeffrey is a long-term partner and grant recipient of the CRCP currently working in collaboration with CRCP and other NOAA staff in all 8 of the U.S. coral reef jurisdictions.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

12 January 2017

Title: Use of computational fluid dynamics to improve oceanographic measurements
Presenter(s): John Abraham, St. Thomas University
Date & Time: 12 January 2017
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 - Room 4817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
John Abraham (St. Thomas University)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's NCEI POC: Tim.Boyer@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
1-877-725-4068 (8634769#) Webcast access go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c

Abstract:
Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a tool that can be applied to a very wide range of fluid simulations, from the microscale to the global scale. While global/regional scale CFD is common within the climate-science community, small-scale applications are also important yet perhaps underutilized. Here, descriptions of CFD analyses of oceanographic devices is provided with a particular focus placed on the trajectories of XBT devices as they descend into ocean water. The numerical model obviates the need of a fall rate equation and in fact, can be modified to account for variations in parameters such as drop height, ocean temperatures, mass of the probe, linear mass density of the wire, and other factors. Through the use of this model, probe-specific descent rates are available that accurately calculate the depth of the probes. Comparisons of the results with co-located CTDs are provided. The method discussed here can be expanded to other instruments that are used to make climatological measurements, including shipborne, autonomous, airborne, glider, or mooring instruments, as examples. The CFD method also inherently incorporates thermal processes both within fluids and solids and therefore solves the coupled conjugate heat transfer problem routinely.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 January 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Process studies to quantify ecosystem dynamics in the California Current
Presenter(s): Dr. Brian K. Wells, Research Fishery Biologist, Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA
Date & Time: 12 January 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NWFSC Map to NWFSC 2725 Montlake Blvd. E. Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Brian K. Wells, Research Fishery Biologist, Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov (206-860-3380) WEBINAR Join WebEx meeting: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=mb24c33557d4143e8f91fa0d71f14bc06 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 800 254 066

Abstract:
I review a suite of biophysical factors in the Northeast Pacific Ocean Basin and California Current shelf ecosystem that directly or indirectly relate to forage, Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), and seabird productivity in central California. The synthesis of our work over the last decade provides a framework for integrating ecosystem process studies with empirical hypothesis testing to benefit fisheries management. Our hypothesis includes seasonality (phenology) as a key element determining forage, Chinook salmon, and seabird productivities. The strength and location of the North Pacific High Pressure System in winter influences shelf ecosystem productivity via "bottom-up" mechanisms and retention of key prey (euphausiid crustaceans and juvenile rockfishes, Sebastes spp.) in nearshore habitats prior to and during salmon out-migration to sea and seabird chick rearing. Prey retention regionally is associated with increased consumption of krill and juvenile rockfishes by salmon and seabirds and is positively correlated with juvenile salmon ocean survival and fledgling success of seabirds. As a case study, the effects of ecosystem-level interactions were related to salmon survival. We found, during warmer, fresher, and stratified conditions (i.e., subtropical, less productive) common murres (Uria aalge) occur in larger aggregations and forage more inshore, where they forage predominantly on adult northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax). While foraging inshore, common murre consumption of juvenile Chinook salmon increases from 0 to 9% of their diet, which correlates negatively to the salmon survival rate. Ultimately, we demonstrate through empirical study of ecosystem interactions the significance of top-down impacts on salmon associated with bottom-up dynamics. This information can be used to parameterize ecosystem models and develop benchmarks and trophodynamic thresholds to evaluate likely outcomes of ecosystem management options, including considerations of three fishery resources and recovering seabird populations.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Precise Surveys at Co-located Geodetic Instruments (National Geodetic Survey)
Presenter(s): Charles Geoghegan, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 January 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Charles Geoghegan, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6318973965535775236. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States:+1 (562) 247-8422 Access Code: 821-212-817 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar.

Abstract:
NGS conducts precise surveys at sites with co-located instruments to enhance future realizations of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF), the international coordinate system for positioning applications. This presentation will describe the motivation, execution and benefit of these surveys.

Bio(s):
Charles Geoghegan is part of the Instrumentation and Methodologies Branch at NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: [Rescheduled to 3/9/2017] National Park Service Alaska "GPS on Bench Marks" Projects
Presenter(s): Nic Kinsman, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 January 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Britta Schroeder, National Park Service; Nicole Kinsman, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7796779165917887236. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States:+1 (213) 929-4212 Access Code: 928-174-468 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar.

Abstract:
Last summer, an intern visited over one hundred National Geodetic Survey (NGS) bench mark sites in Denali National Park and Preserve to collect survey-grade GPS coordinates. Most of these first-order vertical leveling bench marks were established along the ninety-two miles of Denali's park road in 1965 and since then, only a handful had been revisited. Now, over 50% of the monuments have been recovered or were ascertained to exist. The National Park Service (NPS) and NGS also provided geospatial courses and citizen science opportunities to high school and college students funded, in part, through the NOAA Preserve America Initiative. The courses included classroom time and field trips to understand how geospatial science is applied in the wilderness. This webinar will address some of the challenges and accomplishments of the project.

Bio(s):
Britta Schroeder works as the GIS Specialist and Unmanned Aerial Systems pilot in Denali National Park and Preserve; Nicole Kinsman is the National Geodetic Survey's Regional Advisor for Alaska and the US Arctic.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Bio-regional-Scale Analysis of Deep-Sea Coral Assemblage Composition Using NOAA's National Database of Deep-Sea Corals and Sponges
Presenter(s): Robert McGuinn, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 12 January 2017
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Robert McGuinn, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6301573096732081924

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of a NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program webinar series to highlight research, exploration, and management of deep-sea corals and sponges around the U.S. Seminar POC: Heather.Coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract:
The NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program has developed a comprehensive geo-database for deep-sea corals and sponges as a resource for both scientists and resource managers. The database currently integrates more than 250,000 deep-sea coral records and more than 70,000 deep-sea sponge records, most from U.S. waters. Records were compiled from museums, bycatch from fisheries and fisheries surveys, scientific literature, and in situ observations collected by NOAA and other research institutions. The schema accommodates both linear (trawls, transects) and point (samples, observations) data types, along with images and associated information related to biology, environment, provenance and accuracy. Currently, the region with the most records is the U.S. Pacific Coast (60%), while the U.S. East Coast and Caribbean has the least amount of records (2.4%). The database structure can accommodate information on abundance, density, and associated habitat characteristics. The database content and taxonomy are based on international standards (Darwin Core, World Register of Marine Species). We provide an example data analysis exploring differences in coral assemblages by marine ecoregion and depth zone within two data-rich focal regions (the Pacific and Gulf of Mexico). Basic statistical summaries of the community structure, composition, and biodiversity are provided. The relevance of these findings to conservation and management of these habitats are discussed. This project demonstrates how a comprehensive National Database can be used to gain new insights into deep sea community composition and biodiversity.

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Title: Collaborative Development of Deep-Sea Coral Protected Areas in the US Mid-Atlantic
Presenter(s): Kiley Dancy, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council
Date & Time: 12 January 2017
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kiley Dancy, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6301573096732081924

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of a NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program webinar series to highlight research, exploration, and management of deep-sea corals and sponges around the U.S. Seminar POC: Heather.Coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract:
In 2015, the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council proposed measures to reduce the impacts of fishing on deep-sea corals off the U.S. mid-Atlantic coast. The proposal would prohibit the use of most types of bottomtending gear within a 99,000 km2 area on the outer continental shelf, slope, and deep sea to the outer boundary of the EEZ. The proposed coral zones will limit interactions between fishing gear and corals in areas of known or highly likely coral presence, and prevent the deep-water expansion of commercial fishing operations using bottom-tending gears. If approved by NOAA, this action will mark the first use of the 2006 Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Reauthorization Act discretionary authority authorizing regional Fishery Management Councils to designate zones where fishing may be restricted to protect deep-sea corals. The successful development of this action depended on two critical factors. First, availability of recent data products, including a regional habitat suitability model, new coral observations from recent surveys in mid-Atlantic canyons, and high-resolution bathymetry data enabled the development of targeted management options supported by the best available science. Second, management options were evaluated through a collaborative stakeholder workshop to determine an acceptable balance between coral protection and negative impacts on commercial fisheries. Workshop participants, including Council members and advisors, coral and habitat scientists, fishermen who utilize the proposed areas, and conservation organizations interested in coral protection, discussed competing proposals and boundary locations. The resulting set of boundaries, representing a consensus of workshop participants, was subsequently supported nearly unanimously by the Council.

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17 January 2017

Title: Reducing Bird Collisions with Buildings and Building Glass: Best Practices (Introductions to begin at 10:45 am)
Presenter(s): Lesley Kordella, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service; and Meghan C. Sadlowski, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Date & Time: 17 January 2017
10:45 am - 11:45 am ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lesley Kordella and Meghan C. Sadlowski, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Introductions: Eileen Sobeck, Assistant Administrator, NOAA Fisheries. (Note: Introductions are to begin promptly at 10:45 AM). POC: Lee Benaka, Fishery Management Specialist, lee.benaka@noaa.gov For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract:
Glass reflectivity and transparency create a lethal illusion of clear airspace that birds do not see as a barrier. During the daytime, birds collide with windows because they see reflections of the landscape in the glass (e.g., clouds, sky, vegetation, or the ground); or they see through glass to perceived habitat (including potted plants or vegetation inside buildings) or to the sky on the other side. At night, during spring and fall bird migrations when inclement weather occurs, birds can be attracted to lighted structures resulting in collisions, entrapment, excess energy expenditure, and exhaustion. The majority of collisions with both residential and urban buildings happen during the day, as birds fly around looking for food. Annual bird mortality resulting from window collisions in the U.S. is estimated to be between 365- 988 million birds which, according to the latest research, ranks it as the second highest source of direct human-caused bird mortality worldwide. While most people consider bird/glass collisions an urban phenomenon involving tall, mirrored-glass skyscrapers, the reality is that 56% of collision mortality occurs at low-rise (i.e., one to three story) buildings, 44% at urban and rural residences, and <1% at high rises. This brown bag session will focus on explaining some of the major factors involved in building, glass and lighting impacts to birds in buildings we reside and work in every day, and the solutions that can be implemented to help greatly reduce these impacts. Though one of the top human-caused impacts to birds, there are many options for reducing or preventing bird collisions with buildings; several of which are low to no cost or help save in energy and other costs. Join us in learning how you can make a difference in the little things you do everyday to avoid building, glass and lighting impacts to birds.

Bio(s):
Lesley Kordella is a Wildlife Biologist in the Division of Migratory Birds at the USFWS and has spent the past 12 years in the federal government focusing on impacts to wildlife from energy projects. Lesley serves as the UFWS's liaison to the Avian Power Line Interaction Committee, National Environmental Policy Act lead for the proposed rule to authorize incidental take under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and Coordinator for the Council for the Conservation of Migratory Birds"a group of federal agencies dedicated to migratory bird conservation under Executive Order 13186. Meghan Sadlowski is an Environmental Scientist in the USFWS's Migratory Bird Division, Branch of Conservation, Permits and Regulations. Ms. Sadlowski has worked in the Migratory Bird Division for over six years, providing support in the development of decision support tools, guidance documents, and other resources focusing on minimization of anthropogenic impacts to birds. She holds a Masters of Environmental Science and Policy from the Johns Hopkins University.

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Title: NOAA's Work in the International Arctic Council's Emergency Prevention, Preparedness and Response Working Group
Presenter(s): Amy Merten, Ph.D., Chair of the Arctic Council's Emergency Prevention, Preparedness and Response Working Group, NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration
Date & Time: 17 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Amy Merten, Ph.D., Chair of the Arctic Council's Emergency Prevention, Preparedness and Response (EPPR) Working Group, NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
Dr. Amy Merten chairs the Arctic Council's Emergency Prevention, Preparedness and Response (EPPR) working group. Dr. Merten will discuss the Arctic Council's mission and how NOAA interacts with the Council while focusing most of her presentation on her experience as chair of one of the six working groups. She will discuss the high priorities projects under EPPR and how they relate to the broader NOAA community and science. The goal of the EPPR Working Group is to contribute to the protection of the Arctic environment from the threat or impact that may result from an accidental release of pollutants or radionuclides. In addition, the EPPR considers questions related to the consequences of natural disasters. EPPR works with other Arctic Council working groups and other organizations to ensure that the emergencies are appropriately addressed in council products and work. EPPR also maintains liaison with the oil industry and other relevant organizations with the aim of enhancing oil spill prevention and preparedness in the Arctic. EPPR is responsible for overseeing that two binding agreements negotiated under the Arctic Council are exercised and kept up to date, where appropriate: 1) Agreement on Cooperation on Marine Oil Pollution, Preparedness and Response in the Arctic, and 2) Agreement on Cooperation on Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue in the Arctic. EPPR is also responsible for tracking the implementation of: Framework Plan for Cooperation on Prevention of Oil Pollution from Petroleum and Maritime Activities in the Marine Areas of the Arctic, which has overlapping/shared responsibilities with the Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment (PAME) Working Group. The Framework speaks to several NOAA responsibilities including improved forecasting, up-to-date charting, etc. For more information, please see: http://www.arctic-council.org/index.php/en/about-us/working-groups/eppr. About the Speaker. Amy Merten is the Chief of the Spatial Data Branch, NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration, Assessment and Restoration Division, in Seattle, WA. Amy oversaw the data management and visualization activities for the Deepwater Horizon natural resource damage assessment case and continues to provide long-term data management support to the region. Amy is the current Chair of the Arctic Council's Emergency Prevention, Preparedness and Response (EPPR) Working Group. Dr. Merten responded to several major U.S. spills, including the M/V ATHOS (Delaware River), the M/V SELENDANG AYU (Unalaska, AK), several spills on the Mississippi corridor caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and the Deepwater Horizon Disaster. Dr. Merten has expertise in in situ burning and other response technologies, biological impacts of oil, and shoreline assessment. Dr. Merten received her doctorate (2005) and master (1999) degrees in Marine, Estuarine and Environmental Sciences with a specialization in Environmental Chemistry from the University of Maryland at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory.

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18 January 2017

Title: Patterns, Partnerships & Renewable Energy: Marine Biogeographic Assessment of the Main Hawaiian Islands
Presenter(s): Bryan Costa, Matthew Kendall, and Arliss Winship, Marine Scientists of the Biogeography Branch of NOAA/NOS/NCCOS - National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 18 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Bryan Costa, Matthew Kendall, Arliss Winship, Marine Scientists of the Biogeography Branch of NOAA/NOS/NCCOS - National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring at location above.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
The state of Hawai‘i is working to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels by developing local renewable energy sources. Most of the State's potential renewable energy resources (notably, wind) are located in federal waters. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) regulates the leasing, construction & operation of most renewable energy projects in federal waters, & is required to evaluate potential impacts from these projects. BOEM partnered with the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) to gather biogeographic information in support of this evaluation around the Main Hawaiian Islands (MHI). NCCOS compiled spatial data & synthesized new products around the MHI, describing the marine environment, & distribution of benthic habitats, fishes, sea turtles, marine mammals, & seabirds. Data products were specifically tailored to fit within BOEM's framework of offshore lease blocks, & ranged from simple animal distribution maps to mathematical models depicting the predicted distributions of animals. For some animals, this assessment marks the first time that their space-use patterns were mapped or modeled in the MHI. Products from this project are publicly available, including a report, GIS data, web maps & services. Collaborations with a variety of organizations were crucial to this work, including NOAA's Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center, NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, and the State of Hawai‘i.

Bio(s):
Bryan Costa, Matt Kendall & Arliss Winship are marine scientists with NOAA NCCOS. They work to monitor, map & model the distributions of organisms in the coastal waters, territories & flag islands of the United States. Their applied research is designed to inform the decisions of resource managers & policy makers in support of ocean planning.

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Title: NOAA's Contributions to International Activities for Training in Satellite Meteorology via the WMO VLab
Presenter(s): Bernie Connell, Colorado State University
Date & Time: 18 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building, 8th Floor Conference Room, 10210 Greenbelt Road Lanham, MD 20706
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Bernie Connell, Colorado State University

Sponsor(s):
JPSS Science Seminar Series; http://www.jpss.noaa.gov/science_seminars.html

Remote Access:
TO JOIN THE WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m2bbab70e0e8ffded419966b2d5f0ddee Meeting number: 745 553 103 Host key: 341946 Meeting password: 2016!Yes Dial in number: 877-915- 7510, passcode: 35894360

Abstract:
The Coordination Group for Meteorological Satellites (CGMS) and the Space Programme of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) established the Virtual Laboratory for Education and Training in Satellite Meteorology (VLab) in 2000 to promote effective use of satellite meteorology by WMO Members located in all parts of the World. The WMO VLab is a collaborative effort joining major operational satellite operators across the globe with WMO regional training centers of excellence in satellite meteorology. Those regional training centers serve as the satellite-focused training resource for WMO Members. Over time, satellite training for forecasters has been used to supplement gaps in education and as means to present new and improved operational products. This presentation will highlight activities that NOAA supports through the JPSS program to help prepare international users (forecasters, researchers, and managers) on how to utilize imagery and products to provide services in these areas. Highlighted activities include the synergy between NOAA's Weather Prediction Center (WPC) International Desks intensive visitor training and regular virtual monthly focus group sessions; access to imagery; teaching and learning approaches, and lessons learned along the way. Seminar Contact: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov To Attend In Person: Unless noted otherwise, all seminars take place at the Aerospace Building 8th Floor Conference Room 10210 Greenbelt Road Lanham, MD 20706 Please note: Only those with federal government-issued identification or prior approval can attend.

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Title: Deep Sea Science in the Classroom: Exploring Coral Communities of the West Coast National Marine Sanctuaries
Presenter(s): Rietta Hohman, NOAA Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 18 January 2017
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Webinar - See Description for more details
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rietta Hohman, NOAA Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8564494469781197569

Abstract:
Take your students on an incredible journey hundreds of feet beneath the surface of the ocean, without ever leaving the classroom! Using research footage from Remotely Operated Vehicles, your students will be able to utilize real scientific methods to explore the unique deep sea coral communities found in our West Coast National Marine Sanctuaries. They will investigate threats, such as ocean acidification, that these precious ecosystems face and learn the importance of long-term scientific monitoring and protection. This program is aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards and all materials are available for teachers to download from the web free of cost. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

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19 January 2017

Title: Improving Prediction of Salt Marsh Response to Sea Level Rise: New Methods and Novel Dynamics
Presenter(s): Dr. Scott Ensign, Aquatic Analysis and Consulting LLC, Morehead City, NC; and Dr. Carolyn Currin, NCCOS Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research, Beaufort, NC
Date & Time: 19 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Scott Ensign, Aquatic Analysis and Consulting LLC, Morehead City, NC; and Dr. Carolyn Currin, NCCOS Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research, Beaufort, NC. Presenting remotely from Beaufort.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The conservation and restoration of salt marshes is a key component of coastal resiliency, as marshes provide numerous ecosystem services to coastal communities. Municipal, state, and federal agencies require predictions of future wetland change and shoreline erosion to guide responses to sea level rise and develop adaptive management strategies. Simple inundation-based models provide regional scale estimates, but morphodynamic models are needed for fine-scale prediction to support decision-making. However, application of morphodynamic models is limited by 1) the choice of model and 2) site-specific measurements of suspended sediment regime. We developed a GIS-based method of delineating shorelines into the two types addressed by morphodynamic models; the method can be automated within a GIS to provide a decision support system for shoreline change analysis and also allows estimation of suspended sediment regime for model parameterization. We found that the suspended sediment regime in a North Carolina salt marsh was considerably influence by sediment transport at the air-water interface. For example, up to 16% of sediment mass carried across the salt marsh on a flood tide was moved via water surface tension (not turbulent suspension). Moreover, up to 100% of the sediment that settles onto the marsh surface from the water column is lifted by surface tension during the next tide. Incorporation of this process in morphodynamic models, in conjunction with a GIS-based shoreline modeling framework, will improve the resolution and accuracy of wetland shoreline predictions in the US and abroad.

Bio(s):
Dr. Ensign is an aquatic ecologist who studies coastal eco-hydro-biogeochemical processes across the freshwater-tidal spectrum, from streams and swamps to estuaries and saltwater marshes. Dr. Ensign is Managing Principal at Aquatic Analysis and Consulting, LLC, an environmental consulting group that conducted this research on behalf of the Defense Coastal-Estuarine Research Program. More information is available at www.aquaco.us and dcerp.rti.org

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Title: Forecasting the flock: using species distribution models to evaluate the effects of climate change on future seabird foraging aggregations in the California Current System
Presenter(s): Dori Dick, 2016 Knauss Fellow, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Protected Resources
Date & Time: 19 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dori Dick, 2016 Knauss Fellow, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Protected Resources For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Ocean management and conservation in the face of climate change depends on robust understanding of current relationships between species and their environment. This study built spatially-explicit models to identify multispecies seabird foraging aggregations (hotspots) in the California Current System and assessed how locations may shift due to climate change. Models for 30 species were built and validated using 15 years (1997-2012) of seabird survey data. We predicted species-specific relative densities during February, May, July and October under three scenarios and assessed current relationships between SST, sea surface height (SSH) and chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a) to predict future scenarios. Standardized predicted means were averaged by foraging ecotype to create scenario-specific multispecies hotspot maps by month. Results suggest suitable foraging habitat will shift offshore and north, diving and surface feeders will be the most sensitive to a changing climate, and some seamounts may retain suitable habitat in the future.

Bio(s):
Dori Dick is a marine spatial ecologist who uses GIS and spatial analyses to understand what factors influence how species use the ocean and improve marine conservation and management decisions. She has a PhD in Geography from Oregon State University and is a Protected Species Program Specialist on Climate Change with NOAA Fisheries Office of Protected Resources.

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Title: Historical context for the 2013-2016 NE Pacific Marine Heatwave
Presenter(s): Dr. Nate Mantua, Landscape Ecology Team Leader, Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA
Date & Time: 19 January 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NWFSC Map to NWFSC 2725 Montlake Blvd. E. Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Nate Mantua, Landscape Ecology Team Leader, Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov (206-860-3380) WEBINAR Join WebEx meeting: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=mb24c33557d4143e8f91fa0d71f14bc06 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 800 254 066

Abstract:
Between the winters of 2013/14 and 2014/15 during the strong North American drought, the northeast Pacific experienced its largest marine heatwave on record. The extraordinary warming persisted into 2015/2016 under the influence of an extreme El Niño event. Here I'll review the extent to which regional atmospheric forcing of the NE Pacific marine heat wave was related to known atmospheric teleconnections between El Niño, the PDO, and the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO). I will also review the dramatic shift in Pacific climate that followed the end of the 2016 El Niño that included a brief reappearance of the dreaded Blob. BIO Nate Mantua currently leads the Landscape Ecology Team at NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center in Santa Cruz, California. Nate was at the University of Washington in Seattle from 1995-2012, where he co-directed the Climate Impacts Group and was an associate professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. His research interests include climate variability and predictability, climate impacts on natural resources, and the use of climate information in resource management. His lifelong int

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Title: Where are the coral gardens? Mapping densities and condition of gorgonian octocorals in the mesophotic depth zone of the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Peter Etnoyer, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 19 January 2017
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Peter Etnoyer, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2347373041482223108

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of a NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program webinar series to highlight research, exploration, and management of deep-sea corals and sponges around the U.S. Seminar POC: Heather.Coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract:
The term ‘coral garden' is useful for science and management because it identifies vulnerable marine ecosystems and promotes metrics for comparison, specifically density and extent of coral aggregations. This study measured gorgonian octocoral density, extent, and condition in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary (30-150 meters) and compared these to densities reported for ‘coral gardens' in other regions. Three transect approaches were considered, based on distance (100 meters) and duration (5 and 15 minute). The 100 m and 5 min transects identified several aggregations where density exceeded 100 colonies/100 m2. None of the 15 min transects achieved these densities due to the patchiness of coral coverage. The highest average densities were north of Santa Rosa (36 corals/100 m2). The most abundant taxa were Eugorgia rubens and Adelogorgia phyllosclera, with maximum densities of 55 and 70 colonies/100 m2 respectively. Leptogorgia chilensis was also present. Most octocorals appeared to be in healthy condition, but there were some notable declines in density and condition since 2005 in shallow parts of Anacapa Island. Aggregated densities meet the Oslo/Paris convention's (OSPAR) definition for ‘coral garden' (100-700 colonies/100 m2), suggesting the criteria are applicable to this area. Further work is needed to map the full extent of the ‘coral gardens' and assess the potential threats.

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Title: Effects of oil and dispersants on Swiftia exserta, a structure-forming deep-water octocoral from mesophotic reefs in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Janessy Frometa, JHT, Inc., Contracted to NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 19 January 2017
3:30 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Janessy Frometa, JHT, Inc., Contracted to NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2347373041482223108

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of a NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program webinar series to highlight research, exploration, and management of deep-sea corals and sponges around the U.S. Seminar POC: Heather.Coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract:
One outcome of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill was the realization that no well-established toxicity thresholds exist for benthic taxa in deep water (>50 m). Surveys of mesophotic reefs along the Gulf of Mexico Pinnacle Trend in 2011 showed that large octocoral colonies below the oil slick exhibited significantly more injury than in years before the spill. Swiftia exserta, an octocoral species found throughout the West Atlantic at depths of 20-200 meters, was among the injured taxa. In the Gulf of Mexico Swiftia has white polyps, as opposed to the typical red polyps in East Florida, but haplotype frequencies suggest no difference between the two localities. Live fragments of S. exserta from East Florida were exposed to varying concentrations of water-accommodated oil fractions (WAFs), Corexit® 9500 dispersant, and chemically-enhanced WAFs to determine the vulnerability of Swiftia octocorals to oil and dispersants. Following 96-hour toxicological assays, dispersant-alone and oil-dispersant mixtures were substantially more detrimental to coral health than any of the WAF concentrations tested. Complete mortality was observed within 48 hours for some fragments in the dispersant-alone and oil-dispersant treatments, while the WAF and control groups remained relatively uneffected. This is the first toxicity threshold established for a mesophotic octocoral species subject to the DWH spill, and provides evidence of octocoral sensitivity to oil and dispersants, which should inform scientists and managers in the event of a future oil spill.

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24 January 2017

Title: The National Science Foundation (NSF) Arctic Data Center Collaborates with NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)
Presenter(s): Sheekela Baker-Yeboah, Ph.D. NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI
Date & Time: 24 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 4817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sheekela Baker-Yeboah, Ph.D. NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NESDIS National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Arctic Team (NCEI.Arctic.Actions@noaa.gov). NCEI Arctic Action Team's webpage: https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/arcticteam.html

Remote Access:
Phone: 1-877-725-4068 (8634769#); limited to 25 callers on a first come first served basis. For Webcast access go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c

Abstract:
The Arctic Data Center is a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded archive for Arctic scientific data and information (see https://arcticdata.io/). It is a national partnership, led by the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) at the University of California Santa Barbara, in collaboration with NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) and the NSF-funded Data Observation Network for Earth (DataONE). NCEI (https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/) are responsible for hosting and providing access to one of the most significant archives on earth for ocean, atmosphere, and geophysical data. NCEI was formed in 2015 as the merger of the former NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center, National Climatic Data Center, and National Geophysical Data Center.

Bio(s):
Sheekela Baker-Yeboah is an experienced Physical Oceanographer/Research Scientist at the University of Maryland and holds the position of Satellite Team Lead at NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI through CICS-MD at the University of Maryland, College Park. She received her Ph. D. from the University of Rhode Island and her Post-Doctoral Training at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She was a Research Scientist at MIT, a visiting Professor at Worcester Polytechnic Institute of Massachusetts and Lesley University of Cambridge, Massachusetts. She has seagoing, teaching, modeling, and laboratory experience and is a trained Remote Sensing Oceanographer (satellite data processing and analysis using SAR, SWH, AVHRR SST, Altimeter SSH, Ocean Color/SeaWifs). She also works with in situ oceanographic data with training in statistics, ship CTD, oxygen titration, ADCP and XBT data, data analysis, training in and consulting on field research techniques for Pressure Inverted Echo Sounders. Currently, Dr. Baker-Yeboah is focusing on (1) AVHRR Sea Surface Temperature and Altimeter Sea Surface Height to study mesoscale ocean variability and (2) satellite oceanography in the Arctic. She is a Co-PI on the NSF Arctic Data Center Project.

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Title: Using acoustics to prioritize management decisions to protect coastal dolphins: A case study using Hawaiian spinner dolphins
Presenter(s): Heather Heenehan, Ph.D., Postdoctoral researcher at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center in the Passive Acoustics Group
Date & Time: 24 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Heather Heenehan, Ph.D. Postdoctoral researcher at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center in the Passive Acoustics Group; she will be presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring on work from her dissertation at the Duke University Marine Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
For more than a decade, interactions between humans and Hawaiian spinner dolphins in their resting bays have been a concern for members of the general public, managers, scientists, policymakers, and tour operators. Hawaiian spinner dolphins are the target of a large wildlife tourism industry due to their predictable daytime resting behavior and presence in coastal areas. Using results from passive acoustic monitoring between January 2011 and March 2013 on the Kona coast of Hawai‛i Island, USA, the relative importance of four known Hawaiian spinner dolphin resting bays, the contribution of anthropogenic noise including vessel noise to the four bay soundscapes, and the dolphins' response to human activities were assessed. Here the findings are summarized and visualized and recommendations are provided for action to regulate directed dolphin watching and ensuing unauthorized takes under the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972. These findings and recommendations have implications for the federal government's ongoing efforts to implement rules that protect Hawaiian spinner dolphins in their resting bays.

Bio(s):
Heather has a BS in Environmental Science from the University of Connecticut. She received both her Master of Environmental Management and PhD in Marine Science and Conservation from Duke University. Heather is now working in the passive acoustics group at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center where she has been working on the Caribbean Humpback Acoustic Monitoring Programme.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
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25 January 2017

Title: Spatial variability and potential long-term trends in Great Lakes carbon
Presenter(s): Galen A. McKinley, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Center for Climatic Research
Date & Time: 25 January 2017
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Galen A. McKinley, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Center for Climatic Research Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8732706556168576513

Abstract:
Biogeochemical and carbon cycling in Great Lakes occurs in the context of a highly variable aquatic landscape that is significantly impacted by physical forcing. In order to understand biogeochemical cycling in its mean state and as it changes, we must quantify the role of physical variability in space and time. Here, three carbon cycle examples will be presented. In Lake Superior, analysis of a coupled hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model (MITgcm.Superior) shows that physical gradients cause large variation in rates of both production (P) and respiration (R) between nearshore and offshore waters. Accounting for this variability helps to bring the lake-wide carbon budget into balance (Bennington et al. 2012, JGR). In the model, fluxes of organic carbon from nearshore lead to elevated R:P ratios in the slope region, which could support the observed enhanced heterotrophic biomass on the slope (McKinley and Bennington, in prep). Lastly, in all the Great Lakes, I demonstrate that increasing atmospheric CO2 should lead to a reduction of pH by ~0.3 units by 2100, quantitatively the same as projections for “ocean acidification” in the global oceans. In the Great Lakes, the existing carbon cycle observational system is insufficient to track such changes (Phillips et al. 2015).

Bio(s):
Professor McKinley studies the mechanisms of the carbon cycle in the global oceans and Great Lakes, with her research lying at the intersection of physical and chemical oceanography. Her primary tools are numerical models and analysis of large datasets. More specifically, her research addresses the physical drivers of ecosystem and carbon cycle variability in the North Atlantic, global oceans and Great Lakes. Professor McKinley teaches oceanography and climate science in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at University of Wisconsin - Madison. She is also very active in service to the national and international scientific and policy-making communities.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ecological Marine Units: A 3-D Mapping of the Ocean Based on NOAA's World Ocean Atlas
Presenter(s): Dawn Wright, Chief Scientist, Environmental Systems Research Institute Esri, presenting remotely; Roger Sayre, Senior Scientist for Ecosystems, Climate and Land Use Change, USGS at NOAA in Silver Spring; and Sean Breyer, ArcGIS Content Program Manager, Esri at NOAA in Silver Spring
Date & Time: 25 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dawn Wright, Chief Scientist, Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri, presenting remotely); Roger Sayre, Senior Scientist for Ecosystems, Climate and Land Use Change, USGS (presenting in person); and Sean Breyer, ArcGIS Content Program Manager, Esri (presenting in person)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
We report progress on the Ecological Marine Units (EMU) project, a new undertaking commissioned by the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) as a means of developing a standardized and practical global ecosystems classification and map for the oceans, and thus a key outcome of the GEO Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON). The project is one of four components of the new GI-14 GEO Ecosystems Initiative within the GEO 2016 Transitional Work plan, and for eventual use by the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The project is also the follow-on to a comprehensive Ecological Land Units project (ELU), also commissioned by GEO. The EMU is comprised of a global point mesh framework, created from 52,487,233 points from the NOAA World Ocean Atlas; spatial resolution is one-quarter degree by one-quarter degree by varying depth; temporal resolution is currently decadal; each point has x, y, z, as well as six attributes of chemical and physical oceanographic structure (temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, nitrate, silicate, phosphate) that are likely drivers of many ecosystem responses. We implemented a k-means statistical clustering of the point mesh (using the pseudo-F statistic to help determine the numbers of clusters), allowing us to identify and map 37 environmentally distinct 3D regions (candidate 'ecosystems') within the water column. These units can be attributed according to their productivity, direction and velocity of currents, species abundance, global seafloor geomorphology (from Harris et al.), and much more. A series of data products for open access will share the 3D point mesh and EMU clusters at the surface, bottom, and within the water column, as well as 2D and 3D web apps for exploration of the EMUs and the original World Ocean Atlas data. Future plans include a global delineation of Ecological Coastal Units (ECU) at a much finer spatial resolution (not yet commenced), as well as global ecological freshwater ecosystems (EFUs; in earliest planning stages). We will also be exploring how to conceptually and spatially connect EMUs, ELUs, and EFUs at the ECU interface.

Bio(s):
Dawn Wright (http://dusk.geo.orst.edu/) was appointed Chief Scientist of Esri in October 2011 after 17 years as a professor of geography and oceanography at Oregon State University. In this role at Esri, she reports directly to the Esri CEO, with a mission to strengthen the scientific foundation for Esri software and services, while representing Esri to the national and international scientific community. Dawn also maintains an affiliated faculty appointment in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State. Her current research interests include data modeling, benthic terrain and habitat characterization, coastal/ocean informatics, and cyberinfrastructure. Her recent advisory board service includes the NOAA Science Advisory Board and the National Academy of Sciences Ocean Studies Board, the Science Advisory Board of Conservation International, the Board of COMPASS Science Communication Inc., and many journal editorial boards. Dawn is a AAAS Fellow, a GSA Fellow, and a fellow of Stanford University's Leopold Leadership Program. She holds an Individual Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Physical Geography and Marine Geology from UCSB, an M.S. in Oceanography from Texas A&M, and a B.S. cum laude in Geology from Wheaton College (Illinois). Other interests include road cycling, 18th-century pirates, apricot green tea gummy bears, her dog Sally, and SpongeBob Squarepants. Follow her on Twitter at @deepseadawn.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 January 2017

Title: Ecological impacts of climate-related ichthyofaunal shifts and invasive lionfish on Gulf of Mexico reef fishes
Presenter(s): Tony Marshak, PhD, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 26 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 12836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tony Marshak, PhD, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology, 1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology Brown Bag Seminar Points of Contact: Jihong.Dai@noaa.gov and Tony.Marshak@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Phone: 888-913-9579, password: 5425515 Webcast Access: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/st_brown_bag_seminar/

Abstract:
Large and apparently unprecedented increases in the abundance of juvenile gray snapper (Lutjanus griseus), lane snapper (L. synagris), groupers and other tropically-associated species within northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM) seagrass meadows have been recently observed. Although occurring infrequently in the nGOM, their increased abundance has been suggested to reflect regional warming trends, and has resulted in higher numbers in offshore adult habitats. Additionally, recent invasion by the Indo-Pacific red lionfish (Pterois volitans) into nGOM offshore habitats has been documented. Increases in tropically-associated confamilials, and invasive lionfish, could result in pronounced competitive interactions with nGOM reef fishes, such as juvenile red snapper (L. campechanus), in limited natural reef habitat, and cause shifts in the species composition of offshore fish assemblages. We experimentally investigated the intensity of these interactions between increasingly abundant tropical snapper species, red lionfish, and indigenous members of the nGOM reef fish community in large outdoor mesocosms. Compared to tropical counterparts, red snapper demonstrated increased partial roving behavior, aggression, and predation, suggesting their potential to exploitatively outcompete lower latitude snappers. However, lionfish were more active than red snapper, and consumed more prey than range-shifting reef fishes, suggesting additional partial advantage over nGOM fishes. As conditions continue to favor ongoing warming-related species shifts and marine invasions within marine ecosystems, these findings contribute toward the assessment of their impacts toward the valuable nGOM reef fish community.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ecological impacts of climate-related ichthyofaunal shifts and invasive lionfish on Gulf of Mexico reef fishes
Presenter(s): Tony Marshak, PhD, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 26 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 12836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tony Marshak, PhD, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology, 1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology Brown Bag Seminar Points of Contact: Jihong.Dai@noaa.gov and Tony.Marshak@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Phone: 888-913-9579, password: 5425515 Webcast Access: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/st_brown_bag_seminar/

Abstract:
Large and apparently unprecedented increases in the abundance of juvenile gray snapper (Lutjanus griseus), lane snapper (L. synagris), groupers and other tropically-associated species within northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM) seagrass meadows have been recently observed. Although occurring infrequently in the nGOM, their increased abundance has been suggested to reflect regional warming trends, and has resulted in higher numbers in offshore adult habitats. Additionally, recent invasion by the Indo-Pacific red lionfish (Pterois volitans) into nGOM offshore habitats has been documented. Increases in tropically-associated confamilials, and invasive lionfish, could result in pronounced competitive interactions with nGOM reef fishes, such as juvenile red snapper (L. campechanus), in limited natural reef habitat, and cause shifts in the species composition of offshore fish assemblages. We experimentally investigated the intensity of these interactions between increasingly abundant tropical snapper species, red lionfish, and indigenous members of the nGOM reef fish community in large outdoor mesocosms. Compared to tropical counterparts, red snapper demonstrated increased partial roving behavior, aggression, and predation, suggesting their potential to exploitatively outcompete lower latitude snappers. However, lionfish were more active than red snapper, and consumed more prey than range-shifting reef fishes, suggesting additional partial advantage over nGOM fishes. As conditions continue to favor ongoing warming-related species shifts and marine invasions within marine ecosystems, these findings contribute toward the assessment of their impacts toward the valuable nGOM reef fish community.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Transient Tracers for climate and ocean health assessments
Presenter(s): Dr. Toste Tanhua, Senior Scientist, GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany
Date & Time: 26 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Toste Tanhua, Senior Scientist, GEOMAR (Kiel, Germany) For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract:
Transient tracers are a group of (chemical) compounds that can be used in the ocean to quantify ventilation, transit time distribution and transport time-scales. These compounds are ideally conservative in sea-water and a well-established source function over time at the ocean surface, or have well-defined decay-functions. Measurement of transient tracers in the interior ocean thus provides information on the time-scales since the ocean was ventilated, i.e. in contact with the atmosphere. Knowledge of the transit time distribution (TTD) of a water-mass allows for inference of the concentrations or fates of other transient compounds, such as anthropogenic carbon or nitrous oxide. Commonly measured transient tracers are the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) 11 and 12, although in the past also CFC-113 and CCl4 have been measured. More recently also the related compound sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) is regularly measured since it provides information on ventilation of the fast ventilated parts of the ocean. Exciting new techniques might allow for a global survey of Argon-39, a isotope with a 269 decay half-time. Knowledge about ventilation is key to quantify the transport of (climate) perturbations from the surface to interior ocean. For instance, the ocean is storing about 95% of anthropogenic global warming (heat content) and about 30% of anthropogenic carbon. A system of global sustained observations of interior ocean transient tracer observations will help to answer several societal relevant questions articulated in, for instance, climate agreements and SDG-14. Here I will present some basic concepts of transient tracers, and put that in a global context with focus on societal benefits.

Bio(s):
Dr. Toste Tanhua obtained a PhD in Marine Chemistry in Sweden in 1997 based on work on transient tracers. After a few years at Scripps Institute of Oceanography, Dr. Tanhua took a position at GEOMAR in Kiel, Germany. Measurements of oceanic transient tracers has been a central theme of Dr. Tanhua's research, particularly the use of transient tracers to detect and quantify temporal changes in ocean ventilation and ocean storage of anthropogenic carbon.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ecological impacts of climate-related ichthyofaunal shifts and invasive lionfish on Gulf of Mexico reef fishes
Presenter(s): Tony Marshak, PhD, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 26 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 12836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tony Marshak, PhD, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology, 1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology Brown Bag Seminar Points of Contact: Jihong.Dai@noaa.gov and Tony.Marshak@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Phone: 888-913-9579, password: 5425515 Webcast Access: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/st_brown_bag_seminar/

Abstract:
Large and apparently unprecedented increases in the abundance of juvenile gray snapper (Lutjanus griseus), lane snapper (L. synagris), groupers and other tropically-associated species within northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM) seagrass meadows have been recently observed. Although occurring infrequently in the nGOM, their increased abundance has been suggested to reflect regional warming trends, and has resulted in higher numbers in offshore adult habitats. Additionally, recent invasion by the Indo-Pacific red lionfish (Pterois volitans) into nGOM offshore habitats has been documented. Increases in tropically-associated confamilials, and invasive lionfish, could result in pronounced competitive interactions with nGOM reef fishes, such as juvenile red snapper (L. campechanus), in limited natural reef habitat, and cause shifts in the species composition of offshore fish assemblages. We experimentally investigated the intensity of these interactions between increasingly abundant tropical snapper species, red lionfish, and indigenous members of the nGOM reef fish community in large outdoor mesocosms. Compared to tropical counterparts, red snapper demonstrated increased partial roving behavior, aggression, and predation, suggesting their potential to exploitatively outcompete lower latitude snappers. However, lionfish were more active than red snapper, and consumed more prey than range-shifting reef fishes, suggesting additional partial advantage over nGOM fishes. As conditions continue to favor ongoing warming-related species shifts and marine invasions within marine ecosystems, these findings contribute toward the assessment of their impacts toward the valuable nGOM reef fish community.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Processes regulating formation of low-salinity, high-biomass lenses near the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf
Presenter(s): Yizhen Li, Computational Ecologist and Research Oceanographer, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Date & Time: 26 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Yizhen Li, Computational Ecologist and Research Oceanographer, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
In situ observations in austral summer of early 2012 in the Ross Sea suggest the presence of low-salinity, high-biomass lenses within cold eddies along the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf (RIS). Idealized model simulations are utilized to examine the processes responsible for ice shelf eddy formation. 3-D model simulations produce similar cold and fresh eddies, although the simulated vertical lenses are quantitatively thinner than observed. Model sensitivity tests show that both basal melting underneath the ice shelf and irregularity of the ice shelf edge facilitate generation of cold and fresh eddies. 2-D model simulations further suggest that both basal melting and downwelling-favorable winds play crucial roles in forming a thick layer of low-salinity water observed along the edge of the RIS. These properties may have been entrained into the observed eddies, whereas that entrainment process was not captured in the specific eddy formation events studied in our 3-D model"which may explain the discrepancy between the simulated and observed eddies, at least in part. Additional sensitivity experiments imply that uncertainties associated with background stratification and wind stress may also explain why the model underestimates the thickness of the low-salinity lens in the eddy interiors. Our study highlights the importance of incorporating accurate wind forcing, basal melting and ice shelf irregularity for simulating ocean dynamics near the RIS edge.

Bio(s):
Yizhen Li is a computational ecologist and research oceanographer at NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). He is also a guest investigator at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. His research interests include coastal circulation dynamics; coupled bio-physical interactions, especially harmful algal blooms and larval dispersal modeling; variational data assimilation, and satellite oceanography. He earned a BA and an MS at the Ocean University of China. He earned a second MS and then a PhD at North Carolina State University. Yizhen has worked as a research assistant and postdoctoral research associate at North Carolina State University, and a postdoctoral scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He recently joined NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, where he serves as an ecologist and research oceanographer.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Examining the ecology and predation impacts of non-native fishes in the San Joaquin River, California
Presenter(s): Dr. Joseph A. Smith, Research Associate, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 26 January 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NWFSC Map to NWFSC 2725 Montlake Blvd. E. Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Joseph A. Smith, Research Associate, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm)
POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov (206-860-3380)

Abstract:
Understanding the factors that influence the survival of native resident and migratory species within the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is of great interest to researchers, managers, and stakeholders. The recent survival estimates of juvenile salmon emigrating from the Delta have been extremely low. One of the hypothesized causes of low survival rates is predation by non-native fishes but there has been insufficient research in the Delta to rigorously evaluate this hypothesis. To address this need, in 2014 and 2015 a collaboration between the Southwest Fisheries Science Center and University of Washington conducted a study in a portion of the San Joaquin River with the following objectives: 1) examine the abundance, distribution, and movement of non-native fish predators, 2) quantify the magnitude of smolt predation with genetic analysis of predator stomach contents, 3) manipulate the density of predators to assess the influence of predator density on the predation rates of salmon smolts, and 4) determine how predation on salmon smolts may be influenced by physical habitat, water chemistry, and other environmental features. In 2014 and 2015 we estimated predator population sizes from electrofishing and hydroacoustics surveys, we described predator movement using acoustic telemetry, quantified predator diets using genetic analysis, relocated predators from removal reaches to addition reaches and determined relative predation rates with predation event recorders (PER) before and after relocation events, and mapped habitat among nine study reaches covering 25 river km of the San Joaquin River. Our results indicated that there were differences in relative abundance, movement patterns, and smolt consumption rates among different predator species. A total of 2,846 predators were removed and relocated but, surprisingly, these removals and additions had negligible influence on predation rates. Our study results will inform salmon life-cycle models and refine future study objectives.

BIO
Joseph Smith is a Research Associate and Delta Science Fellow in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington. He obtained his Master's degree in Biology from Eastern Washington University and his PhD from the School of Marine Sciences at the University of Massachusetts " Amherst. His research focuses on examining patterns and testing hypotheses regarding the causes and consequences of the distribution, abundance, and movement of aquatic organisms. This includes determining the distribution and movement of animals (e.g., alewife, striped bass, blue catfish, largemouth bass, channel catfish, white catfish, and Pacific salmon) using telemetry and then relating those movements to environmental factors that cause them to stay or move. He also examines the relationships between ecological drivers and fishes including environmental heterogeneity, abiotic gradients, and anthropogenic activities. https://josephsmithfish.wordpress.com/

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

31 January 2017

Title: (Postponed) NOAA's Center for Environmental Prediction and the World Meteorological Organization​'s ​Data Quality Monitoring System
Presenter(s): Robert Grumbine, NOAA/NCEP/EMC
Date & Time: 31 January 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Postponed

Sponsor(s):
EMC Seminar

Presenter(s):
Robert Grumbine (NOAA/NCEP/EMC) Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the eminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook. JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

1 February 2017

Title: Building Consensus in the West: Developing a Model Legal Framework for State Watercraft Inspection and Decontamination Programs
Presenter(s): Stephanie Showalter Otts, National Sea Grant Law Center
Date & Time: 1 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Stephanie Showalter Otts, National Sea Grant Law Center For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
States must work together to limit the introduction, spread, and impacts of invasive species. Regional approaches are extremely important with pathways such as organisms in trade, where people are frequently moving species across state lines. Inconsistency, overlaps, and gaps between neighboring states' legal regimes can hinder prevention and enforcement efforts. This presentation will share information on ongoing multi-state efforts to address the invasive species threat. “Building Consensus in the West,” is an initiative of the Western Regional Panel on Aquatic Nuisance Species (WRP). The goal of the WRP initiative is to develop a multi-state vision for watercraft inspection and decontamination programs. This presentation will provide an overview of the Building Consensus initiative and the National Sea Grant Law Center's role, including contributing legal research support and leading efforts to develop model legislation and regulations for watercraft inspection and decontamination programs.

Bio(s):
Stephanie Showalter Otts is the Director of the National Sea Grant Law Center and the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Legal Program at the University of Mississippi School of Law. Stephanie received a B.A. in History from Penn State University and a joint J.D./Masters of Studies in Environmental Law from Vermont Law School. She is licensed to practice law in Pennsylvania and Mississippi. As Director, Stephanie oversees a variety of legal education, research, and outreach activities, including providing legal research services to Sea Grant constituents on ocean and coastal law issues. Her duties also include the supervision of law student research and writing projects and providing assistance to organizations and governmental agencies with interpretation of statutes, regulations, and case law. Stephanie also teaches a foundational course on ocean and coastal law at the University of Mississippi School of Law. Her research on natural resources, marine, and environmental law issues has been published in a variety of publications. Stephanie has conducted extensive research on marine and freshwater invasive species. Recent relevant publications include “U.S. Regulatory Framework for Genetic Biocontrol of Invasive Fish” in the journal Biological Invasions (September 2012) and “Legislative and Regulatory Efforts to Minimize Expansion of Invasive Mussels through Watercraft Movements” in the Arizona Journal of Environmental Law and Policy (Summer 2013).

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Title: Enhancing Global Climate Change Adaptation Capacity in the Pacific Small Island Developing States
Presenter(s): Britt Parker, Senior Climate and International Specialist, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program and John J. Marra, PhD, Climate Service Director, Pacific Region, NOAA's NCEI
Date & Time: 1 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Britt Parker, Senior Climate and International Specialist, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program and John J. Marra, PhD, Climate Service Director, Pacific Region, NOAA's NCEI

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
Pacific leaders continue to call for assistance as they strive to understand, predict, and adapt to a changing climate. The development and delivery of actionable information about climate patterns and trends - and their impacts on communities, businesses and ecosystems - is essential to many aspects of policy, planning, and decision-making. Consultation with decision makers is critical to ensuring such information is useful, useable and used. NOAA, working through the Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), undertook a two-year, $2.0 million program from 2012-2014 to support climate change adaptation in the Pacific Small Island Developing States by conducting a series of activities to enhance scientific and technical capacity. These activities were designed to strengthen end-to-end climate services and adaptation capabilities working with the Pacific Island Meteorological Services and other regional organizations to support robust and sustained capacity development consistent with the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS). With an emphasis on engagement and consultation between service providers and users, activities carried out over the life of the project included the Pacific Islands Climate Services Forum, a series of in-country climate service dialogues, updated products and services, the advancement of core capabilities of the countries to deliver products and services focused on regional issues, and culminated in the release of the climate services storybook electronically and via web presence (http://pacificislandsclimate.org/csstories/).

Bio(s):
Britt Parker is the Senior Climate and International Specialist for NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program. Britt serves as the Climate and International Coordinator for the NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program. She works with the Federal, State/Territorial, Local and International partners to coordinate planning, inform policies and activities to address the impacts of climate change to coral reef ecosystems and dependent communities. She also coordinates international program activities and engages with key international partners to improve management of coral reefs globally in the face of climate change, unsustainable fishing, and land-based sources of pollution. She has provided technical expertise to multiple USAID related programs and projects including the US Coral Triangle Support Program, the NOAA-USAID Marine Support Partnership, and the NOAA-USAID Enhancing Global Climate Change Adaptation Capacity in Pacific Small Island Developing States project. John J. Marra, PhD., is the NOAA/NCEI Climate Services Director for the Pacific Region, based in Honolulu, HI. For over 20 years he has been working to bridge science, policy, and information technology to address issues related to natural hazards risk reduction and climate adaptation planning. His particular area of expertise is the development and dissemination of data and products associated with coastal inundation and erosion. John served as the lead on the NOAA-USAID Enhancing Global Climate Change Adaptation Capacity in Pacific Small Island Developing States project.

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2 February 2017

Title: Southeast Deep Coral Initiative: exploring deep-sea coral ecosystems off the SE United States
Presenter(s): Daniel Wagner, Ph.D., NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 2 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Daniel Wagner, Ph.D., NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring at location above.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
In 2016, NOAA's Deep-Sea Coral Research and Technology Program (DSCRTP) started a new four-year initiative that aims to collect scientific information needed to manage and conserve deep-sea coral ecosystems across the southeastern U.S., a region including federal waters in the U.S. Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic. The initiative is led by the NCCOS Deep Coral Ecology Laboratory, and is a NOAA cross-line office effort that includes scientists and managers from NOS, NMFS and OAR, as well as external partners. This presentation will review research activities that were conducted as part of this initiative in 2016, as well as those that are planned in 2017-2019.

Bio(s):
Originally from Ecuador, Dr. Daniel Wagner earned his PhD in Biological Oceanography from the University of Hawaii at Manoa in 2008. He then worked for NOAA's Office of Marine Sanctuaries' Papahanauamokuakea Marine National Monument thru 2016. In 2016 Daniel started as research coordinator for the Southeast Deep Coral Initiative in the NCCOS Deep Coral Ecology Laboratory in Charleston, SC. He has authored and co-authored numerous journal articles, technical reports and book chapters, and he has participated in over 20 research expeditions throughout Hawaii, the U.S. Pacific, Caribbean, Galapagos and Antarctica.

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Title: Variability in migration of a Hawaiian freshwater fish: causes and consequences
Presenter(s): Dr. James D. Hogan, Assistant Professor, Department of Life Sciences, Texas A&M Corpus Christi
Date & Time: 2 February 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NW Fisheries Science Center, 2725 Montlake Blvd E, Seattle, WA 98112, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. James D. Hogan, Assistant Professor, Department of Life Sciences, Texas A&M Corpus Christi

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov (206-860-3380) WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=mb24c33557d4143e8f91fa0d71f14bc06 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 800 254 066

Abstract:
Variation in migratory behaviors has been documented for a wide variety of fish species. The causes and consequences of this variability are still poorly understood for most species. Here we investigate variability in migratory histories of a Hawaiian amphidromous goby, Awaous stamineus, across the species' entire geographic range. Amphidromous species undergo a brief marine larval phase followed by a return to freshwaters as juveniles. Using otolith microchemistry, we determined that 62% of individuals did not migrate to the ocean, completing their life cycle entirely within freshwater, demonstrating that amphidromy is not obligate for this species. We show that variation in migratory histories among populations is driven by environmental factors. Specifically hydrologic variability appears to drive migratory patterns, whereby watersheds with more variable water flow show higher rates of oceanic-migrations. Comparing early life history outcomes based on daily otolith growth rings, we find that marine migrating larvae have shorter larval durations and exhibit faster larval and adult growth, compared to purely-freshwater counterparts. These benefits of maintaining marine migrations presumably balance against the challenge of finding and re-entering an island stream from the ocean. The facultative nature of amphidromy in this species highlights the selective balance between costs and benefits of migration in life history evolution. BIO Derek Hogan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Life Sciences at Texas A & M, Corpus Christi. He obtained his PhD from the Biological Sciences Department at the University of Windsor. His research focuses on studying movement ecology, dispersal and migration, to better understand the dynamics and structure of populations and communities in tropical and temperate aquatic ecosystems, with a goal of informing conservation and management decision making. He takes a multi-disciplinary approach to research that involves advanced population genetic analyses and biogeochemistry, including otolith microchemistry, as well as intensive field-based observational studies. https://derekhoganresearch.wordpress.com

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7 February 2017

Title: NOAA Heritage Week, Lunchtime Talk: History of the NOAA Corps
Presenter(s): Captain Albert "Skip" Theberge, Jr. NOAA - retired
Date & Time: 7 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Gateway to NOAA, 1325 Easy West Hwy (SSMC2), Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Captain Albert "Skip" Theberge, Jr. NOAA (retired). Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring at location above. Visit www.noaa.gov/openhouse for more information. Point of Contact: Cheryl.Oliver@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Learn how NOAA Corps officers and their U.S. Coast & Geodetic Survey Corps predecessors have served NOAA and the nation over the past century.

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Title: Accumulated Winter Season Severity Index (AWSSI)
Presenter(s): Barb Mayes Boustead, Acting Manager, Central Region Climate Services Program Manager
Date & Time: 7 February 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: webinar only - login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Barb Mayes Boustead, Acting Manager, Central Region Climate Services Program Manager Please join us! Note, this will be recorded if you're unable to attend. Seminar Host: Emily.Timte@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Registration Link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5835094295195926274

Abstract:
More information on AWSSI can be found here: http://mrcc.isws.illinois.edu/research/awssi/indexAwssi.jsp

Bio(s):
TBD

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8 February 2017

Title: NOAA Heritage Week Lunchtime Talk: Flying for NOAA
Presenter(s): Commander Nicole Cabana, NOAA's Office of Marine and Aviation Operations
Date & Time: 8 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Gateway to NOAA, 1325 East-West Hwy (SSMC2), Silver Spring, MD 210910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Commander Nicole Cabana, NOAA's Office of Marine and Aviation Operations. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring at location above. Visit www.noaa.gov/openhouse for more information. Point of Contact: Cheryl.Oliver@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Learn from a NOAA Corps pilot how NOAA's aircraft fleet provides data vital to hurricane and flood forecasts, coastal and marine life studies, and emergency response.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
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Title: Out of the Vault: Discover the Coast and Geodetic Survey, the U.S.'s first science agency
Presenter(s): Skip Theberge, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 8 February 2017
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Skip Theberge, NOAA Central Library

Sponsor(s):
US Coast and Geodetic Survey Heritage Society historical presentation POC: library.reference@noaa.gov Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#.

Remote Access:
www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag.

Abstract:
Discover the Coast and Geodetic Survey by viewing and examining rare and unique books and items that tell the story of the U.S.'s first science agency. Treasures on display will include: 17th century land surveying texts, early topographic maps, and treatises on nautical surveying. Enjoy a book and history talk with Skip Theberge, 2pm-2:45pm in person (and via webinar) to learn more about the collection -- and come any other time from 1pm-3pm to browse the historic items. Refreshments will be served.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (Skip Theberge, NOAA Central Library) NOAA Central Library's latest Out of the Vault exhibit on the history of the Coast and Geodetic Survey. This one-time-only exhibit on Wednesday, February 8th will run from 1PM-3PM, with a special collections talk from 2-2:45PM.

9 February 2017

Title: A Watershed Approach: Building Resilience in Coral Reefs thru Implementation of Green Infrastructure & Coral Restoration in a Habitat Focus Area off NE Puerto Rico
Presenter(s): Roberto A. Viqueira Rios, Executive Director, Protect Our Watersheds, Inc., Yauco, Puerto Rico
Date & Time: 9 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Roberto A. Viqueira Ríos, Executive Director, Protect Our Watersheds, Inc. , Yauco, Puerto Rico

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-host are Eileen.Alicea@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
The Habitat Focus Areas in Northeastern Puerto Rico are areas that support important coastal ecosystems that help sustain human livelihoods, recreational usage, a high biodiversity, and are therefore vital for the economic growth in these regions. Nonetheless, over the past several decades, these areas have experienced a significant decline in coastal and marine habitats, particularly coral reefs, due to anthropogenic impacts including poorly planned coastal development, land-based sources of pollution (LBSP), overfishing and climate change impacts. In response to these challenges, Protectores de Cuencas, along with the assistance of multiple partners, has undertaken several efforts to abate the impacts of land-based sources of pollution in the Habitat Focus Area's nearshore reefs. Project partners including NOAA, NOAA-Coral Reef Conservation Program, NFWF, US FWS, Department of Environmental and Natural Resources, Sociedad Ambiente Marino, University of Puerto Rico, Ridge to Reef, Municipality of Culebra, and several others, have served a crucial role in the advancement of coral reef conservation efforts. This presentation will discuss the development of the Culebra Watershed Management Plan, its implementation through various projects and assessment of their effectiveness. It will describe, the implementation of various best management practices, including sediment and dirt road stabilization, stormwater practices, permeable parking lots, sediment traps, hydroseeding, among others. Through the Habitat Blue Print Cooperative Agreement, efforts have incorporated other initiatives, in addition to reducing the impact of land-based sources of pollution, such as coral farming activities and the implementation of a social science study to identify the recreational impacts on coral and seagrass areas of Culebra island.

Bio(s):
Roberto Viqueira has over 10 years of experience galvanizing partnerships to support wetland conservation and restoration. Through partnerships in watershed management planning and restoration, Roberto has garnered support for landscape scale conservation to enhance and restore wetland habitats. Briefly, in 2010 Roberto began assisting NOAA as a watershed coordinator for the Guánica Bay Watershed (GBW) in Puerto Rico. Early on he recognized that the issues plaguing the GBW were pervasive which required a broader, Territory-wide solution. In 2011 he developed a non-profit organization, Protectores de Cuencas (Watershed Protectors), to provide watershed coordination to support wetland conservation and restoration throughout the Territory. In less than 5 years, Roberto has taken the lessons learned, partnerships, and successes from the GBW and translated those efforts to other parts of the territory, including: Culebra Island, Vieques Island, Northeastern Ecological Corridor, Rio Grande de Manati, Rincon, Cabo Rojo, and La Parguera. Although his efforts in the GBW alone are award worthy, it is his passion and translation of these efforts to other areas in the Territory that are truly unique and impressive! Roberto has undoubtedly advanced wetland conservation and restoration across the entire Territory through partnering with community leaders, municipal mayors, Territorial and Federal agencies. Lastly, in 2016 he won the National Wetland Award which he received in Washington DC.

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Title: NOAA Heritage Week Lunchtime Talk: Sailing for NOAA
Presenter(s): Commander Colin Little, NOAA's Office of Marine and Aviation Operations
Date & Time: 9 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Gateway to NOAA, 1325 East West Hwy (SSMC2), Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Commander Colin Little, NOAA's Office of Marine and Aviation Operations. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring at location above. Visit www.noaa.gov/openhouse for more information. Point of Contact: Cheryl.Oliver@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Learn how NOAA's fleet of research and survey ships conduct oceanographic research, map the seafloor, study marine life, and explore the ocean.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Protecting Our Marine Treasures, Sustainable Finance Options for U.S. Marine Protected Areas
Presenter(s): Brian E. Baird, Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee External Financing Subcommittee Chair, Director, Ocean & Coastal Program, The Bay Institute and Aquarium of the Bay and Dr. Martha Honey, Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee External Financing Subcommittee Vice-Chair, Co-Founder and Executive Director, Center for Responsible Travel, CREST
Date & Time: 9 February 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Brian E. Baird, Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee External Financing Subcommittee Chair, Director, Ocean & Coastal Program, The Bay Institute and Aquarium of the Bay Dr. Martha Honey, Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee External Financing Subcommittee Vice-Chair, Co-Founder and Executive Director, Center for Responsible Travel (CREST) Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6304105272762202628

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is pat of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
MPAs require sustainable long-term funding for designation and management, specifically education, outreach, monitoring, research, policy development, and enforcement. Recommendations from a new report produced by the Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee will be discussed, along with a wide-range of approaches to obtain external funding, important guidelines for success, and potential sources of external financing. http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/fac/products/mpa-fac-external-finance-report.pdf

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Title: Dynamical seasonal forecasting for decision support in marine management
Presenter(s): Dr. Claire M. Spillman, Australia Department of Meteorology
Date & Time: 9 February 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4, Large Conference Room on the 9th floor (Room 9153) - also remote access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Claire M. Spillman, Australia Department of Meteorology

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program WebEx Seminar, STAR Science Seminars Seminar POC: jacqueline.shapo@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
via Webex and conference dial-in for audio WebEx conferencing information: Meeting Number: 746964141 Meeting Passcode: corals1234 1. To join the meeting: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746964141&p=corals1234&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. Click on Proceed. To access the sound you must dial in using the following number (it is not through the web): Call-in number: 866-581-0524 Passcode: 6578691#

Abstract:
Seasonal forecasting has great scope for use in marine applications, particularly those with a management focus. Seasonal forecasts from dynamical ocean-atmosphere models of high risk conditions in marine ecosystems can be very useful tools for managers, allowing for proactive management responses. The Australian Bureau of Meteorology's seasonal forecast model POAMA currently produces operational real-time global forecasts of sea surface temperatures, with tailored outlooks produced for coral reef, aquaculture and wild fisheries management in Australian waters. Operational realtime seasonal forecasts for coral bleaching risk on the Great Barrier Reef predict warm conditions that may lead to coral bleaching several months in advance, and play an important role in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority's Early Warning System. Early warnings of potential bleaching risk can assist reef managers to prepare for the likelihood of an event, focusing resources, briefing stakeholders and increasing awareness of bleaching onset. In marine farming and fishing operations in Australia, seasonal forecasting is being used to reduce uncertainty and manage business risks. Further, habitat distribution forecasts can be generated by combining these environmental forecasts with biological habitat preference data, providing industry with species-specific information. POAMA will be upgraded to the new higher resolution ACCESS-S seasonal prediction system in 2017, in collaboration with the UK Met Office. Dynamical forecasts potentially offer improved performance relative to statistical forecasts, particularly given baseline shifts in the environment due to climate change. Seasonal forecasts are most useful when management options are available for implementation in response to the forecasts. Improved management of marine resources, with the assistance of such forecast tools, is likely to enhance future planning, industry resilience and adaptive capacity under climate change.

Bio(s):
Dr Claire Spillman holds a PhD in Environmental Engineering and joint BEng/BSc degrees in Environmental Engineering (Hons) and Chemistry from the University of Western Australia. Her postgraduate work investigated impacts of estuarine circulation and oceanic inputs on aquaculture production using high resolution hydrodynamic-ecological modelling. Dr Spillman is a senior research scientist at the Bureau of Meteorology, Australia. Her current research is primarily focused on dynamical seasonal forecasting in marine applications, particularly for coral reef and fisheries management. Applications include predictions for Great Barrier Reef coral bleaching risk, Australian commercial fisheries and aquaculture on multiweek to seasonal timescales.

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Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 February 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Improving Estimates of Earth's Energy Imbalance
Presenter(s): Dr. Gregory C. Johnson, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
Date & Time: 9 February 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: AOML Main Building, Rickenbacker Causeway, Key Biscayne, FL
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Gregory C. Johnson (NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory)

Sponsor(s):
Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory; seminar host is roberta.lusic@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/529113805 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 529-113-805

Abstract:
Earth has been gaining energy over recent decades. This energy gain is difficult to measure directly, being the small difference of absorbed incoming solar radiation and thermal infrared radiation emitted to space. With over 90% of this energy gain warming the oceans, the most accurate way to quantify it is to measure increases in ocean temperatures (along with the smaller contributions from the warming lithosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere). In 2005 the international global Argo array of autonomous robotic profiling floats first achieved sparse near-global coverage of the upper half of the ocean volume. Combining the heat uptake in the upper half of the ocean volume from 2005 through 2015 from Argo with previously published estimates of heat uptake trends, mostly in the deep ocean, allows an estimate of the total heat uptake rate for Earth over that decade. This rate anchors a satellite-observed estimate from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), which requires an in situ baseline. Year-to-year variations of upper ocean heat uptake and CERES energy imbalance are well correlated with each other and the Niño3.4 index over this time. This agreement between two completely independent and complementary measures of Earth's energy imbalance bolsters confidence in each and provides insights into inter annual variation mechanisms. The next biggest term and uncertainty in the global energy imbalance is deep ocean warming. Measurements there could be improved by implementing Deep Argo.

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Title: Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) Update and Experimental Geoid in Alaska (National Geodetic Survey)
Presenter(s): Monica Youngman, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey; Simon Holmes, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 February 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Monica Youngman, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey; Simon Holmes, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3691407256965063940. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (562) 247-8321; Access Code: 728-650-998; Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar; Webinar ID: 141-678-467.

Abstract:
Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum, (GRAV-D), a program collecting airborne gravity across the country, will ultimately help NGS re-define the vertical datum of the United States in 2022. Started in 2008, GRAV-D has collected data over 58% of the country and continues to collect high quality gravity data to support geoid modeling. Learn about recent program activities, upcoming survey plans for FY17 and beyond, and how airborne gravity data and other advances are yielding significant updates to the latest geoid models.

Bio(s):
Monica Youngman is the GRAV-D Project Manager and oversees the gravity program at NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. Simon Holmes is an expert geoid modeler and is highly involved in the creation of geoid models at NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Survival of adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) through the estuary and lower Columbia River amid a rapidly changing predator population
Presenter(s): Michelle Rub, Ph.D, Research Fishery Biologist, Point Adams Research Station, NOAA
Date & Time: 9 February 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NWFSC Map to NWFSC 2725 Montlake Blvd. E. Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Michelle Rub, Research Fishery Biologist, Point Adams Research Station, NOAA

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov (206-860-3380) WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=mb24c33557d4143e8f91fa0d71f14bc06 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 800 254 066

Abstract:
Predation by pinnipeds on salmon and steelhead within the Columbia River (CR) has been identified by NOAA's West Coast Regional Office as a severe threat to salmon recovery. Adult salmon returning to the CR during the spring are particularly vulnerable to predation because their presence most overlaps that of the transient sea lion population. In an effort to assess predation on spring/summer Chinook salmon returning to the Middle and Upper Columbia and Snake Rivers, NOAA Fisheries has been working closely with CR commercial fishermen since 2010. Together we have marked over 2000 adult salmon within the CR estuary and measured their survival and transit time through the first 145 miles of freshwater. After accounting for harvest and impacts from sampling gear, weighted mean annual survival ranged from 58%-91% from 2010-2015. Lower overall survival was observed during recent years coincident with a growing sea lion population. Within season survival has consistently been lower during periods of peak sea lion presence. Our results imply predation is a significant source of mortality for these fish and that some fish populations may be at higher risk than others based on their behavior. BIO Dr. Michelle Rub is a Research Fishery Biologist with NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center. She has worked for NOAA for the past 15 years with the majority of this time spent at the Pt. Adams Research Station in Hammond, Oregon. Dr. Rub has been involved in telemetry studies of fish since 2004 when she served as a fish tagger on multiple Columbia River acoustic telemetry studies. She conducted a laboratory study of transmitter effects in 2006, and in 2007 & 2008 she was the lead researcher for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers funded study; Comparative Performance of Acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged Juvenile Salmonids. This study boasted laboratory and field components conducted in tandem at multiple CR hydro-projects. Notably, nearly 17,000 juvenile salmon were implanted with acoustic transmitters during the course of this study and several thousand were ultimately necropsied to evaluate tag effects. The field work for Dr. Rub's current study examining survival of adult spring/summer Chinook salmon through the lower Columbia River below Bonneville Dam was initiated in 2010. This study has been conducted annually since its inception and has utilized both passive and active telemetry methods. Dr. Rub is a graduate of the University of Illinois, where she received a doctorate in Veterinary Medicine. She is also an Alumni of Oregon State University where she received a Master's degree in Marine Resource Management. She lives in Astoria, Oregon with her husband Howard and three children, Kennedy, Zhoe, and Rocky.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

14 February 2017

Title: Read and Write Grib2 Using Fortran and wgrib2api
Presenter(s): Wesley Ebisuzaki, NOAA/NCEP/CPC
Date & Time: 14 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Wesley Ebisuzaki (NOAA/NCEP/CPC) POC: Suranjana Saha Suranjana.Saha@noaa.gov Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the eminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook. JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Participant: 1262920#

Abstract:
Grib2 is more complicated than grib1 and many methods of reading and writing grib2 have become more complicated. Since we should be thinking about science rather than the grib routines, the interface for grib I/O should be at a high level and simple to use. With the wgrib2api module, reading and writing is simplified to only requiring 4 functions. HPC support is done with 3 more functions which are used to transfer of program and subroutine buffers. Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Moving Faster to a New Arctic
Presenter(s): James Overland, Oceanographer, NOAA Research Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory and Muyin Wang, Meteorologist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Oceans
Date & Time: 14 February 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Western Regional Center, Building 3, Room 2104 (Oceanographer Room), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115
Description:

OneNOAA science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
James Overland, Oceanographer, NOAA Research Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory. Seminar POC: Adi Hanein, adi.hanein@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/168810045 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (872) 240-3212 Access Code: 168-810-045.

Abstract:
A new Arctic surprise (unexpected magnitude of rapid change) was extensive record warm Arctic temperature extremes in January"April 2016, which repeated in fall-early winter 2016-7. In January, the Arctic-wide average temperature was 2.0° C above the previous positive record of 3.0° C above normal, with local January values in excess of 7° C above normal. Record sea ice extent losses were observed for all months of 2016 except during the summer. Sea ice multi-year (MY) fraction (amount of old thick ice) had a sharp drop between January 2016 and January 2017, and was 60 % below the MY fraction during the early 2000s. Delayed sea ice freeze up in fall 2016 helped to maintain the warm temperatures, a clear example of Arctic specific feedback processes that amplified the rate of change. An open question is whether there will be continuing near future rapid Arctic changes from such surprises.

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Title: 2018 National Climate Assessment (NCA): Overview, Alaska Chapter, and Public Feedback/Input for the 2018 Report
Presenter(s): Carl Markon, Non-Federal Lead, National Climate Assessment, Alaska Chapter
Date & Time: 14 February 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Carl Markon, Non-Federal Lead, National Climate Assessment, Alaska Chapter

Sponsor(s):
ACCAP (https://accap.uaf.edu/webinars)

Remote Access:
https://accap.uaf.edu/NCA4

Abstract:
The National Climate Assessment (NCA) is produced every four years by the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). The USGCRP, under the Global Change Research Act of 1990, is mandated to deliver a status report to the President and Congress that evaluates, integrates and interprets the findings of their federal research program on global change. The NCA aims to integrate new information on climate science into the context of larger social, ecological, and policy systems. It will provide an updated report of climate change impacts and vulnerability, evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation and adaptation activities, and identify knowledge gaps. Alaska has been identified as one of 10 Regional Assessments to be included in the 2018 national report. The purpose of the presentation is to provide a brief background on the NCA, present some current topical areas it will include, and seek public feedback. It is hoped that the audience can provides feedback on current landscape changes that are affecting their lifestyles.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

15 February 2017

Title: Connecting Arctic Research Across Boundaries
Presenter(s): Robert H. Rich, Ph.D.,CAE, Executive Director: Arctic Research Consortium of the United States - ARCUS
Date & Time: 15 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Robert H. Rich, Ph.D.,CAE, Executive Director: Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Research to understand the Arctic is a complex, interdependent system that cuts across many traditional boundaries between organizations, disciplines, peoples, geographies, political boundaries, and knowledge systems. ARCUS was founded in 1988 to provide intangible infrastructure that connects Arctic research across these boundaries through communication, coordination, and collaboration. This presentation will highlight recent accomplishments and current plans to support and advance Arctic research, as well as discuss opportunities for NOAA leaders and researchers to participate in these activities.

Bio(s):
Robert H. Rich, Ph.D., CAE is the Executive Director of the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS). He has devoted his career to scientific association leadership, connecting researchers from many disciplines, institutions, and countries with the resources needed to succeed. He's previously worked in professional development, science policy, research grants, member services, volunteer support, and strategy at the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Chemical Society. Dr. Rich is actively involved in the association community and in national and global science conversations, where he shares the important work of Arctic researchers. He holds a B.S. from M.I.T., a Masters from Harvard, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, all in chemistry. As a researcher, he studied the interactions of small molecules with enzymes and other proteins at the National Institutes of Health. Now, he supports the interactions of small and large research groups to work together to create substantial results. He has presented in many professional venues on strategy, association leadership, career development, grantsmanship, Arctic research issues, and chemistry.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 February 2017

Title: Looking at Lake Erie Hypoxia From a Different Point of View
Presenter(s): Mark D. Rowe, Assistant Research Scientist University of Michigan, Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystem Research--CILER, School of Natural Resources and Environment
Date & Time: 16 February 2017
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mark D. Rowe, Assistant Research Scientist University of Michigan, Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystem Research--CILER, School of Natural Resources and Environment Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4153799179608823555

Abstract:
Hypoxia in the central basin of Lake Erie is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied since the 1980s, and even earlier. Low dissolved oxygen in the bottom water of a stratified lake can be harmful from an ecological perspective by killing benthic organisms that serve as food for fish, and also by excluding fish from preferred habitat. Hypoxia is caused by excessive nutrient loading, resulting in excessive algal growth, which consumes oxygen when it settles to the bottom. Most models of hypoxia are designed to answer the question of how much nutrient load reduction is needed to reduce hypoxia to meet some goal. In addition to being an important ecological resource, Lake Erie is a source of drinking water to millions of people. Lake dynamics, including seiche, internal waves, and wind-induced upwelling-downwelling, can cause changing water quality at public water system intakes over a period of a few hours. In order to maintain the quality of treated water, treatment processes may need to be adjusted in response to changes in temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, organic matter, iron, or manganese at the inlet. We recently began a project to develop a hypoxia forecast model that can provide a real-time nowcast and five-day forecast of temperature and dissolved oxygen for public water systems on Lake Erie in order to provide plant managers with advance notice of events that are likely to produce changing water quality at their inlets. While past studies have focused on deep water and on time scales of years, our focus is on nearshore water intakes, on dynamic events that last hours or days, and on development of an operational forecast model. In this presentation, I will discuss past and present models and observations of Lake Erie hypoxia, and what we know and hope to learn about episodes of hypoxia that affect nearshore drinking water intakes.

Bio(s):
Mark Rowe works on developing models to understand and predict changes in the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the Great Lakes. His recent work has focused on development of linked hydrodynamic and biological models to simulate harmful algal blooms and hypoxia in Lake Erie, and impacts of invasive quagga mussels on primary production, nutrient cycles, and the lower food web of Lake Michigan. He has contributed to forecast models that provide timely and actionable information to public water systems, anglers, recreational users of Lake Erie. Dr. Rowe received MS and PhD degrees from Michigan Technological University where he conducted research on measurement and modeling of atmospheric deposition of persistent organic pollutants to Lake Superior.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Web of Science training: a focus on Fisheries
Presenter(s): Kristen Faeth, Clarivate Analytics
Date & Time: 16 February 2017
12:00 pm - 12:45 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kristen Faeth, Clarivate Analytics POC: library.reference@noaa.gov; judith.salter@noaa.gov Location (Online): Register individually for this training session via Thomson Reuters: http://bit.ly/2kOUPFv Class summary: This WoS training will be tailored to NOAA NMFS and fisheries researchers, but all NOAA staff are welcome to register. You may also follow this virtual training along with Librarian Judith Salter in the brown bag area of the NOAA Central Library.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Climatic Regulation of the Toxin Domoic Acid in Shellfish
Presenter(s): Morgaine McKibben, Ph.D., Environmental Scientist, San Francisco Estuary Institute
Date & Time: 16 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar at NOAA SSMC4 Rm 8150, and speaker will be presenting from the Guin Library Seminar Room, Hatfield Marine Science Center, Newport, Oregon
Description:

OneNOAA science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Morgaine McKibben, Ph.D., Environmental Scientist, San Francisco Estuary Institute

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Marc.Suddleson@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
Domoic acid is a potent neurotoxin produced by certain marine microalgae that can accumulate in the foodweb, posing a health threat to human seafood consumers and wildlife in coastal regions worldwide. Evidence of climatic regulation of domoic acid in shellfish over the past 20 y in the Northern California Current regime is shown. The timing of elevated domoic acid is strongly related to warm phases of natural the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the Oceanic Niño Index, an indicator of El Niño events. Ocean conditions in the northeast Pacific that are associated with warm phases of these indices, including changes in prevailing currents and advection of anomalously warm water masses onto the continental shelf, are hypothesized to contribute to increases in this toxin. We present an applied domoic acid risk assessment model for the US West Coast based on combined climatic and local variables. Evidence of regional- to basin-scale controls on domoic acid has not previously been presented. Our findings have implications in coastal zones worldwide that are affected by this toxin and are particularly relevant given the increased frequency of anomalously warm ocean conditions. About the presenter: Dr. Morgaine McKibben is an Environmental Scientist at the San Francisco Estuary Institute and recent graduate of Oregon State University. Broadly, her graduate research focused on harmful algal blooms and satellite remote sensing of coastal phytoplankton blooms. Her current work includes developing a harmful algal bloom monitoring program in the San Francisco Bay and investigating the role of phytoplankton in Bay water quality.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

21 February 2017

Title: Saving Monk Seals: The Science and Conservation of Hawaii's native seal
Presenter(s): Dr. Charles Littnan, Hawaiian Monk Seal Research Program at the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 21 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Charles Littnan, Supervisory Research Ecologist, Hawaiian Monk Seal Research Program at the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center. Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library. POC: Judith.Salter@noaa.gov For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
The endangered Hawaiian monk seal has been the focus of NOAA research and recovery activities since the 80s but it is in the last decade that conservation actions have accelerated including recently being designated one of NOAA Fisheries eight Species in the Spotlight. Dr. Littnan will provide an update on the population status of the species, discuss the newest innovations in science and conservation, and will share photos and videos that highlight the challenges and successes of saving a species that stretches across a 1,500 mile long island chain. Dr. Littnan will also discuss how the conservation effort has changed in the last 10 years as the public and many partners joined NOAA to help the seals' cause. Finally, looking forward into the uncertain years ahead Dr. Littnan will share his (optimistic) outlook on the likelihood of monk seals being around to share the beaches with our future generations.

Bio(s):
Charles leads NOAA's Hawaiian Monk Seal Research Program at the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center. His work with NOAA allows him to focus on two primary interests: using robust science to design and implement novel techniques to help save endangered species and develop innovative ways to better engage the public on complex conservation issues and make science more interesting and accessible to local communities. Charles has a BSc in Marine Biology from Texas A&M University at Galveston and a PhD on the diet and fisheries interactions of Australian fur seals from Macquarie University. Charles has been doing research on marine mammals for the past 22 years and has worked on a variety of whales, dolphins and seals from the coasts of the US to the ice of Antarctica.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Neural Network applications for NWP models
Presenter(s): Vladimir Krasnopolsky, NOAA/NCEP/EMC
Date & Time: 21 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Vladimir Krasnopolsky, NOAA/NCEP/EMC POC: Arun Chawla - Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the eminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook. JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920#

Abstract:
Neural network (NN) is a versatile and generic artificial intelligence (statistical learning) nonlinear tool. In EMC data/model rich environment, we could take full advantage of such a flexible tool if applied it more courageously. Many NN applications have been and are being developed at EMC. Brief review of these NN applications for: (1) model initialization, (2) model physics, and (3) post-processing model outputs is presented. Three of developed NN applications are discussed in more details: NN observation operator to assimilate surface parameters (SSH anomaly); fast long and short wave NN radiation for CGS and GFS; NN nonlinear multi-model ensemble for calculating precipitation rate over ConUS. NN methodologies developed, working on these applications, are generic and can be used and are used currently to solve a variety of problems in post-processing of model outputs, data assimilation, etc. Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Sediment Deficits: the Silent Killer of Salt Marshes
Presenter(s): Neil K. Ganju, Research Oceanographer, USGS, Coastal and Marine Geology Program, Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center
Date & Time: 21 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Neil K. Ganju, Research Oceanographer, USGS, Coastal and Marine Geology Program, Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Salt marshes are valued for their ecosystem services, but their vulnerability is typically assessed through individual points on the landscape. However, multi-dimensional processes sucg as lateral erosion can lead to rapid marsh loss though the marsh may build vertically. Marsh sediment budgets represent a spatially integrated measure of competing constructive and destructive forces: a sediment surplus may result in vertical growth and/or lateral expansion, while a sediment deficit may result in drowning and/or lateral contraction. Here we show that sediment budgets of eight microtidal marsh complexes across the U.S. Atlantic and Pacific coasts consistently scale with areal unvegetated/vegetated marsh ratios (UVVR) suggesting these metrics are broadly applicable indicators of microtidal marsh vulnerability. All sites are exhibiting a sediment deficit, with half the sites having projected lifespans of less than 350 years at current rates of sea-level rise and sediment availability. These results demonstrate that open-water conversion and sediment deficits are holistic and sensitive indicators of salt marsh vulnerability.

Bio(s):
Neil K. Ganju is currently a Research Oceanographer at the USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center. He received his B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Michigan, followed by his M.S. in Coastal Engineering from the University of Florida. He then worked as a hydraulic engineer at the USGS in Sacramento, CA focusing on sediment transport and geomorphic change in San Francisco Bay. Dr. Ganju attended the University of California-Davis and received his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering in 2007. He joined the Woods Hole center in 2008 and has worked on observations and modeling of estuarine and coastal processes along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, specializing in observations and numerical modeling of hydrodynamics and sediment transport.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

22 February 2017

Title: Ecosystem Effects of Invertebrate Fisheries
Presenter(s): Dr. Tyler Eddy, University of British Columbia
Date & Time: 22 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Tyler Eddy, University of British Columbia Sponsored by John Field (john.field@noaa.gov, Southwest Fisheries Science Center) Hosted by Lenfest Ocean Program. For questions about this webinar, please contact info@lenfestocean.org For remote access: Please fill out the registration form (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__pewcharitabletrusts.webex.com_pewcharitabletrusts_onstage_g.php-3FMTID-3De65146f09d7b87e22de634c77a6b5a80c&d=DwMFaQ&c=2qwu4RrWzdlNOcmb_drAcw&r=dCSMIb5Z4P728m4K-0uN6uKsAsmAsoKS3fxCxpAue7I&m=gtG9i_GgBAqRMMnBJJmqC94bXuOsRQHwZqyZAFYgW24&s=AcSgmvyWVCfCg2UKale80jGe1-w4Y0M-mW4sihAkzRc&e=) before the event is scheduled to begin. Event number: 636 074 035 Event password: Invertebrate2017 For teleconference audio after you join the webinar, either: 1. Select “Call Using Computer” 2. Select “Call me” and provide your phone number (recommended over option #3) 3. Call the number below and enter the access code. In the U.S. and Canada, dial 1-855-214-7745. Enter conference code 909 707 1631 After dialing the conference code, be sure to enter the Attendee ID that will appear on your screen.

Abstract:
Since the 1950s, catches of marine invertebrate fisheries have increased six-fold, to over 10 million tons annually, due to expansion of invertebrate fisheries following declines or more restrictive management of finfish fisheries. Invertebrates are a critical food source for fish, mammals, and birds, yet many invertebrate fisheries lack stock assessments and management plans. In a series of recent papers, Dr. Tyler Eddy and colleagues found that many invertebrates play important roles in marine ecosystems, and their effects are comparable in magnitude to those of forage fish. They also found that invertebrates are generally more sensitive to fishing than finfish, and many species are being fished at rates higher than those that would produce maximum sustainable yield. Furthermore, many invertebrates do not follow the traditional fisheries science prediction that only highly connected or highly abundant species will have high ecosystem impacts. This suggests the need for precautionary management, since the consequences of fishing and other human activities can be unpredictable. Dr. Eddy will present the results of his recent work, which touches on lobster fisheries in New Zealand and Nova Scotia, and on global patterns revealed by ecosystem modeling. To read more about this project led by Dr. Heike Lotze and supported by the Lenfest Ocean Program, please visit lenfestocean.org.

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Title: Copepods differ in seasonal abundance and estimated secondary production rates across the warm and cold periods in the eastern Bering Sea
Presenter(s): David Kimmel, PhD, Research Oceanographer, NOAA, AFSC, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 22 February 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Oceanographer Room (Building 3, Room 2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, NE NOAA Dr, Seattle, WA 98115, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
David Kimmel, PhD, Research Oceanographer, NOAA, AFSC, Seattle, WA Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/). Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract:
TBD

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23 February 2017

Title: Seminar postponed to 03/02: Following my dreams
Presenter(s): Sandra A. Cauffman, Earth Science Division Deputy Director NASA Headquarters, GOES-R Deputy System Program Director
Date & Time: 23 February 2017
11:30 am - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 Room 9836 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series NOTE: SEMINAR POSTPONED TO 02/03

Presenter(s):
Sandra A. Cauffman (Earth Science Division Deputy Director NASA Headquarters, GOES-R Deputy System Program Director)

Sponsor(s):
This is part of the Latinos@NOAA 2017 seminar series. If interested in latinos@noaa activities join our group email at latinos@noaa.gov. Seminar from 11:30-12:30. NOAA HQ SSMC3 Room 9836 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910) Join us remotely from your computer, tablet or smartphone: Link: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/493238141 Dial: +1 (312) 757-3129; Access Code: 493-238-141 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting; Meeting ID: 493-238-141

Abstract:
Following my dreams is the story of how a Costa Rican girl from a poor family nurtured an improbable dream about space travel, and despite the obstacles, made that dream come true.

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Title: Advancing Hyperspectral Sounder Applications in the Direct-Broadcast Environment
Presenter(s): Elisabeth Weisz, Ph.D., Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Date & Time: 23 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building, 10210 Greenbelt Rd, Lanham MD, 8th Floor Conference Room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Elisabeth Weisz, Ph.D. Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies Space Science and Engineering Center University of Wisconsin-Madison

Sponsor(s):
JPSS February Science Seminar POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov Phone access: 877-915-7510 pc: 35894360 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=ma3d9d1e311d36c2247361de84c9002c6 Meeting number: 740 447 272 Host key: 679384 Meeting password: Jpss2017!

Abstract:
Accurate retrievals from hyperspectral (HS) sounder infrared (IR) radiance measurements, under both clear and cloudy sky conditions, provide indispensible data that benefit a wide range of applications. Of particular interest, the use of hyperspectral IR data in complement traditional data sources, including imagery and operational products from geostationary and polar-orbiting imagers, ground-based sensors, and other in-situ measurements. Hyperspectral IR data have great potential to enhance regional and other near real-time weather prediction capabilities. To promote the use of high-spectral resolution IR satellite data in meteorological and environmental real-time operations such as severe weather prediction, we characterize the CIMSS CSPP (Community Satellite Processing Package) direct-broadcast (DB) hyperspectral processing capability, which consists of the UW hyperspectral Dual-Regression (DR) retrieval and the NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS). Case studies were developed for a variety of atmospheric conditions to illustrate the differences of the retrieval algorithms and evaluate the retrieval products through comparisons with independent sources. Although the focus is on severe weather indices derived from HS satellite soundings other achievements under this JPSS PGRR funded project will be presented as well.

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Title: Note: Coral Restoration seminar moved to 2/24 at Noon ET and merged with two other talks
Presenter(s): David Vaughan, PhD, Executive Director, Tropical Research Laboratory, Mote Marine Laboratory
Date & Time: 23 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series NOTE; THIS SEMINAR HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED TO 2/24, AND MERGED INTO THIS SEMINAR: Building Resilient Coral Reefs: Harnessing natural variability, assessing flood risk reduction, and restoration at an ecosystem scale

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Title: Cold Temperatures and Health - Unforgotten Health Burdens in Ontario, Canada
Presenter(s): Dr. Hong Chen, Scientist, Environmental Health Assessment, Public Health Ontario; adjunct scientist at the Institute of Clinical Evaluative Sciences, and Assistant Professor at Dalla Lana School of Public Health
Date & Time: 23 February 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Hong Chen, Scientist, Environmental Health Assessment, Public Health Ontario; adjunct scientist at the Institute of Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), and Assistant Professor at Dalla Lana School of Public Health

Sponsor(s):
NWS; seminar host is michelle.hawkins@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Online Access Only; Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1794761797086573826

Abstract:
The impact of ambient cold temperatures on health has gained renewed attention in North America owing to record low temperatures over past several winters. Advances in understanding the health impact of cold temperatures, especially from both extreme and moderate ranges, can help develop interventions to benefit population health. During this talk, we will present recent findings on cold-related health burdens in Ontario, Canada.

Bio(s):
Dr. Hong Chen is Scientist, Environmental Health Assessment, at Public Health Ontario, adjunct scientist at the Institute of Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), and Assistant Professor at Dalla Lana School of Public Health. Hong's current research has focused on understanding the health effects of various environmental exposure (e.g., ambient air pollution, extreme weather, green space, and environmental noise) and evaluating public health impacts of environmental-related policies and programs.

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Title: Common Carp Invasion of North American Lakes: Drivers and Consequences
Presenter(s): Dr. Przemyslaw Bajer, Research Assistant Professor, Dept. Fisheries, Wildlife, and Cons. Biology, University of Minnesota
Date & Time: 23 February 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NWFSC Map to NWFSC 2725 Montlake Blvd. E. Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Przemyslaw Bajer, Research Assistant Professor, Dept. Fisheries, Wildlife, and Cons. Biology, University of Minnesota

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov (206-860-3380) WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=mb24c33557d4143e8f91fa0d71f14bc06 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 800 254 066

Abstract:
Biological invasions are projected to be the main driver of biodiversity and ecosystem function loss in lakes in the 21st century. In this presentation I will discuss the outcome of a century-old invasion, the introduction of common carp to North America, on lakes across Minnesota. I will discuss how and why carp's success varies across three major ecoregions in Minnesota: Northern Forests, Temperate Forests, and Great Plains. I will also illustrate the effects of carp invasions on water quality, nutrient concentrations and biodiversity in different lake types. Finally, I will discuss whether these impacts are reversible and what lake managers might use to control carp populations. BIO ​​Przemek "Shemek" Bajer is a research Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota. He grew up and in Poland and moved to the States in 2000. Since 2006, he has been working at the University of Minnesota, trying to figure out what drives the abundance of the world's most invasive fish, the common carp, and how to control this extraordinary species. His work involves many aspects of carp's behavior and ecology, ranging from processes that regulate the survival of carp eggs and larvae in natural lakes to behavioral interactions associated with carp seasonal migrations and winter aggregations. His research was instrumental in developing and applying some of the first successful Integrated Pest Management strategies for carp in lake-marsh systems in Minnesota. When he is not chasing carp, he enjoys making bamboo fly rods and chasing after trout and steelhead.... and spending time with his family. He DOES NOT enjoy Minnesota winters....

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Title: Males vs. Females: Feeding Behavior of Northern Elephant Seals
Presenter(s): Sarah Kienle, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar, University of California, Santa Cruz, Long Marine Lab
Date & Time: 23 February 2017
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Webinar - See Description for more details
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Kienle, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar, University of California, Santa Cruz, Long Marine Lab Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9222481810699475201 Location: Online Webinar

Abstract:
Male and female northern elephant seals exhibit dramatic differences in size, shape and behavior. My research compares the feeding behavior of male and female seals to understand how the sexes use marine resources throughout the North Pacific Ocean. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

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24 February 2017

Title: Building Resilient Coral Reefs: Harnessing natural variability, assessing flood risk reduction, and restoration at an ecosystem scale
Presenter(s): Dr. Ruth B. Gates, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Dr. Michael W. Beck, lead marine scientist for The Nature Conservancy and adjunct Professor in Ocean Sciences at the University of California Santa Cruz;and Dr. David Vaughan, Executive Director, Tropical Research Laboratory, Mote Marine Laboratory
Date & Time: 24 February 2017
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
- Dr. Ruth B. Gates, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, - Dr. Michael W. Beck, lead marine scientist for The Nature Conservancy and adjunct Professor in Ocean Sciences at the University of California Santa Cruz; and - Dr. David Vaughan, Executive Director, Tropical Research Laboratory, Mote Marine Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Tali Vardi@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
It is well known that coral reefs are being impacted by a myriad of stressors and this is a serious threat aiding the collapse of important ecological and socioeconomic coastal systems. Nevertheless, lead marine scientists and coral reef restoration experts are working hard to promote coral reef resilience and increase public awareness on the importance of the ocean's most diverse tropical ecosystem. In this OneNOAA Seminar Series, Dr. David Vaughan, Dr. Mike Beck, and Dr. Ruth Gates join us to talk about their work related to ecosystem scale restoration, flood risk benefits (spatially-explicit modeling and valuation), and the complex biological factors driving differential coral stress responses.

Bio(s):
Dr. Ruth Gates received a B.S. with Honors in 1984, and a Ph.D. in 1990, both in Marine Biology from the University of Newcastle-upon Tyne, U.K. She held postdoctoral positions from 1990"2002 in four different labs in the Department of Organismic Biology, Ecology and Evolution at the University of California, Los Angeles, and an Assistant Researcher position there from 2002-2003. Since 2003 she has held successive Researcher positions in the HIMB, SOEST, UH Manoa (Assistant, 2003"2007; tenured Associate 2007-2011, Full, 2011-present). She has UH graduate faculty appointments in the Departments of Zoology and Oceanography, since 2003, and Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering, since 2008. In 2010 she was a Sabbatical Fellow at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California, Santa Barbara.Dr. Gates was a UH President's Emerging Leader (2008), runner up in the 10th Annual International Science and Technology Visualization Challenge (2012), winner of the Paul Allen X-Prize Ocean Challenge to Mitigate Impacts of Ocean Acidification (2013), awarded the UH BOR Medal for Excellence in Research (2014), named Distinguished Woman Scholar by the University of Victoria, Canada (2015), elected President of the International Society for Reef Studies (2015-2019), won Scientist of the Year 2015 by the ARCS Foundation, and has more than 100 refereed scientific publications. Dr. Michael W. Beck is the lead marine scientist for The Nature Conservancy and an adjunct Professor in Ocean Sciences at the University of California Santa Cruz, where he is based. Mike works on coastal marine conservation in 5 continents across science, business and policy to bring clear tools and results to decision-makers. Mike focuses on building coastal resilience in the interface between adaptation and conservation, where he works to reduce risks to people, property and nature. Mike has authored more than sixty peer-reviewed science articles. His work covers topics from the role of coral reefs in reducing risks from storms to the effects of people on extinctions of Pleistocene mammals. He has also published numerous popular articles including Op-eds in the Miami Herald, NY Times, Huffington Post and Caribbean Journal. He was a Fulbright Fellow and an Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Sydney. He has served on advisory boards and panels for NOAA, EPA and the National Academy of Sciences. In 2012, Mike was selected as a Pew Marine Conservation Fellow. You can find more on his work at www.coastalresilience.org and www.maps.coastalresilience.org Dr. David E. Vaughan is a senior marine science researcher, who has designed, built and operated many marine aquatic culture projects, programs and businesses. He initiated the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution's Aquaculture Division in 1991 and built the Aquaculture Development Park, a 40-acre, recirculating aquaculture research, training, and education demonstration. Dr. Vaughan built and developed the Center for Marine Ornamental Research (CMOR), which is now incorporated as Oceans, Reefs and Aquariums Inc (ORA), which he was president of until 2001. Dr. Vaughan was also Chief Scientist for EarthEcho Internationals' Coral Reef Restoration Initiative (CRI), a coral gene bank, for reef restoration. Dr. Vaughan is currently the Executive Director of the Mote Tropical Research Lab in the Florida Keys and manages the Coral Reef Research Program, which now re-establishes living coral reefs. David holds a B.S. in Biology/ Chemistry from Graceland College, an M.S. in Biology/Microbiology from Fairleigh Dickinson University, and a Ph.D. in Botany and Plant Physiology from Rutgers University.

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28 February 2017

Title: The Use of Culturally Significant Area Criteria in an Ecosystem Approach to Management Processes
Presenter(s): Robert G. Adlam PhD, Associate Professor and Head of Anthropology, Mount Allison University; Interdisciplinary Studies, University of New Brunswick, Canada and Roland Cormier, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Institute for Coastal Research, Geesthacht, Germany
Date & Time: 28 February 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Robert G. Adlam PhD, Associate Professor and Head of Anthropology, Mount Allison University; Interdisciplinary Studies, University of New Brunswick, Canada and Roland Cormier, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Institute for Coastal Research, Geesthacht, Germany. Speakers are presenting remotely from Canada.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Despite the growing recognition of their importance, immaterial cultural values associated with the sea still tend to be neglected in marine spatial planning (MSP). This socio-cultural evidence gap is due to inherent difficulties in defining and eliciting cultural values, but also to difficulties in linking cultural values to specific places, thus enabling an area-based approach to management. This paper addresses three aspects that are important for including marine cultural values in MSP: Defining cultural values, identifying places of cultural importance, and establishing the relative significance of places of cultural importance.We argue that common classification schemes such as cultural ecosystem services can be a helpful starting point for identifying cultural values, but only go so far in capturing communities' cultural connections with the sea. A method is proposed for structuring a community-based narrative on cultural values and “spatialising” them for MSP purposes, using five criteria that can lead to the definition of “culturally significant areas”. A baseline of culturally significant areas is suggested as an aid to planners to pinpoint places where cultural connections to the sea are particularly strong. Throughout, we emphasise the need for participative processes.

Bio(s):
For the past twenty years, Robert Adlam has been working with Aboriginal and Euro-Canadian harvesters in north eastern New Brunswick, Canada. His research has centered on the relationship of each to the larger ecosystem with particular attention to their knowledge and harvesting practices. The insights gained through this work have proven valuable in his more recent undertakings around mapping areas of cultural significance and assessing the perceived risks from a community perspective. In 2016, Robert partnered with the Mi'kmaw Conservation Group " a body affiliated with the Confederacy of Mainland Mi'kmaq in Nova Scotia, Canada, to bring together scientific methods and Mi'kmaw community knowledge into an ecosystem monitoring project. Under this initiative, they plan to create a process for identifying culturally significant areas or features as well as assessing their resilience and adaptability for change. Robert is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at Mount Allison University and Adjunct Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at the University of New Brunswick. Roland Cormier holds an MSc in Biology from the “Université de Moncton” (Canada). He has more than 35 years of experience in fisheries, fish and seafood safety, environmental assessment as well as coastal and oceans management. He has worked at Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. In addition to being an Associate of the Institute of Estuarine & Coastal Studies at the University of Hull, United Kingdom, he is currently a guest scientist at Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Institute for Coastal Research in Geesthacht, Germany. His current interests are in environmental management from a legislative and policy analysis perspective, using ISO risk management standards and controls assessment. He is also a member of the International Council for the Exploration of Sea (ICES) working group on marine planning and coastal zone management and the Group of Experts on Risk Management in Regulatory Systems of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe. The present focus is on risk approaches to legislative systems of management controls in relation to UN sustainability goals. He is currently active as a consultant in environmental risk management in Europe, Canada and the United States as well as a lecturer in universities in Canada and Europe.

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Title: The Arctic System Reanalysis: Motivation, Development, and Performance
Presenter(s): David Bromwich, Ohio State University
Date & Time: 28 February 2017
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Auditorium
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
David Bromwich, Ohio State University

Title:
The Arctic System Reanalysis: Motivation, Development, and Performance Date, Time, Location: Feb28,2017, 12:30 NCWCP Auditorium POC: Michiko Masutani michiko.masutani@noaa.gov Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the eminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook. JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc Presentation http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2017/Bromwich_NCEP_20170228.pdf

Abstract:
The Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR) is a multi-agency, university-led retrospective analysis (reanalysis) of the greater Arctic, approximately defined as extending poleward from the headwaters of the major northward flowing rivers. ASR blends atmospheric observations, satellite data, and output from the polar-optimized version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using the WRF 3-D variational data assimilation system in cycling mode. With the Arctic's vital link to global climate change, this physically-consistent, comprehensive integration of the regional climate and synoptic meteorology of the Arctic for 2000-2012 provides a high resolution depiction in space (15 km horizontal resolution with 71-vertical levels) and time (3h) of the atmosphere-sea ice-land surface system. A comparison with approximately 4500 surface observations illustrates that ASR reproduces the near-surface atmospheric variables with high skill. A broad-scale analysis of precipitation and site-specific comparisons of incoming radiative fluxes demonstrates substantial improvement over previous versions of ASR. ASR's high-resolution depiction of topography and detailed land surface, including weekly-updated vegetation and realistic sea-ice characteristics (fractional sea-ice, thickness, and snow cover), allows fine-scale processes between the surface and atmosphere to be well captured. In particular, case studies of mesoscale processes (e.g., polar lows, tip jets, etc.) show ASR's improved skill in atmospheric circulation and near-surface wind events throughout the Arctic. ASR's gridded output may be used as boundary conditions in atmospheric/coupled models, verification of regional processes throughout the Arctic, and improved siting for future observation networks. Finally, ASR permits a reconstruction of the Arctic system's rapid change since the beginning of the 21st century, thus complementing global reanalyses. Currently completed through 2012, continued production will bring this data set up to date by mid-2017.

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Title: Research and Forecasting Using the North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME) Seasonal Prediction System
Presenter(s): Kathleen Pegion, George Mason University, Jason C. Furtado, University of Oklahoma, Michael Alexander, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, David DeWitt, NOAA Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 28 February 2017
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections
Seminar POC: Heather.Archambault@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
- Kathleen Pegion (George Mason University)
- Jason C. Furtado (University of Oklahoma)
- Michael Alexander (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory)
- David DeWitt (NOAA Climate Prediction Center)

Abstracts and titles:

Assessing the Fidelity of Predictability Estimates
Kathleen Pegion, George Mason University

Predictability is an intrinsic limit of the climate system due to uncertainty in initial conditions and the chaotic nature of the atmosphere. Estimates of predictability together with calculations of current prediction skill are used to define the gaps in our prediction capabilities, inform future model developments, and indicate to stakeholders the potential for making forecasts that can inform their decisions. The true predictability of the climate system is not known and must be estimated, typically using a perfect model estimate from an ensemble prediction system. However, different prediction systems can give different estimates of predictability. Can we determine which estimate of predictability is most representative of the true predictability of the climate system? We test three metrics as potential indicators of the fidelity of predictability estimates in an idealized framework -- the spread-error relationship, autocorrelation and skill. Using the North American Multi-model Ensemble re-forecast database, we quantify whether these metrics accurately indicate a model's ability to properly estimate predictability. It is found that none of these metrics is a robust measure for determining whether a predictability estimate is realistic for Nino3.4. For temperature and precipitation over land, errors in the spread-error ratio are related to errors in estimating predictability at the shortest lead-times, while skill is not related to predictability errors. The relationship between errors in the autocorrelation and errors in estimating predictability varies by lead-time and region.

--

Predictability of the Tropospheric NAM and Sudden Stratospheric Warming Events in the NMME Phase-2 Models
Jason C. Furtado (University of Oklahoma), Judah Cohen (Atmospheric and Environmental Research), Emily Becker and Dan Collins (NOAA Climate Prediction Center)

The Northern Annular Mode (NAM) is the leading mode of variability of the Northern Hemisphere (NH) wintertime extratropical circulation in both the troposphere and stratosphere. Changes in the tropospheric NAM directly alter NH mid-latitude temperature and precipitation patterns and potentially increase chances for extreme winter weather in major population centers. These features make NAM predictability a significant priority for subseasonal-to-seasonal (S2S) wintertime forecasts. This study examines the predictability of the wintertime tropospheric NAM in the hindcast simulations of the North American Multi-Model Ensemble Phase-2 (NMME-2) model suite, specifically through examining how the models capture the evolution of sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) / weak polar vortex events. SSW events are well-known to precede large changes in the tropospheric NAM by 2-6 weeks, thereby offering extended predictability for mid-latitude winter weather. Findings indicate that the available NMME-2 models (CCSM4, CanCM3, and CanCM4) have an overall mixed performance in capturing the spatiotemporal characteristics of the near-surface NAM and its teleconnections. Strong biases are apparent in the persistence of positive vs. negative NAM regimes, the strength of the Atlantic jet stream, and polar vortex variability. For the lifecycle of simulated SSW events (i.e., those identified within the models), significant biases exist with stratosphere-troposphere coupling diagnostics, similar to those seen in other coupled models from other studies. For example, downward propagation of the stratospheric signal into the troposphere appears only in one model, with the other two models failing to show any connection between the two layers. Issues with precursor patterns leading up to SSWs as well as post-SSW impacts (e.g., 500 mb heights, surface temperature patterns) are also found to be inconsistent with, and sometimes opposite of, those derived from observations. These factors collectively impact the use of the NMME-2 subseasonal forecasts for potential high-impact winter weather regimes. Potential sources of error and pathways forward will also be discussed.

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Skill of Coastal SST Forecasts, including the California Current System, from the North American Multi-model Ensemble
Michael Alexander (NOAA/OAR/ESRL Physical Sciences Division)

Variability in the ocean state, especially the sea surface temperature (SST), is known to strongly influence marine ecosystems. As a first step in the process of ecological forecasting we explored SST forecasts in large marine ecosystems (LMEs), including the California Current System (CCS) from the coupled climate models in the North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME, Kirtman et al. 2014, BAMS). As in most regions, the ensemble mean monthly SST predictions for the CCS have skill and it is greater than those from most individual models, especially for probability forecasts, i.e., what chance would a predicted SST anomaly be above (upper tercile) or below (lower tercile) average. We explored several mechanisms that could drive SST predictability in the CCS, using the Canadian forecast model (CanCM4), perhaps the most skillful NMME member in the CCS. Skill mainly arises due to ENSO teleconnections to the extratropics and persistence of SST anomalies. The forecasts of SSTs in the CCS were shown to improve predictions of sardine biomass.

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Use of NMME Forecast Guidance in Climate Prediction Center Operations
David DeWitt (NOAA/NWS/NCEP Climate Prediction Center)

This presentation will demonstrate how CPC forecasters use the NMME guidance to inform the development of operational forecast products including the monthly and seasonal temperature and precipitation outlooks and associated downstream products, and the El-Nino Diagnostic Discussion.

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2 March 2017

Title: Following my dreams
Presenter(s): Sandra A. Cauffman, Earth Science Division Deputy Director NASA Headquarters, GOES-R Deputy System Program Director
Date & Time: 2 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 Room 14836 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sandra A. Cauffman (Earth Science Division Deputy Director NASA Headquarters, GOES-R Deputy System Program Director)

Sponsor(s):
This is part of the Latinos@NOAA 2017 seminar series. If interested in latinos@noaa activities join our group email at latinos@noaa.gov. Join us remotely from your computer, tablet or smartphone: Link: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/493238141 Dial: +1 (312) 757-3129; Access Code: 493-238-141 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting; Meeting ID: 493-238-141

Abstract:
Following my dreams is the story of how a Costa Rican girl from a poor family nurtured an improbable dream about space travel, and despite the obstacles, made that dream come true.

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Title: Web of Science training: Oceanography
Presenter(s): Kristen Faeth, Clarivate Analytics
Date & Time: 2 March 2017
12:00 pm - 12:45 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kristen Faeth, Clarivate Analytics POC: library.reference@noaa.gov; judith.salter@noaa.gov Location (Online): Register individually for this training session via Thomson Reuters: http://bit.ly/2kOUPFv Class summary: This WoS training will be tailored to NOAA oceanographers and oceanographic researchers, but all NOAA staff are welcome to register. You may also follow this virtual training along with Librarian Judith Salter in the brown bag area of the NOAA Central Library.

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Title: Estuary Restoration and Salmon Recovery: Lessons from Salmon River, Oregon
Presenter(s): Daniel Bottom, Estuarine Ecologist, Estuary and Ocean Ecology Program Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, NOAA -Retired-
Date & Time: 2 March 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NWFSC Map to NWFSC 2725 Montlake Blvd. E. Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Daniel Bottom, Estuarine Ecologist, Estuary and Ocean Ecology Program Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, NOAA (Retired)

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov (206-860-3380) WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=mb24c33557d4143e8f91fa0d71f14bc06 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 800 254 066 ABSTRACT Pacific salmon species are known for expressing a diversity of life-history traits, including considerable variation in migration timing, residency, and habitat use in estuaries. Although the relative contributions of estuarine life histories to salmon productivity and resilience are poorly understood, millions of dollars are now being spent annually on estuary restoration to aid recovery of at-risk populations. Recent research in Salmon River, a small basin on the central Oregon coast, provides some of the first empirical evidence that juvenile life-history variation and adult returns of Chinook and Coho Salmon may benefit directly from restoring estuarine rearing habitat. In the early 1960s most tidal wetlands in Salmon River estuary were diked for agricultural use. A series of restoration projects since 1978 has restored juvenile salmon access to ~70% of the historical estuarine wetlands. Juvenile Chinook Salmon now move into the estuary earlier in the year, stay for longer periods, and enter the ocean at a wider range of sizes and times than in years when most of the estuary's wetlands were diked. Large numbers of subyearling Coho Salmon also leave freshwater in the spring or fall to rear in the restored estuarine marshes for varying periods before entering the ocean as yearlings the following spring. Subyearling migrant coho also were rarely seen in the estuary when most of the wetlands were diked. Estuary rearing opportunities may strengthen Chinook and Coho population resilience by providing alternative feeding and rearing areas in the lower river, dispersing mortality risks more broadly across the basin. Moreover, estuary restoration contributes directly to adult salmon production. Up to 75% of the adult Chinook and 20 - 35% of the adult Coho that now return to spawn in Salmon River are the survivors of juveniles that reared in restored estuarine marshes. Demonstrating the contribution of estuarine habitat opportunity to juvenile life-history expression and adult production, the Salmon River results have important implications for salmon recovery efforts across the region. BIO Dan Bottom served as a fishery research biologist and project leader in state and federal government for 38 years, including 22 years with the ODFW Research Section in Corvallis and 16 years with NOAAs Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Newport, Oregon. His research interests include the juvenile life histories of Pacific salmon species, estuarine ecology of juvenile salmon, and the history of ideas in fisheries conservation. At NOAA he led a research team investigating the ecology and life histories of juvenile Chinook salmon in the Columbia River estuary. Dan retired from federal service in January 2016. He continues serving as a member of the Expert Regional Technical Group in the Columbia River estuary and as Courtesy Faculty at Oregon State University.

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Title: Snow: Dataset development, NWS products evaluations, and its impact on CFS subseasonal to seasonal prediction
Presenter(s): Xubin Zeng, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
Date & Time: 2 March 2017
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2890
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Xubin Zeng, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ POC:Mike Ek michael.ek@noaa.gov

Title:
Snow: Dataset development, NWS products evaluations, and its impact on CFS subseasonal to seasonal prediction Youtube Record https://youtu.be/-_lWMyOG5R8 Presentation http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2017/Zeng_NCEP_2Mar2017.pdf Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the eminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook. JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://docsib.webex.com/docsib/j.php?MTID=m4ac86010bbf79662498762e458a8fd88 Meeting number: 627 381 562 Host key: 145109 JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc Abstract Snow (water equivalent, depth, and fraction) has a major impact on the energy and water cycle and land-atmosphere interactions. Despite this importance, high-quality snow datasets are lacking and NWP and climate models have difficulty in snow data assimilation and in snow modeling. Through our recent progress documented in 6 papers, here I will discuss several snow issues that are highly relevant to the NWS weather, water, and climate prediction. First, we found large snow depth errors over U.S. in snow initializations from NCEP global (GFS and CFS) and regional (NAM) models (Dawson et al. 2016; doi: 10.1175/JHM-D-15-0227.1). The snow water equivalent (SWE) errors are even larger due to deficiencies in snow density. Subsequently we developed a new snow density parameterization for land data assimilation (Dawson et al. 2017a; doi: 10.1175/JHM-D-16-0166.1) that is significantly better than those used in the above snow initialization or in the NCEP land model (Noah). Second, we developed a new and innovative method to obtain daily 4 km SWE and snow depth data from 1981 to present over continental U.S. based on USDA SNOTEL point SWE and snow depth measurements, NWS COOP point snow depth measurements, and PRISM daily gridded precipitation and temperature datasets (Broxton et al. 2016a; doi: 10.1002/2016EA000174). The robustness of our method and our product has been demonstrated using three approaches. Using this dataset, we found large SWE errors in reanalyses (including CFSR) and Global Land Data Assimilation Systems (including GLDAS-Noah) (Broxton et al. 2016b; doi: 10.1175/JHM-D-16-0056.1) and from satellite remote sensing (Dawson et al., 2017b, under preparation). Furthermore, the primary reasons for these underestimates are identified. Finally, we found major impacts of snow initialization on CFS subseasonal to seasonal forecasting over Northern Hemisphere mid- and high-latitudes in the transition season (Apr-Jun), which are even greater than SST effects (Broxton et al. 2017, submitted). Furthermore, snow initialization deficiencies are primarily compensated by CFS atmospheric model deficiencies (most probably those related to atmospheric radiative transfer). These results suggest that, to improve short-term to seasonal forecasting in the spring and early summer, CFS (GFS, and NGGPS) should improve snow initialization first, followed by atmospheric radiative transfer improvement (e.g., clouds and aerosols), and then followed by land model improvement.

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3 March 2017

Title: Population dynamic models based on individual energy budgets lead to counterintuitive fisheries predictions
Presenter(s): Andre de Roos, U. Amsterdam
Date & Time: 3 March 2017
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Online access (NOAA SWFSC)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
André de Roos, U. Amsterdam

Sponsor(s):
NOAA SWFSC Seminar POC: benjamin.martin@noaa.gov Webex information: https://swfsc.webex.com/swfsc/j.php?MTID=m3c859f1c0eceb68af354e4305e300792 Join from a video system or application Dial 993987702@swfsc.webex.com Join by phone +1-415-655-0002 US Toll Can't join the meeting?: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

Abstract:
Historically, models describing the dynamics and management of marine fish stocks are based on assumptions that poorly reflect the ecology of individual fish and the complex interactions among them and their environment. For example, the most often used multi-species fisheries models only take into account the negative effect of predator-prey relations between fish species, that is, the mortality impact of the prey, but ignore the benefits of this predation, the increase in mass of the predator. With an increasing demand for ecosystem based management of fish stocks this discrepancy between the models and the ecology becomes important to address. In this presentation I review how current fisheries models account for ecological processes. Subsequently, I will introduce a class of size-structured population models based on individual energetics that explicitly account for ecological interactions of individual fish. Analysis of models of this kind will be shown to not only increase our understanding of the mechanisms shaping fish community dynamics, but also make counterintuitive predictions about the outcome of fisheries management strategies. More specifically, I will show that the recovery of populations of piscivorous fish stocks, like cod, may be most effectively promoted by harvesting its focal prey species and that increasing food availability for anadromous species like salmon may be detrimental for salmon persistence.out space travel, and despite the obstacles, made that dream come true.

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7 March 2017

Title: New Ocean Film - Hot off the Press! "Ocean Frontiers III: Leaders in Ocean Stewardship & the New Blue Economy." Film Spotlights Nation's First Regional Ocean Plans
Presenter(s): Karen Anspacher-Meyer, Executive Director, Green Fire Productions
Date & Time: 7 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Karen Anspacher-Meyer, Executive Director, Green Fire Productions

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
“Ocean Frontiers III” just had its world premiere and will screen in this NOAA Science Seminar with the film director in attendance. This truly unique and hopeful ocean film explores - from Virginia to Maine - the intersection of national security, maritime commerce, fishing, and recreation, plus expanding industries such as offshore wind energy and aquaculture, coupled with scientific discovery. “Ocean Frontiers III” tells the story of how ocean planning helps us manage and balance all the uses of our ocean to keep it thriving for generations to come. Free DVDs provided to the audience & information on how you can share the film to educate people on implementing the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic ocean plans. www.ocean-frontiers.org Trailer: http://ocean-frontiers.org/the-films/ocean-frontiers-3/

Bio(s):
Karen Anspacher-Meyer is the executive director of Green Fire Productions, a nonprofit media production company. Green Fire uses the power of film to move audiences to action and influence decision makers and the public on conservation and sustainability issues. Karen has produced dozens of award-winning films and implemented effective film distribution and outreach campaigns.

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8 March 2017

Title: ​Biological and Physical Control of Marine Carbon Sequestration in the California Current Ecosystem
Presenter(s): Michael Stukel, Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science Dept., Florida State University
Date & Time: 8 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Michael Stukel, Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science Dept., Florida State University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
The biological pump transports organic carbon from the surface ocean into the ocean's interior. However, large uncertainties remain in the global magnitude of this process and in the many different pathways by which this organic carbon can be transported. In this seminar we will address the role of mesoscale fronts in enhanced vertical carbon transport. Such features have dynamic biological communities and are often regions of increased upwelling, subduction, and vertical mixing. Elevated particle flux at a front in the California Current Ecosystem was mechanistically linked to Fe-stressed diatoms and mesozooplankton fecal pellet production. Using a data assimilative regional ocean model fit , we estimate that additional particulate carbon was exported as subduction of particle-rich water at the front, highlighting a transport mechanism that is poorly quantified by most models and in situ measurements.

Bio(s):
Mike Stukel is an assistant professor in the Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science, Dept. at Florida State University who studies the role of plankton in global carbon and nitrogen cycles. He has an interdisciplinary approach and is both a marine ecologist and biogeochemist; a field scientist and a modeler. He work in oceans around the planet, including coastal waters off of Antarctica, open-ocean upwelling regions of the Pacific, the California Current Ecosystem, the Amazon River Plume, and the Gulf of Mexico. His goal is to understand how a changing climate will impact the ability of marine biota to transport CO2 from the surface ocean-atmosphere system into the deep ocean where it can be sequestered for periods ranging from decades to millennia.

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Title: Contrasting Flathead Sole Hippoglossoides elassodon spawning in the Southeastern Bering Sea During Warm and Cold Periods
Presenter(s): Steven Porter, PhD, Oceanographer, NOAA, AFSC, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 8 March 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Oceanographer Room (Bldg 3 Room 2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, NE NOAA Dr, Seattle, WA 98115, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Steven Porter, PhD, Oceanographer, NOAA, AFSC, Seattle, WA Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/).

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 390-878-509 Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Abstract:
In the recent past the southeastern Bering Sea has alternated between periods of warm (2001-2005) and cold (2007-2012) during the spring and summer. Adult Flathead Sole Hippoglossoides elassodon in the southeastern Bering Sea shift their spatial distribution pattern in relation to bottom temperature and this can affect where spawning occurs. The objective of this study was to infer Flathead Sole spawning area in the southeastern Bering Sea from egg distribution and assess how warm and cold periods affected it. During the warm period, eggs were abundant over a wide area of the middle and outer Bering Sea shelf indicating that temperature most likely did not limit where spawning occurred. Spawning area contracted and shifted west onto the outer shelf during the cold period. One degree Celsius appeared to be a better thermal boundary for temperature tolerance of spawning Flathead Sole than 2°C previously described for adults. Given the relatively constrained nature of fish spawning habitats and that eastern Bering Sea Flathead Sole are at the species' northernmost range, these results provide valuable insight to understanding the behavioral/physiological adaptability of this species to climate variability.

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9 March 2017

Title: Implications of spatial connectivity and climate change for the design and application of MPAs
Presenter(s): Mark Carr, Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Long Marine Laboratory, University of California, Santa Cruz and Dr. Sarah Robinson, Critical Inquiries Research, Brookline, Massachusetts
Date & Time: 9 March 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mark Carr, Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Long Marine Laboratory, University of California, Santa Cruz Dr. Sarah Robinson, Critical Inquiries Research, Brookline, Massachusetts Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4922555718190278401

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The US Marine Protected Area (MPA) Federal Advisory Committee (FAC) has a Connectivity Subcommittee charged with understanding how knowledge about ecological spatial connectivity and climate climate change can be incorporated into the design, use, and management of effective MPAs and MPA networks. The committee has summarized the current scientific understanding of: 1) different types and scales of connectivity and their ecological implications, 2) how connectivity processes create ecological linkages among marine areas, populations, communities, and ecosystems, and 3) how connectivity impacts conservation outcomes in MPAs. This webinar will summarize the work of the FAC on the implications of spatial ecological connectivity for the design and application of MPAs in a changing ocean. This work forms the basis of the FAC's recommendations to the US Secretaries of Commerce and the Interior for future US MPA management and policy. http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/fac/products/connectivity-report-combined.pdf

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Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 March 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Stressed out whales? Using new methods to examine the physiological impacts of ocean noise on gray whales
Presenter(s): Dr. Leigh Torres, Assistant Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 9 March 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NWFSC Map to NWFSC 2725 Montlake Blvd. E. Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Leigh Torres, Assistant Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov (206-860-3380) WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=mb24c33557d4143e8f91fa0d71f14bc06 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 800 254 066 ABSTRACT The threat of rising anthropogenic noise levels in the oceans may adversely affect acoustically sensitive marine species including baleen whales whose functional range overlaps with low frequencies commonly generated by anthropogenic sources. The effects of long-term exposure to increasing ambient sound levels resulting from man-made sources are not well known, and may not be easily recognized from short-term observations of behavioral changes. Rather, chronic stress effects may potentially manifest as a physiological response. Using innovative technologies, including drones and photogrammetry, fecal hormone analysis, and nearshore acoustic measurements, we are investigating how variable noise levels along Oregon's coast affect gray whale health. We are using gray whales as a study species to inform how baleen whales respond to and recovery from ocean noise events. In this talk I will describe our objectives and methods, play audio and video clips to demonstrate our data, and discuss our preliminary results. BIO ​​Leigh Torres is an Assistant Professor at Oregon State University where she works in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, the Marine Mammal Institute, and as an extension agent for Oregon Sea Grant. Leigh received her Masters of Environmental Management (2001) and PhD (2007) from Duke University, then lived and worked in New Zealand for six years before moving to Oregon in 2014. Leigh's research interests center on the spatial and behavioral ecology of marine megafauna, including cetaceans, pinnipeds, seabirds and sharks, with the primary objective to inform management and conservation efforts. When not on a boat or behind a desk, Leigh is likely hanging out with her family or playing soccer " or both together! Leigh leads the Geospatial Ecology of Marine Megafauna Laboratory (GEMM Lab) at OSU and you can read about the lab's exploits and work at their active blog: http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/gemmlab/

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Title: [Rescheduled from 1/12/2017] National Park Service Alaska "GPS on Bench Marks" Projects
Presenter(s): Nic Kinsman, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 March 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Britta Schroeder, National Park Service; Nicole Kinsman, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7796779165917887236. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States:+1 (213) 929-4212 Access Code: 928-174-468 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar.

Abstract:
Last summer, an intern visited over one hundred National Geodetic Survey (NGS) bench mark sites in Denali National Park and Preserve to collect survey-grade GPS coordinates. Most of these first-order vertical leveling bench marks were established along the ninety-two miles of Denali's park road in 1965 and since then, only a handful had been revisited. Now, over 50% of the monuments have been recovered or were ascertained to exist. The National Park Service (NPS) and NGS also provided geospatial courses and citizen science opportunities to high school and college students funded, in part, through the NOAA Preserve America Initiative. The courses included classroom time and field trips to understand how geospatial science is applied in the wilderness. This webinar will address some of the challenges and accomplishments of the project.

Bio(s):
Britta Schroeder works as the GIS Specialist and Unmanned Aerial Systems pilot in Denali National Park and Preserve; Nicole Kinsman is the National Geodetic Survey's Regional Advisor for Alaska and the US Arctic.

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10 March 2017

Title: Sentinel Site Seminar Series: Tackling Sea Level Rise in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: A Cooperative Approach
Presenter(s): Renee Collini, Coordinator, Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative
Date & Time: 10 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series This seminar is the start of the Sentinel Site Seminar Series: A Regional Approach to Addressing Impacts of Sea Level Rise and Changing Coastal Inundation Patterns

Presenter(s):
Renee Collini, Coordinator, Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative, Presenting in person.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Galen.Scott@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
The northern Gulf of Mexico is a thriving coastline, known for excellent seafood, low-key living on beautiful deltas, and picturesque coastal wetlands. Unfortunately, this productive and eye catching region is also highly susceptible to sea-level rise and inundation, putting coastal ecosystems and communities at risk. Throughout the Gulf there are many communities, organization, and agencies working to understand and address sea-level rise and its impacts. The Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative (NGOM SSC) brings these partners together from across the science to stewardship continuum to identify and tackle common issues in sea-level rise monitoring, science, and management. Through active partner participation and leveraging, the NGOM SSC has begun to successfully address these issues by tackling prioritized gaps and needs. Recently, the NGOM SSC has facilitated integration of best available science into decision-making, developed products that help decision-makers navigate available tools and models, and synthesized available monitoring and observing infrastructure critical to understanding sea level trends and related processes. An overview of the NGOM SSC will presented, including recent successes, upcoming projects, and challenges and best practices for maintaining engagement with diverse partners for collaborative success.

Bio(s):
Karen Collini is currently the Coordinator for the Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative, working with organizations and individuals addressing sea-level issues across the data to action continuum. She, in conjunction with partners, facilitates communication and translation of science and observations into management and conservation decision making. Before working for the NGOM SSC, Collini was the Program Manager for the Alabama Real-time Coastal Observing System, working on coastal observing and monitoring with various local, state, and regional partners. Throughout her career, Collini has encouraged collaboration for standardized and coordinated monitoring and observing across the Gulf and integration of these data in management and policy decision-making. Collini holds a Master of Science in Marine Science from the University of South Alabama and a Bachelor of Science in Biology from the University of Texas at Dallas.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

13 March 2017

Title: High resolution Global Modeling: Challenges and Emerging Capabilities
Presenter(s): Jim Kinter, George Mason University/Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Justin Small, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Eric Swenson, George Mason University/Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Francisco Doblas-Reyes, Barcelona Supercomputing Center and ICREA, Lucas Harris, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Ben Kirtman, University of Miami
Date & Time: 13 March 2017
11:00 am - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
NOAA CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program Seminar POC: Daniel.Barrie@noaa.gov SPEAKERS - Jim Kinter (George Mason University/Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies) - Justin Small (National Center for Atmospheric Research) - Eric Swenson (George Mason University/Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies) - Francisco Doblas-Reyes (Barcelona Supercomputing Center and ICREA) - Lucas Harris (NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory) - Ben Kirtman (University of Miami) REMOTE ACCESS INFORMATION: - Link: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=ed732b10a7ebddbd9ac24e396f1cfa8f1 - Passcode: 20910 - Call-in details will pop up on-screen after you log in. Please share your connection with others as space is limited. The presentations and a recording of the webinar will be available at the following link after the webinar: http://cpo.noaa.gov/ClimateDivisions/EarthSystemScienceandModeling/ModelingAnalysisPredictionsandProjections/WebinarSeries.aspx ABSTRACTS Jim Kinter - In the nearly 9 years since the 2008 World Modeling Summit, at which it was proposed to initiate a major effort to develop and test much higher resolution global climate models, there have been attempts by several different groups to do just that. These efforts have been directed at simulation, projection and prediction. While convection-permitting global models are only beginning to be developed, weather-resolving and eddy-permitting models have been exercised in several large-scale experiments. There are some points that are common across the several results the various groups have obtained. Lessons learned from these experiments and potential avenues for further study will be described. Justin Small - This presentation describes recent experiences with high resolution climate modeling at NCAR. Firstly, a long coupled simulation with 0.1deg ocean and 0.25deg atmosphere showed improved representation of coastal upwelling zones, western boundary currents, ENSO and Southern Ocean deep mixed layers. Comparable runs with lower resolution ocean or atmosphere are used to attribute these improvements. Secondly, new efforts of data assimilation with a high resolution ocean model are described, in the context of a broader project on decadal climate prediction. Eric Swenson - The occurrence of boreal winter Rossby wave breaking (RWB) along with quantitative role of synoptic transient eddy momentum and heat fluxes directly associated with RWB are examined during the development of Euro-Atlantic circulation regimes using the ERA Interim Reanalysis. Results are compared to those from seasonal re-forecasts made using the Integrated Forecast System model of ECWMF (at T319, T639 and T1279 spectral resolution) coupled to the NEMO ocean model. The development of both Scandinavian Blocking and the Atlantic Ridge is directly coincident with anticyclonic wave breaking (AWB), however the associated transient eddy fluxes do not contribute to (in fact oppose) ridge growth, as indicated by the local Eliasson-Palm (EP) flux divergence. Evidently other factors drive development, and it appears that wave breaking assists more with ridge decay. The growth of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in its positive phase is independent of RWB in the western Atlantic, but strongly linked to AWB further downstream. During AWB, the equator-ward flux of cold air at upper-levels contributes to a westerly tendency just as much the poleward flux of momentum. The growth of the negative phase of the NAO is almost entirely related to cyclonic wave breaking (CWB), during which equator-ward momentum flux dominates at jet-level, yet low-level heat fluxes dominate below. The re-forecasts yield realistic frequencies of CWB and AWB during different regimes, as well as realistic estimates of their roles during development. However, a slightly weaker role of RWB is simulated, consistent with a modest underestimation in RWB frequency. Francisco Doblas-Reyes - The European SPECS project has delivered a new generation of climate forecast systems, with improved forecast quality and efficient regionalization tools to produce reliable, local climate information over land at seasonal-to-decadal time scales. The improved understanding of the sources of predictability have offered better estimates of the future frequency of high-impact, extreme climatic events. The project has brought into the climate prediction field knowledge from the weather forecasting and climate change communities to leverage both knowledge and model developments that boost the forecast quality. Driven by needs identified by a sister project on climate services, EUPORIAS, SPECS provided an enhanced communication protocol and services to satisfy the climate information needs of a wide range of public and private stakeholders. This has also become a coordinated European response to some of the GFCS components. Lucas Harris - The increasing demands for high-resolution weather and climate models require new models that can produce useful simulation of smaller-scale motions while also making skillful predictions of the driving larger-scale dynamics. The GFDL Finite-Volume Cubed-Sphere dynamical core (FV3) has been developed to allow the development of new models able to unify global and limited-area prediction. FV3 is capable of non-hydrostatic modeling to allow explicit representation of deep convection, and also has grid-nesting and grid-stretching capabilities to be able to efficiently refine the model grid over areas of interest. This dynamical core is being used in several models---GFDL HiRAM, AM4, and fvGFS, NASA GEOS, and elsewhere---for a range of applications, from coarse-resolution climate modeling to convection-resolving weather forecasts, and is being incorporated as the replacement for the spectral core in GFS. Results are demonstrated for several forecast applications. We show preliminary subseasonal predictions of TC activity in HiRAM nested to 8-km over the North Atlantic. Several variable-resolution configurations able to explicitly resolve convective clouds are being developed, with a focus upon severe weather and hurricane forecasts. Forecasts of high-impact weather events, such as the 2012 Derecho and Hurricane Matthew, are presented. We also show some early results from global convection-resolving fvGFS and GEOS forecasts, and discuss the feasibility of a global cloud-scale forecast model within the next decade. Ben Kirtman - There is a continually increasing demand for near-term (i.e., lead times of 2-4 weeks up to a couple of decades) climate information. This demand is partly driven by the need to have robust forecasts to support adaptation and response strategies, and is partly driven by the need to assess how much of the ongoing climate change is due to natural variability and how much is due to anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases or other external factors. Here we discuss results from a set of state-of-the-art climate model prediction and predictability experiments in comparison with observational estimates that show that an assessment of predictability, and indeed, robust predictions from days to decades, requires models that capture the variability of major oceanic fronts and ocean eddies, which are, at best, poorly resolved and may even be absent in current sub-seasonal to interannual prediction systems, and in the decadal climate predictions experiments made as part of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

14 March 2017

Title: Seminar POSTPONED: Diversity and Inclusion and the Hispanic community at NASA’s Goddard’s Space Flight Center
Presenter(s): Daniel Krieger, Diversity and Inclusion Program Manager and the Alternative Dispute Resolution Program Manager for NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland
Date & Time: 14 March 2017
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 11153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Seminar POSTPONED: New date TBD

Presenter(s):
Daniel Krieger (Diversity and Inclusion Program Manager and the Alternative Dispute Resolution Program Manager for NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland)

Sponsor(s):
Latinos@noaa.gov Join us remotely from your computer, tablet or smartphone: Link: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/493238141 Dial: +1 (312) 757-3129; Access Code: 493-238-141 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting; Meeting ID: 493-238-141

Abstract:
Current Diversity and Inclusion program at Goddard with an emphasis on our Hispanic community

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Title: Resched. to 3/22 @ Noon ET - 255 Shades of Grey: Multibeam Backscatter and New Techniques to Create a Seamless Mosaic
Presenter(s): Will Sautter, Marine GIS Analyst, CSS-Dynamac Inc. and NOAA'S NCCOS
Date & Time: 14 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series THIS SEMINAR HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED TO MARCH 22 FROM 12-1PM ET

Presenter(s):
Will Sautter, Marine GIS Analyst, CSS-Dynamac Inc. and NOAA'S NCCOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
The NOAA/NCCOS Biogeography Branch has been using multibeam backscatter intensity data to analyze the geomorphology and sedimentary structures of the seafloor for habitat mapping since the data has become available in the early 2000's. Backscatter data collected from a multibeam echo sounder and sidescan sonar data are used to find features lying on the seafloor, identify hard and soft bottom areas, and even detect the changes in sediment composition or grain size. The biggest challenge is that backscatter and sidescan intensity values can be highly variable between different systems, the time of survey, and even the orientation of the survey lines, due to the dynamics of the underwater environment. These issues create offsets in the decibel values between different backscatter and sidescan datasets, even if they partially overlap the same area, which provides a challenge for analysts to accurately classify or predict different bottom types. The Biogeography Branch has developed a new workflow to normalize intensity returns and integrate a patchwork of backscatter and sidescan surveys into vivid seamless surfaces that can then be used for mapping, monitoring, and modeling the future of benthic habitats.

Bio(s):
Will Sautter is a Marine GIS Analyst with CSS that has worked in the NOAA NCCOS Biogeography Branch for over five years. He graduated from Appalachian State University with a BS in Geology and a certificate in GIS but got his sea legs growing up in the low country of Charleston, SC. His work mainly includes collecting, processing, and ground truthing multibeam bathymetry and backscatter for benthic habitat maps in the US Caribbean, Long Island Sound, and the Channel Islands.

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16 March 2017

Title: A Flooded Future: Projecting the Frequency of Minor Coastal Flooding along the East and Gulf Coasts in 2030 and 2045
Presenter(s): Kristina Dahl,Climate Scientist, Dahl Scientific and the Union of Concerned Scientists
Date & Time: 16 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kristina Dahl, PhD, Climate Scientist, Dahl Scientific and the Union of Concerned Scientists

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Tidal flooding is among the most tangible present-day effects of global sea level rise. Here, we utilize a set of NOAA tide gauges along the U.S. East and Gulf Coasts to evaluate the potential impact of future sea level rise on the frequency and severity of tidal flooding. Using the 2001-2015 time period as a baseline, we first determine how often tidal flooding currently occurs. Using localized sea level rise projections based on the Intermediate-Low, Intermediate-High, and Highest projections from the U.S. National Climate Assessment, we then determine the frequency and extent of such flooding at these locations for two near-term time horizons: 2030 and 2045. We show that increases in tidal flooding will be substantial and nearly universal at the 52 locations included in our analysis. Long before areas are permanently inundated, the steady creep of sea level rise will force many communities to grapple with chronic high tide flooding in the next 15 to 30 years.

Bio(s):
Kristina Dahl is an independent climate scientist based in San Francisco, CA, and holds a PhD in paleoclimate from the MIT-WHOI Joint Program. For the last six years,she has worked as a consultant to the Union of Concerned Scientists with a focus on the impacts of sea level rise on US coastal communities. Prior to starting her consulting practice, she was the Associate Director of the Climate and Environmental Change Initiative at Rutgers University and a course scientist for the American Museum of Natural History.

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Title: NOAA Great Lakes Strategic Public-Private Partnership Project (Affiliation: University of Michigan / Great Lakes Regional Collaboration Team (GLRCT)
Presenter(s): Zhanyang "Young" Gao, University of Michigan's School of Natural Resources and Environment; Jerry Guo, Master's degree student, University of Michigan's School of Natural Resources and Environment, Focus: Conservation Ecology
Date & Time: 16 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Zhanyang "Young" Gao, Graduate student, University of Michigan's School of Natural Resources and Environment and Jerry Guo, Master's degree student, University of Michigan's School of Natural Resources and Environment, Focus: Conservation Ecology. Seminar

Sponsor(s):
University of Michigan, Great Lakes Regional Collaboration Team (GLRCT); NOAA Central Library. POC: Jennifer Day, Regional Coordinator, Great Lakes Regional Collaboration Team, jennifer.day@noaa.gov; Judith Salter, NOAA Central Library, Judith.Salter@noaa.gov For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
The NOAA Great Lakes strategic public-private partnership project is sponsored by the Great Lakes Regional Collaboration Team to identify new partnership opportunities in the region. The presentation will show the audiences how the team uses self-created partnership evaluation models to explore environmental topics of interest, and identify potential partners in the Great Lakes region. The ultimate goal of this project is to create a recommendation list of the top 10 potential partners in the Great Lakes region for NOAA to pursue partnerships with in the future.

Bio(s):
Zhanyang “Young” Gao is a graduate student at the University of Michigan's School of Natural Resources and Environment. In 2015, he received an MBA degree from the UM Ross School of Business. Before that, he worked for seven years as an IT consultant in China. Young aims to combine his degrees to explore solutions to China's pressing environmental problems. Jerry Guo is a Master's degree student at the University of Michigan's School of Natural Resources and Environment, with a focus in Conservation Ecology. He obtained dual undergraduate degrees in Biology and Economics at the University of Utah. Jerry is passionate about helping with environmental issues like invasive species and habitat restoration, hopes to contribute more towards these areas after graduation this Spring.

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Title: Frost/Freeze Guidance Project: What is it and how can you be involved?
Presenter(s): Molly Woloszyn, Extension Climate Specialist from Midwestern Regional Climate Center
Date & Time: 16 March 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Molly Woloszyn, Extension Climate Specialist from Midwestern Regional Climate Center Seminar sponsor: NWSHQ Climate Services Branch

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6266475588521232898

Abstract:
The Midwestern Regional Climate Center (MRCC) leads the Frost/Freeze Guidance project, which provides collaboration among weather forecasters, University Extension specialists, state climatologists, and other vegetation experts to improve communication about the state of vegetation and its susceptibility to potentially damaging low air temperatures. Molly Woloszyn, Extension Climate Specialist from the MRCC, will provide more information about how the project increases communication, the resources that are available, and how NWS offices have utilized the information provided through this collaboration to help their issuance of frost/freeze headlines and coordination with neighboring offices. The Frost/Freeze Guidance project is part of the MRCC's Vegetation Impact Program (VIP). Seminar POC for questions: emily.timte@noaa.gov

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

20 March 2017

Title: Extending Global Biomass Burning Emissions Product with SNPP VIIRS (GBBEPx)
Presenter(s): Shobha Kondragunta, Ph.D., NOAA NESDIS
Date & Time: 20 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building 8th Floor Conference Room, 10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham, MD 20706 and Via Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Shobha Kondragunta, Ph.D., NOAA NESDIS

Sponsor(s):
JPSS March Science Seminar POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov Webex: 877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mab0e699fdb648d0e89f75d3ba84ebb8b Meeting number: 742 972 700 Host key: 864374 Meeting password: Jpss2017!

Abstract:
Wildfires have detrimental impact on human health and economy. While fires burn down buildings in the vicinity of the fires displacing people temporarily, smoke from fires causes health effects, shuts down roads and national parks due to poor visibility, and alters weather. Each year, the U.S. spends nearly half a billion dollars to suppress wildfires (www.nifc.gov). The National Weather Service (NWS) uses numerical models such as HYSPLIT (Hybrid lagrangian Single Particle Integrated Trajectory) and NGAC (NOAA Environmental Modeling System Global Forecasting System Aerosol Component) to provide smoke and aerosol forecast guidance respectively. These numerical models that predict the location and transport of smoke rely on remotely sensed fire hot spots and emissions of trace gases and aerosols for input. The current global operational biomass burning emissions product is based on a network of geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite sensors. This product is being extended to include emissions from smaller fires that are detected by VIIRS due to high spatial resolution and additional fires detected due to reduced orbital gaps in the low latitudes. This seminar will introduce the topic of biomass burning and air quality, algorithm to derive fire emissions, and test runs of NGAC model with GBBEPx to demonstrate the value of near real time availability of fire emissions to the NWS ability to provide accurate aerosol forecasts in support of various decision support systems.
Title: 4th National Climate Assessment: Oceans and Marine Resources Chapter, Request for Feedback
Presenter(s): Andy Pershing, Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Chapter Lead Author, and Fred Lipschultz, US Global Change Research Program, USGCRP Chapter Contact
Date & Time: 20 March 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only - see login below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Andy Pershing, Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Chapter Lead Author, and Fred Lipschultz, US Global Change Research Program, USGCRP Chapter Contact

Sponsor(s):
Point of Contact: Taylor Armstrong, c.taylor.armstrong@noaa.gov , Knauss Marine Policy Fellow, NOAA NMFS Office of Science and Technology and NOAA Ocean Acidification Program Webinar Login: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7271981171002454017)

Abstract:
Join us for a webinar on Monday, March 20th to provide feedback on the 4th National Climate Assessment! The National Climate Assessment (NCA) is produced every four years by the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). The NCA aims to integrate new information on climate science into the context of larger social, ecological, and policy systems. It will provide an updated report of climate change impacts and vulnerability, evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation and adaptation activities, and identify knowledge gaps. Oceans and Marine Resources has been identified as one of the national-level overview chapters to be included in the 2018 national report. The purpose of the presentation is to provide a brief background on the NCA, present the tentative key findings/outline, and seek public feedback. During this webinar, the audience can provide feedback on the major issues facing the oceans and the effects these will have on the United States. If you cannot attend the webinar but would still like to submit suggestions for the NCA4: Oceans Chapter, please submit comments to https://goo.gl/forms/z3KAEGzi9e5fgLTB2

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

21 March 2017

Title: Rising to the challenge: will tidal marshes survive rising seas?
Presenter(s): Kerstin Wasson, Research Coordinator, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve
Date & Time: 21 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kerstin Wasson, Research Coordinator, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve. Presenting remotely from Santa Cruz, California.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
The National Estuarine Research Reserve System has developed a powerful approach to evaluate and compare the ability of tidal marshes to thrive as sea levels rise. Using consistently collected data from their national monitoring program, Research Reserves applied this approach at 16 sites in 13 coastal states to create the first national-scale comparison of marsh resilience to sea level rise. While marshes in most regions exhibited moderate resilience overall, all showed signs of vulnerability. Pacific Coast marshes appeared better able to track rising seas than those along the Atlantic, where two marshes in southern New England were found to be particularly vulnerable. This approach, made available to anyone with a free calculation tool, can be applied at different geographic scales to shape coastal policy and management decisions focused on protecting tidal marshes and the benefits they provide.

Bio(s):
Dr. Wasson has served for 16 years as Research Coordinator of the Elkhorn Slough Reserve in the Monterey Bay region of central California. Her current research focuses on restoration of native oysters and salt marshes, but her job keeps her on her toes, dipping into research topics ranging from sea otter use of estuaries to drivers of eutrophication to shorebird distributions. She was a lead author on a recent publication detailing the findings of the marsh resilience assessment she'll be reporting on in this seminar.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Lake Erie HABs and current research efforts: bloom behavior, producing safe drinking water, public health impacts, and nutrient load reduction
Presenter(s): Christopher J. Winslow, Director, Ohio Sea Grant College Program
Date & Time: 21 March 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Christopher J. Winslow, Director, Ohio Sea Grant College Program Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8317871816052967682

Abstract:
A glimpse into the >50 projects currently managed by Ohio Sea Grant and OSU's Stone Laboratory with assistance from the University of Toledo; Just under $7,000,000 are currently in play. These research efforts aim to: (1) improve the use of existing technologies and to develop new methods to detect, prevent and mitigate harmful algal blooms and their impacts; (2) assess the health impacts of harmful algal blooms and the associated toxins; (3) develop new treatment methods for contaminated drinking water that remove both algal particles in general and the toxins produced by cyanobacteria in particular; and (4) develop ways to disseminate HABs information more effectively by establishing how information moves through existing networks of people and using those networks " such as Extension and farmer partnerships " to distribute new information about harmful algal blooms. This work is supported by the Ohio Department of Higher Education, OSU's College of Food Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and Ohio Sea Grant. These efforts are truly collaborative involving eight agencies (four federal and four state), two NGOs, 13 universities, and four private sector entities.

Bio(s):
For the past thirteen years Chris has been at Ohio State University's Stone Laboratory, first as an instructor and research supervisor, but now as Director of both the Lab and the Ohio Sea Grant College Program. Chris was an Instructor at BGSU (2002-09) and an Assistant Professor at Kutztown University of Pennsylvania (2009-11). Chris' research and outreach efforts include the impact of invasive species, nutrient loading, harmful algal bloom causes and impacts, dredging activity, coastal community resilience and growth, and the potential impacts of climate change. Chris is currently Co-Director of the Lake Erie Millennium Network and committee member of Annex IV and Annex II of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, International Joint Commission's Research Coordinating Committee (Science Advisory Board), Cleveland Water Alliance, Lake Erie Partnership Working Group, Blue Accounting - ErieStat Workgroup (Great Lakes Commission), and the Fertilizer Research Workgroup (Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development). He is also Agency Partner for Ohio Lake Erie Commission, Advisory Board member of OSU's Global Water Institute, Advisory Council member for the Ohio Water Trust, and member for Old Woman Creek National Estuarine Research Reserve Advisory Board. Chris holds a B.S. from Ohio University and both M.S. and Ph.D. from Bowling Green State University.

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22 March 2017

Title: 255 Shades of Grey: Multibeam Backscatter and New Techniques to Create a Seamless Mosaic (Rescheduled from 3/14/17)
Presenter(s): Will Sautter, Marine GIS Analyst, CSS-Dynamac Inc. and NOAA'S NCCOS
Date & Time: 22 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Will Sautter, Marine GIS Analyst, CSS-Dynamac Inc. and NOAA'S NCCOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
The NOAA/NCCOS Biogeography Branch has been using multibeam backscatter intensity data to analyze the geomorphology and sedimentary structures of the seafloor for habitat mapping since the data has become available in the early 2000's. Backscatter data collected from a multibeam echo sounder and sidescan sonar data are used to find features lying on the seafloor, identify hard and soft bottom areas, and even detect the changes in sediment composition or grain size. The biggest challenge is that backscatter and sidescan intensity values can be highly variable between different systems, the time of survey, and even the orientation of the survey lines, due to the dynamics of the underwater environment. These issues create offsets in the decibel values between different backscatter and sidescan datasets, even if they partially overlap the same area, which provides a challenge for analysts to accurately classify or predict different bottom types. The Biogeography Branch has developed a new workflow to normalize intensity returns and integrate a patchwork of backscatter and sidescan surveys into vivid seamless surfaces that can then be used for mapping, monitoring, and modeling the future of benthic habitats.

Bio(s):
Will Sautter is a Marine GIS Analyst with CSS that has worked in the NOAA NCCOS Biogeography Branch for over five years. He graduated from Appalachian State University with a BS in Geology and a certificate in GIS but got his sea legs growing up in the low country of Charleston, SC. His work mainly includes collecting, processing, and ground truthing multibeam bathymetry and backscatter for benthic habitat maps in the US Caribbean, Long Island Sound, and the Channel Islands.

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Title: Ecosystem Response to a Second Warming Stanza in the Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Phyllis Stabeno, PhD, Physical Oceanographer, NOAA, PMEL, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 22 March 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Oceanographer Room (Building 3, Room 2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, NE NOAA Dr, Seattle, WA 98115, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Phyllis Stabeno, PhD, Physical Oceanographer, NOAA, PMEL, Seattle, WA Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/). Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract:


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Title: Explore Your Own Watershed with Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs)
Presenter(s): Sarah Waters, NOAA Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 22 March 2017
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Webinar - See Description for more details
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Waters, NOAA Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4233694090270569729

Abstract:
Building your own ROV is not as complicated as you think! Find out how students near Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary are designing and building their own ROVs to explore the Thunder Bay River and Lake Huron, as well as participate in environmental stewardship projects. This webinar will showcase how ROVs are used to explore our national marine sanctuaries and provide a basic overview of designing and building ROVs with students for your own explorations! More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

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27 March 2017

Title: Challenges, Progress and Ongoing Research in the Application of High Resolution Models in Storm Surge Forecasting
Presenter(s): Rick Luettich, PhD, Professor of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Date & Time: 27 March 2017
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Luettich, PhD, Professor of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Greg.Dusak@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
Knowledge of the fundamental physics that contribute to storm-driven coastal inundation dates to the 1950s and earlier. However, considerable effort is required to develop a realistic predictive model of storm driven surge, waves and inundation for the complex geospatial configurations typical of real coastal areas. Spurred by catastrophic losses along the US East and Gulf coasts during the past 10-15 years and aided by advances in high performance computing, high resolution topographic, bathymetric and land cover data sets, and improved forcing and observational data, considerable advancements have been made in our ability to model and predict storm surge and inundation during this period. Specifically, the ADCIRC storm surge modeling system is now widely used for high-resolution forensic studies, risk assessment and mitigation design associated with coastal storm surge. However, the application of this technology for forecast applications has additional challenges including timely model execution, realistic meteorological forcing and inclusion of unmodeled physics. I will briefly review ADCIRC and its success in commonly used applications, and then discuss recent progress towards its use for real-time forecasting.

Bio(s):
Rick Luettich has an undergraduate and master's degree in civil engineering from Georgia Tech and a doctor of science in civil engineering from MIT. He serves as the Director of UNC Chapel Hill's Institute of Marine Science, which is comprised of approximately 100 residential faculty, staff and students located on the coast of North Carolina. He also serves as Director of UNC Chapel Hill's Center for Natural Hazards Resilience which he founded in 2008. Dr. Luettich's research addresses modeling and observational studies of circulation and transport in coastal waters. He has helped pioneer the development and application of computer models that are optimized for geometrically complex coastal systems and for high performance computing and is one of the principal developers of the ADCIRC circulation and storm surge model. He is actively engaged in the coastal science and natural hazards community, serving as the lead PI for the Department of Homeland Security's Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence and the NOAA IOOS Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed; a member of three National Academies committees (chairing the 2013-14 committee on Coastal Risk Reduction); and as vice-President of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East, which oversees the hurricane protection system around greater New Orleans.

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Title: Balancing the scales: How mobile home residents respond to tornado risk
Presenter(s): Brooke Fisher Liu, University of Maryland
Date & Time: 27 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Brooke Fisher Liu, Associate Professor of Communication and Director, Risk Communication & Resilience Program, START University of Maryland, with Holly A. Roberts, Michael J. Egnoto, and Rhys Lim. Seminar

Sponsor(s):
OAR/OWAQ (Office of Weather and Air Quality); NOAA Central Library; POC: kim.klockow@noaa.gov library.reference@noaa.gov; judith.salter@noaa.gov For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
The difference between mobile and fixed homes has gained a significant attention as a contributing factor to risk during tornadoes. What remains unclear is whether the housing type or socio-behavioral factors contribute more to the risk equation. We investigated how mobile home residents responded to tornado information compared to fixed home residents throughout the Southeast United States through two surveys and a focus group panel in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Findings indicate responsiveness to tornadoes is largely equivalent across housing types. However, mobile home residents are disadvantaged in responding as efficaciously to tornadoes due to situational factors that motivate engagement, comprehension of best protective actions, and abilities to respond while engaging in general life obligations (work, school, etc.). Additional findings indicate significant differences in information access and perceived self-efficacy among mobile home and fixed home residents, which negatively influence mobile home residents' capacity to effectively respond to tornados.

Bio(s):
Dr. Brooke Liu serves as the Director of START'S Risk Communication & Resilience Program. Her research investigates how effective risk and crisis communication can optimally prepare the public to respond to and recover from disasters. In recent years, her research has focused on the unique roles that governments' social/new media can play in building community resilience. In 2013, Dr. Liu directed the launch of START's Training in Risk and Crisis Communication (TRACC) program, which aims to enhance community resilience through sharing the science and theories behind effective risk and crisis communication. She has also led START research teams evaluating: (1) how individuals use, behave and interpret disaster information via social and traditional media and (2) the effectiveness of emergency alerts via mobile devices, among other topics. Dr. Liu serves as a member of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Risk Communication Advisory Committee and on the editorial boards for Communication Yearbook, Communication Quarterly, Public Relations Review, Journal of Applied Communication Research and the Journal of Public Relations Research. Her research has been published in outlets such as Communication Research, Communication Theory, the Handbook of Crisis Communication, Journal of Applied Communication Research, Journal of Communication Management, Journal of Public Relations Research and Public Relations Review.

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28 March 2017

Title: Resources for Understanding the U.S. Maritime Economy
Presenter(s): Gabe Sataloff, Geospatial Analyst, NOAA's Office for Coastal Management. Presenting from Charleston, SC
Date & Time: 28 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Gabe Sataloff, Geospatial Analyst with The Baldwin Group, on contract to NOAA's Office for Coastal Management. Presenting remotely from Charleston, SC

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
NOAA's Office for Coastal Management (OCM) has developed a time-series dataset describing the jobs directly dependent on maritime resources. In 2014, there were over 3 million jobs dependent on maritime resources, and those jobs produced over $350 billion in goods and services. To help communicate the information, OCM has created a series of web-based resources to allow people to see, interact with, and get the data.

Bio(s):
Gabe Sataloff is a spatial analyst with The Baldwin Group, on contract at the NOAA Office for Coastal Management. Gabe has been involved with data development and dissemination of the maritime economy data for the last five years.

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Title: Unified Water Modeling: Droughts, Floods, Fish
Presenter(s): Ed Clark, NOAA Office of Water Prediction/National Water Center, Christa Peters-Lidard, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Gabriele Villarini, University of Iowa, Brian Wells, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 28 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Christa Peters-Lidard (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center) - Similarity Assessment of NLDAS model outputs for drought estimation Edward Clark (NOAA National Water Center) - The National Water Model Gabriele Villarini (University of Iowa) - NMME Precipitation and Temperature Forecasts for the Continental United States and Europe Brian Wells (NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center) - Evaluating and using numerical ocean and biological model products to assess habitat, salmon survival, and forage dynamics along the coastal California Current system

Sponsor(s):
NOAA CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program Seminar POC: Daniel.Barrie@noaa.gov REMOTE ACCESS INFORMATION: - Link: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=ec79425b091f181720bdfeea02655f693 - Passcode: 20910 - For audio: after logging on to the WebEx, click "I will call in" (to hear audio via phone). Make sure to enter both the access code and attendee ID #. Abstracts: Christa Peters-Lidard - Multi-model ensembles are often used to produce ensemble mean drought estimates that tend to have increased simulation skill over any individual model output. If multi-model outputs are too similar, an individual LSM would add little additional information to the multi-model ensemble, whereas if the models are too dissimilar, it may be indicative of systematic errors in their formulations or configurations. We present a formal similarity assessment of the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) multi-model ensemble outputs to assess their utility to the ensemble, using a confirmatory factor analysis. Outputs from four NLDAS Phase 2 models currently running in operations at NOAA/NCEP and four new/upgraded models that are under consideration for the next Phase of NLDAS are employed in this study. The results show that the runoff estimates from the LSMs were most dissimilar whereas the models showed greater similarity for root zone soil moisture and snow water equivalent. Generally, the NLDAS operational models showed weaker association with the common factor of the ensemble and the newer versions of the LSMs showed stronger association with the common factor, with the model similarity increasing at longer timescales. Tradeoffs between the similarity metrics and accuracy measures indicated that the NLDAS operational models demonstrate a larger span in the similarity-accuracy space compared to the new LSMs. The results indicate that simultaneous consideration of model similarity and accuracy at the relevant timescales are necessary in the development of a multi-model ensemble for drought monitoring. Edward Clark - The National Weather Service (NWS) Office of Water Prediction (OWP), in conjunction with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the NWS National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) recently implemented version 1.0 of the National Water Model (NWM) into operations. This model is an hourly cycling uncoupled analysis and forecast system that provides streamflow for 2.7 million river reaches and other hydrologic information on 1km and 250m grids. It will provide complementary hydrologic guidance at current NWS river forecast locations and significantly expand guidance coverage and type in underserved locations. The core of this system is the NCAR-supported community Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-Hydro hydrologic model. It ingests forcing from a variety of sources including Multi-Sensor Multi-Radar (MRMS) radar-gauge observed precipitation data and High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR), Rapid Refresh (RAP), Global Forecast System (GFS) and Climate Forecast System (CFS) forecast data. WRF-Hydro is configured to use the Noah-Multi Parameterization (Noah-MP) Land Surface Model (LSM) to simulate land surface processes. Separate water routing modules perform diffusive wave surface routing and saturated subsurface flow routing on a 250m grid, and Muskingum-Cunge channel routing down National Hydrogaphy Dataset Plus V2 (NHDPlusV2) stream reaches. River analyses and forecasts are provided across a domain encompassing the Continental United States (CONUS) and hydrologically contributing areas, while land surface output is available on a larger domain that extends beyond the CONUS into Canada and Mexico (roughly from latitude 19N to 58N). The system includes an analysis and assimilation configuration along with three forecast configurations. These include a short-range 15 hour deterministic forecast, a medium-Range 10 day deterministic forecast and a long-range 30 day 16-member ensemble forecast. United Sates Geologic Survey (USGS) streamflow observations are assimilated into the analysis and assimilation configuration, and all four configurations benefit from the inclusion of 1,260 reservoirs. Version 1.0 of the NWM provides a foundation that supports out-year growth in operational hydrologic forecasting capability. Goals for Version 1.0 NWM include: Providing forecast streamflow guidance for underserved locations; Producing spatially continuous national estimates of hydrologic states (soil moisture, snow pack, etc.); Seamlessly interfacing real-time hydrologic products into an advanced geospatial intelligence framework; Providing a modeling architecture that permits rapid infusion of new data, science and technology. Version 1.1 of the NWM is scheduled for implementation in May 2017, with subsequent versions of the NWM planned to be implemented on an annual basis beginning in Fall 2017. An overview of the National Water Model will be given during this talk, including details on how the model fits into the current set of NWS modeling tools and operational activities. The role of hydrology in unified modeling will also be discussed. Gabriele Vilarini - This presentation examines the forecasting skill of eight Global Climate Models (GCMs) from the North-American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME) project (CCSM3, CCSM4, CanCM3, CanCM4, GFDL2.1, FLORb01, GEOS5, and CFSv2) over seven major regions of the continental United States and four major regions of Europe. The skill of the monthly forecasts is quantified using the mean square error skill score. This score is decomposed to assess the accuracy of the forecast in the absence of biases (potential skill) and in the presence of conditional (slope reliability) and unconditional (standardized mean error) biases. We summarize the forecasting skill of each model according to the initialization month of the forecast and lead time, and test the models' ability to predict extended periods of extreme conditions conducive to historical flood and drought events. We also assess the forecasting skill associated with different multi-model averaging techniques. Brian Wells - I overview our work using output from numerical ocean and biological models to assess influences of environmental conditions on variability in population and community dynamics along coastal California Current System (CCS). Evaluation of models demonstrates that physical and biological outputs are coherent with empirical data at appropriate spatial and temporal scales and are suitable for quantifying ecosystem dynamics on California shelf waters. I address a variety of ecological hypotheses by confronting model output with biophysical observations. I elucidate mechanisms connecting spatial and temporal upwelling dynamics to observed krill and forage fish abundances. I use model output to estimate interannual variability of biophysical habitat of juvenile Chinook salmon collected from shipboard surveys. I then use results to elucidate mechanisms influencing region-specific survival of Chinook salmon populations along CCS.

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Title: Modeling Potential Effects of Bighead and Silver Carp on Great Lakes Food Webs
Presenter(s): Ed Rutherford and Doran Mason, NOAA/Great lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; Jenny Apriesnig, Colorado State University
Date & Time: 28 March 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only - see webinar link below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ed Rutherford and Doran Mason, NOAA/Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; Jenny Apriesnig, Colorado State University

Sponsor(s):
Canada's Invasive Species Centre Asian Carp Webinar Series, NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series, and NOAA-CILER Great Lakes Seminar Series Point of Contact: Rebecca Schroeder - rschroeder@invasivespeciescentre.ca (705-541-5778) Remote Access Only: Must register for GoToWebinar at this web address: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/287531468091855363 For audio and webcast: See Gotowebinar instructions

Abstract:
Asian carp threaten to invade the Great Lakes which could have negative ecological, economic and social consequences. Two of the four species in particular, bighead and silver carp, are a large threat due to their diet. They are voracious plankton feeders and have the potential to disrupt food webs. This webinar will be presented by three speakers. Dr. Edward Rutherford is a Research Fishery Biologist at NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory where he focuses on population dynamics, early life history and habitat of Great Lakes and marine fishes. Dr. Doran Mason is a Research Ecologist at NOAA and his specialty is quantitative aquatic ecology. Jenny Apriesnig is a Ph. D. candidate at Colorado State University where she develops models to examine fisheries and invasive species issues. This webinar will discuss the potential effects that a silver carp and bighead carp invasion could have on Great Lakes food webs.

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29 March 2017

Title: Copyright, Trademark, and Social Media issues
Presenter(s): Sarah Schwartz, U.S. Department of Commerce, General Law Division, Blake Jones, U.S. Department of Commerce, General Law Division
Date & Time: 29 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Schwartz, Senior Counsel, General Law Division, U.S. Department of Commerce and Blake Jones, Attorney-Advisor, General Law Division, U.S. Department of Commerce. Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library. POC: Judith.Salter@noaa.gov; NOAA Institutional Repository (NOAA IR): https://repository.library.noaa.gov For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
The General Law Division will provide a basic intellectual property (IP) training that broadly covers three areas of IP law, including trademarks, copyright, and social media. The trademark portion will address the benefits of trademark registration, creating new NOAA trademarks, permitting outside party use of NOAA trademarks, and acquiring permission to use another's trademark on NOAA works. The copyright portion will cover copyright fundamentals, copyright in the USG context, works generated by contractors, fair use, copyright and the IR, and best practices for using other parties' copyrighted materials. Finally, the social media portion briefly will address DOC policy on the approval and use of social media.

Bio(s):
Sarah Schwartz provides advice concerning the administration and management of the Department, including: appropriations law, review of Department MOUs, intellectual property, the Privacy Act, the Paperwork Reduction Act, the Records Retention Act, the Federal Advisory Committee Act and Department internal orders. In addition, Ms. Schwartz provides guidance on financial assistance matters. Blake Jones provides advice concerning the administration and management of the Department, including: appropriations law, review of Department MOUs, intellectual property, the Privacy Act, the Paperwork Reduction Act, the Records Retention Act, the Federal Advisory Committee Act, and Department internal orders.

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30 March 2017

Title: Dissolved Oxygen Dynamics in Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Malcolm Scully, PhD, Physical Oceanographer and Associate Scientist with tenure at Woods Hole's Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Group
Date & Time: 30 March 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Malcolm Scully, PhD, Physical Oceanographer and Associate Scientist with tenure at Woods Hole's Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Group

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; and the This is the start of a Special Seminar Series: Recent Advances in Coastal Physical Oceanography, hosted by Yizhen.Li@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Physical processes play an important role in modulating low dissolved (hypoxia) in estuaries. This is illustrated using both field observations and numerical simulations from Chesapeake Bay. The field observations demonstrate how wind-driven circulation interacts with estuarine bathymetry to control when and where vertical mixing of dissolved oxygen occurs. These data highlight that the supply of oxygen to deep regions susceptible to hypoxia cannot be thought of as a simple 1-D process in the vertical, but rather a complex 3-D processes that is heterogeneous in both time and space. Oxygen is not supplied to sub-pycnocline waters directly by vertical mixing, but rather by horizontal advection of water mixed somewhere else. To quantify the role that physical processes play in controlling inter-annual variations in hypoxia, a numerical circulation model with a very simple representation of dissolved oxygen dynamics is used to simulate hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay for the 30-year period 1984-2013. The model assumes that the biological utilization of dissolved oxygen is constant in both time and space in an attempt to isolate the role that physical processes play in controlling hypoxia. Despite the simplicity of the model it demonstrates skill in simulating the observed inter-annual variability of hypoxic volume, capturing 50% of the observed variability in hypoxic volume (< 2 mg/L) for the month of July and 58% of the observed variability for the month of August, over the 30-year period.

Bio(s):
Dr. Malcolm Scully is a physical oceanographer and an associate scientist with tenure in Woods Hole's Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Group. His research interests include: estuarine dynamics; boundary layer and stratified turbulence; Langmuir circulation; low-dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) in estuaries; and fine sediment transport. He has authored and co-authored numerous peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and more. Malcom earned a BA in Environmental Science from the University of Virginia in 1993, his MS in Marine Science from the College of William and Mary, School of Marine Science in 2001, and his PhD also from William and Mary in 2005.

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4 April 2017

Title: Global Change Impacts on Coastal and Ocean Ecosystem Services and Human Health and What We Can Do About It
Presenter(s): Ariana Sutton-Grier, PhD, Assistant Research Scientist at the University of Maryland's Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, and Ecosystem Science Adviser for NOAA's National Ocean Service
Date & Time: 4 April 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ariana Sutton-Grier, PhD, Assistant Research Scientist at the University of Maryland's Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, and Ecosystem Science Adviser for NOAA's National Ocean Service

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science (NOS) Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Coasts and oceans represent some of the earth's most valued ecosystems. For example, in the U.S., about 40% of the U.S. population lives in coastal counties, which make up only 10% of the U.S. land base. Yet these coastal and marine ecosystems that we love are also some of the most threatened ecosystems on the planet. Coastal and marine ecosystems are dealing with multiple simultaneous threats including rising temperatures, ocean acidification, nutrient pollution, habitat loss, and extreme weather events. This webinar will examine how each of these stressors is impacting the ability of coastal and marine ecosystems to continue to provide the important services on which these biodiverse communities depend and how the changes in ecosystem services are impacting human health and well-being. The discussion will conclude with suggestions for how we can help coastal and marine ecosystems be more resilient and continue to provide critical ecosystem services

Bio(s):
Dr. Ariana Sutton-Grier is an ecosystem ecologist with expertise in wetland ecology and restoration, biodiversity, biogeochemistry, climate change, and ecosystem services. Dr. Sutton-Grier is a research faculty member at the University of Maryland in the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center and is also the Ecosystem Science Adviser for the National Ocean Service at NOAA. She holds Honors Bachelor degrees from Oregon State University in Environmental Science and International Studies and a doctoral degree from Duke University in Ecology. Her research interests include the relationships between nature/biodiversity and human health, coastal blue carbon, and natural and nature-based coastal resilience strategies. A former Smithsonian Fellow and a AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow, Dr. Sutton-Grier also was recently selected as an Early Career Fellow by the Ecological Society of America and one of her papers won the ESA 2016 “Innovations in Sustainability Science” award. She gets especially excited about seeking and discovering innovative opportunities to combine science and policy to solve environmental problems and promote ecosystem conservation. Dr. Sutton-Grier has authored over 30 publications in many environmental and policy journals and her research has been featured in several news stories, as well as a children's science TV show.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

5 April 2017

Title: Ocean Observing with Argo
Presenter(s): Steve Piotrowicz, Ocean Observing and Monitoring
Date & Time: 5 April 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SOS room, 1315 East-West Hwy., Silver Spring, Md
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Steve Piotrowicz,Oceanographer, NOAA/OAR's Ocean Observing and Monitoring Division

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of Education, Science On a Sphere SOS Cafe Point of Contact: erik.macintosh@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
none - in-person only

Abstract:
Weather forecasting is a science with a strong research and observational background. Today satellites and networks of atmospheric observing systems distributing data freely and openly around the globe in near real-time that enable analyses of conditions for applications such as transportation and weather prediction, as well as research to improve predictions. Prior to the late 18th Century, ocean observations mainly consisted of circulation along the coasts, general descriptions of surface currents in oceanic basins, and local observations by fishermen. From the early 20th Century ocean observations were basically expeditionary in nature, conducted from ships, and concentrated in the populated, northern hemisphere in spite of the fact that more than one-half of the global ocean lies in the southern hemisphere. Wintertime observations were extremely limited. While observations from satellites can provide data on the vertical structure of the atmosphere, satellite observations only provide data on the very skin (centimeters to meters) of the ocean, not what is beneath the surface or what is acting to determine what is seen on the surface. The development of profiling floats, coincident with advanced telecommunications, has revolutionized ocean sciences by providing oceanographers with the ability to observe the global ocean in real-time without temporal or spatial biases. Those advancements have also changed what is expected of ocean scientists whereby they can now provide a context, that context being the physical environment, of their research. Science On a Sphere is a room-sized, global display system that uses computers and video projectors to display planetary data onto a six foot diameter sphere, analogous to a giant animated globe. For more information, visit sosinssmc.education.noaa.gov.

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Title: Using Plain Language
Presenter(s): Christine Heflin, U.S. Department of Commerce
Date & Time: 5 April 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Christine Heflin, Director of Performance Excellence/Deputy Performance Improvement Officer, U.S. Department of Commerce Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Performance, Risk and Social Science Office (PRSS), NOAA Central Library; POC: library.reference@noaa.gov; judith.salter@noaa.gov For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Discussion will focus on the advantages of "Using Plain Language" in developing great briefing and communication materials. Building on the costs of poor writing and myths about use of plain language, the discussion will highlight the advantages of using plain language. The presentation will show how to develop clear content, including use of NOAA relevant examples. Throughout Ms. Heflin's career with Federal and Local government, and as a consultant, she has been involved in preparing accessible briefings and is interested in sharing what she has learned. Target audience: NOAA Program and Project Managers, and Program Management Council presenters. All NOAA managers are welcome to attend. About the speaker: As the Director of Performance Excellence and the Deputy Performance Improvement Officer, Chris deploys the Federal agenda for evidence based planning and management at the Commerce Department. She has been the point person at the Department for implementation of the Government Performance and Results Modernization Act of 2010. The Act affected a new approach and structure for agency Strategic Planning and an increased emphasis on cross-agency collaboration, including Cross-Agency Priority Goals. Chris was the Internal Consultant for the City of Coral Springs from 1994 until mid-2008. She was a major contributor in 2007 when Coral Springs became the first local government to receive the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. Chris served as an Examiner in the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality program and the Florida Sterling program. She consulted with NATO on development of their system of Balanced Scorecards and served as the Director of Budget and Research of Pima County, Arizona. She has been a Consultant/Trainer for the Florida Institute of Government, and served on the Board of the League of Women Voters in two Florida counties. Her B.A. in Political Science is from McDaniel College and her Master's in Public Administration is from the University of Maryland.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Rethinking the Trap: New Traps to Control an Invasive Species
Presenter(s): Dr. Steve Gitttings, Chief Scientist, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring
Date & Time: 5 April 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Steve Gittings, Chief Scientist, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Recent trap designs for capturing invasive lionfish use unbaited fish attraction devices (FADs) centered in open frames to attract and concentrate lionfish from nearby habitats. Trap jaws close over the FADs during retrieval to capture the lionfish. In trials, traps have produced no bycatch, and the open design would preclude ghost fishing. Recent field tests demonstrated high attraction and capture efficiency for these traps. A second phase of testing will evaluate potential habitat disturbance by the traps, conditions under which trap movement may occur, and the entanglement risk of different gear configurations. Testing will require collaboration with commercial fishermen to improve designs, and to determine optimal soak times and preferred fishing techniques in different situations and locales. Fisheries managers will use the information to decide whether to certify certain designs for use in areas with existing trap bans, to establish limits on the number of traps fished, and consider appropriate temporal or spatial restrictions.

Bio(s):
Steve Gittings is Chief Scientist for NOAA's National Marine Sanctuary Program. Formerly, he was manager of the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. He has broad experience in conservation science, particularly characterization and monitoring of marine ecosystems. He also has extensive field experience in scientific diving, ROV operations, and submersible use. Recently, he has been developing lionfish traps to prevent impacts to deep water ecosystems while creating new opportunities for fishermen to supply lionfish to seafood and other developing markets.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
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Title: A Tiered Approach to Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management: a Lower Trophic Prospective
Presenter(s): Janet Duffy-Anderson, PhD, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA, AFSC, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 5 April 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Oceanographer Room (Building 3, Room 2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, NE NOAA Dr, Seattle, WA 98115, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Janet Duffy-Anderson, PhD, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA, AFSC, Seattle, WA Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/). Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract:
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 April 2017

Title: Are the Salish Sea’s seabird and marine mammal populations linked to those in the California Current?
Presenter(s): Scott Pearson, Ph.D, Senior Research Scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Date & Time: 6 April 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Scott Pearson, Ph.D, Senior Research Scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D526935352%26UID%3D4647882352%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAN_oul_Msj6_8yI0LUdDakhEeIYXrTL5IqSLlWOiMbsKCIN_5brDyh6G_5m2Ys4C-ztaRoVXncLpId1FyyQz9Sv0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm534c3e1cf2a5377453ead1c750dd8129 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 802 536 319 Need help? contact support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412 ABSTRACT This talk consists of two related parts: (1) Salish Sea's marine bird and mammal community is composed of over 70 and 29 species respectively that are relatively abundant and highly dependent upon marine resources for survival. The relative abundance of these species changes dramatically throughout the year due to differences in the timing and extent of residency by migratory, over-wintering and local breeding populations. Evidence suggests that several over-wintering bird species in particular have declined precipitously over the last several decades. To provide additional insights into the health of Salish Sea seabird and marine mammal populations, I will examine trends in seven picivorous species over the past 15 years (2) Variation in seabird diet and reproduction across ecological regimes is usually driven by local prey abundance and species composition which in turn, are strongly influenced by variation in oceanographic conditions. Rhinoceros Auklets depend upon schooling pelagic fish for reproduction and survival, and its diet reflects the availability of prey in the environment. Given that breeding rhinoceros auklets are generally limited to foraging within 40-87 km of their colony during the breeding season, birds from Destruction (located on the outer coast) and Protection islands (located in the Puget Sound) likely take prey exclusively from the California Current and Salish Sea regions, respectively. Birds from Tatoosh Island, which is situated in the California Current at the confluence of these two zones, are able to forage in both systems. These three islands offer a unique opportunity to examine tradeoffs in chick diet quality and composition and auklet reproductive performance in two fundamentally different ecosystems and at the interface of these two systems where birds have an option of foraging in either ecosystem. BIO Dr. Scott Pearson is a senior research scientist at Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington and his M.S. from the University of Michigan. His research is focused primarily on assessing wildlife population status and trends, diet, habitat use and quality, evaluating the effectiveness of conservation efforts, and identifying mechanisms responsible for population declines with a focus on seabirds and prairie associated species. Scott's previous research focused on evaluating the importance of various food resources to migrant and over-wintering birds, the behavioral and ecological aspects of hybridization in warblers, and identifying the habitat features important to bird reproduction and survival. Scott worked as the Westside Natural Areas Ecologist for the State prior to his current position with WDFW where he supervises the west-side research team.

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Title: Dynamic ocean management: A tool for optimizing ecological and economic sustainability
Presenter(s): Dr. Elliott Hazen, Research Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries, Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 6 April 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3, Room 3404, 1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Elliott Hazen (Research Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries, Southwest Fisheries Science Center)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Fisheries Quantitative Ecology and Socioeconomics Training (QUEST) Program Point of Contact for questions about this seminar: Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov Remote Access Information: https://goo.gl/hcfOO7

Abstract:
Highly migratory species are inherently difficult to manage as they cross human-designated jurisdictional boundaries in the open seas. Top predators face multiple threats such as ship-strike risk and incidental catch (bycatch) in fisheries. Given many top predators migrate seasonally across ocean basins, targeted management approaches require an understanding of how distribution and abundance varies with the oceanic environment. Here I discuss two recently developed tools, WhaleWatch and EcoCast. WhaleWatch is designed to assess blue whale density on a monthly basis to help reduce the risk of ship strikes. EcoCast is designed for maximizing target catch while minimizing bycatch. In regard to EcoCast, we focused our analysis on the California Drift Gillnet fishery which targets swordfish, thresher shark, and mako shark, but also can incidentally catch a number of species including sea lions, sea turtles, and blue sharks. We looked at EcoCast output for two years, 2012 and 2015, an average year and an El Niño year respectively, to examine how predicted patterns in catch and bycatch change. Both of our studies provide a framework for how dynamic approaches can be applied to other migratory species for which telemetry, fisheries catch, or survey data are available, and emphasizes the utility in integrating multiple data types for marine conservation and management. About the speaker: Elliott Hazen is a Research Ecologist with NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center's Environmental Research Division and an adjunct professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UC Santa Cruz. Elliott's research includes foraging ecology of rorqual whales (Humpback whales in Antarctica and the Gulf of Maine, Blue whales in the Southern California Bight), spatial ecology of top predators in the Pacific Ocean, climate change effects on marine top predators and their ecosystems, and use of species-environment relationships to create fine scale spatial management tools to maximize ecological and economic sustainability. Elliott also contributes to the California Current Integrated Ecosystem Assessment, co-leading the risk component. Prior to joining NOAA Fisheries, Elliott was a research associate at UC Santa Cruz and a NRC postdoctoral fellow before that. He received his Bachelor of Science from Duke University in Biology in 2000, a Masters of Science in 2003 from the University of Washington in Fisheries, and a PhD in 2008 from Duke University in the field of Ecology. Archive of past seminars: http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/quest/resources/webinars

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

10 April 2017

Title: Lake Superior: A warming ecosystem
Presenter(s): Dr. Robert Sterner, University of Minnesota-Duluth Large Lakes Observatory
Date & Time: 10 April 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Robert Sterner, University of Minnesota-Duluth Large Lakes Observatory

Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Dramatic physical changes to the seasonal mixing regime of Lake Superior have been described: the summer stratified season is lengthening and summer surface temperatures are increasing. At the same time, there are less prevalent other anthropogenic forcings affecting Lake Superior than most other large lakes, including most of the Laurentian Great Lakes. This means Lake Superior may provide important clues about how climate affects large lake ecosystems. Dr. Sterner's seminar will draw from almost twenty years of study of the offshore Lake Superior ecosystem, with an emphasis on nutrients and the lower food web. Changes to primary production and primary producers have been observed, though the complex interconnections of "physics to fish" are still poorly resolved.

Bio(s):
Dr. Sterner's research combines biological with chemical approaches to understand lake ecosystems, with particular focus on understanding the linkages among the cycles of carbon and nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Dr. Sterner received a B.S. in Biology from the University of Illinois in 1980 and a Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of Minnesota in 1986, working with David Tilman. Dr. Sterner has published more than 90 papers and books that together have been cited > 12,000 times. He is one of the founders of the field of Ecological Stoichiometry, which seeks to understand how elemental balances and ratios affect organism success, community structure, ecosystem dynamics, and other topics. He has focused mainly on freshwater plankton, but through work with colleagues and students, he has contributed to the literature on microbes, fish, terrestrial plants, and other organisms. Dr. Sterner has spent most of his career at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities, serving as the Head of the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior. He also spent 2+ years working at the National Science Foundation in senior management as the Director of the Division of Environmental Biology, where he contributed to the shaping of the NSF funding portfolio and acted as a national spokesperson for environmental research in the U.S. He has done research on the Great Lakes since ~1996 and in 2014, he moved to the University of Minnesota Duluth where he became the Director of the Large Lakes Observatory, the only institution in the U.S. dedicated to the scientific study of all the large lakes on Earth.

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11 April 2017

Title: Alaska River Break-up: Historic comparison and 2017 Spring Outlook - What can we expect?
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman and Crane Johnson, NOAA National Weather Service
Date & Time: 11 April 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman National Weather Service & Crane Johnson National Weather Service Seminar sponsor: ACCAP Climate Webinar

Remote Access:
https://accap.uaf.edu/webinars

Abstract:
Each year the National Weather Service provides a breakup outlook for Alaska rivers. We will present a brief overview of current conditions and provide our spring statewide flooding potential outlook for the 2017 spring break-up season. This will be followed by a comparison of historic breakup years and a spring/summer climate outlook.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

12 April 2017

Title: Sentinels for a More Resilient Coast: How the Chesapeake Bay Cooperative is Rising to the Challenge
Presenter(s): Sarah Wilkins, Coordinator, Chesapeake Bay Sentinel Site Cooperative, University of Maryland Sea Grant Extension. Sarah will present at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 12 April 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Wilkins, Coordinator, Chesapeake Bay Sentinel Site Cooperative, University of Maryland Sea Grant Extension. Sarah will present at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
The Chesapeake Bay Sentinel Site Cooperative (CBSSC) is a Bay-wide collection of ecosystem-based study sites. The Cooperative focuses on measuring the impacts of sea level rise and is strengthened by partnerships with coastal managers, decision makers, and community liaisons. Partners work together to apply the science produced at sentinel sites to coastal management and resilience efforts. As a collaborative team, the partners share emerging insights from sentinel site research, explore potential collaborations and funding opportunities, and jointly implement new methods and technologies. This seminar will highlight some of the CBSSC's recent activities, including efforts from a working group established by the Cooperative attempting a regional synthesis of surface elevation table (SET) data.

Bio(s):
Sarah Wilkins is the first ever full-time coordinator for the Chesapeake Bay Sentinel Site Cooperative (CBSSC). Before coming to Maryland Sea Grant Extension in 2015, Sarah spent a year with NOAA's National Ocean Serve as a John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow. She has a Master of Science in Conservation Biology & Sustainable Development from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Bachelor of Science from the University of Vermont in Environmental Science. Sarah has worked all over the country on coastal and estuarine projects for non-profit, academia and governmental agencies. Sarah is based in Annapolis at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Introduction of a Quadrant Model for Assessment of Undersea Marine Research Infrastructure
Presenter(s): Karen Kohanowich, NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research
Date & Time: 12 April 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Karen M. Kohanowich, Ph.D., NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research Seminar POC: Judith Salter, NOAA Central Library, Judith.Salter@noaa.gov For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Within the oceanographic research discipline, the field of ‘submersible science' requires data that is gathered in situ to fully understand marine ecosystems and the interactions within them. The availability of the technological systems (i.e. moored and deployed sensors; remotely operated, autonomous, and human-occupied vehicles) that are used to collect this data is relatively inconsistent for scientists across the United States. National-level assessments that advise this availability have typically focused on the prioritization of research goals, and rarely include consideration of the full suite of economic, operational, political, and social factors that influence the sustainment of infrastructure resources. This talk will introduce a quadrant-style model for assessment of undersea marine research infrastructure (UMRI) that provides a framework to identify and evaluate the full range of technical, operational, functional, and societal influences on the sustainment of U.S. undersea marine research infrastructure. The model is intended for use by both research managers and undersea system providers to better understand and improve undersea marine research infrastructure availability.

Bio(s):
Karen Kohanowich has been a marine research and undersea technology director and manager at NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research and Undersea Research Program since 2005. She has served as NOAA program manager for the Aquarius undersea habitat and Hawaii's Undersea Research Laboratory, chaired NOAA's AUV Working Group, and co-chaired the National Ocean Partnership Program (NOPP) federal working group and an interagency Task Force for Ocean Research and Technology (TFORT). A retired U.S. Navy diver and oceanographer, she served as the Naval liaison to NOAA in 1999-2000. In 2016, Karen was awarded a doctorate in Environmental Science and Public Policy from George Mason University, with a focus on undersea research technology assessment. She has also earned a Master of Science in Environmental Science and Policy from Johns Hopkins University, a Master of Science in Air Ocean Sciences from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, and a Bachelor of Science in Geology from Vanderbilt University.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The Future Response of Fisheries Production to Integrated Anthropogenic Forcing of Climate Change and Fishing Pressure
Presenter(s): Colleen Petrik, PhD, Associate Research Scholar - Nereus Fellow, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ
Date & Time: 12 April 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Oceanographer Room (Building 3, Room 2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, NE NOAA Dr, Seattle, WA 98115, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Colleen Petrik, PhD, Associate Research Scholar (Nereus Fellow), Princeton University, Princeton, NJ Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/). Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract:
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Imagery Applications for Fire Weather Monitoring
Presenter(s): Curtis J. Seaman, CIRA, Colorado State University
Date & Time: 12 April 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Curtis J. Seaman, CIRA, Colorado State University Seminar sponsor: Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium Webinar Series ACCAP Climate Webinar (https://accap.uaf.edu/webinars/virtual-alaska-weather-symposium)

Remote Access:
http://uaf.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=3e466dfbff&e=9097598e1a

Abstract:
The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite has been producing high-quality imagery since its launch in October 2011. Additional VIIRS instruments will be launched on subsequent JPSS satellites (1-4). The 22 bands on VIIRS include 5 high-resolution imagery channels (~375 m resolution at nadir), 16 moderate resolution channels (~750 m resolution), and the Day/Night Band (~742 m resolution), which collectively range in wavelength from 0.412 μm to 12.01 μm. These channels offer a wide range of imagery applications that are useful for monitoring the fire weather environment. For example, VIIRS has 5 bands in the near and shortwave IR that useful for detecting hot spots. The Day/Night Band is sensitive to the light emissions from fires at night, as well as the smoke (given sufficient moonlight). In addition to these individual VIIRS bands, there are many multispectral applications including red-green-blue (RGB) composites of these channels that are useful for detecting fires, smoke, vegetation health, snow and ice coverage, and even flooding. Specific RGB applications include: True Color for detecting/monitoring smoke; Natural Color for detecting snow cover, vegetation health and burn scars; the Fire Temperature RGB composite for monitoring fire activity; and the Snow/Cloud Discriminator product, which utilizes the Day/Night Band to improve the discrimination of snow and clouds at night. An introduction to these RGB composites and an overview of these applications will be discussed

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Lake Huron Red Tails: The Tuskegee Airmen Project
Presenter(s): Stephanie Gandulla and Wayne Lusardi, NOAA Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 12 April 2017
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Webinar - See Description for more details
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Stephanie Gandulla and Wayne Lusardi, NOAA Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2857093440720839170

Abstract:
During World War II, Michigan was home to several African American air combat units including many graduates of the Tuskegee pilot training program. As with many similar training programs during the war, dozens of accidents occurred that resulted in the loss of both aircraft and crewmen. Two Tuskegee airplanes have been discovered in Michigan waters near Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Learn about these submerged aircraft and a project where members of the National Association of Black Scuba Divers and Diving with a Purpose participated to document one of the aircraft wrecks in Lake Huron. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

13 April 2017

Title: NOAA Marine Debris Program-funded Microplastic Research and Current Research Priorities
Presenter(s): Carlie Herring, Research Coordinator, Marine Debris Division, NOAA Office of Response and Restoration
Date & Time: 13 April 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Carlie Herring, Research Coordinator, Marine Debris Division, NOAA Office of Response and Restoration Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5580307763312728833

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Dive into the world of microplastics with the NOAA Marine Debris Program! Learn about the various types and sources of microplastics, and the impacts associated with microplastic marine debris. In this webinar, we will highlight microplastic studies funded by the NOAA Marine Debris Program, including studies that examine chemical and microplastic interactions under various environmental conditions (leaching and sorption studies), ingestion of microplastics by planktonic marine organisms, microplastic and contaminant interactions in marine food webs, and the abundance and occurrence of microplastic debris on beaches and in the Mississippi River watershed. In addition, this webinar will also briefly highlight current MDP research priorities.

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Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 13 April 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Vancouver Fraser Port Authority Enhancing Cetacean Habitat and Observation (ECHO) program: working to reduce the impact of vessel traffic on cetaceans
Presenter(s): Dr. Jason Wood, Senior Research Scientist, SMRU Consulting North America - Orla Robinson, Program Manager, ECHO Program, Vancouver Fraser Port Authority
Date & Time: 13 April 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Orla Robinson, M.Sc, ECHO Program Manager Vancouver Fraser Port Authority & Jason Wood, Ph.D , Operations Manager & Senior Research Scientist SMRU Consulting

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D526935352%26UID%3D4647882352%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAN_oul_Msj6_8yI0LUdDakhEeIYXrTL5IqSLlWOiMbsKCIN_5brDyh6G_5m2Ys4C-ztaRoVXncLpId1FyyQz9Sv0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm534c3e1cf2a5377453ead1c750dd8129 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 802 536 319 Need help? contact support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

Abstract:
The ECHO program is a collaborative initiative aimed at better understanding and managing the cumulative impact of commercial vessel activities on at-risk whales throughout the southern coast of British Columbia, Canada and shared US waters. Underwater noise produced by commercial vessels has been identified as a key threat by Fisheries and Oceans Canada in a number of at-risk whale recovery strategies. With primary shipping routes through the region transiting critical habitat for an endangered resident killer whale population comprising just 80 individuals, the collaborative initiative is advancing a series of individual research projects to inform the development of mitigation and management options that will lead to a quantifiable reduction of noise impacts from vessels. Orla Robinson will provide an overview of the ECHO Program and projects, as well as progress towards reducing vessel noise threats. Jason Wood will highlight key findings from two ECHO projects including: regional ambient noise baseline analysis and a comparison of Southern Resident killer whale response to noise from commercial vessels (ships) and whale watch boats. BIOs "rla Robinson provides strategic advice and direction to Vancouver Fraser Port Authority on issues that intersect both port related activities and at-risk whale species. She has led the development of, and is Program Manager for, the Enhancing Cetacean Habitat and Observation (ECHO) Program. The ECHO program is a collaborative research and management initiative which coordinates the efforts and resources of multiple stakeholders to better understand and manage the potential threats to at-risk whale species that may arise from commercial vessel activities throughout the southern coast of British Columbia. "rla is an experienced environmental specialist with over 18 years technical experience working on a broad range of environmental projects, including: collaborative research programs; environmental impact assessments; regulatory approvals; hydrogeological and hydrological assessments; water resource assessments; contaminated site investigations and soil and groundwater remediation projects. "rla holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Earth Sciences from University College Cork, Ireland and a Masters degree in Hydrogeology and Groundwater Resources from University College London, UK. Jason Wood manages the SMRU Consulting North America offices (USA and Canada). He has over 15 years of experience studying acoustic ecology and behaviour in airborne, substrate (i.e. seismic), and waterborne communication. Following his PhD at the University of California, Davis, he held post-doctoral fellowships at Stanford University in the Geophysics and Otolaryngology departments. Following this he taught an undergraduate field based bioacoustics course through the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories for Beam Reach and is currently an affiliate assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Washington. He also led the research department at The Whale Museum in Friday Harbor. For the past decade his work has focused on marine mammals and the potential impacts of anthropogenic sounds on these animals. These studies have involved the development of complex study designs and the implementation of acoustic, statistical and, spatial analyses and modelling.

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18 April 2017

Title: Sea Changes: Legal Fallouts of US Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing in the Pacific
Presenter(s): Mary X. Mitchell, Ph.D., Cornell University
Date & Time: 18 April 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Mary X. Mitchell, Atkinson Postdoctoral Fellow in Sustainability at Cornell University For remote access: If you are unable to attend in person, please register for the webinar Sea Changes: Legal Fallouts of US Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing in the Pacific to occur on Apr 18, 2017 2:00 PM EDT at: https://goo.gl/f4W65Y After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
Constituting nearly seventy-one percent of the Earth's surface, oceans form thick boundary zones between sovereign powers. Although modern writers have often portrayed them as universal non-places unbound from territorial sovereignty, oceans have remained imperfectly territorialized places of encounter, commerce, and conflict. During the 1940s and 1950s the United States tested 67 of its most powerful nuclear weapons in Oceania in the lands and waters of the Marshall Islands. Confronted with the specter of nuclear contamination, antinuclear activists turned to the law as a means of protesting America's Pacific nuclear tests. This paper explores activists' legal strategies in confronting fallout as a problem on and for the oceans. It examines the emergence and growth of oceanic nonviolent direct action from the 1950s onward, exploring the affordances for protest that activists saw (and continue to see) in the environmental conditions, legal regimes, and technological mediation of ocean spaces.

Bio(s):
Dr. Mary X. Mitchell earned her Ph.D. in history and sociology of science from the University of Pennsylvania. Before beginning her doctorate, she worked in university research and intellectual property management, earned her J.D., practiced law in Pennsylvania, and served as a law clerk to Judge Anthony J. Scirica of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. Her work focuses on the intersections of nuclear science and technology with environmental law and social movements.

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Title: Wildfire and Smoke: Understanding and Predicting Hazards in Alaska
Presenter(s): Randi Jandt, Alaska Fire Science Consortium fire ecologist, UAF; Martin Stuefer, Geophysical Institute associate research professor, UAF; Stacey Cooper, Environmental Public Health Program health assessor, State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Date & Time: 18 April 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Randi Jandt, Alaska Fire Science Consortium fire ecologist, UAF Martin Stuefer, Geophysical Institute associate research professor, UAF Stacey Cooper, Environmental Public Health Program health assessor, State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services Seminar sponsor: This webinar, organized jointly by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy For remote access: http://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=a40ad9cbfa&e=9097598e1a.

Abstract:
This webinar will focus on changing wildfires in Alaska and resulting smoke impacts to help our audience be prepared for the upcoming wildfire season. Randi Jandt will summarize the evidence for changing wildfire seasons and therefore smoke moving into new areas of the state. Martin Stuefer will share information about the WRF-Chem model for forecasting smoke dispersion, which will be operational for 2017. Stacey Cooper will summarize what is known about health effects of smoke exposure and how communities should respond to smoke events. We will provide a list of resources for follow up.

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19 April 2017

Title: Take your publications to the next level with NOAA Author Services
Presenter(s): Sarah Davis, MLS, and Jamie Roberts, MLS, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 19 April 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Davis, MLS, and Jamie Roberts, MLS, Bibliometrics Librarians, NOAA Central Library POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Library Reference Desk: (Library.Reference@noaa.gov); Sarah Davis (sarah.davis@noaa.gov); Jamie Roberts (jamie.roberts@noaa.gov). For remote access: If you are unable to attend in person, please register for the webinar at: https://goo.gl/wTSuDN After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
The NOAA Central Library (NCL) offers a number of services to help NOAA researchers. Join us to learn how NCL can help you improve your research and publishing game. We offer assistance with citation management, author IDs, and DOIs to help improve your writing process and make it easier to track your work. And learn how citation analysis and the NOAA Institutional Repository can take your publications to the next level. Whether you want to publish your research or are looking to showcase the value of your work, we're here to help at every step of the way.

Bio(s):
Sarah Davis received her M.L.S from the University of Maryland and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2008. She heads the bibliometrics team and also works with the NOAA Institutional Repository and the library website. Her favorite cephalopod is the cuttlefish. Jamie Roberts received her M.L.S. from the Catholic University of America and came to the NOAA Central Library from the Library of Congress Rare Books and Special Collections Division in 2016. She is on the bibliometrics team, works with our special collections and can be found at the reference desk two afternoons a week. Her favorite cephalopod is ghost octopus.

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Title: Biological Mechanisms of Marine Invasions
Presenter(s): Katherine Papacostas, PhD, Scientific/Technical Writer, Contractor for ECS Federal within NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology's Statistics Division
Date & Time: 19 April 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Katherine Papacostas, PhD, Scientific/Technical Writer, Contractor for ECS Federal within NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology's Statistics Division. And presenting on behalf of co-authors, including Elizabeth Rielly-Carroll, Samuel Georgian, Dustin Long, Sarah Princiotta, Andrea Quattrini, Kim Reuter and Amy Freestone

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
With expanding trade resulting in increased global transport of non-native species, a broader understanding of the mechanisms of marine invasions is becoming increasingly crucial. Yet our understanding of marine invasions lags behind that of terrestrial invasions, including our understanding of fundamental biological mechanisms that influence marine invasion success. We therefore conducted a systematic search of over 3,000 peer-reviewed papers to review the marine invasion literature, identify overarching patterns, and help direct future research. The study focused on four biological mechanisms: negative interactions (e.g., Limiting Similarity, Biotic Resistance, Enemy Release, Novel Weapons), positive interactions, invader traits, and post-introduction evolution, as they relate to understanding marine invasion success. A total of 470 studies (264 non-native species) were reviewed, resulting in the largest review of biological mechanisms of marine invasions to date. Negative interactions and invader traits received the majority of attention in the literature. Most negative interaction studies documented an increase in invasion success resulting from avoidance or release from competitors or consumer pressure. Consumer pressure, and predation in particular, compared to competition was more commonly documented as a mechanism that can limit invasion success. Despite limited evaluation, positive interactions and post-introduction evolution showed potential for enhancing invasion success. Invader trait studies highlighted the importance of life history and stress tolerance traits. Future studies that examine interactions at multiple scales and utilize multi-faceted approaches, molecular techniques, and predictive modeling will enhance our knowledge and ability to develop strategies to protect native ecosystems.

Bio(s):
Katherine Papacostas has a theoretical and applied research background in biological invasions, community ecology, fisheries and marine resource management. She obtained a Ph.D. in biology from Temple University in 2014, where she researched marine invasion dynamics and trophic interactions across spatial and temporal scales. Upon finishing her doctoral work, she held a 6-month position as an adjunct research professor at Temple University, writing several publications and collaborating on a project examining biogeographic variability in species interactions and invasion success. In 2015, Katherine joined the non-profit organization Conservation International as an assistant scientist, where she worked in their Science Division on large-scale marine resource management and methods for assessing data-limited fisheries with colleagues and government partners in the south Pacific, North and South America, and Europe. Currently, Katherine is a scientific/technical writer with ECS Federal, LLC, contracting in the NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology's Statistics Division. There she supports their Marine Recreational Information Program (a federal initiative that coordinates a nationwide data collection effort targeting saltwater fishing activity) by producing reports, publications, in-reach materials and outreach materials on recreational fisheries survey designs, data collection protocols and statistical estimation procedures.

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Title: Physical and Biological Drivers of Zooplankton Communities in the Chukchi Sea
Presenter(s): Adam Spear, Research Oceanographer, NOAA, AFSC, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 19 April 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Oceanographer Room (Building 3, Room 2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, NE NOAA Dr, Seattle, WA 98115, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Adam Spear, Research Oceanographer, NOAA, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/). Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract:
As part of the Chukchi Acoustic, Oceanographic, and Zooplankton (CHAOZ) project, this research highlights the main physical and biological drivers of zooplankton communities in the US Chukchi Sea in the summer of 2010, 2011 and 2012.

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20 April 2017

Title: Population genomics of geographic range expansion in the invasive lionfish, Pterois volitans
Presenter(s): Ellie Bors, PhD, 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Executive Fellow, NOAA Office of International Affairs
Date & Time: 20 April 2017
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ellie Bors, PhD, 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Executive Fellow, NOAA Office of International Affairs For remote access: If you are unable to attend in person, please register for the Knauss webinars occurring on Thursday, April 20th at: https://goo.gl/2fgoqp (Note: This link will also provide access to Emily Osborne, PhD, 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Executive Fellow, Arctic Research Program, Climate Program Office, NOAA OAR, presenting on the History and Future of Ocean Acidification in the California Current Ecosystem at 12:30pm). After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
Describing the genomic legacies of range expansions is a critical step towards predicting the evolutionary and ecological outcomes of shifting species distributions due to global climate change and species invasions. The invasion of the Indo-Pacific lionfish, Pterois volitans, into waters off the US East Coast, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Sea provides a natural model to study rapid range expansion in an invasive tropical marine fish with high dispersal capabilities. During range expansions, strong genetic drift characterized by repeated founder events can result in decreased genetic diversity with increased distance from the center of the historic range, or the point of invasion. I will present results from 12,759 loci sequenced by restriction enzyme associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq). While genome-level analyses are consistent with previous findings of low to no spatially explicit metapopulation genetic structure in the Caribbean Sea, genetic diversity of the lionfish throughout the invaded range is not homogeneous and correlates with expansion pathway. Observed heterozygosity decreases with distance from Florida while expected heterozygosity stays mostly constant, indicating population genetic disequilibrium correlated with distance from the point of invasion. I will also discuss outlier analyses that identify loci putatively under selection in the invasion.

Bio(s):
Ellie was born and raised in Seattle, Washington. She attended Oberlin College and Conservatory of Music where she earned a B.A. in Biology and a B.Music in Cello Performance. She recently completed her Ph.D. in the joint program in oceanography between MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Ellie is currently a 2017 Knauss fellow in the NOAA Office of International Affairs.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The History and Future of Ocean Acidification in the California Current Ecosystem
Presenter(s): Emily Osborne, PhD, 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Executive Fellow, NOAA OAR Climate Program Office Arctic Research Program
Date & Time: 20 April 2017
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Emily Osborne, PhD, 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Executive Fellow, Arctic Research Program, Climate Program Office, NOAA OAR POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter judith.salter@noaa.gov; Library Reference Desk: Library.Reference@noaa.gov For remote access: If you are unable to attend in person, please register for the Knauss webinars occurring on Thursday, April 20th at: https://goo.gl/2fgoqp (Note: This link will also provide access to the webinar Population genomics of geographic range expansion in the invasive lionfish, Pterois volitans, presented by Dr. Ellie Bors at 12pm). After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
The oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon mitigates climate change, but also results in global ocean acidification (OA) and a corresponding reduction in carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]). Here, we use the calcification history recorded by fossil shells of calcifying zooplankton preserved in marine sediments to reconstruct the progression of OA over the last century in the central California Current Ecosystem (CCE). This record indicates a 20% reduction in calcification translating to a 35% decline in [CO32-] over the 20th century. Our reconstruction also indicates that upwelling strength and shifts in surface current patterns have a profound effect on the carbonate chemistry of the CCE, an observation that has been obscured by the relatively short duration of observational time-series. We observe significant interannual to decadal modulation of ocean acidification in the CCE are related to Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the El Niño Southern Oscillation, suggesting that these climate modes will continue to play an important role in the progression of OA in this region. Despite such modulation, the anthropogenic signal is large, with the reconstructed history of OA in the CCE implying very low CO32- levels in the near future.

Bio(s):
Emily is a South Carolina Sea Grant Fellow originally from Virginia. She has an undergraduate degree in Geology from the College of Charleston (2012) and a PhD in Marine Science from the University of South Carolina (2016). Emily is currently a 2017 Knauss fellow in the Arctic Research Program (Climate Program Office, NOAA OAR).

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Capacity shortfalls hindering the performance of marine protected areas globally
Presenter(s): David Gill, Ph.D., David H. Smith Post-doctoral fellow, Conservation International/George Mason University
Date & Time: 20 April 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
David Gill, Ph.D., David H. Smith Post-doctoral fellow, Conservation International/George Mason University Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7723865057762142467

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Over the last two decades, marine protected areas (MPAs) have become a prominent tool used to conserve marine ecosystems globally, however many unanswered questions remain regarding the ecological impacts of MPAs and the linkages between MPA management and resulting impacts. Using a global database of management and fish population data (433 and 218 MPAs, respectively) we find that most MPAs positively impact marine fish populations, and that the magnitude of these impacts are strongly associated with available staff and budget capacity. However, despite the critical role of MPA management, only 35 percent of MPAs globally reported acceptable funding and only 9 percent globally reported adequate staffing. While the global community focuses on expanding the current MPA network, these results emphasize the importance of meeting capacity needs in current and future MPAs to ensure the effective conservation of marine species.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Habitat, Toxics and Salmon in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary
Presenter(s): Lyndal Johnson, Supervisory Zoologist, Environmental and Fisheries Sciences Division/ Ecotoxicology Program
Date & Time: 20 April 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Lyndal Johnson, Supervisory Zoologist, NOAA/NMFS/NWFSC, Environmental and Fisheries Sciences Division/ Ecotoxicology Program

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D526935352%26UID%3D4647882352%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAN_oul_Msj6_8yI0LUdDakhEeIYXrTL5IqSLlWOiMbsKCIN_5brDyh6G_5m2Ys4C-ztaRoVXncLpId1FyyQz9Sv0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm534c3e1cf2a5377453ead1c750dd8129 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 802 536 319 ABSTRACT The Columbia River Basin was historically one of the largest producers of Pacific salmon in the world. However, human activities such as dredging, diking, and development of low-lying areas, urbanization and industrialization, and the construction of the hydropower system have significantly reduced the quantity and quality of habitat available to salmon, and returns of wild fish have declined to the point where multiple Columbia River and Snake River salmon stocks are listed as threatened or endangered under the US Endangered Species Act. To better understand the factors influencing salmon stocks in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, since 2005 NOAA Fisheries and other partner organizations have been collecting coordinated salmon, salmon prey, habitat, and contaminant and water quality data in collaboration with the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership as part of their Ecosystem Monitoring Program. The primary focus of the program is on emergent wetland habitats in the tidal freshwater portion of the estuary. Multiple sites have been sampled in seven of the eight hydrogeomorphic reaches of Lower Columbia River, including several fixed sites sampled annually for the assessment of trends. A synthesis of the data collected over the past ten years reveals distinctive seasonal and spatial patterns in fish community composition, salmon habitat occurrence, genetic stock composition, contaminant exposure, and other parameters. These habitats support Chinook salmon from multiple stocks, as well as coho and Chinook salmon, and more rarely, sockeye salmon and steelhead. In general, moving upriver, we have observed increased species diversity, richness, and abundance of non-native species; a shift in available prey from Diptera and Hemiptera to Copepods and Cladocerans; increased proportions of marked hatchery fish; and increased proportions of Chinook salmon from Interior Columbia River stocks. Chemical contaminant concentrations are generally higher in salmon from sites near or below the near urbanized areas of the estuary such as Portland and Vancouver, with body concentrations of persistent organic pollutants reaching levels associated with toxic effects in some samples. Chinook salmon growth rate and lipid content also vary by river reach in the estuary. At the multi-year sampling sites, to date we see have seen little evidence of increasing or decreasing trends in the parameters we measure, but have observed unusual patterns of juvenile salmon occurrence in extreme weather years such as 2015. Our findings overall confirm the importance of freshwater tidal habits to juvenile salmon, as well as the widespread impact of human activities even in many of the least disturbed areas of the Lower Columbia Estuary. BIO Lyndal Johnson is a supervisory zoologist at the NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, Washington, with the Environmental and Fisheries Sciences Division Ecotoxicology Program. She studies the effects of chemical contaminants and related human activities on the health of marine and estuarine organisms and provides technical guidance to resource managers on how to project marine animals from harmful impacts of toxicants. Since 2005 she has been working with the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership to examine salmon occurrence and condition, habitat quality, and toxicant exposure in the Lower Columbia River. She also works closely with the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife to monitor the health of Puget Sound marine and anadromous fish as part of the Puget Sound Ecosystem Monitoring Program, in studies involving polycylic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure and liver disease in flatfish, and impacts of endocrine disrupting compounds on English sole and Chinook salmon. She has also taken part in several studies in the Pacific Northwest and Canada to assess damages to marine resources associated with chemical contaminant inputs. Ms. Johnson earned a B.S. degree in Biology from Western Washington State University and an M.S. degree in Fisheries at the University of Washington, and has been working at the Center since 1984.

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24 April 2017

Title: Reintroducing the MIMIC-TPW global composite of water vapor from polar-orbiting satellites
Presenter(s): Tony Wimmers, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Date & Time: 24 April 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: 8th Floor Conference Room Aerospace Building 10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham MD 20706
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tony Wimmers, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies University of Wisconsin - Madison

Sponsor(s):
JPSS April Science Seminar. POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Telecon: 877-401-9225 pc- 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=md546f638303dc9d8fb016df6cda9f573 Meeting number: 747 012 901 Meeting password: Jpss2017!

Abstract:
Creating a global composite of total precipitable water (TPW) presents unique challenges and opportunities for advanced satellite data integration techniques. TPW is a long-lived tracer, meaning that it normally moves with a background wind field without substantially changing its properties for about 9-18 hours. Meanwhile, the revisit time between polar-orbiting satellite observations averages about 4-6 hours. This makes TPW an ideal candidate for data compositing using an added adjustment for advection with the wind, which we call “blended advection” or “morphological compositing.” This approach results in a more accurate, highly fluid, and more intuitively sound depiction of water vapor in the atmosphere. This is a “reintroduction” of MIMIC-TPW because although the product has been around since 2008, it has been substantially enhanced under the JPSS Risk Reduction program. One important change is the new application of MIRS retrievals of TPW over land, which allows for an hourly visualization of moisture moving far inland from the ocean through atmospheric rivers and frontal systems, fueling severe weather events. This talk will cover how morphological compositing is carried out, what a forecaster needs to consider when interpreting this new form of derived product, and what are the larger implications for applying these methods to atmospheric imagery.

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25 April 2017

Title: Using Movement Patterns to Reduce Bycatch in West Coast Fisheries
Presenter(s): Chugey Sepulveda, PhD, Director of Research and Education, Pfleger Institute of Environmental Research,www.PIER.org; chugey@pier.org. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring
Date & Time: 25 April 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Chugey Sepulveda, PhD, Director of Research and Education, Pfleger Institute of Environmental Research, PIER (www.PIER.org; chugey@pier.org). Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
This seminar will focus on how recent movement studies were used to design and test novel fishing gear for the California coast. Using depth data from both target and bycatch, the research team designed a low-impact gear type that targets swordfish deep-during the day. Off the West Coast, strategic targeting is critical given the high degree of spatial overlap exhibited between swordfish and several species of special concern (i.e., marine mammals and sea turtles). Deep-set buoy gear is now being tested by cooperative fishers under an exempted permit issued through the Pacific Fisheries Management Commission (PFMC). To date the work has demonstrated high selectivity for swordfish with marketable catch making up over 97% of the catch. The team is now expanding the design to accommodate larger vessels and offshore fishing conditions. The seminar will touch upon several of the NOAA-funded projects that have collectively contributed to the development of this west coast gear type.

Bio(s):
Chugey Sepulveda, is the director of research and education at the Pfleger Institute of Environmental Research (PIER) in Oceanside, California. PIER is a non-profit research institute dedicated to the advancement of sustainable fisheries management through applied field research and public education. At PIER, Sepulveda has concentrated on addressing important questions related to the sustainable management of several marine fish species. In particular, Sepulveda is focused on the use of pelagic fish movements and physiology to design and develop alternative gear options for pelagic species. Sepulveda has a long history working collaboratively with fishermen, researchers and managers to address bycatch issues in current day fisheries. Sepulveda is an advocate of sustainable fishing operations and enjoys the ocean on many levels.

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26 April 2017

Title: NOAA Unified Modeling Task Force Overview
Presenter(s): Jason Link, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service
Date & Time: 26 April 2017
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jason Link (NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service) Panelists: John Dunne (NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory), Scott Cross (NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS)), Chris Brown (NOAA NESDIS), and more to come

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Unified Modeling Task Force and NOAA CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program Seminar POC: Daniel.Barrie@noaa.gov REMOTE ACCESS INFORMATION: - Link: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=ecd13bf333068207bb3dddbe6ffb2d451 - Passcode: 20910 - For audio: after logging on to the WebEx, click "I will call in" (to hear audio via phone). Make sure to enter both the access code and attendee ID #.

Abstract:
In April 2016 NOAA's Research Council established the Unified Modeling Task Force (UMTF) as a cross-NOAA effort designed to develop a common framework for model interoperability and facilitate transdisciplinary collaborations among (and beyond) NOAA modelers, and to develop a unified modeling approach for the agency. The UMTF includes appointed members from all of NOAA's Line Offices. It recently published a NOAA Technical Report*** defining an approach for unified modeling at NOAA, including key elements of unified modeling and high-priority recommendations. This presentation will provide an overview of the Unified Modeling Task Force report, including main recommended actions: (1) Establish a Formal Body to Oversee Modeling (beyond the one-year mandate of the UMTF), (2) Establish a NOAA-Wide process for Information Exchange, (3) Procure Resources to Execute NOAA-Wide Modeling, (4) Define Best Practices in NOAA Modeling, (5) Establish Regular Review for Model Redundancy and Retention, (6) Make HPC More Accessible to all of NOAA. Next steps, recommended by the Research Council as a follow-up to the report, will also be outlined. *** Report available at: ftp://ftp.library.noaa.gov/noaa_documents.lib/NOAA_UMTF/UMTF_overview_2017.pdf

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27 April 2017

Title: How to be fast when you're cold, phytoplankton adaptations to cold temperature
Presenter(s): Dr. Jodi Young, Assistant Professor, School of Oceanography, Future of Ice
Date & Time: 27 April 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Jodi Young, Assistant Professor, School of Oceanography, Future of Ice

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D526935352%26UID%3D4647882352%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAN_oul_Msj6_8yI0LUdDakhEeIYXrTL5IqSLlWOiMbsKCIN_5brDyh6G_5m2Ys4C-ztaRoVXncLpId1FyyQz9Sv0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm534c3e1cf2a5377453ead1c750dd8129 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 802 536 319 Need help? contact support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412 ABSTRACT TBD

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28 April 2017

Title: Forty-two years in meteorology: vive la revolution
Presenter(s): Glenn White, NOAA/NCEP/EMC
Date & Time: 28 April 2017
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Auditorium, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Glenn White, NOAA/NCEP/EMC
POC: Michiko MAsutani (Michiiko.masutani@noaa.gov)

Title:
Forty-two years in meteorology: vive la revolution
Date, Time: April 28, 2017 at 10:30 am NCWCP Auditorium
Presentation: http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2017/White_april28e.pptx
Youtube: https://youtu.be/PpfvP8bWByo

Abstract:
http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/abstract.2017/White.html

Sponsor EMC seminar.
Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar.

Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the eminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Can't join the meeting? Contact support here:
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Disaster Needs: Sea Grant/Private Sector Partnership Serves Impacted Sectors and Prepares for Future Events (Sea Grant Brown Bag Seminar)
Presenter(s): Dr. Stephen Sempier, Gulf of Mexico Sea Grant and Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium; Scott Lundgren NOAA Office of Response and Restoration, Emergency Response Division
Date & Time: 28 April 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Stephen Sempier, Gulf of Mexico Sea Grant Oil Spill Science Outreach Manager and Deputy Director at Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium; Scott Lundgren is Chief of the Emergency Response Division (ERD) in the NOAA Office of Response and Restoration

Sponsor(s):
National Sea Grant Program; NOAA Central Library; POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Program Coordinator: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); NOAA Central Library Reference Desk (Library.Reference@noaa.gov); National Sea Grant Extension Leader: Samuel Chan (samuel.chan@noaa.gov); Dr. Stephen Sempier (stephen.sempier@usm.edu); Scott Lundgren (scott.lundgren@noaa.gov). For remote access: If you are unable to attend in person, please register for Disaster Needs: Sea Grant/Private Sector Partnership Serves Impacted Sectors and Prepares for Future Events (Sea Grant Brown Bag Seminar). NEW Webinar Link: https://goo.gl/FxONur After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
In 2010, the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill became the largest accidental oil spill in history. Existing NOAA personnel, such as the Scientific Support Coordinators (SSC) in NOS, rapidly mobilized. Nonetheless, this unprecedented spill taxed usual response and science coordination constructs. Staff at the four Gulf of Mexico Sea Grant College Programs collaborated to answer a plethora of questions from leaders throughout the region. The response and research communities did not yet have complete answers to many of those questions. Concurrently, the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) began their 10-year, $500 million investment to research some topics that are of interest to people whose livelihoods depend on a healthy Gulf of Mexico. By 2014, GoMRI and the four Gulf of Mexico Sea Grant College programs formed a partnership to learn about people's ongoing questions and share the latest peer reviewed research results with groups impacted by the spill. Through GoMRI support, the Sea Grant Oil Spill Science Outreach Program began. Now this Sea Grant outreach program is collaborating with NOAA entities and others. This presentation highlights how this effective public/private partnership formed, methods used to extend the two-way dialogue with impacted sectors, how the program is being evaluated, and the plan to extend this Sea Grant extension model to a national level. The presentation will also highlight the cross line cooperation between Sea Grant and NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R) that leverages the science outreach expertise of Sea Grant with the operational scientific support and injury assessment roles of OR&R to create a unique extension and engagement program.

Bio(s):
Stephen Sempier is the Gulf of Mexico Sea Grant Oil Spill Science Outreach Manager and Deputy Director at Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium. He has led or coordinated several Gulf-wide, NOAA-supported projects during the last ten years, including coordinating the development of the Gulf of Mexico Research Plan and managing a NOAA Restoration Center community-based program that addressed hydrologic restoration in the Gulf of Mexico. As part of his current position, he leads a team of five Sea Grant extension and communications professionals that translate oil spill science for diverse audiences. Steve received a B.S. in marine science at Eckerd College, M.S. in marine resource management at Oregon State University, and Ph.D. in coastal sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi. Scott Lundgren is the Chief of the Emergency Response Division (ERD) in the NOAA Office of Response and Restoration where he leads scientific support in spill preparedness and response to 150 coastal oil and chemical pollution emergencies annually. Prior to NOAA, Scott served as a 23 year civilian employee of the Coast Guard in a variety environmental response and incident management positions from the field to headquarters, most recently serving as the senior technical advisor to the national Marine Environmental Response program office. He holds master's degrees in Natural Resources Management/Biology from Harvard University Extension School and in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College, and a Bachelor of Science in Biology and Environmental Studies from Tufts University. As Chief of NOAA's ERD, Scott leads a multidisciplinary team with a 40 year history of answering key scientific questions for preparedness and response to spills through its regionally based Scientific Support Coordinators and a technical and scientific support staff in Seattle.

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1 May 2017

Title: Playing Matchmaker for a NOAA Spotlight Species: Saving the Endangered White Abalone
Presenter(s): Dr. Kristin Aquilino, UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory
Date & Time: 1 May 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Kristin Aquilino, Assistant Project Scientist at UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
NMFS/OPR/ESD; POC: Therese Conant (therese.conant@noaa.gov), Endangered Species Division; NOAA Central Library; POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Library Reference Desk: (Library.Reference@noaa.gov). For remote access: If you are unable to attend in person, please register for the webinar here: https://goo.gl/oq8ntn

Abstract:
Do you want the good news or the bad news first? How about both at once: We think there are now more endangered white abalone in captivity than remain in the wild. While this highlights the critical state of wild white abalone, it also demonstrates the huge success of the white abalone captive breeding program. Intense overfishing of this tasty marine snail landed it a spot on the endangered species list in 2001 -- the first marine invertebrate to be listed. With remaining wild white abalone so far apart from one another that they were unable to reproduce successfully, experts determined that captive breeding and outplanting were the best ways to save the species. After early breeding efforts were hampered by disease, the program headquarters moved to UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory in 2011. Between antibiotic cleansing baths and exfoliating, coconut oil and beeswax treatments, our white abalone healthcare plan now reads like a relaxing spa retreat. With healthy animals and a great deal of collaboration among scientists, aquarists, and aquaculturists to help get the animals “in the mood” for spawning, captive production has skyrocketed, from just a few dozen produced during the 2012 spawning season to nearly 10,000 in 2016. NOAA lists white abalone as one of its eight “Species in the Spotlight,” those species most at risk of going extinct in the near future. Happily, captive breeding efforts bring new hope to recovery efforts, and we are excited to start pilot outplanting work in collaboration with state and federal agencies in the next few years. Our current research focuses on reproductive conditioning, improving post-settlement survival, and enhancing the genetic integrity of our broodstock. By replacing overhead pipes with towering kelp forests and swapping out submersible pumps for steady ocean swells, we hope our precious baby snails might save their species from extinction.

Bio(s):
Dr. Kristin Aquilino is an Assistant Project Scientist at University of California, Davis, Bodega Marine Laboratory and directs the White Abalone Captive Breeding Program. She graduated with comprehensive honors with a Bachelor of Science degree in Zoology and a certificate in Environmental Studies from University of Wisconsin - Madison in 2005 and received her PhD in Population Biology from UC Davis in 2011, after which she joined the white abalone program. Dr. Aquilino recently received the inaugural NOAA "Species in the Spotlight Hero Recognition Award" for her work with with abalone. She has a strong interest in forming meaningful and robust connections among science, restoration, and aquaculture, as well as communicating science to a broad audience, as exemplified by her commitment to science outreach and education. Website: http://kristinaquilino.weebly.com/

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3 May 2017

Title: Out of the Vault: Storm Stories!
Presenter(s): Albert "Skip" Theberge, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 3 May 2017
11:00 am - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series The NOAA Central Library will hold it's latest Out of the Vault exhibit, Storm Stories!, displaying our rarest items on severe weather from 16th century shipwrecks to modern-day superstorms. Browse collection: 11AM-2PM Collections "Book talk": 12PM-12:45PM

Presenter(s):
Albert "Skip" Theberge, NOAA Central Library POC: Judith Salter, NOAA Central Library (judith.salter@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the "book talk" via webinar: https://goo.gl/c87yIi Some images will also be shared via the NOAA Libraries Facebook page during the event: https://goo.gl/dvhl1e

Abstract:
Join us for another "Out of the Vault" NOAA Central Library presentation and display. This event will highlight Rare Books from the legacy collections of the old Weather Bureau Library. Imagery and text from the 16th century to present day will be highlighted in this presentation and many of the rare books on meteorology and related subjects will be on display. Early impressions of lightning, blizzards, floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, and, instead of raining cats and dogs, raining rats, frogs, and fish. A fun and informative presentation highlighting the weather-related legacy collections of the NOAA Central Library.

Bio(s):
Skip Theberge, acting head of reference at the NOAA Central Library, retired from NOAA Corps in 1995 after 27 years of primarily hydrographic surveying and seafloor mapping. Since joining the Library he has become quite familiar with the rare books in the library special collections and was heavily involved in the development and dedication of the Library's Charles Fitzhugh Talman Special Collections Room. Besides Library duties, he has remained active in the ocean mapping community having served for 12 years on the Advisory Committee for Undersea Features of the United States Board on Geographic Names and for three years on its international counterpart. He was part of the NOAA science team that helped design the Sant Ocean Hall of the Smithsonian Institution Museum of Natural History. He is the history editor of Hydro International magazine and the author of over 80 papers dealing with the history of hydrographic and geodetic surveying, seafloor mapping, and various aspects of oceanography. He is a recipient of both a Department of Commerce Gold Medal Award and a NOAA Distinguished Career Award.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

4 May 2017

Title: The Use of Culturally Significant Area Criteria in an Ecosystem Approach to Management Processes
Presenter(s): Robert G. Adlam PhD, Associate Professor and Head of Anthropology, Mount Allison University; Interdisciplinary Studies, University of New Brunswick, Canada and Roland Cormier, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Institute for Coastal Research, Geesthacht, Germany
Date & Time: 4 May 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Note: This is a reprise of the Feb. 28 seminar when we had sound problems.

Presenter(s):
Robert G. Adlam PhD, Associate Professor and Head of Anthropology, Mount Allison University; Interdisciplinary Studies, University of New Brunswick, Canada and Roland Cormier, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Institute for Coastal Research, Geesthacht, Germany. Speakers are presenting remotely from Canada.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Despite the growing recognition of their importance, immaterial cultural values associated with the sea still tend to be neglected in marine spatial planning (MSP). This socio-cultural evidence gap is due to inherent difficulties in defining and eliciting cultural values, but also to difficulties in linking cultural values to specific places, thus enabling an area-based approach to management. This paper addresses three aspects that are important for including marine cultural values in MSP: Defining cultural values, identifying places of cultural importance, and establishing the relative significance of places of cultural importance.We argue that common classification schemes such as cultural ecosystem services can be a helpful starting point for identifying cultural values, but only go so far in capturing communities' cultural connections with the sea. A method is proposed for structuring a community-based narrative on cultural values and “spatialising” them for MSP purposes, using five criteria that can lead to the definition of “culturally significant areas”. A baseline of culturally significant areas is suggested as an aid to planners to pinpoint places where cultural connections to the sea are particularly strong. Throughout, we emphasise the need for participative processes.

Bio(s):
For the past twenty years, Robert Adlam has been working with Aboriginal and Euro-Canadian harvesters in north eastern New Brunswick, Canada. His research has centered on the relationship of each to the larger ecosystem with particular attention to their knowledge and harvesting practices. The insights gained through this work have proven valuable in his more recent undertakings around mapping areas of cultural significance and assessing the perceived risks from a community perspective. In 2016, Robert partnered with the Mi'kmaw Conservation Group " a body affiliated with the Confederacy of Mainland Mi'kmaq in Nova Scotia, Canada, to bring together scientific methods and Mi'kmaw community knowledge into an ecosystem monitoring project. Under this initiative, they plan to create a process for identifying culturally significant areas or features as well as assessing their resilience and adaptability for change. Robert is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at Mount Allison University and Adjunct Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at the University of New Brunswick. Roland Cormier holds an MSc in Biology from the “Université de Moncton” (Canada). He has more than 35 years of experience in fisheries, fish and seafood safety, environmental assessment as well as coastal and oceans management. He has worked at Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. In addition to being an Associate of the Institute of Estuarine & Coastal Studies at the University of Hull, United Kingdom, he is currently a guest scientist at Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Institute for Coastal Research in Geesthacht, Germany. His current interests are in environmental management from a legislative and policy analysis perspective, using ISO risk management standards and controls assessment. He is also a member of the International Council for the Exploration of Sea (ICES) working group on marine planning and coastal zone management and the Group of Experts on Risk Management in Regulatory Systems of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe. The present focus is on risk approaches to legislative systems of management controls in relation to UN sustainability goals. He is currently active as a consultant in environmental risk management in Europe, Canada and the United States as well as a lecturer in universities in Canada and Europe.

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Title: Environmental sensitivity of eggs and larvae of cod species in Arctic/sub-Arctic seas
Presenter(s): Dr. Ben Laurel, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 4 May 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Ben Laurel, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D526935352%26UID%3D4647882352%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAN_oul_Msj6_8yI0LUdDakhEeIYXrTL5IqSLlWOiMbsKCIN_5brDyh6G_5m2Ys4C-ztaRoVXncLpId1FyyQz9Sv0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm534c3e1cf2a5377453ead1c750dd8129 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 802 536 319 Need help? contact support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412 ABSTRACT Marine gadids represent some of the most commercially and ecologically important marine fish species in Arctic and sub-Arctic seas, but early life stages are challenging to study when these regions are ice covered during the winter-spring spawning period. To address this knowledge gap, the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center laboratory at the Hatfield Marine Science Center recently developed a multi-species broodstock program to investigate the thermal biology of cod species in Alaskan waters (Arctic cod, saffron cod, walleye pollock and Pacific cod). New experimental data on lipid content, development and growth indicate that changes in the spring thermal environment will expose early life stages to new ‘match-mismatch' scenarios that could favor certain species over others. These data and continued laboratory work are being applied to new investigations of connectivity, growth and ecotoxicology of gadids in the wake of warming and increased human interest in the Arctic. BIO Ben Laurel is a Research Fisheries Biologist with the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC) seawater laboratory at the Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) in Newport, OR. Ben received his MSc and PhD from Memorial University in Newfoundland, Canada before moving to Oregon in 2005 to begin his current position. Ben's research is primarily focused on studying the effects of temperature on the vital rates of eggs, larvae and juvenile marine fish in the Pacific Arctic/sub-Arctic complex. The primary goal of his research is to understand processes of dispersal, recruitment and biogeography of marine fish species in the wake of climate change. Much of his research is experimental, requiring larviculture and husbandry of Arctic species currently held in the AFSC-NOAA lab at the HMSC.

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8 May 2017

Title: Climate and Connectivity in the Coral Triangle
Presenter(s): Enrique Curchitser, PhD, Associate Professor, Rutgers University, and Joanie Kleypas, Marine Scientist, National Center for Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 8 May 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA, SSMC4, Rm 8150 or via webinar - see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Enrique Curchitser, PhD, Associate Professor, Rutgers University, and Joanie Kleypas, Marine Scientist, National Center for Atmospheric Research

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-host are Jasmin.John@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Possible this, but may change. Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
The Coral Triangle is home to the most biologically rich coral reef ecosystems in the world, but it is also one of the most threatened of all reef regions in the world. To better understand the impacts of climate change on reefs in the Coral Triangle, and their ability to recover following bleaching events, we designed and developed a series of high-resolution, numerical ocean models to address physical and ecological questions relevant to the region's coral communities. The hierarchy of models was designed to optimize the model performance in addressing questions ranging from the role of internal tides in larval connectivity to distinguishing the role of interannual variability from decadal trends in thermal stress leading to mass bleaching events. In this seminar we will show how combining ocean circulation with models of larval dispersal leads to new insights into the interplay of physics and ecology in this complex oceanographic region, which can ultimately be used to inform conservation efforts.

Bio(s):
Dr. Enrique Curchister is an associate professor in the Rutgers Dept. of Environmental Sciences. His primary research interests include ocean circulation and its role in the climate system, dynamics of boundary currents and shelf circulation, physical-biological interactions, development of coupled Earth System Models, and multi-scale climate dynamics and numerical modeling - visit the Churchitser Earth System Modeling Lab at Rutgers - ttp://oceanis.esm.rutgers.edu:8080/ Joanie Kleypas is a marine scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, who investigates how rising atmospheric carbon dioxide is affecting marine ecosystems, including both climate change and ocean acidification. She is currently using high-resolution oceanographic modeling to help identify coral reef refugia based on the expected impacts of climate change on adult populations and how their larvae are transported to other reefs. She is also maintaining a coral reef restoration project in Costa Rica.

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9 May 2017

Title: How are Coral Reef Fish doing in Hawai'i?
Presenter(s): Marc Nadon, Fishery Scientist, NOAA, NMFS, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center-PIFSC, and the Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research-JIMAR
Date & Time: 9 May 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Marc Nadon, Fishery Scientist, NOAA,NMFS,Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) and the Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (JIMAR). Speaker is presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
The coral reef fisheries of Hawaii are characterized by species-rich catch compositions and limited management resources. This leads to a notably data-poor situation for stock assessment. Recent efforts by NOAA to gather data through diver surveys, combined with new tools to estimate life history parameters, have allowed for the first assessment of Hawaiian coral reef fish populations to be conducted. These analyses suggest that 11 out of 27 assessed species may be experiencing overfishing. Long-lived species that are highly targeted by fishermen tended to be in poorer condition. Surgeonfishes and parrotfishes were families with the most vulnerable species, while goatfishes were generally in better condition"in all, these assessments suggest that the stock status of the giant trevally (“ulua”), five surgeonfishes, two goatfishes, and three parrotfishes are of concern.

Bio(s):
Marc Nadon is a fishery scientist with the Stock Assessment Program at the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC). His work is focused on assessing the status of data-poor coral reef fisheries in the Pacific region. Marc obtained a B.Sc. degree in biology from McGill University, a M.Sc. degree in marine ecology from Laval University, and completed a Ph.D. degree in fisheries science at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science in Miami. He has been working at PIFSC since 2006.

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10 May 2017

Title: Cancelled: National Snow Analysis: 13 Years of Operations
Presenter(s): Greg Fall, Physical Scientist, NOAA, NWS, Office of Water Prediction, Geointelligence Division
Date & Time: 10 May 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP Conference Room 2557, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Greg Fall, Physical Scientist, NOAA, NWS, Office of Water Prediction, Geointelligence Division

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; Point of contact is Ralph.R.Ferraro@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Webex link: https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=ed1e7223d8bc1d76b9dee1b99e0a28ea8 Password is password is NESDISOWP Call-in (toll) number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207, Access code: 995 382 585

Abstract:
Operational since October 2004, the National Snow Analysis (NSA) will complete its 13th year of operations in 2017. The NSA is a collection of operational products and services derived primarily from the Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS). SNODAS combines a mass and energy balance model of the surface snowpack over the CONUS and southern Canada, driven by numerical weather prediction (NWP) model analyses and forecasts, with an assimilation system that updates SNODAS states using observations collected by surface stations and surveyors, satellites, and aircraft (via NOAA's Airborne Snow Survey program). Clients of the NSA include NWS River Forecast Centers and other government agencies, emergency managers, policymakers, and the general public. The NSA provides clients with near-real-time raster data sets, imagery, basin averaged snowpack information, and a wide variety of other products available via an interactive web interface. Given its years of operations, the NSA now performs routine comparisons of SNODAS states with period-of-record (currently consisting of water years 2005-2016) normals, providing valuable context for real-time analyses. This presentation will provide an overview of the NSA and SNODAS, with some highlights from the winter of 2016-17.

Bio(s):
Greg Fall joined the National Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center (now the OWP"Chanhassen, MN) in 1999 and contributed to the design, development, and implementation of the Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS). He is currently the lead for the Office of Water Prediction's (OWP) National Snow Analysis function, which encompasses SNODAS and related products and services. Greg also serves as lead for the National Water Model Forcing Data Improvement Project and the Experimental Gridded Snowfall Analysis Project at OWP.

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Title: Validating the Global Ocean Prediction System version 3.1
Presenter(s): Alan J. Wallcraft, Naval Research Laboratory
Date & Time: 10 May 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Alan J. Wallcraft, Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) POC: Avichal Mehra Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Abstract:
The Global Ocean Forecast System (GOFS) 3.1 is comprised of the 1/12° HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) two"way coupled on the same grid to the Community Ice CodE (CICE) in a daily update cycle with the Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation (NCODA). Additionally it uses Improved Synthetic Ocean Profiles (ISOP) to project surface information downward into the water column. GOFS 3.1 nowcasts/forecasts the ocean's “weather”, which includes the three-dimensional ocean temperature, salinity and current structure, the surface mixed layer, the location of mesoscale features, and sea ice fields (including concentration, thickness and drift) in both hemispheres. It is scheduled to replace GOFS 3.0 for the ocean and the Arctic Cap Nowcast/Forecast System (ACNFS) for sea ice, both of which are the existing operational systems at the Naval Oceanographic Office. We describe the differences between GOFS 3.0 and GOFS 3.1 and compare both (and ACNFS) against unassimilated observations at both the nowcast time and as a function of forecast length.

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Title: Management Strategy Evaluation: Ideas and Application
Presenter(s): Curry Cunningham, PhD, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 10 May 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3, Rm 14400, Silver Spring, MD or via webinar; see remote access info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Curry Cunningham, PhD, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center.

Sponsor(s):
QUEST Webinar, NOAA Fisheries Quantitative Ecology and Socioeconomics Training (QUEST) Program; Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://goo.gl/h6BiUv

Abstract:
Efficient and sustainable management of exploited species depends upon tools for evaluating the outcome of alternative management actions, given system uncertainty and stochastic dynamics. Management strategy evaluation (MSE) methods simulate the biological, management, and harvest components of fisheries, to understand the influence of various sources of uncertainty on harvest policy outcomes. However, despite the utility of MSE in fisheries management there remains a lack of clarity regarding MSE purpose, design and best practice within the fisheries community. This seminar will describe the basic ideas behind MSE structure and function, while providing examples from multiple fisheries. Topics of discussion will include: the MSE process, considerations in operating model design, types of uncertainty typically confronted within an MSE, stakeholder involvement, and development of performance statistics. I will conclude with a recent example from my own research, a MSE of the Bristol Bay, Alaska commercial sockeye salmon fishery that evaluated management alternatives given, implementation uncertainty in the in-season management process as a result of mixed-stock harvest concerns and information delays, process variation in the form of periodic shifts between productivity regimes, and parameter uncertainty. About the speaker: Dr. Curry Cunningham is a Research Fishery Biologist with the Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Auke Bay Labs in Juneau, Alaska. His research focuses on the development of quantitative tools for improving fisheries management and understanding the processes that drive population dynamics. Dr. Cunningham uses applied statistics, Bayesian and maximum-likelihood methods, and simulation modelling to improve understanding of, and evaluate alternative management strategies for, Alaska's marine fish and salmon. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and an undergraduate degree from the University of British Columbia. Dr. Cunningham's previous research has encompassed a wide range to topics including: modelling spatial predator-prey relationships between bears and salmon across landscapes, developing tools for partitioning mixed-stock fishery catches based on age and genetic composition data, evaluating the evolutionary implications of natural and anthropogenic selection on salmon populations, and designing improved statistical methods for forecasting salmon run size and timing.

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Title: Finland's proposed meteorological cooperation under the Arctic Council
Presenter(s): Mr. Juhani Damski, Director-General of the Finnish Meteorological Institute, FMI
Date & Time: 10 May 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mr. Juhani Damski, Director-General of the Finnish Meteorological Institute, FMI. Seminar sponsor: Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium Webinar Series ACCAP Climate Webinar (https://accap.uaf.edu/webinars/virtual-alaska-weather-symposium)

Remote Access:
https://events-na11.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1083313451/en/events/event/shared/1216630002/event_registration.html?sco-id=1610662058&_charset_=utf-8 Other info: https://accap.uaf.edu/webinars

Abstract:
Finland's priorities during their Chairmanship of the Arctic Council are: Environmental Protection, Connectivity, Meteorology, and Education. The Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), which is part of the Ministry of Transportation, is the lead for the meteorology priority. As part of their meteorological cooperation program, FMI is proposing overarching themes that would include monitoring of the Arctic, especially the increased utilization of satellite date in operational activities and services; supporting research that aims to increase an understanding of the Arctic environment; and launching of new service concepts under the framework of the World Meteorological Organization to support Arctic functions and increase safety in the Arctic.

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Title: Predicting bycatch risk using dynamic ocean management approaches in the California Current
Presenter(s): Research Ecologist, SouthWest Fisheries Science Center Environmental Research Division
Date & Time: 10 May 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP, Conference Room #3555, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Elliot Hazen, Research Ecologist, SouthWest Fisheries Science Center Environmental Research Division

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group; POC: NOCCG Coordinator: Veronica P. Lance, PhD, NOAA, 301-683-3319, Veronica.Lance@noaa.gov; Nolvia Herrera, 301-683-3308, Nolvia.Herrera@noaa.gov For remote access: USA participants: 866-564-7828 Passcode: 9942991 WebEx Event Number: 998 412 439 WebEx Password: NOCCG Event address for attendees: https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=eff05256c3507bcedb75dad9e969c5477

Abstract:
Please note that the speaker will be presenting this talk remotely. Highly migratory species are inherently difficult to manage as they cross human-imposed jurisdictional boundaries in the open seas. Top predators face multiple human-induced threats such as ship-strike risk and non-target catch (bycatch) in fisheries. Current management approaches use large-scale seasonal closures to avoid bycatch of highly migratory predators, but here we explore a dynamic ocean management approach that tracks ocean features in space and time. Such targeted management approaches require an understanding of how distribution and abundance varies with the oceanic environment through time. Given these data are often sparse and are collected using multiple platforms, e.g. fisheries catch, fisheries independent surveys, and telemetry studies, an approach that synthesizes across data type would provide a more holistic understanding than a single approach alone. Here we explore the California Drift Gillnet fishery that targets swordfish, thresher shark, and mako shark, but also can catch a number of species as bycatch including sea lions, sea turtles, and blue sharks. While still in the formative stage, this tool uses habitat models and risk weightings to estimate catch / bycatch ratios as a function of management concern in near time. We have explored the tool in two years, 2012 and 2015 an average year and an El Niño year respectively, to examine how predicted patterns in catch and bycatch change. These approaches could be applied to other migratory species for which telemetry, catch, or survey data are available, and emphasizes the utility in integrating multiple data types for marine conservation and management.

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11 May 2017

Title: Disentangling the Net: Using Fish Biochronologies to Establish Climate-growth Relationships
Presenter(s): Matthew Dzaugis, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA Climate Program Office and U.S. Global Change Research Program
Date & Time: 11 May 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Matthew Dzaugis, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA's Climate Program Office and U.S. Global Change Research Program

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
Linkages between climate variability and the productivity and functioning of Gulf of Mexico marine ecosystems remain poorly described, largely due to a lack of time series sufficiently long to establish robust bio-physical relationships. To address this issue, multidecadal biochronologies were generated from otolith growth-increment widths of red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus), gray snapper (L. griseus), black drum (Pogonia cromis), and king mackerel (Scomberomorus cavalla) in the Gulf of Mexico. Synchronous growth patterns were evident among red snapper, gray snapper, and black drum, which all significantly (p < 0.05) correlated to one other, but not with king mackerel. Positive growth anomalies in the snapper and drum chronologies were associated with anomalously warm sea surface temperatures, southeast wind stress, and high sea level pressure in the western Atlantic during the early spring months, suggesting that an early transition from a winter to a summer climate pattern is favorable for growth. In contrast, the king mackerel chronology was dominated by decadal-scale patterns and significantly (p < 0.01) and negatively correlated to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Overall, these results show the importance of the spring transition for resident species in the northern Gulf of Mexico, that growth among individuals in a migratory species can be synchronous, and that differences in life history and geography are reflected in climate-biology relationships.

Bio(s):
Matt grew up in Massachusetts and attended the University of Maine, Orono where he earned a B.S. in Marine Science. He attended the University of Texas Marine Science Institute where he earned a M.S. in Marine Science. Matt is currently a 2017 Texas Sea Grant Knauss Fellow with the NOAA Climate Program Office and the U.S. Global Change Research Program.

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Title: The New He'eia National Estuarine Research Reserve
Presenter(s): Matthew Chasse, Coastal Management Specialist, NOAA Office for Coastal Management and Robert J. Toonan, Research Professor, Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology
Date & Time: 11 May 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Matthew Chasse, Coastal Management Specialist, NOAA Office for Coastal Management and Robert J. Toonan, Research Professor, Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5350663766126568451

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
A presentation on the newly designated He'eia National Estuarine Research Reserve, 29th in the system and the first in Hawaii.The 1,385-acre reserve includes upland forests and grasslands, wetlands, reefs and seagrass beds, as well as the largest sheltered body of water in the Hawaiian Island chain. The reserve includes significant historic and cultural resources. This webinar will cover process leading to the designation, and partnerships and management goals, including the integration of traditional Hawai'ian ecosystem management with contemporary approaches. https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/reserves/hawaii.html

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Title: Finding and Tracking the “Goldilocks Zone” for Carbon Cycling in a Great Lakes Watershed
Presenter(s): Dr. Bopaiah Biddanda, Ph.D., Grand Valley State University, Annis Water Resources Institute
Date & Time: 11 May 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Bopaiah Biddanda, Ph.D., Grand Valley State University, Annis Water Resources Institute Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4640516694952910082

Abstract:
For more than a decade, we have monitored the Muskegon Lake estuary, a model drowned river mouth system that is an Area of Concern with connectivity to the 2nd largest watershed in Michigan and Lake Michigan. Measured rates of carbon metabolism from upstream Muskegon River to offshore Lake Michigan show prevalence of high rates of gross production (GP), respiration (R), and net production (NP) in Muskegon Lake that decrease steeply along an offshore transect in Lake Michigan. Over the annual cycle, Muskegon Lake is net autotrophic suggesting that estuary/near-shore waters are net carbon sinks. Autotrophy was maximized in the coastal/estuary zone where longer residence times coincide with nutrient loading from the watershed. Indeed, the overall net autotrophic production in this coastal "Goldilocks Zone" may explain the highly productive resident and migratory fisheries of this Great Lakes estuary. Since spring 2011, using advanced observing technology, we have also been gathering high-resolution time-series data from meteorological and multi-depth water sensors through the Muskegon Lake buoy Observatory (MLO; www.gvsu.edu/buoy). MLO has revealed the intimate inner workings of Muskegon Lake such as how the estuary operates on a daily, monthly, seasonal, and yearly basis. For example, MLO has informed us about the annually recurring summer bottom water hypoxia and emergence of harmful cyanobacterial blooms (HABs) exposing daily and weekly oscillations in the severity of each. With additional moorings and sensor strings deployed lake-wide during 2005-06, we now have evidence that substantial but episodic intrusion of upwelled cold and high-dissolved oxygen water from nearshore Lake Michigan into the bottom waters of the estuary during the summer-stratified period may reduce the severity of both bottom water hypoxia and surface water HABs in this estuary. Open-access time-series data from the MLO is advancing science, and science-based education, outreach and restoration activities. However, continued operation of this sentinel regional infrastructure past the current year is in jeopardy due to severe funding scarcity.

Bio(s):
Dr. Bopaiah (Bopi) Biddanda is an aquatic microbial ecologist/carbon biogeochemist studying the movement of carbon driven by microbes in freshwater ecosystems. He has a Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of Georgia where he explored new mechanisms of carbon flux mediated by microbes in the sea. Subsequently, he went on research and teaching adventures at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (Germany), University of Texas Marine Science Institute, University of Rio Grande (Brazil) and University of Minnesota. Currently, as a professor of water resources at GVSU, he studies the microbial biogeochemistry of the Laurentian Great Lakes " including life in extreme environments, teaches classes in Marine Biology and Biogeochemistry, operates a world-class time-series buoy observatory in Muskegon Lake AOC, serves as a fellow of the Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research, and coordinates NASA's Michigan Space Grant Consortium programs for GVSU. Bopi is a recipient of the 2009 Chandler-Misener Award by the International Association for Great Lakes Research. He just returned from a sabbatical studying the response of oligotrophic high-mountain glacial lakes of Sierra Nevada (Spain) to increasing ultraviolet exposure and Saharan dust deposition. For the foreseeable future, he hopes to study Earth's lakes as sentinels of both local and global change, focusing on the changing carbon cycle in one of our most vital societal commons: freshwater.

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Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 11 May 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

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National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Understanding Invasive Species through Genetics, Genomics and Bioinformatics
Presenter(s): Dr. Carol Stepien, Ocean Environment Research Division Leader, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
Date & Time: 11 May 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Carol Stepien, Ocean Environment Research Division Leader, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D526935352%26UID%3D4647882352%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAN_oul_Msj6_8yI0LUdDakhEeIYXrTL5IqSLlWOiMbsKCIN_5brDyh6G_5m2Ys4C-ztaRoVXncLpId1FyyQz9Sv0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm534c3e1cf2a5377453ead1c750dd8129 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 802 536 319 Need help? contact support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412 ABSTRACT TBD

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16 May 2017

Title: Sources, fate and effects of microplastics in the marine environment – Highlights from a global assessment
Presenter(s): Linda Amaral Zettler, Ph.D., Associate Scientist at the Josephine Bay Paul Center for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution at the Marine Biological Lab in Woods Hole and an Associate Professor in the Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island
Date & Time: 16 May 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Linda Amaral Zettler, Ph.D., Associate Scientist at the Josephine Bay Paul Center for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution at the Marine Biological Lab in Woods Hole and an Associate Professor in the Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. Speaker is presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
The Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Protection (GESAMP) Working Group 40 is a collection of scientific experts dedicated to providing advice on matters of concern regarding the sources, fate and effects of Microplastics (MP) in the marine environment. Plastic marine debris respects no geographical borders and thus calls for international action and coordination: the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA) consisting of 160 delegates adopted Resolution 1/6 on ‘Marine plastic debris and microplastics' (Annex I) in June 2014 in response to this concern. A first report issued in 2015 laid the foundation for terms of reference to focus on as part of its comprehensive assessment of the topic. The second phase of the report was released earlier this year (2017). The structure and scope of the report covers "Sources of MP", "Distribution, Fate and 'Hot-Spots', "Ecological Impacts of MP", "Commercial Fish and Shellfish", "Socio-Economic Aspects", "Method Development and Harmonization", and "An Initial Risk Assessment Framework". This talk will provide a synopsis of the key conclusions and recommendations reached, as well as a presentation of knowledge gaps and research priorities for the future.

Bio(s):
Linda Amaral-Zettler is an Associate Scientist at the Josephine Bay Paul Center for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution at the MBL in Woods Hole and an Associate Professor in the Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. She obtained her Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program after receiving a Bachelor of Science in Aquatic Biology at Brown University. Amaral-Zettler's research investigates the relationships between microbes and the mechanisms that determine their diversity, distribution, survival and impact on local and global processes. From 2004-2010 she served as the Program Manager and Education and Outreach Lead for the International Census of Marine Microbes (http://icomm.mbl.edu), a global effort to census the microbial ocean as part of the Census of Marine Life Program. She led the NSF-funded MIRADA-LTERS project that carried out microbial biodiversity inventories and is exploring large-scale patterns in microbial biogeography across the 13 aquatic US Long Term Ecological Research Sites. As part of the Woods Hole Center for Oceans and Human Health, her research employs next generation sequencing techniques to understand the presence and persistence of pathogens and harmful algal blooming species in the natural and man-made environment. Her current microbiome research interests include microbes on Plastic Marine Debris and the "Plastisphere" and ornamental and cultured fish microbiomes. She has published in PNAS, Nature, ISME, Environmental Science and Technology and other top journals in microbial ecology.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The exceptionally warm winter of 2015-16 in Alaska: Attribution and Anticipation
Presenter(s): John Walsh, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 16 May 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
John Walsh, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s):
ACCAP Climate Webinar

Remote Access:
To register for the webinar, please fill out the form available at: https://accap.uaf.edu/Warm_Winter POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu)

Abstract:
Alaska experienced record-setting warmth during the 2015-16 cold season (October-April). Statewide average temperatures exceeded the period-of-record mean by more than 4°C over the seven-month cold season and by more than 6°C over the four-month late-winter period, January-April. The record warmth raises two questions: (1) Why was Alaska so warm during the 2015-16 cold season? (2) At what point in the future might this warmth become typical if greenhouse warming continues? On the basis of circulation analogs computed from sea level pressure and 850 hPa geopotential height fields, the atmospheric circulation explains less than half of the anomalous warmth. The warming signal forced by greenhouse gases in climate models accounts for about 1°C of the of the anomalous warmth. A factor that is consistent with the seasonal and spatial patterns of the warmth is the anomalous surface state, which 454. The surface anomalies include (1) above-normal ocean surface temperatures and below-normal sea ice coverage in the surrounding seas from which air advects into Alaska and (2) the deficient snowpack over Alaska itself. The location of the maximum of anomalous warmth over Alaska and the late-winter/early-spring increase of the anomalous warmth unexplained by the atmospheric circulation implicates snow cover and its albedo effect, which is supported by observational measurements in the boreal forest and tundra biomes. Climate model simulations indicate that warmth of this magnitude will become the norm by the 2050s if greenhouse gas emissions follow their present scenario.

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17 May 2017

Title: Web of Science Training with a focus on Meteorology
Presenter(s): Kristen Faeth, Clarivate Analytics
Date & Time: 17 May 2017
12:00 pm - 12:45 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kristen Faeth, Clarivate Analytics Duration: approximately 45 minutes POC: library.reference@noaa.gov; judith.salter@noaa.gov Location (Online): Register individually for this training session via Thomson Reuters: https://goo.gl/d3GSe5 Class summary: This WoS training will be tailored to NOAA NWS and meteorological researchers, but all NOAA staff are welcome to register. You may also follow this virtual training along with Librarian Judith Salter in the brown bag area of the NOAA Central Library.

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Title: Reefs at Risk - What's in your Sunscreen? A Short Documentary
Presenter(s): Malina Fagan and Lynn Pelletier, Directors/Producers of “Reefs At Risk" Presenting remotely from Hawai'i
Date & Time: 17 May 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Malina Fagan and Lynn Pelletier, Directors/Producers of 'Reefs At Risk', Fagan Films and The Redford Center

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Set on the beautiful beaches of Hawaii, “Reefs at Risk” explores the harmful effects some sunscreen chemicals have on coral and marine life. Coral reefs are dying at an alarming rate. Why should you care? Coral reefs protect our shores and supply food and oxygen to our planet. They are considered the “rainforests of the sea.” Although there are many factors contributing to the destruction of coral reefs worldwide, toxic chemicals in sunscreens is one we can easily eliminate. This timely film takes you underwater to explore the marine environment and follows those on land trying to protect it. The film also questions the effects these chemicals may have on humans and presents solutions. About the Speakers Malina Fagan - Director / Producer / Cinematographer / Editor Malina is an investigative documentary filmmaker whose films about health, the environment and human empowerment have premiered in IMAX at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, aired on PBS, and been selected at film festivals across the country, winning awards for their cinematography and storytelling. Originally from the Big Island, she holds a BFA in Film Production from Chapman University, where she participated in the highly selective “Destination Africa” program. To see a reel of her work visit: http://bit.ly/1dMXacA Lynn Pelletier - Director / Producer / Writer / Co-Editor Lynn is a health practitioner of over 34 years and long time resident of the Big Island of Hawai'i. Her commitment to raising awareness of environmental toxins and disease prevention, along with her background in chemistry and biology, makes her an invaluable resource in researching and developing health related films. She has been a story consultant on short documentaries ranging in topic from indigenous culture to the Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
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18 May 2017

Title: Make Your Coastal and Marine Data Work Well With Others - Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS)
Presenter(s): Mark Finkbeiner, NOAA's Office for Coastal Management
Date & Time: 18 May 2017
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Remote access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Part of the "Improving Seafloor Habitat Mapping in the Southeast US Webinar Series"

Presenter(s):
Mark Finkbeiner, NOAA's Office for Coastal Management (OCM) Webinar Details Conference Line - 866-795-0095 (1113300#) WebEx - http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=748620767&p=&t=c NO PASSCODE NEEDED FOR WEB

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's SouthEast and Caribbean Regional Collaboration Team (SECART) Point of Contact: Adam.Bode@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Organize information about coastal ocean ecosystems using standards approved by the U.S. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC). The Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) provides a structure for developing and integrating data across regional and national boundaries, and supports activities such as monitoring, policy development, restoration planning, and fisheries management. This webinar will provide a quick overview of what CMECS is, why it's beneficial to use, the various data types it supports, use case examples, and resources that are available to users. About the Speaker Mark Finkbeiner leads NOAA OCM's Ocean Data and Tools project, which focuses on supporting the coastal and marine planning community in a wide range of issue areas. Major activities in this project include the Marine Cadastre, the Ocean Reporting Tool, supporting the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS), and other marine mapping and data development efforts. Mark is one developers of the CMECS standard and has been heavily involved assisting users and advancing its implementation. Mark's areas of expertise include remote sensing, GIS, and benthic mapping. His background includes work in wetland delineation, wellhead protection, land cover change detection and image analysis.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Sea, Storms, & Tourism: A Case Study of the Hazards and Vulnerabilities of Cape Cod, MA
Presenter(s): Lauren E. Gentile, Ph.D., 2017 Knauss Fellow, Sectoral Applications Research Program, Climate Program Office, NOAA OAR
Date & Time: 18 May 2017
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lauren E. Gentile, Ph.D., 2017 Knauss Fellow, Sectoral Applications Research Program, Climate Program Office, NOAA OAR POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter judith.salter@noaa.gov; Library Reference Desk: Library.Reference@noaa.gov; Knauss Fellow Coordinator (May): Emily Osborne (emily.osborne@noaa.gov) For remote access: If you are unable to attend in person, please register for the Knauss webinars occurring on Thursday, May 18th at: https://goo.gl/pfoYmp (Note: This link will also provide access to Gray Redding, MS, presenting on the Northwest Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) population structure evaluated using otolith stable isotopes at 12:30pm). After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
Within the last decade numerous macro-scale storms have impacted the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts. While Hurricane Sandy was an extreme event for the U.S. Northeast, its impacts highlighted this region's vulnerabilities to coastal hazards. This dissertation research examines how chronic and acute coastal hazards, socio-economic characteristics, and governance and decision-making interact to produce more resilient or at-risk coastal communities. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to conduct three assessments. First, GIS was used to model the impacts of sea level rise and hurricane storm surge on natural and built infrastructure. Second, a suite of socio-economic indicators was used to identify communities differentially vulnerable to coastal hazards. Third, semi-structured interviews with planners and decision-makers were analyzed to examine the hazard mitigation planning processes on Cape Cod. The results indicate considerable variability of biophysical and social vulnerabilities across Cape Cod communities. These differences in vulnerabilities are primarily a function of communities' exposure and socio-economic structure. Regional and local decision-makers will need to consider the potential effects of coastal hazards not only to improve hazard preparedness but also to ensure the long-term sustainability of Cape Cod's natural resources and economy.

Bio(s):
Lauren is a University of Southern California Sea Grant Knauss Fellow. She has a Bachelor's degree from University of Miami (2011) and a Master's Degree in Environmental Law and Policy from Vermont Law School (2012). She completed her Ph.D. in Environmental Social Science from Arizona State University last May (2016). Before starting her fellowship, Lauren worked as a research contractor for NOAA Fisheries Northeast Fisheries Science Center's Social Science Branch.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Coral Reefs and People in a High-CO2 World: Where Can Science Make a Difference to People?
Presenter(s): Peter E.T. Edwards, Ph.D., Natural Resource Economist and Social Science, NOAA's Coordinator Coral Reef Conservation Program, The Baldwin Group Inc/NOAA; and Dwight K. Gledhill, Ph.D., Deputy Director, NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program
Date & Time: 18 May 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Peter E.T. Edwards, Ph.D., Natural Resource Economist and Social Science, NOAA's Coordinator Coral Reef Conservation Program, The Baldwin Group Inc/NOAA; and Dwight K. Gledhill, Ph.D., Deputy Director, NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere put shallow, warm-water coral reef ecosystems, and the people who depend upon them at risk. Global environmental stresses resulting from increasing carbon dioxide levels include 1) the effects on the climate system which are resulting in an increasing frequency of thermally induced coral bleaching and associated coral mortality and 2) ocean acidification which may retard a reefs capacity to recover from acute mortality events. While local management has little control over the drivers of global stressors, they will increasingly need to reduce local stressors as the ecosystem services they depend upon may grow more fragile and precarious overtime. Communities will be most impacted where a) human dependence on coral reef ecosystems is high, b) sea surface temperature reaches critical levels soonest, and c) ocean acidification levels are most severe. Science can help inform managers of where these elements are likely to align so that they can prioritize actions needed to best preserve ecoservices which protect people's lives and and support livelihoods.

Bio(s):
Dr. Peter Edwards is a federal contractor and serves as the Economist and Social Science Coordinator for the National Ocean Service's Coral Reef Conservation Program. He is primarily responsible for incorporating social science and economics approaches into the Coral Reef Conservation Program's activities. This includes leading a national (long term) knowledge attitudes and awareness survey that covers all seven US coral reef jurisdictions. He also serves as the global coordinator of the Global Socioeconomic Monitoring Initiative for Coastal Management (SocMon) where he leads strategic planning and implementation efforts for capacity building and training of coastal managers in socioeconomic surveys and data analysis. Dr. Edwards has over twenty (20) years of academic training and professional experience in tropical ecology, environmental monitoring, coastal zone management and environmental consultancy. He holds Bachelors and Master's degrees from the University of the West Indies (Jamaica) in Zoology and Marine Sciences (respectively). He completed his PhD at the University of Delaware, in Marine Studies with a concentration in Marine Policy. His PhD research findings were used to develop models of sustainable financing mechanisms for conservation including environmental fees for tourists and coastal marine users in Jamaica. Dr. Dwight Gledhill is the Deputy Director of NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program office in Silver Spring, MD. The program works to advance the nation's understanding of the risk posed by ocean acidification to the marine environment and dependent human communities. Dr. Gledhill serves as a member of several interagency and international working groups related to ocean acidification and carbon cycling and serves as member of the Northeast Coastal Acidification Network and Gulf Coast Acidification Networks. Formally trained as a carbonate geochemist, Dr. Gledhill was an associate scientist with the University of Miami Cooperative Institute of Marine & Atmospheric Sciences (CIMAS) where he advanced research to better understand the process of ocean acidification within coral reef ecosystems. He was instrumental in establishing two long-term monitoring stations: in La Parguera, Puerto Rico and another within the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. He also developed one of the first satellite-based ocean acidification products to better map the chemical changes unfolding across Greater Caribbean Region. Gledhill received his M.S. and Ph.D. from the Department of Oceanography at Texas A&M University in 2005 where he investigated carbonate mineral kinetics in complex electrolyte solutions as well the sediment biogeochemistry associated with methane clathrates in the Northern Gulf of Mexico.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Northwest Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) population structure evaluated using otolith stable isotopes
Presenter(s): Gray Redding, MS, 2017 John Knauss Fellow, Highly Migratory Species, NOAA NMFS
Date & Time: 18 May 2017
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Gray Redding, MS, 2017 John Knauss Fellow, Highly Migratory Species, NOAA NMFS POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Library Reference Desk: (Library.Reference@noaa.gov); Knauss Fellow Coordinator (May): Emily Osborne (emily.osborne@noaa.gov) For remote access: If you are unable to attend in person, please register for the Knauss webinars occurring on Thursday, May 18th at: https://goo.gl/pfoYmp (Note: This link will also provide access to Dr. Lauren E. Gentile presenting Sea, Storms, & Tourism: A Case Study of the Hazards and Vulnerabilities of Cape Cod, MA at 12:30pm). After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
Stock assessments for Northwest Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) assume a single stock, comprised of northern and southern contingents, each with distinct natal regions in the US and Canada. Redding hypothesized that otolith δ18O and δ13C values could discriminate fish between these regions based upon hydrographic differences and thereby illuminate seasonal migrations and contingent structure. Otoliths from regions throughout the North Atlantic were carefully milled to extract carbonates corresponding to the first year of life. Significant differences occurred in otolith isotope composition across the Atlantic basin, and within the Northwest Atlantic population, despite temporal variability. Two separate natal habitats and associated contingents were found in the Northwest Atlantic for juvenile mackerel, but incursions by the northern contingent into US waters occurred in older fish (age>3). These findings indicate that stock structure assumptions should be revisited in the assessment and management of Northwest Atlantic mackerel.

Bio(s):
Gray Redding grew up in central North Carolina and graduated from UNC Chapel Hill studying Environmental Health Sciences. Redding worked for a few years afterwards as a fisheries observer and technician in fisheries ecology. Redding received his MS from the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory in fisheries science.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Estuarine Acidification, a Subtropical (Texas) Flavor
Presenter(s): Xinping Hu, Texas A&M University
Date & Time: 18 May 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual meeting:https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1135671649257432067
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Xinping Hu, Texas A&M University

Sponsor(s):
Gulf Coast Acidification Network; seminar co-hosted by NOAA Ocean Acidification Program jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here;https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1135671649257432067. You will then receive an email with the information needed to access the webinar.

Abstract:
Estuarine carbonate chemistry is controlled by a myriad of factors, including the endmember (river and ocean) variations and biogeochemical reactions (processes that alter acid-base chemistry). In the context of ocean acidification, the community started exploring estuarine acidification in recent years with most of the attention focusing on ocean endmember changes only. However, how changes in river inflow may influence estuarine carbonate chemistry remains elusive. The unique nature of lagoonal estuaries in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, including limited exchange with the open Gulf waters and varying river endmember composition, makes these coastal water bodies unique to studying this problem. Preliminary results will be presented at this webinar, and the effects of river inflow changes, hypoxia, and within estuarine biogeochemical processes on the changing estuarine carbonate system will also be discussed. The observations made in these subtropical estuaries could be representative of other freshwater-starved coastal systems.

Bio(s):
Dr. Xinping Hu received his B.S. degree in Chemistry from Peking University in 1997, and he got his Ph.D. degree in Oceanography from Old Dominion University in 2007. Afterwards, he worked as a postdoc and then an assistant research scientist in the Department of Marine Sciences of the University of Georgia. In 2012, Dr. Hu joined the Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences in Texas A&M University " Corpus Christi as an assistant professor. Dr. Hu has worked on a variety of issues related to carbonate chemistry in estuarine and oceanic waters, sediment geochemistry, and marine carbon cycle. His research has been supported by federal (NOAA and NSF), state (Texas General Land Office, Texas Sea Grant, Texas Water Development Board), local (Coastal Bend Bays and Estuarine Program), and private (Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative) funding agencies. Dr. Hu's ongoing study funded by NOAA is to examine the influence of freshwater inflow and hypoxia on the acidification of subtropical estuaries in south Texas. Recently, he received an NSF CAREER award and will soon start investigating the impact of hydrologic control on CO2 fluxes and acidification in estuaries in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico.

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Title: Detection and Evaluation of Organic Contaminant Flows In Surface Waters of the Puget Sound Region
Presenter(s): Dr. Edward Kolodziej, Associate Professor, Science and Mathematics, UW Tacoma; Civil and Environmental Engineering, UW Seattle; Principal Investigator, Center for Urban Waters
Date & Time: 18 May 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Edward Kolodziej, Associate Professor, Science and Mathematics (UW Tacoma); Civil and Environmental Engineering (UW Seattle); Principal Investigator (Center for Urban Waters)

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D526935352%26UID%3D4647882352%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAN_oul_Msj6_8yI0LUdDakhEeIYXrTL5IqSLlWOiMbsKCIN_5brDyh6G_5m2Ys4C-ztaRoVXncLpId1FyyQz9Sv0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm534c3e1cf2a5377453ead1c750dd8129 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 802 536 319 Need help? contact support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412 ABSTRACT In recent years, water quality assessment has increasingly begun to shift toward broad spectrum screening techniques based upon high resolution mass spectrometry. As a complement to targeted detection methods, these suspect and non-target detection methods may be especially well suited to identifying toxicants and other important bioactive chemicals in complex samples, fingerprinting different sources of contaminants to watersheds, and understanding the incidence of novel or unrecognized contaminant classes in water and organisms. Today, we will present the use of high resolution quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry to characterize the occurrence and fate of organic contaminants in stormwater runoff, exposed fish, wastewater effluent, and other environmental systems. In these sample types, we detected a number of chemical classes, including pesticides, endogenous neurochemicals, PPCPs, source tracers, and industrial compounds. To understand contaminant uptake processes and evaluate potential toxicants, we also analyzed paired water-tissue samples from coho salmon experiencing acute mortality when exposed to highway runoff. In such samples, many chemical candidates were common to stormwater runoff, liver, and gill samples, indicating effective uptake of many contaminant classes into exposed fish. Such investigations clearly point to the importance of combining chemical analysis with biologically based tools that allow for a comprehensive analysis of contaminant occurrence and fate in aquatic systems. BIO Ed Kolodziej came to UW in 2014 as part of the UW Freshwater Science Initiative. He holds a joint appointment in the Division of Science and Mathematics at UW Tacoma and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UW Seattle, with a research group based at the Center for Urban Waters (http://www.urbanwaters.org/). Ed's research interests include water quality and contaminant fate in natural and engineered systems, especially focusing on interdisciplinary approaches to complex environmental issues affecting water and ecosystem health. His research group works to characterize and control non-point source pollution, understand attenuation mechanisms in natural systems, and optimize engineered systems for organic contaminant removal. His research has been published in Science, and featured in news media such as Nature, Scientific American, U.S. News and World Report, Yahoo Health News, BBC Radio's “Inside Science”, and the Huffington Post among others.

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22 May 2017

Title: Medium-range forecasts with a non-hydrostatic global atmospheric model on a cubed sphere grid
Presenter(s): Song-You Hong, Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems
Date & Time: 22 May 2017
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Song-You Hong, director in KIAPS (Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems) Date, time,place: Monday May 22, 2017 at 10:30am, NCWCP 2155 POC: Jongil.han@noaa.gov Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to MIchiko Masutani (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook. JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract:
Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems (KIAPS), Seoul, Korea, has embarked a national project in developing a new global forecast system in 2011. The ultimate goal of this 9-year project is to replace the current operational model at Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA), which was adopted from the United Kingdom's Meteorological Office's model. Since July 2015, the test version of the KIAPS Integrated Model (KIM) system that consists of a spectral element non-hydrostatic dynamical core on a cubed sphere and a revised physics package that has been updated every three months has been running in a real-time testbed, with a standard data assimilation of 3-D Var. In 2017, the updated KIM with the advanced 4-DEnvar at about 12-km has been launched and its performance and operational deployment schedule will be discussed.

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23 May 2017

Title: New Guidance for Standardized Deep Sea Observations
Presenter(s): Rachel Bassett, Biologist, NOAA/NCCOS Deep Coral Ecology Lab. Presenting at NOAA NCCOS, Room 8150 in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 23 May 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rachel Bassett, Biologist, NOAA/NCCOS Deep Coral Ecology Lab. Presenting at NOAA NCCOS, Room 8150 in Silver Spring, MD

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Greg.Dusak@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
The Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) is a comprehensive, standard terminology published in 2014. The Standard is intended to unify habitat classification efforts, in order to allow for broader integration and comparison of data. The standard is well-developed, but not been tested extensively in the deep sea. NOAA has set a milestone to adopt best practices and standards, such as CMECS, within NOAA's Integrated Ocean & Coastal Mapping Program since 2013, so there is a timely need for guidance directed toward the deep-sea research community about how to apply this standardized methodology. This presentation summarizes the findings from a short research project that engaged field teams during three deep-sea benthic surveys in the US Pacific in 2015, including telepresence cruises in California and Hawaii. The researchers conducted post-cruise analyses to process images from surveys aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, E/V Nautilus from Ocean Exploration Trust, and R/V Shearwater from the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. Thirty-two remotely operated vehicle dives and more than 6,400 still images were analyzed using a simple CMECS annotation. The study considered three of the four CMECS components " geoform, water column, and substrate.

Bio(s):
Rachel received her B.S. in marine biology and her M.S. in Environmental Studies both from the College of Charleston. During her master's work she completed an internship at the SC Department of Natural Resources where her focus was on conservation biology, specifically fisheries management and marine protected areas. She is passionate about anything that will help protect ocean resources.

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Title: Forty years of Conserving Hawaii's Native Seal
Presenter(s): Dr. Charles Littnan, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service
Date & Time: 23 May 2017
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Webinar - See Description for more details
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Charles Littnan, NOAA National Marihne Fisheries Service Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2163330190896552194

Abstract:
In honor of 2017 Year of the Monk Seal, join Dr. Charles Littnan on a four decade journey that tracks the history and challenges of monk seal conservation in Hawai'i. This presentation will highlight a number of threats to the species and the evolution of a rag tag research program into the most proactive marine mammal recovery program on the planet. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

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24 May 2017

Title: Sources of Predictability at Subseasonal to Seasonal Time Scales
Presenter(s): Frederic Vitart, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Cristiana Stan, George Mason University, Antje Weisheimer, University of Oxford & ECMWF
Date & Time: 24 May 2017
10:00 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Frédéric Vitart (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)), Cristiana Stan (George Mason University), Antje Weisheimer (University of Oxford & ECMWF)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR/CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program and NOAA NWS Next Generation Global Prediction System program Seminar POC: Heather.Archambault@noaa.gov REMOTE ACCESS INFORMATION: - Link: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e19baa2884bb6f51e4a43d91a4916fa53 - Passcode: 20910 - For audio: after logging on to the WebEx, click "I will call in" (to hear audio via phone). Make sure to enter both the access code and attendee ID #. Titles and Abstracts: Frédéric Vitart - MJO Prediction and Teleconnections in Sub-seasonal Forecasts

Abstract:
The Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the dominant intra-seasonal mode of organized convective activity in the Tropics, with also a considerable impact in the middle and high latitudes. The skill of sub-seasonal forecasting systems to predict the MJO has improved significantly over the past decade, although most models still have difficulties propagating the MJO across the Maritime continent. The MJO predictive skill and teleconnections in the high latitudes have been diagnosed in 10 operational sub-seasonal prediction models from the WWRP/WCRP Sub-seasonal to Seasonal Prediction (S2S) database. Results suggest that the S2S models display skill to predict the MJO between 2 and 4 weeks, although the majority of S2S models tend to produce a too weak and slow propagating MJO in the extended forecast range. All the S2S models produce MJO extratropical teleconnections which are too weak over the Euro-Atlantic sector, which suggests that they do not fully exploit the predictability associated to the MJO in the Northern Extratropics. The impact of model resolution and ocean-atmosphere coupling on the MJO prediction skill and teleconnections will be discussed. Cristiana Stan - The subseasonal-to-seasonal variability of Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes and its influence on forecasts for weeks 3-4

Abstract:
The variability of the extra-tropics and its interaction with the tropics is studied at seasonal and intraseasonal time scales. Nonlinear oscillations in the extra-tropics are extracted from daily anomalies of 500-hPa geopotential for the period 1979-2012 using a data-adaptive method. One of the emerging global oscillations has a period of 120 days and over the North Atlantic region its pattern resembles the canonical North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). A composite of the lifecycle of the 120-day oscillation shows that for the phase peak (phase 2) the pattern consists of a surface pressure dipole over the North Atlantic accompanied by cold (warm) surface temperature anomalies and anticyclonic wind at low-level to the north (south). The 120-day oscillation was included as a predictor in an experimental version of the statistical forecast model used at CPC as part of the forecast tools for the Week 3-4 temperature and precipitation outlook. The influence of the predictor leads to mixed improvement and deterioration in cross-validated skill. The impacts on Week 3-4 U.S. temperature prediction appear most complimentary in boreal winter and when the MJO is over the Maritime Continent or West Pacific. Less skill is generally added when the MJO is over the Indian Ocean or forecast occurs during boreal summer. Antje Weisheimer - Atmospheric Seasonal Forecasts of the 20th Century: Multi-Decadal Variability in Predictive Skill of the Winter NAO

Abstract:
Based on skill estimates from hindcasts made over the last couple of decades, recent studies have suggested that considerable progress has been made in forecasting winter climate anomalies over the Euro-Atlantic area using current-generation forecast models. However, previous-generation models had already shown that forecasts of winter climate anomalies in the 1960s and 1970s were less successful than forecasts of the 1980s and 1990s. Given that the more recent decades have been dominated by the NAO in its positive phase, it is important to know whether the performance of current models would be similarly skilful when tested over periods of a predominantly negative NAO. To this end, a new ensemble of retrospective atmospheric seasonal forecasts covering the period 1900 to 2009 has been created, providing a unique tool to explore many aspects of atmospheric seasonal climate prediction. In this study we focus on the multi-decadal variability in predicting the winter NAO. The existence of relatively low skill levels during the period 1950s -1970s has been confirmed in the new dataset. This skill appears to increase again for earlier and later periods. Whilst these interdecadal differences in skill are, by themselves, only marginally statistically significant, the variations in skill strongly co-vary with statistics of the general circulation itself suggesting that such differences are indeed physically real. The mid-Century period of low forecast skill coincides with a negative NAO phase but the relationship between the NAO phase/amplitude and forecast skill is more complex than linear.

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Title: Climate Change Damages to Alaska: Public Infrastructure and the Economics of Proactive Adaptation
Presenter(s): April M. Melvin, Associate Program Officer, The National Academy of Sciences
Date & Time: 24 May 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
April M. Melvin, Associate Program Officer, The National Academy of Sciences

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Climate change in Alaska is causing widespread environmental change that is damaging critical infrastructure. As climate change continues, infrastructure is expected to become more vulnerable to damage, increasing risks to residents and resulting in large economic impacts. In this study, we quantified potential economic damages to Alaska public infrastructure resulting from climate driven changes in flooding, precipitation, near-surface permafrost thaw, and freeze"thaw cycles under relatively high and low climate scenarios. We also estimated coastal erosion losses for villages known to be at risk. Our findings suggest that the largest climate damages will result from flooding of roads followed by substantial near-surface permafrost thaw related damage to buildings. Proactive adaptation efforts as well as global action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions could considerably reduce these damages.

Bio(s):
April Melvin is an Associate Program Officer with the National Academy of Sciences Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (BASC). Prior to joining BASC, April was a Science & Technology Policy Fellow in the Climate Change Division at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). As an AAAS Fellow, April's work focused largely on economic impacts of climate change in Alaska, including damages to infrastructure and costs of responding to wildfire. She also spent extensive time in Alaska as a Postdoctoral Research Associate while studying climate change and wildfire in Alaska's boreal forests. April received her Ph.D. in ecosystem ecology/biogeochemistry from Cornell University and holds a B.S. in ecology and evolutionary biology from the University of Rochester.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Updates of Coral Reef Research and Monitoring Across the U.S. Pacific Islands - Science to Support Management and Conservation
Presenter(s): Rusty Brainard, PhD, NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Ecosystem Sciences Division
Date & Time: 24 May 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 10153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Title of Seminar: Updates of Coral Reef Research and Monitoring Across the U.S. Pacific Islands - Science to Support Management and Conservation ​

Presenter(s):
​ Rusty Brainard, PhD, NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Ecosystem Sciences Division ​ Seminar Sponsor and Host: NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program;seminar coordinator is Justine.Kimball@noaa.gov Remote Access Info:

Remote Access:
Audio is only available over the phone: dial: 1-877-708-1667; passcode is 7028688# For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=749351167&p=&t=c Click Proceed. No code is needed for the web.

Abstract:
This presentation will provide an overview of recent coral reef ecosystem research and monitoring activities and results across the U.S. Pacific Islands at scales ranging from sites to islands to regions to Pacific-wide. Topics highlighted will include: 1. The 2014-1016 Mass Coral Bleaching and Mortality events in the Pacific Islands 2. NCRMP Coral Reef Condition Report Cards - American Samoa (in review), Pacific Remote Islands, Guam, Marianas, Hawaii (in prep) 3. Ocean acidification - reduced calcification rates; Pacific-wide carbonate chemistry patterns; IOC-WESTPAC- standardized observations across the Pacific 4. Baseline Assessments for Coral Reef Community Structure and Demographics on West Maui: Data Report Vargas-Angel et al. (in review) 5. Responses of Herbivorous Fishes and Benthos to 6 Years of Protection at the Kahekili Herbivore Fisheries Management Area, Maui. Williams et al. (2016) PLoS One 6. Baseline Surveys for Coral Reef Community Structure & Demographics in Vatia Bay and Faga'ulu Bay, American Samoa - Vargas-Angel et al. (in review) 7. Coral Reef Ecosystems of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument - An 2000-2016 Overview - Boyle et al (in review) 8. Mesophotic Depth Gradients Impact Reef Fish Assemblage Composition and Functional Group Partitioning in the Main Hawaiian Islands. - Asher et al. (2017) Front. Mar. Sci. 9. Biodiversity Metrics to meet Sustainable Development Goal (SDG-14), (ALSO 2017) and The importance of standardization for biodiversity comparisons: A case study using autonomous reef monitoring structures (ARMS) and metabarcoding to measure cryptic diversity on Mo'orea coral reefs, French Polynesia. Ransome et al. (2017) PLoS One 10. Comparison of Reef Fish Survey Data Gathered by Open and Closed Circuit SCUBA Divers Reveals Differences in Areas With Higher Fishing Pressure. Gray et al. (2016) PLoS One 11. Natural bounds on herbivorous coral reef fishes. Heenan et al, (2016) Proc. Roy. Soc. B. 12. Interdisciplinary Baseline Ecosystem Assessment - Surveys to Inform Ecosystem- Based Management Planning in Timor-Leste- Final Report (in review)

Bio(s):
Dr. Rusty Brainard is a supervisory oceanographer and founding Chief of NOAA's Coral Reef Ecosystem Program (CREP), an interdisciplinary, ecosystem-based research program that conducts integrated ecosystem observations, long-term monitoring, and applied research of coral reefs to support ecosystem-based management and conservation. CREP monitors the distribution, abundance, diversity, and condition of fish, corals, other invertebrates, algae, and microbes in the context of their diverse benthic habitats, human pressures, and changing ocean conditions, including ocean acidification (OA) and warming. Moving forward, Rusty will lead the newly formed Habitat

25 May 2017

Title: The GOES-R Series: The Nation’s Next Generation of Geostationary Weather Satellites
Presenter(s): Tim Walsh, Acting Assistant System Program Director, GOES-R Series Program
Date & Time: 25 May 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tim Walsh, Acting Assistant System Program Director, GOES-R Series Program POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter judith.salter@noaa.gov

Abstract:
NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) are a mainstay of weather forecasts and environmental monitoring in the United States. The next generation of GOES satellites, known as the GOES-R series, represents significant advancements in the near real-time observation of severe weather across the Western Hemisphere. The GOES-R satellite, the first in the series that also includes GOES-S, GOES-T and GOES-U, launched on November 19, 2016, from Cape Canaveral, Florida. GOES-R is now known as GOES-16. This presentation will provide a post-launch GOES-16 status, including data validation and release, pre-operational imagery and data, satellite handover to NOAA's Office of Satellite and Product Operations, and operational location designation and timing. It will also include an update on the integration and test status of GOES-S, scheduled for launch in 2018, as well an update on GOES-T and GOES-U development.

Remote Access:
please register for the GOES-R webinar: https://goo.gl/OT796c After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone or computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Bio(s):
Timothy Walsh has been acting Assistant System Program Director since January 2017. In this role, he supports the acting System Program Director with oversight of the program and ground and flight projects. Prior to this role, Tim was the Deputy Project Manager for the GOES-R Series Flight Project. Before joining NOAA in 1995, Walsh supported a number of NASA missions, including the launch and check out of the GOES-8 and GOES-9 spacecraft as a member of the GOES Mission Operations Support Team. Previous to working at NASA, Walsh supporting the development of multiple projects for air traffic and fire-control radar systems, electronic warfare and strategic communications systems. Walsh has a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Duke University and a Master of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Endocrinology in marine mammal fat: how signals of stress, reproduction, and nutritional state can be measured in blubber and the implications for assessing population health
Presenter(s): Dr. Nick Kellar, Lead researcher for the Marine Wildlife Endocrine Lab, Cetacean Life History and Health Program, Marine Mammal and Turtle Division
Date & Time: 25 May 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Nick Kellar, Lead researcher for the Marine Wildlife Endocrine Lab, Cetacean Life History and Health Program, Marine Mammal and Turtle Division

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D526935352%26UID%3D4647882352%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAN_oul_Msj6_8yI0LUdDakhEeIYXrTL5IqSLlWOiMbsKCIN_5brDyh6G_5m2Ys4C-ztaRoVXncLpId1FyyQz9Sv0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm534c3e1cf2a5377453ead1c750dd8129 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 802 536 319 Need help? contact support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

Abstract:
Initiated by the need to glean more biological information from commonly collected dart biopsies, for the last 15 years researchers have been measuring lipophilic hormones in marine mammal blubber with a focus on the assessment of reproductive steroids. This effort has helped identify pregnancy patterns, demographic structure, reproductive cycling, and mating seasonality in free-ranging marine mammal populations. For example, researchers at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center used blubber progesterone levels in blubber biopsies to identify pregnancies and to show a link between high levels of exposure to dolphin encirclement by the tropical Pacific purse-seine tuna fishery and low reproductive rates of associated spotted dolphin populations. Currently, this research effort has broadened to include the assessment of stress response and nutritional condition in populations exposed to a number of human activities including sonar usage, shipping, fishing activity, resource exploration, and contaminant disposal and spills. Here we review 1) all the hormones that have been measured in marine mammal blubber, 2) the unique characteristics of the blubber for endocrine assessments, and 3) the interpretations of the resulting hormone measurements in the evaluation of anthropogenic impacts on population health. Finally, we discuss the future trajectory of this line of research and the incorporation of novel endocrine, molecular, and metabolic markers in health assessments of marine mammal populations.

Bio(s):
Nick Kellar has been a population ecologist for the Marine Mammal and Turtle Division at Southwest Fisheries Science Center since 1997. He is currently the head of the Marine Wildlife Endocrine Laboratory in the Cetacean Health and Life History Program. His research focus is on the discovery and application of marine mammal health and reproductive markers that can be measured in dart biopsies and other biological samples obtained from free-ranging animals. The primary goals of this research are first, to identify or red flag potentially cryptic injuries to marine mammal populations and second, to help assess causal agents in populations experiencing declines in abundance. This work has helped evaluate the relationships between population health parameters and anthropogenic activities such as 1) tuna-dolphin purse seining, 2) Navy sonar usage, and 3) the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

30 May 2017

Title: CICS-MD Proving Ground and Training Center
Presenter(s): Scott Rudlosky, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites, University of Maryland - College Park
Date & Time: 30 May 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: 8th Floor Conference Room Aerospace Building 10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham MD 20706
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Scott Rudlosky, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites, University of Maryland - College Park

Sponsor(s):
JPSS May 2017 Science Seminar POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov Telecon: 877-401-9225 - pc- 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m73606940e4035284d3c5c780a46547e9 Meeting number: 748 489 697 Host key: 365726 Meeting password: Jpss2017!

Abstract:
The JPSS and GOES-R programs have supported development of a CICS MD Proving Ground and Training Center (PGTC). The PGTC is an operational framework that allows CICS-MD to maximize its satellite PG contributions. Infrastructure is being built to promote sustained interaction between JPSS/GOES-R algorithm developers and end users for training, product evaluation, and solicitation of user feedback. Many SCSB/CICS-MD scientists develop algorithms that have a variety of operational applications, but these scientists have limited channels for direct interaction with NWS forecasters. This project is helping to bridge this gap by developing proving ground provider capabilities at CICS-MD. Our updated AWIPS systems read from a Satellite Broadcast Network (SBN) feed as well as several ground-based sources. Three JPSS supported products have been implemented in AWIPS including the NESDIS Snowfall Rate, Aerosols/Smoke/Dust, and Active Fire products. These examples are shown to illustrate the various processes involved in implementing new products in AWIPS.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

31 May 2017

Title: The new He'eia National Estuarine Research Reserve
Presenter(s): Matthew Chasse, Coastal Management Specialist, NOAA Office for Coastal Management and Robert J. Toonen, Research Professor, Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology
Date & Time: 31 May 2017
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Matthew Chasse, Coastal Management Specialist, NOAA Office for Coastal Management and Robert J. Toonen, Research Professor, Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org).

Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The newly designated He'eia National Estuarine Research Reserve is the 29th in the National Estuarine Research Reserve system and the first in Hawaii. The 1,385-acre reserve includes upland forests and grasslands, wetlands, reefs, and seagrass beds, as well as the largest sheltered body of water in the Hawaiian Island chain. The reserve also includes significant historic and cultural resources. This webinar will cover the process leading to the designation, and the reserve's partnerships and management goals, including the integration of traditional Hawai'ian ecosystem management with contemporary approaches. Learn more about the new reserve at https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/reserves/hawaii.html.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

1 June 2017

Title: AdaptAlaska: Opportunities for NOAA to Reduce Risk and Increase Adaptive Capacity in Coastal Alaska
Presenter(s): Amy Holman, NOAA's Regional Coordinator for Alaska. Presenting from NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 1 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Amy Holman, NOAA's Regional Coordinator for Alaska. Presenting from NOAA in Silver Spring, MD

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
In Alaska, changes in snow, ice, and weather have resulted in risks to human lives, infrastructure damage, threats to valuable natural resources, and disruption of hunting, fishing, and livelihoods. Leaders from the Aleutians to the Chukchi Sea came together for a series of Coastal Resilience and Adaptation Workshops, spearheaded by three Landscape Conservation Cooperatives and the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association. Tribal leaders, resource managers, community planners, and scientists explored strategies to adapt to these unprecedented changes.Three hundred management and science questions were generated, and an AdaptAlaska initiative is taking shape to reduce risk to human lives and mitigate disaster impacts by enhancing collaboration among tribes & government agencies and leveraging government resources to support local decision-making. Amy Holman will describe the effort and highlight opportunities for NOAA to contribute.

Bio(s):
Amy Holman is NOAA's Regional Coordinator for Alaska. In this capacity, she is responsible for advancing agency-wide programs and projects designed to both respond to regional needs and support NOAA and national priorities in Alaska and the US Arctic. Comprised of equal parts intergovernmental affairs, strategic planning, and partnership building, her position is one of eight across the continental United States, Alaska, the Caribbean, and the Pacific Islands. Prior to coming to Alaska in 2007, Amy held positions in the National Weather Service, and National Ocean Service, Office Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, Office of Program Planning and Integration, and the Office of Finance and Administration in the Washington DC area. Her roles ranged from congressional affairs and program management/analysis, to Chief of Staff and executive aide. Subjects she especially enjoys are emergency management, decision support, and inter-organizational collaboration. Outside of NOAA, Amy is a an instructor and past Director of the Anchorage Nordic Ski Patrol and a member of the Alaska Incident Management Team for Search and Rescue (Planning Section Chief). She takes joy in skiing, hiking, wilderness trips, kayaking/packrafting, hockey and generally being outdoors. Originally from the Great Lakes (Cleveland, OH), Amy's family now calls Anchorage and Homer, Alaska home.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Analysis and Forecasting at the National Hurricane Center: What's New in 2017
Presenter(s): Chris Landsea,NOAA/NWS/NCEP/NHC Science and Operations Officer
Date & Time: 1 June 2017
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Chris Landsea, NWS/NCEP/NHC Science and Operations Officer Through June 6: NWS/NCEP/WPC Assistant Director (LCDP Detail) Youtube presentation: https://youtu.be/HtNFtOKeLlQ Presentation: http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2017/Landsea_nhc-overview-emc-2017.pptx

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar, Point of contact is Michiko.Masutani@noaa.gov Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar.

Abstract:
The National Hurricane Center issues analyses, forecasts, and warnings over large parts of the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and in support of many nearby countries. Advances in observational capabilities, operational numerical weather prediction, and forecaster tools and support systems over the past 15"20 yr have enabled the center to make more accurate forecasts, extend forecast lead times, and provide new products and services. Important limitations, however, persist. This paper discusses the current workings and state of the nation's hurricane warning program, and highlights recent improvements and the enabling science and technology. It concludes with a look ahead at opportunities to address challenges.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Bringing Coastal Wetlands into the US National Inventory of GHG Emissions​
Presenter(s): Dr. Steve Crooks, Silvestrum Science Associates
Date & Time: 1 June 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: On Line Computer Library Center, 11 Dupont Cir NW #550, Washington, DC 20036, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Steve Crooks, Silvestrum Science Associates

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Climate Program Office. POC: Meredith Ferdie Muth (meredith.f.muth@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
REGISTER online at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8817777972905727490

Abstract:
This year the U.S. is among the first nations to include GHG impacts of wetland activities in the national inventory. Recognizing the emissions and removals of greenhouse gases in coastal wetlands through national inventories can empower countries to recognize the benefit of improved wetland management. This webinar will present the approach to including wetlands, as well as key findings of the emissions and sequestration potential in wetland habitats and how this information can play a role in the policy and management of wetlands. Coastal wetlands " tidal marsh, seagrass and mangrove habitats " provide many important ecosystem services, including carbon capture and storage, referred to as blue carbon. Conversely, when these habitats are drained or degraded, they can become a source of emissions as stored carbon is released back into the atmosphere. Every year the U.S. updates its National Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks to meet commitments under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), yet activities in coastal wetlands had yet to be included. About the speaker: Dr. Steve Crooks is a wetland scientist and geomorphologist with 20 years post-PhD experience in the science and practice of wetland restoration. He has served in many roles bridging academia and private sector to deliver scientifically credible and practicable best-practice solutions for coastal management. Steve has focused on defining best-practice climate mitigation and adaptation strategies. He was a Lead Author of the IPCC 2013 Wetland Supplement. He is a NASA Carbon Monitoring System Principal Investigator and is co-founder of the International Blue Carbon Initiative. Steve is the lead investigator for incorporating blue carbon ecosystems into the National Inventory.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: How animals exploit shifting habitat mosaics: examples from Oregon to Alaska
Presenter(s): Dr. Jonny Armstrong, Assistant Professor, Oregon State University, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
Date & Time: 1 June 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Jonny Armstrong, Assistant Professor, Oregon State University, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D526935352%26UID%3D4647882352%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAN_oul_Msj6_8yI0LUdDakhEeIYXrTL5IqSLlWOiMbsKCIN_5brDyh6G_5m2Ys4C-ztaRoVXncLpId1FyyQz9Sv0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm534c3e1cf2a5377453ead1c750dd8129 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 802 536 319 Need help? contact support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412 ABSTRACT The patterns that we observe in nature are not static, but instead shift over time at a variety of scales. An ongoing challenge for ecologists is to characterize the shifting mosaic of habitat conditions and understand what it means for animals, particularly those that humans care about. Here I present a series of case studies that illustrate how fish and wildlife exploit asynchronous variation among habitat patches in temperature, resource abundance, and other habitat conditions. I begin with research describing how juvenile coho salmon thermoregulate in a dynamic riverscape where patterns of water temperature shift at weekly to inter-annual timescales. I then discuss the resource wave phenomenon and how brown bears exploit phenological variation among salmon populations, which causes ephemeral foraging opportunities to propagate across landscapes. I conclude by summarizing preliminary research on the movement ecology of redband rainbow trout in Upper Klamath Lake, which exhibits severely poor water quality for several months each year, yet supports some of the largest native trout in North America. BIO Jonny Armstrong is an Assistant Professor at Oregon State University in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. His research integrates animal behavior, landscape ecology, and physiology to understand how animals interact with their environment. Armstrong earned his PhD at SAFS working with Daniel Schindler and the Alaska Salmon Program.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 June 2017

Title: Association of foraging Steller sea lions with persistent prey hot spots in southeast Alaska
Presenter(s): Mike Sigler Leader, Habitat and Ecological Processes Research Program NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 6 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mike Sigler, Leader, Habitat and Ecological Processes Research Program NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
Understanding how air-breathing marine vertebrates find and utilize prey provides insight into their foraging mechanisms and ultimately their population productivity and trends. Utilization depends on their ability to locate areas where productive foraging conditions exist. We quantified the abundance of forage fish in southeast Alaska during acoustic surveys between October and April to improve our understanding of Steller sea lion Eumetopias jubatus foraging behavior. Energy densities (millions kJ km'2) of forage fish were orders of magnitude greater between November and February due to the presence of large schools of Pacific herring Clupea pallasi. Herring schools were highly aggregated, although the location of these aggregations shifted southward from November to April. Thus, a productive foraging area in one month did not necessarily equate to a productive area in the next month. However, by surveying on successive days and weeks, we found that herring aggregations persisted at shorter time scales. When the study area was partitioned into 1 - 1 km blocks, the day-to-day abundance of prey within a block was highly correlated with prey abundance the following day (correlation coefficient, r = 0.75, p < 0.001) and with prey abundance for the following week (r = 0.55, p < 0.001). More importantly, the persistence of these prey hot spots was an important characteristic in determining whether foraging sea lions utilized them. The odds of observing a foraging sea lion were about 1 in 3 for locations where prey hot spots were persistent. The persistence of these hot spots allowed predators to predict their locations and concentrate search efforts accordingly.

Bio(s):
Mike Sigler became Program Leader of the Habitat and Ecological Process Research (HEPR) Program in 2005. He is a recognized expert in marine ecology and fisheries stock assessment. Mike has published about 50 peer-reviewed publications and about 35 technical reports on species ranging from phytoplankton to sablefish and Steller sea lions. He has spent over 800 days at sea and has been chief scientist on over 30 research cruises in Alaska

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Accurate Visualization for Knowledge Discovery in Big-Data Science
Presenter(s): Jian Chen, University Maryland Baltimore County
Date & Time: 6 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jian Chen, University of Maryland Baltimore County POC: Keqin Wu - NOAA Affiliate Presentation http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2017/2017June_JianChen_NOAA.pdf Youtube https://youtu.be/xmv1IZFPs5g Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook. JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract:
Imagine big computer displays become a space to augment human thinking. Essential human activities such as seeing, gesturing, and exploring can couple with powerful computational solutions using natural interfaces and accurate visualizations. In this talk, I will present research effort to quantify visualization techniques of all kinds. Our ongoing work includes research in: (1) perceptually accurate visualization " constructing a visualization language to study how to depict spatially complex fields in quantum-physics simulations and brain-imaging datasets; (2) using space to compensate for limited human memory " developing new computing and interactive capabilities for bat-flight motion analysis in a new metaphorical interface; and (3) extending exploratory metaphors to biological pathways to make possible integrated analysis of multifaceted datasets. During the talk, I will point to a number of other projects being carried out by my team. I will close with some thoughts on automating the evaluation of visualizations and venture that a science of visualization and metaphors now has the potential to be developed in full, and that its success will be crucial in understanding data-to-knowledge techniques in big data areas.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: POSTPONED to June 16: Visual tools for communicating complex ocean environment issues to diverse audiences
Presenter(s): Simone Alin, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
Date & Time: 6 June 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Seminar POSTPONED

Presenter(s):
Simone Alin, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
www.necan.org.

Remote Access:
https://www.z2systems.com/track//servlet/DisplayLink?orgId=n682&emailId=171bab16bb13ef25f60568531201d72c1m65081171&&linkId=820&targetUrl=https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1671637388485960451. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing detailed information about this webinar and the system requirements. Please note that although the presentation doesn't begin until 1:00 pm ET, the webinar will be available starting at 12:30 pm ET so that individuals may join early to avoid any technical issues.

Abstract:
As a scientist studying ocean acidification, I am aware of linkages across many processes and stressors that occur in coastal and estuarine environments and may affect marine plants or animals that have economic, cultural, recreational, health, or food security significance to regional human populations. I have also experienced the challenges of communicating to diverse audiences about these complex and interacting issues. Many of the topics involved may be abstract or too technical for many audiences and, further, occur in environments that many may never see or experience first-hand or close-up. To facilitate communication, I partnered with the University of Washington Center for Environmental Visualization to create graphic representations of marine ecosystems, the processes and stressors that occur in them, and some of the pathways through which these may affect human socioeconomic interests. During this presentation, I will walk the audience through the graphics we have created for U.S. West Coast ecosystems to illustrate iconic and economically important organisms in this coastal ecosystem, ecosystem linkages to humans, interactions between ocean acidification and select other stressors on the ecosystem and humans, and Federal management handles as they pertain to some of the iconic species in this region. I welcome feedback from the NECAN community on how these visual tools may be made more useful and/or more accessible to broader user groups and audiences.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

7 June 2017

Title: Preparing for Change: NMFS Climate Science Strategy and Regional Action Plans
Presenter(s): Roger Griffis, Climate Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 7 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Roger Griffis, Climate Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
Climate-related changes in ocean and coastal ecosystems are impacting the nation's valuable marine resources and the many people, businesses and communities that depend on them. Warming oceans, rising seas, ocean acidification and other changes are expected to increase with continued changes in the planet's climate and ocean systems. There is much at risk - for example, U.S. marine fisheries generate an estimated $200 billion in economic activity and 1.7 million jobs annually. Given the pace and scope of climate-related changes in marine and coastal ecosystems, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries) developed a Climate Science Strategy to increase the production, delivery and use of the climate-related information needed to fulfill the agency's mandates in a changing world. This seminar will provide information on the Strategy and its early implementation through Regional Action Plans.

Bio(s):
Roger Griffis is Climate Coordinator for NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries) based in the Office of Science and Technology. He is responsible for increasing the production, delivery and use of climate-related information to fulfill NMFS mandates in a changing world. Roger co-led development of the NMFS Climate Science Strategy and worked with regional teams to develop Regional Action Plans to implement the Strategy in each Region. Roger is a marine ecologist with experience in marine science and management programs.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: A Fine Kettle of Fish: Valuing Changes to Stock Assessments
Presenter(s): Doug Lipton, Senior Scientist for Economics, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 7 June 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3, Rm 3404, Silver Spring, MD or via webinar; see remote access info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Doug Lipton, Senior Scientist for Economics, NOAA Fisheries

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Fisheries Quantitative Ecology and Socioeconomics Training (QUEST) Program; Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://goo.gl/7HQS1D

Abstract:
Under most circumstances, more frequent updating of stock assessments and minimizing the lag time in which fisheries dependent and independent data can be incorporated into the stock assessment will, in the long run, allow for higher annual catch limits. Stock assessment updating and reducing data management lags are costly. We use a management strategy evaluation to estimate the change in catch limits, and then deconstruct an economic analysis of the benefits of the different catch levels to see the impact each of the economic elements play in generating an economic benefits. We apply this approach to the mid-Atlantic summer flounder fishery and simulate harvests from 2014-2040. We first use average price to obtain revenues, then add discounting, demand driven prices for revenues, industry profits, consumer surplus, and finally, recreational values. While it would be desirable to conduct similar analysis for all major species being assessed, this would be expensive and time consuming. The deconstructed analysis helps reveal factors indicative of returning the greatest value. For example, total revenues of a fishery are not as important of an indicator as demand elasticity is, since elasticity indicates to what extent fishery profits are sensitive to quota changes as well as impacts on consumers. Fisheries with major recreational components, where the species is a major direct target of recreational anglers, so other species are imperfect substitutes, would also yield large returns. About the speaker: Doug Lipton is the Senior Scientist for Economics at NOAA Fisheries. Lipton started his career at NMFS Headquarters in the Office of Science and Technology as a fisheries biologist and then industry economist while obtaining his Ph.D. in Agricultural & Resource Economics (AREC) at the University of Maryland. He spent 25 years as a faculty member (now emeritus) in AREC at the University of Maryland and also was Program Leader for the Maryland Sea Grant Extension Program. He currently serves on the Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management Council Scientific and Statistical Committee, is on the Board of Directors for the International Institute for Fisheries Economics and Trade and the Marine Resource Economics Foundation.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

8 June 2017

Title: How Long-Term Atlantic Variability Impacts El Niño
Presenter(s): Aaron Levine, Postdoctoral Research Associate, NOAA/PMEL
Date & Time: 8 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Aaron Levine, Postdoctoral Research Associate, ​​NOAA/PMEL

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
The observational record shows active decades with stronger El Nino events and quiescent decades with weaker events. However, it is unclear if these fluctuations are random internal fluctuations or related to other long climate variability. Here we show a strong influence of the Atlantic on the these fluctuations in El Nino strength. Changes in tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures have previously shown to impact the east-west differences in the tropical Pacific Ocean. We show that these changes to the east-west circulation in the tropical Pacific modify El Nino both over the course of any given year and over the course of decades. We find the distinct fingerprint of this variability in observations, ocean reanalyses and conceptual and coupled model experiments.

Bio(s):
Dr. Aaron Levine is currently a National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at NOAA/PMEL. His work at PMEL has focused on improved understanding of El Nino and its interactions with the tropical Pacific climate and weather. Before coming to PMEL, he received his MS and PhD in Meteorology from the University of Hawaii where his dissertation was on the interaction of weather and El Nino and the creation of Extreme El Nino events.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: A Coastal Conservation Leadership Program in Washington State
Presenter(s): Casey Dennehy, Surfrider Foundation, Washington Coast Program Manager
Date & Time: 8 June 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Casey Dennehy, Surfrider Foundation, Washington Coast Program Manager Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/705023728949816835

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
This webinar will describe a unique program on the Washington coast that has been offered to coastal conservation leaders the last two years. Known as the Surfrider Leadership Academy, the program follows the principles of networked leadership, collaboration, Marshall Ganz's public narrative framework, and concludes with a self-identified group project.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 8 June 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: The solution to pollution is evolution? The genomic landscape of rapid repeated adaptation to human-altered environments
Presenter(s): Dr. Andrew Whitehead, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Toxicology
Date & Time: 8 June 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Andrew Whitehead, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Toxicology

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D526935352%26UID%3D4647882352%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAN_oul_Msj6_8yI0LUdDakhEeIYXrTL5IqSLlWOiMbsKCIN_5brDyh6G_5m2Ys4C-ztaRoVXncLpId1FyyQz9Sv0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm534c3e1cf2a5377453ead1c750dd8129 Join by phone (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 802 536 319 Need help? contact support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

Abstract:
A hallmark of biological systems is their ability to evolve and adapt to changing environmental conditions. In particular, species have been successfully evolving adaptations to chemical poisons for billions of years. They key challenge in the anthropocene is the severity and pace of change of the chemical environment. What are the attributes of species that contribute to their adaptive potential in the face of such environmental change, and what kinds of genetic changes are necessary to rescue species from extinction? Killifish are abundant in estuaries along the Atlantic coast of North America, including in sites polluted with common and persistent organic pollutants. Rapid adaptive evolution has increased the frequency of genetic variants that contribute to heritable chemical tolerance in polluted sites. We present an analysis of 400 whole genome sequences and transcriptomics to reveal the genes and pathways that affect chemical sensitivity in these populations. Importantly, this evolutionary process, coupled with our analysis, has revealed the types of sensitivity-affecting mutations that remain fit in nature. We also present some preliminary QTL mapping that links sensitivity to particular classes of chemicals to particular genes. We propose a comparative QTL mapping program to link sensitivity to specific chemicals (dioxins, PCBs, PAHs) and resistance to particular developmental phenotypes (cardiovascular system and craniofacial developmental abnormalities) in multiple genetic backgrounds. This program should reveal the types of mutations, and the genes and pathways in which they may occur, that affect sensitivity to multiple developmental syndromes upon exposure to environmental pollution while maintaining animal fitness in the real world.

Bio(s):
Andrew Whitehead is the lab PI. Dr. Whitehead earned his B.Sc. from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada, and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Davis (with Dr. Susan Anderson at Bodega Marine Lab). He then went on to do post-doctoral research at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (with Dr. Douglas Crawford) , and was an Assistant then Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at LSU before moving to UC Davis in summer 2012. Research interests include evolutionary and ecological functional genomics, population genomics, conservation genetics, stress physiology, and ecotoxicology. He is a member of the Population Biology Graduate Group, the Graduate Group in Ecology (Chair of the Ecological Genomics and Genetics AOE), the Integrative Genetics and Genomics Graduate Group, and the Pharmacology and Toxicology Graduate Group. He is a member of the UC Davis Center for Population Biology, and the Coastal and Marine Sciences Institute. Brief research theme description: Activities in the Whitehead lab revolve around Environmental, Ecological, and Evolutionary Genomics research. These lines of research seek to understand how genomes integrate cues from, respond to, and are shaped by the external environment. We examine genomic responses to stress that occur over physiological timescales (acclimation responses) and over evolutionary timescales (adaptive responses). Many complementary approaches are integrated into our program, including genome expression profiling, population genetics/genomics and phylogenetics, and physiology, to study how individuals and species respond to and adapt to environmental stress. Stressors of interest include those that are natural (temperature, salinity) or of human origin (pollutants, climate change). We have both a basic science angle to our research program, and also an applied angle that leverages genomic information to diagnose and solve environmental problems.

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13 June 2017

Title: Modeling and Observing Hydrodynamics and Carbonate Chemistry over Florida's Shallow and Deep Coral Reefs
Presenter(s): Mingshun Jiang, PhD, Associate Research Professor, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Florida Atlantic University. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: 13 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mingshun Jiang, PhD, Associate Research Professor, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Florida Atlantic University. Presenting remotely,

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar. This seminar is part of a Special Series: Recent Advances in Coastal Physical Oceanography, co-hosted by Yizhen.Li@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Abundant and diverse corals and associated fish communities live in shallow to mesophotic waters on Florida and Cuban continental shelves, and deep waters in the Florida Straits. These coral communities are facing significant stresses from various sources including land-based pollution, heat, and high CO2 concentrations. This presentation summarizes results from three recent projects, which investigate three different areas of coral reefs using field observations and modeling. The focuses are on the carbonate chemistry and the controlling physical-biogeochemical processes. In the St. Lucie coral reefs, FL, several field surveys were conducted in 2015-2016 using a lightweight tow vehicle Acrobat integrated with CTD, pH and pCO2 sensors. The results from these and a numerical model demonstrate that the freshwater plume transports nutrients and carbon from St. Lucie watershed and Lake Okeechobee to the reef areas, affecting the water quality and carbonate chemistry. A recent cruise surveyed a number of mesophotic reefs around Cuban Islands for the first time using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) integrated with CTD, pH and pCO2 sensors. Abundant corals, sponges and algae were found. Some preliminary results regarding the carbonate chemistry over these reefs will be presented, which indicate generally healthy conditions but significant heterogeneity in pH within short distances of a few hundred meters. Finally, a brief summary of modeling results over two deep coral reefs in the southern Florida Straits will be presented, which show strong temporal variability of the carbonate chemistry due to the upwelling driven by the meandering of Florida Current and meso- and submeso-scale eddies.

Bio(s):
Dr. Mingshun Jiang is an associate research professor at the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Florida Atlantic University. Dr. Jiang receives BS degree in applied mathematics and fluid mechanics from Peking University, China, and PhD degree in physical oceanography from Ocean University of Qingdao, China. His research interests are ocean dynamics, nutrients and carbon cycles, and ecosystem dynamics. His recent works include modeling and observations of physical processes, carbon cycle, carbonate chemistry in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, Florida continental shelf, and Florida Straits. Dr. Jiang has published more than 30 peer reviewed scientific papers.

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Title: Changes to New England States Heat Alert Approach
Presenter(s): Rick Watling, U.S. National Weather Service) and Katie Bush, New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services
Date & Time: 13 June 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Watling (U.S. National Weather Service) and Katie Bush (New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services) Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Michelle Hawkins, Jannie Ferrell - NWS

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2502147996158952706 Webinar ID: 582-833-779

Abstract:
U.S. National Weather Service offices (Caribou, ME; Gray, ME; Burlington, VT; Taunton, MA and Upton, NY) in collaboration with the Northeast Regional Heat Collaborative, have lowered Heat Advisory criteria for all of New England for this summer season. Studies and research conducted by the Collaborative show that emergency department visits and deaths from heat increase significantly on days when the heat index reaches 95 degrees F or higher. Thus, the triggering threshold for heat advisories has been changed. It is expected that this change will alert people sooner to impending heat threats and if acted upon, reduce the number of emergency department visits. In this webinar Rick Watling (U.S. National Weather Service) and Katie Bush (New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services) will describe all that was involved in developing the new heat advisory triggering criteria, the resulting alert/communications and how it relates to adjacent areas not using the same alert criteria, and discuss some of the challenges involved in developing heat health policy from the weather agency and health agency perspectives.

Bio(s):
Dr. Kathleen Bush is the Program Manager for the Environmental Public Health Tracking Program at the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services. Her work focuses on human-environment interactions. Specific areas of interest include the impacts of climate change on health and geospatial analysis of trends. Kathleen completed her Ph.D. in 2011 in Environmental Health Sciences at the University of Michigan, School of Public Health, where she was also a Graham Environmental Sustainability Doctoral Fellow. Rick Watling is the Operations Improvement Meteorologist for the NWS Eastern Region Headquarters and has worked for the US government more than 40 years. Seminar POC for questions: Michelle.Hawkins@noaa.gov

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

14 June 2017

Title: Understanding Arctic Sea Ice and Ecology from the Floe Scale Up
Presenter(s): Christopher Horvat, PhD, Polar Oceanographer and Climate Scientist, Brown University and Harvard University
Date & Time: 14 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Christopher Horvat, PhD, Polar Oceanographer and Climate Scientist, Brown University and Harvard University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar, coordinated by Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Earth's sea ice cover is a vast, multi-scale system made up made up of a myriad number of distinct pieces, known as floes, with sizes that range over many orders of magnitude. In the summer, ice floes are covered in melt ponds that form elaborate formations with wide ranges of size on the ocean surface. The evolution of Arctic climate and ecology is strongly tied to the multi-scale heterogeneity of sea ice, in particular the distribution of these floe sizes and the degree of ponding in the summer months. Yet modern climate models still do not simulate melt pond formation, the evolution of floes, or the floe size distribution. Chris will discuss how melt ponding on sea ice floes has dramatically shifted the ecological status quo in the Arctic. The thinning of sea ice in the past several decades allows for extensive and frequent under-ice phytoplankton blooms, which can have a significant effect on the ecological and carbon cycle in the high latitudes. He'll then discuss how the thermodynamic evolution of sea ice is set by the interaction of sea ice floes and ocean eddies, and how these are determined by the floe size distribution. He will present a model for the joint statistical distribution of floe sizes and thicknesses (FSTD) suitable for future climate studies.

Bio(s):
Christopher Horvat is a polar oceanographer and climate scientist, who sits at the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research in Wellington, NZ as a Frank Knox Memorial Fellow from Harvard University. In July, he will be the subject and participant in the upcoming adventure documentary Enduring Ice to Kennedy Channel, Canada. He will join the Institute at Brown for Environmental Studies as a NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoc and Voss Postdoctoral Fellow in 2018. He received his PhD from Harvard University in 2017.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

15 June 2017

Title: Waves of Change: How waves can alter oyster reef communities
Presenter(s): Jessica Lunt, Ph.D., Biologist, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, FL; Joseph W. Reustle, Ph.D. Student, Texas A&M University- Corpus Christi; and Delbert L. Smee, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Texas A&M University- Corpus Christi. Jessica will present at NOAA in Silver Spring; Joseph and Delbert will participate remotely
Date & Time: 15 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jessica Lunt, Ph.D., Biologist, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, FL Joseph W. Reustle, Ph.D. Student, Texas A&M University- Corpus Christi Delbert L. Smee, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Texas A&M University- Corpus Christi (Jessica will present at NOAA in Silver Spring; Joseph and Delbert will participate remotely)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Hydrodynamic forces associated with waves influence the structure and function of rocky intertidal communities, but, their effects on species composition and morphology within other marine communities have not been well studied. We investigated wave effects on biodiversity and species morphology in oyster reef communities by comparing species differences on windward vs. leeward sides of oyster reefs (Crassostrea virginica). Instrumentation and barnacle (Amphibalanus eburneus) morphology indicated waves were higher and current speed was faster on the windward sides of oyster reefs. Leeward sites had a greater abundance and diversity of species. Windward sites had fewer fish species though there was no difference in the size of fish found on either side of the reef. Thus, waves influenced species diversity, abundance, and size of oyster reef associated species. Our findings indicate that oyster reefs can decrease wave height and can provide shoreline protection, an ecosystem service often mentioned but rarely measured.

Bio(s):
Dr. Jessica Lunt received her Bachelor of Science in Marine Biology from the University of West Florida in Pensacola, Florida. She pursued her Ph.D. in Marine Biology at Texas A&M University, attending the Corpus Christi campus, where she worked on the effects of turbidity and wave energy on oyster reef communities. She is currently a research scientist at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History's Smithsonian Marine Station in Fort Pierce, Florida. Her current work focuses on restored oyster reef monitoring, bivalve feeding behavior, and long-term monitoring of infaunal communities in the St Lucie River and Indian River Lagoon. Dr. Lee Smee is an Associate Professor of Marine Biology and coordinator of the undergraduate biology program at Texas A&M University " Corpus Christi (TAMUCC). Dr. Smee has served on the faculty at Texas A&M " Corpus Christi since 2006, after receiving his Ph.D from Georgia Tech. He completed his undergraduate degree in biology at Piedmont College in 1996 and earned a MS degree from Georgia Souther University in 1998. During his tenure at TAMUCC, his lab has conducted studies in rocky intertidal communities in Maine as well as oyster, marsh, and seagrass communities in the Gulf of Mexico. Current research topics in his lab include oyster reef ecology, mangrove encroachment into Texas estuaries, and how pesticide runoff affects blue crabs. He was instrumental in forming a partnership with the Smithsonian to form the first MarineGEO site in the Gulf of Mexico. Dr. Smee is an Eagle Scout and assistant scoutmaster of Troop 226 in Corpus Christi. He is the 2016-17 recipient of the Texas A&M University" Corpus Christi Faculty Excellence Award in Research and Scholarly Activity. Joseph Reustle is a Doctoral student in the Marine ecology lab at Texas A&M University- Corpus Christi where he works with Dr. Smee. He attended the University of California at Davis where he obtained a Bachelor of Science. Joey worked on several projects as an undergraduate, including fish strike kinematics and phenotypic plasticity in barnacles. Currently, Joey is researching the effects of turbidity on oyster reef communities and the chemical ecology of parasitic barnacles and their castrated hosts. In 2016, Joey was awarded an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 June 2017

Title: Fires, flares, boats and lights: product lines from nighttime VIIRS data
Presenter(s): Chris Elvidge, Earth Observation Group, NOAA NCEI
Date & Time: 16 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building 10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham MD 20706
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Chris Elvidge, Earth Observation Group, NOAA NCEI

Sponsor(s):
JPSS Science Seminar. POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m1819a528c66b8ad213a95183ae295a24 Meeting number: 747 232 716 Host key: 156633 Meeting password: Jpss2017!

Abstract:
VIIRS collects two styles of low light imaging data at night. This includes the day/night band (DNB) and daytime channels that continue to collect at night (M7,8,10). EOG has developed three global product lines based on VIIRS low light imaging data: 1) VIIRS boat detections (VBD), VIIRS nightfire (VNF) and VIIRS nighttime lights (VNL). VBD and VNF are produced in near real time, with a nominal four hour temporal latency. VNL production requires extensive filtering to exclude sunlit, moonlit, and cloudy observations, making annual products most appropriate. The data products are available at: https://ngdc.noaa.gov/eog/.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Visual tools for communicating complex ocean environment issues to diverse audiences
Presenter(s): Simone Alin, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
Date & Time: 16 June 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Recorded seminar here: https://www.z2systems.com/track//servlet/DisplayLink?orgId=n682&emailId=39feda070792d8ccf5c56e0d17d190ea3m8319139f&&linkId=860&targetUrl=http://necan.org/necan-webinar-series-recent-upcoming Seminar previously scheduled for June 6 was postponed to June 16. Please note that if you previously registered for the June 6 seminar you will need to re-register (see below). If you are unable to attend this webinar, it will be recorded and available on the NECAN website, www.necan.org.

Presenter(s):
Simone Alin, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
www.necan.org. POC: Jackie Ball

Remote Access:
https://www.z2systems.com/track//servlet/DisplayLink?orgId=n682&emailId=27b84e1c75f02dc1be6f9dc6772b33d22m7958127b&&linkId=840&targetUrl=https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3470398829526541571 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing detailed information about this webinar and the system requirements. Please note that although the presentation doesn't begin until 1:00 pm ET, the webinar will be available starting at 12:30 pm ET so that individuals may join early to avoid any technical issues.

Abstract:
As a scientist studying ocean acidification, I am aware of linkages across many processes and stressors that occur in coastal and estuarine environments and may affect marine plants or animals that have economic, cultural, recreational, health, or food security significance to regional human populations. I have also experienced the challenges of communicating to diverse audiences about these complex and interacting issues. Many of the topics involved may be abstract or too technical for many audiences and, further, occur in environments that many may never see or experience first-hand or close-up. To facilitate communication, I partnered with the University of Washington Center for Environmental Visualization to create graphic representations of marine ecosystems, the processes and stressors that occur in them, and some of the pathways through which these may affect human socioeconomic interests. During this presentation, I will walk the audience through the graphics we have created for U.S. West Coast ecosystems to illustrate iconic and economically important organisms in this coastal ecosystem, ecosystem linkages to humans, interactions between ocean acidification and select other stressors on the ecosystem and humans, and Federal management handles as they pertain to some of the iconic species in this region. I welcome feedback from the NECAN community on how these visual tools may be made more useful and/or more accessible to broader user groups and audiences.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

20 June 2017

Title: Toward Evaluating Outcomes and Impacts of co-produced climate science using mixed-method approaches
Presenter(s): Tamara Wall, Deputy Director, Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute
Date & Time: 20 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tamara Wall, Deputy Director, Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Bio(s):
Dr. Tamara Wall is an associate research professor at the Desert Research Institute in Reno, NV and the Deputy Director of the Western Regional Climate Center. Additionally, Dr. Wall works with the Center for Climate, Ecosystems, and Fire Applications, and the California-Nevada Climate Applications Program (part of the national NOAA-sponsored Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments network). Dr. Wall holds a Ph.D. in interdisciplinary studies with an emphasis in hazards geography from The University of Montana. Her work focuses on developing wildfire and climate-related research that can be used in decision making and planning efforts by agencies and organizations.

Abstract:
Resource managers and decision makers are increasingly tasked with integrating science into their decisions about resource management and policy development. This often requires climate scientists, resource managers, and decision makers to work collaboratively throughout the research processes " an approach to knowledge development that is often called co-production of knowledge. Over the last three years, we have synthesized the social science theory of co-production of knowledge, the metrics currently used to evaluate usable or actionable science in several federal agencies, and insights from experienced climate researchers and program managers to develop a set of 45 indicators supporting an evaluation framework for co-produced usable science.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

21 June 2017

Title: Acoustic Monitoring of Marine Mammals within and surrounding the Maryland Wind Energy Area
Presenter(s): Jessica Wingfield, Faculty Research Assistant at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science's Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
Date & Time: 21 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jessica Wingfield, Faculty Research Assistant at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science's Chesapeake Biological Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract:
Offshore windfarms provide renewable energy, but activities during the construction phase can affect marine mammals. To understand how the construction of an offshore windfarm in the Maryland Wind Energy Area (WEA) off Maryland, USA, might impact marine mammals, it is essential to determine their poorly understood year-round distribution. Incorporating more than 18 months of harbor porpoise, dolphin, and large whale detection data from passive acoustic monitoring, generalized auto-regressive moving average and generalized additive models were used to investigate occurrence within and around the Maryland WEA in relation to temporal and environmental variables. Acoustic detection metrics were also compared to habitat-based density estimates for harbor porpoises, which were based on sparse aerial and boat-based sightings. Harbour porpoises occurred significantly more frequently during January to May, and foraged significantly more often in the evenings to early mornings at sites within and outside the Maryland WEA. Harbour porpoise occurrence peaked at sea surface temperatures of 5°C and chlorophyll a concentrations of 4.5 to 7.4 mg m-3. The acoustic detections were significantly correlated with the predicted habitat-based densities, except at the most inshore site. North Atlantic right (Eubalaena glacialis), fin (Balaenoptera physalus), and humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) calls occurred most frequently in the winter and spring. Bottlenose dolphins occurred throughout the year, but were most common in the summer and autumn. This study provides insight into previously unknown fine-scale spatial and temporal patterns in occurrence of cetaceans offshore of Maryland. The results can be used to help inform future monitoring and mitigate the impacts of windfarm construction and other human activities.

Bio(s):
Jessica Wingfield has been a Faculty Research Assistant at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, since January 2015. Her work focuses on the passive acoustic monitoring of harbour porpoises, dolphins and large whales offshore of Maryland, USA. Jessica received her Master of Research in Applied Marine and Fisheries Ecology from the University of Aberdeen in Scotland, UK, in 2014 and her Bachelor of Science degree in Marine Biology from Dalhousie University, Canada, in 2013. Jessica is originally from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The Scientist's Guide to Effectively Communicating Results Using Graphs and Other Visuals
Presenter(s): Jacqui Fenner, Visual Communications Specialist, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 21 June 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3, Rm 3404, Silver Spring, MD or via webinar; see remote access info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jacqui Fenner, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Fisheries Quantitative Ecology and Socioeconomics Training (QUEST) Program; Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://goo.gl/OWFMWh

Abstract:
Understanding best practices for visual communications can be daunting. While scientists are regularly expected to communicate their results through visuals, they are often not trained in modern approaches to visual communications. Ideally, all scientists would have access to a graphic designer to translate their ideas into compelling products. Even without access to a designer, scientists can use some basic tips to improve their visuals, better communicate their science, and engage a broader audience. This talk will explore how scientists can use graphs and other visual elements to better highlight the core message of their results. About the speaker: Jacqui Fenner currently works as a Graphic Designer on the Communications Team for NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology. She began her career studying fisheries ecology and management, specializing in Geographic Information Systems. This led to a career change that involved three of her passions " science, communications, and visual design. As a graphic designer, Jacqui works closely with fisheries scientists, and other members of the Communications Team, to produce a range of communications products for both web and print applications. This includes websites, infographics, presentations, posters, publications, fact sheets, brochures, and more.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title:  A Five-Year Study of Lightning Patterns Across Southcentral Alaska
Presenter(s): Rebecca Duell and Matt Clay, NOAA National Weather Service
Date & Time: 21 June 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rebecca Duell and Matt Clay, NOAA National Weather Service (NWS)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA RISA

Remote Access:
https://accap.uaf.edu/VAWS_Lightning

Abstract:
Lightning Activity Level is a parameter forecasted by the National Weather Service that has important fire weather and safety implications across Alaska. In an effort to improve Lightning Activity Level forecasts across Southcentral Alaska, a study of archived lightning data was performed. Lightning data from 2012-2016 over Southcentral Alaska from the Alaska Lightning Detection Network (ALDN) were examined to identify spatial and temporal trends in lightning activity. Lightning event days were broken down both geographically and by lightning frequency, and differences in weather patterns between days with high frequencies of lighting and days with low frequencies of lightning were identified. The five-year lightning climatology will be presented along with a discussion of weather patterns that lead to thunderstorms with varying frequencies of lightning strikes across Southcentral Alaska.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

22 June 2017

Title: Stormwater, Biofilters, and Kangaroos: Investigating Green Infrastructure Down Under
Presenter(s): Emily Parker, 2017 Knauss Fellow, Office of Habitat Conservation, NOAA NMFS
Date & Time: 22 June 2017
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Emily Parker, 2017 Knauss Fellow, Office of Habitat Conservation, NOAA NMFS POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Library Reference Desk: (Library.Reference@noaa.gov); Knauss Fellow Coordinator (June): Aimee Hoover (aimee.hoover@noaa.gov) For remote access: If you are unable to attend in person, please register for the Knauss webinars occurring on Thursday, June 22nd at: https://goo.gl/B0IsNv (Note: This link will also provide access to Rebecca Peters presenting Site Fidelity and Growth Rate of Juvenile Black Sea Bass, Centropristis striata, in the Maryland Coastal Bays Using Mark-Recapture at 12:30pm). After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
Green infrastructure, or low impact development, has the potential to transform urban stormwater runoff from an environmental threat to a valuable water resource. In this presentation, Emily will share some of her research focusing on biofilters (a specific type of green infrastructure) and their ability to remove fecal indicator bacteria (a pollutant responsible for runoff associated inland and coastal beach closures). Emily will also describe her experiences and lessons learned working on an international research partnership between southern California and Melbourne, Australia.

Bio(s):
Emily grew up in northern California. She earned a B.S. in environmental science from UCLA and is now a Ph.D. candidate in environmental engineering at UC Irvine. Emily is enjoying her Knauss fellowship year as a policy analyst for the NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation Restoration Center.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Improved Estimates of Ocean Heat Content from 1960 to 2015
Presenter(s): John Abraham, Professor, School of Engineering, University of St Thomas. Co-authors include: Lijing Cheng, Kevin Trenberth, John Fasullo, Tim Boyer, and Jiang Zhu
Date & Time: 22 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
John Abraham, Professor, School of Engineering, University of St Thomas. Co-authors include: Lijing Cheng, Kevin Trenberth, John Fasullo, Tim Boyer, and Jiang Zhu.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
A number of new techniques are used to quantify the rate of ocean warming over the past 55 years. Since more than 90% of “global warming” ends up in the oceans, if we want to measure global warming, we really need to measure ocean warming. But, measuring the oceans is challenging because they are vast and deep and the instruments we use change over time.This presentation, which is extracted from a recent publication in Science Advances, presents the most updated estimate of this important measurement. We also compare ocean warming with climate model predictions and they are very close.

Bio(s):
Dr. John Abraham is a fluid mechanics expert. He began work on climate change through his desire to improve the quality of temperature measurements made from devices like the Expendable BathyThermograph. He continues to work, with colleagues, on improving ocean temperature measurements and our understanding of climate change.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Site Fidelity and Growth Rate of Juvenile Black Sea Bass, Centropristis striata, in the Maryland Coastal Bays Using Mark-Recapture
Presenter(s): Rebecca Peters, 2017 Knauss Fellow, Office of Science and Technology, NOAA NMFS
Date & Time: 22 June 2017
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rebecca Peters, 2017 Knauss Fellow, Office of Science and Technology, NOAA NMFS POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Library Reference Desk: (Library.Reference@noaa.gov); Knauss Fellow Coordinator (June): Aimee Hoover (aimee.hoover@noaa.gov) For remote access: If you are unable to attend in person, please register for the Knauss webinars occurring on Thursday, June 22nd at: https://goo.gl/B0IsNv (Note: This link will also provide access to Emily Parker presenting Stormwater, Biofilters, and Kangaroos: Investigating Green Infrastructure Down Under at 12:00pm). After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
Studies comparing habitat use and growth rates of fish between habitats within estuaries are needed to more accurately delineate essential fish habitat. Juvenile black sea bass, Centropristis striata, are captured around structured habitats, but few studies have assessed their specific habitat utilization and growth in estuaries. In 2015 and 2016, juvenile eel traps were set at sites with different structured habitats (rock jetty, bridge piling, wood pilings, marsh edge, and seagrass beds), and fish captured from March to December were tagged with external tags in 2015 (n=665) and internal tags in 2016 (n=875) and released at the sites they were captured. Recapture frequencies were 9.3% (2015) and 9.9% (2016). In 2015 all recaptured fish (n=62) were caught in the same location as initial tagging, and in 2016 only two of the recaptured fish (n=87) were caught in different sampling locations than their previous capture. This supports the notion that black sea bass exhibit high site fidelity to structured habitats in estuaries. Overall growth rate in 2015 was 0.39 mm/day ± 0.07 SE, which is similar to growth rate (0.45 mm/day) previously estimated for juvenile C. striata in a New Jersey estuary. The growth rate in 2016 was, however, lower (0.27 mm/day ± 0.02 SE), possibly due to low dissolved oxygen (<4 mg/L) that was observed in summer 2016. Recapture frequencies were highest in both years at two habitat types with artificial structure: bridge pilings and wood pilings, although no significant differences were observed in growth rates among habitat types. Three year-classes (ages 0, 1, and 2) of black sea bass occurred in the MCBs; age 0 fish were most abundant around bridge piling and wood piling sites. These suggest that bridge pilings and wood pilings are important habitats for juvenile C. striata in the MCBs. The results from this study will allow future management to target conservation efforts more effectively to protect and possibly enhance these essential habitats within the MCBs.

Bio(s):
Rebecca attended Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA and received her bachelor of science degree in Biology. After graduation she worked as a marine science educator in the FL Keys and interned with the Shark Population Assessment Group at the NMFS lab in Panama City, FL. She then attended the University of Maryland Eastern Shore in their marine estuarine and environmental science program and re