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OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Past 2019 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

9 January 2019

Title: There is no I in EAFM: Adapting Integrated Ecosystem Assessment for Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas NMFS/NEFSC
Date & Time: 9 January 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Gaichas, Biologist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library.

POC:
EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:


If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7176794265318594306 Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
Resource managers worldwide are being asked to consider the ecosystem while making management decisions. However, it can be difficult to change management systems accustomed to evaluating a constrained set of objectives, often on a species-by-species basis. Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) provides a flexible framework for addressing ecosystem considerations in decision making. IEA was adapted to address species, fleet, habitat, and climate interactions by the US Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) as part of their Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management (EAFM) in 2016. The Council's EAFM framework uses risk assessment as a first step to prioritize combinations of managed species, fleets, and ecosystem interactions for consideration. Second, a conceptual model is developed identifying key environmental, ecological, social, economic, and management linkages for a high-priority fishery. Third, quantitative modeling addressing Council-specified questions and based on interactions identified in the conceptual model is applied to evaluate alternative management strategies that best balance management objectives. As strategies are implemented, outcomes are monitored and the process is adjusted, and/or another priority identified in risk assessment can be addressed. The Council completed an initial EAFM risk assessment in 2017. First, the Council identified a range of ecological, social, and management objectives or risk elements. All objectives/risk elements were evaluated with ecosystem indicators using risk assessment criteria developed by the Council. In 2018, the Council identified summer flounder as a high risk fishery and is now finalizing an EAFM conceptual model. Annual ecosystem reporting updates ecosystem indicators and the risk assessment. The Council's rapid progress in implementing EAFM resulted from positive collaboration between managers, stakeholders, and scientists. Collaboration is essential to IEA and to the success of EAFM.

Bio(s):


Dr. Sarah Gaichas has been a Research Fishery Biologist with the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch at the NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA since September 2011. She is a member of the Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee, has been active in ecosystem reporting and management strategy evaluation for both the Mid-Atlantic and New England Fishery Management Councils. Sarah's primary research is on integrated ecosystem assessment, management strategy evaluation, and ecosystem modeling. Her duties include developing, testing, and using ecosystem data, indicators, and models in natural resource management, and simulation testing management strategies (including analytical tools) that address the needs of diverse ecosystem users. Sarah previously worked at the NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA from 1997-2011 as an observer program analyst, a stock assessment scientist, and an ecosystem modeler. Sarah earned her Ph.D. from the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science in 2006, her M.S from the College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 1997, and her B.A. in English Literature from Swarthmore College in 1991.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Improving Communication of Coastal Flood Warnings to Alaska Communities
Presenter(s): Ed Plumb, National Weather Service
Date & Time: 9 January 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):


Ed Plumb, National Weather Service

Sponsor(s):
Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service POC: Rick Thoman, National Weather Service and Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract:


Coastal flooding and erosion from strong storms pose a significant threat to many Alaska communities. The National Weather Service (NWS) is collaborating with state, regional, local, and tribal organizations to improve impact-based decision support to communities before and during coastal storms. The NWS is also in the process of improving warning messages to rural Alaska in order to effectively communicate threat level, convey risk from storm surge, forecaster confidence, and potential impacts of incoming storms. The NWS is working to incorporate local terminology and place names, traditional knowledge of storm impacts, and storm observations into coastal flood warnings for communities. In order to accomplish this, the NWS is engaging in various workshops, meetings, and performing community visits to interact directly with residents and gain a better understanding of threats to their community. This presentation will highlight recent success the NWS has had in improving two-way communication and warnings to western Alaska communities during coastal flood events.
Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

23 January 2019

Title: What usable science means and how it can be achieved: Lessons from NERRS through the years
Presenter(s): James Arnott, University of Michigan
Date & Time: 23 January 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Please register through GoToWebinar (see below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):


James Arnott, University of Michigan, Email: arnott@umich.edu

Sponsor(s):


NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html).

Abstract:
Since 1998, NERRS has provided competitive funding to generate usable knowledge for coastal and estuarine management. The program's evolution"and the insights from those participating in it"can teach us much about what usable knowledge looks like on the ground and the ways to make it through collaboration. In this webinar, James Arnott will recap his research based on examining 120 past NERRS funded projects and interviewing 40 of their participants. The practical lessons derived from this work suggest that teams of researchers and users working together in collaboration might consider a series of seemingly simple"but often difficult to answer questions"in the process of their work. Questions like: Who are the users? What is use? How do you report on use? What strategies lead to use? What are the benefits of usable knowledge? The history of NERRS research accomplishments demonstrates how many and varied answers to these questions emerge and the importance of taking into account careful consideration of that diversity in planning future projects and programs.

Bio(s):


James Arnott is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Michigan and Associate Director of the Aspen Global Change Institute. James has worked closely with the NERR System during the completion of his doctoral thesis on topics related to science funding, the use of science, and climate change adaptation. In 2011, James was awarded the McCloy Fellowship in Environmental Policy and in 2009 James received a B.A. in Political Science and Economics from Principia College.
Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

28 January 2019

Title: Wildland Fires and Remote Sensing – An Opportunity for Capacity Building and Examination (Webinar Only)
Presenter(s): Evan Ellicott, Associate Research Professor, Department of Geographical Sciences
University of Maryland
Date & Time: 28 January 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: No Physical Location – Webex Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):


Evan Ellicott, Associate Research Professor, Department of Geographical Sciences University of Maryland

Remote Access:

877-401-9225
pc: 53339716

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mbb5accbd091d23d64731b081650d3826
Meeting number: 742 195 670
Host key: 827044
Meeting password: Jpss2019!

Abstract:
Timely and accurate data is needed for both research and operations to develop improved models for wildfire prediction and near-real time situational awareness. Spaceborne assets play a strategic role in providing synoptic and timely data for wildfire monitoring and modeling. The focus of the Proving Ground and Risk Reduction (PGRR) program is identifying, educating, and supporting the user community, soliciting feedback, and simultaneously improving products and access. The goal of this project is to focus on wildland fire community and the use of remotely sensed data and products, in particular the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) active fire (AF) products. This is achieved through user engagement, meeting with regional coordination leaders, both in the U.S. and internationally, to “train the trainers”.
This PGRR AF project supports wildland fire fighting operations, leveraging existing relationships with the National Weather Service (NWS), the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) and their regional centers, and our international partners. Attention was given to the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI), which has seen dramatic impacts from fire recently (e.g. California) while concurrently emphasizing high latitude regions such as Alaska, which must monitor and manage vast areas with little information on the ground.
In this presentation, we begin with an overview of our experience with the PGRR program over the past five years and share lessons learned. We then cover our efforts during the 2018 fire season. This review will discuss capacity building in Southern Africa, the NOAA-funded Visiting Scientist Program (VSP) and associated visits to Geographical Area Coordination Centers (GACCs), and VIIRS active fire product evaluation.

The PGRR VIIRS AF project, much like this session, focuses on aiding decision-making and situational awareness through a circular process of outreach and feedback. The PGRR project started over 5 years ago and has seen, anecdotally, the user knowledge and application of remotely sensed geospatial information for wildland fire applications increase during this time. We believe this program has been successful in achieving some of our goals, but additional work is needed in the international realm and as new satellites come on line.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: When Every Drop Counts: Drought & Climate Outlook for California-Nevada
Presenter(s): Jordan Goodrich, CNAP-RISA, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego; Amanda Sheffield, NOAA-NIDIS; Julie Vano, National Center for Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 28 January 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Note: This webinar may be cancelled, depending on ongoing government shutdown.

Presenter(s):
Jordan Goodrich, CNAP-RISA, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego; Amanda Sheffield, NOAA-NIDIS; Julie Vano, National Center for Atmospheric Research

Seminar sponsor: National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA Climate Program Office

Seminar POC for questions: amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/387106552535054339

Abstract

These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Drought & Climate Update
Jordan Goodrich | CNAP, SIO/UC San Diego

Drought & Climate Outlook
Amanda Sheffield | NOAA/NIDIS

Ways to Make Attribution Studies more relevant to the Water Management Community:
Lessons from Oroville Dam & Hurricane Harvey
Julie Vano | National Center for Atmospheric Research

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

31 January 2019

Title: Does organic matter matter to feeding success of yellow perch larvae in Chesapeake Bay subestuaries?
Presenter(s): Jim Uphoff, Fish Habitat and Ecosystem Assessment Program Chief, Fishing and Boating Services, Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Presenting remotely from Oxford Maryland
Date & Time: 31 January 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Does organic matter matter to feeding success of yellow perch larvae in Chesapeake Bay subestuaries?

Presenter(s):
Jim Uphoff, Fish Habitat and Ecosystem Assessment Program Chief, Fishing and Boating Services, Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Presenting remotely from Oxford Maryland.
Co-authors include: Margaret McGinty, Carrie Hoover, Alexis Park, and Marek Topolski.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:


Remote Access:
We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ , click "guest", and please enter your first and last names. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
We examined whether development negatively influenced watershed organic matter (OM) dynamics, altering zooplankton available for first-feeding Yellow Perch larvae in Chesapeake Bay subestuaries. Successful first-feeding is an important influence on year-class success of fishes. Urbanization may negatively impact quantity of OM by diminishing marshes and forests that provide OM and disconnecting natural OM transport. During 2010-2016, feeding success (ranked from 0 to 4) and diet composition (presence of copepods, cladocerans, or “other”) of 6-9 mm TL larvae (first-feeding) were measured and compared with proportion of samples without OM (OM0) in eight subestuaries with rural to early suburban watershed development. Amount of organic matter present was negatively influenced by development and this relationship was described by a non-linear power function depicted OM0 increasing towards 1.0 (OM completely absent) at a decreasing rate with development. Dome shaped quadratic relationships described how mean fullness rank of early larvae changed with OM0. Presence of copepods also had a significant dome-shaped relationship with OM0 and mean fullness rank was positively and linearly related to presence of copepods, but not remaining food items. Copepods represented a much larger food item. Dome-shaped relationships with feeding variables suggested there might be too much OM (acting as a prey refuge), too little (not enough to support zooplankton), and an optimum amount for first feeding yellow perch larvae. Subestuaries with too little OM were exclusively suburban. Wetlands appeared to be an important source of OM. Absence of OM was linearly and inversely related to wetlands and wetlands were negatively related (inverse power function) to development.

Bio(s):
Jim Uphoff is a native Marylander who received his B.S. from University of Maryland, in 1976. He started with MD DNR in 1978. He has sampled and analyzed most everything that moves in Chesapeake Bay and some things that don't. He is the Fish Habitat and Ecosystem Assessment Program Chief.


Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website.

5 February 2019

Title: Home Front Hawai`i: A Naval Legacy beneath the Sea
Presenter(s): Dr. Hans van Tilburg, Maritime Heritage Program Coordinator, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 5 February 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Hans van Tilburg, Maritime Heritage Program Coordinator, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1125812340237400321

Abstract:
Shipwrecks and other submerged properties tell stories of the past, and some of those stories are about WWII in the Pacific. The Hawaiian Islands were very different during the war period, a plantation territory suddenly witness to the initial attack on Pearl Harbor and subsequent years of intensive combat training both on land and sea. The events of this critical period have left a legacy of sites that act as windows on history, a heritage landscape to be shared in the present.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 February 2019

Title: Mapping Cetacean Sounds in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean with a Wave-Glider
Presenter(s): Lis Bittencourt, Master of Sciences and PhD Oceanography student, Rio de Janeiro State University
Date & Time: 6 February 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Mapping Cetacean Sounds in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean with a Wave-Glider

Presenter(s):
Lis Bittencourt, Master of Sciences and PhD Oceanography student, Rio de Janeiro State University. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:


We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/, enter as "Guest", and please enter your first and last name. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htmAudio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:


Passive acoustic monitoring techniques provide a useful alternative to visual surveys for monitoring of marine mammals, since they are less affected by adverse weather conditions. An autonomous unmanned Wave Glider, equipped with a towed hydrophone and recording system was used to collect acoustic data in the Brazilian offshore waters of the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean. Although high-frequency detections occurred at all hours of the day, the majority occurred during dark hours. Low-frequency detections were not evenly spread through all hours of the day, with the majority of them occurring during dark hours. Encounters composed by high-frequency sounds were separated into seven different groups, probably different species. One of the encounters presented whistles that were previously recorded in the Rio de Janeiro Coast for Steno bredanensis (Rough-toothed dolphin). All of the low-frequency encounters were composed of a type of Balaenoptera brydei (Bryde's whale) call. This type of data collection is unprecedented for the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean and highlighted the use of the sampled area by delphinids on different days and different times of the day, including the dark hours.

Bio(s):


Lis Bittencourt started studying Oceanography in Rio de Janeiro State University in 2008, joining MAQUA lab and getting involved into cetacean research in 2009. Marine bioacoustics has been her major research interest since then, participating in several studies focused on underwater noise pollution, delphinid whistles characterization and passive acoustic monitoring in oceanic environments.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Professional and Technical (ProTech) Services Program Status Update
Presenter(s): Jay Standring, Branch Head, Professional and Technical, ProTech Services Branch, NOAA Acquisition and Grants Office, Strategic Sourcing Acquisition Division
Date & Time: 6 February 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):


Jay Standring, Branch Head, Professional and Technical (ProTech) Services Branch, NOAA Acquisition and Grants Office, Strategic Sourcing Acquisition Division

POC:

Outreach Librarian, Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:


Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6443712479685659651 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:


This presentation will provide the status of the ProTech Domain acquisitions and program.

Bio(s):


Jay Standring joined NOAA as the Professional and Technical Services Branch Head in November, 2016. His previous civil service career was with the Department of Defense (Navy and Marine Corps).
Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Art of the Deep: Painting in Tandem with Oceanographic Research
Presenter(s): Artist Lily Simonson
Date & Time: 6 February 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC3, 2nd Floor., Silver Spring, MD. Remote? Join us via webinar - see access info below.
Description:

OnenOAA Science Seminars

Title:
Art of the Deep: Painting in tandem with oceanographic research

Presenter(s):
Artist Lily Simonson

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library, SSMC3, 2nd Floor. Point of contact is Amanda.Netburn@noaa.gov

Abstract:


Artist Lily Simonson collaborates with researchers at remote field sites to create larger-than-life paintings of extraordinary organisms and extreme environments. Simonson will discuss the significance of her ongoing interdisciplinary collaborations with oceanographers, having sailed as an artist at sea on six different oceanographic expeditions and deploying twice to Antarctica. Enveloping viewers in dramatic, atmospheric scenes, her paintings engage diverse audiences with current oceanographic discoveries.

Bio(s):


Lily Simonson has sailed as the artist-in-residence aboard the E/V Nautilus and R/Vs Melville and Atlantis. As the recipient of the National Science Foundation Antarctic Artists & Writers Award, Lily Simonson scuba-dived daily under the ice-covered McMurdo Sound in Antarctica. Her current solo exhibition Lily Simonson: Painting the Deep will be on view at the Harvard Museum of Natural History until June 30, 2019 and her work has appeared in a range of media outlets, including Interview Magazine, MTV, Atlas Obscura, Pacific Standard, the Los Angeles Times, and LA Weekly.
Visit the NOAA Central Library's Brown Bag Page for upcoming and archived events!

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Email your suggestions, brown bag ideas and questions to library.brownbag@noaa.gov
Title: Valuing climate information
Presenter(s): Malgosia Madajewicz, Columbia University and Meri Davlasheridze, Texas A&M University
Date & Time: 6 February 2019
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):


Malgosia Madajewicz (Columbia University) and Meri Davlasheridze (Texas A&M University)

Seminar sponsor:

NOAA / OAR / CPO / RISA Program / CCRUN RISA

Remote Access:


Register http://whoozin.com/7VF-TFX-XKUR ; view webinar: https://vimeo.com/315742991

Abstract:
The demand for climate information that can guide climate risk management and adaptation is growing rapidly. Scientists, decision makers, and funders are considering how to design programs and projects that provide climate information to decision makers and ones that apply climate information to improve risk management and adaptation. Funders want to quantify the improvements that result in order to justify investments in providing climate information for decision-making. However, evidence regarding how effectively different approaches to providing and applying climate information improve outcomes, and therefore what socio-economic benefits they produce, is still limited. Evidence of benefits should guide the design of programs and projects.

Dr. Malgosia Madajewicz will discuss the approaches and methods used to determine the socio-economic benefits produced by climate information and the issues that complicate the task. She will present ongoing research that is assessing the value of climate information in two different contexts. She will discuss the agenda for research that can improve our understanding of effective approaches to providing and applying climate information.

Dr. Meri Davlasheridze will present a paper titled “The effects of adaptation measures on hurricane-induced property losses: Which FEMA investments have the highest returns?” which provides an example of an indirect approach to assessing the potential value of climate information. The following is the abstract of the paper:

This paper evaluates the relative effectiveness of FEMA expenditures on hurricane-induced property losses. We find that spending on FEMA ex-ante mitigation and planning projects leads to greater reductions in property losses than spending on ex-post adaptation programs " specifically, a one percent increase in annual spending on ex-ante risk reduction and warning projects reduces damages by 0.21 percent while a one percent increase in ex-post recovery and clean-up spending reduces damages by 0.12. Although both types of program spending are effective, we find the marginal return from spending on programs that target long-term mitigation and risk management to be almost twice that of spending on ex-post recovery programs. With the predicted increases in the frequency and severity of North Atlantic hurricanes in the future, our findings suggest there are important potential gains that could be realized from the further diversification of FEMA spending across project categories.

Seminar POC for questions: sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

7 February 2019

Title: Linking theory and data to support the adaptive management of Marine Protected Areas
Presenter(s): Will White, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 7 February 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Will White, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Abstract:
Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an increasingly common conservation and management tool worldwide. Typically, managers expect that after fishing ceases inside an MPA, previously fished populations will steadily increase in abundance as they return to unfished levels. Hence adaptive management typically involves examining the ratio of fish density after:before MPA implementation or inside:outside MPAs. However, the expectation of a steady, positive increase in population density inside MPAs is complicated by two factors: A) the expected increase depends on the level of fishing pre-MPA, which is usually unknown, and B) high variability in larval recruitment to populations in MPAs, both over time (pulses and droughts) and over space (hotspots and coldspots) makes post-MPA trajectories variable. I use examples from southern and central California MPAs to show how we can use dynamic and statistical models to address these problems. First, I show how we can use dynamic models to estimate the pre-MPA fishing rate and make short-term forecasts for population trajectories. Then, in a more data-limited case, I show how statistical models reveal the strong influence of larval recruitment variability on overall fish abundance inside MPAs, but how MPA effects are still revealed by population size structure. Together these approaches can help guide short-term management decisions in an uncertain and highly variable coastal environment.

BIO

Will White studied at Davidson College, NC (BS in Biology, 2000) before earning his PhD at the University of California Santa Barbara (2007). His dissertation combined field observations and theoretical investigations on the population dynamics of coral reef fishes. He was then a postdoc at the University of California Davis (2007-2010), where spent most of his time working on spatial population models to guide the statewide marine protected area planning process underway in California during 2006-2012. This work eventually led to a role on the Science Advisory Team for that process during 2009-2011.

In 2010, White took a position as Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology and Marine Biology at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, where he continued research on marine protected areas and began to work on the management and conservation of eastern oysters and other North Carolina fisheries. In 2017, he had the opportunity to return to the west coast as Assistant Professor of Nearshore Fisheries Oceanography at the Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station at Oregon State.

White's research links statistical and dynamic models to empirical datasets, often seeking to detect subtle patterns in noisy data. His research topics have spanned pelagic larval dispersal and mortality, stock discrimination using otolith chemistry, behavioral ecology, stochastic population dynamics, and state-space modeling. His expert testimony has been used in cases argued before the U.S. Supreme Court, and has informed multiple fishery management processes in California. This research is funded by the National Science Foundation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Sea Grant, and various state fishery management agencies.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

12 February 2019

Title: Interconnection Between the Meridional Overturning Circulation, Atmospheric Forcing, and Sea Level in the Subtropical North Atlantic
Presenter(s): Dr. Denis Volkov, Associate Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 12 February 2019
11:00 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):


Dr. Denis Volkov, Associate Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR AOML

POC:

patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/417603629

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 417-603-629

Abstract:


The climate of the North Atlantic is influenced by the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) as it transports heat from the South Atlantic toward the subpolar North Atlantic. This study investigates the reasons for the observed correlations between the AMOC and sea level in the subtropical North Atlantic, focusing on coastal sea level. Specifically, the present study adds a novel element to the existing canon in that it reports on the correlation between the AMOC transport measured at 26.5N and the Mediterranean Sea level. During the seminar, we will explore whether both the AMOC and sea level are driven by the same processes, and/or whether the AMOC can provide a forcing that affects sea level. We will also investigate the relationship between the AMOC-modulated large-scale heat divergence and sea level along both the western and eastern boundaries of the subtropical North Atlantic.

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Title: Current development of Japan Meteorological Agency global NWP system
Presenter(s): Teppei Kinami, Japan Meteorological Agency, JMA-visiting NCEP/EMC
Date & Time: 12 February 2019
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Online and at NCWCP rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):


Teppei Kinami, Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA)-visiting NCEP/EMC Host: Information for EMC seminars are posted from EMC seminar web site:
http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

Abstract:


In this seminar, I will provide the current development of the global NWP system on Numerical Prediction Division of Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA-NPD). JMA-NPD is operating the Global Spectrum Model (GSM) for the short- and medium-range forecast, a global ensemble prediction system for medium-range forecast (using initial perturbations with SV method and LETKF) and a global data assimilation system (4D-Var). I will introduce the overview of these system, the development from 2017 and JMA future plans.
https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/abstract.2019/Kinami.html

Remote Access:
JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4
Meeting number: 900 826 795
Meeting password: a3YhdEPN
JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3)
1-877-953-0315
1-517-268-7866 (toll number)
Participant: 1262920#
Contact: Michiko Masutani (masutani@umd.edu)

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13 February 2019

Title: There is no I in EAFM: Adapting Integrated Ecosystem Assessment for Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas NMFS/NEFSC
Date & Time: 13 February 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):


Sarah Gaichas, Biologist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):


NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract:


Resource managers worldwide are being asked to consider the ecosystem while making management decisions. However, it can be difficult to change management systems accustomed to evaluating a constrained set of objectives, often on a species-by-species basis. Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) provides a flexible framework for addressing ecosystem considerations in decision making. IEA was adapted to address species, fleet, habitat, and climate interactions by the US Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) as part of their Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management (EAFM) in 2016. The Council's EAFM framework uses risk assessment as a first step to prioritize combinations of managed species, fleets, and ecosystem interactions for consideration. Second, a conceptual model is developed identifying key environmental, ecological, social, economic, and management linkages for a high-priority fishery. Third, quantitative modeling addressing Council-specified questions and based on interactions identified in the conceptual model is applied to evaluate alternative management strategies that best balance management objectives. As strategies are implemented, outcomes are monitored and the process is adjusted, and/or another priority identified in risk assessment can be addressed. The Council completed an initial EAFM risk assessment in 2017. First, the Council identified a range of ecological, social, and management objectives or risk elements. All objectives/risk elements were evaluated with ecosystem indicators using risk assessment criteria developed by the Council. In 2018, the Council identified summer flounder as a high risk fishery and is now finalizing an EAFM conceptual model. Annual ecosystem reporting updates ecosystem indicators and the risk assessment. The Council's rapid progress in implementing EAFM resulted from positive collaboration between managers, stakeholders, and scientists. Collaboration is essential to IEA and to the success of EAFM.

Bio(s):
Dr. Sarah Gaichas has been a Research Fishery Biologist with the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch at the NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA since September 2011. She is a member of the Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee, has been active in ecosystem reporting and management strategy evaluation for both the Mid-Atlantic and New England Fishery Management Councils. Sarah's primary research is on integrated ecosystem assessment, management strategy evaluation, and ecosystem modeling. Her duties include developing, testing, and using ecosystem data, indicators, and models in natural resource management, and simulation testing management strategies (including analytical tools) that address the needs of diverse ecosystem users. Sarah previously worked at the NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA from 1997-2011 as an observer program analyst, a stock assessment scientist, and an ecosystem modeler. Sarah earned her Ph.D. from the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science in 2006, her M.S from the College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 1997, and her B.A. in English Literature from Swarthmore College in 1991.

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Title: Climbing the Ecosystem Based Fishery Management (EBFM) ladder to get ahead of red tide on the Florida West Shelf
Presenter(s): Mandy Karnauskas, NMFS/SEFC
Date & Time: 13 February 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):


Mandy Karnauskas, Ecosystem Science Lead, Southeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):


NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract:


Red tide is a phenomenon that occurs in the Gulf of Mexico due to blooms of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis and the toxic brevetoxins produced by this organism can have severe impacts on ecosystems. The Southeast Fisheries Science Center and Gulf of Mexico Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program have being working to understand the impacts of red tides on federal fishery stocks and account for these impacts in the stock assessment and management process in the Gulf. A series of stakeholder workshops in 2018 revealed multi-faceted impacts of red tide blooms on fishing communities and highlighted the severity of the ongoing red tide event, which has persisted since late 2017. A collaborative response was developed with the purpose of documenting the impacts of the current bloom, understanding the bloom ecology, and learning how to best predict and respond to future events. I will discuss the evolution of red tide research in the Southeast region, from incorporating environmental information into single species frameworks, to managing for red tide in the context of ecosystem-based management.

Bio(s):


Mandy Karnauskas is a fisheries biologist and serves as the Ecosystem Science Lead for the NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center. She is a member of the Gulf of Mexico Integrated Ecosystem Assessment team and the U.S. Focal Point for the Gulf of Mexico Large Marine Ecosystem Project. Her research interests include fisheries oceanography, developing indicators of ecosystem status, and collaborating on interdisciplinary approaches to support ecosystem-based management. Mandy served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Haiti, earned a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and a Ph.D. in marine biology and fisheries from the University of Miami.

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Title: Modeling Aerosols in the Stratosphere: Background and Smoke
Presenter(s): Pengfei Yu, NOAA ESRL CSD and CU CIRES
Date & Time: 13 February 2019
5:30 pm - 6:30 pm ET
Location: Room 2A305, DSRC (NOAA Building), 325 Broadway, Boulder CO
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Pengfei Yu, NOAA ESRL CSD and CU CIRES

Sponsor(s):
NOAA ESRL Chemical Science Division (See https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/csd/seminars/).
POC: please contact Rebecca Washenfelder (Rebecca.Washenfelder@noaa.gov) or Sean Davis (Sean.M.Davis@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Aerosol is one of the most important climate change drivers from anthropogenic activities. The often overlooked stratospheric aerosols and their interaction with climate remain unclear and of large uncertainties. In this presentation I am going to introduce the most recent work I am involved to study the composition, transport and physical properties of the stratospheric aerosols with focus on background particles and smoke.

The background stratospheric aerosol increases since preindustrial and therefore contributes to the human-induced climate change. Constrained by satellites and in-situ measurements, we suggest that the stratospheric background aerosol budget has increased by 77% since year 1850. The estimated radiative forcing of the background stratospheric aerosols is about -0.07 Wm-2, which is as large as 20% of the total aerosol radiative forcing of the entire atmosphere [Yu et al., 2016]. Our study reports that the radiative forcing from background stratospheric aerosol of anthropogenic origin, has not been widely considered as a significant influence on the climate system.

We also investigate the transport pathways of the stratospheric aerosols. Yu et al. [2017] demonstrates that the abundant anthropogenic aerosol precursor emissions from Asia coupled with rapid vertical transport associated with monsoon convection leads to significant particle formation in the upper troposphere within the monsoon anticyclone. These particles subsequently spread throughout the entire Northern Hemispheric (NH) lower stratosphere and contribute significantly (∼15%) to the NH stratospheric column aerosol surface area on an annual basis. This contribution is comparable to that from the sum of small volcanic eruptions in the period between 2000 and 2015.

Our most recent study suggests that organics particles injected from large wildfires may also contribute to the stratospheric aerosol budget. Using solar occultation instrument (SAGEIII) on board of international space station and satellite-borne instruments (MLS and CALIOP), we, for the first time tracked the entire lifecycle of the stratospheric smoke for over 8 months. The observations from the space clearly show that the smoke rose from 12km to 23 km in 2 months. In the meantime, combined the space measurements with the aerosol-climate model we are able to quantify the physical-chemical properties of the smoke particles in the stratosphere including the size evolution, lifetime, and the chemical reaction rate with ozone. My research suggests that this "natural experiment" (pyroCb smoke) confirms previous hypothesis on "nuclear winter": the smoke from regional nuclear exchange can have long-lasting global impacts.

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14 February 2019

Title: Operational Gauge-adjusted GHE-based Precipitation Estimation and its Application for Flash-flood Occurrence Prediction Worldwide
Presenter(s): Konstantine P. Georgakakos - Hydrologic Research Center
Date & Time: 14 February 2019
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Conference Room # 2554-2555, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Konstantine P. Georgakakos, Sc.D., Director of Hydrologic Research Center, San Diego, CA

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207
Access code: 997 695 711

Abstract:
The Global HydroEstimator (GHE) precipitation estimates constitute a critical source of low-latency operational data that feed the Flash Flood Guidance system (FFGS), which supports forecasters in 64 countries (currently) by providing to them products relevant to assessments for flash flood occurrence in an operational environment. The system integrates and quality controls data from a variety of remote and on-site sensors to support forecaster products. The talk will discuss the processing of precipitation data and provide information on validation of precipitation estimates from diverse regions.

Bio(s):
Konstantine P. Georgakakos, M.S. and Sc.D. (MIT 1980, 1982). Director of HRC and Adjunct Professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, and at Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Iowa. Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2016), Fellow of the AMS (2006).

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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Title: Initial Geostationary Lightning Mapper Observations
Presenter(s): Scott Rudlosky - NESDIS/STAR/CoRP
Date & Time: 14 February 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Host: STAR Science Seminars
This talk was originally scheduled for 11/15/2018, 12/5/2018, and 1/17/2019


Presenter(s):
Scott Rudlosky - NESDIS/STAR/CoRP

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode: 6070416

Slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190213_Rudlosky.pdf
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190213_Rudlosky.pptx

Abstract:
The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) is the first sensor of its kind, and this technological advancement now allows continuous operational monitoring of lightning on time and space scales never before available. This has led to a golden age of lightning observations, which will spur more rapid progress toward synthesis of these observations with other meteorological datasets and forecasting tools. This study documents the first nine months of GLM observations, illustrating that the GLM captures similar spatial patterns of lightning occurrence to many previous studies. The present study shows that GLM flashes are less common over the oceans, but that the oceanic flashes are larger, brighter, and last longer than flashes over land. The GLM characteristics also help diagnose and document data quality artifacts that diminish in time with tuning of the instrument and filters. The GLM presents profound possibilities, with countless new applications anticipated over the coming decades. The baseline values reported herein aim to guide the early development and application of the GLM observations.

Bio(s):
Dr. Scott Rudlosky is a NOAA/NESDIS physical scientist in the Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) Cooperative Research Program (CoRP). He is co-located with the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites (CICS) in College Park, Maryland. Scott is the NESDIS Subject Matter Expert on lightning and science lead for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). He originally joined CICS as a Research Associate in January 2011 following completion of his M.S. (2007) and Ph.D. (2011) in Meteorology at Florida State University. He obtained his B.S. (2004) in Geography with a specialization in Atmospheric Science from Ohio State University.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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Title: Case Studies in Climate Adaptation in Marine Protected Areas
Presenter(s): Sara Hutto, Ocean Climate Program Coordinator for NOAA Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary and Susan Guiteras, Supervisory Wildlife Biologist with Dept. of Interior US Fish and Wildlife Service
Date & Time: 14 February 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Case Studies in Climate Adaptation in MPAs

Presenter(s):
Sara Hutto of the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary and Susan Guiteras of the US Fish and Wildlife Service

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe);

Webinar Points of Contact: Roldan.Munoz@noaa.gov and Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Climate impacts are already being felt at coastal and marine protected areas, and some managers are moving beyond conducting vulnerability assessment to implementing climate adaptation actions to address climate stressors. These actions range from relatively small-scale efforts (e.g., restoring native oysters that protect shorelines) to major restoration and adaptation projects (e.g., returning tidal flow in wetlands and restoring natural barrier island geomorphology to increase resiliency to storm events). Speakers will present case studies from the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary and Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge.

Bio(s):
Sara Hutto is the Ocean Climate Program Coordinator for Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary where she developed and is implementing the Sanctuary Climate Adaptation Plan, primarily focusing on resilient coasts. Sara provides training for marine protected area managers around the country to undertake climate-smart adaptation planning, and has developed adaptation tools for international audiences. Sara's background is in rocky intertidal ecology, and she holds a Master of Science from Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. Susan Guiteras is the Supervisory Wildlife Biologist of the Coastal Delaware National Wildlife Refuge Complex, and has been with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for 19 years. She coordinates the biology programs at Bombay Hook and Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuges in Delaware. Over the past several years, she has been coordinating the monitoring program associated with the tidal marsh restoration project at Prime Hook NWR that she will be highlighting today.

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Title: Take Only Pictures, Leave No Footprints: Development of an Advanced Technology Untrawlable Habitat Survey in Alaska
Presenter(s): Kresimir Williams, PhD., Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/AFSC/ Midwater Assessment & Conservation Engineering Group
Date & Time: 14 February 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kresimir Williams, PhD., Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/AFSC/ Midwater Assessment & Conservation Engineering Group

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

NWFSC directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm

Abstract:

Stock assessments of Alaskan groundfish conducted by NOAA rely on bottom trawl surveys to estimate abundance trends and demographic structure of fish populations. Trawl surveys are limited to areas where trawling is possible, excluding rocky high relief areas, which are the preferred habitat of important fish species such as rockfishes. This untrawlable habitat (UH) constitutes a substantial portion of the Gulf of Alaska Shelf (~ 20 %) and thus presents unique challenges for the assessment of rockfishes.

Survey abundance estimates are derived by applying density at trawl stations to depth and geographic area-stratified survey grounds, including the UH. Annual changes in availability of rockfish to the survey can result in substantial bias and increased uncertainty in population estimates. A new UH survey time series carried out alongside the existing AFSC bottom trawl survey would greatly reduce these concerns.

AFSC is currently in the development stages for starting a new UH survey. Non-extractive survey methods using cameras and acoustics have been trialed by AFSC scientists in Alaska over the past decade. This potential new survey effort represents an opportunity to start an important time series. The survey design will have to address considerations such survey catchability and selectivity, uncertainty in estimates, and determining the required infrastructure to sustain the survey effort into the future.

Survey methods will be based on innovative technologies that are constantly evolving, such as automated image analysis, camera technology, and development of automated vehicles (e.g. AUV's), as opposed to stationary methods of traditional trawl surveys.

A new time series can also establish new collaborations among NOAA Science Centers and among fisheries scientists and stakeholders. Developing a survey that incorporates fishing vessels as survey platforms and where survey activities make use of standard fishing practices can give stakeholders a direct role in the survey and assessment process.



Bio(s):

Kresimir Williams has worked at the Alaska Fisheries Science center since 2003. Over the years, his work included a variety of marine fisheries survey-related research topics, including trawl selectivity, fish behavior responses to survey gear, and developing efficient, technologically advanced survey methodology. More recently, Kresimir's work has center on quantitative use of image-based data, including application of stereo-camera technology and automated image processing to marine fisheries surveys. Future work will focus on implementing a camera based untrawlable habitat survey in Alaska, as well as continued research into the application of camera and acoustic instruments for fisheries surveys.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
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Title: How to Update Reserve Visitor Centers and Create Workforce Ready Students at the Same Time
Presenter(s): Maggie Pletta, Delaware NERR
Date & Time: 14 February 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Please register through GoToWebinar (see below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Maggie Pletta, Delaware NERR

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html

Abstract:
Technology has become an integral part of environmental education, however purchasing or producing technology can be very cost-prohibitive. As part of a NERRS Science Collaborative Science Transfer grant, the Delaware, Guana Tolomato Matanzas, and Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserves (the clients) partnered with the University of Delaware Introduction to Software Engineering course (the consultants). As part of their coursework, students produced educational computer games that promote interactive, free-choice learning opportunities. Learn more about the process that led to the final educational games that are being installed in the three centers, including the ups and downs of working with students.

Learn more about: http://graham.umich.edu/media/pubs/Rainer-Fact-Sheet.pdf

Bio(s):
Maggie Pletta is the current Education Coordinator at the Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve (DNERR) where she is tasked with managing and leading K-12 fieldtrips and outreach, public programs, family events, and teacher professional development workshops. Prior to her position at DNERR she held positions at the National Park Service, NASA, Educational Non-Profits, and DNREC's Wetland Monitoring and Assessment Program. Her professional areas of interest include teaching people about estuaries and climate change, as well as reconnecting children with nature, and making science fun for all ages.

Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

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Title: New technology for old problems: Exploring the use of eDNA in the reserve system
Presenter(s): Alison Watts, University of New Hampshire and Bree Yednock, South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve
Date & Time: 14 February 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Please register through GoToWebinar (see below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Alison Watts, University of New Hampshire and Bree Yednock, South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html).

Abstract:
Environmental DNA (eDNA), or DNA present in an environmental sample, is emerging as a powerful tool to detect species present in an ecosystem without having to actually capture and identify individual organisms. Fish, invertebrates, and other animals shed DNA, through fragments of tissue and reproductive and waste products, into the environment in which they live. We will present initial results from a pilot environmental eDNA monitoring program being developed and tested at several National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) sites in New England and Oregon. Sampling is conducted in coordination with traditional monitoring programs to validate species identification and detection limits.

This webinar is an opportunity for the research team to engage reserves that are considering eDNA monitoring, and compare notes with other researchers and natural resource managers that are using eDNA approaches.

Bio(s):


Dr. Alison Watts conducts research on water resources at the University of New Hampshire. Bree Yednock, Jason Goldstein, Chris Peter and others from South Slough, Wells and Great Bay NERRs guide the application of this project within each of their Reserves.
Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

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Title: The Art of Knowledge Exchange – Lessons from World Bank Experience and Applications for Marine Conservation
Presenter(s): Phil Karp, Principal Knowledge Management Officer with the World Bank's Social/Urban/Rural Development and Resilience Global Practice, presenting remotely
Date & Time: 14 February 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4, Room 9153 or via webinar, see login info below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
The Art of Knowledge Exchange " Lessons from World Bank Experience and Applications for Marine Conservation

Presenter(s):
Phil Karp, Principal Knowledge Management Officer with the World Bank's Social/Urban/Rural Development and Resilience Global Practice, presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program; point of contact is Robin.Garcia@noaa.gov
Please visit the Coral Collaboration site for slides from past meetings and to submit updates
and/or ideas for a future talk.

Abstract:
The Art of Knowledge Exchange " Lessons from World Bank Experience and Applications for Marine Conservation: Knowledge exchange, or peer-to-peer learning, is a powerful way to share, replicate and scale up practical solutions to challenges and to transform ideas into action. But the challenge remains as to how best to design and execute knowledge exchange to achieve intended results, and how to integrate it as part of larger change processes. Drawing on lessons from its extensive involvement in knowledge exchange, the World Bank has developed a systematic framework and guide to help practitioners to play a more effective role as knowledge providers, brokers, or recipients. At the core of the framework is a 5-step process which can be easily mastered and applied to: connect various actors to new information; catalyze innovative thinking; accelerate decision making; overcome bottlenecks to action; enhance skills to replicate and scale up solutions; and measure results.The webinar will present the framework, introducing the range of knowledge exchange instruments and activities that are available and how these can be blended and sequenced to achieve desired outcomes. This will be followed by a discussion of how this approach can be applied in the realm of marine ecosystem conservation, drawing on several examples. The presentation will also look at the impact and implications of new communications modalities, such as social media, and of new actors, most notably citizen scientists.

Bio(s):
TBD

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19 February 2019

Title: The Price of Extreme Weather Uncertainty: Evidence from Hurricanes
Presenter(s): Brigitte Roth Tran, Federal Reserve Board
Date & Time: 19 February 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library (library.brownbag@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s):
Brigitte Roth Tran, Federal Reserve Board

Join us at the NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, 2nd Floor and via webinar

Abstract:


Despite predictions that extreme weather events will increase in frequency and severity due to climate change, little is known about the uncertainty that local economies face because of extreme weather events like hurricanes. This paper investigates the uncertainty of hurricanes through the lens of financial markets. Hurricanes can form suddenly and their evolving paths create substantial landfall uncertainty over several days. After landfall, there remains uncertainty about the actual impact on firms located in the disaster region. We combine firm establishment-level data with novel hurricane forecast and damage data to examine market responses to both impact and landfall uncertainty. We find evidence for impact uncertainty in option and stock prices. In the days following landfall, options for firms exposed to the landfall region exhibit large increases in implied volatilities. In the months following landfall, the underlying stocks have negatively skewed returns. Using the probability distribution of hurricane forecasts as a measure of landfall uncertainty, we show that a reduction in landfall uncertainty leads to impact uncertainty being more strongly reflected in prices, consistent with investors being attentive to hurricane forecasts.
Accessibility: *This presentation will be recorded and available on our YouTube Channel. If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

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21 February 2019

Title: An Industry Perspective on West Coast Groundfish, or: How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love Stock Synthesis
Presenter(s): Brad Pettinger, Commercial Fisherman & PFMC Council Member, Pacific Fishery Management Council
Date & Time: 21 February 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):


Brad Pettinger, Commercial Fisherman & PFMC Council Member, Pacific Fishery Management Council

Sponsor(s):


NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Abstract:
The relationship between the West Coast fishing industry and the fisheries scientific community has historically been a contentious one. This tumultuous relationship over the last 30+ years is explored through an industry perspective on the groundfish fishery's boom, bust and rebirth. Pettinger gives his take on what went wrong, what went right and why the fishery's promising future is more fragile than we might think.

Bio(s):
Brad Pettinger has participated in the West Coast commercial fishing industry for more than 50 years as a crewman, skipper and a vessel owner. During that time he has trolled for salmon and albacore tuna, trapped Dungeness crab and trawled for pink shrimp and groundfish off of the three West Coast states.

He has also served on numerous fishing industry committees and commissions during his career and worked 15 years as the director of the Oregon Trawl Commission (OTC), departing that position in June 2018. In his time at the OTC, Pettinger worked collaboratively in the Pacific Fishery Management Council process to improve the management of West Coast groundfish fisheries. Under his leadership at the OTC, all three of Oregon trawl fisheries were certified by the Marine Stewardship Council as well-managed and sustainable fisheries.

Pettinger currently owns a vessel that participates in the West Coast trawl groundfish catch share program off the coast of northern California and southern Oregon.

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25 February 2019

Title: Delivering Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Data to Improve Situational Awareness and Decision Making through GeoCollaborate®…and Screening of the New Video Production: The Promise of JPSS
Presenter(s): Dave Jones, Founder & CEO StormCenter Communications, Inc
Date & Time: 25 February 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771, Conference Room S650
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):


Dave Jones, Founder & CEO StormCenter Communications, Inc
Abstract

StormCenter has been working as a JPSS funded task order under the JPSS Fire & Smoke and River, Ice and Flooding initiatives to see how more data can be accessed and delivered into various decision-making environments. GeoCollaborate®, now a federal government SBIR Phase III technology, enables data to be accessed and shared in real-time across any device or platform. The concept behind GeoCollaborate® is simple: allow anyone to author the content of a lead web map, share that content, and collaborate with others in real time on follower web maps. GeoCollaborate® is available on the cloud as a hosted web map and a data sharing and collaborative service. The web maps can be hosted on StormCenter's GeoCollaborate® servers or on any customer web server.

Dave will discuss how GeoCollaborate® has been used in the Fire & Smoke and River, Ice and Flooding initiatives and share ideas as to how it can be applied in recent use cases presented last month. Dave will reference some of the valuable information presented by Evan Ellicott in his January webinar and provide input on possible pathways forward to get more critical information in front of decision makers. Dave will also discuss evolving Operational Readiness Levels (ORLs), a trusted data sourcing initiative that has been adopted by DHS and the utility industry to enable decision makers to rapidly assess the trustworthiness of datasets. This approach can help introduce more JPSS initiative data to the decision making environments.

In addition, Dave will also provide a screening of the new video production: The Promise of JPSS
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eulPPfwexaE&feature=youtu.be

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26 February 2019

Title: From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle Assessment
Presenter(s): James Butler, NOAA
Date & Time: 26 February 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle Assessment

The video and PDFs of the presentations can be accessed here.

Seminar 1 in the Series, "From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle (SOCCR2) Seminar Series". We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28

Presenter(s):

- James Butler, Director, NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, Earth System
Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division. Presenting from Boulder, Colorado
- Gyami Shrestha, Director, U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office, presenting at NOAA SIlver Spring.
Co-authors: Nancy Cavallaro, USDA NIFA National Program Leader and Zhiliang Zhu, USGS, Chief, Biologic Carbon Sequestration Program

12:05pm-12:30pm ET, Part 1: ‘Carbon Cycle Science across NOAA: Discussing the 'Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group"(CCIWG) and SOCCR2 science and societal relevance to NOAA's mission, by James Butler
12:30-12:55pm ET, Part 2: ‘From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle Assessment'
by Gyami Shrestha

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/, enter as "Guest", and
please enter your first and last name. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
What was the fate and impact of carbon in atmospheric, aquatic and terrestrial systems across North America over the last decade? How is it projected to grow and impact future climate change, given current scenarios and how can we harness current scientific and socio-economic advances in our knowledge of the carbon cycle at the intersection of human dimensions to better manage it in order to reduce future climate change risks? The just released Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (#SOCCR2, 2018) tells you all about it. SOCCR2 is a Sustained Assessment series special product of the U.S. Global Change Research Program, spanning 4 sections, 19 chapters and 7 appendices across 878 pages, developed by a 200+ member international team who produced over 6 formal drafts reviewed over 6 times, including by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the general public before final review and released by the 13 agencies of the USGCRP the same day as the 4th National Climate Assessment. To kick-off this special One NOAA SOCCR2 Seminar Series ‘From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle Assessment', this talk will provide an overview of the multiyear, multi-step, interagency assessment formulation and development process. A snapshot of the many scientifically significant and societally relevant key findings, as a preview of the upcoming SOCCR2 OneNOAA Seminar talks the following Tuesdays (12-1 pm ET, Feb 26-May 28) will also be provided. This talk will also focus on potential carbon management strategies along with trade-offs and co-benefits of certain actions, to showcase the carbon cycle science-derived climate change actions and solutions that decades of the interdisciplinary research has rendered possible. SOCCR2 can be downloaded here.

Bio(s):

Jim Butler is Director of Global Monitoring at NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA/ESRL) in Boulder, Colorado, where he has conducted research on climate forcing and ozone depletion for over 30 years. In his current capacity, Dr. Butler oversees the nation's continuing measurements of atmospheric constituents that affect the world's climate, including greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases, aerosols, and surface radiation. Dr. Butler's published works address the distribution and cycling of gases in the atmosphere, their production and consumption by the ocean, their exchange across the air-sea interface, their distribution in polar snow, and methods for their analysis. He is a regular contributor to international documents on stratospheric ozone depletion, atmospheric chemistry, and global warming.

Dr. Gyami Shrestha, directs the US Carbon Cycle Science Program Office activities for the Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group (CCIWG), such as the Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2) which she just completed as Lead Development Advisor & Manager with a 200+ multinational team, as a lead editor, lead author & contributor on multiple chapters (See carbon2018.globalchange.gov). Interfacing with scientists & funders, Gyami supports, conceptualizes, leads & co-leads, community & interagency US Government programs & activities around carbon & climate change. Her domestic & international portfolio helps to catalyze coordinated scientific advances in the context of US Government priorities in collaboration with the CCIWG, UCAR, USGCRP, White House & community. Prior to joining the Program in 2011, she acquired a decade of research, management & consulting experience in NGOs/INGOs, academia & consulting. Previously, Gyami recruited & managed research proposal review panels for King Abdullah City for Science & Technology (KACST) via the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences (AAAS) & completed degrees in Environmental Systems (incl. Air Quality & Health Training Certificate) & Soil Science & Water Resources with Restoration Ecology Certificate. As Science & Technology Policy Fellow at the US National Academy of Sciences, Gyami contributed to research, writing & review panel recruitment to finalize the landmark America's Climate Choices Advancing the Science of Climate Change Report. Prior research includes terrestrial carbon with a focus on pyrolized/black carbon, carbon sequestration, land reclamation & restoration; stakeholder analysis & decision-support tool development for rainwater harvesting, improved cookstoves & gender mainstreaming via participatory tech transfer in rural Nepal and South Asian network building. She also served on Advisory Boards of the University of California & the Nepalese Children's Education Fund. Bio link at https://www.carboncyclescience.us/Gyami-Shrestha

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27 February 2019

Title: Managing bacterial shellfish pathogens in commercial hatcheries
Presenter(s): Diane Kapareoko, NMFS
Date & Time: 27 February 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: WEBINAR Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Join the NOAA Central Library and the Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) for the NOAA Innovators Series! This series will be facilitated by Derek Parks, Technology Transfer Program Manager.

Presenter(s):
Diane Kapareiko, USDOC/NOAA Fisheries/Milford Laboratory, Biological Laboratory Technician-Microbiology

Abstract:
In an effort to improve hatchery production of Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) seed for aquaculture and restoration, NOAA's Milford Laboratory has isolated and evaluated a naturally-occurring beneficial bacterial isolate, probiotic strain OY15 (Vibrio alginolyticus) from the digestive glands of adult Eastern oysters. This probiotic strain has demonstrated significant protective effects against a shellfish larval pathogen B183 (Vibrio corallyliticus) in experimental larval trials and can improve survival by 20-35%. Advancing these efforts to develop natural methods to prevent disease in commercial oyster aquaculture facilities has led NOAA's Milford Laboratory to partner with public and private companies through Material Transfer Agreements (MTA) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA) to commercialize probiotic bacterial strain OY15 for use as an economic and stable feed supplement to prevent bacteriosis and improve survival of all life-stages of the Eastern oyster.

Bio(s):
In 1980, Diane Kapareiko graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from the University of Bridgeport. After participating in a cooperative internship semester at the NOAA Fisheries Milford Laboratory to complete her degree requirements, Diane was hired as a Biological Laboratory Technician in Microbiology. She has recently completed 35 years in federal service at NOAA's Milford laboratory. Diane has been the principle investigator for researching and developing probiotics for oysters, beneficial bacterial strains which can prevent bacterial disease and improve hatchery production of Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) seed for aquaculture and restoration. In 2016, Diane Kapareiko, Dorothy Jeffress and Gary Wikfors of the Aquaculture Sustainability Branch at the Milford Laboratory, were awarded the Department of Commerce Group Silver Medal for Scientific and Engineering Achievement for this probiotic research as well as negotiating a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement for commercialization.

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Title: On the data quality and quantity of VIIRS/SNPP ocean color data products: from research to applications
Presenter(s): Dr. Chuanmin Hu, University of South Florida College of Marine Science
Date & Time: 27 February 2019
3:00 pm - 3:45 pm ET
Location: Conference Room #3555, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Chuanmin Hu - University of South Florida College of Marine Science, St. Petersburg, FL, USA

Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminars
with SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group

SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group
The NOCCG is a NOAA organization founded in 2011 by Dr. Paul DiGiacomo, Chief of the Satellite Oceanography and Climatology Division at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR. The purpose of the NOCCG is to keep members up to date about developments in the field of satellite ocean color and connect ocean color science development with users and applications. We have representatives from all the NOAA line offices, including National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, National Ocean Service, National Weather Service and from several levels of the National Environmental and Satellite Data and Information Service (where Paul is housed). Dr. Cara Wilson of South East Fisheries Science Center is our current chair. We meet bi-weekly on Wednesday afternoons, 3 PM Eastern Time in room 3555 at the National Center for Weather and Climate Prediction building in College Park, MD with teleconferencing and Webex for out of town members and guests. We host a guest speaker, usually about once a month.

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio(s):
Chuanmin Hu received a BS degree in physics from the University of Science and Technology of China in 1989 and a PhD degree in physics (environmental optics) from the University of Miami (Florida, USA) in 1997. He is currently a professor of optical oceanography at the University of South Florida (USA), who also directs the Optical Oceanography Lab[HC1] . He uses laboratory, field, and remote sensing techniques to study marine algal blooms (harmful and non-harmful, macroalgae and microalgae), oil spills, coastal and inland water quality, and global changes. His expertise is in the development of remote sensing algorithms and data products as well as application of these data products to address earth science questions. He has authored and co-authored >250 refereed articles, many of which have been highlighted on journal covers and by AGU and NASA. His research has led to the establishment of a Virtual Antenna System to generate and distribute customized data products in near real-time, from which unique coastal observing systems have been developed to address specific monitoring and research needs. These include a Virtual Buoy System (VBS[HC2] ) to monitor coastal and estuarine water quality, an Integrated Redtide Information System (IRIS[HC3] ) to provide near real-time information on harmful algal blooms, and a Sargassum Watch System (SaWS[HC4] ) to combine remote sensing and numerical modeling to track macroalgae. Between 2009 and 2014 he served as a topical editor on ocean optics and ocean color remote sensing at Applied Optics, and between 2015 and 2017 he served as a chief editor at Remote Sensing of Environment.

POC:
Nolvia Herrera, 301-683-3308, Nolvia.Herrera@noaa.gov
NOCCG Coordinator: Veronica P. Lance, PhD, NOAA, 301-683-3319, Veronica.Lance@noaa.gov

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Title: NESDIS Snowfall Rate Product and Assessment
Presenter(s): Huan Meng, NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research and Wes Adkins, NWS/Juneau, Alaska Weather Forecast Office
Date & Time: 27 February 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: WEBINAR Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Huan Meng, NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research and Wes Adkins, NWS/Juneau, Alaska Weather Forecast Office

Host: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy

Abstract:
An over land snowfall rate (SFR) product has been produced operationally at NOAA/NESDIS since 2012. The product utilizes measurements from passive microwave sensors aboard eight polar-orbiting satellites managed by NOAA, NASA, EUMETSAT, and DMSP. The SFR algorithm consists of a statistical snowfall detection component and a 1DVAR-based physical snowfall rate estimation component. The product has been validated against gauge observations and radar snowfall rate estimates. NASA SPoRT has also made it available in AWIPS and provides the product to some NWS WFOs at near real-time. This seminar will include a description of the SFR product, algorithm validation, and its assessment at the Juneau and Anchorage WFOs.

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28 February 2019

Title: Assessment of Conservation Needs for the Regional Sea Turtle Hotspot Isla Arena-Celestun
Presenter(s): Eduardo Cuevas, Universidad Autónoma del Carmen
Date & Time: 28 February 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
Patrick Opay, Protected Resources Division, Southeast Regional Office, NOAA Fisheries (patrick.opay@noaa.gov)

Join the NOAA Central Library for a webinar only presentation on the "Assessment of Conservation Needs for the Regional Sea Turtle Hotspot Isla Arena-Celestun: Critical Aggregation Habitat for Sea Turtles in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean" on Thursday, February 28, 2019 at 12-1PM EST.

Presenter(s):
Eduardo Cuevas, Researcher at the Universidad Autónoma del Carmen, Campeche, México.

Abstract:


Kemp's ridley, loggerhead, green, and hawksbill sea turtles are all found in the waters off of the northwestern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. These species are migratory and use the waters of many countries, including the United States of America. This presentation will show the areas used by these species, outline the threats to their conservation, and emphasize the actions needed to address sea turtle recovery in the Yucatan. Efforts to address conservation issues of the Yucatan are important to NMFS sea turtle conservation programs and successful recovery of the species.

Bio(s):
Eduardo Cuevas has worked studying ecological and reproductive aspects of sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean for almost 20 years. He leads the Laboratory of Spatial and Movement Ecology at his University, and they are just closing a project on satellite telemetry for 4 sea turtle species in the Gulf of Mexico, assessing their ecological vulnerability and elaborating a Response Plan in case of oil spills. He is Country Co-Coordinator for WIDECAST in Mexico, member of the MTSG and Co-Vicechair in the Atlantic and Caribbean for the MTSG/SSC/IUCN.

(MTSG = Marine Turtle Specialist Group; WIDECAST is the Wider Sea Turtle Conservation Network; SSC = Species Survival Commission; IUCN = International Union for the Conservation of Nature)

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Title: Observations of Atmospheric Dynamics in 3D with LEO-GEO and GEO-GEO Stereo Imaging
Presenter(s): James L. Carr - Carr Astronautic Corp
Date & Time: 28 February 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
James L. Carr, Carr Astronautic Corp., jcarr@carrastro.com

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Abstract:
Multi-temporal imagery from a single geostationary (GEO) satellite such as NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) are routinely used to derive Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMVs) that represent winds in the atmosphere. The AMV method generally assumes that the cloud or moisture feature being tracked is undergoing horizontal motion that is observed by the displacement of the feature in a sequence of images. Observations from a single vantage point provide no geometric information about the height of an AMV in the atmosphere; therefore, AMV heights are generally assigned using IR temperatures and an a priori model atmosphere. Such height assignments can have large uncertainties and are error prone in the presence of multiple cloud layers. Multi-angle, multi-satellite stereo imaging is a powerful tool for observing atmospheric dynamics in three dimensions. When a tracked feature is viewed from multiple vantage points, additional information in the form of geometric parallax enables accurate determination of feature height and even the possibility of measuring vertical motion. This talk describes our work in this area using LEO-GEO combinations under NASA sponsorship and GEO-GEO combinations under NOAA sponsorship, and includes results combining imagery from the GOES-R satellites paired with each other and paired with imagery from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The advanced Image Navigation and Registration (INR) of GOES-R is the key to very accurate coupled retrievals of wind velocities and wind heights. We show that adding GOES-R improves AMV measurements from a single LEO (e.g., MISR), for which separating in-track cloud motion and height-induced parallax is difficult. Our methods are generally applicable to all LEO-GEO, LEO-LEO, and GEO-GEO combinations, including combinations with GOES, Meteosat, Himawari, MODIS, VIIRS, and others, and requires no synchronization between observing systems. Wind retrievals using these methods should play an important role in addressing the 2017 Earth Science Decadal Survey objectives to observe 3D atmospheric dynamics as well as for improving NOAA operational capabilities with existing and future assets.

Bio(s):
Dr. Carr is the founder and CEO of Carr Astronautics, a science and technology firm working in the NASA, NOAA, and international space arenas, with an emphasis on atmospheric remote sensing. Dr. Carr functions as both a scientist and a senior executive and strives to spend at least 50% of his time as a scientific leader on the programs within his company's business portfolio. Dr. Carr enjoys building mathematical models of complex systems and finding innovative and entrepreneurial solutions to complex problems. Dr. Carr earned a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Maryland in 1989. Dr. Carr founded his company in 1991 to help design the European Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) weather satellite, during which he resided in France for five years with his family. After returning to the U.S., he became a leader in the development of the GOES-NOP and GOES-R weather satellite systems. Dr. Carr is a Co-Investigator on the NASA TEMPO mission, which is a hosted payload for remote sensing of the atmosphere from geostationary orbit. TEMPO will retrieve trace gas concentrations for O3, NO2, H2CO, SO2, and C2H2O2 species, hourly across Greater North America, at fine spatial resolution, to enable the study of the sources, sinks, and propagation of atmospheric pollutants. Dr. Carr is the lead investigator on two 3D Winds projects, one funded by NASA and the other by NOAA, exploiting observations from multiple satellites to resolve cloud-motion winds in 3D.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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Title: Move, Adapt, or Die: California Sea Lion Responses to a Changing California Current
Presenter(s): Sharon Melin, PhD., Wildlife Research Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/AFSC/, Marine Mammal Laboratory, CA Current Ecosystem Program
Date & Time: 28 February 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sharon Melin, PhD., Wildlife Research Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/AFSC/, Marine Mammal Laboratory, CA Current Ecosystem Program

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

ABSTRACT

California sea lions are resident large marine predators of the California Current ecosystem. Recently, the California Current has shown unusual variability that has disrupted the prey communities that sea lions rely on, leading to unprecedented numbers of pups dying, retarded growth of surviving pups, poor survival of juveniles, and unusual behaviors of females. This seminar will summarize how extreme environmental events like the “Blob” and El Niño combined with gradual changes in ocean conditions and forage fish communities have halted the exponential growth of the California sea lion population by impacting its most vulnerable age group and discuss what it means for management issues along the West Coast.

Bio(s):

Sharon Melin is a wildlife biologist with MML's California Current Ecosystem Program. Her professional interests focus on research that promotes the understanding of factors influencing the growth of animal populations as they recover from historical exploitation. Her current research focuses on demography and foraging ecology of California sea lions and northern fur seals in California and the factors that influence trends in the populations such as El Niño, climate change, disease, contaminants, and inter- and intra-specific competition for resources.

Sharon received a B.S. in zoology and a M.S. in wildlife science at the University of Washington and a Ph.D. in conservation biology at the University of Minnesota. She has been part of the California Current Ecosystem Program since 1984.

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Title: GEOID18 Improvements and a Look Ahead
Presenter(s): Galen Scott, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 28 February 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Galen Scott, National Geodetic Survey

This webinar provides an overview of the 2018 GPSonBM campaign and how these new observations improved GEOID18. We will also look ahead to the 2019 GPSonBM campaign, review the new priority list, and discuss the many different ways that sharing GPSonBM data will improve NGS models and tools.

Description:

Galen Scott is a program analyst in NGS' Geosciences Research Division. He is the project lead for GEOID18 and the project to collect GPS data to support the development of the transformation tools for NAPGD2022. This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:


This webinar provides an overview of the 2018 GPSonBM campaign and how these new observations improved GEOID18. We will also look ahead to the 2019 GPSonBM campaign, review the new priority list, and discuss the many different ways that sharing GPSonBM data will improve NGS models and tools.Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge is helpful. To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit:
https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

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National Geodetic Survey webinars are usually held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

5 March 2019

Title: Computer Vision for Conservation
Presenter(s): Christin Khan, NMFS
Date & Time: 5 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Join the NOAA Central Library for a presentation on Computer Vision for Conservation on March 5th at 12PM ET.


Presenter(s):
Christin Khan, NOAA Fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, READ division, Protected Species Branch

Abstract:
Motivated by recent developments in image recognition, we hosted a data science challenge on the crowdsourcing platform Kaggle to automate the identification of endangered North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis).The winning solution automatically identified individual whales with 87% accuracy with a series of convolutional neural networks to identify the region of interest on an image, rotate, crop, and create standardized photographs of uniform size and orientation and then identify the correct individual whale from these passport-like photographs. Recent advances in deep learning coupled with this fully automated workflow have yielded impressive results and have the potential to revolutionize traditional methods for the collection of data on the abundance and distribution of wild populations.


Bio(s):
Christin Khan is a Fishery Biologist in the Protected Species Branch at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole. She is an aerial survey observer of the North Atlantic Right Whale Sighting Survey which conducts aerial surveys to monitor right whale abundance and distribution from New Jersey to Canada. When not in the air, Christin also works on right whale social behavior, automated image recognition, right whale outreach signs, the Right Whale Sighting Advisory System, interactive Google map, and the Whale Alert app.

Check out her recently published paper:"Applying deep learning to right whale photo identification" https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/cobi.13226

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Title: Rising Carbon Dioxide’s Effects on Land and Ocean
Presenter(s): Sarah Cooley, Director, Ocean Acidification Program at Ocean Conservancy, presenting remotely
Date & Time: 5 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Rising Carbon Dioxide's Effects on Land and Ocean
Seminar 2 in the Series, "From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle (SOCCR2) Seminar Series". We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28

Presenter(s):


Sarah Cooley, Director, Ocean Acidification Program at Ocean Conservancy. Presenting remotely. Co-Author: David Moore, Associate Professor, University of Arizona

Sponsor(s):


U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:


Rising carbon dioxide (CO2) has decreased seawater pH at long-term observing stations around the world, driving ocean acidification that has already affected some marine species and altered fundamental ecosystem processes. Further effects are likely. While atmospheric CO2 rises at approximately the same rate all over the globe, its non-climate effects on land vary depending on climate and dominant species. In terrestrial ecosystems, rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations are expected to increase plant photosynthesis, growth, and water-use efficiency, though these effects are reduced when nutrients, drought or other factors limit plant growth. Rising CO2 would likely change carbon storage and influence terrestrial hydrology and biogeochemical cycling, but concomitant effects on vegetation composition and nutrient feedbacks are challenging to predict, making decadal forecasts uncertain. Consequences of rising atmospheric CO2 are expected to include difficult-to-predict changes in the ecosystem services that terrestrial and ocean systems provide to humans. Continued persistence of uptake of carbon by the land and ocean is uncertain. Climate and environmental change create complex feedbacks to the carbon cycle and it is not clear how feedbacks modulate future effects of rising CO2 on carbon sinks. These are several mechanisms that could reduce future sink capacity.

Bio(s):

Sarah Cooley is the Director of the Ocean Acidification Program at Ocean Conservancy, in Washington DC. Prior to 2014, she was a researcher and postdoctoral investigator at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), as well as the ocean acidification scientist in the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program Project Office.Sarah's guiding interests include ocean carbon cycling, science communication, and incorporating accurate ocean science knowledge into policy. In her position at Ocean Conservancy, Sarah works to educate and engage decision-makers and stakeholders from every political perspective at regional to international levels on ocean acidification, identifying ways that different groups can take concrete, stepwise action on the issue. In her work, Sarah combines science synthesis, strategic communications, political strategy and advocacy, and public advocacy. https://oceanconservancy.org/people/sarah-cooley/

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Title: The 4th National Climate Assessment: The process and take-aways for Alaska
Presenter(s): Steve Gray, Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center; Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy; Jeremy Littell, Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center; Tom Hennessy, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Date & Time: 5 March 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Steve Gray, Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center; Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy; Jeremy Littell, Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center; Tom Hennessy, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Sponsor(s):
ACCAP

Abstract:
The 4th National Climate Assessment (NCA), released Nov 23rd, 2018, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, now and in the future. A team of more than 300 experts guided by a Federal Steering Committee (composed of representatives from each of USGCRP's 13 member agencies) produced the report, which was extensively reviewed by the public and experts, including federal agencies and a panel of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report is divided into regions and sectors. This presentation will explore the NCA process and key takeaway points with a focus on Alaska, including observed and projected climate changes on human heath and community well being, as well as coastal and marine impacts.

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6 March 2019

Title: Motivation for an experiment: Can we utilize the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) short-wave channels in data assimilation?
Presenter(s): Chris Barnet - STC
Date & Time: 6 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2554-2555, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Chris Barnet (STC) with Co-Authors: Thomas S. Pagano, NASA Jet Propulsion Lab., Sid Boukabara (STAR), Kevin Garrett (STAR), Kayo Ide (Univ. Maryland), Erin Jones (IMSG), Yingtao Ma (IMSG), Nadia Smith (STC), Rebekah Esmaili (STC)

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode: 6070416

Abstract:
Advanced hyperspectral sounders such as the Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Interferometric Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (IASI) and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) all invested heavily in providing high signal-to-noise measurements in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectral region (defined here as from 3.8 to 5 microns).

The use of this spectral region is complicated by the need to handle solar radiation that is both reflected from the surface and also excites molecules in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere into non-equilibrium emission. The AIRS Science Team demonstrated how to properly use the SWIR to derive high-quality temperature, moisture, and trace gases with the launch of Aqua/AIRS in 2002. The NOAA-Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) operationally deployed the AIRS algorithm for the Metop-A/IASI, S-NPP/CrIS, Metop-B/IASI, and the NOAA-20/CrIS instruments since 2008, 2011, 2012, and 2018, respectively.

This presentation will focus on the lessons learned from the NUCAPS experience and discuss the advantages, and disadvantages, of using SWIR channels. The high sensitivity (at higher operating temperatures) and uniformity of detector arrays could enable lower cost and more compact concepts to be deployed in low-Earth and geostationary orbits. This has led to the following question: could the SWIR channels replace the long-wave channels currently used within numerical weather prediction? This presentation will conclude with a discussion of an experiment to help answer that question.

Bio(s):
Chris Barnet's early career was a “random walk” kind of process which allowed him to be involved with many interesting topics that required finding a practical solution to the problem of the day. He started as a welder at Fermilab - an accelerator for protons - and that led to working with waveguides, superconductors, holography, radio telescopes, quasi-stellar objects, array processors, observing and modeling of the outer planets, and finally Earth remote sounding. This mixture of engineering and science may be the reason why he is now interested in finding ways to transition new algorithm concepts into operational applications.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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Title: What can we do about ocean acidification? Telling the story of local action in the face of global change
Presenter(s): Francis Chan, Oregon State University & Charlie Plybon, Surfrider Foundation
Date & Time: 6 March 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Francis Chan, Oregon State University & Charlie Plybon, Surfrider Foundation

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Ocean Acidification Program Office, Sharing Ocean Acidification Resources for Communicators and Educators. Email: noaa.oceanacidifcation@noaa.gov; Website: oceanacidification.noaa.gov

Abstract:
A leading focus of ocean acidification outreach has involved issue identification- education the public and decision makers on the scale of the problem facing the ocean. The message of what can be done has been less well told. In this webinar, the speakers will share their motivation for and experiences with developing and education video on local actions and solution to address ocean acidification. Using a series of stories of citizen science-based monitoring, industry innovation, and the search for local mitigation solutions, they will share experiences of Oregonian's rolling up their sleeves to act locally against a global challenge. Surprises and lessons learned will also be related, particularly in the context of a fast moving ocean acidification and hypoxia policy landscape.

POC:
http://oceanacidification.noaa.gov/WhatWeDo/EducationOutreach.aspx#14965

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7 March 2019

Title: Capital and Income Breeding: How Breeding Type Influences Estimation of Reproductive Potential in Exploited Fish Stocks
Presenter(s): Richard MKcBride, NOAA/NMFS/NEFSC
Date & Time: 7 March 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Richard MKcBride, Branch Chief & Supervisory, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/NEFSC/, Population Biology Branch

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Abstract:

Some species spawn and feed in separate areas, during different seasons, by storing energy and drawing on it later for reproduction (i.e. capital breeding). Other species spawn using energy acquired locally, throughout a prolonged spawning season, allocating energy directly to reproduction (i.e. income breeding). Capital breeders tend to ovulate all at once and are more common at boreal latitudes where productivity varies seasonally. Income breeding allows small fish to overcome allometric constraints on egg production and respond to current conditions; ceasing egg production when food is in short supply and resuming quickly when conditions improve. Poor-feeding environments can lead to delayed maturation, skipped spawning, shorter spawning season or fewer eggs produced per event. Variations in feeding environments have been significantly correlated with recruitment variability in some cases, when measured at the correct scale for the breeding type. These findings have implications for temporal and spatial sampling designs, and for interpreting fishery and ecosystem assessments.

Bio(s):
Rich McBride is a Supervisory Research Fishery Biologist at NOAA Fisheries, in Woods Hole, Massachusetts (http://nefsc.noaa.gov/staff/mcbride.html ). He leads a branch that builds reliable datasets for stock and ecosystem assessments (http://www.nefsc.noaa.gov/femad/pbio/). His research synthesizes the components of an organism's life history " their age, size, reproduction,mortality, trophic and habitat dynamics " to better understand their population dynamics and their functional role in the ecosystem. He received his B.S. in Biology from Eckerd College (Florida), an M.S. in Marine Science from Stony Brook University (New York), and a Ph.D. in Ecology & Evolution from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. He has published >70 papers in peer-review journals and is currently on the editorial boards of the journals ‘Fishery Bulletin' and ‘Bulletin of Marine Science.'

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Title: State Plane Coordinate System Update
Presenter(s): Michael Dennis, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 7 March 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

NGS will establish the State Plane Coordinate System of 2022 (SPCS2022) as part of modernizing the National Spatial Reference System. NGS invited written comments on the draft SPCS2022 policy and procedures. In this webinar, we will share the feedback it received on SPCS2022 and the final SPCS2022 Policy and Procedures.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge is helpful.

Location: Webinar access

Description: OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Michael Dennis, National Geodetic Survey

Michael Dennis is a geodesist at NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) where he performs research and assists in developing products and services to define, maintain, and provide access to the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS). He is also a Professional Engineer and Surveyor with private sector experience, including ownership of a consulting and surveying firm.

Abstract:
NGS will establish the State Plane Coordinate System of 2022 (SPCS2022) as part of modernizing the National Spatial Reference System. NGS invited written comments on the draft SPCS2022 policy and procedures. In this webinar, we will share the feedback it received on SPCS2022 and the final SPCS2022 Policy and Procedures.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit:
https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

National Geodetic Survey webinars are usually held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

12 March 2019

Title: A Discussion on the need to improve Mesoscale Analyses for the NBM to support Field Operations
Presenter(s): YJ Kim, Mark Tew & Andrew Stern NWS/AFS
Date & Time: 12 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
YJ Kim, Mark Tew & Andrew Stern NWS/AFS

Title:
A Discussion on the need to improve Mesoscale Analyses for the NBM to support Field Operations

Contact: Brian.Gross@noaa.gov

Abstract:

The lunchtime seminar is an opportunity to strengthen relationships between EMC and field operations via the Analyze, Forecast and Support Office (AFSO). AFSO supports the field by collecting proposed requirements, working the requests through established governance and developing policies to support evolving NWS field operations.

The presentation will begin with an overview of NWS governance which supports the collection and validation of field requirements and how the cyclical process of validation and innovation requires our organizations to build relationships and work together to support the life and property mission.

The discussion will then show needs collected from the field regarding mesoscale analysis which is largely represented by URMA (UnRestricted Mesoscale Analysis). One particularly important focus area is on the challenges of terrain variation effects and related improvements to the National Blend of Models (NBM).

The seminar will conclude with an open discussion period where ideas can be exchanged with the desire to strengthen communications through future dialogs.

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Title: Carbon Cycle Processes in North American Forest & New Estimates of Terrestrial Wetland Soil Stocks & Fluxes
Presenter(s): Grant Domke, USDA Forest Service; Chris Williams, Clark University;Randy Kolka, Research Soil Scientist, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station; and Carl Trettin, Research Soil Scientist, USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station
Date & Time: 12 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Recent Trends, Drivers & Projections of Carbon Cycle Processes in Forests of North America
Seminar 3 in the Series, From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle, the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2)
We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28

Today's seminar includes two presentations:
12:05-12:30: Recent Trends, Drivers, & Projections of Carbon Cycle Processes in Forests of North America

Presenter(s):
Grant Domke, USDA Forest Service and Chris Williams, Clark University

12:35-12:55 New Estimates of Terrestrial Wetland Soil Stocks and Fluxes

Presenter(s):
Randy Kolka, Research Soil Scientist, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station &
Carl Trettin, Research Soil Scientist, USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract for first presentation: Forest ecosystems are the largest terrestrial carbon sink on earth and their management has been recognized as a relatively cost-effective strategy for offsetting greenhouse gas emissions. In North America, forests, including urban forests, woodlands and the products obtained from them, play a major role in the carbon cycle. In this presentation we examine recent trends, drivers, and projections of U.S. and North American carbon cycle processes, stocks, and flows in the context of interactions with global scale budgets and climate change impacts in managed and unmanaged forest ecosystems. We will also highlight carbon management science and tools for informing decisions and opportunities for improving carbon measurements, observations, and projections in forests.

Abstract for first presentation: TBD

About the Speakers presenting first: Grant Domke is a research scientist and group leader for Timber Products Output and Carbon Estimation and Report in the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program within the USDA Forest Service. Domke studies how carbon is cycled through forest ecosystems and harvested wood products in the U.S. using strategic-level forest inventory data and auxiliary information. He and his team are responsible for compiling estimates of greenhouse gas emissions and removals in forests each year as part of the U.S.' commitment to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Domke has served as a lead author on several national and international reports including the recently released Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report and the Fourth National Climate Assessment as well as the forthcoming 2019 Refinement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories. For additional information on Domke's work visit: https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/people/gmdomke



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Title: Recent Trends, Drivers & Projections of Carbon Cycle in Forests and Wetland Soils across North America
Presenter(s): Grant Domke, USDA Forest Service; Chris Williams, Clark University; Randy Kolka, USDA; Carl Trettin, USDA
Date & Time: 12 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Seminar 3 in the Series, "From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle (SOCCR2) Seminar Series". We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28

Presenter(s):
Grant Domke, Research Scientist & group leader, USDA Forest Service, Timber Products Output and Carbon Estimation and Report, Forest Inventory and Analysis Program; and
Randy Kolka, Research Soil Scientist, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station;

Co-Authors include:
Chris Williams, Land surface hydrologist and Terrestrial ecosystem ecologist, Associate Professor of Geography, Adjunct Associate Professor of Biology, Clark University; and
Carl Trettin, Research Soil Scientist, USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station

Today's seminar includes two presentations:
12:05-12:30: Recent Trends, Drivers, & Projections of Carbon Cycle Processes in Forests of North America by Grant Domke (USDA Forest Service) and Chris Williams (Clark University)
12:35-12:55 New Estimates of Terrestrial Wetland Soil Stocks and Fluxes, by Randy Kolka, Research Soil Scientist, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station &
Carl Trettin, Research Soil Scientist, USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract for first presentation: Forest ecosystems are the largest terrestrial carbon sink on earth and their management has been recognized as a relatively cost-effective strategy for offsetting greenhouse gas emissions. In North America, forests, including urban forests, woodlands and the products obtained from them, play a major role in the carbon cycle. In this presentation we examine recent trends, drivers, and projections of U.S. and North American carbon cycle processes, stocks, and flows in the context of interactions with global scale budgets and climate change impacts in managed and unmanaged forest ecosystems. We will also highlight carbon management science and tools for informing decisions and opportunities for improving carbon measurements, observations, and projections in forests.

Abstract for second presentation: Because carbon (C) density of terrestrial wetlands is much greater than that of upland ecosystems, consideration of C stocks and fluxes along with associated changes resulting from management or land-use change are of particular importance at local, regional and global scales. Through new analyses of recent available data bases and literature, C stocks, net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and methane (CH4) fluxes were estimated for North American (US, Canada, Mexico and Puerto Rico) terrestrial wetlands. North America contains approximately 2.2 million km2 of terrestrial wetlands (approximately 37% of the global wetland area) with an ecosystem C pool of approximately 161 Pg (approximately 36% of global wetland C stock). Canada has the greatest area of terrestrial wetlands (52%), followed by the US (47%), Mexico (1%) and Puerto Rico. Likewise, Canada has the largest C stocks, NEE, and CH4 fluxes (80%, 51%, and 57%, respectfully) followed by the US (19%, 43%, and 39%, respectfully) and Mexico (1%, 7%, and 4%, respectfully). Forested wetlands comprise 55% of the total terrestrial wetland area, with the vast majority occurring in Canada. Organic-soil wetlands comprise 58% of the total terrestrial wetland area and contain 80% of the C stock. Overall, North American terrestrial wetlands currently are a CO2 sink (i.e., negative NEE) of approximately 126 Tg of C per year. However, North American terrestrial wetlands are a natural source of CH4, with mineral-soil wetlands emitting 56% and non-forested wetlands emitting 55% of the estimated total of 45 Tg CH4 "C per year.

Bio(s):
Grant Domke is a research scientist and group leader for Timber Products Output and Carbon science and reporting in the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program within the USDA Forest Service. Domke studies how carbon is cycled through forest ecosystems and harvested wood products in the U.S. using strategic-level forest inventory data and auxiliary information. He and his team are responsible for compiling estimates of greenhouse gas emissions and removals in forests each year as part of the U.S.' commitment to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Domke has served as a lead author on several national and international reports including the recently released Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report and the Fourth National Climate Assessment as well as the forthcoming 2019 Refinement to the 2006 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories. For additional information on Domke's work visit: https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/people/gmdomke.

Randy Kolke holds a B.S. degree in Soil Science from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, and MS and PhD degrees in Soil Science from the University of Minnesota. Following the completion of his PhD in 1996, he was a post-doctoral Research Soil Scientist with the USDA Forest Service's Southern Research Station on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. In 1998 he became an Assistant Professor of Forest Hydrology and Watershed Management in the Department of Forestry at the University of Kentucky. In 2002, he became Team Leader and Research Soil Scientist with the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station in Grand Rapids, MN. In this position, he currently leads a team of scientists, graduate students and post-docs conducting research on the cycling of water, carbon, nutrients, and mercury at the plot to watershed scale in urban, agricultural, forested, wetland and aquatic ecosystems across the globe. He is an adjunct faculty member at 6 universities and has published over 200 scientific articles in his career.

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Title: How to Update Reserve Visitor Centers and Create Workforce Ready Students at the Same Time
Presenter(s): Maggie Pletta, Delaware NERR
Date & Time: 12 March 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Please register through GoToWebinar (see below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Maggie Pletta, Delaware NERR

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html

Abstract:
Technology has become an integral part of environmental education, however purchasing or producing technology can be very cost-prohibitive. As part of a NERRS Science Collaborative Science Transfer grant, the Delaware, Guana Tolomato Matanzas, and Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserves (the clients) partnered with the University of Delaware Introduction to Software Engineering course (the consultants). As part of their coursework, students produced educational computer games that promote interactive, free-choice learning opportunities. Learn more about the process that led to the final educational games that are being installed in the three centers, including the ups and downs of working with students.

Bio(s):
Maggie Pletta is the current Education Coordinator at the Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve (DNERR) where she is tasked with managing and leading K-12 fieldtrips and outreach, public programs, family events, and teacher professional development workshops. Prior to her position at DNERR she held positions at the National Park Service, NASA, Educational Non-Profits, and DNREC's Wetland Monitoring and Assessment Program. Her professional areas of interest include teaching people about estuaries and climate change, as well as reconnecting children with nature, and making science fun for all ages.

Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

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13 March 2019

Title: State of the Ecosystem: An open approach to reporting on ecosystem status and trends within the Northeast Large Marine Ecosystem
Presenter(s): Sean Hardison, Integrated Statistics/ Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch, NEFSC, NMFS, NOAA
Date & Time: 13 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar (see login below) or NEFSC Stephen H. Clark Conference Room, NOAA Aquarium Building
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presented by:
Sean Hardison, Integrated Statistics/ Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch, NEFSC, NMFS, NOAA

Sponsor(s):


NEFSC Resource Evaluation and Assessment Division, Ecosystem Dynamics and assessment branch. POC: scott.large@noaa.gov

Abstract:

Reporting on the status and trends of marine ecosystems plays an important role in providing contextual ecosystem information to fisheries managers working at the species or stock level. However, busy fisheries managers may be less inclined to absorb and incorporate ecosystem information into decision making if links to management objectives are not made clear. In the Northeast US, we have addressed these challenges through the development of State of the Ecosystem (SOE) reports. These documents are relatively short, and are focused on providing concise descriptions of ecosystem processes in relation to established management objectives. In this seminar, I will describe the role of State of the Ecosystem reporting in the Northeast US, present highlights from this year's document, and outline the open-source software methods that we have relied upon to make SOE reporting efficient but rigorous.

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Title: The distributional shifts of groundfish in response to the recent anomalously warm period (2014-2016, "The Blob")
Presenter(s): Qiong Yang Ph.D., Research Scientist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 13 March 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Qiong Yang Ph.D., Research Scientist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA.

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.


Abstract:
The distributional shifts of groundfish in response to the recent anomalously warm period (2014-2016, "The Blob"). Paper can be found here: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/fog.12422

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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Title: Physical and Biological Implications of Eddy Signatures
Presenter(s): Dr. Sheekela Baker-Yeboah, University of Maryland, ESSIC & CICS
Date & Time: 13 March 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room #3555, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
with SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group

Presenter(s):
Dr. Sheekela Baker-Yeboah - University of Maryland, ESSIC & CICS

Sponsor(s):


SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group
The NOCCG is a NOAA organization founded in 2011 by Dr. Paul DiGiacomo, Chief of the Satellite Oceanography and Climatology Division at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR. The purpose of the NOCCG is to keep members up to date about developments in the field of satellite ocean color and connect ocean color science development with users and applications. We have representatives from all the NOAA line offices, including National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, National Ocean Service, National Weather Service and from several levels of the National Environmental and Satellite Data and Information Service (where Paul is housed). Dr. Cara Wilson of South East Fisheries Science Center is our current chair. We meet bi-weekly on Wednesday afternoons, 3 PM Eastern Time in room 3555 at the National Center for Weather and Climate Prediction building in College Park, MD with teleconferencing and Webex for out of town members and guests. We host a guest speaker, usually about once a month.

Abstract:
Using the strong correlation between altimeter and in situ pressure sensor-equipped inverted echo sounder (PIES) data, an analysis is done using current altimeter data in conjunction with Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Ocean Color and Sea Surface Temperature data to gain further insight into the physical and biological implications of mesoscale eddies associated with rings off of South Africa. A comparison is done with the California Current system, another major upwelling regime in the World Ocean, to assess the the relationship of slope eddies in upwelling regions to open ocean eddy signatures.

Bio(s):
Dr. Sheekela Baker-Yeboah is a Physical Oceanographer/Research Scientist at the University of Maryland (ESSIC & CICS), currently doing research and product development using Ocean Color, Altimetry, and Sea Surface Temperature data in collaboration with Paul DiGiacomo of Satellite, Oceanography and Climate Division (SOCD) and previously held the position of Satellite Team Lead at NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI in collaboration with the University of Maryland. She received her Ph. D. in Oceanography from the University of Rhode Island then Post Doctoral training at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Her professional appointments include Research Scientist at MIT, a visiting Professor at Worcester Polytechnic Institute of Massachusetts, and visiting Professor at Lesley University of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Her background experiences include training in Remote Sensing Oceanographer (satellite data processing and analysis using SAR, AVHRR SST, Altimeter SSH, Ocean Color/SeaWifs), as well as seagoing, teaching, modeling, and laboratory experience. She has worked with in situ oceanographic data (with training in statistics, ship CTD, oxygen titration, ADCP and XBT data, data analysis, training in and consulting on field research techniques for Pressure Inverted Echo Sounders, and recently Ocean Color in situ data. Dr. Baker-Yeboah has ongoing collaborations (1) with the SOCD Altimeter Sea Surface Height Laboratory, (2) as Co-PI on NSF Arctic Data Center Project, and (3) international collaborations (France, South Africa, Germany, Russia, and the US) on the South Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (SAMOC) program in the South Atlantic.

POC:
Nolvia Herrera, 301-683-3308, Nolvia.Herrera@noaa.gov
NOCCG Coordinator: Veronica P. Lance, PhD, NOAA, 301-683-3319, Veronica.Lance@noaa.gov
Title: Improving Communication of Coastal Flood Warnings to Alaska Communities
Presenter(s): Ed Plumb, Warning Coordination Meteorologist, NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 13 March 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: VIa webinar (see login below) or available in-person at: Room 407, Akasofu Building, UAF Campus, Fairbanks
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Title:
Improving Communication of Coastal Flood Warnings to Alaska Communities

Presenter(s):
Ed Plumb, Warning Coordination Meteorologist, NOAA's National Weather Service

Sponsor(s):
Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service POC: Rick Thoman, National Weather Service and Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract:
Coastal flooding and erosion from strong storms pose a significant threat to many Alaska communities. The National Weather Service (NWS) is collaborating with state, regional, local, and tribal organizations to improve impact-based decision support to communities before and during coastal storms. The NWS is also in the process of improving warning messages to rural Alaska in order to effectively communicate threat level, convey risk from storm surge, forecaster confidence, and potential impacts of incoming storms. The NWS is working to incorporate local terminology and place names, traditional knowledge of storm impacts, and storm observations into coastal flood warnings for communities. In order to accomplish this, the NWS is engaging in various workshops, meetings, and performing community visits to interact directly with residents and gain a better understanding of threats to their community. This presentation will highlight recent success the NWS has had in improving two-way communication and warnings to western Alaska communities during coastal flood events.

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Title: Guidelines for Implementing an Ecosystem Approach to Management in the Arctic: The Arctic Council Protection of the Marine Environment (PAME) Joint Ecosystem Approach Expert Group
Presenter(s): Libby Logerwell, NMFS/AKSFC
Date & Time: 13 March 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Libby Logerwell, Research Fishery Biologist, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Accessibility: This presentation will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel.

Abstract:
The Arctic Council is a high level intergovernmental forum to provide a means for promoting cooperation, coordination and interaction among the Arctic States, with the involvement of the Arctic Indigenous communities and other Arctic inhabitants. Ecosystem Based Management, a.k.a the Ecosystem Approach to Management (EA), was adopted as an overarching principle and approach by Arctic Council Ministers in 2004 as part of the Arctic Marine Strategic Plan. The PAME Working Group of the Arctic Council established in 2007 an EA Expert Group (EA-EG) to better focus its work on EA within its mandate for the protection of the Arctic marine environment. The members of the EA-EG collectively contribute to the integration of EA implementation into the overall work of the Arctic Council. The EA-EG also provides a mechanism to facilitate the exchange and review of information and experiences gained to support the development of a common and coordinated approach to the implementation of the EA by Arctic states. To this end, the EA-EG has recently produced the “Guidelines for Implementing an Ecosystem Approach to Management of Arctic Marine Ecosystems”. In this presentation Dr. Logerwell will describe how the EG developed the Guidelines and discuss the main conclusions and recommendations.

Bio(s):
Libby Logerwell is a Research Fishery Biologist in the Recruitment Processes Program at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center and the co-chair of the Arctic Council PAME Joint Ecosystem Approach Expert Group. Her research interests include fisheries oceanography, fish early life history, Arctic benthic communities and ecosystem based management. Libby received a BS from Stanford University and PhD from the University of California Irvine, and was a post-doc at NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center and then the University of Washington before joining the AFSC in 2001.

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Title: There is no I in EAFM: Adapting Integrated Ecosystem Assessment for Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas NMFS/NEFSC
Date & Time: 13 March 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Gaichas, Biologist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract:


Resource managers worldwide are being asked to consider the ecosystem while making management decisions. However, it can be difficult to change management systems accustomed to evaluating a constrained set of objectives, often on a species-by-species basis. Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) provides a flexible framework for addressing ecosystem considerations in decision making. IEA was adapted to address species, fleet, habitat, and climate interactions by the US Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) as part of their Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management (EAFM) in 2016. The Council's EAFM framework uses risk assessment as a first step to prioritize combinations of managed species, fleets, and ecosystem interactions for consideration. Second, a conceptual model is developed identifying key environmental, ecological, social, economic, and management linkages for a high-priority fishery. Third, quantitative modeling addressing Council-specified questions and based on interactions identified in the conceptual model is applied to evaluate alternative management strategies that best balance management objectives. As strategies are implemented, outcomes are monitored and the process is adjusted, and/or another priority identified in risk assessment can be addressed. The Council completed an initial EAFM risk assessment in 2017. First, the Council identified a range of ecological, social, and management objectives or risk elements. All objectives/risk elements were evaluated with ecosystem indicators using risk assessment criteria developed by the Council. In 2018, the Council identified summer flounder as a high risk fishery and is now finalizing an EAFM conceptual model. Annual ecosystem reporting updates ecosystem indicators and the risk assessment. The Council's rapid progress in implementing EAFM resulted from positive collaboration between managers, stakeholders, and scientists. Collaboration is essential to IEA and to the success of EAFM.

Bio(s):


Dr. Sarah Gaichas has been a Research Fishery Biologist with the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch at the NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA since September 2011. She is a member of the Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee, has been active in ecosystem reporting and management strategy evaluation for both the Mid-Atlantic and New England Fishery Management Councils. Sarah's primary research is on integrated ecosystem assessment, management strategy evaluation, and ecosystem modeling. Her duties include developing, testing, and using ecosystem data, indicators, and models in natural resource management, and simulation testing management strategies (including analytical tools) that address the needs of diverse ecosystem users. Sarah previously worked at the NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA from 1997-2011 as an observer program analyst, a stock assessment scientist, and an ecosystem modeler. Sarah earned her Ph.D. from the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science in 2006, her M.S from the College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 1997, and her B.A. in English Literature from Swarthmore College in 1991.

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14 March 2019

Title: Atmospheric methane: where did you come from, where did you go?
Presenter(s): Alexander J. Turner, Atmospheric Chemist, Miller Postdoctoral Fellow. UC Berkeley. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 14 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Atmospheric methane: where did you come from, where did you go?

Presenter(s):
Alexander J. Turner, Atmospheric Chemist, Miller Postdoctoral Fellow. UC Berkeley. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Atmospheric methane plays a major role in controlling climate and its atmospheric burden has more than doubled since 1850, yet contemporary methane trends (1982-2017) have defied explanation. Methane concentrations stabilized in the early 2000s and began increasing again in 2007. Neither the stabilization nor the recent growth are well understood, as evidenced by multiple competing hypotheses in the literature over the past 2 years. Explanations for the increases and stabilization have invoked changes in tropical wetlands, livestock, fossil fuels, biomass burning, and the methane sink. This talk will address three main questions: 1) "What do we know about sources, sinks, and underlying processes driving observed trends in atmospheric methane?", 2) "How will global methane respond to changes in anthropogenic emissions?", and 3) "What future observations could help resolve changes in the methane budget?"

This talk will draw on results from a recent open-access paper: Turner*, Frankenberg*, & Kort*, PNAS (2019). The paper is available on the PNAS website or at: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1814297116.

Bio(s):
Alex Turner is a Miller Postdoctoral Fellow at UC Berkeley working with Ron Cohen and Inez Fung. He works on a variety of topics related to atmospheric chemistry, the carbon cycle, inverse modeling, and remote sensing. Broadly, his research focuses on understanding how carbon cycles through the various reservoirs in the earth system (e.g., the atmosphere, ocean, and biosphere). He completed his PhD in atmospheric chemistry in 2017 at Harvard where he worked with Daniel Jacob and his BS in mechanical engineering in 2012 at CU Boulder where he worked with Daven Henze. He was supported by a NOAA Hollings Scholarship and a DOE CSGF fellowship during his undergraduate and graduate work, respectively.

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Title: Sustaining Marine Protected Area Benefits In a Changing Ocean: A Call To Action from the US Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee
Presenter(s): Brian Baird, Ocean and Coastal Policy Advisor; Samantha Murray, Scripps Institution of Oceanography; Mark Carr, University of California Santa Cruz; Charles Wahle, NOAA's National MPA Center
Date & Time: 14 March 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Sustaining MPA Benefits In a Changing Ocean: A Call To Action from the US Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee

Presenter(s):
Brian Baird, Ocean and Coastal Policy Advisor, and former MPAFAC Chair; Samantha Murray, Executive Director of Scripps Institution's Marine Biodiversity and Conservation Program, and the MPAFAC Lead on the MPA Benefits charge; Mark Carr, Professor of Ecology and Environmental Biology, UC Santa Cruz, and the MPAFAC Team Lead for Ecosystem Resilience; Charlie Wahle, Senior Scientist in NOAA's MPA Center, and the Designated Federal Officer for the MPAFAC

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National MPA Center; MPA News, a service of OCTO; EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe); OpenChannels, a service of OCTO

Points of Contact: Roldan.Munoz@noaa.gov and Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee (MPAFAC) provides recommendations to the US Departments of Commerce (NOAA) and Interior on ways to ensure the effective design, establishment and adaptive management of the nation's MPAs. Created in 2003 and reauthorized by the White House in 2017, the Committee comprises 20 members representing diverse sectors and interests in ocean matters. In 2018, the Committee was directed to document examples of the ecological, economic and cultural benefits provided by federal and other MPAs around the country, and to recommend specific actions that should be undertaken by MPA agencies to sustain those benefits in the face of rapidly changing ocean conditions and uses. After a thorough investigation, the MPAFAC found extensive, and sometimes surprising, examples of benefits from existing MPAs, including: ecological resilience; coastal storm protection; revenue from ocean tourism and recreation; cultural and historical education; diverse public engagement in ocean conservation; and capacity-building for local ocean decision-makers. The Committee also provided specific recommendations for sustaining MPA benefits, including a unanimous call to "Fully support, fund, maintain, evaluate and adaptively manage the nation's MPAs ...". In this webinar, three of the Committee's leaders, and the NOAA liaison, will provide an overview of the Committee's findings and recommendations and will discuss their implications for MPAs in the US and elsewhere.

Bio(s):
Brian Baird is an Ocean and Coastal Policy Advisor. He chaired the MPA Federal Advisory Committee and serves as President of the Coastal States Stewardship Foundation. He previously directed the Ocean and Coastal Program at The Bay Institute (TBI) in San Francisco and served for 18 years as the Assistant Secretary for Ocean and Coastal Policy under California Governors Brown, Schwarzenegger, Davis, and Wilson.

Brian was the chief writer of California Governor Pete Wilson's 1997 ocean management strategy and for California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger's 2004 ocean action plan. He helped create and staff the West Coast Governors' Alliance (now West Coast Ocean Partnership), advised the California Ocean Protection Council, and served on the California Coastal Commission and other state and national boards, commissions, and ocean advisory committees.

From 2007 to 2008 Brian chaired the national Coastal States Organization. He was later appointed by the White House to serve as an advisor to the National Ocean Council after nomination by the Governors of California, Oregon, and Washington. He created the international conference - California and the World Ocean " held in 1997, 2002, 2006, and 2010. Brian received formal recognition of his ocean protection work from the California State Legislature and the California Congressional Delegation in 2011.

Samantha Murray is faculty at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, where she is also the Executive Director of an interdisciplinary Master's Program in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation. She has nearly two decades of experience in conservation and has directed ocean and water programs at Ocean Conservancy, the Audubon Society and Oregon Environmental Council. Samantha also founded an ocean policy consulting business, where she works with clients on issues related to water quality, ocean acidification, habitat protection and climate change. Samantha played a key role in the design and implementation of California's network of marine protected areas, which now covers 16 percent of state waters.

Samantha has spoken at conferences around the world about ocean conservation best practices and holds a J.D. from Lewis and Clark Law School, where she was awarded a Certificate in Natural Resources and Environmental Law. Samantha is committed to diversity, inclusion and more equitable impacts of public policy.

Dr. Mark Carr is a Professor of marine ecology in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His research focuses on the ecology of coastal marine fishes and coastal marine ecosystems and informs a variety of topics in marine conservation and fisheries management. His research includes the design and evaluation of marine protected areas (MPAs). For eight years, Mark served as Co-chair of the Science Advisory Team to California's Marine Life Protection Act, which culminated in the establishment of a state-wide network of marine protected areas. He is now involved in the design and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program of California's MPA network. He is a founding principal investigator with the Partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans (PISCO).

Dr. Charles Wahle serves as the Senior Scientist for NOAA's National MPA Center and as the Designated Federal Officer for the MPAFAC. A coral reef ecologist with over four thousand hours underwater conducting research, Charlie's work at NOAA now focuses on bringing sound science into the design, creation and adaptive management of the nation's MPAs. He has also led science and policy programs in the National Marine Sanctuary Program and the Natl. Estuarine Research Reserve System, and has played key roles in the creation of the MPA Executive Order, NOAA's coral reef conservation program, and the US National Ocean Policy of 2010. Charlie is an elected Fellow of AAAS and has received three Bronze Medals, NOAA's highest civilian award, for his work in ocean conservation.

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Title: Communicating Fisheries Management Advice for Tactical and Strategic Decision-Making in Light of Uncertainty and Variability
Presenter(s): Allan Hicks, PhD., Quantitative Scientist, International Pacific Halibut Commission
Date & Time: 14 March 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Allan Hicks, PhD., Quantitative Scientist, International Pacific Halibut Commission

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

ABSTRACT

Different models are used for different purposes which span a continuum along three general categories: broad conceptual understanding, strategic planning, and tactical decision making. Uncertainty and variability are addressed in different ways depending on the purpose of the model. Using examples of strategic and tactical models from the International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC), the incorporation of uncertainty and variability, classified in four categories, is compared and contrasted. The stock assessment, a tactical model for short-term decision-making, has the purpose of providing predictions of the historical, current, and short-term status of the Pacific halibut stock. The operating model of the Management Strategy Evaluation (MSE) process, a strategic model, is to simulate potential scenarios of the Pacific halibut stock for use in the evaluation of management procedures against short, medium, and long-term policy goals. These two models incorporate data uncertainty in a similar way to condition the model, but treat it differently in projections. They both address model uncertainty through the use of multiple models in an ensemble approach. The long-term, strategic operating model incorporates population uncertainty directly through future variability and multiple hypotheses about the system, and the MSE approach can directly include implementation variability. Results from both of these models are presented in a consistent manner to IPHC Commissioners in the form of a decision table showing performance metrics (the risk of something bad happening) for various management options, and the performance metrics are related to objectives, which may differ for tactical and strategic decision making. Although these two models incorporate uncertainty in different ways, they are part of a continuum of models and are similar in many ways. Communicating the purpose of a model to managers is important so that the model is used appropriately for decision-making.

Bio(s):
Allan Hicks has been focusing on Management Strategy Evaluation at the International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC) since 2016. Before working at IPHC, he was a Fishery Research Biologist at the NWFSC for 7 years conducting assessments of many different groundfish. He received his Ph.D. in fisheries from the School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington, his M.S. in statistics from the University of Idaho, and his B.S. in fisheries from Humboldt State University.

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18 March 2019

Title: An Ocean of Data: 70 Years of Ocean Ecosystem Observing In the California Current
Presenter(s): Dr. Brice Semmens, Associate Professor, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego; Director, California Cooperative Fisheries Investigations, or CalCOFI
Date & Time: 18 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Medium Conference Room - 8348
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
An Ocean of Data: 70 Years of Ocean Ecosystem Observing In the California Current

Presenter(s):
Dr. Brice Semmens, Associate Professor, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego; Director, California Cooperative Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar and NOAA/NOS Office of National Marine Sanctuaries; POCs for this seminar are Steve.Gittings@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The California Cooperative Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) has collected critical marine resource data off the coast of California since 1949. First formed to study the sardine population collapse, the program continues today, informing management of fisheries and the living marine environment, especially in the face of changing ocean conditions.

Please join Dr. Brice Semmens, Director of CalCOFI, at UC San Diego's Scripps Institution of Oceanography, for a discussion of the history and future potential of this advanced coastal ecological monitoring program. Dr. Semmens will highlight the variety of data products and tools CalCOFI provides for ocean management along the California coast.

If time permits, Dr. Semmens will switch oceans to discuss the Grouper Moon Project, a long-term collaborative program aimed at understanding and managing fish spawning aggregations in the Caribbean.

Bio(s):
Dr. Semmens is a fisheries ecologist and conservation biologist. His research focuses on biological conservation and resource management with an emphasis on fisheries population dynamics, spatial ecology, and ultimately, assessment in the context of resource management. He participates in a diverse set of fisheries programs, including field-based research on endangered reef fish in the Caribbean, fisheries oceanography along the California coast, and fisheries modeling and stock assessment methods and techniques.

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Title: Satellite Soil Moisture Data Products and Their Potential Contributions to NOAA Research and Operations
Presenter(s): Xiwu “Jerry” Zhan, Physical Scientist NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research
Date & Time: 18 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771, Conference Room S562
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Xiwu “Jerry” Zhan, Physical Scientist NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research

Abstract

Soil moisture controls land surface water and energy partitioning through impacting evapotranspiration that is one of the main energy sources for the atmospheric dynamics. Soil moisture is thus consequently critical for NOAA's numerical weather, climate and hydrological prediction operations. NOAA and other national and international space agencies have made significant investment to acquire near real time soil moisture observations from space since decades ago. This presentation will introduce why satellite soil moisture observations is important to NOAA operations, how soil moisture data products are generated from these satellite observations, and how these data products could be assimilated into NOAA numerical weather and water prediction models in order to improve NOAA weather and water predictions. Progresses and issues in these research and application areas will be discussed.

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19 March 2019

Title: We share the same goals and difficulties: putting you through recent and current IFS developments
Presenter(s): Peter Bechtold, ECMWF
Date & Time: 19 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Peter Bechtold, ECMWF

Title:
We share the same goals and difficulties: putting you through recent and current IFS developments Date,Time, Room: Tuesday 19 Mar at noon in NCWCP Rm 2155 Contact: Jack Kain

Abstract:
Title: Carbon Cycling in North America’s Land–Ocean Aquatic Continuum
Presenter(s): Ray Najjar, Professor of Oceanography, Dep't of Meteorology and Atmospheric Science Penn State University. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 19 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Carbon Cycling in North America's Land"Ocean Aquatic Continuum
Seminar 4 in the Series, "From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle (SOCCR2) Seminar Series". We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28

Presenter(s):
Ray Najjar, Professor of Oceanography, Dep't of Meteorology and Atmospheric Science Penn State University. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
While the land and ocean have long been recognized to be important components of the global carbon cycle, the aquatic continuum that connects land and ocean has often been overlooked. Here we present a synthesis of carbon cycle research in North America that spans a continuum that includes terrestrial wetlands, inland waters (streams, rivers, and lakes), tidal wetlands, estuaries, and the coastal ocean. This synthesis is based on four chapters in the Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2). Emphasis is placed on exchange with the atmosphere, burial, and lateral transfers. Terrestrial wetlands, tidal wetlands, and the coastal ocean are estimated to be sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide totaling 352 teragrams (Tg) C per year, while inland waters and estuaries are estimated to be sources of atmospheric carbon dioxide totaling 257 Tg C per year. All aquatic systems bury carbon, totaling an estimated 282 Tg C per year. 507 Tg C per year is transferred laterally to inland waters, assuming a steady-state balance. Lateral transfers from rivers to estuaries, from estuaries to the coastal ocean, and from the coastal ocean to the open ocean all exceed 100 Tg C per year. The synthesis of aquatic carbon cycle research from SOCCR2 establishes the importance of aquatic systems to the North American carbon cycle and identifies numerous areas requiring further research.


Bio(s):
Raymond Najjar is a Professor of Oceanography in the Department of Meteorology and Atmospheric Science at The Pennsylvania State University, where he has been on the faculty since 1993. He earned his Ph.D. in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at Princeton University and was a post-doctoral fellow at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. At Penn State, he has taught numerous courses in oceanography and atmospheric science. Dr. Najjar has conducted research on a variety of topics in hydrology, oceanography, and climate science, with current focal areas of research being carbon cycling in coastal waters and the impacts of climate change on estuaries. He has co-authored more than 70 peer-reviewed studies with support from a variety of federal and state agencies.

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20 March 2019

Title: Zooplankton dynamics in the Gulf of Alaska
Presenter(s): David Kimmel Ph.D., Research Oceanographer, NOAA Fisheries Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA.
Date & Time: 20 March 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
David Kimmel Ph.D., Research Oceanographer, NOAA Fisheries. Seattle, WA.

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.


Abstract:


Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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21 March 2019

Title: Sponge Community Biocomplexity, Competition, and Functional Significance in Hard-Bottom Habitats of The Florida Keys, FL (USA)
Presenter(s): Marla Valentine, Office of Science and Technology, NMFS, NOAA
Date & Time: 21 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Knauss Fellow Marla Valentine, International Fisheries Science Specialist, Office of Science and Technology, NMFS, NOAA

Sponsor(s):
Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Christine Hirt (christine.hirt@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Sponges can have powerful effects on ecosystem processes in shallow, tropical marine ecosystems and are an integral component of the bentho-pelagic cycle of nutrients via filtering of dissolved and particulate organic matter from the water column. This research sought to experimentally establish the baseline effects of Florida Keys sponges and their complex microbiomes, at ecologically relevant biomass levels, on various shallow water ecosystem processes and functions. My work makes clear the implications of a reduction in the natural density and diversity of sponges in terms of significant alterations to the ecosystem's natural biogeochemical cycles and bentho-pelagic linkages.

About the speaker: Marla Valentine graduated from Louisiana State University in 2013 with a Master of Science degree in Oceanography that centered on deep-sea benthic ecology using ROVs and AUVs following the Deepwater Horizon Incident. Marla defended her doctorate at Old Dominion University in 2018 focusing on biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in coastal marine ecosystems, specifically in the Florida Keys. Between degrees, Marla worked for several marine research labs from Alabama to Delaware to Alaska studying sharks alligators and finfish fisheries, acoustic and satellite telemetry, and aquatic invasive species.

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Title: Advances in High Resolution Numerical Weather Prediction over the Pacific Northwest
Presenter(s): Clifford Mass, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 21 March 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Clifford Mass, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

ABSTRACT

This talk reviews the extraordinary advances in high-resolution numerical prediction over the region during the past 30 years. It will describe how the combination of higher resolution, better models, increasing observational data over the Pacific, and major advances in data assimilation have led to the ability to predict skillfully the complex meteorology of the region. Recently, the development of high-resolution ensembles has begun to drive capabilities for skillful probabilistic prediction.

Bio(s):

Cliff Mass went to Cornell University for his undergraduate education where he majored in physics and worked with Astronomer Carl Sagan on a model of the Martian atmosphere. Cliff earned his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Washington in 1978 where he worked with climatologist Stephen Schneider on the influence of volcanic eruptions, solar variations, and CO2 on climate. He later joined the faculty of the Meteorology department at the University of Maryland from 1978-1981. He returned to the UW in 1981 becoming an assistant professor in the Atmospheric Sciences department.


During the next few decades, Cliff and his students have published over 70 papers on west coast weather phenomena including orographic precipitation, coastal surges, the Catalina Eddy, the Puget Sound convergence zone, onshore pushes, downslope windstorms, and various local gap winds. His group has written numerous papers on storm and frontal structure and evolution across the U.S., including the application of high-resolution modeling. Numerical simulation has been a key tool for his group, which now runs the most extensive local high-resolution prediction system in the United States.


Now a full professor at the UW, he is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society, has been an editor of a number of meteorological journals, is a member of the Washington State Academy of Sciences, and has served as a member of a number of National Academy committees. Cliff has been involved in several other initiatives, including the acquisition of coastal radar on the Washington coast, improving the infrastructure of the National Weather Service, the use of smartphone pressure observations for weather prediction, and the improvement of K-12 math education. He is the author of the 2008 book “The Weather of the Pacific Northwest” and broadcasts a weekly weather information segment on KPLU, a local public radio station.

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25 March 2019

Title: Toward Improved Satellite Measurement of Climate Trends in the Atmospheric Temperatures
Presenter(s): Dr. Cheng-Zhi Zhou - NOAA/NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 25 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: ESSIC Conference Room 4102, 5825 University Research Ct, College Park, MD 20740
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Dr. Cheng-Zhi Zou, NOAA/NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research

Sponsor(s):
ESSIC Seminar Series, crosslisted with the STAR Science Seminar Series

Abstract:
Global warming theory predicts increasing surface and tropospheric temperatures and decreasing stratospheric temperatures when anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and other greenhouse gases increase. Satellite-borne sensors are the only means available for providing global temperature observations in the atmosphere for climate trend monitoring and verifying the global warming theory. During the past two decades, scientists have been developing atmospheric temperature climate data records (CDRs) using satellite observations from the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU), Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit- A (AMSU-A), and Stratospheric Sounding Unit (SSU) onboard NOAA/NASA/MetOp historical and currently operational polar-orbiting satellites. These CDRs allow scientists to study the size, significance, and causes of the global atmospheric temperature trends and variability, to evaluate climate model performance, to assess the consistency between observed surface and tropospheric temperature changes, and to investigate the impact of ozone depletion and recovery on the stratospheric temperature changes. Overall, atmospheric temperature CDRs provided improved understanding on the anthropogenic impact on climate change.

Changes in diurnal sampling over time and calibration drift have been the main sources of uncertainties in the satellite measured temperature trends. We have recently examined observations from the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) that has been flying onboard the NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) environmental satellite since late 2011. The SNPP satellite has a stable afternoon orbit that has close to the same local observation time as NASA's Aqua satellite that has been carrying the heritage microwave sounder, the AMSU-A, from 2002 until the present. The similar overpass timing naturally removes most of their diurnal differences. Direct comparison of temperature anomalies between the two instruments shows little or no relative calibration drift for most channels. Our results suggest that both ATMS and AMSU-A instruments have achieved absolute stability in the measured atmospheric temperatures within 0.04 Kelvin per decade.

The high radiometric stability in the SNPP/ATMS and Aqua/AMSU-A observations could have broad implication and impact on the climate trend observations from the microwave sounders as well as other instruments. It provides an opportunity for using these instruments as references to calibrate and recalibrate other observations and help resolve debates on observed differences in the climate trends. In this talk, we review the status of the currently available atmospheric temperature CDRs in climate change detection and present detailed analyses of the radiometric stability in the SNPP/ATMS and Aqua/AMSU-A observations. We discuss why and how these instrument observations could be used as references for improving the accuracy of CDRs in climate change monitoring. We present examples in using these reference observations to recalibrate microwave sounders onboard other satellites and provide a perspective on future applications of such a concept.

About the speaker:
Cheng-Zhi Zou is a Physical Scientist at the NOAA/Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) located in College Park, Maryland. Dr. Zou received his PhD from the University of Oklahoma in 1995 and worked in NOAA/STAR since 1997. He has been mainly engaged in measuring long-term changes in the atmospheric temperatures using satellite observations and evaluation of data products for climate change studies from different sources including those from satellite retrievals, climate reanalyses, and climate model simulations. He has developed a set of atmospheric temperature climate data records capable of detecting climate trends from the lower troposphere to the upper stratosphere during the satellite era. He conducted satellite retrievals to derive climate products such as polar winds. He also collaborated with colleagues on using mesoscale models to simulate and analyze a variety of atmospheric clouds and costal wave phenomena observed by satellites. He has published over 50 articles in AMS, AGU, and other leading journals including Nature, Science, and PNAS. He has received Department of Commerce Silver Medal Award and NOAA Administrator's Award for advancement of satellite calibration and development of atmospheric temperature climate data records. He is a referred reviewer for many journals in the atmospheric science field.

Seminar POC:
Dr. John Yang
ESSIC Seminar Coordinator
University of Maryland
5825 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740-3823
Email: jxyang@umd.edu
Tel: 301-405-2819
Fax:301-405-8468

26 March 2019

Title: A Sneak Peek at the New Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society that Will Launch in 2020
Presenter(s): Keith Seitter, AMS
Date & Time: 26 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Keith Seitter, Executive Director, American Meteorological Society

Abstract:
The Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) celebrates its 100th year of publication as the AMS celebrates its centennial. As it moves into its second century, BAMS will take on a new character with new features and functionality, making it a very different kind of publication from today. This presentation will preview some of the exciting new elements of the new BAMS.

About the speaker: Dr. Keith Seitter has been the executive director of the AMS since 2004, after serving in other leadership roles in AMS since 1991. Prior to joining the staff at AMS, he was on the faculty in the meteorology program at UMass-Lowell.

POC: Erin Cheever, Outreach Librarian (erin.cheever@noaa.gov)

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Title: All about Carbon: An Overview of the State of Carbon Cycle Report
Presenter(s): Melanie Mayes, Senior Staff Scientist, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Date & Time: 26 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
All about Carbon: An Overview of the State of Carbon Cycle Report
Seminar 5 in the Series, "From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle (SOCCR2) Seminar Series". We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28

Presenter(s):
Melanie Mayes, Senior Staff Scientist, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Rising carbon dioxide (CO2) has decreased seawater pH at long-term observing stations around the world, driving ocean acidification that has already affected some marine species and altered fundamental ecosystem processes. Further effects are likely. While atmospheric CO2 rises at approximately the same rate all over the globe, its non-climate effects on land vary depending on climate and dominant species. In terrestrial ecosystems, rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations are expected to increase plant photosynthesis, growth, and water-use efficiency, though these effects are reduced when nutrients, drought or other factors limit plant growth. Rising CO2 would likely change carbon storage and influence terrestrial hydrology and biogeochemical cycling, but concomitant effects on vegetation composition and nutrient feedbacks are challenging to predict, making decadal forecasts uncertain. Consequences of rising atmospheric CO2 are expected to include difficult-to-predict changes in the ecosystem services that terrestrial and ocean systems provide to humans. Continued persistence of uptake of carbon by the land and ocean is uncertain. Climate and environmental change create complex feedbacks to the carbon cycle and it is not clear how feedbacks modulate future effects of rising CO2 on carbon sinks. These are several mechanisms that could reduce future sink capacity.

Bio(s):
Dr. Melanie Mayes is a Senior Staff Scientist and Team Leader with the Environmental Sciences Division and the Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. She holds Joint Faculty Appointments with the Departments of Biosystems Engineering & Soil Science, and Earth & Planetary Sciences at the University of Tennessee. She is interested in diverse research at the intersection of water, soil minerals, solute chemistry, and biological cycling, and she designs experiments to build better models to represent natural processes. Her current research involves improving the representation of terrestrial carbon cycling processes in Earth system and process models, developing techniques to incorporate metagenomic information into nutrient cycling models, and investigating technologies to reduce mercury loading and methylmercury generation in surface and ground water systems

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Title: NOAA’s Newest Generation of Geostationary Weather Satellites
Presenter(s): Rafael DeAmeller, NOAA NESDIS
Date & Time: 26 March 2019
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Gateway to NOAA (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rafael DeAmeller, NOAA NESDIS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Open House and for lunchtime talks at Gateway to NOAA! Point of contact is gatewaytonoaa@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
No remote access available

Abstract:
NOAA's newest geostationary weather satellite constellation scans Earth's entire Western Hemisphere and the Pacific Ocean from Guam all the way to the west coast of Africa every 15 minutes. GOES-East and GOES-West provide timely, accurate data for weather forecasting and environmental monitoring like never before.

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27 March 2019

Title: Recovery of North Atlantic Right Whales Constrained by Human-caused Mortality
Presenter(s): Dr Peter Corkeron. Leader, Large Whale Team, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center. Woods Hole MA.. Presenting remotely from Woods Hole
Date & Time: 27 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150, and NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Clark Conference Room, Aquarium building
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Recovery of North Atlantic Right Whales Constrained by Human-caused Mortality
Rescheduled from 2/7/19

Presenter(s):


Dr Peter Corkeron, Leader, Large Whale Team, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center. Woods Hole MA. Presenting remotely from Woods Hole.

Sponsor(s):


NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:


North Atlantic right whales (NARW), Eubalaena glacialis, were nearly exterminated by historical whaling. Their abundance slowly increased up until 2010, to a maximum of fewer than 500 whales, and since then they have been in decline. We assessed the extent to which the relatively slow increase demonstrated by NARW was intrinsic, and how much could be due to anthropogenic impacts. In order to do so, we first compared calf counts of three populations of Southern right whales (SRW), E. australis, with that of NARW, over the period 1992"2016. By this index, the annual rate of increase of NARW was approximately one-third of that of SRW. Next we constructed a population projection model for female NARW, using the highest annual survival estimates available from recent mark"resight analysis, and assuming a four-year calving interval. The model results indicated an intrinsic rate of increase of 4% per year, approximately twice that observed, and that adult female mortality is the main factor influencing this rate. Necropsy records demonstrate that anthropogenic mortality is the primary cause of known mortality of NARW. Anthropogenic mortality and morbidity has limited the recovery of NARW, and baseline conditions prior to their recent decline were already jeopardizing NARW recovery.

Bio(s):


Dr Peter Corkeron has led the large whale research program at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center since 2011. The primary focus of this program is to assess the status as well as the anthropogenic and ecological drivers affecting North Atlantic right whales. Peter's work also includes assessing the effects of noise on large whales, developing new technology to enhance our understanding of whales' behavior and ecology, and applying these technologies to improve conservation outcomes for whales. He serves on the editorial boards of Marine Ecology Progress Series and Tourism in Marine Environments, and is a member of the World Conservation Union's (IUCN) Cetacean Specialist Group. Dr Corkeron's PhD on the ecology of inshore dolphins in the waters off Brisbane, Queensland, was the first PhD on the biology of living cetaceans awarded by an Australian university.

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Title: GOES-East Meets West: Earth in High Definition
Presenter(s): Pam Sullivan, NESDIS
Date & Time: 27 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Join the NOAA Central Library for GOES-East Meets West: Earth in High Definition on March 27th at 12PM ET.

Presenter(s):
Pam Sullivan, GOES-R System Program Director

Abstract:
An overview of the GOES-R Program including recent status and results from the first two years of orbital operations from our newest geostationary satellites.

Bio(s):
Pam Sullivan is the System Program Director for the GOES-R Series Program, overseeing the development, acquisition, integration, installation, and acceptance of major system elements (spacecraft, instruments, launch services and ground systems) for the GOES-R Series satellites. Before joining NOAA in May 2018, she managed the GOES-R Flight Project for NASA. Sullivan has broad space flight development experience that includes serving as the Deputy Project Manager for the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Project, Program Manager for the National Polar Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Visible/Infrared Imager/Sounder System (VIIRS), and Manager of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera, and GOES-IM Imager and Sounder instruments.

POC: Outreach Librarian, Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

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Title: Measuring the Earth from the Sky, Space and Ground
Presenter(s): Christine Gallagher, NOAA NOS
Date & Time: 27 March 2019
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Gateway to NOAA (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Christine Gallagher, NOAA NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Open House and for lunchtime talks at Gateway to NOAA! For more information on NOAA's Open House or Heritage Week events, directions, parking and inclement weather please visit https://www.noaa.gov. Point of contact is gatewaytonoaa@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
No remote access available

Abstract:
NOAA planes snap photographs of our coast after storms and hurricanes, but learn how a combination of satellites in the sky and small marks in the ground help us align these amazing photos. NOAA's National Geodetic Survey has supported mapping in the United States since 1807, learn more about our story.

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28 March 2019

Title: Beyond Break the Grip (Rip Current)
Presenter(s): Greg Dusek, Ph.D., NOAA NOS
Date & Time: 28 March 2019
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Gateway to NOAA (1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Greg Dusek, Ph.D., NOAA, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Open House and for lunchtime talks at Gateway to NOAA! For more information on NOAA's Open House or Heritage Week events, directions, parking and inclement weather please visit https://www.noaa.gov. Point of contact is gatewaytonoaa@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:
No remote access available

Abstract:
Learn about the future of NOAA rip current forecasting and observations from one of NOAA's oceanographer and rip current experts

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Title: Unmanned Systems (UxS): Transforming How We Study and Manage the Marine Environment
Presenter(s): John McDonough, NOAA Office of Marine and Aviation Operations
Date & Time: 28 March 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Unmanned Systems (UxS): Transforming How We Study and Manage the Marine Environment

Presenter(s):
John McDonough, NOAA Office of Marine and Aviation Operations

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National MPA Center; MPA News, a service of OCTO; EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe); OpenChannels, a service of OCTO

Webinar Points of Contact: Roldan.Munoz@noaa.gov and Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Unmanned Systems (UxS) are transforming how we study and manage the marine environment. This presentation will provide an overview of unmanned aerial systems, unmanned surface vehicles, unmanned underwater vehicles, buoyancy gliders, and remotely operated vehicles. Emphasis will be placed on their contributions to establishing and managing marine protected areas.

Bio(s):
John McDonough joined NOAA's Office of Marine and Aviation Operations (OMAO) in January 2017 to develop a framework and process to identify, develop, test, evaluate and transition advanced technologies that support the NOAA mission and are compatible with OMAO's operational mission. This includes unmanned technologies that meet multiple NOAA mission requirements and could be transitioned to become a core OMAO provided capability.

Before joining OMAO John served as the Deputy Director of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research where he planned and executed collaborative ocean exploration campaigns with federal agencies, non-profit organizations, academic institutions and industry both nationally and internationally. He has worked extensively with OMAO throughout his career and has been engaged in several NOAA ship conversions, most notably the conversion of the USN Capable to NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

Among his many duties he has served as a member of the NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program Senior Management Council; served as the NOAA representative on the Executive Committee of the Interagency Extended Continental Shelf Mapping Task Force; established an ongoing partnership between NOAA, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, and the US Geological Survey to conduct baseline characterizations of previously unknown marine areas in the Gulf of Mexico and Mid-Atlantic Bight; and in collaboration with NOAA Fisheries and NOAA's National Ocean Service helped establish the NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program.

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Title: Using Field Observations and Biophysical Transport Models to Examine the Early Life Ecology of Arctic Gadids in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas
Presenter(s): Cathleem Vestfals, PhD., Post-Doctoral Fellow, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 28 March 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Cathleem Vestfals, PhD., Post-Doctoral Fellow, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

ABSTRACT

Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) and saffron cod (Eleginus gracilis) are two ecologically important species in the Arctic marine ecosystem, yet little is known about their life history in the Pacific Arctic. In particular, information about their spawning locations and early life stages is extremely limited. To address some of these critical knowledge gaps and to better understand the early life histories of these species, we described the spatial and temporal distributions of their early life stages (ELS, preflexion larvae to late juveniles) in the Chukchi and western Beaufort seas based on ichthyoplankton surveys conducted in 2004, 2008, 2009, 2012, and 2013, and examined how their distributions varied in response to environmental factors. Using the particle-tracking tool TRACMASS, individual-based, biophysical transport models were developed to examine the growth and transport of their ELS from hypothesized spawning and hatching locations in the northern Bering and Chukchi seas. These models build on a recently developed Pan-Arctic ocean circulation model (PAROMS), field observations from the Arctic Ecosystem Integrated Survey (Arctic Eis), and laboratory studies on temperature-dependent growth of both species. Results presented here provide new insights into how environmental variability influences the distribution and abundance of Arctic cod and saffron cod ELS, and advances our understanding of the habitats occupied by these key forage species during their first few months of life. In addition, this research helps to improve our understanding of how the growth and dispersal of these species may be impacted by variable climate forcing.

BIO
Dr. Cathleen Vestfals is a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the University of Alaska Fairbanks' College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences. She is interested in research that investigates how environmental variables influence the distribution and abundance of marine fishes, with the ultimate goal of informing fisheries and ecosystem models and improving management strategies. Cathleen attended the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, B.C., where she received her B.Sc. in Biology, with a specialization in Marine Biology. After graduating, she participated in several oceanographic research cruises along Line P, where she conducted bacterial and primary productivity experiments with scientists from UBC and Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Cathleen worked for several years as a North Pacific groundfish observer in Alaska collecting fisheries management data for NOAA aboard commercial fishing vessels. In 2009, she obtained her Masters Degree in Marine Resource Management and a graduate certificate in Fisheries Management from Oregon State University working with Drs. David Sampson, Lorenzo Ciannelli, and Waldo Wakefield to characterize canary rockfish habitat factors off the Washington and Oregon coasts. She obtained her Ph.D. in Oceanography in 2015 from OSU, working with Drs. Lorenzo Ciannelli and Janet Duffy-Anderson to examine the effects of environmental variability on slope-spawning flatfish in the eastern Bering Sea. In her post-doc position with Dr. Franz Mueter, Cathleen is developing the first individual-based models for Arctic cod and saffron cod in the Pacific Arctic in an effort to identify their spawning locations and to help understand how climate variability affects the growth and dispersal of their early life stages.

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29 March 2019

Title: Local and Regional Dynamics of a Catastrophic Disease Epizootic
Presenter(s): William Precht, Dial Cordy
Date & Time: 29 March 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Come join us in the Library for a presentation either in person or via webinar!

Presenter(s):
William F. Precht, Director Marine & Coastal Programs, Dial Cordy and Associates, Inc., Miami FL


Abstract:
Following a major coral bleaching event in the late summer of 2014, we documented the impact of an extremely high-prevalence outbreak of white-plague disease (a.k.a. Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease) at 14 sites off southeastern Florida. The first signs of active disease were observed near Virginia Key, Florida, in late September 2014. After four years the disease has spread the length of the Florida Reef Tract from Key West in the south to Martin County in the north. The disease outbreak has affected at least 17 coral species. Eusmilia fastigiata, Meandrina meandrites, and Dichocoenia stokesi were the most heavily impacted coral species and were reduced to <3% of their initial population densities in Miami-Dade County. Several other coral species, including Colpophyllia natans, Pseudodiploria strigosa, Diploria labyrinthiformis, and Orbicella annularis were reduced to <25% of their initial densities. Similar observations by other researchers have been made throughout Florida. Importantly, there appears to be a strong phylogenetic preference to disease susceptibility and mortality patterns observed regionally, however, to-date a putative pathogen has not been isolated. The high prevalence of disease, the number of susceptible species, its transmissibility, and the high mortality of corals affected suggests this disease outbreak is arguably one of the most lethal ever recorded on a contemporary coral reef system. Recent reports of continued spread through other regions of the Caribbean (Jamaica, Grand Cayman, Yucatan of Mexico, the USVI, and St. Maarten) is troubling indeed and may portend continued decline to a reef system already at risk.


Bio(s):
Since completing his graduate degree from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, Bill has specialized in the assessment, monitoring, restoration, and rehabilitation of various coastal resources, especially coral reef, seagrass, and mangrove systems. His contributions to the professional and academic ecological sciences community are nationally and internationally recognized, particularly in regard to historical ecology and the application of ecological principals to coastal restoration. Bill's work draws upon significant, state-of-the-art research experience in field studies and theoretical analysis. From 2002-2008 he served as the Chief Scientist responsible for the long-term monitoring of the reefs in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. He was also NOAA's Program Manager of the Damage Assessment, Restoration and Resource Protection Program for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary from 2008-2012. He has been the Director of Marine and Coastal Programs for Dial Cordy and Assoc. since 2012. He is based in Miami, FL.

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2 April 2019

Title: Expanding Watershed Management and Restorations with Coastal and Marine Scientific Research
Presenter(s): Dr. William Hernández, NOAA Center for Earth System Science and Remote Sensing Technologies-CESSRST, City College, New York, NY
Date & Time: 2 April 2019
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Expanding Watershed Management and Restorations with Coastal and Marine Scientific Research

Presenter(s):
Dr. William Hernández, NOAA Center for Earth System Science and Remote Sensing Technologies (CESSRST), City College New York, NY. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Date/Time: Tuesday, April 2, 10-11am EDT, 2019

Co-authors: Roy A. Armstrong-2, Suhey Ortiz-Rosa-2, Erick F. Geiger-3,4, C. Mark Eakin-3, Robert A. Warner-5, and Roberto Viqueira-6
2. University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez Marine Science Department. 3. NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Coral Reef Watch, College Park, MD., 4. UMD-CICS, 5. NOAA/NOS/NCCOS, Silver Spring, MD. 6. Protectores de Cuencas Inc.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
In this presentation we highlight some examples of the integration of scientific research by NOAA, Academia, and local Non-Profit Organizations (NGO) to support current watershed management activities. This scientific research is mainly focused on the use of remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) and making the data accessible to the managers. We also present the use of ocean color data and the development of data portals to provide easier access to managers to this information, and the use of drones for aquatic research. Additional collaborations include participation in proposals to address new threats, like Sargassum accumulations and sea level rise. Examples and results from this work will be presented.

Bio(s):
Dr. Hernández is currently appointed as a Post-Doctoral Researcher for the NOAA CREST City College City University of New York. He has more than 12 years of experience in the analysis and processing of remotely sensed data and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). His education consists of a Bachelor's degree in Biology, a Master's degree in Environmental Science (Water Resources) and a Ph.D. in Marine Sciences (Biological Oceanography) from the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez. His doctoral dissertation was entitled: “Benthic Habitat Mapping and Bio-Optical Characterization La Parguera Marine Reserve using Passive and Active Remote Sensing Data”. He has worked in multiple industries including academia, government and private sector, performing duties as an environmental consultant, research scientist, fish and wildlife biologist in government agencies dedicated to conservation, and developer of information systems technology in environmental science and infrastructure management. Dr. Hernández is currently a collaborator of the NOAA NESDIS STAR Coral Reef Watch Ocean Color Projects and the US Coral Reef Task Force Guanica watershed management. He has also been collecting bio-optical and water quality data in La Parguera and the Guánica area for the past 8 years.

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Title: Carbon Cycle of North America and Research Needs for Enhancing CO2 Removal
Presenter(s): Richard A. Birdsey, Senior Scientist, Woods Hole Research Center
Date & Time: 2 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Carbon Cycle of North America and Research Needs for Enhancing CO2 Removal
Seminar 6 in the Series, "From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle (SOCCR2) Seminar Series". We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28

Presenter(s):
Richard A. Birdsey, Senior Scientist, Woods Hole Research Center

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The second “State of the Carbon Cycle of North America Report” (SOCCR-2) includes an overview of the North American carbon budget and future projections, the consequences of changes to the carbon budget, details of the carbon budget in major terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems(including coastal ocean waters), information about anthropogenic drivers, and implications for policy and carbon management. SOCCR-2 includes new focus areas such as soil carbon, arctic and boreal ecosystems, tribal lands, and greater emphasis on aquatic systems and the role of societal drivers and decision making on the carbon cycle. SOCCR-2 provides information to support science-based management decisions and policies that include climate change mitigation and adaptation in Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Findings indicate that North America is a net emitter of carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere, and that natural sinks offset about 43% of emitted carbon dioxide. Forests, soils, grasslands, wetlands, and coastal oceans comprise the largest carbon sinks. Another report from the National Academy of Sciences was released at the same time, titled “Negative emissions technologies and reliable sequestration: a research agenda”. With SOCCR-2 providing a baseline about carbon sinks over the last decade, the current role of land ecosystems in removing CO2 from the atmosphere is highlighted, along with research needs to facilitate the important role of negative emissions in reducing greenhouse gases sufficiently to limit climate warming to 2 degrees C or less by the end of this century. Afforestation, improved land management, and bioenergy crops are technologically ready for deployment at large scales to achieve reductions of about 10 PgCO2 per year globally. However, research needs to achieve this involve: how to reduce barriers to deployment and achieve full participation by landowners; new approaches to reduce impacts on biodiversity, water, and other land values; better understanding of induced impacts such as changes in timber markets; and improved monitoring and accounting approaches.

Bio(s):
Dr. Birdsey is a specialist in quantitative methods for large-scale forest inventories and has pioneered development of methods to estimate national carbon budgets for forest lands from forest inventory data. He recently retired from the U.S. Forest Service as a “Distinguished Scientist” and was the Program Manager for global change research in the Northern Research Station. He was a lead author of 2 Special Reports for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change which was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007. He was a lead author of the first North American “State of the Carbon Cycle” report and is currently a member of the science team guiding the second report. He has contributed to several assessments of climate change in the U.S. He served three years as Chair of the U.S. Government Carbon Cycle Science Steering Group. He has published extensively on forest management and strategies to increase carbon sequestration, and facilitated the development of decision-support tools for policy and management. He was recognized by the U.S. Department of Agriculture as a major contributor to creating a new agricultural commodity " carbon. Dr. Birdsey is a member of a team of scientists developing and implementing the North American Carbon Program, an international effort to improve quantification and understand causes of carbon exchange between land, atmosphere, and oceans. In recent years he has been actively working with Mexico and Canada to improve monitoring, verification, and reporting to support climate change mitigation with an emphasis on Reducing Deforestation and Forest Degradation and promoting sustainable forest management (REDD+) and improving forest management in the three countries. He is currently working with the Forest Service National Forest System to implement carbon assessments for all of the U.S. National Forests.

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3 April 2019

Title: Structure and variability of the Antilles Current at 26.5°N
Presenter(s): Dr. Chris Meinen, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhD
Date & Time: 3 April 2019
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Chris Meinen (NOAA/AOML/PhD)
Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBA

The seminar video on this page https://www.aoml.noaa.gov/phod/videos/index.php.

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Title: Climate Resilience in Cities
Presenter(s): Mr. Saleem Chapman, City of Philadelphia and Mr. Daniel Bader, CCRUN RISA/Columbia University
Date & Time: 3 April 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Drexel University or Webinar (see below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Climate Resilience in Cities

Presenter(s):
Mr. Saleem Chapman (Deputy Director of Sustainability, City of Philadelphia) and Mr. Daniel Bader (Program Manager, CCRUN RISA and Columbia University)

Sponsor(s):
OAR / CPO / RISA Program

Abstract:

The Beat the Heat Initiative: A Case Study in Equitable, Community-Driven Climate Resilience Planning (Saleem Chapman).

While climate change affects everyone, not everyone is affected equally. People of color and lower-income populations experience increased exposure and sensitivity to climate risk. As local governments prepare for future impacts, an opportunity exists to address the root causes of inequalities in climate risk while creating greater resilience in overburden communities. This presentation examines the experience of the Philadelphia Office of Sustainability in implementing a community-driven, equity-focused planning process to address heat vulnerability in the Hunting Park neighborhood.

New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC) report (Daniel Bader)

This year marks the 10-year anniversary of the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC), and advisory body helping the City of New York with their climate resiliency planning. Established in 2008, the NPCC has pushed new boundaries of urban climate science, enabling New York City to set an example for all cities of how science-stakeholder partnerships can achieve science-based responses to climate change challenges. The NPCC's latest work was published in March 2019. This presentation will cover the report's later findings and and their implications for New York City and other cities seeking to identify and mitigate the impacts of a changing climate.

Seminar POC for questions: sean.bath@noaa.gov

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4 April 2019

Title: Identifying climate service production constraints to adaptation decision-making in Sweden
Presenter(s): Kathleen Ernst, PhD, Environment and Climate scientist, NOAA RESTORE Science Program, NOAA's National Center for Environmental Information, Stennis Space Center, MS
Date & Time: 4 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Identifying climate service production constraints to adaptation decision-making in Sweden

Presenter(s):
Kathleen Ernst, PhD, Environment and Climate scientist, NOAA RESTORE Science Program, NOAA's National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI) I Stennis Space Center, MS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Climate change adaptation efforts continue to increase as the impacts of climate change increase, intensify, and become more apparent. However, many adaptation efforts fail to result in adaptation actions. This inaction has been linked to several constraining factors including a lack of actionable information for adaptation decision making processes. We wonder if climate service producers face constraints as they try to create and deliver actionable information for adaptation decision-making efforts? This paper draws on semi-structured interviews and participant-observations across climate service production environments in Sweden to answer our research question and finds that climate service producers engage in research, coordination, and communication to
varying degrees and experience constraints related to the production and dissemination of actionable information
and stakeholder engagement, as well as funding, professional, and institutional constraints. Some constraints are experienced differently by climate service producers depending on their specific role, institutional affiliation, agency, and experience. Additionally, some climate service production constraints create or exacerbate additional constraints for adaptation decision-making stakeholders. Therefore, climate service production constraints limit the effectiveness of climate services, and overcoming them would help make progress towards more adaptation implementation in specific contexts. However, for adaptation actions to be widespread, the production and dissemination of climate services must be met with additional support and guidance for adaptation efforts beyond the provision of actionable information.

Bio(s):
Dr. Ernst holds a Ph.D. in environment and climate sciences and an M.S. in geography with a minor in environmental policy from the University of Tennessee, as well as a Bachelor's in geography and sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research focuses on resilience and adaptation planning in urban, energy, and water systems and on public lands. Specifically, she studies the creation and use of information for adaptation and resilience decision-making, evaluates the types of adaptation and resilience actions that are taken, and studies ways to identify and act upon opportunities that create co-benefits and synergies across sectors rather than negative consequences or tradeoffs. Kathleen has conducted research at the Urban Dynamics and Climate Change Sciences Institutes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory; at the Stockholm Environment Institute in Stockholm, Sweden; and most recently in Norrköping, Sweden as a U.S. Department of State Fulbright Scholar.

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Title: Radio Occultation Data Assimilation Using a Limited-ray-path 2D Raytracing Operator and an Impact Multipath Quality Control in the Tropical Lower Troposphere
Presenter(s): Xiaolei Zou - Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland
Date & Time: 4 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Xiaolei Zou, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland

Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio: USA participants: 866-832-9297 Passcode: 6070416

Slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190404_XZou.pdf

Abstract:
The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC-2) has more powerful GPS receiver antennas, a twice higher sampling rate of 100 Hz, and a three times smaller inclination of 24o than those of COSMIC-1. COSMIC-2 will, therefore, provide an unprecedented ample number of radio occultation (RO) data in the tropics. Assimilation of RO data in the tropics is challenging due to unique features such as large horizontal gradients of refractivity, spherical asymmetry, and impact multipath in the moist tropical lower troposphere. In this talk, I'll first show occurrences of multipath in the tropical lower troposphere using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/Global Forecast System analysis as input to a 2D raytracing operator for COSMIC ROs in March and April 2017. An up to 600-m lift in the impact parameter is observed for simulated RO rays in the presence of a strong horizontal gradient of refractivity over 250-km distances from the perigee, rendering the simulation bending angles multivalued functions of impact parameter. An impact multipath quality control (QC) procedure is developed to effectively identify the multipath simulations. Second, the accuracy and precision of a two-dimensional (2D) limited-ray-path raytracing operator is tested against the 2D raytracing operator that simulates global ray paths. Finally, bending angle data assimilation in the tropical lower troposphere is done using the 2D limited-ray-path raytracing operator and a one-dimensional (1D) Abel transform operator. The impact multipath QC is incorporated to eliminate occurrences of impact multipath in bending angle simulations. The fractional differences in bending angle simulations between the limited-path-length raytracing operators and the original 2D raytracing operator have zero bias, and their standard deviations are more than three times smaller than those between the 1D Abel transform operator and the 2D raytracing operator. The highest accuracy and precision are achieved for the 2D limited-ray-path raytracing operator if the ray path is confined within 400 km. Use of the physically based impact multipath QC is shown to improve COSMIC data assimilation and forecast results using either the 1D Abel transform or the 2D limited-ray-path observation operators of bending angle in the tropical lower troposphere.

Bio(s):
Dr. Xiaolei Zou received a PhD in Meteorology is a research professor at ESSIC at University of Maryland.

POC: Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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Title: Exploiting the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) genome editing revolution to advance aquaculture and fisheries research
Presenter(s): Michael Phelps, Ph.D., Department of Pathology, University of Washington
Date & Time: 4 April 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Michael Phelps, Ph.D., Department of Pathology, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Abstract:
The rapidly advancing clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) genome-editing field has opened a new world of possibilities to study the biology and ecology of organisms of all taxonomic groups. It has the potential to significantly enhance fundamental research in the environmental sciences while also providing a tool to improve species conservation. Unfortunately, controversial genome editing approaches have overshadowed many important applications of the technology that could directly impact aquaculture and fisheries research. These applications include powerful new genomic technologies and methods of interrogating the function of critical genes important in aquatic ecology and physiology. Advances in genome editing technology are also paving the way for enhanced monitoring of species abundance, pathogen detection and even improving the fitness of wild and cultured organisms. These newly acquired capabilities however, carry with them an inherent responsibility to safeguard against unintended or malicious misuse. Understanding the positive and negative features of CRISPR technology is critical to navigating this transformative period in biology, to help guide the future of the environmental sciences in the new genome-editing era.


Bio(s):
Michael Phelps is an Instructor at the University of Washington where he is developing CRISPR genome-editing technologies to address a wide range of questions in basic biology and the environmental sciences. He is particularly interested in applying new genome editing approaches to address important questions underlying fish physiology, genomics and conservation biology. Michael has a bachelor's degree in cellular and marine biology from Western Washington University, a PhD in environmental science and fish physiology from the University of Rhode Island with Postdoctoral experience in stem cell biology and genome-editing technology from the University of Washington.

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Title: How to effectively compete for the FIS/ET/CSP FY2020: Request for Proposals
Presenter(s): Lisa Peterson, NMFS
Date & Time: 4 April 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Join us in the NOAA Central Library for a presentation on the Request for Proposals on the FIS/ET/CSP FY2020.

Description: The Fisheries Information System (FIS), Electronic Technologies (ET), and Catch Share Program (CSP) are collectively making available (subject to appropriations) up to $5.5 million of FY2020 funding to support projects in Regional Offices, Science Centers, Headquarters Offices, FIN programs, and State partners through the Interstate Commissions. While all proposed projects should focus on fishery-dependent data, the programs supporting this request for proposals (RFP) have developed the following areas of interest:
  • Quality Management and Continuous Improvement;
  • Data Improvements, Modernization, and Integration;
  • Electronic Reporting and Electronic Monitoring; and
  • Fisheries Information Network Development.
But what do those focus areas really mean? How do you make sure your proposal is in scope and of high quality? This presentation will go through the different focus areas as well as the details of what makes a good proposal, while also providing an opportunity for potential principal investigators to ask questions.

Bio(s):
Lisa Peterson will be giving this presentation, she is the Fisheries Information System program coordinator.

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5 April 2019

Title: The EUMETSAT Contribution to the Global Space-based Observing System and the Initial Joint Polar System
Presenter(s): Dr. Kenneth Holmlund, EUMETSAT
Date & Time: 5 April 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

STAR Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Dr. Kenneth Holmlund, EUMETSAT

Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
USA participants: 866-832-9297

Passcode: 6070416

Slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190405_Holmlund.pdf
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190405_Holmlund.pptx

The PPTX file is over 1 GB. The PDF is about 50MB and omits all animations.

Abstract:
As part of the EUMETSAT-NOAA Initial Joint Polar System EUMETSAT operates today three EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) Metop satellites. The last satellite, Metop-C, was only launched in November 2018, whereas the first satellite, Metop-A, has now been in orbit for more than 12 years. Whilst Metop-A is now slowly drifting out its nominal orbit is still allows EUMETSAT to operate three satellites in the morning orbit until 2021, providing unique opportunities for deriving multi-satellite data and assessing their impact on global NWP. The second back-bone of the EUMETSAT meteorological satellite fleet is the Meteosat Second Generation system, today a constellation of four geostationary satellites. These satellites provide full-disc service over the European/African/Atlantic region, rapid scan data over Europe and full disk coverage over the Indian Ocean. Both of the aforementioned systems will be continued with next generation satellites through the EPS-Second Generation (EPS-SG) and Meteosat Third Generation Programmes. Both systems consist of six satellites, EPS-SG by three sets of two platforms for imaging, sounding and microwave observations, MTG by four imaging platforms including lightning observations and two sounding platforms. In addition to the meteorological satellite systems EUMETSAT operates and provides data services for oceanography and marine meteorology through the Jason altimetry missions and the Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellites, with the latter also providing observations for SST and ocean colour. The EUMETSAT data and products services, which also include reprocessing activities supporting climate services, are provided through a distributed network including Satellite Application Facilities. This presentation will give an overview of these satellite systems, their products and current impact on various application areas.

Bio(s):
Dr. Kenneth Holmlund is the Chief Scientist at EUMETSAT.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

8 April 2019

Title: Trophic teleconnections in the changing Arctic Ocean: Modelling zooplankton life history and energy flows along long-distance transport corridors
Presenter(s): Neil S Banas, Dept of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland and Affiliate Assistant Professo, School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle
Date & Time: 8 April 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Neil S Banas, Dept of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland and Affiliate Assistant Professo, School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle,

Sponsor(s):
This special seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.


Abstract:
Marine foraging hotspots are usually conceived of, or defined as, sources of energy and nutrients to surrounding waters. This study considers whether Arctic foraging hotspots for top predators are indeed sites of net production--and thus standing in contrast to the Arctic system as a whole--or whether they are net sinks at lower trophic levels, sites that collect plankton productivity from other oceans and deliver it in concentrated form to top predators.

The Coltrane (Copepod Life history Traits and Adaptation to New Environments) model provides a mathematical framework for layering multiple levels of mesozooplankton biology on top of oceanographic models. It resolves 1) individual life history (strategy traits controlling growth, development, and size, diagnosed from a broad review of lab studies); 2) population dynamics (the time-dependent energy balance between growth, egg production, and predation mortality); and 3) community assembly (the envelope of viable trait combinations under particular annual cycles of prey and temperature). Advective pathways in the Atlantic and Pacific Arctic were mapped using the BIOMAS and SINMOD oceanographic models, and Coltrane is being used to map the energy budget of Calanus populations along these pathways.

Results in the Pacific Arctic suggest that the yield of Calanus to predators in the Chukchi Sea is dependent primarily on Bering Sea phytoplankton blooms, although this complex interdependence could change as ice retreats and phytoplankton phenology shifts. Similar model results in Disko Bay, West Greenland are reinforced by a statistical analysis revealing intense predation by bowhead whales on overwintering Calanus: an unexpected trophic link from mesozooplankton to a top predator. Both lines of evidence suggest that Disko Bay is, like the Arctic Ocean as a whole, a net sink for plankton. However, completing this picture and fully testing this hypothesis will require solving difficult problems of scale in both the biology and the hydrodynamics.

Paper can be found here: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/fog.12422

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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9 April 2019

Title: The Social Implications of Pervasive Carbon
Presenter(s): Dr. Elizabeth L Malone, Independent Researcher
Date & Time: 9 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
The Social Implications of Pervasive Carbon
Seminar 7 in the Series, "From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle (SOCCR2) Seminar Series". We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28

Presenter(s):
Dr. Elizabeth L Malone, Independent Researcher

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
People's needs and wants are the starting point for social scientific investigation of how carbon is embedded in the conditions and in which they find themselves and the technologies they use. From energy sources to land management and from urban hardscapes to rural landscapes, carbon is emitted, conserved, or captured as people work, travel, eat, and perform other everyday activities and as human institutions and economic systems form and operate. Research that starts with such social configurations complements studies that examine changes in the carbon cycle, identify points of emissions, and quantify the technical potential of reducing them. People-centered research into the social embeddedness of carbon involves a wide range of scientific areas and a commitment to involvement by stakeholders. Such research leads to findings that will deepen knowledge about how social systems both persist and change and people's multiple roles within those systems. Results can indicate pathways by which carbon emissions can be reduced and carbon sequestration increased.

Bio(s):
Dr. Elizabeth L. Malone focuses on policy-relevant sociological research in global change issues, integrating disparate worldviews, data sources, and scientific approaches. She coordinated, drafted, and provided the science text for the National Intelligence Assessment on Climate Change in 2008 and was the technical lead for six regional reports for the National Intelligence Council (2009), summarizing climate change projections, impacts projections, and adaptive capacity. Malone was an author and review editor for the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment. She helped develop structured methods for analyzing vulnerabilities to climate change. She edited, with Steve Rayner, Human Choice and Climate Change (4 vols. 1998), which assesses social science research relevant to global climate change. Malone holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Maryland-College Park. Her book Debating Climate Change (2009) uses both discourse analysis and social network analysis to explore bases for agreement in the arguments used in the global climate change debate.

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Title: Seeing stars: ophiuroid phylogeography challenges Antarctic dogma
Presenter(s): Dr. Matthew Galaska, Post-doctoral Research Associate, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA.
Date & Time: 9 April 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/192640621
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Matthew Galaska, Post-doctoral Research Associate, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA.

Abstract:
Ophiuroids, commonly known as brittle stars, are a speciose member of the benthic community in the Southern Ocean. Additionally, many of these species are thought to possess a circumpolar distribution throughout the region. This talk will present findings from two phylogeographic studies on the species Astrotoma agassizii and Ophionotus victoraie, comparing how their geographic structure relates to traditionally held beliefs of benthic community dispersal abilities within and around the Southern Ocean. These studies utilized a combination of traditional mitochondrial markers and analyses, along with reduced representation genomic techniques, specifically RADseq, to uncover fine scale geographic structure and the first case of genetic connectivity across the Antarctic Polar Front in a benthic invertebrate.

Seminar POC: Adi Hanein, adi.hanein@noaa.gov

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Title: Listening to "See" Beneath the Waves: Soundscape monitoring in Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Dr. Lindsey Peavey Reeves, Research Specialist for NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 9 April 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Lindsey Peavey Reeves, Research Specialist for NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Abstract:
National marine sanctuaries are special places that support many human uses simultaneously, like fishing, recreation, and commercial shipping. At the same time, sanctuary habitats support thriving animal communities made up of some species that can move great distances, and some that remain relatively stationary. Like all marine environments, sanctuaries experience a variety of seasonal conditions and weather each year, like wind-driven upwelling and storms. Each of these sanctuary elements have one thing in common: they produce sound. It is rarely the case that researchers can visually observe all, or even some of these things, and so we need additional tools to "see" beneath the waves to better understand and protect sanctuaries. Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary has been a hot spot for passive acoustic monitoring for years, and in this webinar we'll explore various ways in which the Channel Islands sanctuary and partners are characterizing the sanctuary soundscape, what we've been able to learn so far, and what we are still seeking to understand.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

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10 April 2019

Title: Characterizing and comparing U.S. fisheries ecosystems: Successful factors in moving toward EBFM
Presenter(s): Tony Marshak, NMFS/OST
Date & Time: 10 April 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tony Marshak, Research Associate, NMFS Office of Science and Technology

Sponsor(s):
NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Implementing ecosystem-based fisheries management requires a comprehensive examination of fisheries ecosystem components. Determining the relative prominence among these components is warranted given the many issues facing marine ecosystems. This presentation will provide an overview of the characterization of U.S. marine fishery ecosystems by compiling a multidisciplinary view of coupled socioecological system (SES) indicators for each ecosystem. These characterizations can be applied toward understanding the interdependence of foundational human and natural properties as applied toward determining successful Living Marine Resource (LMR) management strategies, and in determining system-level thresholds. In this presentation, Tony Marshak will emphasize cross-regional comparisons among SES indicators, with specific examples from temperate, subtropical, and tropical U.S. fisheries ecosystems.

Bio(s):
Tony Marshak is a Research Associate with ECS Federal, LLC in support of NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology's Marine Ecosystems Division. He co-leads the NOAA Fisheries habitat science program and additionally collaborates with NOAA Fisheries Senior Ecosytem Scientist on EBFM-related investigations. His research interests include fisheries ecology, the effects of climate change on reef fishes, the influences of habitat complexity on marine communities, and more recently investigations into marine socio-ecological systems. Tony received a BS from Texas A&M University, a MS from the University of Puerto Rico, and a PhD from the University of South Alabama, and was a Knauss Fellow in the NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology in 2014.

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Title: There is no I in EAFM: Adapting Integrated Ecosystem Assessment for Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas NMFS/NEFSC
Date & Time: 10 April 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Gaichas, Biologist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Resource managers worldwide are being asked to consider the ecosystem while making management decisions. However, it can be difficult to change management systems accustomed to evaluating a constrained set of objectives, often on a species-by-species basis. Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) provides a flexible framework for addressing ecosystem considerations in decision making. IEA was adapted to address species, fleet, habitat, and climate interactions by the US Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) as part of their Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management (EAFM) in 2016. The Council's EAFM framework uses risk assessment as a first step to prioritize combinations of managed species, fleets, and ecosystem interactions for consideration. Second, a conceptual model is developed identifying key environmental, ecological, social, economic, and management linkages for a high-priority fishery. Third, quantitative modeling addressing Council-specified questions and based on interactions identified in the conceptual model is applied to evaluate alternative management strategies that best balance management objectives. As strategies are implemented, outcomes are monitored and the process is adjusted, and/or another priority identified in risk assessment can be addressed. The Council completed an initial EAFM risk assessment in 2017. First, the Council identified a range of ecological, social, and management objectives or risk elements. All objectives/risk elements were evaluated with ecosystem indicators using risk assessment criteria developed by the Council. In 2018, the Council identified summer flounder as a high risk fishery and is now finalizing an EAFM conceptual model. Annual ecosystem reporting updates ecosystem indicators and the risk assessment. The Council's rapid progress in implementing EAFM resulted from positive collaboration between managers, stakeholders, and scientists. Collaboration is essential to IEA and to the success of EAFM.

Bio(s):
Dr. Sarah Gaichas has been a Research Fishery Biologist with the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch at the NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA since September 2011. She is a member of the Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee, has been active in ecosystem reporting and management strategy evaluation for both the Mid-Atlantic and New England Fishery Management Councils. Sarah's primary research is on integrated ecosystem assessment, management strategy evaluation, and ecosystem modeling. Her duties include developing, testing, and using ecosystem data, indicators, and models in natural resource management, and simulation testing management strategies (including analytical tools) that address the needs of diverse ecosystem users. Sarah previously worked at the NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA from 1997-2011 as an observer program analyst, a stock assessment scientist, and an ecosystem modeler. Sarah earned her Ph.D. from the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science in 2006, her M.S from the College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 1997, and her B.A. in English Literature from Swarthmore College in 1991.

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11 April 2019

Title: Adaptation, Law, and Infrastructure Planning in the Southeast: Roads Forward, Backward, or Somewhere In-Between?
Presenter(s): Shana Jones, J.D., Associate Public Service Faculty, Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia, and Director, Georgia Sea Grant Law Program; Jason Evans, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Environmental Science and Studies, Stetson University; and Thomas Ruppert, J.D., Coastal Planning Specialist, Florida Sea Grant College Program
Date & Time: 11 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar or in SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150, for NOAA Silver Spring folks
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Adaptation, Law, and Infrastructure Planning in the Southeast: Roads Forward, Backward, or Somewhere In-Between?

Presenter(s):
- Shana Jones, J.D., Associate Public Service Faculty, Carl Vinson Institute of Government,
University of Georgia, and Director, Georgia Sea Grant Law Program
- Jason Evans, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Environmental Science and Studies, Stetson University
- Thomas Ruppert, J.D., Coastal Planning Specialist, Florida Sea Grant College Program

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of Coastal Management and the National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Bill.Obeirne@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Coastal communities are increasingly becoming aware of the risks to local infrastructure because of increased flooding, more extreme storm surges, and sea-level rise. As local governments are responsible for the lion's share of land use decision-making and infrastructure development in the United States, local governments in the coastal zone will play a key role in climate adaptation. Local governments already face hard questions about whether to build new infrastructure to adapt, continue maintaining existing infrastructure under increasingly adverse conditions, or, particularly in the instance of roads, whether to abandon them. Using roads and stormwater infrastructure as examples, this presentation distills findings from a research project funded by NOAA's Office of Coastal Management, North Carolina Sea Grant, South Carolina Sea Grant, Georgia Sea Grant, and Florida Sea Grant (Project No. FY2014-2018: NA14OAR4170084). We will discuss:
· How tort law both furthers and inhibits resilience planning and climate adaptation efforts, using four
South Atlantic states, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, as case studies;
· Whether FEMA's HAZUS is the appropriate tool for local government adaptation planning; and
· Lessons learned and opportunities for future planning directions, both at the local and state levels.

A law review article distilling our findings appeared in the Columbia Journal of Environmental Law this winter. You may access the article at: http://www.columbiaenvironmentallaw.org/roads-to-nowhere-in-four-states-state-and-local-governments-in-the-atlantic-southeast-facing-sea-level-rise/. For a discussion of “takings” issues related to adaptation planning by one of our presenters and project partners, Thomas Ruppert, see also https://www.flseagrant.org/wp-content/uploads/Castles-and-Roads-In-the-Sand_2018_48_ELR_10914.pdf, which appeared recently in Environmental Law Reporter.

Bio(s):
Shana Jones, J.D., manages the Planning & Environmental Services Unit at the Carl Vinson Institute of Government at the University of Georgia and Directs the Georgia Sea Grant Program. Her primary research and outreach focus involves coastal flooding issues and adaptation planning. Ms. Jones' experience includes developing robust legal and policy guidance for local governments related to environmental, land use, and utility-related issues. She also directs an annual Environmental Policy Academy for the Georgia House and Senate Natural Resource Committees. Prior to joining the University of Georgia, Ms. Jones was the Director of the Virginia Coastal Policy Clinic at William & Mary Law School, which she founded in 2012. She has authored several law review articles and co-authored The Case for Grassroots Collaboration: Social Capital and Ecosystem Restoration at the Local Level. She contributes annually to the law treatise, Waters and Water Rights.

Jason Evans is Associate Professor of Environmental Science and Studies and Faculty Director for the Institute of Water and Environmental Resilience at Stetson University in DeLand, FL. Trained as a landscape and systems ecologist, most of Dr. Evans's recent research has focused on climate change adaptation within coastal communities, with a particular focus on sea-level rise. Through support provided by NOAA Sea Grant programs, over the past several years he has conducted flood vulnerability assessments for numerous local governments in the southeast United States: Monroe County, the Village of Islamorada, and Satellite Beach, FL; Tybee Island and St. Marys, GA; Hyde County, NC; and Beaufort, SC. Dr. Evans also serves as Co-Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Environmental Management, a leading international publication within the fields of environmental science, engineering, and planning.

Thomas Ruppert, Esq., coastal planning specialist at the Florida Sea Grant College Program, is a licensed attorney developing legal and policy analysis for local governments on aspects of adaptive planning for sea-level rise, community resilience, and associated long-term challenges and opportunities for Florida's coastal communities. Areas of expertise include federal and state property rights law, beach and coastal policy in Florida, flood insurance, Florida's Coastal Construction Control Line program, planning law, and coastal and marine permitting programs. He has worked with over a dozen partners to organize and host legal workshops on coastal issues and flood insurance around the state. Mr. Ruppert is currently involved with several initiatives within Florida communities planning for sea-level rise and maintains a website of original resources at www.flseagrant.org/climatechange/coastalplanning/.

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Title: The effects of temperature on species distributions and community composition: Implications for Marine Protected Area (MPA) management
Presenter(s): Malin Pinsky, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, Rutgers University
Date & Time: 11 April 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
The effects of temperature on species distributions and community composition: Implications for Marine Protected Area (MPA) management

Presenter(s):
Malin Pinsky, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, Rutgers University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National MPA Center; MPA News, a service of OCTO; EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe); OpenChannels, a service of OCTO

Webinar Point of Contact: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Recent research has shown that the geographic distributions of marine species are changing - and will continue to change - as climate change leads to geographic shifts in their preferred thermal habitats. Furthermore, as a result of these changing geographic distributions, ecological communities are being reorganized. These changes are already posing challenges for managing living marine resources, and these challenges are likely to grow as marine organisms continue to shift ranges, including across national, state, and other political boundaries. This presentation will provide an overview of relevant research (conducted off the coasts of the US and Canada) and discuss implications for Marine Protected Area management.

Bio(s):
Malin Pinsky is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources at Rutgers University, where he leads a research group studying the ecological and evolutionary impacts of climate change in the ocean. Among other activities, he developed the OceanAdapt website to document shifting ocean animals in North America. He has published more than 50 articles in Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and other journals; has been named a “rising star in ecology”; and has received early career awards and fellowships from the National Academy Sciences, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the American Society of Naturalists, and the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. His research has received coverage in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, BBC, and other media. He has a Ph.D. from Stanford University, an A.B. from Williams College, and grew up near the coast of Maine.

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Title: Shoreline Mapping Data and Products
Presenter(s): Tim Blackford, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 11 April 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tim Blackford, National Geodetic Survey

The NGS Coastal Mapping Program produces the national shoreline and other critical data used to update the NOAA nautical charts. The data is also used by coastal resource managers and others for GIS analysis, coastal modeling, and as the baseline for defining U.S. territorial limits. This webinar will provide an overview of how the NGS Remote Sensing Division collects, processes, and delivers shoreline mapping data and products.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge is helpful.

Location: Webinar access

Abstract:
The NGS Coastal Mapping Program produces the national shoreline and other critical data used to update the NOAA nautical charts. The data is also used by coastal resource managers and others for GIS analysis, coastal modeling, and as the baseline for defining U.S. territorial limits. This webinar will provide an overview of how the NGS Remote Sensing Division collects, processes, and delivers shoreline mapping data and products.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit:
https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

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National Geodetic Survey webinars are usually held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/
Title: The international Gulf of Alaska expedition: Using a Russian research ship to study salmon on the high seas
Presenter(s): Laurie Weitkamp, Ph.D., conservation Biology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 11 April 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Laurie Weitkamp, Ph.D., conservation Biology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):

NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Abstract:


Many years ago, Dr. Richard “Dick” Beamish (Canadian Department Fish and Oceans) had the audacious idea of sending an international scientific research team to international waters in the Gulf of Alaska in late winter to study the ecology of salmon. This area and time were thought to regulate year class strength of salmon, but no directed sampling had been done to support or dismiss this idea. Through Herculean effort and relentless tenacity, Dick finally managed to get this privately-funded expedition off the ground in late winter 2019, which has become the signature event for the International Year of the Salmon. Laurie Weitkamp was fortunate to be invited as one of 21 scientists representing U.S., Canada, Russia, Japan, and South Korea on the International Gulf of Alaska Expedition. The team spent 30 days (mid February to mid March) on the Russian Research Vessel Professor Kaganovskiy documenting salmon and their winter habitat across nearly 700,000 km2 in the Gulf of Alaska. The scientific team consisted of physical and biological oceanographers, chemists, and fish and invertebrate biologists, allowing measurement of everything from ocean physics to salmon genetics. This talk will describe the initial findings from the expedition (with many more to come once 1,000s of collected samples are analyzed), and the unique experience of spending a month on a Russian research vessel.

Bio(s):
Laurie Weitkamp has been a Salmon Biologist at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center since 1992, moving from Montlake to the Newport Research Station in 2004. She has been involved in the scientific basis for West Coast coho salmon listing and recovery under ESA for over two decades. Her research focuses on the ecology of salmon in estuarine and marine environments, primarily the distribution of juvenile and adult salmon in estuarine and marine waters, and the factors that influence growth and survival, including recent anomalous conditions. Laurie has recently branched out to explore the little-studied estuarine and marine ecology of anadromous lamprey. Laurie serves on a variety of technical committees, including the Coho Technical Committee of the Pacific Salmon Commission. Laurie received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Washington.

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Title: New Research to Inform Sustainable Shoreline Design, Placement and Monitoring
Presenter(s): Christine Angelini, Assistant Professor in Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida; Stuart Findlay, Aquatic Ecologist, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies; Jennifer Raulin, Manager, Chesapeake Bay-Maryland National Estuarine Research Reserve; Denise Sanger, Research Coordinator, ACE Basin National Estuarine Research Reserve; Eric Sparks, Assistant Extension Professor, Mississippi State University
Date & Time: 11 April 2019
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Please register through GoToWebinar (see below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Christine Angelini, Assistant Professor in Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida
Stuart Findlay, Aquatic Ecologist, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Jennifer Raulin, Manager, Chesapeake Bay-Maryland National Estuarine Research Reserve

Denise Sanger, Research Coordinator, ACE Basin National Estuarine Research Reserve

Eric Sparks, Assistant Extension Professor, Mississippi State University

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html).

Abstract:
Living, or “soft,” shoreline stabilization techniques include a set of strategies for maintaining shoreline stability while also providing ecosystem services. A living shoreline enhances features of the natural environment to preserve shoreline integrity -- slowing erosion and absorbing wave energy -- while also promoting ecological benefits such as increasing habitat diversity, reducing water pollution via captured runoff, and providing pathways for wetland migration.

Members of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) and partners, in part supported by Science Collaborative resources, have been studying how different shoreline techniques perform in different coastal locations from Mississippi to New York, and also developing tools to increase their use.

This webinar will: a) facilitate a candid panel discussion of the lessons learned, management implications and next steps related to a series of applied research projects focused on better understanding the benefits of living shorelines; and b) give audience members the opportunity to engage and ask questions about opportunities and challenges surrounding living shorelines.

Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

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12 April 2019

Title: Tropospheric humidity: a known unknown
Presenter(s): Dr. Isaac Moradi, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center - University of Maryland, College Park, MD
Date & Time: 12 April 2019
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Isaac Moradi, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center - University of Maryland, College Park, MD.

To schedule a meeting with Dr. Moradi during his visit, please contact Lei Shi at Lei.Shi@noaa.gov, 828-350-2005.

Abstract:
Water vapor is the most dominant greenhouse gas and plays a critical role in the climate by regulating the Earth's radiation budget and hydrological cycle. A comprehensive dataset is required to describe the temporal and spatial distribution of water vapor, evaluate the performance of climate and weather prediction models in terms of simulating tropospheric humidity, and understand the role of water vapor and its feedback in the climate system. Satellite microwave and radiosonde measurements are two main sources of tropospheric humidity. However, both datasets are subject to errors and uncertainties. This talk focuses on our knowledge of these errors and uncertainties as well as some applications of such observations, as follows:

The quality of operational radiosonde data were investigated for different sensor types. It was found that the use of a variety of sensors over the globe introduces temporal and spatial errors in the data. Furthermore, it was shown that the daytime radiation dry bias, which is one of the most important errors in radiosonde data, depends on both sensor type and radiosonde launch time.

Radiometric errors in satellite data were investigated using both intercomparison of coincident observations as well as validation versus high-quality radiosonde and Global Positioning System Radio Occultation (GPS-RO) data. Overall, the absolute accuracy of the microwave satellite data cannot still be validated due to the lack of reference measurements.

In addition, a novel technique for correcting geolocation errors in microwave satellite data was developed based on the difference between ascending and descending observations along the coastlines. Using this method, several important errors including timing errors and sensor mounting errors were found in some of the microwave instruments.

Finally, since satellite data are indirect measurements, a method was developed to transform satellite radiances from different water vapor channels to layer averaged humidity. The technique is very fast because radiative transfer calculations are only required to determine the empirical coefficients. This technique was then used to evaluate the diurnal variation of tropospheric humidity in the tropical region.

This research was funded by NOAA Environmental Data Record Program and JPSS Programs.

Bio(s):
Dr. Isaac Moradi received his MSc. in Meteorology from University of Tehran, his first PhD in Climatology and Environmental Planning from Kwarizmi University of Tehran and his second PhD in Radio and Space Science from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Before joining University of Maryland, he worked at University of Tehran, Ministry of Energy, and Lulea University of Technology, Sweden. Since joining ESSIC, University of Maryland in 2010, he has been working on satellite data calibration, radiative transfer modeling, product retrieval, data assimilation and OSSEs. He has been working at NASA GMAO since 2015 where his work is focused on satellite data assimilation, OSSE and radiative transfer modeling. Before joining GMAO, he worked at NOAA Joint Center Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, as well as NOAA STAR. Dr. Moradi is currently representing ESSIC in the UMD Senate, and also is an editor of Atmospheric Measurement Techniques.

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15 April 2019

Title: Communicating Science: A picture really is worth a thousand words!
Presenter(s): Dan Satterfield, Chief Meteorologist, WBOC-TV, Salisbury, MD
Date & Time: 15 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771, Conference Room S650
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Dan Satterfield, Chief Meteorologist, WBOC-TV - Salisbury, MD

Sponsor(s):
JPSS Science Seminar

Abstract:
Images are the most powerful form of communication, and in an age of fake news, science needs to use them widely to communicate science about our changing planet. The new satellite era opens up a wide range of possibilities to do just that. Satellite images have become a vital part of the WBOC broadcast. WBOC-TV 16 began broadcasting on July 15, 1954 in Salisbury, Md. The television station has become known to the community as "Delmarva's News Leader." WBOC is an affiliate of CBS and a member of the Associated Press. WBOC is a regional news source. We make a commitment every day by way of resources, air time and experience to do the best job we can covering issues that affect the entire Delmarva Peninsula. In Maryland, the station reaches Wicomico, Worcester, Somerset, Dorchester, Talbot, Caroline and Queen Anne's counties. In Delaware, it reaches Sussex and Kent counties. In Virginia, it reaches Accomack County. These 10 counties are with just under 500,000 viewers, not including those who visit area beaches during the summer.

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16 April 2019

Title: State of Carbon in Soils and Agriculture: Linking North American Science to Global Efforts
Presenter(s): Nancy Cavallaro, National Program Leader, Soils Water & Global Change Programs, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA
Date & Time: 16 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
State of Carbon in Soils and Agriculture: Linking North American Science to Global Efforts
Seminar 8 in the Series, "From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle (SOCCR2) Seminar Series". We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28

Presenter(s):
Nancy Cavallaro, National Program Leader, Soils Water & Global Change Programs, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report, SOCCR2, is primarily focused on North America but it is within a global context. Within terrestrial systems, soil plays a key part in carbon balance, and this is particularly important in managed systems such as those linked to agricultural production and food. The largest reservoir of stable carbon storage (carbon sequestration) on agricultural lands is the carbon in soils. Carbon uptake from plant systems (including the plants that supply food to livestock) requires good growth of plants, and that depends on the health, nutrient status and resilience of the soils. Most crop and livestock production systems overall have small net greenhouse gas emissions, but some have a considerable carbon footprint, while others that are particularly well-managed and productive systems have a net carbon uptake. Thus, although agriculture accounts for about 9-10% of total North American GHG emissions, and this sector accounts for closer to 20% worldwide, there is an opportunity to increase the net uptake of carbon from the atmosphere by better and more judicious land management and land use. Livestock systems, particularly beef production systems, tend to emit methane and account for more than a third of the emissions of this potent carbon-containing greenhouse gas. In both crop and livestock production, a promising way to sequester carbon and turn net emissions to net uptake is via the soils. This webinar will discuss major findings of the soils and agriculture chapters of SOCCR2, as well as some relevant parts of the chapters on grasslands and aquatic systems. It will also present some linkages between North American agriculture and soil carbon science and global efforts in these areas.

Bio(s):
Dr. Nancy Cavallaro has served as a National Program Leader at USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture since 2001, managing research, extension, and education programs in soils, watersheds and water quality, carbon and climate change, and environmental aspects of agricultural and forestry production systems. She is also the current Co-Chair of US Global Change Research Program's (USGCRP) Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group, and also served for 4 years as co-chair of the Land Use and Land Cover Change Interagency Working Group. In addition to her work on the SOCCR2 report, she was part of the core writing team for the USGCRP's decadal strategic plan (2012-2021) and contributed to the 2003 strategic plan of the USGCRP's Climate Change Science Program. She is the US representative to the Integrated Research Group of the Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases. Prior to starting at USDA, she worked primarily in academia as a researcher, professor, and sometime extension specialist at several diverse locations: Cornell University, the Colegio de Postgraduados in Mexico, and the University of Puerto Rico, with short-term appointments at the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory in New Hampshire (Army Corp of Engineers), and Texas Tech University.

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17 April 2019

Title: Trade Wind charging and ENSO predictability.
Presenter(s): Dr. Soumi Chakravorty, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 17 April 2019
10:00 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Soumi Chakravorty, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBA

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Title: Saving endangered species: large-scale management experiments addressing the loss of a large mammal from the continental USA
Presenter(s): Dr. Robert Serrouya, Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Unit, University of Alberta. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 17 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Saving endangered species: large-scale management experiments addressing the loss of a large mammal from the continental USA

Presenter(s):
Dr. Robert Serrouya, Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Unit, University of Alberta. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Adaptive management is a powerful means of learning about complex ecosystems, but is rarely used for recovering endangered species. Here, we demonstrate how it can benefit woodland caribou, which became the first large mammal extirpated from the contiguous United States in recent history. The continental scale of forest alteration and extended time needed for forest recovery means that relying only on habitat protection and restoration will likely fail. Therefore, population management is also needed as an emergency measure to avoid further extirpation. Reductions of predators and overabundant prey, translocations, and creating safe havens have been applied in a design covering >90,000 km2. Combinations of treatments that increased multiple vital rates produced the highest population growth. Moreover, the degree of ecosystem alteration did not influence this pattern. By coordinating recovery involving scientists, governments, and First Nations, treatments were applied across vast scales to benefit this iconic species.

Bio(s):
Dr. Serrouya's main research focus has been to test recovery options for caribou and other species by implementing broad-scale adaptive management experiments. He has worked as a large mammal ecologist in Alberta and British Columbia for 20 years. He specializes on broad-scale processes, particularly how forestry and energy extraction affect trophic interactions within ecosystems that until recently, had little early"seral vegetation. How this shift in vegetation, from old forests to shrubs, affects the abundance and interactions among herbivores and carnivores is one of his main research interests. He currently works on boreal and mountain ecotypes of woodland caribou, and focuses on how the changing dynamics of other herbivores (moose and deer) and carnivores (bears, wolves, and cougars) affect the survival of caribou.

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Title: Red Sky Mobile App: Crowdsourcing Weather for Coastal Mariners
Presenter(s): Colleen Keller, Senior Analyst, Metron, Inc.
Date & Time: 17 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Colleen Keller, Senior Analyst, Metron, Inc.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library

Abstract:
Metron is developing a mobile App to crowdsource observation data from boaters in the coastal marine environment. The effort was funded under a NOAA Phase II SBIR. The data collected will be made available to all App users for real-time condition monitoring, and will also be provided to NOAA to inform and vet forecasts.

Bio(s):
Colleen Keller is an operations research analyst with expertise in US Navy systems, tactics, and procedures. She is also Metron's spokesperson for the application of Bayesian analysis to search and rescue operations. Ms. Keller wrote the winning SBIR proposal for this App based on another App she conceived and developed to support search and rescue operations. She is a private pilot and aircraft owner/mechanic, and air races and flies aerobatics as hobbies.

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Title: How Long does Anthropogenic CO2 stay in the Atmosphere?
Presenter(s): Dr. Stephen Schwartz, Brookhaven National Laboratory
Date & Time: 17 April 2019
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see link below) or at NASA Goddard, Building 3 Goett Auditorium
Description:

Science Seminar Series

Title:
How Long does Anthropogenic CO2 stay in the Atmosphere?

Presenter(s):
Dr. Stephen Schwartz, Brookhaven National Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
Scientific Colloquium Committee

Sponsor(s):
Pete Colarco " Code 614 " Phone (301) 614-6382
Coffee and tea served at 3:00, For current Scientific Colloquium information, visit http://scicolloq.gsfc.nasa.gov

Abstract:
Knowledge of the adjustment time of anthropogenic CO2, the e-folding time by which excess CO2 (above preindustrial) would decrease in the absence of anthropogenic emissions, is central to understanding the influence of anthropogenic CO2 on climate change and to prospective control of CO2 emissions to reach desired targets. Estimates of this adjustment time from current carbon-cycle models range from about 100 years to over 700 years. This talk examines
the CO2 budget by a top-down, observationally based approach. Major stocks and fluxes are quantified. The net flux from the atmosphere and the ocean mixed layer, which are in near equilibrium, to the deep ocean and terrestrial biosphere is found to be proportional to the excess CO2 in these compartments over the Anthropocene. Theseobservations, together with knowledge of the underlying physical and chemical processes, are used to develop a simple, transparent model that describes the transport of CO2 between major compartments -- the atmosphere, the mixed-layer ocean, the deep ocean, and the terrestrial biosphere. This model compares well with observed atmospheric
CO2 from 1750 to the present. The adjustment time of excess CO2, evaluated by multiple means including the 1/e decay time and the negative inverse of the fractional annual transfer rate of excess CO2 into the terrestrial biosphere and the deep ocean, is found to be 54 ± 10 years. Such a short adjustment time, if correct, would mean that the atmospheric amount of CO2 would respond quickly and strongly to emission changes. For example, atmospheric CO2 could be immediately stabilized at its present value by decreasing anthropogenic emissions by about 50%.

Bio(s):
Stephen E. Schwartz is a senior scientist at Brookhaven National Laboratory. His current research interest centers on the influence of energy related emissions on climate, with a focus on the role of atmospheric aerosols. Schwartz is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Geophysical Union, and is recipient of the 2003 Haagen-Smit Award for an "outstanding paper" published in the journal Atmospheric Environment. In 2010 he received an Outstanding Leadership Award from the U.S. Department of Energy. In his research at
Brookhaven National Laboratory, Schwartz developed methods to describe the rate of reactions in clouds that lead to production of acid rain. Schwartz's research exerted a major influence on the drafting of the acid deposition section of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. More recently, Schwartz has been focusing on microscopic and submicroscopic aerosol particles, which influence a variety of atmospheric processes, from precipitation to climate change. Schwartz's research has been quite influential. In 2001 he was one of some 350 scientists worldwide to be designated a "highly
cited researcher" in geophysics by Thomson-ISI (then the Institute for Scientific Information). Schwartz received his bachelor's degree in chemistry from Harvard University, in 1963, and his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1968. After postdoctoral research at the University of Cambridge, England, Schwartz joined the Chemistry Department at Stony Brook University. He joined Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1975.

18 April 2019

Title: Predicting the distribution of Threatened Orbicellid corals in shallow and mesophotic reef ecosystems along the Puerto Rican shelf
Presenter(s): Katharine Egan, OER
Date & Time: 18 April 2019
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Katharine Egan, Ocean Exploration Fellow with the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

Sponsor(s):
Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Hollis Jones (hollis.jones@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCE) are deep, diverse reefs, yet little is known about their spatial extent and location. For MCEs on the Puerto Rican shelf, the predominant reef-building corals are Orbicellids, which are listed as Threatened under the US Endangered Species Act. The goals of this study were to predict suitable habitat for Orbicellid coral species, identify how abiotic environmental factors constrain potential Orbicellid habitat, and identify areas of unexplored coral reef. The resulting spatial predictions will provide insight into habitat characterization of Orbicellids and provide direction for future MCE exploration efforts.

About the speaker: Katharine Egan recently graduated from the University of the Virgin Islands with an M.Sc. in Marine and Environmental Science where her thesis was focused on predicting coral distributions. Prior to the Knauss Fellowship, she worked as a GIS Analyst for the NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science in Beaufort, NC providing project support for predicting ESA-listed corals, the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program, and the assessment of hurricane impacts to coral reefs in Puerto Rico. Katharine has also completed an internship with NASA related to disaster prevention and has received funding to prevent marine debris through outreach in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

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Title: Applications of passive acoustics in fisheries: observations of grouper spawning aggregations and source level measurements in Little Cayman, Cayman Island
Presenter(s): Katharine Wilson, NMFS/OST
Date & Time: 18 April 2019
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Katherine Wilson, Electronic Technologies Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology

Sponsor(s):
Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Hollis Jones (hollis.jones@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
More than 800 species of fish produce sound related to spawning, aggression, and/or disturbance. These sounds can be used to monitor the presence and activity of many of these fishes to understand their ecology and may be a means to estimate abundance. I will discuss the passive acoustic monitoring and localization studies that I have used to study the temporal and spatial dynamics of spawning aggregations of Nassau grouper (Epinephelus striatus) and red hind (E. guttatus) in Little Cayman, Cayman Islands. Additionally, these localizations were used to measure the source levels, which are required to determine communication ranges and develop methods for estimating abundance, of the sounds produced by these species as well as black grouper (Mycteroperca bonaci) and yellowfin grouper (M. venenosa).

About the speaker: Katherine Wilson recently completed her doctorate degree at Scripps Institution of Oceanography where she studied applied ocean science and used passive acoustics to study the ecology of grouper in the Cayman Islands. Prior to this, she received B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Portland and Clemson University, respectively, and worked as a communications engineer for Bonneville Power Administration for 3 years. In addition to her diverse background in bioacoustics, intelligent systems, and network security, she comes from a commercial fishing family and has worked as a deckhand fishing for Chinook salmon and albacore tuna on the F/V Jo El.

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Title: Alaska salmon fisheries: Managing with the end in mind
Presenter(s): William Templin, PhD., Division of Commercial Fisheries, Alaska Department of Fish and Game
Date & Time: 18 April 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
William Templin, PhD., Division of Commercial Fisheries, Alaska Department of Fish and Game

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Abstract:
Capping the northern extent of the Pacific Ocean, the state of Alaska is situated at the heart of the natural range of the six most abundant species of Pacific salmon. With a relatively extreme environment and limited access to agriculture and industry, salmon are likewise situated at the heart of the culture and concerns of Alaskans. So much so, that local control of the resource drove the push for statehood, and public ownership and perpetuation of the resource are enshrined in the state constitution. Relative to other salmon-producing regions, Alaska enjoys some unique advantages (e.g., single-entity management and intact habitat) while also facing a matching set of difficulties (e.g., scale of the landscape and limited access). In this context, the mechanisms for decision-making, allocation, and management of the resource were developed around two main responsibilities 1) to the extent possible providing all residents access to salmon for economic, subsistence, cultural and/or recreational uses and 2) to the extent possible maintaining the production of salmon from natural systems for future generations. Based on these responsibilities, salmon management in Alaska is achieved by managing salmon usage with the intent to achieve escapement goals for future production, setting escapement goals to achieve continued harvestable surpluses and dividing the surpluses among users in an open and flexible process that can be influenced by stakeholders. While there are myriad ways that the context changes across the state (applications, users, gear types, species, etc.) the mission remains the same, ultimately providing a robust and responsive management system.

Bio(s):
William "Bill" Templin is currently the Chief Fishery Scientist for Salmon at the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Commercial Fisheries. He received his B.S. in Biology at Wheaton College in Illinois after which he worked in biochemistry at the University of Illinois, Chicago. In 1990, with his wife and newborn son, he drove across country to Juneau to pursue a master's degree in Fisheries Science at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. In Juneau, he worked with Drs. Jeremy Collie and Terry Quinn II to develop a run reconstruction model for pink salmon in Prince William Sound to assess the effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill. As a biologist who was pretty good at math, in 1994 he was hired on a whim into the ADF&G Gene Conservation Laboratory by Drs. Lisa and Jim Seeb. The team was investigating the use of genetic information for management of Pacific salmon and marine fish and shellfish, so he was involved with the analysis of genetic data for the purposes of delineating stock structure and developing mixed stock analysis applications for commercially important aquatic species. When Jim and Lisa moved to the University of Washington in 2007, Bill was hired as the Principal Geneticist, in charge of the ADF&G genetics program, providing review and advice to staff, and representing the department in national and international venues. Three years ago, he left that position to take on the new challenges of his current job overseeing the division's statewide salmon research and stock assessment programs and helping ensure that research is well integrated with fisheries management.

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19 April 2019

Title: April 2019 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, ACCAP
Date & Time: 19 April 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (rthoman@alaska.edu)

Abstract:
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for May and the summer season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

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22 April 2019

Title: Climate Prediction Center (CPC) sea ice prediction systems and research products for Alaska
Presenter(s): David DeWitt and Wanqiu Wang, CPC
Date & Time: 22 April 2019
6:30 pm - 7:30 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
David DeWitt and Wanqiu Wang, CPC

Abstract:
The National Centers for Environmental Prediction's Climate Forecast System (CFS) version 2 is one of the first operational coupled atmosphere-ocean models that provide sea ice predictions with a dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice component. The predicted sea ice from CFS, however, contains large errors in seasonal cycle as well as interannual variations due to unrealistic model physics and use of erroneous sea ice initial conditions. An experimental forecast system (CFSpp) was developed based on CFS at the NCEP Climate Prediction Center (CPC) with improved model physics and improved sea ice initial conditions from University of Washington Pan-arctic Ice/Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS). CPC started providing seasonal sea ice prediction in 2015. The CFSpp has been recently further upgraded to CFSm5 with a newer ocean component (MOM5) and an in-house CPC Sea ice Initialization System (CSIS). In this talk, we present an overview of the development of the CPC experimental sea ice forecast system, prediction products, and an evaluation of the predictions. The following aspects will be discussed: (1) Challenges in sea ice forecasts from NCEP operational CFS; (2) CPC experimental sea ice prediction system; (3) CPC sea ice initialization system; (4) Forecast performance assessment; and (5) Forecast products. An assessment of the forecast for the record-low Bering Sea sea ice extent in 2018 spring and the sea ice advancement in Bering Sea in 2018-2019 winter will also be presented.

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23 April 2019

Title: Indigenous Practices Contribute to Carbon Management and Climate Adaptation
Presenter(s): Maureen I. McCarthy, PhD, Tahoe and Great Basin Program Director, Project Director, Water for the Seasons, University of Nevada-Reno; presenting remotely
Date & Time: 23 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Indigenous Practices Contribute to Carbon Management and Climate Adaptation
Seminar 9 in the Series, "From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle (SOCCR2) Seminar Series". We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28.

Presenter(s):
Maureen I. McCarthy, PhD, Tahoe and Great Basin Program Director, Project Director, Water for the Seasons, University of Nevada-Reno

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
This webinar will discuss key findings from the Tribal Lands Chapter of the SOCCR2 Report. Insight into carbon cycling on Indigenous lands in North America can be gained through the complementary lenses of native wisdom and western science. Many North American Indigenous communities maintain traditional practices that inherently affect carbon stocks and fluxes. These practices include sustainable management of forests, agriculture, and natural resources. The lack of direct measurements of carbon stocks and fluxes on tribal lands requires that carbon cycle impacts associated with traditional practices be considered in comparison with non-tribal practices on similar land types, as data do not yet exist for creating tribal land carbon budgets. Comparing and contrasting carbon cycling impacts resulting from traditional practices on tribal lands with Eurocentric-based land-use practices on (and off) tribal lands could prove beneficial in developing more effective carbon management programs for both tribal and non-tribal lands.

Bio(s):
Maureen I. McCarthy, PhD, is Director of the Tahoe & Great Basin Research at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). She is also a faculty member in the Graduate Program in Hydrologic Sciences, and Research Faculty member at the Desert Research Institute. Her portfolio includes large, multi-institutional, transdisciplinary research programs focused on climate resiliency, water sustainability, natural resource management, and multi-hazard early warning. McCarthy is Project Director for the Water for the Seasons Project, a multi-institution research project focused on climate adaptation and water sustainability in snow-fed arid land river systems, and the Native Waters on Arid Lands Project, a research-extension partnership with 1862 and 1994 Land-Grant Institutions, tribal communities, and research institutions, focused on enhancing the climate resiliency of Native American agriculture. Before moving to UNR, McCarthy directed WMD research, intelligence, and treaty compliance programs in Washington, DC for the Departments of Homeland Security, Energy and Defense. Immediately following 9/11, she served as Senior Advisor in the Executive Office of the President. She was a Lady Davis Postdoctoral Fellow at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel, and holds a Ph.D. in Chemical Physics from the University of Colorado and a B.Sc. in Chemistry from Boston College.

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Title: Alaska River Break-up: 2019 Spring Outlook - What can we expect?
Presenter(s): Crane Johnson, National Weather Service & Rick Thoman, ACCAP
Date & Time: 23 April 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Crane Johnson, National Weather Service & Rick Thoman, ACCAP

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Rick Thoman

Abstract:
Each year the National Weather Service provides a breakup outlook for Alaska rivers. This winter stands out as unusual with both temperature and precipitation anomalies observed throughout the state. This year we are partnering with UAF to present a brief overview of current conditions and provide a climate outlook and the flooding potential for the 2019 spring break-up season.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

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24 April 2019

Title: Extreme Drought and Colorado River Water Supply
Presenter(s): Paul Miller, Service Coordination Hydrologist and Climate Focal Point, NOAA's Colorado Basin River Forecast Center, and Heather Patno, Hydraulic Engineer for the Bureau of Reclamation Upper Colorado Region and Glen Canyon Dam Operator. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 24 April 2019
9:00 am - 10:00 am ET
Location: Webinar only; see webinar registration info below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Extreme Drought and Colorado River Water Supply

Presenter(s):
Paul Miller, Service Coordination Hydrologist and Climate Focal Point, NOAA's Colorado Basin River Forecast Center , and Heather Patno, Hydraulic Engineer for the Bureau of Reclamation Upper Colorado Region and Glen Canyon Dam Operator

Sponsor(s):
This webinar series is a collaboration of NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA's Colorado Basin River Forecast Center (CBRFC), NOAA's National Weather Service, the Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, state climatologists, universities and other drought experts.

The webinar will be recorded and made available on drought.gov. For additional information, please contact Elizabeth.Weight@noaa.gov, with NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System

Abstract:
The 2018 exceptional drought in the Colorado River Basin was followed by heavy 2018-2019 winter snowpack. What does one winter of good snowfall among many years of dry conditions and exceptional drought mean? This webinar focuses on how the drought affects current basin conditions, the water supply forecast, and critical reservoir operations, including Lake Mead and Lake Powell.

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Title: Creating Alerts and Warnings for Short Messaging Channels
Presenter(s): Jeannette Sutton, UofK & Erica Kuligowski, NIST
Date & Time: 24 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jeannette Sutton, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Communication, University of Kentucky & Erica Kuligowski, PhD, Research Social Scientist, Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Abstract:
How do risk communicators design and deliver effective alerts and warnings in 360 characters or less? In this presentation, we will offer evidence-based guidance on strategies to communicate with populations over short messaging channels such as Wireless Emergency Alerts and Twitter. We will offer a set of messaging templates that identify key design features to positively affect message attention and behavioral intent under imminent threat.

Bio(s):
Jeannette Sutton, PhD, is an expert in alerts and warnings for short messaging platforms. She has conducted research across a range of natural, technological, and human induced hazards and serves on advisory boards for the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the United States Geological Survey, and the Department of Homeland Security. She is funded by the National Science Foundation and is an Associate Professor of Communication and Director of the Risk and Disaster Communication Center at the University of Kentucky.

Erica Kuligowski, PhD, is a research social scientist in the Engineering Laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology with 16 years of experience studying human behavior in disasters. She has received Department of Commerce Gold and Bronze Medals for her social science contributions to the federal investigations of the 2001 World Trade Center disaster, the 2003 Rhode Island Nightclub Fire, and the 2011 Joplin, MO tornado. Dr. Kuligowski has expertise in decision-making and response behavior under imminent threat, emergency communications, and evacuation modeling.

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Title: NOAA NWS Support for Avalanche Forecasting Operations in Southcentral Alaska
Presenter(s): Kyle Van Peursem, NOAA
Date & Time: 24 April 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kyle Van Peursem, NOAA

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Rick Thoman

Abstract:
Snow avalanches are the most deadly natural hazard on National Forest land, killing around 25-30 people in the U.S. each year, with 3-4 of those fatalities occurring in Alaska. Avalanches also pose a serious threat to transportation infrastructure across the state, including vital highways and railroads. Several avalanche forecasting centers work throughout the winter to help keep Alaskans safe by issuing backcountry avalanche forecasts and performing avalanche control work. Weather is one of three main contributors to avalanche hazard and a successful avalanche forecasting center relies heavily on accurate and timely weather observations and forecasts. This presentation will discuss ways in which various NWS offices provide support to avalanche forecasting operations and highlights how the NWS Anchorage office has engaged its core partners while providing vital support during significant avalanche events across Southcentral Alaska. Additionally, this presentation will discuss new and up and coming technology, including testing of a coupled weather and snow cover model to simulate snowpack and avalanche conditions throughout several mountain ranges in Southcentral Alaska.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

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25 April 2019

Title: Cetacean Behavioral Response Studies in California: Results, Implications, and New Directions
Presenter(s): Brandon Southall, Southall Environmental Associates & UC Santa Cruz
Date & Time: 25 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Join the NOAA Central Library in person or remotely via webinar for our speaker today!

Presenter(s):
Brandon Southall, Marine Scientist, Southall Environmental Associates & UC Santa Cruz

Abstract:
Major progress has been made in recent experimental studies of how noise affects the behavior and physiology of marine mammals. Several major recent and ongoing studies off California involving military sonar have obtained direct measurements of exposure, responses, and consequences. New results, implications for science and policy, and new ideas and methods will be discussed.

Bio(s):
Dr. Brandon Southall lead NOAA's Ocean Acoustics Program (NMFS; ST) a decade ago and has subsequently conducted extensive research on the effects of noise on marine mammals. He is a senior scientist at Southall Environmental Associates and a research associate with the University of California, Santa Cruz. He has lead several major research programs on the behavioral responses of marine mammals and recently lead a major synthesis and review of how noise affects hearing for all marine mammal species.

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Title: OysterFutures: Testing a Consensus-driven Process
Presenter(s): Elizabeth North, Associate Professor and Michael Wilberg, Professor, both with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
Date & Time: 25 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Oyster Futures: Testing a Consensus-driven Process

Presenter(s):
Elizabeth North, Associate Professor and Michael Wilberg, Professor, both with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
We will use Adobe Connect.To join the

Abstract:
After decades of conflict over the oyster in Maryland, stakeholders in the oyster resource came to consensus through the science-based, facilitated Consensus Solutions process which was tested in the OysterFutures research program. This talk summarizes the process, the science, and the stakeholders' efforts that led to their sweeping and meaningful package of recommendations for oyster management in the Choptank region.

Bio(s):

Elizabeth North is a fisheries oceanographer and Associate Professor at Horn Point Laboratory of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Her research focuses on the transport and ecology of fish and shellfish larvae, fisheries recruitment variability, estuarine physical oceanography, and oil droplet fate and transport. She is the lead developer of the Lagrangian TRANSport model (LTRANS), an open source 3D particle tracking model. For more information on Dr. North's research programs, please visit https://www.umces.edu/elizabeth-north.

Mike Wilberg is a fisheries science Professor at Chesapeake Biological Laboratory at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science in Solomons, MD. He has been at CBL since 2006 working on understanding population dynamics and management of a range of fish and shellfish species including oysters, blue crabs, American eel, paddlefish, and summer flounder. Before that he completed his Ph.D. and post doc at Michigan State University on improving and testing stock assessment approaches and evaluating management strategies for yellow perch in Lake Michigan. He completed an M.S. in Natural Resources at the University of Wisconsin " Stevens Point and a B.S. in Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University. Dr. Wilberg's research interests include population dynamics, stock assessment, quantitative fisheries, management strategy evaluation, and fisheries management. For more information on Dr. Wilberg's research, please visit http://wilberglab.cbl.umces.edu.

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Title: Fate of the U.S. Survey Foot after 2022: A Conversation with NGS
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Dennis, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 25 April 2019
1:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Description: Fate of the U.S. Survey Foot after 2022: A Conversation with NGSApril 25, 2019, 2 pm, Eastern Time

Dr. Michael Dennis, National Geodetic Survey

Since 1959, the U.S. has used two types of feet, the “international foot” and the “U.S. survey foot.” They differ by only 0.01 foot per mile, but having both in use creates problems with real costs.This webinar discusses the history of the foot, the importance of standards, and shows how NGS can help move the U.S. to a single foot definition in 2022.

Technical Rating of webinar:
Beginner: No prior knowledge of the topic is necessary.

Description: OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Michael Dennis, National Geodetic Survey

Abstract:
Since 1959, the U.S. has used two types of feet, the “international foot” and the “U.S. survey foot.” They differ by only 0.01 foot per mile, but having both in use creates problems with real costs.This webinar discusses the history of the foot, the importance of standards, and shows how NGS can help move the U.S. to a single foot definition in 2022.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit:
https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are usually held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/
Since 1959, the U.S. has used two types of feet, the “international foot” and the “U.S. survey foot.” They differ by only 0.01 foot per mile, but having both in use creates problems with real costs.This webinar discusses the history of the foot, the importance of standards, and shows how NGS can help move the U.S. to a single foot definition in 2022.
Title: Contagious clam cancer
Presenter(s): Michael Metzger, PhD., Pacific Northwest Research Institute
Date & Time: 25 April 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Michael Metzger, PhD., Pacific Northwest Research Institute

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Abstract:
Cancer is normally an evolutionary dead-end"neoplastic cells that arise and evolve within an organism either regress or they kill their host, and the death of the host marks the death of the cancer lineage. However, in some cases, neoplastic cells develop the ability to spread from individual to individual, turning from conventional cancers into clonal contagious cancer lineages. The natural transmission of cancer cells has been observed in two mammals (Tasmanian devils and dogs), and we have found that a leukemia-like disease in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) is due to the horizontal spread of a clonal cancer lineage. We also analyzed mussels (Mytilus trossulus), cockles (Cerastoderma edule), and carpet shell clams (Polititapes aureus) and found that the neoplasias in all three of these species are due to independent transmissible cancer lineages. These results show that this type of cancer transmission is far more widespread than previously believed, especially in the marine environment.

Bio(s):
Michael Metzger earned a master's degree in epidemiology and a PhD in molecular and cellular biology at the University of Washington. He completed a short postdoctoral fellowship in basic science at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship in Dr. Stephan Goff's lab at Columbia University " where he first identified transmissible cancer in clams. He joined the Pacific Northwest Research Institute as an assistant investigator in 2018, and he is an affiliate faculty member of the University of Washington's Department of Genome Sciences.

RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS
(REVIEW) Metzger MJ, Goff SP. A Sixth Modality of Infectious Disease: Contagious Cancer from Devils to Clams and Beyond. PLoS pathogens. 2016; 12(10):e1005904.

Metzger MJ, Villalba A, Carballal MJ, Iglesias D, Sherry J, Reinisch C, Muttray AF, Baldwin SA, Goff SP. Widespread transmission of independent cancer lineages within multiple bivalve species. Nature. 2016; 534(7609):705-9.

Metzger MJ, Reinisch C, Sherry J, Goff SP. Horizontal transmission of clonal cancer cells causes leukemia in soft-shell clams. Cell. 2015; 161(2):255-63.

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Title: Fate of the U.S. Survey Foot after 2022: A Conversation with NGS
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Dennis, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 25 April 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar:
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Michael Dennis, National Geodetic Survey

Description: Fate of the U.S. Survey Foot after 2022: A Conversation with NGS
Since 1959, the U.S. has used two types of feet, the “international foot” and the “U.S. survey foot.” They differ by only 0.01 foot per mile, but having both in use creates problems with real costs.This webinar discusses the history of the foot, the importance of standards, and shows how NGS can help move the U.S. to a single foot definition in 2022.

Technical Rating of webinar:
Beginner: No prior knowledge of the topic is necessary.

Abstract:
Since 1959, the U.S. has used two types of feet, the “international foot” and the “U.S. survey foot.” They differ by only 0.01 foot per mile, but having both in use creates problems with real costs.This webinar discusses the history of the foot, the importance of standards, and shows how NGS can help move the U.S. to a single foot definition in 2022.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit:
https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

National Geodetic Survey webinars are usually held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/
Since 1959, the U.S. has used two types of feet, the “international foot” and the “U.S. survey foot.” They differ by only 0.01 foot per mile, but having both in use creates problems with real costs.This webinar discusses the history of the foot, the importance of standards, and shows how NGS can help move the U.S. to a single foot definition in 2022.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 April 2019

Title: The Aleutian Bering Sea Initiative: developing science, information, and partnerships to tackle unprecedented environmental change impacting the lives, lands and waters of the Aleutians and Bering Sea.
Presenter(s): Aaron Poe, Coordinator for the Aleutian Bering Sea Initiative, Alaska Conservation Foundation, Anchorage, Alaska
Date & Time: 26 April 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/464813725
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Aaron Poe, Coordinator for the Aleutian Bering Sea Initiative, Alaska Conservation Foundation, Anchorage, Alaska.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory


Abstract:
The Aleutian Bering Sea Initiative (ABSI) began as one of a network of 22 Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) launched by the U.S. Department of Interior in 2010 and funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Though the USFWS has reduced financial and administrative support for LCCs nationally, the agency remains committed to large-scale collaborative conservation and along with staff from NOAA and four other federal agencies continues to serve on ABSI's Steering Committee--providing guidance on projects and science priorities. In 2018, ABSI partnered with the Alaska Conservation Foundation (ACF) to maintain staff support for the LCC. The ABSI Coordinator (Aaron Poe) originally an employee with the USFWS, now works for ACF where he continues to serve the Steering Committee which operates under its original charter and remains focused on priorities established by the partnership in 2013. Aaron will share an update on our latest efforts which continue be non-regulatory and policy neutral--focusing instead on finding collaborative science and solutions that connect scientists, managers, tribes and communities.

Seminar POC: adi.hanein@noaa.gov

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29 April 2019

Title: ICESat-2: Measuring the Height of the Earth One Photon at A Time
Presenter(s): Dr. Thomas Neumman, NASA Goddard Flight Space Center
Date & Time: 29 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: ESSIC Conference Room 4102, 5825 University Research Ct, College Park, MD 20740
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Cross posted for ESSIC Seminars

Presenter(s):
Dr. Thomas Neumman, NASA Goddard Flight Space Center

Sponsor(s):
ESSIC Seminars

Remote Access:
Webex Info:Event site: http://go.umd.edu/neumann
Event number: 734 184 330
Event password: essic

To join the online event

1. Click here
https://umd.webex.com/umd/onstage/g.php?MTID=e5f3217e2305bc73347dfd1d1920fc6e6
to join the online event.

Or copy and paste the following link to a browser:https://umd.webex.com/umd/onstage/g.php?MTID=e5f3217e2305bc73347dfd1d1920fc6e6

2. Click "Join Now".
IT help:
Travis Swaim: tswaim1@umd.edu
Cazzy Medley: cazzy@umd.edu

Audio:
US Toll: +1-415-655-0002
Global call-in numbers: https://umd.webex.com/umd/globalcallin.php?serviceType=EC&ED=781911597&tollFree=0
Access code: 734 184 330

Slides:

Abstract:
The Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite -- 2 (ICESat-2) observatory was launched on 15 September 2018 to measure ice sheet and glacier elevation change, sea ice freeboard, and enable the determination of the heights of Earth's forests. ICESat-2 current orbit inclination allows data collection between 88 degrees north latitude and 88 degrees south latitude from nominally 500km elevation above Earth's surface. ICESat-2's laser altimeter, the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimetry System (ATLAS) uses green (532 nm) laser light and single-photon sensitive detection to measure elevation along each of its six beams ten thousand times per second. In this presentation, I describe the major components of the observatory and the ATLAS instrument. I summarize the first six months of on orbit data collection and present the status of the observatory and the ATLAS instrument. I'll present on the status of the lower-level data products including the Level-2A data product (ATL03), which provides the geodetic location (i.e. the latitude, longitude and elevation) of the ground bounce point of photons detected by ATLAS. The ATL03 data product is the primary product used for higher-level (Level 3A) surface-specific data products such as glacier and ice sheet elevation, sea ice freeboard, vegetation canopy height, ocean surface topography, and inland water body elevation. This presentation will also present the plans for future data collection, the geolocation uncertainty of the ATL03 global geolocated photon data product, the status of data product availability, and plans for data reprocessing.

Bio(s):
Tom Neumann is a cryospheric scientist who focuses on the development of ICESat-2, the next-generation laser altimeter scheduled for launch in 2018. His research includes both theoretical and experimental studies of the chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of polar snow and ice. He has been involved extensively in field work on the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, leading four expeditions and participating in five others between the two poles. Recent work has involved studies of snow chemistry on the East Antarctic plateau and calibrating ICESat altimetry data using ground-based GPS surveys in Antarctica.
Tom joined NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in October 2008. Prior to that, he was an assistant professor in the Geology Department at the University of Vermont. He remains an Affiliate Assistant Professor in Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington. He earned a B.A. in geophysical science from the University of Chicago, and a Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of Washington.

POC:
John Xun Yang, jxyang@umd.edu ESSIC seminar calendar and site: MSQ-4102; http://go.umd.edu/essicseminar

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30 April 2019

Title: NOAA Hurricane Awareness Series: Lessons learned from the 2017-18 hurricane seasons
Presenter(s): Ken Graham, Director, NOAA's National Hurricane Center, and Tom Johnstone, Tallahassee Weather Forecast Office, NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 30 April 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Hurricane Awareness Series: Lessons learned from the 2017-18 hurricane seasons

Presenter(s):
Ken Graham, Director, NOAA's National Hurricane Center, and Tom Johnstone, Tallahassee Weather Forecast Office, NOAA's National Weather Service

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Southeast and Caribbean Regional Collaboration Team (SECART). Point of contact is Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov

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Title: Global carbon budget accounting following the State of the Carbon Cycle Report: The Regional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes study (RECCAP-2)
Presenter(s): Ben Poulter, Research Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Date & Time: 30 April 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Global carbon budget accounting following the State of the Carbon Cycle Report: The Regional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes study (RECCAP-2)
Seminar 10 in the Series: From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle, the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2). We plan to host this series series on Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, 2/26-5/28.

Presenter(s):
Ben Poulter, Research Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract and

Bio(s):
TBD

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1 May 2019

Title: Climate and Public Health
Presenter(s): Hunter Jones, NOAA Climate Program Office
Date & Time: 1 May 2019
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Drexel University or via webinar https://whoozin.com/NN4-EPW-XGTV-GKQJ
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Hunter Jones, NOAA Climate Program Office

Seminar sponsor: OAR/CPO/RISA/CCRUN (Consortium on Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast)

This seminar will be recorded and posted here: http://www.ccrun.org/resources/seminars/

Abstract:
Extreme heat is detrimental to human health and well-being, and recent reports from the National Climate Assessment, IPCC, and the Lancet Countdown demonstrate that this problem is only getting worse as the climate system warms. While many communities across the US and the globe are working to mitigate the health risks of extreme heat, there is not a consolidated place to look for resources, to collaborate, and to learn from one another. In response to this challenge, NOAA and CDC came together to launch NIHHIS " the National Integrated Heat Health Information System. NIHHIS works to understand how decision-makers in many disciplines are working to manage heat-health risk, and to improve and integrate the information available for this purpose. As part of this effort, NIHHIS runs workshops around the country to understand and document what information is needed by decision-makers, and we use a tool called a “decision calendar” to do so. In this presentation, I will explain how we recently applied this tool in a workshop in the Northeast to understand heat health decision-making, and where we plan to go with our findings next.

About the CCRUN Green Infrastructure, Climate, and Cities Seminar Series
More than half of the world's population now lives in cities. This demographic shift creates a host of new opportunities, but also some new risks, especially given the challenges posed by climatic extremes. This timely seminar series focuses attention on these issues, and what decision makers, researchers, and practitioners are learning about how to address them.

The focus of the CCRUN seminar series is on urban solutions to global problems associated with increasing temperature and sea level rise, precipitation variability, and greenhouse gas emissions. We are interested in the implications of such changes on the complex infrastructure of intensely developed landscapes, and on the health, well-being, and vulnerability of the people who live in them.

All the seminars are free, and held at 4:00 PM on the first Wednesday of every month at Drexel University in the Hill Conference Room, located in the LeBow Engineering Center. Refreshments will be provided. The sessions will be broadcast live via webcast, recorded, and archived on the CCRUN website.

Space is limited, so registration is required. Please use the links to register!

Seminar POC for questions: sean.bath@noaa.gov

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2 May 2019

Title: Agile Earth Observation Using GNSS Signals and Spire’s Growing Constellation of CubeSats
Presenter(s): Dallas Masters, Spire Global, Inc.
Date & Time: 2 May 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
D. Masters, Spire Global, Inc, United States
Co-authors V. Nguyen (Spire Global, Inc, US), T. Yuasa (Spire Global Singapore PTE Ltd), O. Nogués-Correig (Spire Global UK Ltd), L. Tan (Spire Global Singapore PTE Ltd), S. Esterhuizen (Spire Global Luxembourg S.a.r.l.), P. Jales (Spire Global UK Ltd), T. Duly (Spire Global, Inc, US), V. Irisov (Spire Global, Inc US), J. Cappaert (Spire Global UK Ltd), J. Spark (Spire Global UK Ltd)

Sponsor(s):
LSA Science Seminar Series

Audio: +1 314-925-1794‬ PIN: ‪186 986‬#

Abstract:
Spire Global, Inc. operates a large and rapidly growing constellation of CubeSats performing GNSS-based science and Earth observation. In a few short years, Spire has grown from a modest CubeSat kickstarter campaign to a paradigm-shifting provider of satellite data to NOAA, NASA, and other customers of Earth observations. Spire specializes in using science-quality observations of GNSS signals (e.g., GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, QZSS, etc.) to derive valuable information about the Earth environment. Currently, these observations include radio occultations to profile the neutral atmosphere with high accuracy and vertical resolution for applications such as NWP assimilation and climate monitoring, as well as ionosphere slant total electron content and scintillation indices for space weather applications. Currently, the Spire constellation consists of 76, 3U CubeSats, with many of these satellites performing GNSS science and with plans to grow the GNSS-enabled constellation to over 100 satellites.

Beginning in 2018, Spire began an accelerated effort to add the capability to perform GNSS bistatic radar (reflectometry or “GNSS-R”) for Earth surface observations targeting a variety of applications, including soil moisture, wetlands and flood inundation mapping, sea surface roughness and winds, and sea ice characterization. This effort has two parallel paths: 1) build dedicated GNSS-R CubeSats to perform operational scatterometry (akin to the NASA CYGNSS mission), with the first satellites to be launched later in 2019, and 2) already harnessing existing orbiting Spire satellites used for radio occultation to additionally perform grazing angle GNSS-R measurements and to test the concept of phase-delay altimetry.

This presentation will introduce the Spire constellation of CubeSats for GNSS-enabled Earth observation and will focus on the unique experience of adapting the current constellation of radio occultation satellites to perform new and potentially valuable GNSS-R Earth observations. We will introduce the concept of phase-delay altimetry and its potential to estimate surface heights on the order of 10 cm using observations of coherent GNSS signals reflected from various Earth surfaces. We will summarize the agile steps Spire took to collect these observations on-orbit within just a couple of months of conceptualization, as well as the initial inversion technique to estimate surface reflector heights with high precision. We will show some promising initial results of estimating sea surface height and sea ice draft using this technique and discuss plans for further investigation and calibration/validation activities. Finally, we will discuss Spire's potential to rapidly proceed with these measurements from research to operations and to make them available as a new set of Earth observations.
Screen reader support enabled.


Bio(s):
Dr. Dallas Masters has been active in the field of remote sensing since helping to develop the first all-composite satellite, FORTE, at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1995, followed by a doctorate in Aerospace Engineering Sciences from the University of Colorado in 2004. Dr. Masters joined Spire Global, Inc. in January of 2018, to lead the development of a GNSS passive bistatic radar mission based on Spire's existing GNSS science receiver and 3U CubeSat bus. He recently merged the existing GNSS radio occultation and bistatic radar remote sensing programs and now directs Spire's single GNSS science program. His teams develop all aspects of Spire's GNSS payload instruments and science processing systems for various applications ranging from atmospheric profiling and ionosphere monitoring via radio occultation to ocean wind and soil moisture mapping via passive bistatic radar. Prior to joining Spire, Dr. Masters was involved in a number of NASA remote sensing and Earth science projects, first at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, and later at the Colorado Center for Astrodynamics at the University of Colorado. Dr. Masters has worked in many areas of satellite remote sensing, with emphasis on the science and applications of GNSS bistatic radar and both conventional and SAR altimetry. He has participated in a number of NASA science teams, including the Ocean Surface Topography Science Team, Sea Level Change Team, CYGNSS Science Team, and the SWOT Science Definition Team.

POC:
Eric Leuliette, eric.leuliette@noaa.gov

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Title: Intergenerational carryover effects in shellfish and the consideration of a role for DNA methylation
Presenter(s): Steven Roberts, Ph.D., School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 2 May 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Steven Roberts, Ph.D., School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Abstract:
It is increasingly evident that environmental perturbations can have impacts on marine invertebrates beyond acute exposure periods. In some instances this might manifest as an adult phenotype that is associated with an early-life stage exposure event. There is also the case where parental environmental exposures can influence offspring phenotype. The processes involved in these intergenerational carryover effects can be diverse in nature, and can be related to physiological compromise in adults that results in negative effects linked to poor quality gametes or insufficient maternal resource allocation. However, in some cases an environmental perturbation experienced by parents might result in a positive effect in offspring, such as improved performance upon secondary exposure to the condition experienced by the parents. Results from recent experiments looking at intergenerational carryover effects in oysters (Ostrea and Crassostrea) and geoduck clams will be presented. Specific environmental conditions examined include temperature, diet, and seawater pH. In addition, preliminary data will be discussed in terms of a role for DNA methylation as a mechanisms for environmental memory within and across generations.

Bio(s):
Steven Roberts is the Kenneth K. Chew Endowed Associate Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. Dr. Roberts received his Ph.D. in Biology at the University of Notre Dame in 2002. His main research interest is the physiological response of aquatic species to environmental change with a particular focus on environmental epigenetics, reproductive biology, and aquaculture.

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7 May 2019

Title: NOAA Hurricane Awareness Series: Hurricane Michael analysis and findings
Presenter(s): Jack Beven and Stacy Stewart, National Hurricane Center, NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 7 May 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Hurricane Awareness Series:Hurricane Michael analysis and findings

Presenter(s):
Jack Beven and Stacy Stewart, National Hurricane Center, NOAA's National Weather Service

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Southeast and Caribbean Regional Collaboration Team (SECART). Point of contact is Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more.
Title: An Overview of Global Carbon Cycle: Where are the Gaps in our Understanding?
Presenter(s): Lori Bruhwiler, Physical Scientist, NOAA/OAR/ESRL, Global Monitoring Division and John Miller, Physical Scientist, NOAA/OAR/ESRL, Global Monitoring Division
Date & Time: 7 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
An Overview of Global Carbon Cycle: Where are the Gaps in our Understanding?
Seminar 11 in the Series, "From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle (SOCCR2) Seminar Series". We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28

Presenter(s):
Lori Bruhwiler, Physical Scientist, NOAA/OAR/ESRL, Global Monitoring Division and John MIller, Physical Scientist, NOAA/OAR/ESRL, Global Monitoring Division.

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:

Atmospheric carbon dioxide has increased from a preindustrial abundance of 280 ppm to over 400 ppm, an increase of 43%. Methane has increased from a preindustrial abundance about 700 ppb to more than 1,850 ppb, an increase of over 2.5 times. The current understanding of the sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon supports a dominant role for human activities, especially fossil fuel combustion, in the rapid rise of atmospheric carbon. As of 2017, the anthropogenic radiative forcing was 3.1 W/m2, with CO2 accounting for 2 W/m2, and CH4 accounting for 0.5 W/m2. Global fossil fuel emissions of CO2 increased at a rate of about 4% per year until 2013, when the rate of increase abruptly declined. Emissions were flat in 2015 and 2016, but increased again in 2017 by an estimated 2.0%. About half of anthropogenic CO2 is taken up by lands and oceans, and this keeps atmospheric concentrations much lower than they wold otherwise be. The magnitude of future land and ocean carbon sinks is uncertain because the responses of the carbon cycle to future changes in climate are uncertain. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2013) estimated that to have a 66% chance of limiting the warming to less than 2°C since 1861"1880 will require cumulative emissions from all anthropogenic sources to stay below about 1,000 Pg C, meaning that only 221 Pg C equivalent can be emitted from 2017 forward. Current annual global CO2 emissions are approximately 10 Pg C per year, so this limit could be reached in as little as 20 years.

Bio(s):

Lori Bruhwiler is a physical scientist at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division in Boulder, Colorado. Her research interests include understanding past and future budgets of CO2 , CH4 and other greenhouse gases using atmospheric transport models and data assimilation techniques. Lori has spent her entire career so far at NOAA, beginning with her postdoctoral thesis on stratospheric chemistry at the NOAA Aeronomy Laboratory (now ESRL CSD). She went on to the NOAA Geophysical Research Laboratory where she worked with models of stratospheric chemistry and dynamics, before joining the GMD Carbon Cycle Group. Lori earned her undergraduate degrees in Physics and Mathematics from the University of Texas at Austin, and her PhD from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

John Miller: John works as a carbon cycle scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Earth System Research Laboratory. His research focuses on the emission and absorption of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane in the atmosphere at regional and global scales. He uses both modeling of measurements of CO2 and CH4 and their stable and radioisotopes to better understand the processes responsible for their source and sink variations. His specific interests are in fossil fuelcombustion emissions of carbon dioxide at the national and global scales, the relationship between the Amazon forest and greenhouse gas emission and absorption and how these impact global climate.

John received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Colorado in 1999, was a National Research Council post-doctoral fellow at NOAA from 2000-2002 and has been a research scientist at NOAA since then. He has been an author on 110 peer-reviewed scientific journal articles. He has also been a contributing author for the World Meteorological Organization quadrennial assessment of ozone depletion, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report and other international reports. Recently, John served as a lead author of the Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2), an interagency U.S. government-led decadal assessment of carbon cycle science across North America.

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Title: Commercial Space Alternatives to Maritime Domain Awareness
Presenter(s): Rob Miller, HawkEye 360
Date & Time: 7 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rob Miller, HawkEye 360; USG Account Manager

Sponsor(s):
Tim Battista, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, NOAA National Ocean Service

Abstract:
HE360 operates a first of its kind commercial constellation of satellites that detect and geolocate radio-frequency signals. Should a ship turn off its VMS or AIS transponder, HE360 can monitor for other RF emissions, such as navigation radar, to locate the "dark" vessel. Automated geo-processing tools also return novel insights and actionable results faster, reducing analytic burden while advancing the mission.

Bio(s):
Rob Miller leads US government programs at HE360. Before joining the company, he served 15 years in the federal government, having worked on Capitol Hill, in The White House, and in the Intelligence Community.

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Title: Progress in forecast skill at three leading global operational NWP centers during 2015-2017 as seen in Summary Assessment Metrics (SAMs)
Presenter(s): Ross Hoffman, AOML
Date & Time: 7 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar or NCWCP rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ross Hoffman, AOML

Sponsor(s):
ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER SEMINAR (Michiko Masutani masutani@umd.edu). More information visit https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

Abstract:


The summary assessment metric (SAM) method is applied to an array ofprimary assessment metrics (PAMs) for the deterministic forecasts ofsome leading numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers for the years2015-2017. The PAMs include anomaly correlation, RMSE, and absolutemean error (i.e., the absolute value of bias) for different forecasttimes, vertical levels, geographic domains, and variables. SAMsindicate that in terms of forecast skill ECMWF is better than NCEP,which is better than but approximately the same as UKMO. The use ofSAMs allows a number of interesting features of the evolution offorecast skill to be observed. All centers improve over the three yearperiod. NCEP short-term forecast skill substantially increases duringthe period. Quantitatively, the effect of the 2016 May 11 NCEP upgradeto the 4D-ensemble variational (4DEnVar) system is the largest SAMimpact during the study period. However, the observed impacts arewithin the context of slowly improving forecast skill for operationglobal NWP as compared to earlier years. Clearly the systems laggingECMWF can improve, and there is evidence from SAMs in addition to the4DEnVar example that improvements in forecast and data assimilationsystems are still leading to forecast skill improvements.

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Title: Great Lakes Water Tension in the 21st Century
Presenter(s): Peter Annin, Author and Director of the Mary Griggs Burke Center for Freshwater Innovation
Date & Time: 7 May 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar (see login below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Great Lakes Water Tension in the 21st Century

Presenter(s):
Peter Annin, Author and Director of the Mary Griggs Burke Center for Freshwater Innovation

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory and the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research, contact Nicole Rice, nicole.rice@noaa.gov or Mary Ogdahl, ogdahlm@umich.edu

Abstract:
Water diversion controversies continue to make news across the Great Lakes region. From Waukesha, Wisconsin, to the Foxconn factory south of Milwaukee, and the massive century-old water diversion in Chicago, the Great Lakes region continues to struggle with how best to keep Great Lakes water inside the Great Lakes watershed. In recent years, Southeast Wisconsin has emerged as the frontline in the Great Lakes water diversion debate. But the State of Michigan continues to play an influential role in regional water management decisions"as it has for decades. Last Fall Peter Annin published a major revision of his award-winning book, The Great Lakes Water Wars, to coincide with the 10th Anniversary of the Great Lakes Compact. The book includes chapters about all of the water diversion hotspots mentioned above, as well as many others. His talk will help cut through the confusion surrounding the Great Lakes water diversion debate and put Great Lakes water tensions in a regional, continental and global context.

Bio(s):
Peter Annin is the director of the Mary Griggs Burke Center for Freshwater Innovation and the author of The Great Lakes Water Wars, the definitive work on the Great Lakes water diversion controversy. Before coming to Northland College in 2015, Peter served as a reporter at Newsweek, the associate director of the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources, and the managing director of the University of Notre Dame's Environmental Change Initiative. He continues to report on the Great Lakes water diversion issue and published the second edition of the Great Lakes Water Wars in the fall of 2018.

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8 May 2019

Title: Using Biodiversity Indicators to Meet Marine Conservation Objectives
Presenter(s): Dr Abigail McQuatters-Gollop, Lecturer in Marine Conservation, University of Plymouth. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: 8 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Using Biodiversity Indicators to Meet Marine Conservation Objectives

Presenter(s):

Dr Abigail McQuatters-Gollop, Lecturer in Marine Conservation, University of Plymouth. Presenting remotely

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:

Indicators are effective tools for summarising and communicating key aspects of ecosystem state and have a long record of use in marine pollution and fisheries management. The application of biodiversity indicators to assess the status of species, habitats, and functional diversity in marine conservation and policy, however, is still developing and multiple indicator roles and features are emerging. Links between biodiversity indicators and the pressures affecting them are frequently unclear as links can be obscured by environmental change, data limitations, food web dynamics, or the cumulative effects of multiple pressures. In practice, the application of biodiversity indicators to meet marine conservation policy and management demands is developing rapidly in the management realm, with a lag before academic publication detailing indicator development. Making best use of biodiversity indicators depends on sharing and synthesising cutting-edge knowledge and experience. Using lessons learned from the application of biodiversity indicators in policy and management from around the globe, we define the concept of ‘biodiversity indicators', explore barriers to their use and potential solutions, and outline strategies for their effective communication to decision-makers.

Bio(s):
Abigail McQuatters-Gollop is a plankton ecologist and lecturer in marine conservation at University of Plymouth. She is a NERC Knowledge Exchange Fellow and Defra Senior Policy Fellow and is leading the implementation of the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive for pelagic habitats (plankton) for the UK and OSPAR (Northern Europe). Abigail's research focuses on marine ecological responses to anthropogenic and climate change and the subsequent integration of results into the policy process. A key area of interest lies in the separation of climate responses in the plankton from those due to anthropogenic disturbances, and the linking of biodiversity state changes to manageable human pressures. Abigail also sits on the British Ecological Society Brexit Policy Working Group and has recently received a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Invited Fellowship to work on policy impact generation in Japan. Personal website: www.planktonpolicy.org, Twitter: @anaturalstate.

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Title: The Future of the Raja Ampat Coral Reef Ecosystem
Presenter(s): Dr. Phillip Dustan, Department of Biology, College of Charleston, SC
Date & Time: 8 May 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 9153 or Via webinar (see login below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
The Future of the Raja Ampat Coral Reef Ecosystem

Presenter(s):
Dr.Phillip Dustan, Department of Biology, College of Charleston, SC.
Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, SSMC4, Room 9153.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Tracy Gill and Rick Schwabacher

Abstract:
The reefs of Raja Ampat in the heart of the Coral Triangle are the epicenter of global biodiversity. Their equatorial location provides a refuge from tropical cyclones while being supplied by tropical Pacific Ocean water as part of the Indonesian Throughflow that joins the Pacific and Indian Oceans. However, ecotourism, principally sport diving, has become a booming economic engine that is flooding the area with people. In the past 50 years science has revealed that the very adaptations that enable coral reefs to flourish make them vulnerable to human activity, principally through overfishing, nutrification, and physical damage. The exponential growth of the tourism is already generating destructive ecological effects which are nested within the impacts of ocean warming, acidification, and commercial and artisanal overfishing. Raja Ampat's reefs are of the highest priority for conservation as witnessed by the strong presence of major non-profits including (WWF, TNC, CI) but without a concerted effort to reduce local stressors, coral diseases, algal overgrowth, crown-of-thorns infestations, and physical destruction will quickly decimate live coral cover initiating a cascade to ecological ruin. We have the knowledge, but can we muster the political will and courage to recognize, organize, and implement an initiative to sustain the richest reefs on Earth?

Bio(s):
Dr. Phillip Dustan, Professor of Biology, College of Charleston, is a marine ecologist specializing in the ecology, vitality, and conservation of coral reefs. Much of his work has centered on detecting change in reef communities to assess coral reef vitality and human influences. Phil began his reef studies in Discovery Bay, Jamaica in the early 1970's which expanded to include the Florida Keys, Bahamas, the wider Caribbean, Pacific, Indian Oceans, and Java Sea. He worked closely with Captain Jacques Yves Cousteau and the Cousteau Society between 1974-2000, testified to the US Senate Subcommittee on Oceans in support of the Coral Reef Conservation Act of 2000. More recently was part of the scientific team for the Emmy and Peabody Award winning documentary Chasing Coral by ExposureLabs. Dr. Dustan was a founding Principal Investigator on the USEPA Florida Keys Coral Reef/Hardbottom Monitoring Project, pioneered remote sensing techniques for coral reef change and collaborated on developing coral molecular stress markers. Recently, Phil has begun retrospective studies of reefs in Jamaica, Belize, and Florida; places he worked as a young scientist that have all changed almost beyond recognition, having lost between 50% and 95% of their living coral cover (http://biospherefoundation.org/project/coral-reef-change/). This has sparked collaboration with TreestoSeas.org to involve more people in reef conservation through the concept of “Diving with a Purpose”. People get involved with reef conservation through clean-up dives and other projects that connect them personally to the reef, triggering them to become ardent conservationists. Just like politics, all conservation really begins with local people and their local actions.

Multimedia credits (television, video, film, web):
TEDx Charleston on saving coral reefs, October, 2017.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iwENBNrfKj4
Chasing Coral 2017, Coral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. https://www.chasingcoral.com/
Vanishing Coral, Earth Focus Episode 72, 2017. The personal story of scientists and naturalists working with local communities to protect coral reefs. First aired on KCET TV 11 April 2017.
https://www.kcet.org/shows/earth-focus/episodes/vanishing-coral
Coral Reef Bleaching in Bali, NW Bali, Indonesia a video showing ecological change 2015 to 2016: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxOfLTnPSUo
Caribbean Coral Reefs Through Time 1972 to 2013 http://biospherefoundation.org/project/coral-reef-change/
Coral Reefs Canaries of the Sea, 2003. Glick, P. Reston, VA: National Wildlife Federation.
Mysteries of the Hidden Deep, 1976. Science Advisor to Undersea World of Jacques Yves Cousteau, Episode 34. Filmed in Belize, Jamaica, and Mexico.

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Title: The role of windage in the North Atlantic surface circulation
Presenter(s): Dr. Elizabeth "Libby" Johns, Oceanographer, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 8 May 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Elizabeth "Libby" Johns (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)
Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBA

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Title: Tuning Up Your Ecosystem Status Report with the Fishery Management Council Process
Presenter(s): Yvonne deReynier, NMFS/West Coast Region
Date & Time: 8 May 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Yvonne deReynier, Senior Resource Management Specialist, NMFS West Coast Region

Sponsor(s):

NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract:

NOAA Fisheries and its partners have been reporting on the status of our marine ecosystems for decades, but only in recent years have we adopted the goal of providing ecosystem status reports for each of the U.S. large marine ecosystems. If these reports are to provide useful information to natural resource managers and stakeholders, they must be shared with and evaluated in public policymaking processes. Our nation's premier fisheries law, the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, provides a ready forum for testing and improving the utility of ecosystem status reports through the fishery management council process. Developing, delivering, reviewing, and revising ecosystem status reports for use in fisheries management requires advance process planning and ongoing coordination between NOAA and the fishery management councils. This presentation will discuss how we have meshed the Pacific Fishery Management Council process with the California Current Integrated Ecosystem Assessment approach to educate West Coast stakeholders about our ecosystem, and to help scientists and managers educate each other about what makes a useful ecosystem status report.

Bio(s):

Yvonne deReynier is a Senior Resource Management Specialist with NOAA Fisheries' West Coast Region, focusing on ecosystem-based management and climate change planning. She chairs the Pacific Fishery Management Council's Ecosystem Workgroup and her work addresses cross-mandate policy development and implementation for our variable marine ecosystems.

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Title: There is no I in EAFM: Adapting Integrated Ecosystem Assessment for Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas NMFS/NEFSC
Date & Time: 8 May 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Gaichas, Biologist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Resource managers worldwide are being asked to consider the ecosystem while making management decisions. However, it can be difficult to change management systems accustomed to evaluating a constrained set of objectives, often on a species-by-species basis. Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) provides a flexible framework for addressing ecosystem considerations in decision making. IEA was adapted to address species, fleet, habitat, and climate interactions by the US Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) as part of their Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management (EAFM) in 2016. The Council's EAFM framework uses risk assessment as a first step to prioritize combinations of managed species, fleets, and ecosystem interactions for consideration. Second, a conceptual model is developed identifying key environmental, ecological, social, economic, and management linkages for a high-priority fishery. Third, quantitative modeling addressing Council-specified questions and based on interactions identified in the conceptual model is applied to evaluate alternative management strategies that best balance management objectives. As strategies are implemented, outcomes are monitored and the process is adjusted, and/or another priority identified in risk assessment can be addressed. The Council completed an initial EAFM risk assessment in 2017. First, the Council identified a range of ecological, social, and management objectives or risk elements. All objectives/risk elements were evaluated with ecosystem indicators using risk assessment criteria developed by the Council. In 2018, the Council identified summer flounder as a high risk fishery and is now finalizing an EAFM conceptual model. Annual ecosystem reporting updates ecosystem indicators and the risk assessment. The Council's rapid progress in implementing EAFM resulted from positive collaboration between managers, stakeholders, and scientists. Collaboration is essential to IEA and to the success of EAFM.

Bio(s):
Dr. Sarah Gaichas has been a Research Fishery Biologist with the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch at the NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA since September 2011. She is a member of the Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee, has been active in ecosystem reporting and management strategy evaluation for both the Mid-Atlantic and New England Fishery Management Councils. Sarah's primary research is on integrated ecosystem assessment, management strategy evaluation, and ecosystem modeling. Her duties include developing, testing, and using ecosystem data, indicators, and models in natural resource management, and simulation testing management strategies (including analytical tools) that address the needs of diverse ecosystem users. Sarah previously worked at the NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA from 1997-2011 as an observer program analyst, a stock assessment scientist, and an ecosystem modeler. Sarah earned her Ph.D. from the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science in 2006, her M.S from the College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 1997, and her B.A. in English Literature from Swarthmore College in 1991.

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9 May 2019

Title: An update to the Gulf of Maine Harmful Algal Bloom (Alexandrium catenella) Forecast System
Presenter(s): Yizhen Li, Computational Ecologist, CSS Inc., Under Contract to NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science - NCCOS, HAB Forecasting Branch. Presenting at NOAA Silver Spring
Date & Time: 9 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 or via webinar (see access below), SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

An update to the Gulf of Maine Harmful Algal Bloom (Alexandrium catenella) Forecast System

Presenter(s):

Yizhen Li, Computational Ecologist, CSS Inc., Under Contract to NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), HAB Forecasting Branch. Presenting at NOAA Silver Spring, SSMC4, Rm 8150.

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The repetitive Alexandrium catenella bloom causes extensive shellfish closure in New England coastal states each spring and summer. An interesting part of its life cycle is the dormant cyst stage to overwinter, the abundance of which has been found to be crucial to the bloom severity for the upcoming season. Improved understanding of the Alexandrium dynamics enables a quasi-operational forecast system transitioning to operations. Here we briefly introduce the research background of the bloom in the Gulf of Maine, followed by an update on the numerical modeling system. We will present the NCCOS efforts in the cyst cruise, the latest water mass characteristic in the Gulf of Maine, and the architecture of the coupled physical-biological modeling system, and coordinated effort to collaborate with other line offices to transition the system into operations.

Bio(s):

Yizhen Li is an oceanographer at NCCOS HAB Forecasting branch, and an adjunct scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Yizhen got his Ph.D. from North Carolina State University, and was a postdoctoral scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution during 2014-2016. His research interests include: ocean circulation dynamics, mesoscale eddies, ocean data assimilation, coupled physical-biological interactions (HAB, specifically). He is leading the project to transition Gulf of Maine HAB forecast system into operations, and engaged in research of HAB related questions in other areas. Working closely with Dr. Richard Stumpf, his recent research focuses on utilizing satellite images and in-situ observations to study the upper ocean processes associated with Karenia brevis bloom in southwest Florida.

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Title: uPanFTS - a GEO Hosted Instrument for Weather Forecasting
Presenter(s): Yen-Hung -James- Wu, NASA JPL
Date & Time: 9 May 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Yen-Hung (James) Wu, NASA JPL, presenting remotely

Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx (for screen sharing only, see below for Audio):
Event Number: 908 762 029
Password: STARSeminar

Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=madfbb19ebb9c708c6598905245a5f904

Audio:
USA participants: 866-832-9297

Passcode: 6070416

Slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190509_Wu.pdf

Abstract:


The 2017-2027 Decadal Survey for Earth Science and Applications from Space identifies six “Science & Applications Topic”, two of which are “Extending & Improving Weather and Air Quality Forecasts” and “Reducing Climate Uncertainty & Informing Societal Response”. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been developing the Panchromatic imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (PanFTS) to address different atmospheric measurements related to these two applications. PanFTS is envisioned as a hosted payload on a geostationary (GEO) communication satellite. This offers the access to GEO with “a fee”, vs the costs associated with a dedicated launch vehicle and spacecraft. In parallel, the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture Study (NSOSA) report calls for “… a small number of GEO hosted instruments.” Similar to CrIS, PanFTS is a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). CrIS is a point mapping spectrometer. It has three different spectral bands of 3 x 3 photo detectors, mapping 9 ground pixels simultaneously. PanFTS is an imaging spectrometer. It has 1 - 3 imaging cameras, mapping 0.3 - 1 million ground pixels simultaneously. The several orders of improved observation throughput is enabled by the high speed cameras and the matching high speed onboard data processing electronics. PanFTS successfully completed a NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program (ESTO IIP) task in 2011. An engineering model (EM) was built. PanFTS - EM spanned 0.29 - 16 um wavelength, and it could achieve a spectral resolution DeltaR = 0.05 cm-1. PanFTS - EM performances were characterized in a thermal vacuum chamber at 110K, and the results were independently reviewed. However, PanFTS - EM occupied a ~1.5 m3 volume. We propose to miniaturize PanFTS (uPanFTS) into a ~6 - 12 U volume using a 2-color camera technology. This camera technology has been developed by the DOD sponsors over the last two decades, and it is currently deployed in the fields.

Bio(s):


Mr. Yen-Hung (James) Wu is an optical system engineer at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He has worked on a variety of NASA and non-NASA projects, ranging from a cubsat imager to a deep UV spectrometer on the Mars 2020 Rover to a laser metrology for the NuSTAR x-ray space telescope. He has been working with the team to develop PanFTS since its conception in 2007. Currently, he is leading two JPL internally funded strategic R&D tasks to 1). miniaturize the front end PanFTS instrument hardware suitable for the future solar system and planetary exploration missions, and 2). advance the PanFTS back end data interface / real-time processing to the operational science quality.
POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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Title: Anthropogenic stressors governing phytoplankton functional diversity
Presenter(s): Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez, Ph.D., Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology, University of California Santa Barbara
Date & Time: 9 May 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez, Ph.D. , Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology, University of California Santa Barbara

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Abstract:
The activities of seven and a half billion humans are changing the properties of the oceans affecting many marine organisms. Phytoplankton are amongst the first to display alterations in their physiology and their adaptation to a warmer and more corrosive environment as ocean acidification, pollution and warming continue. I will discuss results from a study examining an unprecedented bloom of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi along the California coast during the NE Pacific warm anomaly of 2014"2015. Specifically, a warming anomaly of up to +5 ºC, appears to be responsible for changes in species composition and changes in ecosystem structure in the California Current. Following a large harmful algal bloom event, a coccolithophore bloom with cell densities of up to ~6 x106 cells L-1 was observed within the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) in early summer of 2015, causing prominent changes in ocean color that were also detected by satellite-based remote sensing. We speculate that the rare cooccurrence of warm water, high water column stability, and an extensive preceding diatom bloom during the anomaly contributed to the development of this bloom. I will also present some ongoing work on other stressors that are impacting the NE Pacific in the context of climate change.

Bio(s):
Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez is a biological oceanographer with a broad interest in mechanisms controlling diversity and function in marine biota. She has a B.Sc. in Biology & Biochemistry (Univ. Santiago de Compostela (Spain). After her PhD (1996) on carbon utilization in phytoplankton (Swansea Univ., U.K.), she was awarded a NERC Fellowship to study genetic diversity in coccolithophores (Bristol Univ., U.K.), and a NASA Fellowship to model their distribution using satellite data (Rutgers Univ., USA). Until December 2012, she ran a research group at the National Oceanography Centre (Southampton, U.K.), focusing on marine bioluminescence and the effect of ocean acidification on marine plankton. She has contributed to several white papers on OA, was a keynote speaker on ocean acidification at the 2011 IPCC workshop on OA, and in 2009, one of her papers published in Science was identified by Thomson Reuters as “fast breaking paper” and at the top 0.01 most cited papers in Geoscience. She was an advisor of the U.K. Government on climate change impacts on marine ecosystems (UK parliamentary papers on ocean acidification, advice to Sir John Beddington, U.K. Government Chief Scientific Advisor). At UCSB she continues to work on carbon biogeochemistry and ocean problems caused by humans including ocean acidification and warming, but she has expanded her work to include other stressors such as oil impacts on phytoplankton dynamics and health and effect of ash deposition on productivity following more frequent and intense fires in California over the past decade.

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Title: China's Underwater Cultural Heritage in the South China Sea: Nanhai #1, A Window on the Maritime Silk Road
Presenter(s): Hans Van Tilburg, Maritime Heritage Coordinator Pacific Islands Region, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 9 May 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
China's Underwater Cultural Heritage in the South China Sea: Nanhai #1, A Window on the Maritime Silk Road

Presenter(s):
Hans Van Tilburg of the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National MPA Center; MPA News, a service of OCTO; EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe); OpenChannels, a service of OCTO

Webinar Point of Contact: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Underwater Cultural Heritage can inform us about past events and seafaring cultures in powerful ways. China's ambitious Nanhai #1 excavation project has achieved a new milestone in the recovery of underwater cultural heritage artifacts. The discovery of a 900-year old Song dynasty merchant vessel initiated the removal of the adjacent seafloor along with the intact wreck, allowing for meticulous "in situ" excavation under environmentally controlled conditions within a specially-built lab. The wealth of porcelains and trade goods found with the vessel demonstrates the extensive and vibrant past of the Maritime Silk Road, and archaeologists are only now reaching the lower levels of the vessel's cargo holds. The project is also relevant to today's resource and management issues in the South China Sea.

Bio(s):
Hans Van Tilburg completed a geography major at the University of California Berkeley (BA 1985), Masters degree with East Carolina University's Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology program (MA 1995), and ran a graduate program in maritime archaeology at the University of Hawai'i while completing his degree in Asian and Pacific maritime history (PhD 2002). He has taught numerous university courses in world history and maritime history, published numerous articles and several books, and served as principal investigator for maritime archaeology projects throughout the Pacific Islands region. Hans has been an expert consultant for UNESCO's intangible cultural heritage program, as well as co-instructor for UNESCO's Underwater Cultural Heritage Foundation courses. He has served as program chair and co-chair for the Asia Pacific Regional Conference on Underwater Cultural Heritage (APCONF 2014-2020) series. He is currently the maritime heritage coordinator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Office of Marine Sanctuaries in the Pacific Islands region, and the unit diving supervisor for NOAA's National Ocean Service in Hawai'i.

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10 May 2019

Title: A framework for the development of a global marine taxon reference image database to support image-based analyses
Presenter(s): Dr. Kerry Howell, University of Plymouth
Date & Time: 10 May 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Gotowebinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Kerry Howell, University of Plymouth

Sponsor(s):
NMFS; POC: heather.coleman@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Video and image data as sampling tools are now regularly used in the field of benthic ecology. However, their use is subject to a number of challenges, not least of which is the identification of taxa within the images without associated physical specimens. The challenge of applying traditional taxonomic keys to the identification of fauna from images has led to the development of personal, research group, or institution level reference image catalogues of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) or morphospecies. The lack of standardisation among these reference catalogues has led to problems with observer bias and the inability to combine datasets across research groups and geographical regions. In addition, the lack of a common reference standard is stifling efforts in the application of artificial intelligence to taxon identification. Using the North Atlantic deep sea as a case study, we propose a database structure to facilitate the standardisation of morphospecies image catalogues between research groups and support future use in multiple front-end applications. We also propose a framework for coordination of international efforts to develop reference guides for the identification of marine species from images. The proposed structure follows the Darwin Core standard to allow integration with both WoRMS and OBIS databases. We suggest a management framework where high-level taxonomic groups (e.g. Antipatharians, Pennatulaceans, Hexactinellids, Anthozoans) are curated by a regional team, consisting of both end users and taxonomic experts for that taxon and region. We identify a mechanism by which overall quality of data within a common reference guide could be raised over the next decade, through increased international coordination and cooperation. Finally, we discuss the role of a common reference standard in advancing marine ecology and supporting challenges in sustainable use of this ecosystem.

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13 May 2019

Title: Generating Hyperspectral Sounder Retrieval Products at LEO and GEO Imager Spatial Resolution
Presenter(s): Elisabeth Weisz Associate Scientist, Space Science and Engineering Center, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Date & Time: 13 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771, Conference Room S650
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Elisabeth Weisz Associate Scientist, Space Science and Engineering Center, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Sponsor(s):
JPSS Science Seminar

Abstract:
Synergistic use of high spatial resolution imager data with high spectral resolution infrared sounder data provides advantages in various applications over use of individual data sets alone. The VIIRS imaging instrument on the polar-orbiting S-NPP and JPSS satellite platforms has infrared window bands, but no carbon dioxide and water vapor absorption bands, which are essential for accurately deriving atmospheric variables. An overview of the imager and sounder (e.g., VIIRS and CrIS) radiance data fusion method to construct missing high spatial resolution radiances is presented. These fusion radiances can then be used to infer profile, cloud, and surface parameters using heritage retrieval algorithms. But rather than retrieving the aforementioned parameters from the fusion radiance data, it is also possible to perform “product fusion”, where high vertical resolution sounder temperature and humidity profile retrievals (or derived products such as lifted index) are constructed directly at imager high spatial resolution. Moreover, the retrieval products can be further enhanced with high temporal resolution when geostationary imager (ABI) data is combined with the polar-orbiting sounder (CrIS) data to benefit, for example, the study of moisture transport, cloud top change, and convective stability during severe weather development. Various case studies are presented with promising potential improvements in weather monitoring and forecasting applications from using the VIIRS/CrIS and ABI/CrIS fusion capabilities.

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Title: Implementation of the ECMWF cumulus convection scheme into the GFS and A stochastic approach to cumulus convection parameterization using cellular automata
Presenter(s): Lisa Bengtsson, ESRL
Date & Time: 13 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar or NCWCP rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lisa Bengtsson, ESRL

Sponsor(s):
ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER SEMINAR for more information visit https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

Abstract:
https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/abstract.2019/Bengtsson.html

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14 May 2019

Title: 60 years of Satellite Monitoring of the Earth from Space: A brief history of atmospheric sounding
Presenter(s): Dr Chris Barnet, Senior Research Scientist, Science and Technology Corp. Senior Research Scientist
Date & Time: 14 May 2019
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771 - Conference Room S600
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Dr Chris Barnet, Senior Research Scientist, Science and Technology Corp. (STC): Senior Research Scientist, 10015 Old Columbia Road, Suite E-250, Columbia, MD 21046

Sponsor(s):
JPSS Satellite History Seminar Series

Shortly after the Russian launch of Sputnik-1, the United States launched TIROS-1 on April 1, 1960 - the 1st of many satellites dedicated for meteorological applications. During the following decades there was a rapid development of sensors and algorithms to derive the atmospheric temperature and composition for the Earth and other planets in our solar system. This presentation will focus on the key developments of remote sounding " that is, the conversion of space-borne measurements to geophysical information such as cloud information, surface information, and profiles of temperature, moisture, ozone, and other trace gases. The presentation will also discuss the evolution in technology that has led to advanced microwave and infrared sensors such as the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) flown on Suomi-NPP and the JPSS series of satellites. The evolution of these sensors is critical for modern data assimilation and retrieval algorithms such as the NOAA-Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS).

This seminar is the 1st of a series of seminars celebrating the 60th anniversary of the launch of TIROS-N.

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Title: NOAA Hurricane Awareness Series: Use of Aircraft Reconnaissance Data in Tropical Cyclone Analysis and Forecasting
Presenter(s): Mike Brennan, NOAA's National Hurricane Center, and Jason Sippel, NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory
Date & Time: 14 May 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Hurricane Awareness Series: Use of Aircraft Reconnaissance Data in Tropical Cyclone Analysis and Forecasting

Presenter(s):
Mike Brennan, NOAA's National Hurricane Center, and Jason Sippel, NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Southeast and Caribbean Regional Collaboration Team (SECART). Point of contact is Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov

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Title: Scientific Community Engagement for Carbon Cycle Researchers
Presenter(s): Dr. Libby Larson, NACP Coordinator and Senior Support Scientist, NASA Carbon Cycle & Ecosystems Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Date & Time: 14 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only (see access below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

Scientific Community Engagement for Carbon Cycle Researchers
Seminar 12 in the Series: From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle, the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2). We plan to host this series series on Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, 2/26-6/4.

Presenter(s):

Dr. Libby Larson, Coordinator of the North American Carbon Program (or NACP), and Senior Support Scientist, NASA Carbon Cycle & Ecosystems Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Sponsor(s):

U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha and Tracy Gill

Remote Access:

We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/, enter as "Guest", and please enter your first and last name. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset. Questions? Email Tracy Gill

Abstract:

Scientific community engagement can help funding program managers and researchers alike in managing resources, facilitating collaboration, and fostering innovation and insight. NASA's Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems Office at Goddard Space Flight Center has been serving this role for NASA programs such as Terrestrial Ecology and Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning, as well as supporting the broader community through the North American Carbon Program (NACP). This work has enabled much of the research that contributed to the success of the Second State of the Carbon Cycle (SOCCR2).



Bio(s):

Dr. Libby Larson started working for NASA as a AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow in 2012. After her fellowship ended, she was hired by the NASA Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems Office to continue her work in coordinating the North American Carbon Program, supporting the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) field campaign, and representing NASA in the US Global Change Research Program. In addition to serving on the Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group, she also co-chairs the Social Sciences Steering Committee. Dr. Larson is an urban ecologist by training and was a contributing author to the Built Environment, Urban Systems, and Cities chapter of the 2018 National Climate Assessment.

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15 May 2019

Title: Understanding the Indian monsoon behavior in a changing climate using the IITM Earth System Model: Implications for monsoon predictability
Presenter(s): R. Krishnan, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology
Date & Time: 15 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar or NCWCP rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
R. Krishnan, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology

Sponsor(s):
ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER SEMINAR for more information visit https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

Abstract:


Observations indicate that the Indian landmass experienced significantsurface warming at a rate exceeding 0.6oC (100 years)-1, sincebeginning of the 20th century. Precipitation datasets reveal adecreasing trend in summer monsoon rains over the region by about 7%since 1950s, together with significant increases in the frequency andintensity of heavy precipitation (intensity > 100 mm day-1)occurrences that have adversely affected the regional hydro-climate. Weconducted numerical simulation experiments using the IITM Earth SystemModel (IITM ESM), which has been developed from the NCEP CFS-v2 climateforecast system, to understand the impact of climate change on theIndian summer monsoon. The IITM ESM is a radiatively balanced climatemodeling framework that has been developed at the Centre for ClimateChange Research (CCCR), Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology(IITM), Pune for studying long-term climate variability and change, aswell as the Earth System response to human-induced climate change.
The results from the present study point to the role of human-inducedclimate change on the declining trend of summer monsoon precipitationover the Indian subcontinent. In particular, the IITM-ESM simulationssuggest that the combined influence of anthropogenic aerosol forcingand global warming has likely suppressed organized summer monsoonconvection, weakened the monsoon circulation and in turn causeddecrease of precipitation over the region. The detailed physicalmechanisms of the Indian monsoon response to Greenhouse Gas (GHG) andanthropogenic aerosol forcing would be discussed during thepresentation. The present findings have implications for the role ofclimate change on the subseasonal-to-seasonal predictability of theIndian summer monsoon.

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Title: Causes and implications of record low sea-ice extent in the Bering Sea in 2018
Presenter(s): Phyllis Stabeno, PMEL
Date & Time: 15 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Phyllis Stabeno, Physical Oceanographer, PMEL

Sponsor(s):
Kelley Uhlig, Knauss Fellow, OOMD (kelley.uhlig@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The winter of 2018 had record breaking low sea ice extent. Sea ice arrived late due to warm southerly winds in November. More typical northerly winds in December and January advanced the ice, but strong, warm southerlies in February and March forced the ice to retreat once again. The cold pool (shelf region with bottom water < 2°C) was the smallest on record. Ice extent in winter of 2019 was very similar to that of 2018. Thus, there have been two consecutive, record-breaking low ice years in the Bering Sea. The lack of ice impacted the ecosystem from the timing of the spring phytoplankton/ice-algal blooms to fish and marine mammal distributions.

About the speaker: Dr. Phyllis Stabeno is a physical oceanographer at the NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, Washington. Together with Dr. Janet Duffy-Anderson, she is co-leader of NOAA's Ecosystems and Fisheries Oceanography Coordinated Investigations. EcoFOCI is one of NOAA's only cross-line office programs and the second oldest fisheries-oceanography program in the agency. For the past 30 years, Dr. Stabeno has worked on physical oceanographic, climate and ecosystem projects focused on Alaska's marine ecosystem including the Gulf of Alaska, Bering Sea, Aleutian Islands and most recently, the Chukchi Sea. She is the lead investigator in maintaining a biophysical mooring array in the Bering Sea, including the M2 mooring, "Peggy" now deployed for the 25 year. She recently completed as a Principle Investigator for the North Pacific Research Board sponsored Bering Sea Integrated Ecosystem Research Plan (BSIERP) project and NSF Bering Ecosystem Study (BEST), which won a 2015 NOAA Gold Medal Award. And as of this week, she is a 2019 NOAA Distinguished Career Award recipient, nominated by OAR for key scientific achievements and superior leadership in conducting and communicating the EcoFOCI research, supporting US marine resources in Alaska. "

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Title: Reconstruction of Submesoscale Velocity Field from Surface Drifters
Presenter(s): Dr. Rafael Goncalves, Postdoctoral Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 15 May 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Rafael Goncalves, Postdoctoral Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBA

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16 May 2019

Title: Collections of Young Ocean Quahogs: Lessons Learned From the Newest Recruits of the World's Longest-Living Metazoan
Presenter(s): Chase Long, SO
Date & Time: 16 May 2019
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Chase Long, Data Policy Analyst, NOAA Office of the Chief Data Officer within the Office of the Chief Information Officer

Sponsor(s):
Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Hollis Jones (hollis.jones@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Ocean quahogs are a very long-lived species of bivalve, with a maximum lifespan exceeding 500 years. Growth signatures in their shells have been used to study the climate dating back thousands of years, yet relatively little is known about the growth rates or age at maturity of recent recruits. Given their economic importance as a commercially-fished species, collections of recent recruits were targeted for examination of age at maturity and growth rates in support of sustainable fishery management. Evidence suggests that growth rates are increasing along with warming ocean waters, and individuals appear to be reaching maturity at a younger age than previously understood.

About the speaker: Chase Long began to study molluscs upon moving to Virginia in 2014 after spending nearly six months hiking the Appalachian Trail earlier that year. His work at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science on the commercially important bivalve species of the Chesapeake Bay and the US east coast led to an interest in the policies behind sound fisheries management. While working toward filling data gaps in support of sustainable management of the ocean quahog fishery during his graduate studies, Chase applied to the Sea Grant Knauss Fellowship program. Chase now works as a Knauss Fellow in the office of NOAA's first Chief Data Officer, Ed Kearns, on data policy in support of NOAA's mission of Science, Service, and Stewardship."

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Title: Cubed-sphere modelling activities at CSIRO
Presenter(s): John McGregor, CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere
Date & Time: 16 May 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar or NCWCP rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
John McGregor, CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere

Sponsor(s):
ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER SEMINAR for more information visit https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

Abstract:
The Conformal-Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM) has been developed atCSIRO over a number of years. CCAM is formulated on the conformal-cubicgrid, and employs 2-time-level semi-Lagrangian semi-implicit numerics.The model is quite mature. It has mainly been used in dynamicaldownscaling studies of climate change, but is also used for specializednumerical weather prediction applications. CCAM employs reversiblestaggering for the wind components (McGregor, MWR, 2005), producinggood wave dispersion behavior and also good behaviour for the kineticenergy spectra. For treatment of non-hydrostatic flow, CCAM utilizesthe highly efficient equations of Miller and White (QJRMS, 1984).

Recently the CCAM code has been generalized to utilize the UniformJacobian (UJ) variation of the cubed-sphere grid. This grid is derivedfrom the conformal-cubic grid to provide equal area for every gridcell. Since the grid lines are no longer orthogonal, covariant andcontravariant velocity components are required. Apart from thecomplications of the velocity components, most of the CCAMsemi-Lagrangian approach may be used, including reversible staggeringof the contravariant velocity components to switch between values atcell centres and cell edges. The solver for the Helmholtz equation is alittle more complicated than for CCAM. A split-explicit version of CCAMhas also been developed, solving the primitive equations in flux form.

A major application of CCAM is for downscaling climate changesimulations of coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs. The CSIRO downscalingstrategy utilizes forcing from the sea-ice and Sea Surface Temperatures(SSTs) provided by chosen GCMs. Because the GCMs may have somesignificant biases in their SSTs, the SSTs from each GCM are correctedfor their monthly biases in both mean value and variance, as calculatedfrom their 30-year present-day climatologies. The same monthly SSTcorrections are applied throughout the simulations from each GCM. Thetalk will include results from some recent CORDEX regional climatedownscaling simulations.

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Title: The Seattle Aquarium's 25-year non-invasive sea otter endocrinology database: We take s--t from any otter
Presenter(s): Shawn Larson, Ph.D., Seattle Aquarium
Date & Time: 16 May 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Shawn Larson, Ph.D., Seattle Aquarium

Sponsor NOAA NWFS Monster Seminar Series. POC: Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Abstract:
The Seattle Aquarium has been studying sea otter, Enhydra lutris, endocrinology for 25 years. We monitor the reproductive and stress related physiology of sea otters through non-invasively collected fecal samples to document sexual maturity, normal reproductive cycling, the adrenal stress response, and the effectiveness of chemical contraception. Sea otters are the only marine mammal without a blubber layer and must eat approximately 25% of their body weight to maintain body condition in the cold north pacific waters in which they live. They eat a lot and in turn they poop a lot making sampling their feces for physiological data relatively easy. The Seattle Aquarium was the first to successfully breed sea otters in captivity and to measure fecal steroid hormone metabolites, and remain one of the only labs to do so. Zoos and Aquariums from all over the world have sent us fecal samples to determine the reproductive physiology and status of their animals. We will take poop from any otter and have over 4000 archived sea otter fecal samples in our freezer. In addition to monitoring fecal steroid metabolites we also measure toxic chemicals such as pesticides, flame retardants, PCBs as well as microplastics in the sea otter diets and fecals. The purpose of this work is to understand the normal and abnormal endocrinology of captive sea otters and the associated events that preceded them to effectively manage the welfare of sea otters in human care.

Bio(s):
Shawn Larson was educated at the University of California, Berkeley (BS in Biology of Natural Resources 1988), California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (MS Wildlife Biology in 1992) and University of Washington (PhD in School of Aquatic and Fisheries Biology 2003, with a focus on sea otter genetics and endocrinology). Shawn launched the Seattle Aquarium conservation research program in 1995. Her work spans a variety of areas"she leads conservation research projects in the Salish Sea, Hawai'i, and (soon!) Indonesia; oversees all water quality testing for the aquarium exhibits; and leads the wildlife rehabilitation program. Shawn's research is cross-disciplinary, including projects focused on marine mammal physiology, shark genetics, reef fish population biology and ecology, and orca population trends. She has published several scientific papers, book chapters on marine mammals, and a book on sea otter biology and conservation. More recently, Shawn has been involved in environmental monitoring of toxic pollutants and microplastics in the Salish Sea and elsewhere. In 2016, she also become a contracted Research Curator for the Whale Museum in Friday Harbor where she focuses on longterm datasets on Southern Resident killer whale sightings, the impact of whale watching vessels on the Southern Residents, and 20 years of orca calls from hydrophones.


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21 May 2019

Title: NOAA Hurricane Awareness Series: Assessing Post-Storm Damage: NOAA Emergency Response
Presenter(s): Mike Aslaksen, NOAA National Geodetic Survey, and Parks Camp, Tallahassee Weather Forecast Office, NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 21 May 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Hurricane Awareness Series:Assessing Post-Storm Damage: NOAA Emergency Response

Presenter(s):
Mike Aslaksen, NOAA National Geodetic Survey, and Parks Camp, Tallahassee Weather Forecast Office, NOAA's National Weather Service

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Southeast and Caribbean Regional Collaboration Team (SECART). Point of contact is Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov

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Title: Where does all the carbon go? Piecing together the North American carbon puzzle from a synthesis of top-down and bottom-up estimates
Presenter(s): Daniel J. Hayes, University of Maine, and Rodrigo Vargas, University of Delaware. Both presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 21 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Where does all the carbon go? Piecing together the North American carbon puzzle from a synthesis of top-down and bottom-up estimates.
Seminar 13 in the Series, "From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle (SOCCR2) Seminar Series". We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - June 11

Presenter(s):
Rodrigo Vargas, University of Delaware. Presenting from Delaware..
Co-author: Daniel J. Hayes, University of Maine

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyamo Shrestha & Tracy Gill.

Abstract:
Scientific information quantifying and characterizing regional-to-global scale carbon cycling is necessary for developing national and international policy on climate change impacts, mitigation and adaptation. In this presentation, we show how we can piece together the various components of the North American carbon budget from multiple constraints on continental-scale estimates of the major stocks and flows. Our analysis synthesizes bottom-up estimates of stock change over the past decade among carbon pools of the major land sectors (forests and wood products, agricultural soils, grasslands, wetlands, and arctic-boreal ecosystems) and lateral transfers along the terrestrial-aquatic system (inland waters, tidal wetlands, estuaries and the coastal ocean). Using a simple but comprehensive and consistent budget accounting framework, we reconcile the various bottom-up assessments into an overall estimate of net land-atmosphere exchange of carbon from North America's land and coastal ocean to the atmosphere, and compare this estimate with top-down estimates for the continent over the last decade.

Bio(s):

Daniel Hayes is Assistant Professor in the School of Forest Resources and serves as Director of the Wheatland Geospatial Analysis Laboratory at the University of Maine. He teaches, does research and performs outreach in the use of remote sensing in forest inventory and ecosystem applications. Dan studies the role of climate change and disturbance in the dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems, with a particular focus on Arctic and Boreal regions. He has contributed to various regional, continental and global carbon budget modeling and synthesis efforts and publishes on the methods and results of multi-disciplinary, ecosystem-scale scientific investigations. Prior to his appointment at the University of Maine, Dan was a post-doctoral fellow in the Institute of Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a research scientist in the Climate Change Science Institute at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He is currently involved in various collaborative efforts including the interagency North American Carbon Program (NACP), NASA's Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE), DOE's Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE-Arctic) and the NSF Permafrost Carbon Network.

Rodrigo Vargas is an Associate Professor at the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences at the University of Delaware. He completed his PhD at the University of California-Riverside and a postdoc at the University of California-Berkeley. His research interests focus on how biophysical factors regulate greenhouse gas dynamics in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. He studies soil-plant-atmosphere interactions to understand and quantify the response of ecosystems to management, extreme events, and global environmental change. His research spans from data mining and digital soil mapping, to remote sensing and micrometeorological measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes at multiple spatio-temporal scales and vegetation types. Dr. Vargas has published over 100 peer-reviewed publications and has received funding from NSF, NASA, USDA, DOD and several state and international organizations. He serves as an Associate Editor for Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences published by the American Geophysical Union. He is part of the science steering groups of the North American Carbon Program, North American Forestry Commission, Mexican Carbon Program, and AmeriFlux. He is a member of the committee on Science and the Arts in the Earth and Environmental Science cluster of the Franklin Institute, and a member of the U.S. National Committee for Soil Science of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

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Title: Estimating Coral Feeding Habits from Space
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Fox, Postdoctoral Scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Date & Time: 21 May 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Michael Fox, Postdoctoral Scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Abstract:
Reef-building corals rely on a symbiosis with microscopic algae for much of their energetic needs. Rising ocean temperatures threaten this symbiosis and can cause it to break down in a process known as coral bleaching, which is one of the primary threats to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems globally. Corals are not helpless, however, as they are also excellent predators and if they can capture food to maintain their energy budgets while bleached they may have a greater chance for survival. Learn more how natural variation in food availability on reefs around the world and how this may influence coral resilience and recovery from bleaching events.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

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22 May 2019

Title: Advancing U.S. Operational Weather Prediction Capabilities in the Next Decade with Exascale HPC, Machine Learning and Big Data Technologies
Presenter(s): Mark Govett, ESRL/GSD
Date & Time: 22 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar or NCWCP rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mark Govett, ESRL/GSD

Sponsor(s):
ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER SEMINAR for more information visit https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

Abstract:
A revolution in computing, modeling, software and big data is needed to advance U.S. weather prediction capabilities in the next decade. An estimated 1000 to 10000 times more computing is needed to advance prediction models to cloud-resolving, 1-3KM resolution global scales.However, existing models are not capable of exploiting future HPC systems with tens to hundreds of millions of processors. Models will need to be rewritten to use more efficient algorithms, incorporate parallelism at all levels, minimize inter-processor communications, and improve I/O efficiency. In addition, Artificial Intelligence (AI) can be used to replace compute heavy calculations with fast, light-weight algorithms. AI and the rapidly growing field of Machine Learning (ML)has the potential to disrupt the way weather prediction and assimilation models are developed in the future.

In addition, the current prediction system is being overwhelmed with too much data. New strategies are needed to more effectively handle the ingest, processing, computation, and distribution of data within the prediction system. Emerging technologies such as 5G networks, cloud computing, ML, and edge computing can be used to support the processing, distribution, and dissemination of data, information, and insights to diverse end users.

This presentation will offer a critical and visionary assessment of key technologies and developments needed to advance U.S. operational weather prediction in the next decade. I will describe challenges in our prediction system today and highlight exploratory developments at GSD and other modeling centers to overcome these challenges.

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Title: Recent Trends in Nutrient & Sediment Loading to Coastal Areas of the Conterminous US: Insights & Global Context
Presenter(s): Gretchen P. Oelsner, Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey, New Mexico Water Science Center, Albuquerque, NM
Date & Time: 22 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

Recent Trends in Nutrient & Sediment Loading to Coastal Areas of the Conterminous US: Insights & Global Context

Presenter(s):

Gretchen P. Oelsner, Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey, New Mexico Water Science Center, Albuquerque, NM

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Suzanne Bricker and Tracy Gill

Abstract:
Coastal areas in the U.S. and worldwide have experienced massive population and land-use changes contributing to significant degradation of coastal ecosystems. Excess nutrient pollution causes coastal ecosystem degradation, and both regulatory and management efforts have targeted reducing nutrient and sediment loading to coastal rivers. Decadal trends in flow-normalized nutrient and sediment loads were determined for 95 monitoring locations on 88 U.S. coastal rivers, including tributaries of the Great Lakes, between 2002 and 2012 for nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and sediment. N and P loading from urban watersheds generally decreased between 2002 and 2012. In contrast, N and P trends in agricultural watersheds were variable indicating uneven progress in decreasing nutrient loading. Coherent decreases in N loading from agricultural watersheds occurred in the Lake Erie basin, but limited benefit is expected from these changes because P is the primary driver of degradation in the lake. Nutrient loading from undeveloped watersheds was low, but increased between 2002 and 2012, possibly indicating degradation of coastal watersheds that are minimally affected by human activities. Regional differences in trends were evident, with stable nutrient loads from the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico, but commonly decreasing N loads and increasing P loads in Chesapeake Bay. Compared to global rivers, coastal rivers of the conterminous U.S have somewhat lower TN yields and slightly higher TP yields, but similarities exist among land use, nutrient sources, and changes in nutrient loads. Despite widespread decreases in N loading in coastal watersheds, recent N:P ratios remained elevated compared to historic values in many areas. Additional progress in reducing N and P loading to U.S. coastal waters, particularly outside of urban areas, would benefit coastal ecosystems.

Bio(s):
Gretchen completed her PhD in Hydrology at the University of Arizona in 2007. Her dissertation focused on nutrient cycling in the semi-arid Upper Rio Grande. Following her PhD, Gretchen did a post-doc with the EPA's Office of Research and Development's Western Ecology Division examining changes in water quality in lakes and streams affected by acid rain. In 2011, Gretchen joined the U.S. Geological Survey in the New Mexico Water Science Center and worked on many projects related to surface-water quality in New Mexico. In 2013, Gretchen began work with the USGS's National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Project as part of the Surface Water Trends Team. Initially she worked to harmonize data from 600+ sources of water-quality data across the country and screen them for trend analysis. Once the trend analysis was complete, Gretchen started to work on projects to interpret the trend results including trends in nutrient and sediment loading in coastal streams (the focus of this presentation) and possible drivers of national salinity concentration trends.

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Title: Water Level Sensing through Collaboration and Innovation
Presenter(s): David Schoenmaker, Stillwater Technologies LLC & Crane Johnson, Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center
Date & Time: 22 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
Join the NOAA Central Library and the Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) for the new NOAA Innovators Series! This series will be facilitated by Derek Parks, Technology Transfer Program Manager.

Presenter(s):
David Schoenmaker, Software and Hardware Engineer, Stillwater Technologies LLC & Crane Johnson, Hydrologist, Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center [Moderator] Derek Parks.

Abstract:
A new and innovative water level sensor was developed by the Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center to help fill data gaps in Alaska's current water level sensing network. After successfully deploying these small low cost gages at over 40 locations, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was established with Stillwater Technologies to continue development and bring these gages to the retail market. The development of the iGage river water level sensor, technology transfer through the CRADA and subsequent improvements will be presented.

Bio(s):
David Schoenmaker grew up in the Seattle area has spent his entire career in software and hardware development. In addition to working in software development for Microsoft he has experience in wireless, cellular and data communications. Outside of work he enjoys flying, amateur radio and continuing to learn.

Crane Johnson has been living and working in Alaska since 1995. As a registered Civil Engineer he has spent most of his career working on water resource projects that includes over a decade of water control and flood forecasting experience. Outside of work Crane enjoys to ski and hike Alaska's mountains.

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23 May 2019

Title: Effects of ocean acidification and hypoxia on rockfish across multiple life stages
Presenter(s): Scott Hamilton, PhD., Moss Landing Marine Laboratories
Date & Time: 23 May 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Scott Hamilton, PhD., Moss Landing Marine Laboratories

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Abstract:
Climate change has the potential to profoundly influence the structure and function of marine ecosystems. In the California Current Ecosystem, marine heatwaves, ocean acidification, and hypoxia are three stressors exacerbated by human activities. In my lab, we have focused on investigating the independent and interactive effects of ocean acidification and hypoxia on rockfish across multiple species and life stages, testing responses from the organismal to the molecular level. In this talk, I will describe recent results of experiments testing the independent effects of ocean acidification and hypoxia on behavior, physiology, and gene expression in juvenile rockfish, and results from experiments testing responses to static versus fluctuating environmental conditions that more realistically simulate upwelling-relaxation dynamics under climate change. Lastly, I will present results from studies of the effects of ocean acidification and hypoxia on the reproductive process, embryo development, larval physiology, and gene expression in rockfish.

Bio(s):
Scott Hamilton received his undergraduate degree in Ecology and Evolution from Princeton University in 2000 and his PhD in Marine Ecology from UC Santa Barbara in 2007. He served as a postdoc and research scientist at UCSB from 2007-2010. In 2011, Scott started as an Assistant Professor of Ichthyology at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories and San Jose State University and became an Associate Professor in 2016. His research program at MLML focuses on: (1) the effects of climate change stressors on fish and other nearshore organisms, (2) life history and demographic variability in fish populations, (3) the effects of fishing and spatial management (MPAs) on community structure and function, (4) the role of consumers in nutrient cycling in kelp forests, and (5) emerging issues in aquaculture. He has supervised over 50 undergraduate students, 42 Master's students at MLML, and served on 30 MS thesis committees and 3 PhD committees.

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Title: Human and Environmental Well-being in Alaska's Kachemak Bay Watershed: An Ecosystem Services Assessment
Presenter(s): Ellie Flaherty, University of Michigan; Kate Kirkpatrick, University of Michigan; Trey Snow, University of Michigan; and Julia Wondoleck, University of Michigan
Date & Time: 23 May 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Wednesday, 3103 Mainway, Burlington, ON L7M 1A1, Canada
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ellie Flaherty, University of Michigan; Kate Kirkpatrick, University of Michigan; Trey Snow, University of Michigan; and Julia Wondoleck, University of Michigan

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html.

Abstract:
The Kachemak Bay watershed, located on the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska, encompasses several terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems that provide a range of benefits and services that are not easily quantified. This webinar highlights methods and findings from a Master's project - advised by Dr. Julia Wondolleck - that provides insights about current ecosystem services valued in Kachemak Bay using a socio-cultural, place-based, ecosystem services framework.
In addition to hearing from the students, their partners at Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve will share how they hope to apply their findings, and offer ideas for others interested in working with a student team in the future. Master's projects are interdisciplinary capstone experiences that enable University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability master's students to develop solutions to pressing problems faced by real-world clients. To learn more, read the team's recent report and review the process for proposing an idea for a future project.

Learn more about: [Human and Environmental Well-being in Alaska's Kachemak Bay Watershed: An Ecosystem Services Assessment]

SPEAKER BIOS:
Ellie Flaherty holds a Master of Science from the University of Michigan, School for Environment and Sustainability, with concentrations in Environmental Policy and Conservation Ecology. Ellie has experience in environmental compliance support, as well as policy and program analysis, and currently works as a Research Associate for the NEERS Science Collaborative (NSC) program at the University of Michigan's Water Center. Ellie's particular interests lie in marine and coastal management and collaborative resource management processes.

Kathryn Kirkpatrick holds a Master of Science in Conservation Ecology and Environmental Policy within the School for Environment and Sustainability (SEAS) at the University of Michigan. She holds a particular interest in wetland restoration, fostered by various work experiences in ecological consulting, wetland banking, and independent research. Her master's project in evaluating human and environmental well-being in Alaskan watersheds helped develop an interest in environmental policy, leading to her current position as a student assistant in the Water Resources Division at the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE), formerly the MDEQ.

Trey Snow is a 2019 graduate from the School for Environment and Sustainability at University of Michigan where he received a Master's of Science in Environmental Policy and Planning. While at the University of Michigan, Trey was a teaching assistant for environmental policy and geospatial analysis courses. Following his bachelors in economics from Bucknell University in 2016, Trey spent time across the US from the Montana backcountry with the US Forest Service to an organic farm in New England. His work on this ecosystem service master's project highlights his interest in building connections between ecological monitoring and public policies and outreach.

Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

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24 May 2019

Title: May 2018 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 24 May 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s):
OAR/CPO/RISA/Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (rthoman@alaska.edu)

Abstract:
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for June and the summer season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

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28 May 2019

Title: Future of the North American Carbon Cycle
Presenter(s): Deborah Nicole Huntzinger, Associate Professor, Climate Science, School of Earth & Sustainability, Northern Arizona University, and Abhishek Chatterjee, Scientist, Universities Space Research Association, Columbia, MD, and NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, Greenbelt, MD
Date & Time: 28 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or in SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

Future of the North American Carbon Cycle

Presenter(s):

Deborah Nicole Huntzinger, Associate Professor, Climate Science, School of Earth & Sustainability, Northern Arizona University,
Co-Author:Abhishek Chatterjee, Scientist, Universities Space Research Association, Columbia, MD, and NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, Greenbelt, MD. Both are SOCCR-2 Chapter 19 Contributing Authors

Sponsor(s):

U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha , & Tracy Gill

Abstract:
Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, primarily due to fossil fuel emissions and land-use change, are expected to continue to drive changes in both climate and the terrestrial and ocean carbon cycles. Over the past two-to-three decades, there has been considerable effort to quantify terrestrial and oceanic system responses to environmental change, and project how these systems will interact with, and influence, future atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate. In this presentation, we will summarize key findings related to projected changes to the North American carbon cycle, and the potential drivers and associated consequences of these changes, as reported in Chapter 19 of the Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2). The findings not only capture projections of emissions from fossil fuel and changes in land cover and land use, but also highlight the decline in future carbon uptake capacity of North American carbon reservoirs and soil carbon losses from the Northern high-latitudes. Such a discussion of future carbon cycle changes is new in SOCCR-2. It underlines the progress made since the release of the First State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-1) in 2007 in identifying the vulnerability of key carbon pools and their co-evolution with changing climatic conditions. We will also discuss key knowledge gaps and outline a set of future research priorities, including both monitoring and modeling activities, that are necessary to improve projections of future changes to the North American carbon cycle and associated adaptation and resource-management decisions.

Bio(s):
Deborah Huntzinger is an Associate Professor of Climate Science at Northern Arizona University. Her expertise lies in modeling complex environmental systems, and the development of methods to evaluate and compare model estimates. Her work in sustainability and climate has included carbon cycling dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems, carbon sequestration in industrial waste byproducts, and groundwater modeling in a socially and ecologically important watershed. Much of Dr. Huntzinger's current research interests are in advancing the understanding of the land carbon cycle's interactions and feedbacks with Earth's changing climate. She was one of the core investigators in the North American Carbon Program (NACP) Regional Interim Synthesis Project and is the lead investigator of the NACP Multi-Scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP).

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Title: California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System May Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Dr. Dan Cayan, CNAP, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD; Bryan Henry, Meteorologist, National Interagency Fire Center, Dr. Dan McEvoy, CNAP, Western Regional Climate Center
Date & Time: 28 May 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System May Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar.
These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Feature Topics, Speakers and Affiliations:
Drought & Climate Update & Outlook, by Dr. Dan Cayan, Climate-Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego

Wildland Fire Potential Outlook, by Bryan Henry, Meteorologist, National Interagency Fire Center

Drought Indices & Wildfire: A Test Case for the CA-NV DEWS, by Dr. Dan McEvoy, Climate-Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Western Regional Climate Center

Sponsor(s):

National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), https://www.drought.gov/drought/. For additional information contact Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS

Abstract:

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) May 2019 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Niño and La Niña). The webinar takes place at 11 a.m. PT, Tuesday May 28, 2019.

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Title: Identifying deep-sea animals from video and still images: a guide to guide development
Presenter(s): Virginia Moriwake, University of Hawai‘i
Date & Time: 28 May 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Gotowebinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Virginia Moriwake, University of Hawai‘i

Sponsor(s):
NMFS DSCRTP; POC: heather.coleman@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Virginia Moriwake is a Deep Sea Animal Research Specialist at the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) at the University of Hawai‘i, Mānoa. Virginia will speak about the approach that her team has been taking to identify deep-sea coral and sponge taxa for the Pacific Islands Benthic Deepwater Animal Identification Guide, and to subsequently annotate video footage to describe taxa recorded by NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in the Pacific Islands region.

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29 May 2019

Title: SmallScaleOA [Ocean Acidification] for Coral and Beyond!
Presenter(s): Katherine Leigh -Kat- Leigh, Marine Biologist, Leader of SmallScaleOA. Presenting at NOAA Silver Spring
Date & Time: 29 May 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar, or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Rm 8150, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

SmallScaleOA [ocean acidification], for Coral and Beyond!

Presenter(s):

Katherine Leigh (Kat) Leigh, Marine Biologist, Leader of SmallScaleOA

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar hosts are Jason Philabotte and Tracy Gill


Abstract:
SmallScaleOA is a multi-entity, collaborative initiative to conduct proof-of-concept pilot projects that will demonstrate a viable approach for incentivizing resilient coastal communities and seafood industry. SmallScaleOA will create a circular data economy to incentivize traceable, transparent seafood; as well as inclusive, low-cost, coastal research on a hyper-localized scale. Using aquatic sensors, mobile phones, satellites, and IoT concepts, SmallScaleOA will exponentially decrease the cost of collecting coastal/ocean observations; increase the inclusivity and local relevance of scientific research; facilitate access to financial services, investment capital, and insurance coverage; and fill several data gaps in our knowledge of ocean changes like acidification, deoxygenation, and temperature rise. SmallScaleOA will collect continuous, observational data across entire coastal areas (not just one stationary point) as well as across multiple aquaculture sites, while simultaneously gathering fishery and aquaculture production and chain-of-custody data. SmallScaleOA will begin in Southeast Asia (a region where coverage is currently lacking), and expand to other regions over time. SmallScaleOA's interoperable blockchain technologies will connect dispersed fishers, farmers, businesses, academics, government agencies, NGOs, etc. to a data ecosystem, ensure the validity and accessibility of this data, and adequately reward these actors for their contributions all without requiring a central authority.

Bio(s):

Katharine (Kat) Leigh is the Leader of SmallScaleOA. Kat has held positions in both the for-profit and non-profit sector with entities including The Nature Conservancy, Environmental Defense Fund, Cornell University, and Epic Software Systems. Her roles have spanned across project management and implementation, administration and marketing, scientific visioning, public data access strategizing, and community-based fisheries management. Although employed full-time, Kat dedicates much of her spare time towards launching her initiative, SmallScaleOA as well as leading her social venture, KomunikasIndonesia (KI). Ultimately, her goal is to combine economics, marine ecology/biology, and a dash of technology in order to incentivize sustainability in Indonesian small-scale fisheries. She has been a member of the Women's Aquatic Network (WAN) since 2017, having joined after networking with current members and participating in the organization's coastal clean-up event. Kat has a B.S. in Biology with a concentration in Marine Biology from Cornell University. She also holds minors in Environment and Resource Economics and International Development.

Despite having already spent over 10 years advocating for sustainable seafood, food systems and waste disposal, Kat wants to further expand her knowledge and become a better problem-solver. Thus, she will be going to graduate school in the fall of 2019. Kat's love of Marine Ecology continues to transcend traditional academic and social boundaries, merging into the fields of International Development and Environmental Economics. Ultimately, by drawing from her broad educational background, she plans to dedicate her career towards sustainability, and alleviating marine resource inequalities. She aims to focus on the incentive structures within small-scale fisheries in Southeast Asia. By bridging chronic communication and data silos, she will promote equity, accessibility, practicality, and resiliency at the interface between government, business, institutions, research, and the general public.

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30 May 2019

Title: The impact of remote forcing on US summer temperature extremes
Presenter(s): Dr. Hosmay Lopez, Assistant Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 30 May 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Hosmay Lopez, Assistant Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBA

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Title: Pacific herring across space and time: what can modern and ancient DNA reveal about population structure in a pelagic fish?
Presenter(s): Eleni Petrou, M.S., School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 30 May 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Eleni Petrou, M.S., School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Abstract:
Forage fish are key trophic links in coastal ecosystems, transferring energy from lower to higher trophic levels. In the Pacific Northwest, herring are one of the most abundant forage fish species and are prey for a wide variety or organisms. Human inhabitants of the region have used herring as a food resource for millennia, and archaeological research has demonstrated that herring bones are among the most abundant fish remains unearthed from ancient village sites. Given the importance of herring to the coastal ecosystem and human livelihoods, there is considerable interest in sustainably managing the fisheries which target this species. However, management is complicated by limited knowledge of herring population structure and a lack of long-term temporal data on population diversity. In this talk, I will describe the mechanisms driving genetic differentiation between herring populations, using genomic data collected from wild spawning aggregations. I will also discuss how aDNA preserved in fish bones can be used to investigate the relative contributions of genetically distinct herring populations to food supplies over the last millennium.

Bio(s):
Eleni Petrou was educated at the State University of New York at Buffalo (B.S. in Biological Sciences) and the University of Washington (M.S. in Fisheries Science). In 2013, she was a Fulbright Fellow at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. Eleni's research combines field and laboratory approaches to address evolutionary and ecological questions relevant to the conservation and management of marine and anadromous species.

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Title: Using Integrated Stream and Wetland Restoration Systems to Improve Habitat and Achieve Clean Water Objectives
Presenter(s): Erik Michelsen, Administrator of Anne Arundel County MD's Watershed Protection and Restoration Program
Date & Time: 30 May 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Restoration Webinar Series
The Restoration Webinar Series, hosted by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is a venue for disseminating new approaches, best management practices and innovative restoration techniques to some of our nation's greatest restoration challenges. The series covers a broad spectrum of topics including: planning and implementing restoration projects; project monitoring and evaluation at multiple time scales; accounting for a changing climate in restoration; regional restoration planning and priority setting; and permitting.

Seminar

Title:

Using Integrated Stream and Wetland Restoration Systems to Improve Habitat and Achieve Clean Water Objectives

Presenter(s):

Erik Michelsen, Administrator of Anne Arundel County MD's Watershed Protection and Restoration Program.

Sponsor(s):

US Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA. Contact Eric Tsakiris or Nina Garfield with questions.

Abstract:
Anne Arundel County, MD, like many municipalities in the Chesapeake Bay region, has aggressive, regulatory clean water goals and has authorized hundreds of millions of dollars to achieve those aims. Rather than simply focusing on numeric attainment of its MS4 permit and Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) goals, the County has tried " where possible " to emulate the functions of historical, integrated stream and wetland systems throughout the jurisdiction to provide both water quality and habitat benefits in a dramatically manipulated landscape. This presentation will focus on a number of case studies, and discuss the evolution of the approach over time.

Bio(s):

Erik Michelsen is currently the Administrator of Anne Arundel County's Watershed Protection and Restoration Program and is charged with managing its restoration effort to clean up the County's waterways and satisfy its Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) and Chesapeake Bay TMDL requirements.

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4 June 2019

Title: North American Energy System Contributions to the Global Carbon Cycle: Will the cycle be unbroken?
Presenter(s): Peter J. Marcotullio, Professor of Geography, Director of the Institute for Sustainable Cities,
Hunter College, City University of New York
Date & Time: 4 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

North American Energy System Contributions to the Global Carbon Cycle: Will the cycle be unbroken?

Presenter(s):

Peter J. Marcotullio, Professor of Geography, Director of the Institute for Sustainable Cities,
Hunter College, City University of New York.

Sponsor(s):

U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha, & Tracy Gill.

Abstract:
The North American energy system has undergone dramatic changes over the past 15 years. From a monotonic trend of increasing energy use based upon fossil fuel combustion since the early 1990s, the system headed into energy use declines starting around 2007. The latest trend has lasted through to 2016. The presentation will examine this decline, detailing from where and what sectors both energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions decreases were experienced. The seminar then overviews the factors behind the declining trends. We end the discussion with a look at what the future might bring from a variety of different scenarios, asking whether current trends will continue.

Bio(s):

Peter J. Marcotullio is Professor of Geography, Hunter College, City University of New York (CUNY), Director of the Institute for Sustainable Cities at Hunter College, Associate of the CUNY Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) and faculty member in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Program at the CUNY Graduate Center. He is also Adjunct Professor of Urban Planning at Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation (GSAPP). Prior to 2006, Prof. Marcotullio was Lecturer (1999-2001) and Professor (2001-2006) of Urban Planning in the Urban Engineering Department, University of Tokyo and held several positions at the United Nations University, Institute for Advanced Studies, Japan (1997-2008). His research interests focus on urbanization, energy use and the environment. Professor Marcotullio is currently co-Editor-in-Chief of Urban Climate (Elsevier), Associate Editor of Sustainability Science, Springer, and on the Advisory Board of One Earth, Cell Press.

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Title: The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Arctic Regional Climate Center (ArcRCC) and Pan Arctic Regional Climate Outlook Forum (PARCOF)
Presenter(s): Renee Tatusko, National Weather Service, Alaska Region
Date & Time: 4 June 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Renee Tatusko, National Weather Service, Alaska Region

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and NOAA CPO RISA Program

Abstract:
There have been many recent changes to better observe Alaska from the Geostationary Based on the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) Regional Climate Center's (RCCs) concept and as a legacy of the 2007-2008 International Polar Year, the Arctic Regional Climate Center (ArcRCC) network has been established. The ArcRCC is a network of the Arctic national meteorological and ice services that is providing pan-Arctic seasonal temperature, precipitation, and sea ice products. The ArcRCC began a 2-year demonstration phase in May 2018. In support of the ArcRCC initiative, Pan-Arctic Regional Climate Outlook Forums (PARCOFs) occur every May (a face-to-face meeting) and October (virtually). These forums allow for the national meteorological and ice services to meet and prepare the seasonal products in consultation with different Arctic user groups. The PARCOFs produce seasonal summaries of the past season describing actual temperature, precipitation, and sea-ice details/trends; seasonal outlooks for the upcoming season for temperature, precipitation, and sea ice; and a Consensus Statement which reviews the trends in the historical monitoring data and explains the forecasts in a text format providing greater regional details, i.e., forecasted sea-ice freeze-up and break-up. This presentation will provide an overview of the ArcRCC and the latest information from the Third PARCOF held in Rovaniemi, Finland, May 8-9.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

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5 June 2019

Title: The presence of large whale species in Clayoquot Sound and its offshore waters
Presenter(s): Rianna Burnham, PhD, Senior Researcher, Whale Research Lab, University of Victoria and Post Doctoral Research Scientist at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Presenting from Victoria
Date & Time: 5 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: VIa webinar (see login below) or in SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
The presence of large whale species in Clayoquot Sound and its offshore waters

Presenter(s):
Rianna Burnham, PhD, Senior Researcher, Whale Research Lab, University of Victoria and Post Doctoral Research Scientist at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Presenting from Victoria.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Rianna will discuss the findings from two offshore ocean glider missions aiming to map the habitat use of large whale species in offshore waters. First we will look at the acoustic presence of species in passive acoustic recordings made by the gliders, and compare them to recordings from stationary units deployed in deep coastal and deep shelf break locations. Then, she will focus on the vocalizations of the fin whale. This species shows spatial and temporal separation in area use between spring and winter deployments in the study area on the west coast of Vancouver Island, indicated by the dominant call type heard. Finally she will look at methods of reconciling the habitat data collected by the glider and the whale presence data, which is collected on much broader spatial scales, in hopes to identify important habitat units for sensitive species.

Bio(s):
Rianna Burnham is an acoustics ecologist, who uses acoustics as a tool for ecological study and understanding the life histories of marine species. She completed her graduate work with the Whale Lab at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada on the foraging ecology and vocalisation behaviors of whale species. She was a lead researcher in the Whale Habitat and Listening Experiment (WHaLE) project, collaboration of project teams on the east and west coast of Canada, that used acoustic technologies to mitigate acoustic disturbance and ship strike threat. She has worked both in academia and the private sector.

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Title: The State of the ocean 2018.
Presenter(s): Dr. Rick Lumpkin, Oceanographer, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 5 June 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Rick Lumpkin, Oceanographer, (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBA

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Title: The State of Local Government Climate Action in the U.S
Presenter(s): Ariella Maron, Lion Advisors for Community and Environment
Date & Time: 5 June 2019
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Drexel University
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ariella Maron, Lion Advisors for Community and Environment

Seminar sponsor: OAR/CPO/RISA/CCRUN (Consortium on Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast)

Topic: The State of Local Government Climate Action in the U.S.: Lessons Learned, Emerging Trends, and Next Generation Inspiration

Abstract:
Cities across North America have made ambitious commitments to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and prepare their communities for the existing and potential impacts of climate change. In the United States alone, 240 communities joined the We Are Still In (WASI) campaign, showing the world that America is still committed to the climate guidelines set by the Paris agreement; 212 have signed on to Mayor's for 100% Clean Energy; almost 400 participate in Climate Mayors; and the list goes on. However, even with commitment to achieve ambitious climate action goals, progress towards achieving these goals is currently not as fast or deep as required to hold the increase in the global average temperature to 1.5⁰C above pre-industrial levels, beyond which the impacts of climate change could become both catastrophic and irreversible. City governments are unlikely to achieve their committed GHG reduction levels on their own, but both evidence and modeling suggests that they can absolutely do so by pursuing an expansive agenda that includes partnerships across multiple sectors and at multiple levels of policy, in addition to assertively applying their own powers and authorities.

During this seminar, Ariella Maron will provide an overview of local government climate action in the U.S., including trends and themes around climate commitments, plans, and participation in related initiatives. She will then focus on emerging ideas impacting next generation climate action planning; the growing gap between local governments' growing ambition and slow, incremental progress; and the need for new approaches moving forward. The seminar will also include an interactive discussion around best practice case studies, other sources of inspiration, and ideas for creative collaborations.

About the CCRUN Green Infrastructure, Climate, and Cities Seminar Series
More than half of the world's population now lives in cities. This demographic shift creates a host of new opportunities, but also some new risks, especially given the challenges posed by climatic extremes. This timely seminar series focuses attention on these issues, and what decision makers, researchers, and practitioners are learning about how to address them. The focus of the CCRUN seminar series is on urban solutions to global problems associated with increasing temperature and sea level rise, precipitation variability, and greenhouse gas emissions. We are interested in the implications of such changes on the complex infrastructure of intensely developed landscapes, and on the health, well-being, and vulnerability of the people who live in them.

All the seminars are free, and held at 4:00 PM on the first Wednesday of every month at Drexel University in the Hill Conference Room, located in the LeBow Engineering Center. Refreshments will be provided. The sessions will be broadcast live via webcast, recorded, and archived on the CCRUN website. Space is limited, so registration is required. Please use the links to register! This seminar series is sponsored by the Consortium on Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast, a NOAA RISA team.

Seminar POC for questions: sean.bath@noaa.gov

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6 June 2019

Title: Gotta Be Fresh: Benthic Habitat Mapping in the Great Lakes
Presenter(s): Will Sautter, Marine GIS Analyst with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 6 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or in SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

Gotta Be Fresh: Benthic Habitat Mapping in the Great Lakes

Presenter(s):

Will Sautter, Marine GIS Analyst with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science in Silver Spring, MD. Presenting at NOAA Silver Spring, SSMC4, Rm 8150.

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) has expanded it's habitat mapping expertise to the clear, cold and fresh waters of the Great Lakes. The team of scientists and surveyors have ventured up to Wisconsin and Michigan over the past three years with the Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab (GLERL) and the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) to conduct several mapping missions on the R/V Storm for exploration and characterization of the lakebed. The NCCOS Marine Spatial Ecology Division has adapted the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) to these freshwater habitats by analyzing high resolution sidescan sonar, multibeam bathymetry, backscatter, topographic LiDAR, and hundreds of high definition, underwater drop camera videos to understand the changes in substrate, geoform, and biotic cover. NCCOS is using these surveys and other benthic mapping data to produce several spatial prioritization and BIOmapper tools which will be demonstrated during the talk. From finding lost shipwrecks to monitoring invasive mussel cover, these maps are excellent tools for planning and natural resource management for the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and future marine protected areas in the Great Lakes.

Bio(s):

Will Sautter is a marine GIS analyst under contract with CSS Inc., with the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science in Silver Spring, MD. Originally from Charleston, SC, he received a Bachelor of Science in Geology at Appalachian State University in North Carolina and is currently working on a Master's in Environmental Science and Policy from John's Hopkins University. He specializes in mapping the seafloor using multibeam sonars and underwater ground validation video data. He has conducted several surveys for habitat mapping in the Channel Islands, Gray's Reef, Flower Garden Banks, and the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuaries, but he is mostly excited at the opportunities to research and explore our federally protected waters.

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Title: Synchrony and Thresholds in Salmon Abundance and Forecast Performance
Presenter(s): William Satterthwaite, PhD., Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 6 June 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
William Satterthwaite, PhD., Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Abstract:
I will talk about two ongoing projects falling under the umbrella of synchrony and thresholds for US West Coast salmon. I will first summarize a multi-year project documenting the existence of a weakening portfolio effect in Central Valley fall run Chinook salmon stock complex, the southernmost native population of this species and a major contributor to ocean fisheries. This heavily hatchery-subsidized stock complex is characterized by years of high abundance and fishing opportunity as well as years of critically low abundance such as a 2008-2009 "collapse" that closed all ocean salmon fisheries off California and much of Oregon and a 2018 overfished designation. I will review work to date on potential drivers of variation in returns to individual rivers, increasing synchrony among rivers, and the potential for hatchery practices to influence resilience in this system, with particular emphasis on the potential for phenological match-mismatch dynamics to create boom/bust dynamics and on the potential for straying to increase demographic synchrony and homogeneity. I will close the first part of the talk with discussion of plans to build on this work with a closed loop simulation or management strategy evaluation exploring the short- and long-term tradeoffs surrounding decisions to adaptively truck hatchery salmon in response to drought conditions. For the second part of the talk, I will shift to work in progress taking a broader look at the performance of salmon abundance forecasts along the U.S. West Coast, describing patterns of synchrony in forecast performance for Chinook and coho and what factors seem to explain shared trends. Synchrony is higher for the performance of coho forecasts than for Chinook, and geographic proximity appears to drive synchrony more than forecasting methodology, hatchery influence, or other stock characteristics considered. I will also describe work on select Chinook salmon stocks of high management priority searching for nonlinear and threshold relationships between forecast performance and environmental indicators. This exploratory work has revealed several promising relationships worthy of further study and consideration.

Bio(s):
Will Satterthwaite is a research ecologist at NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center in Santa Cruz. He did his graduate work on the population ecology and life history of plants with Ingrid Parker at UC Santa Cruz. After brief stints in environmental consulting and community college teaching, he transitioned to the world of fish through a postdoc with Marc Mangel working on life history models for steelhead. He then began working with the Salmon Assessment Team at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center as a UCSC affiliate and then a federal employee, working primarily on the demography, life history, and ocean distribution of Chinook salmon. Lately he has been spending much of his time in service to the Pacific Fishery Management Council, entering his seventh year on the Scientific and Statistical Committee and recently joining the newly-formed Southern Resident Killer Whale Workgroup.

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7 June 2019

Title: Interannual variability of currents at 4N, 23W.
Presenter(s): Dr. Renellys Perez, Oceanographer, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 7 June 2019
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Renellys Perez, Oceanographer, (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBA

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Title: Lessons learned from the 2017-18 hurricane seasons and what lies ahead?
Presenter(s): Roberto Garcia, San Juan Puerto Rico Weather Forecast Office, NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 7 June 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Lessons learned from the 2017-18 hurricane seasons and what lies ahead?

Presentation will be in Spanish

Presenter(s):
Roberto Garcia, San Juan Puerto Rico Weather Forecast Office, NOAA's National Weather Service

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Southeast and Caribbean Regional Collaboration Team (SECART). Point of contact is Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov

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10 June 2019

Title: Impact of propagating sea level anomaly features on the AMOC
Presenter(s): Dr. Cyril Germineaud, Postdoctoral Fellow, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 10 June 2019
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Cyril Germineaud, Postdoctoral Fellow, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBA

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Title: Predicting Pacific Albacore Distribution Changes Using Predator-Prey Relationships
Presenter(s): Stephanie Green, University of Alberta; Larry Crowder, Stanford University; Elliott Hazen, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center; Steven Bograd, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center; Michael Jacox, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center; and Natasha Hardy, University of Alberta
Date & Time: 10 June 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

The research team for this project consists of:
• Dr. Stephanie Green, University of Alberta
• Dr. Larry Crowder, Stanford University
• Dr. Elliott Hazen, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center
• Dr. Steven Bograd, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center
• Dr. Michael Jacox, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center
• Dr. Natasha Hardy, University of Alberta

Sponsor(s):
Lenfest Ocean Program. Contact Willy Goldsmith, Senior Associate, Lenfest Ocean program, at wgoldsmith@lenfestocean.org.


Abstract:
Climate change is already driving marine organisms into cooler waters, which could have major implications for coastal communities and ocean resource managers. To help prepare for population shifts, several studies have projected the future abundance and distribution of various species, primarily based on predicted water temperature. A new research project supported by the Lenfest Ocean Program aims to build on these projections by accounting for a critical missing factor: predator-prey relationships. The research team"led by Stephanie Green of the University of Alberta and Larry Crowder of Stanford University"will develop a new modeling method and apply it to albacore tuna. The project aims to inform the ongoing renegotiation of the U.S.-Canada Albacore Treaty, which governs how the two nations share the catch of this important species. Download the fact sheet to learn more about the project

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11 June 2019

Title: Observing System Experiments for the 2017 and 2018 Atlantic hurricane seasons.
Presenter(s): Dr. George Halliwell, Oceanographer, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 11 June 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. George Halliwell, Oceanographer, (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBA

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Title: How to Inventory the Environmental Waters of the World, One Atom at a Time
Presenter(s): Timothy Bromage, New York University College of Dentistry
Date & Time: 11 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Timothy G. Bromage, New York University College of Dentistry

Abstract:
Given the importance of water to all life, it is astonishing that no systematic research has ever been undertaken on absolute element concentrations across the breadth of the chemical periodic table in any environmental water. Recently simultaneous-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (si-ICP-MS) has been developed to measure the full relevant inorganic mass spectrum, which includes 71 of 90 elements from lithium (3rd element) to uranium (92nd element) with as little as 1 mL per fluid sample, in seconds, and at relatively low cost. This universal capacity to “fingerprint” water far more cheaply and at higher sensitivities than conventional methods will enable any individual or state or federal agency to detect trends in their environment and to find solutions to predicaments before they become hardened into resilient complex systems.

Bio(s):
Timothy G. Bromage directs NYU's Isotope Facility, employing currently the one of only six si-ICP-MS instruments in the US. Using his Max Planck Prize in Life Science, he developed the method to allow si-ICP-MS to quantify the complete relevant inorganic spectrum.

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Title: Two Talks: Urban Carbon & Cows, Dirt, Smoke, Water: A State of the Carbon Story
Presenter(s): Kevin Gurney, Northern Arizona University and Gyami Shrestha, Director, U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office, U.S. Global Change Research Program
Date & Time: 11 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or for NOAA SIlver Spring folks, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

'Cows, Dirt, Smoke, Water, Human Settlements: A State of the Carbon Story' with two talks:
1. Urban Carbon
2. Gyami Shrestha: ‘Cows, Dirt, Smoke, Water: A State of the Carbon Story'
Seminar 16 in the Series, "From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle (SOCCR2) Seminar Series". We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - June 11

Presenter(s):

Kevin Gurney, Professor, School of Informatics, Computing and Cyber Systems, Northern Arizona University and
Gyami Shrestha, Director, U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program and UCAR CPAESS

Sponsor(s):

U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha, & Tracy Gill.

Abstracts:
Talk 1: Kevin Gurney will present an overview of the SOCCR2 chapter 4: “Understanding Urban Carbon Fluxes” and take a deeper dive into aspects of the urban carbon cycle related to quantification of fluxes, atmospheric monitoring, and urban-scale inverse modeling. Together, these elements are being conceived of as a potential greenhouse gas flux information system for cities. He will also provide a description of new and continuing efforts at the national and international scales focusing on the urban carbon cycle and how new monitoring and modeling efforts are attempting to meet stakeholder needs both domestically and globally.

Talk 2: What role do cows, dirt, smoke and water play in the carbon cycle? Through a biographic narrative, the speaker will explore this question, providing an overview of the related research needs and future outlook focused on carbon management, based on the decadal Second State of Carbon Cycle Report and other related scientific publications. This talk wraps up the Spring 2019 Joint U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program -NOAA webinar series ‘From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle'.

Bio(s):

Kevin Gurney: Kevin Gurney is an Atmospheric Scientist, Ecologist and Policy expert currently working in the areas of carbon cycle science, climate science, and climate science policy at Northern Arizona University where he is a Professor in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Cyber Systems. He has degrees from UC Berkeley, MIT, and Colorado State University. Gurney's current research involves simulation of the global carbon cycle using the inverse approach, linkages between terrestrial carbon exchange and climate variability, and deforestation and carbon/climate feedbacks. Most recently, he has worked on research characterizing fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the global (“FFDAS”), national (“Vulcan”) and urban (“Hestia”) scales. Using data mining and innovative algorithms, these greenhouse gas quantification efforts are being used by analysts, scientists, and governments and are a core component of the NASA-led Carbon Monitoring System. The urban work, in particular, is anchoring new efforts at NASA and the National Institute for Standards and Technology to develop urban-focussed carbon monitoring and modeling. Gurney is an IPCC lead author, an NSF CAREER award recipient, Sigma Xi Young Scientist recipient, a Fulbright scholar, and has published over 120 peer-reviewed scientific articles with multiple papers in Nature and Science and a book from MIT Press, Mending the Ozone Hole.

Dr. Gyami Shrestha, directs the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office activities for the Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group (CCIWG), one of the longest running U.S. interagency global change research partnerships. Recent accomplishments include a decadal assessment, the Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report, which she co-led as Lead Development Advisor and Manager with a 200+ multinational team, also serving as a lead editor, lead author and contributor on multiple chapters over a three-year period. Interfacing with scientists and funders, Gyami supports, conceptualizes, co-leads and executes carbon and climate change-focused community and interagency U.S. Government programs and activities, as part of her domestic and international portfolios to help catalyze coordinated scientific advances and strategies. Prior to joining the Program in 2011, she accumulated over 10 years of direct research, management and consulting experience in academia, NGOs and INGOs. She recruited and managed research proposal review panels for King Abdullah City for Science and Technology (KACST) via the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences (AAAS). As Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, Gyami contributed to research, writing and review panel recruitment to finalize the landmark America's Climate Choices Advancing the Science of Climate Change Report. Previously, Gyami led research on pyrolyzed/black carbon, carbon sequestration, grazing land management, surface coal mine land reclamation & restoration in Western U.S.. In Nepal, she conducted stakeholder analysis and decision-support tool development for rainwater harvesting, improved cookstoves and gender mainstreaming via participatory tech transfer and South Asian energy, water, and gender regional organizations' network building in collaboration with UNEP, ENERGIA and the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD). Gyami holds graduate degrees in Environmental Systems (incl. Air Quality and Health Training), Soil Science, Water Resources and Restoration Ecology, and has served on Advisory Boards of the University of California and the Nepalese Children's Education Fund. Gyami has just been inducted in the 2019-2020 Senior Executive Development Program of the American Asian Government Executives Network.

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Title: Protecting Blue Whales and Blue Skies - Vessel Speed Reduction in California
Presenter(s): Jessica Morten, Resource Protection Specialist, contractor to NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary & Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary through the Greater Farallones Association
Date & Time: 11 June 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jessica Morten, Resource Protection Specialist, contractor to NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary & Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary through the Greater Farallones Association

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Abstract:
California's nutrient-rich coastal waters are home to several species of large whales, including gray whales and endangered blue, humpback, and fin whales. The state is also home to four major shipping ports - San Diego, Long Beach, Los Angeles, and Oakland - that result in thousands of large container and tanker transits taking place within California national marine sanctuary waters. In the past decade, over 10 whale fatalities have been recorded along the California coast as a result of ship and whale collisions, and recent research suggests that many more of these ship strikes are going undetected each year. To address this global issue, learn more about how west coast national marine sanctuaries have been working with a number of partners to better understand the issue of ship strikes and slow vessels down to reduce harmful air emissions and protect endangered whales.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

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12 June 2019

Title: U.S. Fishery Disasters:  Trends, Causes, and Impacts of Pacific Salmon Declines on Native American Communities
Presenter(s): Kim Marshall, NOAA/NMFS
Date & Time: 12 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Kimberly Marshall, Biologist, NOAA/NMFS

Abstract:
This study used NOAA Fisheries data on fishery disasters to analyze trends from 1989-2017. The cost of fishery disasters was found to be ~$1.4B. 255 disasters were observed with the greatest impacts being along the Pacific coast (53%). Statistically significant increases in disasters were observed for inland Pacific salmon and Native American communities. When the causes of disasters were investigated, it was found that 1) the top 20% of causes were El Niño, high ocean water temperatures, disease, drought, and flooding, suggesting climate extremes & climate change likely play a significant role; 2) conditions causing disasters are persisting; 3) hurricanes are persisting; 4) 36% of the causes are recent: changing climate, extreme weather event, habitat loss, poor freshwater quality, predation, unfavorable ocean conditions, and positive Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO); and 5) certain causes, e.g., urban development, dams/hydroelectric power, were cited during interviews with tribal members.

Bio(s):
Kim is the Fishery Disasters Lead for NOAA Fisheries. She also served on the Restoration Planning Leadership Team for the NOAA Restoration Center developing habitat restoration projects in the Gulf of Mexico to restore natural resources harmed from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and was instrumental in securing $8 million in RESTORE Act funding to implement a Gulf Conservation Corps to restore habitat while investing in local communities. Kim's doctoral research on the Trends in Fishery Disasters and Impacts of the Declines in Pacific Salmon on Native American Tribes was awarded the Dissertation Award for Greatest Impact on the Study of Environmental Science and Public Policy from George Mason University. Kim loves the outdoors and lives in Maryland with her husband and two children.

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Title: Rigorously Valuing the Role of US Coral Reefs in Coastal Hazard Risk Reduction
Presenter(s): Curt Storlazzi, PhD, Research Geologist. US Geological Survey, Coastal and Marine Hazards and Resources Program.
Date & Time: 12 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

Rigorously Valuing the Role of US Coral Reefs in Coastal Hazard Risk Reduction

Presenter(s):

Curt Storlazzi, PhD. Research Geologist. US Geological Survey, Coastal and Marine Hazards and Resources Program. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov


Abstract:
The degradation of coastal habitats, particularly coral reefs, raises risks by increasing the exposure of coastal communities to flooding hazards. The protective services of these natural defenses are not assessed in the same rigorous economic terms as artificial defenses, such as seawalls, and therefore often are not considered in decision making. Here we combine engineering, ecologic, geospatial, social, and economic tools to provide a rigorous valuation of the coastal protection benefits of all populated U.S. coral reefs in the States of Hawaii and Florida, the Territories of Guam, American Samoa, Puerto Rico, and Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. We follow risk-based valuation approaches to map flood zones at 10-square-meter resolution along all 3,100+ kilometers of U.S. reef-lined shorelines for different storm probabilities that account for the effect of coral reefs in reducing coastal flooding. We quantify the coastal flood risk reduction benefits provided by coral reefs using the latest information from the U.S. Census Bureau, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and Bureau of Economic Analysis for return-interval storm events and in terms of their annual expected benefits, a measure of the annual protection provided by coral reefs. Based on these results, the annual value of flood risk reduction provided by U.S. coral reefs is more than 18,000 lives and $1.805 billion in 2010 U.S. dollars. These data provide stakeholders and decision makers with spatially explicit, rigorous valuation of how, where, and when U.S. coral reefs provide critical coastal storm flood reduction benefits. The overall goal is to ultimately reduce the risk to, and increase the resiliency of U.S. coastal communities.

Bio(s):

Curt Storlazzi is the Chief Scientist of the USGS Coral Reef Project and leads a research team of 13 scientists that examines the geologic and oceanographic processes that affect the sustainability of US coral reefs and reef-lined coasts, authoring more than 140 scientific papers, reports, and book chapters on these topics. He received his BSc from the University of Delaware in 1996, his PhD from the University of California at Santa Cruz in 2000, and has been a research geologist in the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program since 2003. His research focuses on the quantitative study of hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and geomorphology in coastal and marine environments across the Pacific, Atlantic, Arctic, and Indian Oceans. Curt is on the steering committee for the US Coral Reef Task Force and regularly contributes scientific review for the US Global Change Research Program, NOAA's National Marine Sanctuary Program, the National Park Service, the USFWS Landscape Change Cooperatives, and the USGS Climate Science Centers.

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Title: Geostationary Satellite Improvements for Better Viewing of Alaska and Surrounding Areas
Presenter(s): Tim Schmit, Research Satellite Meteorologist, NOAA NESDIS STAR at the University of Wisconsin
Date & Time: 12 June 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tim Schmit, Research Satellite Meteorologist NOAA NESDIS STAR at the University of Wisconsin

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium:. Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and NOAA CPO RISA Program

Abstract:
There have been many recent changes to better observe Alaska from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) perspective. The most significant change was on February 12, 2019 when GOES-17 became NOAA's operational West geostationary satellite. The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) has spectral bands covering the visible, near-infrared and infrared portions of the electro-magnetic spectrum. The ABI represents a major improvement from the legacy GOES imagers for many attributes, such as those relating to: spectral, spatial, temporal, radiometric, and image navigation/registration. An on-board cooling issue associated with the Loop Heat Pipe on GOES-17 causes degradation for certain periods of the year, at certain times, mostly at night. The affected spectral bands are those with wavelengths greater than 4 micrometers with effects that start with biasing, striping, banding, and ultimately complete saturation for the most affected bands. In order to mitigate the impacts of this issue, improvements to the calibration procedures are improving the image quality before and after saturation occurs. These improvements include a modification to the ABI timeline in the 10-min Full Disk flex mode, predictive calibration, and other changes. Once a spectral band is saturated, there is little that can be done to better calibrate the data. The current status of Level 2 or derived products, such as cloud heights or atmospheric motion vectors, from the GOES-17 ABI will also be covered.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

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Title: Communication, Collaboration, & Transparency: Tailoring ecosystem science to inform fisheries management
Presenter(s): Elizabeth Siddon - NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Science Center and Co-Authors: Stephani Zador & Martin Dorn - NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Science Center
Date & Time: 12 June 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or in NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC #3, 1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD. USA
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Communication, collaboration, and transparency: Tailoring ecosystem science to inform fisheries management

Presenter(s):

Elizabeth Siddon - NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Science Center
Co-Authors: Stephani Zador & Martin Dorn - NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Science Center

Sponsor(s):

NOAA Office of Science and Technology and NOAA's Central Library, Point of Contact: Peg.Brady@noaa.gov

Overview:
Ecosystem information is essential to U.S. federal fisheries managers that are charged with setting fisheries quotas. The ecosystem information is comprised of indicators such as physical and biological parameters that track and document changes in the ecosystem. To be effective the ecosystem information needs to be timely and at relevant spatial scales to be valuable to the decision-making process. The indicators are synthesized into an assessment within the Ecosystem Status Reports that are presented to managers annually. This information is shared immediately preceding the individual stock assessment reviews and the determination of quota recommendations, providing contextual information and operationalizing ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM).

Communication, collaboration, and transparency are integral components of this information sharing effort. Regular communication among scientists, managers, and fisheries practitioners enables information to be tailored to specific needs through iterative conversations. Collaboration and transparency are vital to ensuring a level of trust within the fisheries management system among all stakeholders.

Our presentation will focus on best practices, as well as new products we are implementing in order to improve trust, understanding, and engagement in the fisheries quota-setting process in Alaska.

About our

Presenter(s):

Elizabeth Siddon is a Fisheries Research Biologist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries, in Juneau, AK. She holds a MS and PhD in Fisheries from the University of Alaska Fairbanks. She leads the Eastern Bering Sea assessment for the Ecosystem Monitoring and Assessment Program and is also the lead for the Eastern Bering Sea Ecosystem Status Report. She is also co-founder of SouthEast Exchange, a community partnership between STEM professionals and the Juneau School District with the goal of bringing place-based science into classrooms.

About our Co-Authors:
Stephani Zador has been leading the development and production of Alaska's ecosystem status reports (ESR) since 2009. She recently moved to a new position as a deputy division director at the AFSC, but will continue to be involved with ESRs and providing ecosystem science to federal fisheries managers. She received her PhD at the Univ. of Washington in Aquatic and Fisheries Science and her MS at the University of Washington in Wildlife Science. Prior to graduate school, she worked for 7 years as a seabird biologist, primarily in Alaska, but also California and Antarctica.

Martin Dorn is a Fisheries Research Biologist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries, in Seattle, USA. He holds a M.Sc. in Biomathematics and a Ph.D. in Fisheries from the University of Washington. His current research focuses on modeling the effect of predation and climate change on the population dynamics of marine resources. Martin leads the stock assessment team for walleye pollock in the Gulf of Alaska. He is presently Co-Chair of Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Plan Team and is an Affiliate Associate Professor at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington, Seattle.

Save the Date: The next seminar in our series is set for Wednesday, July 10th, 2019 (same time).
Please share this announcement and the attached flyer with your colleagues.

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Title: There is no I in EAFM: Adapting Integrated Ecosystem Assessment for Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas NMFS/NEFSC
Date & Time: 12 June 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Gaichas, Biologist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Resource managers worldwide are being asked to consider the ecosystem while making management decisions. However, it can be difficult to change management systems accustomed to evaluating a constrained set of objectives, often on a species-by-species basis. Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) provides a flexible framework for addressing ecosystem considerations in decision making. IEA was adapted to address species, fleet, habitat, and climate interactions by the US Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) as part of their Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management (EAFM) in 2016. The Council's EAFM framework uses risk assessment as a first step to prioritize combinations of managed species, fleets, and ecosystem interactions for consideration. Second, a conceptual model is developed identifying key environmental, ecological, social, economic, and management linkages for a high-priority fishery. Third, quantitative modeling addressing Council-specified questions and based on interactions identified in the conceptual model is applied to evaluate alternative management strategies that best balance management objectives. As strategies are implemented, outcomes are monitored and the process is adjusted, and/or another priority identified in risk assessment can be addressed. The Council completed an initial EAFM risk assessment in 2017. First, the Council identified a range of ecological, social, and management objectives or risk elements. All objectives/risk elements were evaluated with ecosystem indicators using risk assessment criteria developed by the Council. In 2018, the Council identified summer flounder as a high risk fishery and is now finalizing an EAFM conceptual model. Annual ecosystem reporting updates ecosystem indicators and the risk assessment. The Council's rapid progress in implementing EAFM resulted from positive collaboration between managers, stakeholders, and scientists. Collaboration is essential to IEA and to the success of EAFM.

Bio(s):
Dr. Sarah Gaichas has been a Research Fishery Biologist with the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch at the NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA since September 2011. She is a member of the Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee, has been active in ecosystem reporting and management strategy evaluation for both the Mid-Atlantic and New England Fishery Management Councils. Sarah's primary research is on integrated ecosystem assessment, management strategy evaluation, and ecosystem modeling. Her duties include developing, testing, and using ecosystem data, indicators, and models in natural resource management, and simulation testing management strategies (including analytical tools) that address the needs of diverse ecosystem users. Sarah previously worked at the NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA from 1997-2011 as an observer program analyst, a stock assessment scientist, and an ecosystem modeler. Sarah earned her Ph.D. from the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science in 2006, her M.S from the College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 1997, and her B.A. in English Literature from Swarthmore College in 1991.

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13 June 2019

Title: Finding Meteotsunamis: A Signal in the Noise of NOAA Tide Gauges
Presenter(s): Greg Dusek, PhD, Senior Scientist, NOAA/NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services
Date & Time: 13 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Finding Meteotsunamis: A Signal in the Noise of NOAA Tide Gauges

Presenter(s):
Greg Dusek, PhD, Senior Scientist, NOAA/NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). Presenting at NOAA in SIlver Spring, SSMC4, Room 8150.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Meteotsunamis are atmospherically forced ocean waves with characteristics similar to seismic tsunamis. Roughly 25 of these weather-driven tsunami waves arrive on the shores of the U.S. East Coast each year, but until recently little was known about when or where they occur and what kind of risk they pose. This seminar discusses recently published research describing a climatology of meteotsunamis along the U.S. East Coast from 1996-2017. The meteotsunami signals were discovered through an analysis of what is often considered the less important “noise” of NOAA tide gauges - wave oscillations of under 2 hours. We found that although meteotsunamis are fairly common, the vast majority of them are quite small (~95% are under 2 feet). Larger waves occur on average about once a year and are associated with a range of weather events including summertime thunderstorms, tropical storms and nor'easters. Tide gauges along the open coast observed the most frequent events, including more than five events per year at Atlantic City, NJ, Duck, NC, and Myrtle Beach, SC. The largest waves were observed by gauges in estuaries that amplified the meteotsunami signal, such as those in Providence, RI and Port Canaveral, FL. This work helps to better understand meteorological conditions which force more impactful waves and supports ongoing NOAA efforts to warn on the detection of potentially hazardous events.

Bio(s):
Greg is a physical oceanographer and the Chief Scientist for the NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). His research focuses on coastal oceanographic product development through the intersection of data science with coastal hazards. Greg has been at CO-OPS for nearly 8 years. Prior to serving as Chief Scientist, Greg was an oceanographer on the currents team where he led a range of physical oceanographic projects. Notable projects include a large-scale, multi-year current survey of Puget Sound where over 130 current profilers were deployed; the development of a High Frequency Radar Surface Current web product; and the creation and operationalization of a rip current forecast model. Prior to joining NOAA, Greg completed his PhD in physical oceanography at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill where he studied coastal processes and rip currents.

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Title: Physiological stress in the smalltooth sawfish: effects of ontogeny, capture method, and habitat quality
Presenter(s): Bianca Prohaska, OAR/IA
Date & Time: 13 June 2019
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Bianca Prohaska, OAR International Activities

Sponsor(s):
Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Hollis Jones (hollis.jones@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
We examined basic stress physiology over ontogeny and as a function of capture using different fishing gears. We also examined stress parameters to test whether degraded habitat and water quality from altered habitats may have resulted in chronic stress in juveniles. Results suggested that the stress response to capture by all methods was low, particularly for blood lactate, compared to other elasmobranchs examined to date. Overall, the low physiological stress responses to all capture methods investigated in this study suggest that this species is resilient, which should promote optimism for recovery of the population.

About the speaker: Bianca earned a Bachelor's in Science in biology and marine biology from Florida Institute of Technology, a Master's of Science in marine science from the University of New England, and a Doctorate of Philosophy in ecology and evolution from Florida State University. Her main research interests lie in studying the physiological ecology of elasmobranchs (sharks, skates and rays), so that the results can be applied to management and conservation.

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Title: Let me put a bug in your ear: what NOAA should know about insects
Presenter(s): Audrey Maran, OAR/NSGO
Date & Time: 13 June 2019
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Audrey Maran, Science Communication Specialist, OAR/National Sea Grant Office

Sponsor(s):
Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Hollis Jones (hollis.jones@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
From weather and climate to ocean coasts and fisheries, insects impact NOAA science and information sharing. Tune in to learn more about how insects can have surprising and sometimes even profound impacts on oceanic and atmospheric research

About the speaker: Audrey Maran is a Biological Sciences PhD candidate at Bowling Green State University. Her research has centered around insect ecology in a human-impacted world. Her specific research topics have included insects and carbon cycling under climate change, insects and nutrient cycling in agricultural soil, and insect interactions in urban prairies. Before pursuing her Master's degree, and now PhD, Audrey received her undergraduate degree in High School Life and Earth Science Education from Bowling Green State University. During her undergraduate senior year she was asked to volunteer in a professor's lab, where she fell in love with the process of science, aquatic insects, and the terrestrial-aquatic interface.

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Title: Physiological and reproductive repercussions of consecutive summer bleaching events of the threatened Caribbean coral Orbicella faveolata
Presenter(s): Erica Towle, CRCP's National Coral Reef Monitoring Program Coordinator
Date & Time: 13 June 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ: SSMC4 Large Conference Room - Rm 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Erica Towle, CRCP's National Coral Reef Monitoring Program Coordinator

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Coral Collaboration Seminar. POC: Robin Garcia (robin.garcia@noaa.gov)
Communications Director, NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program

Abstract:
Thermal stress is a major contributor to loss of coral cover, significantly impacting reefs during the third global bleaching event between 2014 and 2017. The long term persistence of coral reefs depends on acclimatization and adaptation to changing climate, which are influenced greatly by the interactions between bleaching and reproductive success. We observed a genotypically diverse population of Orbicella faveolata before, during, and after consecutive bleaching events in 2014 and 2015 in the Florida Keys. We documented less bleaching during the second event despite 40% more time above local bleaching thresholds and an association between bleaching severity and subsequent spawning. Approximately 75% of colonies experienced the same or less severe bleaching in the second event despite being metabolically compromised, with a substantial minority ( ~35%) faring better in the second event. The second bleaching event also resulted in smaller decreases in chlorophyll content per symbiont cell and symbiont-to-host cell ratio reef-wide, representing less damage to the coral"algal symbiosis. All colonies that recovered quickly (~1 month) or did not bleach in 2014 released gametes in 2015, while only 60% of colonies that 30 recovered more slowly did. Bleaching also impacted the amount of gametes released, with more severe bleaching significantly associated with gamete release from <50% of the colony surface area. Bleaching and spawning outcomes were supported by dynamic physiological changes during bleaching and recovery. Lipid concentration and symbiont-to-host cell ratios collected from the bottom edge of the colony in the middle of the recovery period (February and April) were most important for predicting spawning the following year, highlighting the dynamic interaction between micro-habitats and time in recovery and gametogenesis. This study finds signals of physiological acclimatization in an important reef-building coral and underscores the importance of recovery post-bleaching and reproduction for the persistence of coral reefs.

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14 June 2019

Title: Note New Time - The Nature Conservancy: From science to impact
Presenter(s): Dr. Hugh Possingham, The Nature Conservancy
Date & Time: 14 June 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Silver Spring SSMC3 - 14836; Gotowebinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

PLEASE NOTE THE TIME CHANGE TO 1pm ET!

Presenter(s):
Dr. Hugh Possingham, The Nature Conservancy

Sponsor(s):
NMFS DSCRTP; POC: heather.coleman@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register for this webinar at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3384346667423511053
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.
Call +1(631) 992-3221 or use computer audio.

Abstract:
In this talk, I will discuss some of the innovative science and conservation mechanisms The Nature Conservancy uses. TNC co-authors over 320 Web of Science listed peer reviewed papers a year (up from 30 twenty years ago). Major scientific partners include US federal agencies, University of Queensland, Stanford, Minnesota, Cornell, Columbia, Yale, Oxford, etc. New science is required to both develop the strategies for action on the ground and evaluate the performance of existing strategies. Examples include (1) the science behind valuing natural infrastructure, (2) the science behind choosing the best sites to protect, (3) the science behind enabling development that also allows nature to thrive, and (4) the science behind determining the impact of urban trees on mental and human health. TNC also explores new economic instruments that help to deliver outcomes for nature and people: (1) insurance for natural infrastructure, e.g. coral reefs, (2) Incentive schemes to change behaviour for agricultural practices, and (3) payment schemes for migratory birds.

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17 June 2019

Title: Modeling the Canopy Effect in the Great Lakes Cladophora Model v3
Presenter(s): Dr. Anika Kuczynski, National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research in Christchurch, New Zealand
Date & Time: 17 June 2019
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Anika Kuczynski, National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) in Christchurch, New Zealand

Abstract:
For decades, nutrient-driven nuisance algal growth has wreaked havoc in the lower four Great Lakes. Empirical and mechanistic models have long been used to set open-lake nutrient targets and manage nutrient loads to meet those targets. Although there was some success in mitigating nuisance algal growth, ecosystem perturbations in the last two decades have resulted in a Cladophora resurgence. We offer improvements in the mechanistic Great Lakes Cladophora Model in version 3 (GLCM v3) to better inform management. Like earlier versions (GLCM v1 and v2), the model simulates algal biomass density (g dry mass m-2) and stored (cellular) phosphorus content (P as % dry mass) over the growth period. Earlier versions of the GLCM treated the algal mat as a lumped system, using the logistic growth model with a prescribed maximum biomass density coefficient to simulate the carrying capacity effect. While that approach resulted in a good model fit to biomass observations (normalized root mean square error, NRMSE =17.8%, and percent bias, PBIAS = -11.0%), it was not based on identified ecological mechanisms and empirical specification of the coefficient was undermined by significant intra- and inter-site variability. Two major advances are presented: 1) an improved characterization of the light and temperature response surfaces driving photosynthesis and respiration and 2) a segmented canopy approach for simulating the effect of self-shading (carrying capacity) on growth. In the GLCM v3, biomass accrual is mechanistically governed by light attenuation through the canopy and model agreement with observations improved (NRMSE = 13.6%, PBIAS = -5.7%). The introduced vertical extinction coefficient for light passing through the mat included in GLCM v3 may be directly measured and offers much less freedom as a tuning parameter than the prior approach using a maximum biomass coefficient. The GLCM v3 is a more mechanistic and robust tool than previous versions, designed to aid management of nuisance algal growth.

Bio(s):
Dr. Anika Kuczynski is a water quality modeler at the National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) in Christchurch, New Zealand. She has experience in using and developing field, laboratory, and modeling approaches to inform river and lake management regarding nuisance algal growth. Anika's background is in water quality modeling in the Laurentian Great Lakes and she is interested in mechanistic stream periphyton (attached algae) modeling and nutrient cycling. The focus of Dr. Kuczynski's PhD (in environmental engineering at Michigan Tech) was mechanistic modeling of nuisance Cladophora (filamentous green alga) in the Great Lakes. At NIWA, Anika's focus is on monitoring and modeling periphyton growth in streams, seeking to develop tools that can be applied by regional councils to work toward meeting national water quality standards. She currently leads a team in developing and testing methods using fixed and aerial (drone) red-green-blue and multispectral imagery to monitor stream periphyton cover and biomass. Clients and stakeholders who have received her work include the Northeast Ohio Region Sewer District, the Upstate Freshwater Institute, the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (Canada), the Town of Ajax (Canada), Mercury Ltd. (hydropower company, New Zealand), Environment Canterbury (regional council, New Zealand), and the Ministry of the Environment (New Zealand).

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18 June 2019

Title: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in a Changing Climate: An Overview of the Fourth National Climate Assessment
Presenter(s): Ben DeAngelo, Deputy Director, Climate Program Office, NOAA
Date & Time: 18 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below), or for NOAA Silver Spring staffl SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in a Changing Climate: An Overview of the Fourth National Climate Assessment
Seminar No. 1 in the NCA4/NOAA 11-part Seminar Series: The Fourth National Climate Assessment: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States


MP4 and PDF of the slides are here:
https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars#OneNOAA%20NCA4

Presenter(s):
Ben DeAngelo, Deputy Director, Climate Program Office, NOAA

Sponsor(s):
US Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Katie Reeves & Tracy Gill

Abstract:
The Nation's authoritative assessment of climate impacts, the Fourth National Climate Assessment Vol. II: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States (NCA4 Vol. II) was released in November 2018. The assessment focuses on the ecological, societal, and economic impacts of climate change for ten regions and seventeen topics across the country, and provides examples of local actions being taken to reduce the risks associated with climate change. This presentation will provide an overview of NCA4, including a look at the structure and the summary findings of the report.

Bio(s):
Benjamin DeAngelo has over 20 years of experience bridging science and policy for the stewardship of the global environment. Ben is the Deputy Director of the Climate Program Office within NOAA's research arm, and serves as the U.S. head of delegation for the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP), a working group under the Arctic Council. In addition to his work on 2017's Climate Science Special Report, Ben served on the Federal Steering Committee for Volume II of the Fourth National Climate Assessment, and was an author on Chapter 29 of NCA4: Reducing Risks Through Emissions Mitigation. Prior to starting at NOAA in 2017, Ben was the Deputy Director of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and special assistant for climate change to the President's Science Advisor in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and had a 18-year career at EPA working on climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion.

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Title: How does the recent passage of the Government OPEN Data Act impact NOAA?
Presenter(s): Dr. Ed Kearns, CDO/OCIO
Date & Time: 18 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Ed Kearns, Chief Data Officer; Office of the Chief Information Officer

Abstract:
The Government OPEN Data Act was signed into law in January 2019 as part of the Foundations of Evidence Based Policymaking Act. The implications for NOAA of these new laws that take effect in July 2019 will be discussed, as well as connections to the new Federal Data Strategy and its related Action Plan, and their relationships to NOAA's ongoing data and cloud strategy efforts.

Bio(s):
As NOAA's first Chief Data Officer, Dr. Edward J. Kearns leads the development of strategies and practices for managing NOAA's data as a national asset. Ed is seeking to promote new uses and wider understanding of NOAA's data through new partnerships and technologies, such as the NOAA Big Data Project. As part of the White House's Leveraging Data as a Strategic Asset initiative, he is helping develop the new Federal Data Strategy. Previously, Ed led the Climate Data Record program and data archive and stewardship activities at what is now NCEI; guided Everglades restoration for the National Park Service; and calibrated NASA satellite products and developed integrated ocean observing systems as a professor at the University of Miami. Ed holds degrees in Physical Oceanography from URI/GSO (Ph.D. 1996) as well as Physics and Marine Science from the University of Miami (B.S. 1990).

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Title: Our Warming Planet: Topics in Climate Dynamics
Presenter(s): Randal Koster and Andy Lacis
Date & Time: 18 June 2019
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Randal Koster and Andy Lacis

Seminar sponsor: The Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (a NOAA RISA)

Abstract:

Topics:
  • Soil Moisture in the Climate System by Randal Koster
  • Atmospheric Radiation by Valdar Oinas

These presentations are part of a monthly series hosted by CCRUN, a NOAA RISA Team. The lectures are drawn from the recent book, Our Warming Planet: Topics in Climate Dynamics, published by World Scientific. The series encompasses topics such as natural and anthropogenic climate forcing, climate modeling, radiation, clouds, atmospheric dynamics and storms, hydrology, cryosphere, paleoclimate, sea level rise, agriculture, atmospheric chemistry, and climate change education. The lecture series is for students, teachers, and interested researchers and colleagues around the world to be better able to understand various aspects of climate change.

The book, containing most of the material in this webinar series, can be purchased as an e-book, soft cover, or hard cover copy at the World Scientific Publishing website: https://www.worldscientific.com/worldscibooks/10.1142/10256

Webinars will take place monthly on Tuesdays from 3:00-5:00PM. No purchase of book necessary for viewing the webinar series. All webinars are recorded and made available on the Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast website at http://www.ccrun.org/resources/lectures-in-climate-change/.

Seminar POC for questions: Sean Bath, sean.bath@noaa.gov

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Additional presenters field:

19 June 2019

Title: NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) Boundary Layer Modifications in Pre-Convective Environments
Presenter(s): Jack Dostalek, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University
Date & Time: 19 June 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771, Conference Room S561, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Jack Dostalek, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University

Sponsor(s):
JPSS Science Seminar

Abstract:
The NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System, or NUCAPS, combines satellite measurements of infrared and microwave radiation to provide global operational retrievals of vertical profiles of temperature and water vapor. In particular, NUCAPS retrievals from the SNPP and NOAA-20 polar-orbiting satellites are generated using data from the CrIS and the ATMS instruments. With early afternoon overpasses, the NUCAPS retrievals generated from SNPP and NOAA-20 are well positioned in time to be used by forecasters assessing the pre-storm environment during the spring and summer months. Evaluations of NUCAPS at the Hazardous Weather Testbed's Experimental Warning Program have revealed that NUCAPS can have errors in its low-level temperature and moisture retrievals. These low-level values are critical for severe weather analysis via their use in calculating variables such as Convective Available Potential Energy. A project was therefore begun to combine NUCAPS retrievals with surface data from the Real Time Mesoscale Analysis, split window data from the GOES-16 Advanced Baseline Imager, and a simple mixed layer model to reduce the errors in the low levels and to make the retrieved soundings more reliable for analysis of severe weather potential. The algorithm to make this modification will be presented, largely in the context of its evaluation at the Hazardous Weather Testbed over the last three years.

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20 June 2019

Title: Compact Hyperspectral Infrared Sounding Interferometer (CHISI) - an inexpensive LEO small satellite for Longwave Infrared Sounding
Presenter(s): John Fisher, Brandywine Photonics
Date & Time: 20 June 2019
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
John Fisher, Brandywine Photonics

Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode: 6070416

Slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190620_Fisher.pdf

Abstract:
The MetNet Alliance is currently developing a network of LEO small weather satellite constellations including imagers, upper atmosphere dynamics, microwave, space weather, and Hyperspectral IR Sounding. These small satellites shall provide key commercial weather data to NOAA, Department of Defense agencies, and weather analytics companies. For MetNet, Hyperspectral Infrared Sounding has been identified as one of the top observations needed for improving weather forecasts by providing temperature profiles, moisture profiles, and atmospheric motion vector (AMV) 3D winds. Brandywine's proposed solution is to provide global, high-resolution, hyperspectral infrared (LWIR) sounding data through a constellation of 24-36 small LEO satellites using modified commercial interferometers. A Small Business Innovation Research Phase I contract has been funded by Air Force Research Labs to evaluate the customer interest in CHISI to fill in key gaps in Defense global weather models. This talk will discuss the advantage of small satellites, more recent enabling technologies, and the roadmap to an observational infrared sounding capability.

KEYWORDS: Infrared Sounding, Longwave Infrared, Atmospheric Motion Vectors, 3D Winds, Temperature Sounding, Moisture Sounding, Commercial Data Pilot Program.

Bio(s):
John Fisher is the President and CTO for Brandywine Photonics, whose mission is to “Save Lives and Homes through Better Weather Data.” After working as an optical engineer at the U.S. Naval Research Labs, John founded Brandywine Photonics in 1999 to build his own airborne sensors. His work in oceanography culminated in the delivery of the Hyperspectral Instrument for Coastal Observing (HICO) spectrometer, which operated on the International Space Station from 2010-2015. In 2015, John transitioned Brandywine Photonics to weather satellite payload development, with currently three payloads in early stage development, and one funded for launch in late 2020. John is the Co-Founder of the MetNet Alliance which teams with other payload and data analytics companies in developing lower-cost, higher performance, small weather satellites. He graduated from Penn State with a BS and MS in Electrical Engineering in 1986 and 1987 respectively, with a specialization in optics. John lives in Exton, Pennsylvania with his wife and family, and enjoys camping with his two sons in the Cub Scouts and watching his daughter's ballet recitals.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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