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OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Past 2020 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

8 January 2020

Title: HazAtlas: A Tool for Assessing Facility-Level Climate Risk
Presenter(s): Dr. Sue Kemball-Cook, Principal, Ramboll
Date & Time: 8 January 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar for for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

The MP4 recording of this seminar can be viewed here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pzu7m7xix8b1/
You will need to logon to Adobe Connect as a guest to watch this.

Title:

From HazAtlas: A Tool for Assessing Facility-Level Climate Risk

Presenter(s):
Dr. Sue Kemball-Cook, Principal, Ramboll

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:

HazAtlas: A Tool for Assessing Facility-Level Climate Risk. Public and private sector organizations face increasing pressure from shareholders, lenders, insurers and the public to characterize their current and future risk from climate hazards. The increasing availability of downscaled climate model projections has simplified the determination of asset-level exposure to climate hazards, but exposure estimation is just the first step in quantifying overall climate risk. Climate risk is the expected, annual socio-economic cost of a hazard defined as the product of the annual probability of a hazard multiplied by its consequences, which depend on the exposure, vulnerability and adaptive capacity of the affected people and/or systems. Development of effective climate resiliency strategies requires determination of climate risk so that cost-benefit analysis of potential adaptation measures can be performed. Ramboll is developing HazAtlas, a digital dashboard that assesses risk from climate hazards. The dashboard is designed to help organizations understand how their assets are exposed to climate change and quantify the associated financial risk now and in the future. This allows organizations to prioritize development of adaptation strategies and minimize future damages from the changing climate.

Bio(s):

Dr. Susan Kemball-Cook is a Principal in Ramboll's Novato, CA Office and has been with the firm for 15 years. Sue leads Ramboll's Americas climate change impact assessment team. Her expertise includes climate change impact assessment and global and regional climate modeling. Her recent work includes asset-level and portfolio climate change assessments in the mining, chemical, real estate, hospitality, utility, port and industrial sectors. Sue has performed climate change assessments as part of environmental impact assessments and flood control measure design. She received her undergraduate degree in physics from Yale University and her PhD in atmospheric science from the University of California, Davis. Prior to coming to Ramboll (then ENVIRON), Sue held postdoctoral appointments in climate science at the University of Hawaii and in regional climate modeling at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.


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Title: There is no I in EAFM: Adapting Integrated Ecosystem Assessment for Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas, NMFS/NEFSC
Date & Time: 8 January 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Gaichas, Biologist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) was adapted to address species, fleet, habitat, and climate interactions by the US Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) as part of their Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management (EAFM) in 2016. The Council's EAFM framework uses risk assessment, conceptual modelling, and management strategy evaluation (MSE) in an iterative process. As strategies are implemented, outcomes are monitored and the process is adjusted, and/or another priority identified in risk assessment can be addressed. The Council first completed an EAFM risk assessment in 2017 based on annual ecosystem reporting, identified summer flounder as a high risk fishery in 2018, and finalized an EAFM conceptual model in 2019. MSE is planned for 2020, and annual ecosystem reporting continues to update the risk assessment. The Council's rapid progress in implementing EAFM resulted from positive collaboration between managers, stakeholders, and scientists. Collaboration is essential to IEA and to the success of EAFM.

Bio(s):
Dr. Sarah Gaichas has been a Research Fishery Biologist with the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch at the NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA since September 2011, and worked at the NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA from 1997-2011. She is a member of the Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee, has been active in ecosystem reporting and management strategy evaluation for both the Mid Atlantic and New England Fishery Management Councils. Her primary research is on integrated ecosystem assessment, management strategy evaluation, and ecosystem modeling. Sarah earned her Ph.D. from the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science in 2006, her M.S from the College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 1997, and her B.A. in English Literature from Swarthmore College in 1991.

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Title: Managed Retreat in the Coastal Zone: Relocation as Adaptation
Presenter(s): Dr. Radley Horton, CCRUN-RISA & Columbia University and Anna LoPresti, CCRUN-RISA & Columbia University
Date & Time: 8 January 2020
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Radley Horton (CCRUN-RISA & Center for Climate Systems Research at Columbia University) and Anna LoPresti (CCRUN-RISA & Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University)Seminar sponsor: CCRUN-RISA & OAR/CPO/CSI/RISA program

Abstract:
Sea level rise and coastal flooding will threaten hundreds of millions of people around the globe this century, and trillions of dollars in assets. Managed retreat, the relocation of human and non-human life, assets, and structures inland as a coastal adaptation strategy, will be necessary to address the impacts of climate change. Many people in harm's way are just starting to be ready to talk about managed retreat, even as others have been trying to relocate"with varying levels of success"for decades. More discussions across groups of diverse perspectives are needed if managed retreat is to be implemented equitably and strategically. This presentation will discuss major themes that emerged from a first of its kind conference on managed retreat held at Columbia University in partnership with CCRUN, suggesting possible tools for addressing managed retreat, research directions, and applications outside of the coastal zone. The presenters will then take a closer look at managed retreat in US communities to assess where, how, and why they are considering retreat as an adaptation option.Seminar POC for questions: Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu) or Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov)

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9 January 2020

Title: Green Growth That Works: Natural Capital Policy and Finance Mechanisms from Around the World
Presenter(s): Lisa Mandle, Lead Scientist, Natural Capital Project, Stanford University and Mary Ruckelshaus, Managing Director, Natural Capital Project, Stanford University
Date & Time: 9 January 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar only (see access below). Open to NOAA and non-NOAA people.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

Green Growth That Works: Natural Capital Policy and Finance Mechanisms from Around the World

You can view the webinar recording thru the link below; you will have to login to Adobe Connect as a guest: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pq8rs5iebewb/

Presenter(s):
Lisa Mandle, Lead Scientist, Natural Capital Project, Stanford University and
Mary Ruckelshaus, Managing Director, Natural Capital Project, Stanford University

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:

The dilemma of our times is to figure out how to improve the human condition without destroying nature's. If ecosystems collapse, so eventually will human civilization. One answer is inclusive green growth - the efficient use of natural resources. Inclusive green growth minimizes pollution and strengthens communities against natural disasters while reducing poverty through improved access to health, education, and services. Its genius lies in working with nature rather than against it. Mary Ruckelshaus and Lisa Mandle, both of the Natural Capital Project at Stanford University, share real-world cases studies of pragmatic finance and policy tools that can make investment in natural capital both attractive and commonplace. Drawing from the Natural Capital Project's decade of experience in this area and its recent book Green Growth That Works, they present a range of approaches being successfully used around the globe to conserve and restore earth's ecosystems. They addresses questions such as: How can we channel economic incentives to make conservation and restoration desirable? What approaches have worked best? How can governments, businesses, NGOs, and individuals work together successfully?

Bio(s):
Lisa Mandle is a Lead Scientist with the Natural Capital Project at Stanford University. Her research sheds light on how the environmental impacts of land management and infrastructure development affect ecosystem services, social equity, and human health. Lisa works with governments, multi-lateral development banks, and non-governmental organizations to incorporate this understanding into development decisions, particularly in Latin America and Asia. She led development of guidance for the Inter-American Development Bank on integrating natural capital into road planning and investment, and of a decision-support software tool for biodiversity and ecosystem service offsets in Colombia. Most recently, she is lead editor of the book Green Growth That Works, which provides a practical guide to policy and finance mechanisms from around the world for securing benefits from nature.

Mary Ruckelshaus oversees all work of the Natural Capital Project partnership including strategy, coordination, fundraising, communications, and hiring. She is based in Seattle, WA, where she previously led the Ecosystem Science Program at NOAA's NW Fisheries Science Center. Prior to that, she was an Assistant Professor of biological sciences at The Florida State University (1994-1997). The main focus of her recent work is on developing ecological models including estimates of the flow of environmental services under different management regimes in marine systems worldwide. Ruckelshaus serves on the Science Council of The Nature Conservancy and is a Trustee on its Washington Board, and is a past chair of the Science Advisory Board of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). She was Chief Scientist for the Puget Sound Partnership, a public-private institution charged with achieving recovery of the Puget Sound terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems. Ruckelshaus has a bachelor's degree in human biology from Stanford University, a master's degree in fisheries from the University of Washington, and a doctoral degree in botany, also from Washington.
.

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Title: Rearing strategies for hatchery steelhead to reduce fitness loss and aid recovery of natural populations
Presenter(s): Chris Tatara, Ph.D. Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/NWFSC Environmental and Fisheries Sciences Division
Date & Time: 9 January 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or NOAA NWFSC- Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Chris Tatara, Ph.D.Research Fisheries Biologist,NOAA/NMFS/NWFSC, Environmental and FisheriesSciences Division

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's NWFSC Monster seminars https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/index.cfm

ABSTRACT
Hatchery supplementation programs for steelhead have been implemented throughout the Pacific Northwest to mitigate for stock declines resulting from loss of habitat, overharvest, hydropower development, among other factors. These programs, originally designed to provide harvest opportunity, have expanded their role to include recovery and conservation of threatened and endangered natural populations. Hatchery programs with harvest objectives typically produce smolts after just a single year in culture by using hatchery-origin broodstock with advanced spawn timing, rearing juveniles in warmer water, and feeding high rations to accelerate growth. Programs with a conservation objective must use local natural-origin broodstock to maintain natural spawn timing, minimize fitness loss, and reduce genetic impacts of interbreeding between hatchery- and natural-origin fish. Beyond broodstock sourcing and genetic management considerations, conservation hatcheries may have to alter rearing strategies in order to achieve suitable rates of smoltification upon release. The greatest impediment to producing yearling smolts using natural-origin broodstock is that their natural spawn timing is often several months later than hatchery-origin broodstock. This provides less than a year for growth before release. Conservation hatcheries have recently attempted to resolve this issue by producing age-2 smolts by delaying fry emergence, and slowing juvenile growth using lower water temperatures, and feeding reduced rations. Here we provide evidence from a series of studies conducted at both the laboratory and production hatchery scales to demonstrate that the environmental conditions under which steelhead are reared can profoundly affect a number of important phenotypic traits essential to the success of any hatchery supplementation program. These include outmigration survival, migratory behavior, residualism (failure to smolt), size and age-at-maturity, reproductive behavior and relative reproductive success. Laboratory studies, to date, have made progress on identifying mechanisms of domestication selection and developing a novel flexible rearing strategy for natural-origin hatchery broodstock that is currently being tested at the hatchery scale. Furthermore, we are currently conducting a study to develop guidance for use across a range of broodstock spawning dates and hatchery thermal environments for potential implementation in steelhead hatchery programs throughout the region.

Bio(s):
Chris Tatara's career with NOAA Fisheries began in 1999 at the Santa Rosa, CA office of the Southwest Region. There, he provided scientific support on toxicology and water quality issues in support of NOAA Fisheries regulatory activities under the Endangered Species Act. In 2002, he joined the Hatchery Reform Science program at the NWFSC's Manchester Research Station. Chris earned a B.S. in fisheries biology from the University of California, Davis and a Ph.D. in ecology from the University of Georgia, Athens.

Chris is a member of a research team that investigates the effects of artificial propagation (hatcheries) on natural anadromous salmonid populations. The team designs and conducts experiments to evaluate the ecological and behavioral effects of innovative rearing technologies for anadromous salmonids and recommends solutions for the enhancement, conservation and protection of salmonid fisheries. The team specifically investigates the effects of hatchery-rearing practices on the development of juvenile and adult salmonids, and how rearing practices can be altered to minimize domestication selection and fitness loss.

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14 January 2020

Title: Establishing Meaningful Drought Partnerships with Tribal Nations
Presenter(s): Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Emily Bamford and Marianne Shiple, University of Colorado Boulder Masters of the Environment program; Mark Junker, Sac and Fox Nation
Date & Time: 14 January 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Emily Bamford and Marianne Shiple, University of Colorado Boulder Masters of the Environment program; Mark Junker, Sac and Fox Nation

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System, University of Colorado Boulder Masters of the Environment program

POC: Elizabeth Weight (elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
This webinar will provide an overview of key learnings from a Tribal Drought Engagement Project, conducted in partnership between NIDIS and the University of Colorado Boulder Masters of the Environment program. The Webinar will include key engagement strategies and priorities moving forward.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Elizabeth Weight (elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
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Title: Sea Grant Spotlight: Water Extension Liaison
Presenter(s): Dr. Karen Bareford, Sea Grant Liaison
Date & Time: 14 January 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
National Sea Grant and the NOAA Central Library POC: Hollis Jones (hollis.jones@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s):
Karen Bareford, Ph.D., National Water Extension Liaison
Affiliations: Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant, National Weather Service Office of Water Prediction and the National Water Center, University of Alabama's Alabama Water Institute

Abstract:
Karen will discuss her role as the National Water Extension Liaison and the ongoing work of the National Water Extension Program (NWEP). The NWEP is a new Sea Grant program that links the Sea Grant Network to the National Weather Service and various NOAA line offices to leverage capabilities and strengthen partnerships around the focus of water. The goal of this program is to leverage the Sea Grant Network, along with the NWC and other NOAA water efforts, to facilitate the delivery of resources that will allow communities and organizations to accurately and efficiently make vital short- and long-term planning decisions regarding the safety and security of their citizens and water resources. In addition to information delivery, the NWEP strives to enable multidirectional learning between water information providers and decision makers. This multi-way exchange of information is critical to ensure the necessary information is produced and used to make the most informed decisions possible to help communities prepare for, and become more resilient to, water crises. Karen will provide information about a variety of key program achievements that connect water issues across NOAA.

Bio(s):
Dr. Karen Bareford is the National Water Extension Liaison located at the National Water Center. Dr. Bareford works for the University of Alabama, in conjunction with the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium, and the National Weather Service's Office of Water Prediction. With more than 13-years' experience in coastal and ocean conservation and management, and coastal planning, Karen's work now focuses on ensuring that new and relevant water information and science is provided to communities across the nation. Karen's combination of experience and education enable her unique ability to work across organizational boundaries to provide effective service delivery to address critical water and coastal resource challenges.


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Title: My Personal Leadership Philosophy and Principles: All In, All Good, and All for One
Presenter(s): RDML Tim Gallaudet, PhD, USN Retired. Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Deputy NOAA Administrator
Date & Time: 14 January 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ, Silver Spring, MD, SSMC4 Room 1W611, or via webinar (see below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Seminars are available to the Public via webinar, and NOAA staff can attend in person or via webinar.
To access the video and PDF of the presentation from the seminar, visit: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries
And Look under tab called Past Presentations.

Title:
My Personal Leadership Philosophy and Principles: All In, All Good, and All for One

Presenter(s):
RDML Tim Gallaudet, PhD, USN Retired. Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Deputy NOAA Administrator.

Sponsor(s):
2020 NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series: To provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council. See seminars here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

For questions about the seminars: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov, Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov

Bio(s):
Timothy Gallaudet, Ph.D., was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on October 5, 2017, as the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere for the Department of Commerce, NOAA. Dr. Gallaudet was previously a rear admiral in the U.S. Navy, where his most recent assignment was Oceanographer of the Navy and Commander of the Navy Meteorology and Oceanography Command. During his 32 years of military service, Dr. Gallaudet has had experience in weather and ocean forecasting, hydrographic surveying, developing policy and plans to counter illegal, unregulated and unreported fishing, and assessing the national security impacts of climate change. He has led teams of Navy sailors and civilians performing such diverse functions as overseeing aircraft carrier combat operations, planning and conducting humanitarian assistance and disaster response efforts, assisting Navy SEAL Teams during high visibility counter-terrorism operations, and developing the Navy's annual $52 billion information technology, cyber security and intelligence budget. Dr. Gallaudet holds a bachelor's degree from the U.S. Naval Academy and master's and doctoral degrees from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, all in oceanography. https://www.noaa.gov/our-people/leadership/rdml-tim-gallaudet-phd-usn-ret

Are our seminars recorded? Yes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDFIDJpO710

Slides:
ftp://ftp.library.noaa.gov/BrownBags/NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar


Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Managing National Marine Sanctuaries in a Changing Ocean
Presenter(s): Zachary J. Cannizzo, Ph.D., National Marine Protected Areas Center and NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Fellow through the Sea Grant John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Program
Date & Time: 14 January 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Zachary J. Cannizzo, Ph.D., National Marine Protected Areas Center and NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Fellow through the Sea Grant John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Program

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Abstract:
As a system of nationally significant places managed by NOAA, national marine sanctuaries are directly experiencing climate impacts, and serve as important assets for climate-informed management, science and education. Learn more about how the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries is actively incorporating climate into site management plans, facilities management, science and assessment, and education and outreach. This presentation will discuss how sanctuaries work with partners to use NOAA climate information in management, our role as climate educators, building a network of sentinel sites, and challenges in managing sanctuaries in a changing ocean.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

15 January 2020

Title: Climate Change, Fish Reproduction, and the Shifting Seasonality of the Sea: What will the Future Hold?
Presenter(s): Rebecca G. Asch, Assistant Professor of Fisheries Biology, East Carolina University
Date & Time: 15 January 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar for for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

You can view a recording of this webinar, using Adobe Connect, here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pf8ohv7k8m4m/

Title:

Climate Change, Fish Reproduction, and the Shifting Seasonality of the Sea: What will the Future Hold?

Presenter(s):
Rebecca G. Asch, Assistant Professor of Fisheries Biology, East Carolina University

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:

Substantial interannual variability in marine fish recruitment has been hypothesized to be related in part to whether the timing of fish spawning matches that of seasonal plankton blooms. Environmental processes that control the timing of blooms,such as stratification, may differ from those that influence the timing of fish spawning, such as temperature‐linked reproductive maturation. These different controlling mechanisms could cause the timing of these events to diverge under climate change with negative consequences for fisheries. We use an earth system model to examine the impact of a high‐emissions, climate warming scenario (RCP8.5) on the future spawning time of two classes of temperate, epipelagic fishes: “geographic spawners” whose spawning grounds are defined by fixed geographic features (e.g., rivers,estuaries, reefs) and “environmental spawners” whose spawning grounds move responding to variations in environmental properties, such as temperature. By the century's end, projections of increased stratification cause spring and summer phytoplankton blooms to start 16 days earlier on average (±0.05 days SE)at latitudes >40°N. The temperature-linked phenology (i.e., seasonal timing)of geographic spawners changes at a rate twice as fast as phytoplankton, causing these fishes to spawn before the bloom starts across >85% of this region. “Extreme events,” defined here as seasonal mismatches >30 days that could lead to fish recruitment failure, increase 10‐fold for geographic spawners in many areas under the RCP8.5 scenario. Mismatches between environmental spawners and phytoplankton were smaller and less widespread, although sizable mismatches still emerged in some regions. This indicates that range shifts undertaken by environmental spawners may increase the resiliency of fishes to climate change impacts associated with phenological mismatches, potentially buffering against declines in larval fish survival, recruitment, and fisheries. Model results are supported by empirical evidence from ecosystems with multi-decadal observations of both fish and phytoplankton phenology.

Bio(s):

Rebecca Asch is an Assistant Professor of Fisheries Biology at East Carolina University (ECU).

She is also currently an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellow in Ocean Sciences. Dr. Asch received a B.A. in cultural anthropology from Smith College and a M.S. and Ph.D. in biological oceanography from the University of Rhode Island and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, respectively. Prior to arriving at ECU, Dr. Asch was Postdoctoral Research Associate and Senior Nereus Fellow at Princeton University's Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences. As a fisheries oceanographer, Dr. Asch's research focuses on interactions between fish populations, plankton ecology, and climate change and climate variability.

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16 January 2020

Title: Carbonate Chemistry of Estuaries along a Climatic Gradient
Presenter(s): Xinping Hu, Associate Professor, Dept of Physical and Environmental Sciences, Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi
Date & Time: 16 January 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150, SSMC4 9415 Multimedia Room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

Carbonate Chemistry of Estuaries along a Climatic Gradient
The first seminar in a NOAA seminar series, "Stressed Out by Coastal Acidification".

You can view the MP4 recording here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pv5gb04oukwj/
You will be prompted to enter Adobe Connect as a guest to watch it.

Presenter(s):
Xinping Hu, Associate Professor, Dept of Physical and Environmental Sciences, Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi

Sponsor(s):

Beth Turner, NOAA's National Center for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Erica Ombres, NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program (OAP), and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator Tracy Gill.

Abstract:

Estuaries along the Texas coastline in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico (nwGOM) lie in a climatic gradient with decreasing rainfall and freshwater inflow, the combination of which result in a decreasing freshwater inflow balance of two orders of magnitude from northeast to southwest. Aside from the latitudinal climatic pattern, these freshwater sources also have been experiencing a long-term decline over the past decades, presumably because of increasing demand from population growth as well as expanding agricultural and industrial activities. This presentation will provide an overview of a recent study that examined spatial and temporal distributions of carbonate chemistry in four nwGOM estuaries (Lavaca-Colorado, Guadalupe, Mission-Aransas, and Nueces-Corpus Christi). Our study period (2014-2018) overlapped with various phases of hydrological states, starting from the end of a prolonged drought and going through multiple period of floods and even a major hurricane. The freshwater pulses introduced relative brief periods of low carbonate saturation states, yet these estuaries responded differently because of the vastly different freshwater endmember compositions. Despite all the variations, these estuaries exhibited greater buffer against pH change than the adjacent coastal ocean under most circumstances (except during large freshwater discharge periods). Therefore,careful freshwater management and infrastructure building could benefit both the natural calcifiers and those that will be cultured under the new Texas mariculture initiative.

Bio(s):

Xinping Hu is an associate professor in chemical oceanography at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi (TAMU-CC). His research interests include coastal and estuarine carbon cycle, ocean and estuarine acidification, sediment biogeochemistry, and stable isotope biogeochemistry.His major contributions include the discovery of multidecadal dealkalization and acidification in estuaries of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, theorization of an "estuarine minimum buffer zone", and studies focusing on the acidification issues related to hypoxia. His current research includes examining carbon fluxes and ocean acidification in both estuaries and the coastal ocean, hydrological control on estuarine biogeochemistry, and long-term changes in ocean margin CO2 levels and fluxes. These studies have been funded by NOAA and NSF as well as various state and private funding agencies. Prior to joining TAMU-CC, he received a BS degree in Chemistry from Peking University (China) in 1997, a PhD degree in Oceanography from Old Dominion University in 2007, after which he went to the University of Georgia,first working as a postdoc associate and then an assistant research scientist in the Department of Marine Science, from 2007 to 2012.

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Title: Invasion and restoration at Palmyra Atoll: benthic dynamics associated with the invasive corallimorph, Rhodactis howesii
Presenter(s): Amanda Carter, OAR
Date & Time: 16 January 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Amanda Carter, Congressional Affairs Fellow for NOAA Research

Sponsor(s):
Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Hollis Jones (hollis.jones@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Few studies have documented the spatial and temporal dynamics of highly invasive species in coral reef benthic communities. In this presentation, we will discuss how we quantified the ecological dynamics of invasion by a corallimorph, Rhodactis howesii, at Palmyra Atoll in the central Pacific. We examined the spatial and temporal dynamics of this invasion, and its impact on the benthic community, using a combination of permanent photoquadrats and large-scale photomosaic imagery. Additionally, clearing plots were established and coral fragments were transplanted to provide the basis for a long-term restoration experiment on a reef undergoing invasion.

About the speaker: Amanda has a Masters and Ph.D. from Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, CA. Her graduate research focused on global and local stressors on coral reefs, and their impacts on the spatial, chemical, and microbial ecology of the benthic community. She was fortunate enough to spend the last 8 years working at Palmyra Atoll, one of her favorite places to dive.

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Title: That Fish is Going Places: New stories of migration from chemical tracers in salmon, sawfish, and Amazonian catfish
Presenter(s): Jens Hegg, Ph.D., Post Doc - Lab Manager, University of Idaho, Kennedy LIFE Lab
Date & Time: 16 January 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or NOAA NWFSC- Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Jens Hegg, Ph.D., Post Doc - Lab Manager, University of Idaho, Kennedy LIFE Lab

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's NWFSC Monster seminars
NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website
To contact Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Migration is often an important feature of fish life history. Ecologically these movements can have important implications for the population and mediate ecological processes within and across communities. But migration is not a monolithic process, nor is it solely explainable at the large scale. Migrations are populations of individuals, and processes at the individual and local scales shape life-history decisions that are visible at larger scales. These individual and local processes, the interplay of phenology and environment, shape life-history diversity at the population scale but are driven by local processes. This is especially true for large fish which often make long migrations. However, many of these “megafish” migrations worldwide are poorly understood due to technological or infrastructure limitations. Chemical tracers can be powerful tools to understand long distance fish migration across multiple scales. Using multi-tracer approaches in Snake River Fall Chinook salmon we demonstrate the ability to understand fine-scale movement and life-history information. These approaches, as well, have elucidated migratory life-history diversity at continental scales in Amazonian catfish. Meanwhile, we have advanced the use of alternative hard-parts such as teeth and scales to begin uncovering migratory details in Atlantic tarpon and largetooth sawfish with implications for both ecology and conservation of these imperiled species.

BIOJens Hegg began his career in aquatic ecology as an undergraduate, studying river mussels in the St. Croix River in Minnesota. He is fascinated by the ways that the movement strategies of individual animals affect ecological processes, influencing population size, resilience, and community structure.

Jens received his PhD from the interdisciplinary Water Resources program at the University of Idaho and most recently was a Fulbright Post-Doctoral Fellow studying megafish migration on the Brazilian Amazonian coast. His work includes characterizing life-history diversity in Snake River Fall Chinook salmon in the Snake River, as well as work with migratory Amazonian catfish, sawfish and tarpon.

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21 January 2020

Title: Precision Navigation Socioeconomic Study
Presenter(s): Charles Goodhue, Zach Finn/ERG
Date & Time: 21 January 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 E W Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Charles Goodhue, Senior Economist, and Zach Finn, Economist, ERG

POC: Christine Burns (christine.burns@noaa.gov)

Abstract:

Precision Navigation provides mariners a single data source for all navigational products, rather than mariners accessing disparate data sources to determine the best route when navigating congested waterways. ERG implemented a socio-economic study to 1) identify and prioritize seaports that could most benefit from Precision Navigation, 2) develop methodologies to estimate the benefits of Precision Navigation, and 3) implement those methods at the Port of New York/New Jersey and the Ports of the Lower Mississippi River.

Bio(s):
Charles Goodhue is a Senior Economist and Project Management Professional at Eastern Research Group (ERG). He has managed or supported over two-dozen socio-economic projects for NOAA with a economic focus on the ocean economy and resilience, including work to estimate the size of the ocean economy, value coastal management activities, implement economic impact analyses, and develop and implement methods to value the benefits of adapting to hazards. Zach Finn is an Economist at Eastern Research Group (ERG). He has supported over a half-dozen socio-economic projects for NOAA involving coastal resiliency efforts, natural infrastructure and coral reef habitats, using methods such as conducting surveys, economic valuations, and cost-benefit analyses.

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Title: Tidal Wetland Loss, Restoration, and Fish Response: Tales from the Pacific Coast
Presenter(s): Laura Brophy, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis OR and
Correigh Greene, NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle WA
Date & Time: 21 January 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

You can watch the recording of this seminar here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p32pvbwfy6bg/
but you will likely have to download Flash Player if you want to view it.
Or you can email Tracy Gill and I will send you a link to the mp4 to download.

Title:
Tidal Wetland Loss, Restoration, and Fish Response: Tales from the Pacific Coast
This webinar will be recorded and likely available thru link here, the next day.

Presenter(s):
Laura Brophy, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis OR and
Correigh Greene, NOAA Fisheries,Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle WA

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov. You may email a request for the PDF and/or recording.

Abstract:

Across the world, tidal wetlands have been reduced to a fraction of their historical extent, posing challenges for coastal communities that rely on their ecosystem services and for species that utilize these wetlands during their life cycles. In this talk, we examine these issues through the lens of estuaries in Washington, Oregon, and California. Our recent research produced new elevation-based maps which reveal the historical extent of U.S. West Coast estuaries. We applied these extents in an indirect assessment of wetland loss, which revealed that 85% of West Coast tidal wetlands have been lost since European settlement. Compounding this problem is emerging wetland loss through climate change. Research in Oregon projects the shifting locations and losses of tidal wetlands under six future sea level rise (SLR) scenarios. Losses vary greatly among estuaries, but coastwide there is near-complete upslope displacement of tidal wetlands (and thus near-complete loss of historical tidal wetlands) at 2.5m SLR. Oregon research also shows that some wetland types such as forested tidal swamps have been disproportionately impacted by past land uses, and these wetland types may be particularly vulnerable to current and future stresses such as SLR. This is important to nursery fish species " several studies have demonstrated that abundance and growth opportunities of native fish fauna are tied to wetland conditions. Restoration is an important tool for bringing back lost wetland functions, yet the many efforts across the three states comprise a small fraction of historical loss.Nevertheless, research is demonstrating that estuary restoration benefits fish populations, and that conservation and restoration of a diversity of wetland types is important. Ongoing research is documenting locations and effects of tidal barriers, spatial extent of restored tidal wetlands, and effects of restoration on productivity in fish populations.

Bio(s):
Laura Brophy directs the Estuary Technical Group at the Institute for Applied Ecology in Corvallis, Oregon. For over 20 years, she has conducted field research in U.S. Pacific Northwest estuaries and provided leadership in estuary restoration and conservation science, at scales ranging from on-the-ground restoration projects to the West Coast of the USA. Correigh Greene has been studying fish in estuaries for over 15 years, focusing on species in the Puget Sound region. However, his background isn't entirely fishy; before becoming a research ecologist at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center, he studied lab rats as an undergraduate at Tufts University, owls for his Masters thesis at the University of Michigan, and lizards for his dissertation at UC Davis.

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Title: Transforming Daily Global Climate Model Precipitation Output for use in Hydraulic/Hydrologic Modeling
Presenter(s): Mark Maimone, CDM Smith
Date & Time: 21 January 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar - see details below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mark Maimone, Senior Vice President at CDM Smith

Sponsor(s):
Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast , A NOAA RISA Team

Abstract:

Many municipalities are facing the problem of an aging stormwater collection system that must deal with storm events that more and more often exceed the system's design capacity. This will only be exacerbated by projected impacts of climate change. In order to better incorporate potential changes to precipitation due to climate change in planning and designing stormwater collection system, there is a need for projections of continuous time series at one hour or shorter time steps to support H&H modeling of urban stormwater systems, as well as the development of projected IDF curves that account for climate change in the design of new storm sewers.

An innovative approach was developed by PWD and CDM Smith to transform GCM output into actionable science that can directly inform planning, design and engineering applications for stormwater, CSO and separate sewer systems including hydrologic and hydraulic (H&H) modeling and intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curve development. This approach uses GCM output for current (1995-2015) and future (2080-2100) conditions under Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5) to develop delta change factors that recognize that the percentage change can vary from less than a 5% increase for smaller storms to 20% or more for larger storms. These factors can also vary by season. Having developed these more nuanced factors that relate current rainfall patterns to projected future patterns, they can be used to create plausible future hourly time series suitable for H&H model input.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.rand.org/events/2020/03/05/webinars.html)

Seminar POC for questions: Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu) or Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov)

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Title: Drought Risks and Information Needs of the Outdoor Recreation Industry
Presenter(s): Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Jonah Seifer, Noelle Crowley, Josh King, Rebecca Mace, Carly Doolittle, University of Colorado Boulder Masters of the Environment program; Marca Hagenstad, Circle Economics
Date & Time: 21 January 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Jonah Seifer, Noelle Crowley, Josh King, Rebecca Mace, Carly Doolittle, University of Colorado Boulder Masters of the Environment program; Marca Hagenstad, Circle Economics

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System, University of Colorado Boulder Masters of the Environment program

POC: Elizabeth Weight (elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
This webinar will explore the effects of uncertain snowpack levels, streamflows, and warming temperatures on outdoor recreation businesses with a focus on snow- and water-based activities (skiing, fishing, rafting, etc.).

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Elizabeth Weight (elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov)

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Title: Alaska Garden Helper: Explore local growing conditions under a changing climate
Presenter(s): Nancy Fresco, Network Coordinator, SNAP & Associate Director, CIFAR
Date & Time: 21 January 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Nancy Fresco, Network Coordinator, SNAP & Associate Director, CIFAR

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract:
How is climate change affecting agriculture in Alaska? What might growing seasons look like in the near and distant future, in communities from Utqiagvik to Kodiak, from Gambell to Ketchikan? How cold will “cold” be, in the future? Should you plant tomatoes? Peonies? Apple trees? What do these changes suggest about natural vegetation and ecosystems? A new set of online tools created by the Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning, with funding from the USDA and the Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center, allows you to explore these questions and more.
Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
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22 January 2020

Title: Exploring trends in extreme heat and public response to heat-related forecasts in the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico transboundary region
Presenter(s): Dr. Tamara Wall, Desert Research Institute et al.
Date & Time: 22 January 2020
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 Rm 12836 Large Conference Room or remote access via webinar (details below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Drs. Tamara Wall, Kristin VanderMolen, Ben Hatchett, and Erick Bandala (Desert Research Institute) and Kat Lembrecht (University of Nevada, Reno)

Sponsor(s):
OAR/CPO/CSI's International Research and Applications Program (IRAP)Point of Contact: Lisa Vaughan (lisa.vaughan@noaa.gov)Recording: The seminar will be recorded- if you are unable to join us and would like the link to the recording, please contact Lisa Vaughan.

Abstract:
Exploring trends in extreme heat and public response to heat-related forecasts in the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico transboundary region The frequency of extreme heat and heat waves over the last decades has prompted an increase in heat-related mortality and morbidity, including in parts of the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico transboundary region. This ongoing project explores trends in historical heat extremes and heat-related mortality and morbidity in the border cities of San Diego-Tijuana and Calexico-Mexicali, as well as the reach and effectiveness of heat-health messaging by area National Weather Service Offices (NWS) and public health agencies. In this webinar, we will provide an update on the project, including preliminary results from the historical trend analyses and our evaluations of public values related to heat-related forecasts elicited through NWS Facebook posts, as well as next steps relating to engaging public health agencies and improving the efficacy of long-range forecast messaging.
Note: This work is supported by the NOAA International Research and Applications Project (IRAP). See more at https://www.climate.noaa.gov/IRAP.

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Title: Carbonate Chemistry in Two Semiarid Estuaries: Controls and Correlates
Presenter(s): Melissa McCutcheon, PhD Candidate - Coastal and Marine System Science, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi
Date & Time: 22 January 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

Carbonate Chemistry in Two Semiarid Estuaries: Controls and Correlates
The second seminar in a NOAA seminar series, "Stressed Out by Coastal Acidification".

You may view the recording of this seminar here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pluv3ai51jkd/
You will have to login to Adobe Connect as a guest to watch it.

Presenter(s):
Melissa McCutcheon, PhD Candidate - Coastal and Marine System Science, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

Sponsor(s):

Beth Turner, NOAA's National Center for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Erica Ombres, NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program (OAP), and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator Tracy Gill.

Abstract:
The Nueces and Mission-Aransas Estuaries"both located in thenorthwestern Gulf of Mexico along the Texas coast"are shallow, lagoonal estuaries that receive relatively little freshwater inflow. This presentation will provide an overview of recent studies of the carbonate chemistry in each of these estuaries. In Nueces Estuary, we examined the carbonate system as it relates to the episodic summertime hypoxia formation. While we did find a correlation between hypoxia and acidification, the high buffer capacity of the estuary prevented drastic decline in pH and saturation state of aragonite (ΩAr); hypoxic waters never experienced undersaturation, unlike observations in other estuaries. In the Mission-Aransas estuary, we examined temporal trends in carbonate system parameters using both in situ sensors with continuous observations (lower estuary only) and discrete sample collections (both lower and upper estuary). The diel range in pH at the site in the lower estuary often exceeded the magnitude of average pH decrease that has occurred in the global surface ocean over the last century, and dieland seasonal fluctuations were primarily controlled by temperature, net ecosystem metabolism, and tidal cycles. Discrete monitoring in the upper estuary demonstrated that the seasonal-scale fluctuations in carbonate chemistry are greatest near the river endmember. Despite the established long-term acidification of Texas bays, both studies demonstrate that current carbonate chemistry conditions remain very suitable to sustain calcifiers.

Bio(s):
Melissa McCutcheon is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Coastal and Marine System Science Program at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and works in Dr. Xinping Hu's Carbon Cycle Lab. Her dissertation research examines spatial trends and diel to decadal temporal trends and variability in the carbonate system of the Texas estuaries. Her work focuses on the physical, biological, and geochemical controls on the estuarine carbonate chemistry. She has also dedicated time throughout her degree to the fields of marine policy and science communication and education. Previously, she received a BS degree in Biology from Slippery Rock University in 2013 and an MS degree in Environmental Science from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi in2015"with research focusing on the effect of predators on the calcification, respiration, and carbon cycle contribution of oysters.

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23 January 2020

Title: The Growing World of Citizen Science: A look at how NOAA is harnessing the power of the crowd
Presenter(s): John McLaughlin, Office of Education
Date & Time: 23 January 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Chris Bowser, Education Coordinator, Hudson River Estuary Program and Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve; NYS Water Resource Institute at Cornell University

Amy Fritz, NOAA National Weather Service, Office of Observations, National Cooperative Observer Program Manager

Jennifer Jencks, Director of the IHO Data Centre for Digital Bathymetry, NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information

John McLaughlin (NOAA Citizen Science Co-Coordinator), NOAA Office of Education

Laura Oremland (NOAA Citizen Science Co-Coordinator), NOAA Fisheries Office of Science andTechnology

Gil Compo, University of Colorado CIRES and NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Physical Sciences Division

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of Education and NOAA Central Library. POC: Education Program Manager, John McLaughlin (john.mclaughlin@noaa.gov )

Abstract:
Volunteers have long played a role in advancing scientific research and monitoring, but new tools and methods are rapidly expanding the ways they can participate. The Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science Act of 2016 states citizen science projects “have a number of additional unique benefits, including accelerating scientific research, increasing cost effectiveness to maximize the return on taxpayer dollars, addressing societal needs, providing hands-on learning in STEM, and connecting members of the public directly to Federal science agency missions and to each other”. We will discuss NOAA's approach to citizen science (also known as community science) and look at 4 projects including: 1) Cooperative Observer Program; 2) Crowdsourced Bathymetry; 3) Hudson River Eel Project; and 4) Old Weather. Learn how you can get involved in NOAA's citizen science community whether you are a project manager, a prospective volunteer, or are simply curious.

Bio(s):
Chris Bowser is the Education Coordinator for the Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve. He has served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in West Africa and teaches environmental science at Marist College.Amy Fritz is the new National Cooperative Observer Program manager as of April, 2019. She manages the Cooperative Observer (COOP) program comprised of over 10,000 volunteers at 8100 sites that provided daily meteorological readings, mainly precipitation and temperature, to the U.S. Climate Record.

Jennifer Jencks is the Director of the IHO Data Centre for Digital Bathymetry, which is hosted by NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) in Boulder, Colorado. She leads the NCEI Ocean and Coastal Mapping Team and is actively involved with many national and international seafloor mapping projects.

John McLaughlin is a Program Officer with NOAA's Environmental Literacy Program. He has worked in citizen science since 2002 and serves as a Citizen Science Coordinator for the agency.

Laura Oremland is an Education Program Manager in the NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology. She has worked in citizen science since 2015 with a special focus on incorporated citizen science into fisheries research. Gil Compo is a Senior Research Scientist at the University of Colorado Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Physical Sciences Division. He leads the NOAA-CIRES-DOE 20th Century Reanalysis Project, the global weather reconstruction now spanning 1806 to 2015, and is a co-lead of the Old Weather citizen science project recovering marine weather observations to better understand global weather and its changes since observational records began. Old Weather has involved more than 20,000 people since its inception in 2010.

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Title: Causes and consequences of the great pyrosome bloom in the Northern California Current
Presenter(s): Ric Brouder, Ph.D., Senior Scientist, NOAA/NMFS/NWFSC, Fish Ecology Division
Date & Time: 23 January 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or NOAA NWFSC- Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Ric Brouder, Ph.D., Senior Scientist, NOAA/NMFS/NWFSC, Fish Ecology Division

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's NWFSC Monster seminars

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's NWFSC Monster seminars
NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website
To contact Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

ABSTRACT
Pelagic urochordates (salps and appendicularians) are dominant components of oceanic, low productivity waters globally and have been studied with some regularity in many ecosystems. However, colonial pyrosomes, are generally restricted to oceanic tropical seas and have been far less studied. The subtropical species, Pyrosoma atlanticum, has periodically been sampled off Southern California. With the advent of anomalously warm conditions due to the severe Marine Heatwave in the North Pacific in 2014, P. atlanticum started appearing north of its known latitudinal range in coastal trawl surveys off Oregon and Washington, continuing to increase dramatically for the next four years and becoming the dominant component of pelagic surveys in 2017 and 2018, but retreated to southern waters in 2019. These massive blooms impaired commercial fisheries and washed up on beaches prompting public concerns. Due to the paucity of information on this species outside its normal range, we examined horizontal and vertical distribution, habitat preferences, energy density, diets based on fatty acid and stable isotopic signatures, grazing rates, and utilization by higher trophic levels. Since this tropical invader may become established in this productive temperate ecosystem with predicted future warming of the North Pacific, understanding its ecology and potential impacts to the pelagic and benthic food webs and human utilization may fill critical gaps in our knowledge of the importance hitherto understudied species in this productive ecosystem.

Bio(s):
Dr. Richard Brodeur is a Research Fisheries Oceanographer working in the Fish Ecology Division of the Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries, and is based in Newport, OR. Ric received his B.S. in Fishery Science from the University of Massachusetts, his M.S. in Oceanography from Oregon State University, and his Ph.D. in Fisheries from the University of Washington. Following a postdoctoral position at Pacific Biological Laboratory in Nanaimo, B.C. Canada, he began his career working on early life history and recruitment dynamics of walleye pollock in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea for the Alaska Fisheries Science Center. He returned to Oregon to work on habitat preferences and trophic ecology of juvenile salmon and other fishes as well as recruitment processes in marine fishes. He has focused much of his research on feeding and food web interactions centering on fish. He has had a longstanding interest in gelatinous plankton and particularly in how they interact with both exploited and non-exploited fishes. He has co-organized five sessions at major scientific meetings on jellyfish and was co-chair of the North Pacific Marine Science Organization PICES Jellyfish Blooms Working Group.


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Title: NOAA’s Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program: A Decade of Research for Deep-Sea Conservation
Presenter(s): Tom Hourigan, NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program
Date & Time: 23 January 2020
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 13514 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tom Hourigan - Chief Scientist of the Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program, NOAA Fisheries Office of Habitat Conservation

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology ProgramPoint of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)For audio: Participants can use their computer speakers or call 631-992-3221 followed by passcode 803-874-107.

Abstract:
The United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) established the Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program in 2009 as the first U.S. program dedicated to providing scientific information to inform the management of deep-sea coral ecosystems. The Program focuses on 1) developing alliances and partnerships; 2) conducting 3-4 year regional field research and analysis initiatives on deep-sea biogenic habitats; and 3) creating frameworks for data and information to guide management. In the decade since, our program and partnerships have supported integrated research initiatives and smaller targeted projects in every U.S. region, from the Bering Sea to the U.S. Caribbean, and from New England Seamounts to American Samoa. We have supported advances in predictive habitat modeling, developed the first comprehensive deep-sea coral species list for U.S. waters, and made information from past and new research available through our data portal (deepseacoraldata.noaa.gov). Here we present highlights from this body of research and show how our Program's findings and information have catalyzed U.S. deepwater conservation action. As we enter our second decade, deepwater ecosystems will face new challenges from expanding economic activities in offshore waters and changing ocean conditions. We explore directions that our research, partnerships, and approaches are moving in order to meet these challenges and to better support both national and international marine conservation.

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Title: Engaging Communities in Role-Playing Simulations to Advance Climate Planning
Presenter(s): Maeve Snyder, North Inlet-Winyah Bay NERR and Annie Cox, Wells NERR
Date & Time: 23 January 2020
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Engaging Communities in Role-Playing Simulations to Advance Climate Planning

Presenter(s):
Maeve Snyder, North Inlet-Winyah Bay NERR and Annie Cox, Wells NERR

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html or http://www.nerrssciencecollaborative.org/)

Seminar POCs for questions:
dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

Abstract:
Coastal communities face tough decisions about how to manage flooding risks associated with rising seas and extreme rain events. Two project teams have developed an innovative planning tool that allows community leaders and residents to make sense of local climate projections and experiment with collaborative decision making in a safe environment.

The New England Climate Adaptation Project tested the use of role-play simulations, or “games,” to engage community members in climate adaptation planning. In a structured workshop setting, participants receive background information describing a fictional place - typically with a striking resemblance to their own - and must assume a fictional role in which they work collaboratively to prioritize actions that help the community manage climate risks. Following the framework developed in New England, the Georgetown Climate Adaptation Project produced a customized set of local climate projections and role playing materials for the coastal southeast. In this webinar, presenters will discuss lessons learned from planning and leading simulation workshops in two different coastal regions.

Bio(s):
Maeve Snyder is the Coastal Training Program Coordinator at the North Inlet " Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. In this role, she supports science-based decision making through tools, skills, information, and partnerships. Maeve earned a M.S. in Biological Sciences from the University of South Carolina and a B.S. in Biology from Coastal Carolina University. Maeve has experience in ecological research, including a thesis on climate - driven range shifts of marine organisms. She has also worked in science communication and education throughout the coastal southeast.

Annie Cox is the Coastal Training Coordinator at the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve. She develops and organizes workshops and trainings for professionals working with and making decisions that affect our natural resources. Annie holds a masters in Ecological Design from the Conway School. She became interested in land use planning issues during her Peace Corps service teaching sustainable agriculture and aquaculture in rural Zambia, where she served for two years. Annie's undergraduate degree is in Biology from the University of Maine at Farmington.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminarsrequest@list.woc.noaa.gov with the work 'subscribe'in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA ScienceSeminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Restoration activities planned for mesophotic and deep benthic communities
Presenter(s): Kris Benson, NOAA Fisheries Restoration Center
Date & Time: 23 January 2020
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 13514 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kris Benson - NOAA Fisheries Office of Habitat Conservation, Restoration Center

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology ProgramPoint of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract:
The Deepwater Horizon oil spill caused natural resource injuries in US waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico from Texas to Florida. Federal and state agencies (Trustees) are utilizing funds from a Natural Resources Damage Assessment settlement to restore those natural resources and the services they provide. The Trustees have released a draft restoration plan that includes four proposed projects at an approximate cost of $126 million to help restore mesophotic and deep benthic communities (MDBC) injured by the oil spill. The projects were developed with substantial public input and evaluated against regulatory criteria and Trustee priorities beginning in 2017, by a team of subject matter experts from across the Trustee agencies. The projects comprise an integrated portfolio of activities to be implemented at an unprecedented scope and scale over a 7-8 year period, in an iterative approach to improving understanding of and restoring these communities. The project portfolio encompasses a) mapping, ground-truthing, and predictive habitat modeling; b) habitat assessment and evaluation; c) active management and protection; and d) development of coral propagation techniques. Implementation of the restoration portfolio will substantively advance science supporting restoration, conservation, and management related to MDBC. The emphasis on monitoring and adaptive management in the project recommendations reflects the need for information about these communities to inform or augment efforts at establishing protections and management for them or actively restoring them. The restoration plan incorporates a phased approach to project implementation intended to allow for detailed planning for the large and complex suite of activities as well as engagement with a broad array of entities involved in mesophotic and deep coral restoration and science, to address critical uncertainties and inform adaptive decision-making as the projects develop further and are implemented over time.

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24 January 2020

Title: January 2020 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 24 January 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Room 407, Akasofu Building, University of Alaska Fairbanks or Remote webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract:

The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
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27 January 2020

Title: Use of JPSS and other Polar-Orbiting Satellite Data to Improve Operational Tropical Cyclone Position, Intensity, and Wind Structure Estimates, and Intensity Forecasts
Presenter(s): Galina Chirokova, Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere-CIRA, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
Date & Time: 27 January 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20706, Conference Room S562
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Galina Chirokova, Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA)/ Colorado State University (CSU), Fort Collins, CO

Abstract:
Joint Polar Satellite Systems (JPSS) data can be used to improve operational tropical cyclones (TC) position and intensity estimates, as well as to obtain TC wind structure estimates and improve TC intensity forecasts.CIRA is working on improving existing and developing new TC applications that utilize imagery from JPSS Suomi National Partnership(SNPP) and NOAA-20 Very High-Resolution Infrared Imaging Radiometer (VIIRS) and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), as well as ATMS Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MiRS) temperature and moisture profiles, together with microwave imagery and retrievals from other polar-orbiting satellites,including Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) onboard the NOAA-18/19 andMetOp-A/B; Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) onboard the GCOM-W1, and Global Precipitation Mission(GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI). These TC applications include:1) Operational Hurricane Intensity and Structure Algorithm (HISA) that uses ATMS- and AMSU-MiRS temperature profiles to generate global objective and independent of Dvorak technique estimates of TC intensity and wind structure. 2) Moisture In Flux Storm Tool (MIST) that provides a way to quantitatively estimate and characterize dry air intrusions in TC environment using ATMS- and AMSU-MiRS moisture retrievals, and to evaluate the vertical distribution of dry air,providing information beyond the estimates of Total Precipitable Water (TPW) and water vapor imagery that are commonly used to infer the amount of dry air around TCs. 3) Objective Radius of Maximum Wind (ORMW) application that is under development to objectively and automatically determine RMW from microwave imagery with accuracy similar to or exceeding the accuracy of RMW estimates made by forecasters. 4) Combined VIIRS-DNB-ProxyVisible application that will provide a continuous real-time verification of the CIRA nighttime ProxyVisible imagery, together with the ability to see features not available in ProxyVisible imagery.An overview of the current status of the above applications and the discussion of future plans, including the upcoming demonstration to forecasters, will be presented.

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28 January 2020

Title: A Practical Stochastic Weather Generator for Exploring Variability in Projected Precipitation Time Series
Presenter(s): Mark Maimone, CDM Smith
Date & Time: 28 January 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar - see details below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mark Maimone, Senior Vice President at CDM Smith

Sponsor(s):
Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast , A NOAA RISA Team

Abstract:

In addition to addressing the need for realistic projected future precipitation time series (addressed in last week's webinar), another important aspect of using these projections is to recognize the potential range of natural variability that can be expected associated with these projections. This problem was addressed by developing an innovative and practical approach to creating a stochastic weather generator that utilizes the adjusted future time series to explore potential variability in projected precipitation patterns. The Weather Generator is based on the use of the projected future precipitation time series as a probability set, and represents a simple to implement approach for generating multiple future time series that can both explore the range of future projections, as well as provide rough guidance on the relative probabilities of extreme future time series.

Using the Stochastic Weather Generator to calculate the potential natural variability in precipitation, it can then be used to develop the minimum and maximum IDF curves likely to occur for present and future rainfall patterns, compared to the actual IDF curves produced from local rain gauge data. The importance of the innovative approach presented in this study is that it is both easy to implement, addresses a key challenge with GCM output, and transferable to many areas of the US, addressing the need for actionable climate change information in the field of urban stormwater management.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.rand.org/events/2020/03/05/webinars.html)

Seminar POC for questions: Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu) or Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The Challenges of Observing and Forecasting the Conditions on the Gulf Stream
Presenter(s): Joe Sienkiewicz, Chief, Ocean Applications Branch/Ocean Prediction Center, NWS/NOAA
Date & Time: 28 January 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP, Room 2890
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Joe Sienkiewicz, Chief, Ocean Applications Branch/Ocean Prediction Center, NWS/NOAA

Sponsor(s):
ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER SEMINAR, for more information visit https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

Abstract:
Forecasting and observing hazardous wind and wave conditions in the Gulf Stream continues to be very challenging for the forecast staff of the Ocean Prediction Center. Available observations on the scale of the Gulf Stream current gradients such as winds from scatterometers, wave heights from altimeters, and representative current velocities are extremely limited in time and frequency. In addition, present day numerical guidance does not account for wave, wind, and current interactions. A recent study to quantify the impacts to marine operations using shipboard Automatic Identification System (AIS) tracking data has revealed significant delays and course changes by vessels transiting the Gulf Stream during winter and early spring. With very limited observations, it is assumed that wave conditions due to wind, wave, and current interaction require vessel operators to significantly reduce speed and/or alter course while transiting the Gulf Stream in a variety of conditions. This talk will discuss the impact to vessel operations, the limitations of present day observations and numerical model guidance, and present observational evidence of Gulf Stream impacts to winds and waves.

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29 January 2020

Title: Climate Communication Preferences: Results from Statistical Analyses on a Fisheries Stakeholder Survey
Presenter(s): Zuzanna Abdala, NOAA/OST/NSF Graduate Research Intern
Date & Time: 29 January 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 E W Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: Laura Oremland (laura.oremland@noaa.gov) or Outreach Librarian, Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s):
Zuzanna Abdala, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science & Technology, NSF Graduate Research Intern

Abstract:
The Marine Fisheries Advisory Committee (MAFAC) was tasked with recommending effective communication strategies for key fishery audiences and stakeholders. To obtain this information they issued a climate communications survey to gather input in late 2016. This survey captured a collection of variables, including the stakeholders' affiliations and information preferences regarding (1) type of climate science information, (2) delivery methods, (3) information formats, and (4) trusted experts. Their preferences were analyzed in relation to three main affiliation groups defined by their fisheries involvement. This analysis provides information and recommendations on how fisheries stakeholder groups prefer to receive climate science information.

Bio(s):
Zuzanna Abdala earned her Bachelor's from George Mason University in May 2014 in biology and is currently finishing her Master's in biological oceanography at Old Dominion University as a NSF Graduate Research Fellow and recently defended her research on diatom community composition in California Current System eddies. Earlier this year, she was awarded the NSF Graduate Research Internship, which she has completed in the NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science & Technology and will present the results of her project. Zuzanna is also a 2020 Knauss Fellow, eager to start her placement at the NOAA Fisheries, Office of Habitat Conservation, Restoration Center as a Habitat Science & Policy Analyst.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
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Title: JPSS and GOES Satellite Training and Data Resources for NOAA and non-NOAA Users
Presenter(s): Jorel Torres, Colorado State University
Date & Time: 29 January 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Room 407, Akasofu Building, University of Alaska Fairbanks or Remote Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jorel Torres, Colorado State University (CSU)

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract:

With the influx of new polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites orbiting the globe, a plethora of satellite datasets are available for users to analyze and employ in the operational forecasting environment. But where can users find satellite training resources to learn about polar-orbiting and geostationary product applications? This presentation will explore a comprehensive list of where NOAA and non-NOAA users alike can find JPSS and GOES satellite training resources on-line, via satellite teletraining along with conference workshops. Product applications will also be highlighted, along with links of where non-NOAA users can access satellite datasets and imagery.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

30 January 2020

Title: New Insights into the Complexity of Estuarine Acidification
Presenter(s): Jeremy Testa, Associate Professor, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, Wei-Jun Cai, Professor, University of Delaware, and Ming Li, Professor, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory
Date & Time: 30 January 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar, or for NOAA SIlver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
New Insights into the Complexity of Estuarine Acidification
The third seminar in a seminar series, "Stressed Out by Coastal Acidification".

Here is a link to the recording on Adobe Connect:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p1hiy4sj5tnt/
Login as a guest to view the recording.

Presenter(s):
Jeremy Testa, Associate Professor, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory,

Co-Authors:
Wei-Jun Cai, Professor, University of Delaware, and
Ming Li, Professor, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory

Sponsor(s):

Beth Turner, NOAA's National Center for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Erica Ombres, NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program (OAP), and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator Tracy Gill.

Abstract:

Estuarine acidification has been offered as a concept that links to (and contrasts with) ocean acidification, given that high rates of internal metabolism and associated watershed inputs in estuaries may conspire to drive acidification in excess of that originating from atmospheric CO2. Wecoupled a comprehensive measurement program to retrospective and future model simulations to quantify controls on estuarine acidification in Chesapeake Bay,a large estuarine complex with strong gradients of salinity, oxygen, metabolic rates, and bathymetry. We discovered that estuarine acidification may be even more complex (and interesting!) than originally posited, owing to self-buffering processes within macrophyte communities, connections of acidification rates to watershed management aimed at oxygen improvements, and a varying buffering of acidification through altered carbonate chemistry within freshwater sources. This new understanding presents both challenges and opportunities to managing future acidification along the coast.

Bio(s):
Jeremy Testa is a systems ecologist at the UMCES Chesapeake Biological Laboratory who has used a combination of modeling and empirical approaches to understand coupled watershed-estuarine biogeochemistry and its implications for the management of water quality and living resources in coastal systems.About the Co-Authors:
Wei-Jun Cai is a carbonate chemist specializing in coastal ocean and estuarine biogeochemistry.He has worked extensively worked on CO2 and acidification issues in the South Atlantic Bight, Northern Gulf of Mexico, and more recently the East Coast including the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays.Ming Li is a physical oceanographer at the UMCES Horn Point Lab who develops coupled hydrodynamic-biogeochemical models to understand how climate change and nutrient enrichments affect estuarine and coastal systems.

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Title: Listening to climate data: Using sound and music in science communication
Presenter(s): Judy Twedt, M.S., Doctoral Candidate, University of Washington, Department of Atmospheric Sciences
Date & Time: 30 January 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or NOAA NWFSC- Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Judy Twedt, M.S., Doctoral Candidate, University of Washington, Department of Atmospheric Sciences

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's NWFSC Monster seminars
NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website
To contact Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

ABSTRACT
As environmental scientists in the 21st century, our research often communicates distressing information, whether it's about climate change, ocean acidification, new vulnerabilities of ecosystems, or threats to iconic species like salmon and orcas. Standard information-driven models of science communication " particularly those documenting environmental risks or decline " can leave audiences with cognitive overload or cause disengagement, thus siloing the public value of scientific research. I present experiments in science communication using data sonification " the process of mapping data to sound parameters to musically express and memorialize important climate datasets. I show how, by translating data artfully and with emotional sensitivity, we can increase accessibility and bring more public value to environmental science.

BIO
Judy Twedt has a masters degree in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Washington, and is a PhD Candidate in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program, drawing from the departments of Atmospheric Sciences and Digital and Experimental Arts (DXARTS) in her studies in climate data sonification. A National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, her soundtracks have been aired on NPR, PBS, Canadian Public Broadcasting, NOAA's Science on a Sphere, and live for TEDx Seattle. She is a fifth generation Washingtonian and speaks regularly about climate change for both lay and technical audiences. More information as www.judytwedt.com

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Title: Final Presentations of 2019 CLIMAS Environment and Society Fellows
Presenter(s): Alma Anides Morales et al. see description
Date & Time: 30 January 2020
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: University of Arizona campus or remotely via Zoom (see details below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Alma Anides Morales, Nupur Joshi, Sean Schrag-Toso, and Norma Villagómez-Márquez (University of Arizona)

Sponsor(s):
Climate Assessment for the Southwest, A NOAA RISA Team

Abstract:

Please join us for the final presentations of our 6th cohort of Environment & Society Fellows. Over the past year, each student has delved into interesting and important research questions by developing relationships with community partners locally and around the world. The Fellowship supports projects that connect social or physical sciences, the environment, and decision-making, and is made possible by the University of Arizona's Office of Research, Innovation, & Impact and the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS), a NOAA RISA Team.

Presentations will be held on Thursday, January 30 from 12:00-1:30 pm in Room N604 of the Environment and Natural Resources 2 Building (ENR2, 1064 E Lowell St.). You may also connect remotely through Zoom (information below).

Building a Risk Assessment - A combined effort between Naco Elementary School, Cochise County Health and Social Services, and the University of Arizona
Alma Anides Morales, a masters student in Soil, Water, and Environmental Science, will discuss her past year of relationship building, skill training, and sample collection in an effort to produce a risk assessment specific to Naco Elementary students from the potential microbial hazards due to sewage overflows in the area.
Hybrid Waters: Informal Water Provision, Municipal Governance and Household Water Security in Nairobi's Informal Settlements
Nupur Joshi, a doctoral student in Geography, will discuss how small scale private water sellers operate and the roles that Nairobi's municipal water governance play in these private operations. Her presentation is a story of water's urbanization in low-income settlements of Nairobi, and the everyday struggles of the urban poor to secure water.
Isotopes, geochemistry, citizen science, and local partnerships as tools to build upon a fractured understanding of the hydrology of the Patagonia Mountains
Sean Schrag-Toso, a masters student in Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences, will present on how drought and increased demand for groundwater resources have led to concern about future groundwater availability and dwindling spring flow in the Patagonia Mountains of southern Arizona. This research aims to better understand groundwater movement in the Mountains, and through collaborating with local partners, will inform monitoring and management of groundwater resources in the area.
Let it Rain: Discovering the Chemistry of a Raindrop
Norma Villagómez-Márquez, a doctoral student in Soil, Water, and Environmental Science, presents personal illustrations of rainwater collection systems, rainwater contamination, and quality through the eyes of urban children.

Seminar POC for questions: Ben McMahan (bmcmahan@email.arizona.edu) or Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
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4 February 2020

Title: Whale Worlds, Past and Future
Presenter(s): Nick Pyenson, National Museum of Natural History
Date & Time: 4 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 E W Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Nick Pyenson, National Museum of Natural History, Curator of Fossil Marine Mammals

Join us in the NOAA Central Library for a reading by Nick Pyenson of his book:
Spying on Whales: THE PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE OF EARTH'S MOST AWESOME CREATURES

Summary: It's not difficult to grasp why whales have captured the human imagination. Operating at the furthest edge of physiological extremes, their mysterious lives beneath the observable ocean surface can make whales seem otherworldly; yet, in their undeniable intelligence and social nature, we also recognize something of ourselves. To really understand whales, we must dig into their fascinating evolutionary history and search for insight about their place in past environments. Armed with knowledge of past whale worlds, we can accurately assess the current challenges that whales face and work to protect their place in oceans of the future.

Take Aways:
  • The fossil record reveals the incredible story of how modern whales evolved from land-based ancestors.
  • Many of these iconic marine mammals are highly threatened or endangered in today's oceans.
  • Knowing how and why whales have changed over geologic time is crucial for understanding their fates during the Anthropocene, as their potential futures relate to past oceans as much as it does to human threats.


Bio(s):
DR. NICK PYENSON is the curator of fossil marine mammals at the National Museum of Natural History. His work has taken him to every continent, and his scientific discoveries frequently appear in the New York Times, the Washington Post, National Geographic, and the BBC. His research has received the highest awards from the Smithsonian, and he has also received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from the Obama White House. He is the author of the acclaimed book SPYING ON WHALES, describing his scientific adventures chasing the past, present and future of whales all over the world.

Seminar POC: David Ermisch (david.ermisch@noaa.gov)

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Title: Using Pressure Change to Stochastically Disaggregate Hourly Precipitation Series from Temperature Projections of Climate Change in The Northeast of The US
Presenter(s): Ziwen Yu, University of Florida
Date & Time: 4 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar - see details below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ziwen Yu, Assistant Professor at the University of Florida

Sponsor(s):
Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast , A NOAA RISA Team

Abstract:

Stochastic precipitation generators (SPGs) can be used to produce synthetic precipitation series for numerous applications including irrigation system, reservoir, and drainage infrastructure planning and design. Typically, the stochastic processes built into these generators assume a stationary climate. To incorporate non-stationarity in the generation process, this study presents an hourly precipitation generation algorithm conditioned on average monthly temperature (AMT) projected by Global Climate Models (GCMs). The physical basis for precipitation formation is considered explicitly in the design of the algorithm using Pressure Change Events (PCE), the characteristics of which depict the relationship between hourly climate characteristics and AMT. The algorithm consists of a multi-variable Markov Chain and moving window conditioned on time, temperature, and pressure change. The synthetic results, when compared with historical observations in the northeast US, suggest that future precipitation in this region will have greater scatter with more frequent mild events and fewer but intensified extremes especially in warm seasons. Summers are predicted to have less precipitation while winters will be wetter. These predictions generally agree with current research on climate change projections in the northeast US.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.rand.org/events/2020/03/05/webinars.html)

Seminar POC for questions: Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu) or Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

5 February 2020

Title: Mapping Urban Heat with Community Science, Machine Learning, and Remote Sensing
Presenter(s): Vivek Shandas, Professor of Climate Adaptation and Director of the Sustaining Urban Places Research - SUPR Lab, Portland State University
Date & Time: 5 February 2020
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC3, OAR CPO Fishbowl, Room 12871
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Mapping Urban Heat with Community Science, Machine Learning, and Remote Sensing

Presenter(s):

Vivek Shandas, Professor of Climate Adaptation and Director of the Sustaining Urban Places Research (SUPR) Lab at Portland State University. Presenting in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s):

NOAA Climate Program Office: Communication, Education, and Engagement Division and the National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS).

Abstract:
Hot summers and heatwaves are deadly, killing more Americans than any other natural hazard, on average, and sending many more to the emergency room. Regionally in the US, urban areas contain the hottest temperatures in comparison to their surrounding countryside because of a phenomenon known as the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect. This effect, which occurs as a result of materials used in constructing cities mediate the absorption and dissipation of the sun's radiation differently than surrounding non-built areas, and can drive temperature differences across urban-rural gradients of 20°F and more. More recently, researchers are mapping intra-urban variation in temperatures in an effort to understand the mechanisms that produce the hottest areas, which in turn, can help to inform potential urban planning and policies, and reduce exposure to extreme heat, especially among those most health-vulnerable communities.While many methods exist to observe, model, and map urban heat, they differ in terms of the techniques employed, the data they capture, their transferability, and, ultimately, the interventions they can inform. In this webinar, UHI measuring and modeling expert Dr. Vivek Shandas will tease these varying approaches apart, and provide an overview of a relatively new machine learning method that incorporates conventional satellite remote sensing data, and in situ observations of temperature and humidity from community science urban field campaigns [see recent paper here: https://doi.org/10.3390/cli7010005]. This presentation will cover the methods applied, results from past campaigns, and lessons learned over the 20 different urban field campaigns conducted since 2015. The presentation will also touch on the emerging plans for 2020 and how outcomes from previous campaigns are helping to inform its design. Applications of the UHI maps to intervention analysis and city planning and policy are already underway.

Bio(s):
Vivek Shandas is a Professor of Climate Adaptation and Director of the Sustaining Urban Places Research (SUPR) Lab at Portland State University. Dr.Shandas's studies the feedbacks between a warming planet, and urban development processes and patterns. By examining the assumptions about our built environment, Dr.Shandas supports communities in improving their adaptation from climate stressors, including extreme events such as urban heat, air quality, and stresses on natural resources upon which we depend. Dr.Shandas serves as Chair of the City of Portland's Urban Forestry Commission, and is a Principal at CAPA Strategies, LLC, a global consulting group that helps communities prepare for climate-induced disruptions.

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Title: Professional and Technical (ProTech) Services Update
Presenter(s): Jay Standring, NOAA/AGO/SSAD/ProTech
Date & Time: 5 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jay Standring, NOAA AGO SSAD Professional & Technical Services (ProTech) Branch Chief

Seminar POC: Jay Standring (jay.standring@noaa.gov)

Abstract/summary: This presentation will provide the status of the ProTech Domain acquisitions and program.


Bio(s):
Jay Standring joined NOAA as the Professional and Technical Services Branch Head in November, 2016. His previous civil service career was with the Department of Defense (Navy and Marine Corps).

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Title: Reducing Societal Impacts from Hazardous Weather and Other Environmental Phenomena
Presenter(s): Clinton Wallace, Director, Space Weather Prediction Center, NOAA NWS; Jeff Craven, Chief, Statistical Modeling Division, NOAA NWS-Meteorological Dev. Lab; Jamie Rhome, Storm Surge Specialist/Team Lead, NOAA NWS/National Hurricane Center; and Dr. Kim Klockow-McClain, Research Scientist, University of Oklahoma- Cooperative Institute and NOAA/OAR/National Severe Storms Laboratory
Date & Time: 5 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA SIlver Spring staff, SSMC4 Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Science Report Seminar Series #1: Reducing Societal Impacts from Hazardous Weather and Other Environmental Phenomena
The first of four seminars in the NOAA Science Report Seminar Series. There will be four speakers for each seminar; see description of first seminar below.

Presentation Titles and Speakers for Feb 5:
Improving space weather forecasts so astronauts are ready for exploration, by Clinton Wallace, Director, Space Weather Prediction Center, NOAA NWS, Boulder, COThe National Blend of Models forms an accurate basis for forecasts, by Jeff Craven, Chief, Statistical Modeling Division, NOAA NWS/Meteorological Development Lab, Silver Spring, MDProtecting lives and mitigating flood damage during hurricanes and tropical storms, by Jamie Rhome, Storm Surge Specialist/Team Lead, NOAA NWS/National Hurricane Center, Miami, FLEstimating the economic benefits of the tornado warning improvement and extension program,
by Dr. Kim Klockow-McClain, Research Scientist, CIMMS/NSSL Societal Impacts Group Team Lead, Impact360 Alliance Steering Committee Vice Chair, University of Oklahoma/Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, NOAA/OAR/National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, OK

Sponsor(s):

The NOAA Science Report team, Gina Digiantonio, Emma Kelley, Laura Newcomb, and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator, Tracy Gill.

Abstract:
NOAA research and development advances the forecasts and warnings that inform the public about hazardous weather and other environmental phenomena. This seminar will include lightning talks on improving space weather forecasts, NOAA's advancements for the National Blend of Models,NOAA storm surge mapping during the 2019 hurricane season, and the economic benefits from improved tornado forecast information.

Bio(s):
Clinton Wallace earned a Master's Degree in Meteorology from the University of Oklahoma in 1997, and graduated Cum Laude in 1994 from Northeastern State University in Tahlequah,Oklahoma with a Bachelor's Degree, double majoring in Engineering Physics and Mathematics.Clinton is currently the director of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center,which is the Nation's official civilian source of space weather alerts and warnings, and one of the National Weather Service's nine National Centers of Environmental Prediction.Jeff Craven is a native of Oxnard, CA. He received a B.S. in Meteorology from San Jose State University(1988), and an M.S from the University of Oklahoma (2001). Jeff has been in operational forecast settings for 24 of his 29-year career with NWS and joined National NWS Headquarters at MDL in 2017.Jamie Rhome received both his Bachelor of Science degree and Master of Science degree in meteorology from North Carolina State University (1999, 2002). Mr. Rhome is the Storm Surge Specialist and Team Lead at NOAA's National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami,Florida, and serves as a subject matter expert on storm surge and coastal inundation for the National Weather Service's hurricane program. He is also theNOAA representative for the tri-agency (NOAA, FEMA, Army Corp. of Engineers)National Hurricane Program (NHP).Kim Klockow-McClain earned her Doctorate in Hazards Geography and Masters of Professional Meteorology from the University of Oklahoma, and Bachelors degrees in Economics and Meteorology from Purdue University. She is currently a research scientist and the societal impacts coordinator for CIMMS/NSSL. Her research involves behavioral science focused on weather and climate risk, especially informed decision-making to support warning response,and issues in the communication of forecast uncertainty.

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Title: Flood Vulnerability in Eastwick
Presenter(s): Dr. Phillip Orton, Stevens Institute/CCRUN et al. see description
Date & Time: 5 February 2020
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Drexel University / Webinar (see description)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Philip Orton (Stevens Institute/CCRUN), Ashley DiCaro (Interface Studio), and Christiana Pollack (Princeton Hydro)Seminar sponsor: The Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast, CCRUN (a NOAA RISA Team)A video recording will be posted here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqxnekXINtMARnkWCEgeSKA/videos

Abstract:
This month's Green Infrastructure, Climate and Cities seminar topic is Flood Vulnerability in Eastwick, featuring Dr. Philip Orton of Stevens Institute, Ashley DiCaro of Interface Studio and Christiana Pollack of Princeton Hydro.Eastwick, a low-lying neighborhood in Southwest Philadelphia, is at risk of both riverine and coastal flooding, a common yet inadequately studied problem for estuary-adjacent communities. Eastwick has a fraught history of urban renewal and broken promises by the city, and now faces an uncertain future due to sea level rise and riverine flooding, exacerbated by Climate Change. There are many studies highlighting environmental and social justice issues and Climate Change vulnerability in Eastwick; this seminar features a few of those studies. Dr. Philip Orton will provide the context for studying compound flooding in a community like Eastwick. Then Ashley DiCaro will discuss the history of planning and policy from the Lower Eastwick Public Land Study. Finally, Christiana Pollack will describe an analysis of the Lower Darby Creek and its flooding impacts on Eastwick.

The seminar will be held in the Hill Conference Room in the Lebow Engineering Center on Drexel University's campus in Philadelphia. Registration is FREE and refreshments will be provided! The sessions will be broadcast live so those that cannot attend in person can attend online.Seminar POC for questions: Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu) or Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov)

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6 February 2020

Title: Alkalinity Fluxes and Geochemical Properties of Harris Creek Oyster Reef Cores
Presenter(s): George Waldbusser, Associate Professor, College of Earth, Ocean & Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State Universityand Jeffrey Cornwell, Research Professor at the Horn Point Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Co-authors include Iria Gimenez Jeff Cornwell, Michael Owens, and Melanie Jackson
Date & Time: 6 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Alkalinity Fluxes and Geochemical Properties of Harris Creek Oyster Reef Cores
The fourth seminar in a seminar series, "Stressed Out by Coastal Acidification".

Speakers/Co-authors:
George Waldbusser, Associate Professor, College of Earth, Ocean & Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University and Jeffrey Cornwell, Research Professor at the Horn Point Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Co-Authors include Iria Gimenez, Michael Owens and Melanie Jackson.

Sponsor(s):

Beth Turner, NOAA's National Center for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Erica Ombres, NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program (OAP), and Tracy Gill, NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator.

Abstract:

Calcium carbonate shells and shelly habitats are increasingly recognized as potential mitigation approaches for localized acidification effects, however very little is known about the alkalinity and geochemical properties of intact oyster reefs. We collected cores of restored oyster reefs in Harris Creek, MD and measured alkalinity fluxes under controlled conditions, and sacrificed several cores for solid and fluid phase chemistry down core. Our measured alkalinity fluxes exceeded nearly all published sediment alkalinity fluxes to date, and found that a significant component of this flux was due to net alkalinity generation due to anaerobic metabolism and subsequent reactions. The material budgets for these cores indicates a very high proportion of calcium carbonate material down core, moderate levels of organic C and N present, driving the anaerobic metabolism that is responsible, in part, for preservation of shells in the reef matrix. Computed saturation states of porewater indicate highly saturated conditions as well, despite these oyster reefs existing in mesohaline waters, and thus reduced alkalinity. Importantly, the combined effects of a significant amount of calcium carbonate shells with anaerobic metabolism appear to be key in ensuring preservation of the reef shell core. In other words, a healthy population of live oysters generating biodeposits appears to be crucial to shell persistence in these otherwise thermodynamically marginal conditions for calcium carbonate preservation.Rates of dissolved inorganic carbon production and oxygen consumption in oyster reefs are among the highest observed in coastal environments. The focusing of seston via oyster filtration results in the production of biodeposits, with exceptionally high rates of nitrogen and phosphorus regeneration. In Harris Creek, Maryland, > 350 acres of oyster restoration result in the oyster reefs being the dominant benthic biogeochemical feature of this basin. Experimental work in the restored

Bio(s):
George Waldbusser is an Associate Professor in Oregon State University's College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, and Program Director of the Ocean, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences graduate program. Dr. Waldbusser obtained his PhD in Marine and Estuarine Environmental Science at the University of Maryland, Center for Environmental Science, and MS in Biological Oceanography from the University of Connecticut. He has been working on acidification in estuaries and coastal waters and on estuarine bivalves since 2008, while he was a post-doctoral researcher at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. His research interests span physiological to ecosystem scale studies. He has conducted research on various stages of bivalve life history including larvae, juveniles, and dead shell, specifically examining bottlenecks where acidification effects may be amplified and contribute to population level impacts. Mostly however he thinks seashells are pretty cool and interesting and possesses a pure curiosity for how marine invertebrates make shells and what happens to them in the environment.Jeffrey Cornwell is a Research Professor at the Horn Point Laboratory, a unit of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) in Cambridge, Maryland. His Ph.D. at the University of Alaska examined nutrient and metal cycling in arctic lakes, followed by post-doctoral work in marine sulfur chemistry at Texas A&M University prior to starting at UMCES in 1986. His research programs have emphasized benthic transformation of nutrients and carbon, with current studies on 1) the biogeochemistry of wetland restoration using dredged materials and 2) the value of oysters to Chesapeake Bay water quality. He chairs the Expert Panel on Oyster BMP's for the Chesapeake Bay Program and is vice-chair of the Maryland Aquaculture Coordinating Council. In alignment with his interests in basic and applied biogeochemical processes in freshwater and coastal environments, his graduate students have joined state and federal agencies, academic institutions, and industry.

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Title: Linking temperature and discharge to expressed behavior of fishes: Implications for climate change
Presenter(s): Rebecca Flitcroft, PhD, Research Fish Biologist, USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station
Date & Time: 6 February 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or NOAA NWFSC- Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Rebecca Flitcroft, PhD, Research Fish Biologist, USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's NWFSC Monster seminars
NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website
To contact Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

ABSTRACT
River systems have been extensively modified by anthropogenic development of uplands and alterations in flow regimes. These changes reduce the capacity of river floodplains to absorb natural geophysical and environmental changes and directly affect life history adaptations that have developed over the millennia for native species. For example, in western North America changes in upslope processes (i.e. fire regimes, forest harvest and associated managements) work in concert with alterations in natural flow and thermal regimes through dams, levees, and floodplain development to change recovery trajectories of river systems. However, existing phenotypic adaptation by native fishes to environmental conditions may not be compatible with alterations to flow and thermal regimes. Climate change may compound this issue by further reducing variability in environmental conditions, both directly and indirectly, thereby inhibiting the full expression of life history diversity present in current populations. We explored expressed behavioral variability in upriver migration and passage for adult coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), an endangered salmon in Washington and Oregon, USA. We combined long-term records of river flow, water temperature, and upstream fish passage in a single visualization, providing strong empirical foundations for understanding upstream behavioral movement and tolerances of this native salmon. We compared current behavioral variability of coho salmon to scenarios representing possible future hydrologic conditions associated with a changing climate. We found that in some locations, the range of environmental conditions in the future is not outside the behavioral variability currently expressed by upstream migrating adult coho salmon. However, in some locations, predicted changes in streamflow and temperature occur during times of peak migration and may affect survival of upstream migrants. We discuss management implications and recommendations for action that may expand the capacity of riverscapes to absorb perturbations, thereby allowing for enhanced resilience of native fish populations.

BIODr Rebecca Flitcroft is a Research Fish Biologist with the United States Forest Service at the Pacific Northwest Research Station, Oregon, USA. She received her PhD in Fisheries and MS in Natural Resource Geography from Oregon State University. Rebecca's research explores holistic approaches to catchment analysis and management. She uses both statistical and physical representations of stream networks in analysis and monitoring to more realistically represent stream complexity and connectivity for aquatic species.

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Title: U.S. West Coast Deep-Sea Coral Initiative: Design and Implementation in Support of Resource Management
Presenter(s): Chris Caldow, NOAA Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 6 February 2020
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 13514 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Chris Caldow - NOAA Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology ProgramPoint of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract:
Cost in terms of time and funding to explore, characterize and study the deep sea (>50m) is often prohibitively expensive, yet this ecosystem is vital to many nations' fishery resources and is home to a diverse array of organisms. With limited funding available, the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Deep-Sea Coral Research and Technology Program (DSCRTP) has effectively and efficiently focused its geographic and topical scope while broadening their alliances and partnerships. Recently, the DSCRTP launched their 2018-2021 West Coast Deep-Sea Coral Initiative (WCDSCI) focused on the U.S. contiguous west coast states. The initiative began with the establishment of a steering committee that includes representatives from across the agency. Once formed, the committee hosted a Science Priorities Workshop bringing together experts from across federal and state agencies, tribes, NGOs, academia, and museums to inform selection of research and funding priorities. Over 40 individuals from across the agencies or institutions participated. The input from this workshop led to the formation of three overarching priorities: 1) Gather baseline information from areas subject to fishing regulation changes; 2) Improve our understanding of known deep-sea coral bycatch “hot spots”; and 3) Explore and assess deep-sea coral resources within NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries on the west coast. Within these priorities, funded activities include: 1) mapping; 2) visual surveys; 3) modeling; 4) species identification, genetics and connectivity; and 5) education and outreach. The commitment of funding from DSCRTP helped galvanize commitment from additional partners into a coast wide campaign focused largely on the priorities identified at the workshop. This focus and suite of partnerships has the WCDSCI uniquely poised for success to carry out their mission and supply resource managers with the information they require across this under studied ecosystem.

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Title: Facilitating Conservation and Management of Deep-Sea Corals and Sponge Ecosystems through Partnerships, Education, and Outreach
Presenter(s): Lizzie Duncan, NOAA Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 6 February 2020
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lizzie Duncan - NOAA Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology ProgramPoint of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract:
Conservation is both a social and biological challenge where public support of policy measures can be the key to implementation success. With human and environmental stressors on the rise, particularly with the increasing and competing uses of the world's oceans, creating effective conservation management systems is crucial to ensure the health of many nations' marine resources. Generally, garnering public support to sustain vulnerable ecosystems can be challenging, but this is particularly true for remote ecosystems such as deep-sea coral and sponge communities. However, advancements in the tools and technology available to both researchers and educators have increased the public's' access to the deep-sea. This presentation explores the resources and partnerships available to the United States West Coast Deep-Sea Coral Initiative (WCDSCI; 2018-2021) that will support the research, education, and outreach objectives of the research program. Examples include the National Marine Sanctuaries' free online deep-sea community curricula, SeaSketch's web-based interactive mapping tools, at-sea tele-presence technologies, and partnerships with aquaria with deep-sea exhibitions. Ultimately, education and outreach targeting both the public and managers will provide decision makers with the best available information about deep-sea corals, sponges, and fishes.

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11 February 2020

Title: Fostering a Culture of Scientific Integrity in NOAA
Presenter(s): Cynthia J. Decker, PhD, NOAA's Scientific Integrity Officer, NOAA's Office of Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 11 February 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ Silver Spring, MD SSMC4 Room 1W611, or via webinar (see below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

2020 NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series: To provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission.


Title:

Fostering a Culture of Scientific Integrity in NOAA

Presenter(s):

Cynthia J. Decker, PhD, NOAA's Scientific Integrity Officer, NOAA's Office of Atmospheric Research.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Research Council, the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series, and the NOAA Library.
here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

Seminar Point of Contacts:
Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov , Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov

Abstract:

Scientific knowledge underpins everything NOAA does. The success of the agency in its service and stewardship endeavors rests on the quality and credibility of the science it carries out and funds. In order to ensure this is sustained, NOAA has a scientific integrity policy that addresses the overall concept of scientific integrity and prescribes how it will be encouraged and maintained in the agency. This presentation will cover the overall concept of scientific integrity as well as the specific procedures NOAA has put in place to ensure it is protected.

About the speaker:
Cynthia J. Decker is the NOAA Scientific Integrity Officer, and Executive Director of the NOAA Science Advisory Board. She is the primary point of contact in the agency for all matters pertaining to scientific and research misconduct, working with the Deputy Under Secretary for Operations and NOAA Research Council on these matters. She serves as the designated federal official for the SAB, overseeing all of their activities and ensuring coordination of NOAA input to them as well as facilitating communication between the Board and various NOAA activities. She also oversees the work of the SAB's four standing working groups. Prior to coming to NOAA in 2006, Dr. Decker was the Deputy Chief of the External Programs Branch for the Oceanographer of the Navy. This office is responsible for coordination at the policy level of Navy operational oceanography and meteorology programs with other military services, civilian agencies, and international organizations. Dr. Decker was formerly the Director of Research for the Consortium for Oceanographic Research and Education (CORE, now the Consortium for Ocean Leadership), which represents over 100 academic, government, industry and non-profit ocean institutions around the United States. At CORE, she was also Director of the International Secretariat for the Census of Marine Life and Executive Director for the National Oceanographic Partnership Program. She received her Ph.D in Coastal Oceanography from the State University of New York at Stony Brook (Stony Brook University) and her Master's in Zoology from Louisiana State University. She has previously worked for the U.S. Office of Naval Research running a marine environmental research program, and for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, where she administered an estuarine management program on behalf of the state.

Are our seminars recorded?
Yes. When available recordings and PDF of slides will be posted here:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

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12 February 2020

Title: How NUCAPS (NOAA-Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System) and gridded NUCAPS can help you
Presenter(s): Scott Lindstrom, University of Wisconsin-Madison Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies
Date & Time: 12 February 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or in NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Scott Lindstrom, University of Wisconsin-Madison Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS)

Abstract:
NUCAPS (NOAA-Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System) profiles of Temperature and Moisture are created from the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) onboard Suomi-NPP and NOAA-20. In Alaska, Suomi-NPP and NOAA-20 data downlinked at the Direct Broadcast antenna in Fairbanks are processed at GINA and made available to forecast offices via LDM. Data that are available includes individual profiles that are color-coded in AWIPS by what data are included within the sounding and also horizontal fields (for example, 300-mb Temperature) of data derived from the vertical profiles. This seminar will discuss the data and how it can be used to provide useful information over Alaska, and offer suggestions of when it's likely to be most useful.

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Title: Supporting the Implementation of EAFM in SE Asia: Curriculum development and training
Presenter(s): Michael Abbey, NMFS/OAA/OIASI/IA
Date & Time: 12 February 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Michael Abbey of NOAA Fisheries, Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection.

Sponsor(s):
NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
NOAA Fisheries (IASI, formerly CREP), NOS/CRCP and partners (FAO, Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem, South East Asian Fisheries Development Center, etc) worked together since 2011 to strategize about the institutionalization of good fisheries management, science and enforcement practices, write materials for and then deliver these materials in the form of EAFM courses in Asia and recently into the Americas. Through this partnership, NOAA prepared the "Essential EAFM"" and “EAFM LEAD.” I will walk through the materials and interactions in SE Asia as we and our partners have 'trained' a 1000+ participants. The website “EAFMLEARN.ORG” holds most of our curriculum. The Essential EAFM training course has been designed to address these capacity development needs and provides the practical skills, tools and resources to do so. The materials are translated into other SE Asian languages (and Spanish).

Bio(s):
Michael is the NOAA Fisheries Lead for Technical Capacity Building in Asia-Pacific. He is responsible for assessing, developing and managing international fisheries collaborations between NOAA Fisheries and partners in the Asia/Pacific region, including regional and bilateral projects with USAID missions. He is a member of the US delegation to the Western & Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (management of tuna and tuna-like species). He manages the bilateral fisheries engagements with Taiwan and Korea and is the United States Representative to the FAO/ Asia-Pacific Fisheries Commission (APFIC). He is also ‘this' close to getting his PhD from the National University of Singapore.

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Title: Using Ocean Color to Report on Sustainable Development Goal 14.1.1
Presenter(s): Emily Smail, CICESS/NOAA SOCD
Date & Time: 12 February 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA College Park folks, NCWCP, Rm 3555
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars
NOCCG Seminar crosslisted with OneNOAA and STAR Seminars

Presenter(s):
Dr. Emily Smail, CISESS-University of Maryland and SOCD

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG). This seminar will not be recorded. Slides may be shared upon request (send email to the POC listed below).



Abstract:
The Group on Earth Observations(GEO) is an international partnership working to improve the availability, access and use of Earth observations (EO) for the benefit of society. GEO's 109 Member Countries and 132 Participating Organizations work to actively improve and coordinate global Earth Observation systems and promote broad, open data sharing. GEO's priority engagement areas include the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. GEO's initiative for oceans and coasts, GEO BluePlanet, is working to support Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14 "Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development". This presentation will provide an overview of GEO Blue Planet's work in support of SDG 14 with a focus on activities to support the United Nations Environment Programme to develop the methodology for reporting on an SDG indicator for coastal eutrophication and applications for visualizing this data that are being developed in collaboration with Esri.

Bio(s):
Emily Smail is the Executive Director of the GEO BluePlanet Initiative and a Senior Faculty Specialist at the NOAA-University of Maryland Cooperative Institute for Satellite and Earth System Science. She also serves as the co-chair of the GEO AquaWatch Initiative's outreach and user Engagement working group and supports outreach and education efforts for the NOAA CoastWatch/OceanWatch program. Previously, Dr. Smail worked in informal science Education at the Waikiki Aquarium and policy in the United States Senate through the Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Program. She received a B.S. in Biology from the Pennsylvania State University and a PhD in Biology from the University of Southern California where her research focused on water quality and marine biogeochemistry.

Seminar POC for questions or access to slides: Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

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13 February 2020

Title: Semi-automated Detection of Marine Mammals using Infrared Cameras
Presenter(s): Kevin Sullivan/Toyon Research Corp
Date & Time: 13 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kevin Sullivan, Toyon Research Corporation

POC: Tiffany House (tiffany.house@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
We developed a system for estimating the number of gray whales that migrate along the California Coast. This system consists of infrared cameras which continuously stare at the ocean, automated detection software for detecting whale blows, whale-blow verification software for reviewing and removing false alarms, and counting software which estimates the number of whales that have passed by the observation station. Our system has been deployed to multiple locations in support of biologists and oil and gas operations.

Take Aways:
  • They are currently developing a vessel-based version of the system.
  • They have had multiple Phase II awards through the NOAA SBIR Program.
  • Funding from NOAA's SBIR program has contributed to the success of their research and development.


Bio(s):
Mr. Sullivan received a B.S. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara. He has been active in the areas of image and signal processing, multi-target tracking, data fusion, and sensor resource management for over thirty years while supporting numerous DoD agencies.

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Title: A Hybrid Approach to Producing Downscaled and Bias-corrected Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) Curves for NYC
Presenter(s): Eric Rosenberg, Hazen and Sawyer and Art DeGaetano, Cornell University
Date & Time: 13 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar - see details below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Eric Rosenberg, Associate at Hazen and Sawyer and Adjunct Professor at Columbia University;
Art DeGaetano, Professor at Cornell University

Sponsor(s):
Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast , A NOAA RISA Team

Abstract:

More information to come

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.rand.org/events/2020/03/05/webinars.html)

Seminar POC for questions: Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu) or Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: GPS on Bench Marks: 2022 Transformation Tool Campaign Update
Presenter(s): Galen Scott, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 13 February 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
GPS on Bench Marks: 2022 Transformation Tool Campaign Update

Presenter(s):
Galen Scott, National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. POC: Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey

Abstract:
As part of modernizing the National Spatial Reference System, NGS will produce the 2022 Transformation Tool. It will enable mapping grade conversions from current vertical datums to the North American-Pacific Geopotential Datum of 2022 (NAPGD2022) and be integrated into the NGS Coordinate Conversion and Transformation Tool (NCAT). Users are encouraged to submit GPS data on existing bench marks to improve the quality of the transformation in their local areas.

In 2019, NGS released a new prioritized list of bench marks across the United States and its Territories to direct local users to the marks in their area where new GPS observations would have the biggest impact on the quality of the tool. A web map is also available that enables users to explore, sort, and download the coordinates on the list.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge is helpful.

Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
Title: Influences of climate change on abundance and body size of stream-dwelling trout and salamanders
Presenter(s): Ivan Arismendy, Assistant Professor, Oregon State University, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
Date & Time: 13 February 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or NOAA NWFSC- Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Ivan Arismendy, Assistant Professor,Oregon State University,Department of Fisheries and Wildlife

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's NWFSC Monster seminars
NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website
To contact Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

ABSTRACTQuantifying the dynamics of natural populations is a central question in ecology. Density-dependent processes, including competition and predation, and density-independent processes (e.g., climatic factors) are the main forces driving population abundance. Yet, few studies have documented the relative importance of these drivers due to statistical uncertainties at the population-level and logistical issues of maintaining continuous long-term studies. Further, climate change projections in western North America include increasing winter floods and prolonged droughts during summer. Though such changes in extreme conditions may have some negative effects, the ability of ecosystems to resist change in the face of disturbances and to be resilient and recover quickly often are underestimated. Here, I will present long-term information from continuous surveys of Coastal Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) and Pacific giant salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus) populations from the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon. Model selection and information-theoretic approaches will be used to contrast multiple hypothesis including density dependent and density independent factors. Overall, population sizes tend to increase after major annual floods, but the size of animals have consistently decreased over time. This work provides insights about the importance of different drivers of population regulation under future potential scenarios of climatic variability.

Bio(s):
Dr. Ivan Arismendi is an Assistant Professor at Oregon State University. His research interests include the links among water, land, and people focused on the role of natural variability and human-related disturbances on aquatic ecosystems across multiple spatial and temporal scales. He has published extensively on the impacts of invasive salmonids in southern South America as well as the consequences of climate change on freshwaters in North America.


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19 February 2020

Title: Exploring Instrument Hosting Potentials from Emerging Internet Platforms
Presenter(s): Likun Wang, Riverside Technology, inc
Date & Time: 19 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

This seminar was previously scheduled on January 29, 2020.

Presenter(s):
Likun Wang, Riverside Technology, inc
Co-Authors: LingLiu, Katherine Lukens, Kayo Ide, Kevin Garrett, Sid Boukabara

Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series

Slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2020/20200219_Wang.pdf
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2020/20200219_Wang.pptx

Abstract:
The NOAA global observing system (GOS) contains a large variety of observing platforms, including geostationary and polar-orbiting satellites, radiosonde,aircraft, surface stations, ships, buoys, etc. Despite the comprehensiveness of the observing system, many critical gaps exist in spatial/temporal coverage,spectral coverage, and resolution. To address these gaps, the NOAA/NESDIS Technology Maturation Program funded one of projects to explore use of emerging internet platforms (such as Loon high altitude balloons and SpaceX StarLink Satellites) for hosting remote sensing instruments. This talk summarizes feasibility assessment on potentials payload hosting opportunities that can benefit NOAA GOS system, which mainly focuses on Loon platforms and also extends to recent SpaceX StarLink constellations. First, the Loon platform characteristics and flight dynamics are comprehensively surveyed to explore the capability and limitation for Loon as a hosting platform. Second, by comparing GOES-16 Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) with collocated Loon infrared thermometer measurements,we demonstrate that the Loon platform can served as a validation platform for future NOAA satellite sensors. Third, through simulation studies, observational geometry (e.g., footprint size, swath width, pointing accuracy) and weighting functions are studied for the scenarios that the Loon platform can host passive microwave instruments. More importantly, we demonstrate that balloon-based GPS radio occultation (RO) measurements can be complementary to current satellite based GPSRO systems. Efforts have been devoted to develop the capability of simulating the GPSRO slant path and bending angle from the balloon platform at~20 km, utilizing current constellation of Global Navigation Satellite Systems.Based on the calculations, the sampling characteristics and spatial and temporal coverage as well as the advantages and disadvantages are discussed.Based on this, the Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) is designed to assess possible impacts on Global Forecasting System (GFS) forecasting capabilities by adding balloon-based GPSRO observations. The impacts are demonstrated and compared to those from space-based GPSRO observations. Finally,SpaceX StarLink constellation are simulated and potential hosting opportunities are discussed.

Presenter(s):


Dr. Likun Wang is now working in NOAA/NESDIS/STAR as a contract scientist employed by Riverside Technology, inc for Research Technology Maturation for the Exploitation of Emerging Technologies (RTMEE) Contract, including near space payload hosting platform assessment, Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology demonstration, and geostationary sounder proxy data simulations. With more than 15 years of progressive working experiences of NOAA's satellite sensors, Dr. Likun Wang has been responsible for the pre- and post-launch calibration testing data analysis, inter-calibration for post-launch instrument monitoring and assessment, ground processing software development, configuration and calibration parameter refining, and new algorithm design and integration. He currently serves the chair of World Meteorological Organization (WMO) sponsored Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System (GSICS) infrared sensor working group. Likun Wang received his B.S. degree in atmospheric sciences and the M.S. degree in meteorology from Peking University, Beijing, China, in 1996 and 1999, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in atmospheric sciences from University of Alaska Fairbanks, in 2004.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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Title: Assimilating Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), Past, Present and Future
Presenter(s): Dr Jim Jung, Senior Scientist, Cooperative Institute of Meteorological Satellite Studies, CIMSS / University of Wisconsin
Date & Time: 19 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20706, Conference Room S561
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):

Dr Jim Jung, Senior Scientist, Cooperative Institute of Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS), University of Wisconsin

Abstract:

An overview of the various Cross-Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) related changes made to the NCEP Data Assimilation System will be presented. This includes changes to the data thinning, profile selection using the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), and transition to full spectral resolution. Some details of our current work, including potential changes to the IR ocean emissivity model and future plans will also be discussed.

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Title: Sustainable Use & Stewardship of Ocean & Coastal Resources
Presenter(s): Melissa Karp, Research Associate, NOAA NMFS Office of Science and Technology, National Stock Assessment Program; Gary Wikfors, Supervisory Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/Milford Laboratory Director; Richard Stumpf, Oceanographer, NOAA NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science; and Alexander Gilerson, Professor, City College of New York, Department of Electrical Engineering
Date & Time: 19 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA SIlver Spring staff, SSMC4 Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Science Report Seminar Series #2: Sustainable Use and Stewardship of Ocean and Coastal Resources
The second of four seminars in the NOAA Science Report Seminar Series. There will be four speakers for each seminar.

Presentation Titles and Speakers for Feb 19:Forecasting fisheries in a changing climate, by Melissa Karp, Research Associate, Contractor in support of NOAA/NMFS/Office of Science and Technology/National Stock Assessment Program, Silver Spring, MDEstablishing a scientific foundation for blue mussel offshore aquaculture in the southern New England, by Gary Wikfors, Supervisory Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/Milford Laboratory Director and Chief, Aquaculture Sustainability Branch, Ecosystems and Aquaculture Division, Milford, CTNew tools to monitor harmful algal blooms; example from the Florida Coast, by Richard Stumpf, Oceanographer, NOAA NOS/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Silver Spring, MD
New tools to monitor harmful algal blooms, by Alexander Gilerson, Professor, City College of New York, Department of Electrical Engineering, New York City, NY

Sponsor(s):
The NOAA Research and Development Enterprise Committee, Gina Digiantonio, Emma Kelley, Laura Newcomb, and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator, Tracy Gill.

Abstract:
NOAA research and development seeks to better understand the biogeochemical and human processes that impact our ocean,coasts, and Great Lakes and to inform their conservation, restoration, and sustainable use. This seminar will include lightning talks on managing shifting fish distributions and changing productivity, assessing opportunities for domestic mussel production, and developing new monitoring capabilities for detecting and tracking harmful algal blooms.

Bio(s):
Melissa Karp received her M.S. in marine science from the College of William and Mary's School of Marine Science, at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 2016 and her B.S. in Biology and Environmental Science from Tufts University in 2013. Currently, Melissa is a contractor with ECS Tech working on behalf of NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology. Her work focuses on supporting efforts to advance stock assessment methodology in the U.S., particularly related to the incorporation of ecosystem and climate information in the assessment process.Gary Wikfor's terminal degree is in Phycology, the study of algae, but he always has worked at the intersection of phytoplankton and the bivalve mollusks -- such as oysters, clams, scallops, and mussels --that derive their nutrition from phytoplankton. As Chief of the Aquaculture Sustainability Branch, Gary has a hands-on role in several current team initiatives: 1) Nutrient bioextraction using shellfish aquaculture, 2)Probiotic bacteria for use in shellfish hatcheries, and 3) Shellfish cellular immune response to environmental variation.
Dr. Rick Stumpf received a B.A. degree in the Environmental Sciences from the University of Virginia, and M.S. and Ph.D.degrees in Marine Studies from the University of Delaware. Dr. Stumpf develops methods to use satellite data and modeling to understand coastal eutrophication, habitat change, and algal bloom monitoring and forecasting. He leads NOAA's efforts to translate forecasts of harmful algal blooms from research to operations.Dr. Gilerson received his B.S., M.S. and PhD degrees in Engineering from the Technical University, Kazan, Russia. From 2003 he works at the City College of the City University of New York, Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory as a Senior Scientist and then as a Professor. His current research interests include development of advanced algorithms for the retrieval of properties of ocean particulates, detection and monitoring of algal blooms,hyperspectral polarimetric imaging of the ocean body and validation of the Ocean Color satellite sensors.

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Title: Sea Grant Spotlight: Sea Grant/PMEL Tsunami and Coastal Resilience Liaison
Presenter(s): Carrie Garrison-Laney, Sea Grant Liaison
Date & Time: 19 February 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only,
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
National Sea Grant and the NOAA Central Library POC: Elizabeth Rohring (elizabeth.rohring@noaa.gov)

Key Takeaways: The U.S. can apply "lessons learned" from the Japanese experience to improve coastal resilience. - U.S. coastal communities need more education to understand the magnitude of a tsunami and how to survive one.- Plans for community response in the aftermath of a tsunami should be made in advance of the next tsunami event.


Presenter(s):
Dr. Carrie Garrison-Laney, a Tsunami Hazards Specialist at Washington Sea Grant at the University of Washington and a liaison to the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory's NOAA Center for Tsunami Research in Seattle.

Abstract:
Dr. Carrie Garrison-Laney will talk about her recent trip to areas of Japan destroyed by the Tohoku earthquake tsunami in 2011, and the ongoing recovery and reconstruction. Insights gained from this major disaster can reduce future disaster losses (which is the meaning of the Japanese word "bosai"). These lessons in resilience can be applied to coastal areas of the U.S. through continued education, planning, and preparation for a tsunami disaster, and are critical to Washington Sea Grant's coastal resilience efforts.


Bio(s):
Dr. Carrie Garrison-Laney is tsunami hazards specialist at Washington Sea Grant at the University of Washington and a liaison to the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory's NOAA Center for Tsunami Research in Seattle. Carrie's work includes research on tsunami geology and tsunami modeling. She also works collaboratively with the Washington Department of Natural Resources, and the Washington Emergency Management Division creating outreach materials and giving outreach trainings and talks.

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Title: Temperature-related mortality under climate change scenarios in health regions of Canada
Presenter(s): Éric Lavigne , Ph.D, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Date & Time: 19 February 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Éric Lavigne , Ph.D, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada


Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Weather Service

Seminar POC for questions: Michelle.Hawkins@noaa.gov, 301-427-9374

Abstract:
Climate change is an important global health threat of the 21st century. According to the fifth report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), greenhouse gases emitted from anthropogenic emissions were established as the leading sources for the warming of the planet. In Canada, land temperature has already raised by 1.7°C since 1948 and is expected to increase on average by about 5.44 °C in major cities towards the end of the century. This webinar aims to present findings from an health impact projection study using the daily mortality counts of non-accidental, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality for 111 health regions across Canada. During the seminar, it will be shown that Canada will experience an increase in mortality under higher greenhouse gas emission scenarios during the 21st century. In particular, climate change may potentially result in an increase in heat-related excess mortality that is not balanced by a decrease in cold-related deaths which will result in an overall positive net increase in mortality for Canada. Climate change would result in a net increase in cardiovascular and, to a larger extent, respiratory mortality towards the end of the 21st century under a higher emission scenario.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, contact Michelle.Hawkins@noaa.gov for recordings.

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Title: Passive Acoustic Monitoring in California’s National Marine Sanctuaries
Presenter(s): Samara Haver, Ph.D candidate at Oregon State University; Angela R. Szesciorka and Vanessa ZoBell, Ph.D. candidates at Scripps Institution of Oceanography - all are Dr. Nancy Foster Scholars
Date & Time: 19 February 2020
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Samara Haver, Ph.D candidate at Oregon State University; Angela R. Szesciorka and Vanessa ZoBell, Ph.D. candidates at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (all are Dr. Nancy Foster Scholars)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Abstract:
Acoustic signals travel quickly and efficiently over long distances in the aquatic environment; thus, sound has become the principal sensory modality used by many marine animal species. This is particularly true for acoustically oriented marine mammals that rely on sound to communicate, perceive their environment, detect and avoid predators, forage for food, and navigate. Passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) is used to measure, monitor, and determine the sources of sound in underwater environments, enabling scientists to eavesdrop on the acoustic behavior of marine animals (e.g., whale song, fish chorusing, snapping shrimp), natural abiotic sounds (e.g., wind, earthquakes), and human generated sounds (e.g., cargo vessels). By utilizing PAM tools in national marine sanctuaries, researchers are able to collect data to answer questions about these valuable marine habitats and provide important condition information to managers and policymakers. In this webinar, three Ph.D. candidates that are NOAA Dr. Nancy Foster Scholars will discuss current PAM research efforts taking place in some of California's national marine sanctuaries.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

20 February 2020

Title: Clear as a Whistle: Documenting Dolphin Occurrence with Passive Acoustic Ocean Gliders
Presenter(s): Dr. Tammy Silva, Postdoctoral Fellow, NOAA's Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary & School for Marine Science & Technology, University of Massachusetts
Date & Time: 20 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Clear as a Whistle: Documenting Dolphin Occurrence with Passive Acoustic Ocean Gliders

Presenter(s):
Dr. Tammy Silva, Postdoctoral Fellow, NOAA's Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary & School for Marine Science & Technology, University of Massachusetts

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov. You may email a request for the PDF and/or mp4 recording; they may be available.

This webinar will be recorded and likely available by request from Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:

Basic information about marine mammal habitat use patterns is essential for informing ecosystem-based management and mitigating humanimpacts. However, collecting shipboard or aerial survey data on the occurrence and distribution of highly mobile, cryptic animals with large home ranges, like oceanic dolphin species, is challenging. We addressed this challenge by using autonomous ocean gliders equipped with passive acoustic recorders to document dolphin occurrence in and around Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, a highly productive, urbanized area in the southwestern Gulf of Maine that lacks data on dolphin habitat use. Our results showed a frequent, consistent presence of dolphin species and possible annual site fidelity, suggesting that dolphins could play an important role in the southwestern Gulf of Maine ecosystem and highlighting the advantages of passive acoustic ocean gliders in collecting baseline habitat use data.

Bio(s):
Tammy is a Postdoctoral Fellow working with Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary and the School for Marine Science and Technology at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. She leads the sanctuary's forage fish research project focused on how sand lance drive ecology of sand habitats and her current research focuses on quantifying predator-prey spatial relationships. Her doctoral work focused on integrating passive acoustic monitoring with opportunistic sightings data to document toothed whale habitat use in the southwestern Gulf of Maine. Tammy earned her PhD and MS from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and a BS in Biology from Stonehill College.

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Title: NOAA Shoreline and Geospatial Products Review
Presenter(s): Mike Aslaksen, National Geodetic Survey; Ken Logsdon, Jr., Dewberry
Date & Time: 20 February 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mike Aslaksen, National Geodetic Survey; Ken Logsdon, Jr., Dewberry

Short description: During this "town hall" webinar, we will update stakeholders on NGS's efforts to improve shoreline.noaa.gov as an entry point to a more modernized and streamlined NOAA Shoreline Data Explorer (NSDE).

Long description:
The NGS Coastal Mapping Program produces the national shoreline and other critical data used to update the NOAA nautical charts. The data is also used by coastal resource managers and others for GIS analysis, and coastal modeling. The NOAA Shoreline Data Explorer system is an online management and sharing system of this shoreline data including the
  • national shoreline,
  • Continually Updated Shoreline Product,
  • raster T-Sheets,
  • planned shoreline boundaries, and
  • metadata.

During this "town hall" webinar, we will update stakeholders on NGS's efforts to improve shoreline.noaa.gov as an entry point to a more modernized and streamlined NOAA Shoreline Data Explorer (NSDE).

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Title: Misinformation in and about science
Presenter(s): Jevin West, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of Washington
Date & Time: 20 February 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or NOAA NWFSC- Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Jevin West, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's NWFSC Monster seminars
NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website
To contact Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov


JOIN IN PERSON
Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Auditorium
2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Maps and directions

ABSTRACT Science is the greatest of human inventions. It has solved and continues to solve many of societies most pressing questions in human health, planetary wellness and economic viability. But one of Science's new challenges is the well being of Science itself and ways in which scientists communicate within this social system. The reproducibility crisis, misaligned motivations, literature overload, publication bias, p-hacking, retraction loss, gender inequity, complicity of university presses, and out-of-date publishing models are just a few of the maladies of Science and its modes of communication. These maladies are further exacerbated with intentional disinformation campaigns and by the speed in which misinformation travels on social media. Turning the microscope on Science, with the goal of improving its health, will be the focus of this talk.

BIO Jevin West is an Associate Professor in the Information School at the University of Washington. He is the co-founder of the DataLab and the Director of the new Center for an Informed Public at UW. He holds an Adjunct Faculty position in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. He is also a Data Science Fellow at the eScience Institute and Affiliate Faculty for the Center for Statistics & Social Sciences. His research and teaching focus on misinformation in and about science. He develops methods for mining the scientific literature in order to study the origins of disciplines, the social and economic biases that drive these disciplines, and the impact the current publication system has on the health of science. He co-developed a course, Calling BS, that teaches students how to combat misinformation wrapped in data, figures, and statistics. The course is now being taught at universities around the globe. More information can be found at jevinwest.org.

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Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Trent Ford, Illinois State Climatologist
Date & Time: 20 February 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Trent Ford, Illinois State Climatologist

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

POCs: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:

The focus area for this webinar is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña.

Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Register: https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/north-central-us-monthly-climate-and-drought-summary-and-outlook-5

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

21 February 2020

Title: February 2020 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 21 February 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access:
http://accap.adobeconnect.com/feb2020/event/registration.html

Abstract:

The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
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24 February 2020

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Meghan Dalton, Climate Impacts Research Consortium; Britt Parker, National Integrated Drought Information System, John Abatzoglou, University of Idaho, Tim Cook, WA State Emergency Management Division, Adrienne Marshall, Department of Forest, Rangeland and Fire Sciences at the University of Idaho
Date & Time: 24 February 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Meghan Dalton, Climate Impacts Research Consortium; Britt Parker, National Integrated Drought Information System, John Abatzoglou, University of Idaho, Tim Cook, WA State Emergency Management Division, Adrienne Marshall, Department of Forest, Rangeland and Fire Sciences at the University of Idaho

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System, Climate Impacts Research Consortium, USDA Northwest Climate Hub, National Weather Service

POC: Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

25 February 2020

Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar
Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District
Date & Time: 25 February 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

POC: Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract:

The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar is part of a monthly (twice a month during drought status) webinar series designed to provide stakeholders, water-resource managers, and other interested parties in the ACF region with timely information on current drought status, seasonal forecasts and outlooks, streamflow​ conditions and forecasts, groundwater conditions, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir conditions.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Resilience Dialogues: Strategies for Conflict Management in Collaborative Science
Presenter(s): Dr. Christine Feurt, Wells NERR
Date & Time: 25 February 2020
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only ,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Resilience Dialogues: Strategies for Conflict Management in Collaborative Science

Presenter(s):
Dr. Christine Feurt, Wells NERR

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative

Seminar POCs for questions:
dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

Abstract:

Resilience Dialogues are conversations that occur among people with diverse perspectives who have agreed to work together to increase community and ecological resilience.Planning and facilitating resilience dialogues requires skills in collaboration, stakeholder engagement, and conflict management.
TheResilience Dialogues project looked across a decade of collaborative science projects to distill key lessons learned and best practices used to build resilience. This webinar shares successful collaborative techniques that worked to engage the diverse expertise of stakeholders, develop a shared language around commonly held values and craft solutions-based science that respected local knowledge and the concerns of vulnerable communities. Results of the project have been used to develop training and resources for facilitators of collaborative processes and to guide the transfer of collaborative science projects to new audiences.

Bio(s):
Dr. Christine Feurt is the director of the Coastal Training Program at the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve in Maine. Dr. Feurt integrates natural and social science into stakeholder processes using the Collaborative Learning approach in order to sustain ecosystem services and build resilient coastal communities.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminarsrequest@list.woc.noaa.gov with the work 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA ScienceSeminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 February 2020

Title: Subseasonal Prediction: An Emerging Capability of US Weather Enterprise
Presenter(s): Dr. Jan Dutton, Prescient Weather
Date & Time: 26 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jan Dutton, Prescient Weather, CEO

POC: Tiffany House (tiffany.house@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Prescient Weather successfully completed a Phase II NOAA SBIR in 2018 focusing on subseasonal prediction of impact variables of importance to the energy industry. The research created an operational multi-model subseasonal forecast methodology that was then used to predict impact variables three to five weeks in advance. The presentation will discuss the science behind the product, the product implementation, and the success enjoyed since the SBIR.

Key Takeaways:
  • Subseasonal and seasonal forecasts are improving
  • A growing number of customers are buying subseasonal forecasts
  • The World Climate Service uses sophisticated capabilities to provide market-leading subseasonal and season forecasts developed with the support of the SBIR program.


Bio(s):
Dr. Jan F. Dutton is a 19-year veteran of the Weather Information Services industry. He holds a PhD in Meteorology and MBA from The Pennsylvania State University and he has served as product manager, sales manager, business development manager, and general manager at well-known companies in the industry. In his role as CEO of Prescient Weather, Dr. Dutton focuses primarily on marketing and sales in an effort to widely distribute the fantastic S2S science-to-product activities of the company.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

27 February 2020

Title: Could Oyster Reef Restoration Benefit Seafood Harvesters and Regional Economies? An Ecological-Economic Modeling Approach
Presenter(s): Dr. Scott Knoche, Director, Morgan State University, Patuxent Environmental & Aquatic Research Laboratory - PEARL, and Dr. Tom Ihde, Research Assistant Professor, Morgan State University - PEARL
Date & Time: 27 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Could Oyster Reef Restoration Benefit Seafood Harvesters and Regional Economies? An Ecological-Economic Modeling Approach

Presenter(s):
Dr. Scott Knoche, Director, Morgan State University, Patuxent Environmental & Aquatic Research Laboratory (PEARL), and Dr. Tom Ihde, Research Assistant Professor, Morgan State Univ., PEARL

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov. You may email a request for the PDF and/or mp4 recording; they may be available.

This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. This webinar will be recorded and likely available by request from Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:

In this study we explore commercial fishing related regional economic impacts resulting from different oyster management strategies associated with oyster reef restoration in Maryland's Choptank River system. First, an ecological model is used to simulate the young restored reefs currently protected from oyster harvest through designated sanctuaries. Next, the model is used to simulate the effects of different oyster management strategies on commercial fisheries harvests in the region for the following three scenarios: 1) immature protected reef, 2) mature protected reef, and 3) open oyster harvest on formerly protected reefs. Species-specific commercial harvest estimates are translated into dockside revenues by applying historic per-unit prices to biomass harvested. A regional economic impact model is then used to convert dockside revenues to economic measures such as sales, value-added, income, and employment. Ecological model results will be presented and potential regional economic impacts discussed.

Bio(s):
Dr. Scott Knoche is the Director of the Morgan State University Patuxent Environmental and Aquatic Research Laboratory (PEARL). As the Director of PEARL, Dr. Knoche leads a diverse staff with expertise in environmental education, shellfish aquaculture and genetics, fisheries biology, and ecological modelling. Dr. Knoche also maintains an active research program in his area of expertise - environmental and natural resource economics. Much of this research focuses on estimating the economic benefits of outdoor recreation and environmental restoration.

Dr. Tom Ihde is a fisheries biologist specializing in crustacean fisheries and ecosystem modeling. He integrates ecological, physical and chemical forcing, and fisheries population dynamics principles, in the context of spatial and temporal change, to provide policymakers with the quantitative information they need to make well-informed natural resource decisions. His work has largely focused on the dynamics and management of the Chesapeake Bay.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Canceled: Puget Sound river nitrogen: Partitioning trends through time and watershed sources
Presenter(s): Gordon Holtgrieve, Ph.D., H. Mason Keeler Associate Professor, University of Washington
Date & Time: 27 February 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or NOAA NWFSC- Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Gordon Holtgrieve, Ph.D.
H. Mason Keeler Associate Professor, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's NWFSC Monster seminars
NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website
To contact Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBD


Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Warm-water anomalies in the mesophotic depth range of the Southern California Bight with implications for gorgonian octocorals
Presenter(s): Elizabeth Gugliotti, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 27 February 2020
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 14817 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Elizabeth Gugliotti - NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Deep Coral Ecology Lab

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology ProgramPoint of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract:
In recent years, ‘marine heatwave' events have affected multiple ecosystems along the California coast, including kelp beds, sea stars, and pelagic ecosystems. The effect of heatwaves on cold-adapted, deep-water corals is unknown. Mortalities of gorgonian octocorals were observed along the California coast below 20 m. These mortalities were hypothesized to be a result of warm-water anomalies. This study deployed temperature loggers in 2016 at 20, 50, 100, and 200 m in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary (CINMS) to characterize warm-water anomalies in the mesophotic depth range. The in situ temperature variability observed during the 2015-2016 ENSO event informed a laboratory study to determine the upper thermal limit of the common gorgonian octocoral Adelogorgia phyllosclera, using a series of temperature assays. Warm-water anomalies in the CINMS were frequently observed at 50 and 100 m, with most of these anomalies occurring during strong ENSO months. The laboratory temperature assays suggested that the upper thermal limit of A. phyllosclera was 20°C, which was exceeded occasionally during the 2015-2016 ENSO event at depths that A. phyllosclera is known to occur. This study indicates that gorgonian octocorals at mesophotic depths are frequently exposed to warm-water anomalies that last 1.5-3.8 hours on average and that these anomalies are near the upper thermal limits of A. phyllosclera. These results provide evidence that warm-water anomalies during the 2015-2016 ENSO event could have contributed to the gorgonian mortalities observed in 2016, either directly or indirectly. Further monitoring is needed to understand the threat of ocean warming to gorgonian octocorals living at mesophotic depths.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Crumbling reefs: a natural ocean acidification laboratory in the Northeast Pacific
Presenter(s): Leslie Wickes, Thrive Blue LLC
Date & Time: 27 February 2020
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 14817 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Leslie Wickes - Thrive Blue LLC, Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology ProgramPoint of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract:
Ocean acidification (OA) over the next century will leave most known cold-water coral (CWC) reefs exposed to seawater that is undersaturated with aragonite and corrosive to their dead skeletons. Laboratory experiments and reports of Lophelia pertusa below the aragonite saturation horizon (ASH) have led to the assumption that CWC ecosystems may persist under future acidification conditions. This assumption does not consider the effects of OA to the larger reef framework or dead skeleton that comprises the bulk of the three-dimensional structure. The shallow ASH of the Northeast Pacific creates a natural laboratory for investigating the effects of OA on CWC in future ocean conditions. The current study utilized ROV surveys (n=707 2003-2015) to document the distribution of L. pertusa, in the Southern California Bight. Though widely distributed (n=171) at 313-66 m depth, the majority of sites had only sparse live patches. Aragonite saturations at L. pertusa sites were between 0.68-1.86. L. pertusa sites that had substantial cohesive reef framework, consisting of live and dead coral, were limited to shallow sites (169-66 m, n=14). The highest frequency and abundance of L. pertusa was found in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, where surveys targeted collections and characterization of reef framework above and below the ASH. Sites that experience persistent undersaturation (> 170 m) had an absence of dead-reef framework and lacked structural complexity. The absence of complexity in undersaturated conditions indicates a loss of structural integrity that we attribute to dissolution of dead reef-framework. This study set the stage for a cross-disciplinary collaborative investigation of the coral that employed in situ, structural and mechanical analyses to provide an explanation for the loss of reef complexity. The rapid shoaling of the ASH in this region provides an unprecedented opportunity to assess the ecosystem-scale effects of OA on CWC reefs.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
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2 March 2020

Title: Journey From the Beginning of the Universe: How Did We Get There?
Presenter(s): Dr. John Mather, Senior Project Scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and 2006 Nobel Prize Winner
Date & Time: 2 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or at ESSIC Conference Room 4102, 5825 University Research Ct, College Park, MD 20740,
Description:



Title:

Journey From the Beginning of the Universe: How Did We Get There?
Event site link. If you plan to attend in person, please RSVP here by Wed., February 25. Please note: your RSVP does not guarantee you a seat.

Presenter(s):

Dr. John Mather, Senior Project Scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and 2006 Nobel Prize Winner.

Sponsor(s):

University of MD Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC). Point of contact is Dr. John Yang.

Remote Access:

- Event site: http://go.umd.edu/mather. Event number: 857 457 136, Event password: essic
- To join the online event: 1. Click here to join the online event. 2. Click "Join Now".
- To join the audio conference only: US Toll: +1-415-655-0002, Global call-in numbers, Access code: 857 457 136
- For IT assistance: Cazzy Medley or Travis Swaim

Abstract:

In 1974, fearless physicists proposed to measure the Big Bang with a space observatory, the Cosmic Background Explorer, COBE. Launched in 1989, it provided the beginning of precision cosmology, supporting the expanding universe concept (misnamed the Big Bang Theory), and establishing the initial conditions for the formation of galaxies, stars, planets, and people. Our history includes self-heating by gravitational energy release in the collapse of gas clouds, self-heating by nuclear fusion in stars, explosive energy release and recycling of stellar material in supernovae, and eventual formation of planets. New space and ground observatories are poised to reveal even more. The James Webb Space Telescope, planned for launch in March 2021, will be able to see a bumblebee at the distance of the Moon. With JWST, astronomers will search for the first stars and galaxies, examine star and planet formation hidden inside dusty gas clouds, and observe exoplanets as they transit in front of their stars.


Bio(s):
John Mather is the senior project scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, where he has worked since 1976. He was the lead scientist for the COBE mission and shared the Nobel Prize in Physics (2006) for this work.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

3 March 2020

Title: Extreme Precipitation: NOAA Atlas 14 & Extreme Precipitation in New England
Presenter(s): Art DeGaetano, Director of the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and Mark Glaudemans, Director, NOAA/NWS/National Water Center, Geo-Intelligence Division
Date & Time: 3 March 2020
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: via Zoom webinar (registration required)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

Extreme Precipitation: NOAA Atlas 14 & Extreme Precipitation in New England

Presenter(s):
Art DeGaetano, Director of the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and
Mark Glaudemans, Director, NOAA/NWS/National Water Center, Geo-Intelligence Division.

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:

Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:

This webinar will feature a presentation on NOAA Atlas 14, which develops and updates precipitation frequency estimates for the U.S. states and territories by Marc Glaudemans, from the NOAA/NWS/Office of Water Prediction. Then Art DeGaetano, director of the NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, will present on Extreme Precipitation in New England.

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Implementation of multidomain Unified Forward Operators (UFO) within the Joint Effort for Data assimilation Integration (JEDI): Ocean applications
Presenter(s): Hamideh Ebrahimi, JCSDA
Date & Time: 3 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Hamideh Ebrahimi, JCSDA

Sponsor(s):
ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER SEMINAR for more information visit https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4
Meeting number: 900 826 795
Meeting password: a3YhdEPN
JOIN BY PHONE
1-877-953-0315

1-517-268-7866 (toll number)

Participant: 1262920#
The Joint Center for Satellite Data assimilation (JCSDA) is a multi-agency research center to improve the use of satellite data for analyzing and predicting the weather, the ocean, the climate and the environment. The (Sea-Ice Ocean and Coupled Assimilation) SOCA as one of the JCSDA projects, focuses on the application of JEDI to marine data assimilation . One of the goals of SOCA is to make use of surface-sensitive radiances to constrain sea-ice and upper ocean fields (e.g., salinity, temperature, sea-ice fraction, sea-ice temperature, etc.).

The focus of this research is to build the first elements toward an ocean/atmosphere coupled data assimilation capability within JEDI, with a focus on supporting and developing the assimilation of radiance observations sensitive to the ocean and atmosphere . We will present preliminary results of the direct radiance assimilation of surface sensitive microwave radiances focusing on Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Imager (GMI) for the SST Constraint and Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) for the Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) constraint.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Global Maritime Trade at the Port of Baltimore
Presenter(s): Jim Dwyer, Planning Director at the Maryland Port Administration, Maryland Department of Transportation
Date & Time: 3 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see login below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4 Room 9348
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Global Maritime Trade at the Port of Baltimore

Presenter(s):
Jim Dwyer, Planning Director at the Maryland Port Administration, Maryland Department of Transportation. Presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the mp4 recording, contact Tracy Gill.

Remote Access:

Please register https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/dwyer/event/registration.html .
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar, here.
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the mp4 recording, contact Tracy Gill.

Abstract:

We all want our “stuff” and sometimes we get it overnight; however, it takes a lot of logistical staging to make that happen. The Port of Baltimore links the Mid-Atlantic region to the global marketplace, to connect suppliers and customers for a wide variety of commodities. The Port has been around since 1706 and has seen many changes as logistics have evolved. International trade and shipping are influenced by many things, such as: the expanded Panama Canal, trade/tariff wars, mega ships, strength of US$, Coronavirus, migration of manufacturing, etc. Globalization appears to be here to stay.

Bio(s):
Jim Dwyer has been in the maritime industry since 1970. He is the Director for Planning at the Maryland Department of Transportation's Port Administration, which manages the seven state-owned cruise and cargo terminals in the Port of Baltimore. He is responsible for the Capital Program, Strategic and Facility Development Plans. Before joining the Maryland Port Administration, he was in the U.S. Coast Guard for 23 years. Mr. Dwyer holds a Master's license in the U.S. Merchant Marines and is a graduate of the Coast Guard Academy.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Linking microbial communities and biogeochemistry across the Laurentian Great Lakes
Presenter(s): Maureen Coleman, University of Chicago
Date & Time: 3 March 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Maureen Coleman, University of Chicago

Title:
Linking microbial communities and biogeochemistry across the Laurentian Great Lakes

Webinar Registration: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4302585117583410187

About the presentation: The Laurentian Great Lakes hold 20% of Earth's surface freshwater and provide essential ecosystem services. Moreover, as an interconnected waterway that spans strong environmental gradients, the Great Lakes represent a unique natural laboratory for understanding how physical, chemical, and biological forces interact to shape microbial communities and biogeochemistry. Here we explore the drivers of microbial diversity and activity across the Great Lakes, using samples collected as part of an ongoing multi-year time series. First we characterized community composition across lakes, depths, seasons, and years. We found that depth and light are strong drivers of community structure in stratified water columns. Across surface waters, we found distinct microbial signatures in each of the Great Lakes, reflecting their biogeochemical variability. To explore metabolic functions, we reconstructed hundreds of microbial genomes and created a microbial tree of life for the Laurentian Great Lakes. We mapped ecological distribution patterns for these genomes and found distinct distributions for taxa and metabolisms across lakes and depths. We focus here on two important groups for ecology and biogeochemistry, the cyanobacteria and nitrifying Bacteria and Archaea. Our work represents the first picture of microbial diversity across the entire Laurentian Great Lakes and is an essential baseline from which to monitor future ecosystem change.
About the speaker: Dr. Coleman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of the Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago. She is a microbial ecologist who studies the causes and consequences of microbial diversity in aquatic systems. Currently her lab is busy characterizing microbial communities, genomic diversity, and biogeochemistry across the Laurentian Great Lakes. She is also cultivating new microbial lineages and developing genetic tools to study their biology. She holds an undergraduate degree in biology from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from MIT. She was a postdoc at MIT & Caltech before joining the University of Chicago in 2012.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory and the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research, contact Mary Ogdahl at ogdahlm@umich.edu.

More information and webinar recordings (when available) can be found at: https://ciglr.seas.umich.edu/events/

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

4 March 2020

Title: A Robust & Effective Research & Development Enterprise
Presenter(s): John Forsythe, Sr Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere; Bryan Costa, Marine Ecologist, NOAA's NOS National Centers for Ocean Coastal Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division; Josh London, Wildlife Biologist, NOAA NMFS, AFSC National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Polar Ecosystems Program, Seattle, WA; Maria Kavanaugh, Assistant Professor, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences; and Joaquin Trinanes, Associate Professor, University of Santiago de Compostela; NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory
Date & Time: 4 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or for NOAA SIlver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
2019 NOAA Science Report Seminar Series #3: A Robust and Effective Research and Development EnterpriseThe third of four seminars in the NOAA Science Report Seminar Series.
There will be four or five speakers for each seminar; see description of third seminar below.

Presentation Titles and Speakers for March 4:Blended Satellite Water Vapor Products for Forecasters, by John Forsythe, Senior Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), Colorado State University, Fort Collins, COLeveraging partnerships and unmanned systems to map coastal elevations and nearshore depths, by Bryan Costa, Marine Ecologist, NOAA NOS/National Centers for Ocean Coastal Science/Biogeography Branch, Marine Spatial Ecology Division,Santa Barbara, CAUsing drone technology to obtain critical new estimates of harbor seals in the Pribilof Islands, by Josh London, Wildlife Biologist, NOAA NMFS, AFSC National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Polar Ecosystems Program, Seattle, WAMarine Biodiversity Observing Network (MBON) Seascape Products on CoastWatch, by Maria Kavanaugh and
Joaquin Trinanes. Maria is an Assistant Professor at Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences,Corvallis, OR. And Joaquin is an Associate Professor at the University of Santiago de Compostela; and also with NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML).

Sponsor(s):
The NOAA Research and Development Enterprise Committee, Gina Digiantonio, Emma Kelley, Laura Newcomb, and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator, Tracy Gill.

Remote Access:

Please register for the seminar at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nsrs3/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe Connect, you should test your ability to use Adobe Connect at this link. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using aMac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived andmade accessible in the near future. Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset. Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract
NOAA advances a robust and effective research and development enterprise. This seminar will include lightning talks about predicting high-impact weather events using water vapor information; using drones to map coastal elevations and nearshore depths, as well as to estimate harbor seal populations; and, the Marine Biodiversity Observing Network.

Bio(s):

John Forsythe received his B.S from the University of Maryland (1987) and M.S. from Colorado State University (1993). He is an expert in satellite remote sensing with specialty in microwave remote sensing,and serves as a PI on several NOAA JPSS, GOES-R and Hydrometeorology Testbed projects to improve and deliver new blended products to forecasters.Bryan Costa graduated from Middlebury College (03.5') with a joint degree in Biology and Environmental Studies and from the University of Maryland, College Park (09') with an MPS in Geospatial Sciences.His research interests include novel applications of state-of-the-art remote sensing and commercially available geospatial technologies. He currently is co-located with the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary in Santa Barbara, CA.
Josh London received a B.S. in wildlife sciences from the University of Washington College of Forest Resources and a Ph.D. from the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. Josh is currently a wildlife biologist with the Polar Ecosystems Program, and his research focus is population assessment and ecology of harbor seals.Maria Kavanaugh received her B.S. in Zoology, M.S. in Marine Ecology with Statistics and Oceanography minors, and Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography with a Statistics minor from Oregon State University. She is an assistant professor at Oregon State University and her research specialties are seascape ecology, remote sensing, and global change.Joaquin Trinanes received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from the University of Santiago de Compostela in 1993 and 1998 respectively. He is an Associate Professor at the University of Santiago de Compostela and works as Op. Manager of the CoastWatch Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico node at NOAA/AOML, in Miami. His research interests are focused on remote sensing, oceanography, and scalable data management and analysis.

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Title: Overview of the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research
Presenter(s): Michael Bonadonna, OFCM; C. Sim James, OFCM
Date & Time: 4 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 E W Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Michael Bonadonna, Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology, Federal Coordinator for Meteorology

C. Sim James, Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology

Remote? Join us online: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8575347776280120077

Summary: This talk will give an overview of the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology structure, history, and recent accomplishments. OFCM fosters the effective use of federal meteorological resources by encouraging and facilitating the systematic coordination of weather services and supporting research across the Federal Weather Enterprise. The principal work in coordinating meteorological activities and in the preparation and maintenance of OFCM reports, plans, and other documents is accomplished by the OFCM staff with the numerous interagency program councils, committees, and working groups.

Take Aways:
  • OFCM is a long standing office housed within NOAA that is wholly devoted to conducting effective continuous interagency work supporting federal research, policy, and operations.
  • OFCM is involved in a wide variety of topics and policies relating to Meteorological services and research across the whole of federal government. These include everything from climate model research coordination to year by year hurricane observation operations.


Bio(s):
Mr. Michael Bonadonna is the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology. Prior to this, Mr. Bonadonna served as the Secretariat for Federal Meteorological Coordination at OFCM. He held a number of roles including the Executive Secretary for the Space Weather Research, the National Space Weather Program Council, and Committee for Operational Environmental Satellites. He is a 24-year U.S. Air Force veteran having served as a Meteorologist, providing operational weather support to the US Air Force.

Mr. C. Sim James works at the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research where he coordinates Earth System Modeling and Research topics. He serves as Executive Secretary for both the National Earth System Prediction Capability Project and Interagency Weather Research Coordination Committee.. Prior to this he worked at Cherokee Nation Businesses providing support to the NOAA OAR Weather Program Office. He is a retired U.S.Navy officer having served as a Staff Oceanographer, Requirements Officer, and Officer in Charge for ashore weather facilities in assignments providing operational environmental support to the US Navy units and staffs..

POC: Outreach Librarian Erin Cheever (erin.cheever@noaa.gov)

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Title: Adapting Stormwater Management for a Changing Climate
Presenter(s): Daniel Bader, CCRUN/Columbia University and Dr. Franco Montalto, CCRUN/Drexel University
Date & Time: 4 March 2020
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (registration required, see below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Daniel Bader, Program Manager for CCRUN/Columbia University and Dr. Franco Montalto, CCRUN/Drexel University

Sponsor(s):
Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA RISA TeamPoint of Contact: Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu)

Remote Access:
Please register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/adapting-stormwater-management-march-2020-ccrun-seminar-tickets-90803404427 Recording: Event will be recorded and posted on CCRUN's YouTube page: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqxnekXINtMARnkWCEgeSKA/videos

Abstract:
Extreme precipitation events are occurring more frequently in many parts of the United States, according to the Fourth National Climate Assessment, and the frequency of these events are expected to grow further as the climate warms. Recent extreme events, such as the ~4 inches in an hour that fell in the July 8th event in Washington D.C., have illustrated the devastating impacts that heavy precipitation can bring to urban areas, including damaging and disruptive flooding, reduced drinking water and receiving water quality, and wastewater overflows. These extreme rainfall events also have exposed critical gaps in planning when it comes to effective urban stormwater and wastewater management in a changing climate. Planners and engineers for utilities, municipalities, departments of transportation, and other infrastructure sectors are beginning to do more to plan for extreme precipitation events, but these efforts have been highly variable, depending on location, and do not yet reflect a consensus on best practices for analysis or planning.An upcoming workshop organized by the Mid-Atlantic Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (MARISA) team and CCRUN, titled Adapting Stormwater Management for a Changing Climate, will synthesize the State of the Art for incorporating climate change into stormwater planning. This seminar will be a preview of that workshop. Daniel Bader, Program Manager for CCRUN at Columbia University, will outline the climatology of the Northeast, including the science of heavy rainfall and global circulation patterns. He will also discuss how Global Climate Models (GCMs) work and broadly what global projections show. Then Dr. Franco Montalto of Drexel University will demonstrate some of his work monitoring the performance of green stormwater infrastructure in extreme and non-extreme events.About the speakers:Daniel Bader is a Program Manager at Columbia University's Center for Climate Systems Research (CCSR). His primary responsibility is managing the Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA RISA Project. He has extensive experience with preparing and communicating climate science information to policy makers, specifically in states across the Northeast. In this role, he leads the climate science work of the Climate and Urban Systems Partnership (CUSP), an education product focused on connected personal interests to climate science across urban learning networks. Prior to managing CCRUN, he was a research analyst at CCSR, tasked with developing climate scenarios to be used for adaptation planning. The data he has worked with is the foundation for climate resiliency planning efforts in New York City (through the New York City Panel on Climate Change), New York State, and across the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). His educational background includes a Bachelor of Science in Atmospheric Science from Cornell and Masters in Climate and Society from Columbia.Dr. Franco Montalto, P.E. is a designer, researcher, educator, and visionary with expertise in the conceptualization, planning, and implementation of a wide range of urban sustainability and resilience projects. Through eDesign Dynamics, the engineering firm he founded in 2000, Dr. Montalto works with a wide range of clients to design and implement innovative solutions to water and other environmental infrastructure challenges in urban and urbanizing settings. As a professor and researcher at Drexel University, he develops and tests new approaches for realizing ecological, social, and economic goals in the design of the built environment, especially in the context of climate change. He is also the Director of the North American Hub of the Urban Climate Change Research Network (UCCRN).This event is FREE to attend and refreshments will be served! The seminar is livecast for those that cannot attend in person can attend online.

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Title: Empowering Young Water Scientists with the EarthEcho Water Challenge!
Presenter(s): Sean Russell, Associate Director of Youth Engagement and Partnerships for EarthEcho International
Date & Time: 4 March 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sean Russell, Associate Director of Youth Engagement and Partnerships for EarthEcho International

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: hannah.macdonald@noaa.gov (989)-657-1362

Webinar information
TBD

Abstract:

TBD
.

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5 March 2020

Title: Implementing the Evidence Act in the Department of Commerce
Presenter(s): Christine Heflin, DOC
Date & Time: 5 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 E W Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Christine Heflin, Director of the Office of Performance Excellence, US Department of Commerce

Remote? Join us online: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6545751565682317315

Abstract:
This training session discuss the Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking Act of 2018 (Evidence Act). This introductory course goes into detail about the Evidence Act-- what it is and what the requirements are.

Take Away: Key points include: overview of the Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking Act of 2018 ("Evidence Act"); implementation approach; key requirements of the Evidence Act; and evidence examples and methodologies.

Bio(s):
Chris Heflin is the Director of Performance Excellence in the US Department of Commerce. Ms. Heflin is a performance management practitioner with over thirty years of leadership in government innovation and improvement. Ms. Heflin received a B.A. in Political Science from McDaniel College and a Master's in Public Administration from the University of Maryland.

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Title: Linking the ‘what’ and the ‘where’ – how habitat type and location can affect estuarine fishes
Presenter(s): Dr. Ryan J. Woodland, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, Solomons, MD, USA
Date & Time: 5 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room 8150,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Linking the ‘what' and the ‘where' " how habitat type and location can affect estuarine fishes

Presenter(s):
Dr. Ryan J. Woodland, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, Solomons, MD, USA

Co-Authors:
- Dr. Fiona Y. Warry, Dep't of Environment, Land, Water & Planning, Arthur Rylah Institute, Heidelberg,
Victoria, AU
- Dr. Yafei Zhu, Water Studies Centre, School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton,Victoria, AU
- Dr. Ralph Mac, Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, AU
- Dr. Paul Reich, Dep't of Envir', Land, Water & Planning, Arthur Rylah Institute, Heidelberg, Victoria, AU
- Dr. Gregory P. Jenkins, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Queenscliff,
Victoria, AU; & School of Biosciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, AU
- Dr. Perran L. M. Cook, Water Studies Centre, School of Chemistry, Monash Univ., Clayton, Victoria, AU

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov. You may email a request for the PDF and/or mp4 recording; they may be available.

Remote Access:

Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/woodland/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
This webinar will be recorded and likely available by request from Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:

Estuaries are among the most productive ecosystems per unit area, but this productivity is unevenly distributed across a complex mosaic of habitats. Identifying the qualities of different habitats that influence the composition and productivity of biotic communities is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of these ecosystems. We combined field surveys, hydrological modelling and stable isotope analysis to understand the roles of habitat, hydrological connectivity, salinity and temperature in determining assemblage composition, species abundance and trophic ecology of an estuarine fish community. Hydrodynamics, vegetation matrices of macroalgae and seagrass and the presence of epiphytes on vegetation explained spatial patterns in taxonomic biodiversity, multivariate assemblage structure and the occurrence of juvenile black bream Acanthopagrus butcheri, a species that possesses ecological traits common to many demersal estuarine fish species. Juvenile bream abundance was related to vegetation composition (particularly epiphyte presence), supporting the hypothesis that juvenile habitats that provided resources or conditions that extended beyond just structure conferred more ecological advantages. This was further evidenced by stable isotope-based estimates of basal resource contributions of epiphytes. Our findings suggest that hydrodynamic connectivity with riverine water masses acts as a coarse determinant for estuarine fish communities at large spatial scales. At smaller scales, habitat-level associations influence local abundances and the identity and importance of specific trophic resources. Coupling hydrodynamic modelling with natural biomarkers provides a powerful approach for assessing the spatial context of habitat use that can help resource managers prioritize monitoring and habitat preservation efforts for coastal fish communities in a changing global environment.

Bio(s):
Ryan Woodland is an Assistant Professor at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, part of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, located in Solomons, MD. His research focuses on the role of natural and human-derived processes in shaping the structure and function of biological communities in coastal ecosystems. He received his BSc from the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, and his MS and PhD from the University of Maryland College Park. Prior to his current position, he held postdoctoral research positions at the Université du Québec Trois-Rivières in Québec, Canada, andat Monash University in Victoria, Australia.

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Title: Model Improvement via Systematic Investigation of Physics Tendencies
Presenter(s): Glen Romine, NCAR
Date & Time: 5 March 2020
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Glen Romine, NCAR

Sponsor(s):
ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER SEMINAR for more information visit https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
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Meeting number: 901 151 754
JOIN BY PHONE
1-866-756-2072
Participant: 4546287



Abstract:
The NGGPS process aims to move NOAA's model development activities toward a unified forecast system (UFS) to dramatically simplify the production suite. Simultaneously, efforts are underway to develop a skillful and reliable ensemble prediction system at convection-permitting horizontal grid spacing. The first operational implementation of a convection-permitting ensemble prediction system, known as the High Resolution Ensemble Forecast version 2 (HREF), is a multi-model conglomerate of well-tuned deterministic forecasts. Thus, the HREF is not in the spirit of the NGGPS process, yet it also provides both skillful and reliable guidance for high-impact weather that exceeds the performance of formally developed, single dynamic core (SDC), uniform-physics ensemble prediction systems, as demonstrated by several research teams from NOAA labs, universities, and other communities. Among these development teams, a group from NCAR, GSL, and EMC are developing community tools to enable a formal approach to convection-permitting ensemble design. These tools and application methods aim to improve the mean predictive skill of the model, within a continuously cycled data assimilation system, as a pathway to improve the analysis and subsequent forecasts. Additional tools will monitor error growth rates in the convection-permitting ensemble, providing much needed guidance to understand how best to boost ensemble dispersion within SDC uniform-physics ensembles, which are notoriously under-dispersive. The talk will introduce these tools and methods, demonstrate their use in ensemble design, and encourage discussion on how these approaches might be applied in the development of NOAA's future Rapid Refresh Forecast System.


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Title: Avenues of marine invertebrate acclimatization in response to rapid environmental change
Presenter(s): Hollie Putnam, Ph.D. Associate Professor, University of Rhode Island
Date & Time: 5 March 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or NOAA NWFSC- Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Hollie Putnam, Ph.D. Associate Professor, University of Rhode Island

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's NWFSC Monster seminars
NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website
To contact Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

JOIN IN PERSON
Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Auditorium
2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Maps and directions

JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join Webex
Meeting number: 900 441 597
Meeting password: D3KQpmv8

JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 900 441 597

ABSTRACTThe swiftly changing climate presents a challenge to organismal fitness by creating a mismatch between the current environment and phenotypes adapted to historic conditions. Rapid compensatory response to environmental change generated by epigenetic mechanisms and the emergent properties of symbiosis can provide a temporal buffer for genetic adaptation. My research focuses on these acclimatory mechanisms that may be especially crucial for sessile benthic marine systems, such as reef-building corals and bivalve mollusks, where climate change factors including ocean acidification and increasing temperature elicit strong negative physiological responses including bleaching, disease, and mortality. By integrating across biological scales from molecular to ecological in a series of preconditioning experiments to future temperature and ocean acidification, we documented evidence of intra and trans-generational acclimatization and parental effects in corals and clams. Furthermore, our findings support a role for parental investment and DNA methylation in phenotypic plasticity. Induction of potentially heritable phenotypic plasticity via preconditioning or parental effects may provide mechanisms with significant implications for sessile marine organism persistence under rapid climate change.

BIODr. Hollie Putnam is an Assistant Professor at the University of Rhode Island in the Department of Biological Sciences. She received a Master's of Science from California State University Northridge in 2008 studying the effects of fluctuating temperature on coral physiology, with fieldwork conducted in French Polynesia, Taiwan,and the USVirgin Islands. Her PhD awarded in 2012 from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa focused on coral acclimatization and transgenerational plasticity (TGP). Dr. Putnam currently has projects on coral and clam epigenetics, reproductive plasticity, TGP, assisted evolution, and biomineralization in Hawaiʻi, Mo'orea, Seattle, and Bermuda. Putnam's work in relation to environmentally resistant corals, is in the areas of assisted evolution, TGP and epigenetics and environmental priming.

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Title: A coral of a different color: Genetic insights to the diversity and distribution of gorgonian octocorals in the US Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Peter Etnoyer, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 5 March 2020
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 13514 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Peter Etnoyer - NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Deep Coral Ecology Lab

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology ProgramPoint of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4201985300294108429.For audio: Participants can use their computer speakers or call 415-930-5321 followed by passcode 775-994-993.

Abstract:
Genetic analyses can provide critical information to assist restoration activities in the wake of environmental assaults, like the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoMx). The damage assessment for the DWH spill showed that several species of gorgonian octocorals on rocky reefs in the mesophotic zone (50-150 m) had significantly more injury post-spill compared to pre-spill conditions, but genetic diversity was unknown at the time. To meet the goals of restoration activities, this study set out to evaluate the mtDNA mutS and CO1+ igr gene regions of two injured taxa, from across the GoMx. DNA sequences were cross-referenced with museum specimens using BLAST. Results from the mtDNA mutS gene in samples of Swiftia exserta (n = 278) revealed three haplotypes in S. exserta, but no significant differences among phenotypic color morphs. Only one haplotype was found among presumptive Hypnogorgia pendula (n = 314). Homology searches for both species revealed inconsistencies with online data bases as presumptive Hypnogorgia samples exhibited high homology with Muricea pendula. Similarly, the S. exserta sequences failed to match other S. exserta sequences in GenBank, but they matched museum specimens. Phylogenetic analyses conducted using a subsample of octocoral mutS sequences in Genbank in conjunction with our data, revealed evidence of extreme divergence within the Swiftia. This is problematic as S. exserta is the type species for this genus. Our results indicate that the genera Hypnogorgia, Muricea, and Swiftia will require additional taxonomic analyses and possibly a systematic revision. To build upon these findings, sclerite morphology will be closely examined using scanning electron microscopy, and the nuclear marker 28S will be used to verify these findings. Other genera of gorgonian octocorals were injured by the spill (Thesea, Placogorgia, Paramuricea), and these may also benefit from inclusion into a larger molecular analysis.

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Title: Comparative observations of flow intensity around Hawaiian deep-sea corals
Presenter(s): Frank Parrish, NOAA Fisheries Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 5 March 2020
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 13514 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Frank Parrish - NOAA Fisheries Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology ProgramPoint of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4201985300294108429.For audio: Participants can use their computer speakers or call 415-930-5321 followed by passcode 775-994-993.

Abstract:
Fifteen instruments placed close to deep sea corals on the slopes of 3 islands in Hawaii showed the mean current flow rates differed significantly by site and taxa. Measurements for some of the 19 coral taxa observed were limited to one island site while others were measured at all sites. Patches of coralids were measured at separate sites with the “red” Hemicorallium laauense found at areas with the lowest flow (0.5-4.9 cm/s) and the “pink” Pleurocorallium secundum seen at a higher level flow sites (12.6-18.4 cm/s) with little overlap between. A patch of Narella gigas and N. muzikae were observed only at the site with the highest flow (18.4-21.7 cm/s). Measurements of bamboo coral (Acanella dispar) and the parasitic zooanthid, gold coral (Kulamanamana haumeaae) that colonizes bamboo, were made at all three sites with flow ranging from (2.8-18.9 cm/s). The number and maximum size of gold coral colonies were negatively correlated with increasing flow, but this was not seen for the bamboo colonies. Although preliminary, these observations provide some insight as to how flow regimes form coral patches and influence diversity in deep-sea coral communities.

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10 March 2020

Title: Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center, Todd Hamill/Jeff Dobur, Southeast River Forecast Center, NOAA/NWS
Date & Time: 10 March 2020
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center (SERCC), Todd Hamill/Jeff Dobur, Southeast River Forecast Center, NOAA/NWS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

POC: Meredith Muth (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract:

Join us for the first Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8718215018617761804

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Meredith Muth (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

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Title: How to Effectively Compete for the FIS/ET/CSP FY 2021 Request for Proposals
Presenter(s): Lisa Peterson, NMFS
Date & Time: 10 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 E W Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lisa Peterson, Fisheries Information System program coordinator

Join us on the webinar by registering here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2315323403140996610

Abstract:
The Fisheries Information System (FIS), Electronic Technologies (ET), and Catch Share Program (CSP) are collectively making available (subject to appropriations) up to $5.5 million of FY2021 funding to support fisheries-dependent data projects in Regional Offices, Science Centers, Headquarters Offices, FIN programs, and State partners through the Interstate Commissions. This presentation will go through the different focus areas of the RFP and the details of what makes a good proposal, while also providing an opportunity for potential principal investigators to ask questions.

Key Takeaways:
  • This RFP supports projects that focus on Quality Management and Continuous Improvement; Data Improvements, Modernization, and Integration; Electronic Reporting and Electronic Monitoring; and Fisheries Information Network Development.
  • Pre-proposals will be due in April, full proposals will be due in June, and funded projects will be announced in September.


Bio(s):
Lisa Peterson is the Fisheries Information System program coordinator in the NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology.

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Title: What It Takes to Build a Weather-Ready Nation
Presenter(s): Louis Uccellini, PhD, NOAA Assistant Administrator for Weather Services, and Director of the National Weather Service
Date & Time: 10 March 2020
2:00 pm - 2:45 pm ET
Location: VIa webinar or in NOAA Science Center, 1301 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Seminars are available to the Public via webinar, and NOAA staff can attend in person or via webinar.

Title:

What It Takes to Build a Weather-Ready Nation
Part of the 2020 NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series. See list of seminars here.


Presenter(s):

Louis Uccellini, PhD, NOAA's Assistant Administrator for Weather Services, and Director of NOAA's National Weather Service

Sponsor(s):

2020 NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series: To provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council.

Seminar Points of Contact:
For questions contact: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov and
katie.rowley@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/uccellini/event/registration.html
After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address. If you have not used Adobe Connect before, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect at this link. Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
As the cost and societal impacts of extreme weather, water, and climate events continue to rise across the United States, the National Weather Service (NWS) has adopted a strategic vision of a Weather-Ready Nation that aims to prepare all citizens to be ready, responsive, and resilient in the face of upcoming extreme weather, water and climate events. To achieve this vision and to meet the NWS mission of saving lives and property and enhancing the national economy, the NWS must: 1) improve the accuracy and timeliness of forecasts and warnings, 2) directly connect these forecasts and warnings to critical life- and property-saving decisions at all government levels through the provision of impact-based decision support services (IDSS), and 3) provide these services to all those responsible for public safety. While the NWS has been moving in this direction for years, the shift to delivering IDSS holistically requires an agency-wide transformation, which will be discussed in this seminar. Examples of successful IDSS and lessons learned over the past 7 years will also be provided.

Bio(s):

Dr. Louis W. Uccellini is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Assistant Administrator for Weather Services, and Director of the National Weather Service. In this role, he is responsible for the day-to-day civilian weather operations for the United States, its territories, adjacent waters, and ocean areas.

Prior to this position, he served as the Director of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) for 14 years. He was responsible for directing and planning the science, technology, and operations related to NCEP's nine centers: Central Operations, Environmental Modeling Center, Ocean Prediction Center, Hydrometeorological Prediction Center, Climate Prediction Center, all in Camp Springs, MD; the National Hurricane Center in Miami, FL; Storm Prediction Center in Norman, OK; Space Weather Prediction Center in Boulder, CO; and the Aviation Weather Center in Kansas City, MO. With his leadership, the 13 year effort to plan, develop and build the new NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (the NCWCP Building) at the University of Maryland M Squared Research Center was completed; as was the implementation of a Seamless Suite of Models from the S2S to Mesoscale modeling systems based on the principle of multi model ensembles.

Dr. Uccellini was the Director of the National Weather Service's Office of Meteorology from 1994 to 1999, Chief of the National Weather Service's Meteorological Operations Division from 1989 to 1994, and section head for the Mesoscale Analysis and Modeling Section at the Goddard Space Flight Center's Laboratory for Atmospheres from 1978 to 1989.

Dr. Uccellini received his Ph.D. (1977), Master (1972) and Bachelor of Science (1971) degrees in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has published more than 70+ peer-reviewed articles and chapters in books on subjects including analysis of severe weather outbreaks, snowstorms, gravity waves, jet streaks, cyclones, and the use of satellite data in analysis and modeling applications and more recently the basis for the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, the WMO based Grand Challenge for Seamless Prediction and the Restructuring of the NWS to Build a Weather Ready Nation. He is the co-author of a widely acclaimed two-volume American Meteorological Society (AMS) monograph Northeast Snowstorms, published in 2004, and authored chapters in the 1990 AMS publication Extratropical Cyclones, the 1999 AMS publication The Life Cycles of Extratropical Cyclones, and the 2008 AMS publication Synoptic Dynamic Meteorology and Weather Analysis and Forecasting.

Dr. Uccellini is the Permanent US Representative at the World Meteorological Organization, and has served on many national and international research and field experiment programs. He has received many awards in recognition of his research and operational achievements including the Maryland Academy of Sciences Distinguished Young Scientist Award (1981), the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement (1985), the AMS's prestigious Clarence Leroy Meisinger Award (1985), the Cleveland Abbe Award (2016), and the National Weather Association's Research Achievement Awards for Significant Contributions to Operational Meteorology (1996). He was elected as President of the AMS in 2012- 2013 and served as Co-Chief Editor of Weather and Forecasting from 1988-1992. In 2001 he received the U.S. Presidential Meritorious Executive Rank Award and in 2006 he received the U.S. Presidential Distinguished Rank Award. https://www.weather.gov/organization/uccellini_louis

Are our seminars recorded?
Yes. When available these will be posted here:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

11 March 2020

Title: Realtime Coastal Observation Network (ReCON)-The story of building a flexible, high capacity ecosystem observation network
Presenter(s): Steve Ruberg, OAR/GLERL
Date & Time: 11 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library and the Office of Technology Partnerships

Presenter(s):
Steve Ruberg, OAR/GLERL, Observing Systems Researcher, Observing Systems and Advanced Technology Theme Lead

Join us on the webinar by registering here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2069688108113127181

Abstract:
Observing systems located on fixed coastal platforms, surface buoys, airborne systems, and unmanned marine systems have been deployed with the goal of improving NOAA's understanding of Great Lakes and coastal ocean ecosystems. Long-term observations allow monitoring of trends in nutrient and dissolved oxygen concentrations and under ice ecosystem conditions while real-time observations permit monitoring events such as harmful algal blooms and hypoxia.

Bio(s):
Steve is the lead of the Observing Systems and Advanced Technology (OSAT) branch at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory. Current OSAT research topics include projects such as 1) the development of Real-time Coastal Observation Network (ReCON) buoys and autonomous vehicles implementing underwater acoustics technology, video imagery, and sensor arrays applied to long-term research related to ecosystem understanding, harmful algal blooms, and a hypoxia, 2) aircraft hyperspectral imaging providing harmful algal bloom information to regional managers, and 3) the exploration and mapping of submerged sinkhole systems.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: SeaHawk-1: The First Dedicated Ocean Color CubeSat Mission
Presenter(s): Dr. Sara Rivero-Calle, University of North Carolina Wilmington
Date & Time: 11 March 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA College Park folks, NCWCP, Rm 3555,
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

NOCCG Seminar crosslisted with OneNOAA and STAR Seminars

Title:
SeaHawk-1: The First Dedicated Ocean Color CubeSat Mission

Presenter(s):
Dr. Sara Rivero-Calle, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact:
Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Abstract:
CubeSats are revolutionizing the way we make Earth Observations. These low-cost mini satellites are described as cube-shaped spacecrafts with units of 1U =10X10x10cm. SeaHawk,with a total weight of 5kg, is the first 3U CubeSat specifically designed to hold an ocean color instrument payload (HawkEye). SeaHawk was built as part of SOCON (Sustained Ocean Color Observations Using Nanosatellites, http://www.uncw.edu/socon), an ongoing “proof of concept” project at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington (UNCW). This seminar will provide an overview of SeaHawk's characteristics and mission status. HawkEye's specifications are similar to SeaWiFS (one of the most successful ocean color mission to date) in that it is an 8-band multi-spectral ocean color sensor,except band 7 was modified to improve atmospheric correction and the SNR is>50% that of SeaWiFS. However, HawkEye was designed to fit a 1U cube, it has ~130m spatial resolution, it does not saturate over land, and was built with low-cost, off-the-shelf materials. SeaHawk follows a sun-synchronous Low Earth Orbit at a nominal height of 575km, orbiting 15 times a day, with a swath of 216 x 480km and a repeat time of about 18 days. SeaHawk-1 was launched in December 2018 as part of SpaceX first ride-share mission. Once fully commissioned, data will be available at no cost through NASA's OBPG (https://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov). The ocean color community will also be able to submit requests for image acquisition (e.g. for field support) through UNCW. This project was possible thanks to the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and a Space Act Agreement between NASA and UNCW.

Bio(s):
Dr. Sara Rivero-Calle is a Post-Doctoral researcher at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Her interest in bio-optics and satellite remote sensing started at the University of Puerto Rico, where she earned her M.Sc. degree in Biological Oceanography working on the ecology of sponges in mesophotic coral reefs using Autonomous Underwater Vehicles. She then earned a PhD degree in Oceanography from Johns Hopkins University, where she studied long term changes in the North Atlantic phytoplankton communities using the Continuous Plankton Recorder survey, the largest and longest ongoing phytoplankton sampling effort. Sara is interested in projects that involve large datasets, combining remote sensing, modeling and in situ data to answer large-scale ecological questions. She is currently working on the topic of finescale variability and subpixel variability, combining satellite products, ARGOfloats, HPLC pigments and numerical models. At UNCW, Sara is Science Lead and an active member of the Management team of SOCON: Sustained Ocean Color Observations Using Nanosatellites. SOCON recently built and launched SeaHawk-1,the first ocean color CubeSat mission.

Slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov
with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Estimating Long-term Phosphorus Retention Capacity of Ohio Riverine and Coastal Wetlands
Presenter(s): Dr. Kristi Arend and Emily Kuzmick, Old Woman Creek NERR; Dr. Song Qian, University of Toledo
Date & Time: 11 March 2020
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only ,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Estimating Long-term Phosphorus Retention Capacity of Ohio Riverine and Coastal Wetlands

Presenter(s):
Dr. Kristi Arend and Emily Kuzmick, Old Woman Creek NERR; Dr. Song Qian, University of Toledo

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative

Remote Access:
Please register through GoToWebinar (https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6814344663631536387)

Seminar POCs for questions:
dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

Abstract:

Just how much phosphorus can a wetland absorb and retain over the long run? That's the question that researchers have spent the past two years investigating as part of an effort to reduce the phosphorus loading that is fueling algal blooms in Lake Erie. Aresearch team from Old Woman Creek Reserve and the University of Toledo developed a Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach to calculate the phosphorus retention capacity of wetlands with limited datasets. In this webinar, the team will share some of their key findings, management implications, and potential for other practitioners to use their monitoring guide and statistical codes to calculate the nutrient retention capacity of their wetlands. In addition to taking audience questions, the team will offer some ideas about how their work informs an ambitious new water quality initiative in Ohio.

Bio(s):
Kristi Arend is the Research Coordinator at Old Woman Creek NERR, where she has overseen the implementation and onsite expansion of the System-side Monitoring Program and has collaborated on projects related to wetland nutrient dynamics, shoreline development, and the impacts of Lake Erie water level change on wetland ecosystem indicators.

Emily Kuzmick is the Coastal Training Program Coordinator at the Old Woman Creek National Estuarine Research Reserve, where she works with environmental professionals to provide training and technical assistance relating to stormwater and nutrient management, land-use practices, species and habitat monitoring, shoreline erosion control solutions, and other identified Great Lakes coastal issues.

Song Qian is an expert in environmental and ecological statistics, particularly the applications of Bayesian statistics. His research includes several papers quantifying an Everglades wetland's assimilative capacity of phosphorus and setting ecological threshold nutrient criteria in the U.S.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminarsrequest@list.woc.noaa.gov with the work 'subscribe'in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA ScienceSeminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

12 March 2020

Title: Simulating Acidification (and linked processes) along the North American West Coast
Presenter(s): James McWilliams, PhD, Louis B. Slichter Professor of Earth Sciences in the Dept of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Institute of Geophysical and Planetary Sciences at UCLA
Date & Time: 12 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only (see access below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Simulating Acidification (and linked processes) along the North American West Coast
Seminar No.5 in the NOAA Science Seminar Series, "Stressed Out by Coastal Acidification"

Presenter(s):
James McWilliams, PhD, Louis B. Slichter Professor of Earth Sciences in the Dept of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Institute of Geophysical and Planetary Sciences at UCLA.

Co-authors: Daniele Bianchi, Pierre Damien, Curtis Deutsch, Evan Howard, Faycal Kessouri, and Lionel Renault

Sponsor(s):
Beth Turner, NOAA's National Center for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Erica Ombres, NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program (OAP), and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator Tracy Gill.

Remote Access:
Please register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/mcwilliams/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Recently a new generation of realistic, coupled atmosphere-circulation-biogeochemistry-ecosystem simulations has been developed and deployed by our team for the California Current System. Its centerpiece is a multi-decadal hindcast with fine mesoscale grid resolution, with nested subdomains and time periods for focus on particular places and processes (e.g., urban eutrophication in Southern California), as well as regional impact assessments for the future. This webinar will address motivations, methodology, and a sampling of key results. This project and its continuing extensions have meaningful implications for management of climate change at a regional level.

Bio(s):
James C. McWilliams received his college degrees in Applied Mathematics: a B.S. (with honors) in 1968 from Caltech, and a M.S. in 1969 and Ph.D. in 1971 from Harvard. After holding a research fellowship in geophysical fluid dynamics at Harvard (1971-74), he jointly established the Oceanography Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), where he became a senior scientist in 1980. In 1994 he became the Louis B. Slichter Professor of Earth Sciences in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Institute of Geophysical and Planetary Sciences at UCLA. He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences.

His primary areas of scientific research are the fluid dynamics of Earth's oceans and atmosphere, both their theory and computational modeling. Particular subjects include the maintenance of the general circulations; climate dynamics; mesoscale and submesoscale eddies; boundary layer turbulence; biogeochemical and ecosystem modeling; and coastal and nearshore waves and currents. He is a co-creator of the Regional Oceanic Modeling System, a widely used circulation code for highly turbulent currents.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Satellite Precipitation - A Historical Perspective (WEBEX ONLY)
Presenter(s): Ralph Ferraro, Chief, Satellite Climate Studies Branch, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 12 March 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: WEBEX Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Ralph Ferraro, Chief, Satellite Climate Studies Branch, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR, E/RA1, 5825 University Research Court, Suite 4000, College Park, MD 20740

Remote Access:
877-401-9225
passcode: 53339716
JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m81898ff1f845a44e65a15c40b5175a0d
Meeting password: Jpss2020!


Abstract:
The retrieval of precipitation from satellites dates back to the 1960's when TIROS-I was put into orbit, and meteorologists noted the correlation of cloud imagery to falling precipitation. From that point forward and with the launch of GOES-1 in 1975, numerous techniques based on visible and infrared imagery began to emerge. Passive microwave measurements also began to be made, first on NASA research missions, where various signals related to rainfall were evident. Moving forward in time, the first DMSP Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) was launched in 1987, and in some sense, was "a game changer" because of its operational nature and the vast amount of information that was gained from it. Then, in 1998, NOAA's next generation of sensors, including the AMSU, became useful for precipitation monitoring (although it was primarily intended for temperature and moisture sounding). At this time, NASA launched the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM), which was the real game changer in the field, because for the first time, both a passive microwave sensor and an active precipitation radar were in operation from space. Today, the best methods for precipitation retrieval (both rain and snow) use a combination of IR and MW measurements. This talk will step through a historical perspective of the critical satellite missions, the pioneers of the field who developed critical algorithms to advance the science, and explain some of the methods we used "back then" and where we are today. It will also include what is likely to emerge in the next 10 years.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Gravity at NGS: Why We Need it and How We Measure It
Presenter(s): Derek van Westrum, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 March 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Gravity at NGS: Why We Need it and How We Measure It

Presenter(s):
Derek van Westrum, National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.

Seminar Contact: Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey

Beginner Technical Content Rating: No prior knowledge of the topic is necessary.

Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.


Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3747906789496130571

Abstract:
NGS will switch to a vertical datum based on geopotential in just a few years. With that in mind, this webinar will describe “geopotential,” how it relates to gravity, and how NGS collects gravity data. Learn about relative vs. absolute gravity, terrestrial vs. airborne gravity, gravity vs. gravity gradient, and more.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

17 March 2020

Title: Investigations of the Effects of Human Inputs on Acidification & Deoxygenation in the Southern California Bight
Presenter(s): Fayçal Kessouri, Ph.D. and Martha Sutula. Ph.D., Biogeochemistry Department, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project Authority - SCCWRP, Costa Mesa CA
Date & Time: 17 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only (due to COVID-19 precautions)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Investigations of the Effects of Human Inputs on Acidification & Deoxygenation in the Southern California Bight
Seminar No.6 in the NOAA Science Seminar Series, "Stressed Out by Coastal Acidification"

Presenter(s):
Fayçal Kessouri, Ph.D. and Martha Sutula. Ph.D., Biogeochemistry Department, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project Authority (SCCWRP), Costa Mesa CA
Co-Authors: Jim McWilliams, Curtis Deutsch, Daniele Bianchi, Nina Bednarsek, Evan Howard, Lionel Renault, Karen McLaughlin, Richard Feely, Simone Alin, Richard Ambrose, Stephen Weisberg, Mark Gold

Sponsor(s):
Beth Turner, NOAA's National Center for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Erica Ombres, NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program (OAP), and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator Tracy Gill.

Remote Access:
Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/sccwrp/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The southern California Current System is especially vulnerable to ocean acidification, deoxygenation (OAH), all of which are exacerbated by global climate change. Management of local pollution sources, increasing ecosystem resilience and investment in bioremediation are all strategies specifically identified to address OAH in the California Ocean Protection Council's (OPC)Strategic Plan (2020; theplan can be found here). Disentangling the magnitude and interaction of local pollution, climate change and the biophysical and biogeochemical feedbacks requires an integrated system modeling approach carefully validated against available datasets. It also requires a patient application of this modeling system to drive management conversations about climate change adaptation and local pollution management. Other ingredients to this solution include an active and engaged stakeholder community and scientific consensus on the import of these changes to nearshore biological communities. This talk presents a case study of how a multidisciplinary team of scientists and managers are assembling the scientific ingredients to California's strategic response to climate change and its impact on OAH nearshore,including the proliferation of coastal harmful algal blooms in the Southern California Bight, a large marine embayment on the US West Coast.

Bio(s):
Dr.Fayçal Kessouri is a senior scientist in SCCWRP's Biogeochemistry Department, specializing in numerical ocean modeling of biogeochemistry and lower trophic ecosystem. His present research efforts focus on investigations of regional impact of terrestrial and atmospheric inputs and large-scale upwelling variability on acidification,deoxygenation and harmful algal blooms within the California Current System along the North American West Coast. Previous research experience includes multiple programs of observational campaigns and numerical modeling in the Mediterranean Sea, studying the deep convection process, fronts and eddies dynamics, and their impact on nutrient distribution and plankton responses. He received his M.S in oceanography from University Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris in 2012 and Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Toulouse Paul Sabatier in 2015. He joined SCCWRP in 2016.

Dr. Martha Sutula is head of the Biogeochemistry Department at the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project Authority (SCCWRP), a non-profit research institute is to enhance the scientific foundation for management of Southern California's ocean and coastal watersheds. Dr. Sutula oversees research related to eutrophication and harmful algal blooms in streams, lakes, estuaries and nearshore waters, tracking sources and fate of nutrients including stormwater and atmospheric deposition, and water quality modeling. Beyond her research activities, she focuses on linking science to management. Examples of this include her work as lead scientist to the California State Water Resources Control Board providing support to develop nutrient management (e.g. nutrient criteria, TMDLs) She received her undergraduate degree in Chemistry (with Honors) from Purdue University, her Masters of Public Health from Tulane University, and her Ph.D. from the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University. She joined SCCWRP in 2001.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Emergent Properties of Deep Convective Ensemble in Organization of Tropical East Pacific Convection (OTREC)
Presenter(s): David J. Raymond & Zeljka Fuchs, New Mexico Tech
Date & Time: 17 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or at NCWCP, Room 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Emergent Properties of Deep Convective Ensemble in Organization of Tropical East Pacific Convection (OTREC)

Presenter(s):
David J. Raymond & Zeljka Fuchs, New Mexico Tech

Sponsor(s):

ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER SEMINAR for more information visit https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

Remote Access:
JOIN WEBEX MEETINGhttps://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4
Meeting number: 900 826 795
Meeting password: a3YhdEPN
JOIN BY PHONE
1-877-953-0315
1-517-268-7866 (toll number)
Participant: 1262920

Abstract:
We postulate that the statistical characteristics of ensembles of convection over tropical oceans are actually simpler than the characteristics of individual convective cells. This postulate is based on the hypothesis that the mean characteristics of convective ensembles depend only on the static properties of the environment, i.e., horizontal wind and thermodynamic profiles plus sea surface temperature. Dynamic processes such as externally imposed convergence are assumed to have long time scales so that their action is manifested by their cumulative effects on atmospheric profiles. Several field programs studying tropical oceanic convection suggest that a small number of parameters derived from thermodynamic profiles can explain a significant part of the variance in such convection. Preliminary results from the OTREC (Organization of Tropical East Pacific Convection) project support and extend these conclusions. As with any metrics of atmospheric convection, the chaotic nature of the process introduces significant noise. Nevertheless, our results provide constraints which may be useful in the construction of parameterizations of deep convection over tropical oceans.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Advancing the Use of Blue Carbon for Coastal Systems
Presenter(s): Craig Cornu, Institute for Applied Ecology, OR; Tonna-Marie Surgeon-Rogers, Waquoit Bay NERR, MA; Coowe Walker, Kachemak Bay NERR, AK; Stefanie Simpson, The Nature Conservancy
Date & Time: 17 March 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only ,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Advancing the Use of Blue Carbon for Coastal Systems

Presenter(s):
Craig Cornu, Institute for Applied Ecology, OR; Tonna-Marie Surgeon-Rogers, Waquoit Bay NERR, MA; Coowe Walker, Kachemak Bay NERR, AK; Stefanie Simpson, The Nature Conservancy

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative

Remote Access:
Please register through GoToWebinar (https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8282053048801836802)

Seminar Contact:
dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

Abstract:
Coastal wetlands capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and permanently store carbon in wetland soils. This “blue carbon” service can be used to inform and incentivize wetland restoration; however, the science behind blue carbon and the role of carbon finance in support of coastal restoration and conservation are still emerging.
Over the past 12 years, the National Estuarine Research Reserve System and its partners have been filling key information gaps and fostering collaborations to advance understanding and application of blue carbon for the management of coastal wetlands. Recent projects are helping to quantify the carbon storage potential of coastal wetlands, predict greenhouse gas fluxes, and assess the market feasibility of using carbon offsets to support wetland restoration.

In this webinar, panelists representing four regions across the United States will share lessons learned from their work leading blue carbon projects, and offer ideas for advancing the use of blue carbon for coastal wetland management.

Bio(s):
Coowe Walker has worked at the Kachemak Bay NERR since the Reserve was designated in 1999, working in areas including leading watershed research, helping to establish the Community Council, scoping facilities, and for the past two years, serving as the Reserve Manager. Her research interests center around landscape support of stream productivity, watershed connectivity, juvenile salmon rearing habitats, and innovative science communication to support conservation and stewardship.

Craig Cornu helped found the Pacific Northwest Blue Carbon Working Group in 2014, and was stewardship coordinator with South Slough NERR for many years. He manages grant-supported research projects to help fill key blue carbon data gaps and assess the feasibility of blue carbon projects for the region.

Tonna-Marie Surgeon-Rogers has over 15 years of experience connecting science with management and engaging stakeholders in research and planning processes. She is experienced in leading NERRS Science Collaborative research and transfer projects and utilizing the Collaborative Learning approach to facilitate end user involvement in research projects.

Stefanie Simpson (Panel Moderator) is the Coastal Wetland Program Manager for The Nature Conservancy's Global Teams. She supports TNC's regional programs to develop climate finance market mechanisms and support coastal wetland restoration and conservation project development. Prior to TNC Stef worked for Restore America's Estuaries, the EPA's Office of Water, and South Carolina's ACE Basin NERR.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminarsrequest@list.woc.noaa.gov with the work 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

18 March 2020

Title: 2019 NOAA Science Report: A Sample of Research Accomplishments, including Social Science
Presenter(s): Jennifer Henderson, Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science CIRES and NOAA's Global Systems Division; David DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist, Associate College Professor, CoCoRaHS State Coordinator, Director of the NM Climate Center, New Mexico State University; Kara Salazar, Assistant Program Leader and Extension Specialist for Sustainable Communities, Illinois- Indiana Sea Grant, Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources; and Alan Haynie, Economist, NOAA NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 18 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only (due to COVID-19 precautions)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Science Report Seminar Series #4: A Sample of Research Accomplishments, including Social ScienceThe fourth of four seminars in the NOAA Science Report Seminar Series. There will be four speakers for each seminar; see description of the final seminar below.

Presentation Titles and Speakers for March 18:Improving forecaster and partner interpretation of uncertainty and confidence in risk information, by Jennifer Henderson, Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES) and Global Systems Division at NOAA, Boulder, Colorado;
Science clears the air in dust storm response, by David DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist, Associate College Professor, CoCoRaHS State Coordinator, Director of the NM Climate Center, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico;
Engaging communities with online action planning tools: Tipping Point Planner for improving water quality across the Great Lakes, by Kara Salazark, Assistant Program Leader and Extension Specialist for Sustainable Communities, Illinois- Indiana Sea Grant, Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, West Lafayette, IN;Using big data to understand data-poor fisheries, by Alan Haynie, Economist, NOAA NMFS/Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s):
The NOAA Research and Development Enterprise Committee, Gina Digiantonio, Emma Kelley, Laura Newcomb, and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator, Tracy Gill.

Remote Access:
Please register for the seminar at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nsrs4/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe Connect, you should test your abilityto use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using aMac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived andmade accessible in the near future. Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset. Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:

This seminar will include lightning talks highlighting some of NOAA's 2019 research accomplishments. Speakers will talk about improving forecaster and partner interpretation of uncertainty and confidence in risk information, dust storm warnings saving lives and reducing the economic impacts of these events, engaging communities with online action planning tools, and using big data to understand data-poor fisheries.

Bio(s):
Dr. Jennifer Henderson received her M.F.A. at Goucher College and Ph.D. at Virginia Tech University. Dr. Henderson works with stakeholders in the weather and climate communities to co-produce knowledge about improved communication of risk and uncertainty in predictive information contexts.Dr. David DuBois received his B.A. in Physics at Rutgers University, M.S. in Physics at New Mexico State University, and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science at the University of Nevada, Reno.As the State Climatologist for New Mexico, Dr. DuBois focuses on climate literacy through providing climate information to the public, speaking engagement, interviews, school demonstrations, networking, and tours. Through his faculty appointment at New Mexico University, he maintains an active research program in air quality and applied climatology.Dr. Kara Salazar has a B.S. and M.P.A. from Indiana University's School of Public and Environmental Affairs and a M.S. from the Indiana University School of Education. Additionally, she is pursuing a Ph.D. part-time in Natural Resources Social Science at Purdue University. Kara Salazar is Assistant Program Leader and Extension Specialist for Sustainable Communities, affiliated with Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, Purdue University Extension and Department of Forestry and Natural Resources. Working with multidisciplinary teams, she develops programs and resources to support planning and sustainable development strategies in communities across Indiana and Great Lakes states.Dr. Alan Haynie was an undergraduate in Economics and International Relations at Stanford University and was a NMFS/Sea Grant Marine Resource Economics Graduate Fellow at the University of Washington, from where he received his PhD. Alan is currently an economist at the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, and his research includes the spatial analysis of fisheries under changing climate, biological and market conditions and with the implementation of catch shares and other management changes.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. And visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Fish Trap Extension Kit (FTEK) for Invasive Lionfish Mitigation
Presenter(s): Brent Roeder, R3 Digital Sciences
Date & Time: 18 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library and the NOAA Technology Partnerships Office invite you to the next NOAA Innovators presentation!

Join the webinar here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6634150102106627851

Presenter(s):
Brent Roeder, P.E., R3 Digital Sciences

Abstract:
Commercial spiny lobster traps are effective at capturing lionfish in large numbers, however, they produce bycatch and are susceptible to ghost fishing. Therefore, R3 Digital Sciences (R3-DS) is developing the FTEK, an electromechanical device that extendsthe capabilities of commercial spiny lobster traps, and converts them from indiscriminate traps into “smart traps” capable of targeting specific fish types. This presentation, will provide an overview of the results of R3 Digital Sciences' Phase I/II NOAA SBIR to develop the FTEK for invasive lionfish mitigation.

Key Takeaways:
1. The Fish Trap Extension Kit (FTEK) is a technically and commercially viable solution for invasive lionfish mitigation;

2. An operational FTEK prototype was designed, built, and tested during Phase II of the NOAA SBIR program;

3. R3 Digital Sciences is pursuing opportunities to refine the FTEK for commercial sales;

Bio(s):
Roeder has more than fifteen years of experience in developing and managing innovative engineering projects. Roeder founded R3 Digital Sciences to create novel solutions by integrating additional intelligence into traditional devices and transform them into smart devices. Roeder earned an M.S. in Computer Engineering from George Mason University in 2011, and B.S. degrees in Computer Engineering and Mathematics from Virginia Tech in 2005 and 2000 respectively.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. And visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Serieswebsite for more information.
Title: Assimilation of Lidar PBL Height Retrievals into WRF Forecasts
Presenter(s): Dr. Andy Tangborn, Research Associate Professor, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Date & Time: 18 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Ct, College Park, MD 20740, USA, Room 2890
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Assimilation of Lidar PBL Height Retrievals into WRF Forecasts

Presenter(s):

Dr. Andy Tangborn, Research Associate Professor, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Center for Environmental Prediction, Environmental Modeling Center. Point of contact is Jeff McQueen.

Remote Access:

https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=m5ae2686a552304fa94b9775a5667242b
Meeting number: 900 225 327 (password m7rXGJP2et5 for mobile devices)
Phone: 866-756-2072, Participant code: 4546287#
Point of contact is Mary Hart.

Abstract:

Lidar retrievals of the planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) are assimilated into WRF model forecasts from the Plains Elevated Convection at Night Campaign (PECAN) using an ensemble approach to estimate the covariances between the PBLH height and temperature, moisture and velocity profiles within the planetary boundary layer. Corrections to the state variable profiles are largest for temperature, with smaller changes for other variables. Comparisons with sonde profiles show that these corrections mostly reduce differences with the independent observations. Significant changes are made only in the late afternoon when convective growth of the PBL occurs and the WRF model differs the most with the lidar observations.

Bio(s):
Dr. Andrew Tangborn received undergraduate degrees from the University of Washington in Mathematics and Mechanical Engineering and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Mechanical Engineering. He is currently a Research Associate Professor and is affiliated with the Department of Mathematics at UMBC, where he teaches graduate courses in data assimilation, computational fluid dynamics and wavelet transform methods.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: POSTPONED: Validation of the Polarimetric Radio Occultation and Heavy Precipitation (ROHP) data and Potential Application to Weather Modeling
Presenter(s): F. Joseph (Joe) Turk and Chi O. Ao, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA
Date & Time: 18 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

This seminar is postponed until further notice. A new date will be announced when we have one. We apologize for any inconvenience.

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
F. Joseph (Joe) Turk and Chi O. Ao, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA

Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number: 902 629 658
Password: STARSeminar

Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=me9f3b586d540b847e7aa28c848f6b3e2

Audio:
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 902 629 658


Abstract:
As stated in the recent Decadal Survey for Earth Observations from Space, the climate and weather forecast predictive capability for precipitation intensity is limited by gaps in the understanding of basic cloud-convective processes. This process lacks several observational constraints, one being the difficulty in obtaining the thermodynamic profile (i.e., vertically resolved pressure,temperature, and water vapor structure) in close proximity to convective clouds. The objective of the Radio Occultations and Heavy Precipitation (ROHP) experiment, orbiting onboard the Spanish PAZ satellite since May 2018, is to demonstrate the simultaneous capability to detect heavy precipitation along the same RO ray paths used to estimate the thermodynamic profile. While conventional RO does not directly provide this capability, PRO enhances standard RO by receiving the GNSS signals in two orthogonal polarizations (“H” and “V”). Owing to hydrometeor asymmetry, the H- and V-polarized radio signals propagating through heavy precipitation will experience differential phase delays,measurable via the ROHP polarimetric antenna. In this presentation we will discuss the on-orbit calibration and validation of the ROHP data, and present potential applications for these data in weather modeling. The ROHP calibration is performed with an extensive dataset of one year of observations, co-located with independent information from Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) precipitation products and ionospheric activity. The validation demonstrates how the calibrated products can be used as a proxy for heavy precipitation. The PRO signals also exhibit positive differential phase signatures well above the freezing level, indicating possible sensitivity to frozen hydrometeors and the cloud vertical structure. This knowledge of the presence of precipitation associated with the RO observation is useful for the evaluation and diagnosis of NWP forecast models. The use of PRO in data assimilation methods will require an observation operator that can simulate all contributions to the differential phase delay along realistic RO propagation paths, taking into account the cloud structure.

Presenter(s):

F.J.(Joe) Turk is a radar scientist at JPL, where he has been since 2009. From 1995-2009, he was a member of the meteorological applications group at the Naval Research Laboratory, Marine Meteorology Division, in Monterey, CA. He received his Ph.D. degree from Colorado State University, and his M.S. and B.S. degrees from Michigan Technological University, all in electrical engineering. His work experience has covered polarimetric weather radar, satellite passive microwave and radar observations and applications, microwave radiative transfer, polarimetric RO, and airborne radar and wind lidar observations. He is a member of NASA's Precipitation Measurement Missions science team.Chi O.Ao is a research technologist at JPL with over 15 years of experience in GNSS radio occultation (RO) receiver tracking and inversion techniques, simulation methods, data analysis, and climate applications. He leads the RO processing and applications team from multiple missions including CHAMP and COSMIC at JPL. He is currently the GNSS-RO Scientist of the Jason-CS/Sentinel-6mission, the Principal Investigator of the NASA Earth Science U.S. Participating Program for the ROHP-PAZ experiment, and a member of the Decadal Survey Incubation Study Team for the Planetary Boundary Layer.POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
Title: Recent Arctic Shipping in Bering Strait and the Russian Maritime Arctic
Presenter(s): Lawson Brigham, University of Alaska Fairbanks / Wilson Center
Date & Time: 18 March 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see description)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lawson Brigham, Visiting Researcher, University of Alaska Fairbanks & Global Fellow, Wilson Center

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA TeamSeminar Contact: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
http://accap.adobeconnect.com/arctic_shipping/event/registration.html

Abstract:
The extraordinary retreat of Arctic sea ice provides for greater marine access and potentially longer seasons of navigation throughout the Arctic Ocean. In addition, a major driver of increasing Arctic marine traffic remains natural resource development, particularly in the Russian Arctic. This talk will focus on recent marine operations and shipping in the U.S. maritime Arctic and along the length of the Russian marine Arctic.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

19 March 2020

Title: Phenotypic and transcriptomic response of farmed Atlantic surfclams to repeated heat stress
Presenter(s): Michael Acquafredda, OAR
Date & Time: 19 March 2020
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 E W Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library and the 2020 Knauss Fellowship

Presenter(s):
Michael Acquafredda, International and Domestic Liaison for Capacity Building, NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Abstract:
The Atlantic surfclam (Spisula solidissima) is vulnerable to high temperature conditions, an issue that will be exacerbated by rising ocean temperatures and one that will be problematic on shallow coastal farms. This presentation discusses the phenotypic and transcriptomic responses of farmed surfclams to heat stress, and the ability for the heat-tolerant phenotype to be passed to subsequent generations.

Bio(s):
Mike is a PhD candidate at the Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory at Rutgers University. His background is in shellfish ecology and sustainable aquaculture. Specifically, Mike's research is focused on developing the husbandry techniques for the Atlantic surfclam, breeding farmed surfclams to be better adapted to ocean warming, and evaluating the feasibility of bivalve polyculture.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Observational Needs for Marine Ecosystem Modeling and Forecasting: From Coastal Systems to the Global Ocean
Presenter(s): Dr. Antonietta Capotondi, University of Colorado/CIRES and NOAA/ESRL Physical Sciences Division
Date & Time: 19 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only (due to COVID-19 precautions)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Observational Needs for Marine Ecosystem Modeling and Forecasting: From Coastal Systems to the Global Ocean

Presenter(s):
Dr. Antonietta Capotondi, Physical Oceanographer, University of Colorado/CIRES and NOAA/ESRL Physical Sciences Division

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator Tracy Gill.

Remote Access:

Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/capatondi/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. If you have not used Adobe connect, you should can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:

Coastal regions host rich marine ecosystems and are centers of important economic activities,including fishing, shipping, and recreation. Due to the socioeconomic and ecological importance of these areas, predicting relevant indicators of the ecosystem state on sub-seasonal to interannual timescales is becoming increasingly important. Depending on the application, forecasts may be sought for physical, chemical and biological quantities. While these quantities are known to be influenced by large-scale modes of climate variability, which provide important sources of predictability, prediction capabilities are limited by insufficient observations needed for understanding the physical and biological processes involved, as well as for initialization and verification of the prediction systems. In this presentation, I will use examples from U.S.coastal applications developed in the context of the NOAA-CPO-MAPP Marine Prediction Task Force, to identify key observational requirements for facilitating improved understanding and sustaining operational ecosystem forecasting.

Bio(s):

Antonietta Capotondi is a Physical Oceanographer at the University of Colorado and the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, CO. Antonietta received a bachelor degree (“Laurea”) in Physics from the University of Pisa, Italy, where her study focused on quantum mechanics. After receiving her degree, she worked for a few years in an Italian engineering company that designed marine structures for oil exploitation, where she discovered the field of Physical Oceanography and became very interested in deepening her knowledge and understanding of ocean circulation, an interest that motivated her to pursue a PhD in Physical Oceanography in the MIT/Woods Hole Joint Program. She has been interested in understanding the role of the ocean in climate variations at interannual to decadal timescales, with a special focus on El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and its influence on the physical drivers of Northeast Pacific marine ecosystems.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Using deep-sea imagery to characterize ecosystem services associated with methane seeps
Presenter(s): Jennifer Le, OAR
Date & Time: 19 March 2020
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 E W Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library and the 2020 Knauss Fellowship

Presenter(s):
Jennifer Le, Ocean Exploration Fellow, OAR Office of Ocean Exploration & Research

Abstract:
Repositories of deep-sea imagery represent a wealth of information and knowledge that is often under-utilized. These data can be leveraged, along with novel application of biological trait analysis, to begin developing an approach for characterizing and, ultimately quantifying, deep-sea ecosystem services.

Bio(s):
Jen recently received her PhD at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in Biological Oceanography with a specialization in Interdisciplinary Environmental Research. Her background in both ecology and economics supported her dissertation work on ecosystem services associated with human-impacted systems, specifically the deep sea and urban environments.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: On a scale of 0-14, how familiar are you with the ocean acidification pHacts?!
Presenter(s): Kari St. Lawrent, PhD, Research Coordinator, Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve, and Amy Dean, MS, NOAA Data in the Classroom Education Lead
Date & Time: 19 March 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
On a scale of 0-14, how familiar are you with the ocean acidification pHacts?! An installment of the Sharing Ocean Acidification Resources with Communicators & Educators Series

Presenter(s):
Kari St. Lawrent, PhD, Research Coordinator, Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve, and
Amy Dean, MS, NOAA Data in the Classroom Education Lead

Sponsor(s):

Sharing Ocean Acidification Resources with Communicators & Educators Series, NOAA Office of Education, National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service

Remote Access:

Please register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/797833530126074883

After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.

Audio will be available thru the computer and phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:

When you hear the term ocean acidification, what does it actually mean? How is coastal acidification different from ocean acidification? This talk will give an introduction into the chemistry, causes, and processes going on in our marine waters causing them to increase in acidity. We'll also debunk some myths, learn about recent scientific findings, and give an outlook into what the future may hold for the ocean's pH. Finally, we'll look at the big picture of what this all could mean for the ocean's ecosystems.In the second half of this presentation, participants will learn how to use NOAA's new Data in the Classroom module to explore the science behind ocean and coastal acidification. Can ocean conditions can support the growth and survival of marine life, both now and in the future? The interactive module provides authentic research questions and scaled data interactions that give students the opportunity to explore this question (and more)About the Author(s):
Kari is an environmental scientist with the State of Delaware and research coordinator for the Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve. She holds a Ph.D. in oceanography from the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island and is perfectly okay being a total science nerd. She is currently the state representative on the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Acidification Network's steering committee and the co-lead for the NERRS Coastal and Ocean Acidification Workgroup.
Amy has worked in science education for 20 years. She holds a Masters Degree in Marine Biology and is fascinated by the wonderful and bizarre world of marine invertebrates. She has been working with NOAA for 15 years, managing education programs, designing curriculum and providing teacher training services. In her spare time, she is a full time teacher of Biology and Environmental Science for high school students in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Characterizing Potential Distributions of Deep-Sea Corals and Sponges Offshore the US West Coast through Spatial Predictive Modeling
Presenter(s): Matt Poti, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 19 March 2020
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 13514 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Matt Poti - NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Biogeography Branch

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology ProgramSeminar Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8814729048907734029.For audio: Participants can use their computer speakers or call 415-655-0052 followed by passcode 998-178-755.

Abstract:
Multiple agencies manage marine resources in the Northeast Pacific Ocean offshore the US West Coast. Information about the spatial distribution of sensitive biota, such as deep-sea corals and sponges (DSCS), is critical for making environmentally sound decisions related to offshore activities such as commercial fishing and energy development. Spatial predictive modeling is a cost-effective tool for identifying potential habitat in broad areas where data are sparse. For the area offshore the US West Coast, models of predicted suitable habitat were generated at 200 m resolution for ~50 DSCS taxa. DSCS occurrences were extracted from the NOAA National Deep-Sea Corals and Sponges Database. This included a large number of records from recent high-resolution visual surveys. For each taxon, a statistical model was used to relate occurrence locations to information describing the environmental conditions at these locations, including measures of seafloor topography, surficial sediment character, and oceanography. Models were fit using maximum entropy (Maxent) methods, a common approach for modeling presence-only data. Unlike in previous studies that have modeled distributions of deep-sea biota using Maxent, models were fit as regularized generalized linear models following the recent interpretation of Maxent as a point process. Two steps were taken to reduce the effects of spatial sampling bias on model predictions. First, background location data were selected from the broader set of occurrence data for all taxa. Second, occurrence data were assigned to cross-validation folds for model fitting and testing using spatial blocking. In addition, a stepwise model selection procedure was used to choose an optimal set of environmental predictors for which model performance and complexity were balanced. Model outputs include maps of the predicted distribution of suitable habitat, spatially explicit depictions of prediction uncertainty, and measures of model performance.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The State of Deep-sea Coral Protection in U.S. Waters
Presenter(s): Heather Coleman, NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program
Date & Time: 19 March 2020
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 13514 conf room,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Heather Coleman - NOAA's Office of Habitat Conservation, Deep Sea Coral Research & Technology Program

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology ProgramPoint of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8814729048907734029.For audio: Participants can use their computer speakers or call 415-655-0052 followed by passcode 998-178-755.

Abstract:
The United States has been protecting deep-sea corals and sponges from fishing impacts since the early 1980s, and new ocean observations are accelerating conservation efforts. Each U.S. regional Fishery Management Council has now protected portions of the deep-sea, although area size, impetus for creation, fishing regulations, and mechanisms of protection have varied greatly. This presentation reviews coordinated steps that Councils and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have taken to advance habitat conservation for these vulnerable and slow-growing organisms. NOAA's Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program works with Councils and other resource managers, researchers, NGOs, and fishermen to develop research priorities that guide data collection to directly inform conservation action. Compilation of both new and historic coral location data is also beginning to allow extrapolation from study sites to larger areas relevant to cross-regional management. The Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program's database maintains these data, associates them with photographs and oceanographic information, and makes them publicly available. Maps shown in this presentation display these data overlaid with areas currently protected from various types of fishing impacts and by various legal mechanisms across Fishery Management Council regions over time and according to depth. Sharing this information visually tells the story of deep-sea coral and sponge protection and lessons learned, and can inform evaluation of future conservation options.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body

20 March 2020

Title: Forecasting Green-up: It’s seems simple…but it’s not
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 20 March 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see description)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

Seminar Contact: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://uaf-accap.org/event/forecasting-green-up-its-seems-simplebut-its-not/

Abstract:

Green-up, that time when leaves burst forth from Alaska's deciduous trees has important implications for the seasonal ecology, society and even meteorology in the state. Fairbanks has a unique record of more than four decades of green-up dates. This presentation builds on work started more than 20 years ago to demonstrate how this unique observational record combined with the latest advances in weather and climate forecasting, allow for an objective forecast for the timing of green-up well before the snow has even started to melt.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: March 2020 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 20 March 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

Seminar Contact: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
http://accap.adobeconnect.com/march2020/event/registration.html

Abstract:

The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

23 March 2020

Title: The Return of Drought Impacts: California-Nevada Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Ben Hatchett, WRCC/DRI; Pete Fickenscher, NOAA NWS CA-NV River Forecast Center; Dan Macon, UCCE Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor
Date & Time: 23 March 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Drought & Climate Update, Ben Hatchett, WRCC/DRI; Drought & Climate Outlook, Pete Fickenscher, NOAA NWS CA-NV River Forecast Center; Drought & Ranching Impacts, Dan Macon, UCCE Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Scripps Institution of Oceanography, NOAA NWS CA-NV River Forecast Center, UC Agriculture and Natural Resources
Seminar Contact: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Abstract:

As has been noted pretty much everywhere recently, February was dry, dry, and more dry in much of California and Nevada. January wasn't much better. While most reservoirs are still in good shape from last year's wetter weather, impacts from the current dryness will most likely still be felt in other areas, such as agriculture, ranching, and wildfire risks. This webinar will provide an overview of the current conditions and outlook for spring as well as drought impacts on ranching.

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) March 2020 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Niño and La Niña).

Remote Access:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8680334641869679117
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

25 March 2020

Title: History and Potential of Artificial Intelligence for the Environmental Sciences
Presenter(s): Philippe Tissot, Conrad Blucher Institute - Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi
Date & Time: 25 March 2020
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Via webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

STAR Science Seminars
Note: This series will be presented online only.

Presenter(s):
Prof. Philippe Tissot, Conrad Blucher Institute - Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series: Special Seminar Series on AI



Slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2020/20200325_Tissot.pdf





Recording:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2020/20200325_Tissot.mp4



Abstract:
The field of Artificial Intelligence (AI), including applications in the environmental sciences, is evolving at an accelerating pace. Its progress has been made possible by developments in the computer sciences, the availability of larger and more comprehensive environmental data sets, and the ever-increasing availability of affordable computing power. The presentation will start with the early days of the field, including how the term was coined by John McCarthy. We will then cover the progression of the field, including its ups and downs, through a series of examples.

The American Meteorological Society AI workshops and conferences allow to track this progression. Expert systems were the method of choice in the eighties while Neural Networks took over in the nineties followed by a broadening of the methods including fuzzy logic, tree-based methods, genetic algorithms, support vector machines... At the 2019 and 2020 AMS AI conferences deep learning became by far the method of choice with 36% and over 50% of the presentations based on this new method. We will trace back this explosive growth to its roots including Imagenet, AlexNet and the importance of the datasets in a sense driving the development of these methods.

While the AI methods have changed considerably over the years, the topics not so much. The first AMS AI conference in 1998 included talks on precipitation predictions, satellite retrieval and pattern recognition, climate classification and prediction, image processing, decision aids and natural language systems. We will introduce selected environmental applications and methods developed at the Conrad Blucher Institute (CBI) to provide local operational predictions including for water levels, coastal flooding, coastal fog, and a model designed and implemented to predict the cold stunning of sea turtles. These methods take advantage of the flexibility of AI to combine real-time environmental measurements and numerical weather predictions, typically from NOAA, as the predictors to different types of AI models.

We are expecting the fast growth of AI/ML to continue and as the method is becoming one of the main approaches to better predict and gather a deeper understanding of a wide variety of complex and nonlinear processes in the earth sciences. The presentation will conclude with the introduction of some of the present AI related research questions such as the quantification of uncertainties, interpretability, incorporating domain-knowledge in model design and the further potential for AI applications in the environmental sciences.


Bio(s):
Philippe Tissot is the Interim Director of the Conrad Blucher Institute and an Associate Research Professor at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. For the past 20 years, his research has focused on the development of artificial intelligence methods and other models for the analysis and predictions of environmental systems and coastal physical processes. Projects have included the development and implementation of predictive models supporting navigation and coastal management. Other studies have included the modeling and impact of relative sea level rise and storm surge, the spatial variability of subsidence at the regional scale, tidal studies and local hydrodynamic models. His team's models have been used for over a decade for the prediction of cold stunning of sea turtles allowing to interrupt navigation ahead of these events and other preparation by local stakeholders. Other work has included ML predictions of thunderstorms and the development of ML algorithms to take advantage of 3D point clouds of marsh environments and urban runoff water quality modeling. Dr. Tissot has authored or co-authored over 40 peer reviewed articles, 200 proceedings, abstracts and technical presentations, a Physical Science textbook for future K-12 teachers, and 2 US Patents. Professor Tissot is a member and former chair of the American Meteorological Society Committee on Artificial Intelligence Applications to Environmental Science.

Seminar Contact:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
Title: Warm anomalies at depth in the northwestern Gulf of Alaska in summer 2019
Presenter(s): Nicholas Bond, PhD., Atmospheric Scientist and Washington State Climatologist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 25 March 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Warm anomalies at depth in the northwestern Gulf of Alaska in summer 2019

Presenter(s):
Nicholas Bond, PhD., Atmospheric Scientist and Washington State Climatologist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA.

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, https://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Abstract:
The causes and impacts of the warm water that occurred offshore of Kodiak Island in the summer of 2019.

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311, Access Code: 891-851-101

Seminar Contact: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 March 2020

Title: Organic Matter Dynamics in South Texas Bays and Estuaries
Presenter(s): Zhanfei Liu, PhD, Associate Professor, Marine Science Institute, The University of Texas at Austin
Date & Time: 26 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar only (for corona virus precaution)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
The impact of extreme weather events on organic matter dynamics in South Texas bays and estuaries, Seminar No. 7 in the NOAA Science Seminar Series, "Stressed Out by Coastal Acidification"

Presenter(s):
Zhanfei Liu, PhD, Associate Professor, Marine Science Institute, The University of Texas at Austin

Sponsor(s):
Beth Turner, NOAA's National Center for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Erica Ombres, NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program (OAP), and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator Tracy Gill.

Remote Access:
Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/zhanfeiliu/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Eutrophication and hypoxia are becoming more frequent and intense in coastal bays and estuaries. While inorganic parameters, such as dissolved oxygen and inorganic nitrogen, have been used to monitor aquatic systems for justifiable reasons, organic matter including dissolved and particulate forms has often not been emphasized despite their important role in biogeochemical processes in bays and estuaries. In this talk, Dr. Liu will talk about the bioavailability of riverine dissolved organic nitrogen and its molecular level characterization using advanced mass spectrometry. He will also talk about the effects of storms and hurricanes on dissolved and particulate organic matter dynamics in bays and estuaries in south Texas.


Bio(s):
Zhanfei Liu received a B.S. in chemical oceanography and M.S. in environmental science and engineering at Xiamen University, China. He received his Ph.D. in coastal oceanography in 2006 from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He then spent 3 years at Old Dominion University as a Postdoctoral Research Associate. In 2009, he joined the Department of Marine Science, The University of Texas at Austin, as an Assistant Professor and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2015. Dr. Liu's research is primarily concerned with the source, transformation and fate of biogenic and anthropogenic organic compounds in aquatic systems. Dr. Liu is working to decipher these processes both mechanistically and quantitatively. His recent research mainly focuses on the geochemical behaviors of peptides in seawater, the weathering of crude oil in marine environments, and effects of extreme weather events on biogeochemical processes in bays and estuaries.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Ocean Guardian Schools: Learn how to get involved
Presenter(s): Naomi Pollack, Ocean Guardian School Program Coordinator
Date & Time: 26 March 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Naomi Pollack, Ocean Guardian School Program Coordinator

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1035761246304441357

Abstract:
What do 134 schools with over 61,000 students from around the country have in common? They have all made a commitment to protect the health of their local watersheds, one ocean and special ocean areas like national marine sanctuaries. ​Since 2009, NOAA's Ocean Guardian School program (https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/ocean_guardian/) has supported K-12 schools to conduct hands-on watershed/ocean stewardship projects on campuses and in local communities. Please join Naomi Pollack for a program overview and learn how your school can participate and become recognized by NOAA as an Ocean Guardian School.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

30 March 2020

Title: Using Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) to Examine Feasibility of Short-Wave SmallSat Assimilation
Presenter(s): Benjamin Ruston, Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey CA
Date & Time: 30 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: WEBEX Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Benjamin Ruston, Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey CA877-401-9225
passcode: 53339716 Webex: https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m9bad8f0cae8340ec6f1f5858a44241a7Meeting Password: Jpss2020!

Abstract:
The use of hyperspectral infrared (IR) satellites in global and regionalnumerical weather prediction (NWP) data assimilation systems has shownconsistent benefit for over a decade. This began with the Atmospheric Infra-Red Sounder (AIRS) on NASA-AQUA,followed by Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOpfrom EUMETSATs EPS programme, and now the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS)from the JPSS program. Traditionally theuse of the hyperspectral IR sensors has focused on the longwave regionwavelengths of 15 " 10.2 μm or 650 " 980 cm-1. In this longwave region the interferometersIASI and CrIS exhibit better noise performance than the spectrometer AIRS. Changes to the system have not been thatdramatic. There have been small changesas the model top was raised and allowed increase spectral usage. Extension of stratospheric channel usage overland was also added. The hypsespectralsounders also helped to identify a missing stratospheric sink term formoisture, due to the bias in the fits of the moisture channels. The largest change recently added to thesystem is to account for correlated error, which has been implemented for IASIand CrIS. Additionally in thisdiscussion, we will focus on a shortwave region of wavelengths between roughly4.6 " 4.0 μm, or wavenumbers 2180 - 2500 cm-1. In this shortwave region the AIRSspectrometer has the best noise performance of the hyperspectral IR sounders,with the interferometers IASI and CrIS exhibiting higher noise. The initial test have had to restrict use ofIASI until confirmation of the validity of the forward, and tangent linearcalculations by the radiative transfer model (used by this study is theCommunity Radiative Transfer Model [CRTM] of the JCSDA) can be more thoroughlyexamined. The study will present themethods used to evaluate the channel sets, effectiveness and impacts. The toolsused in this study include the NAVGEM (NAVy Global Environmental Model) whichincludes the 4D-Var assimilation system NRL Atmospheric Variational DataAssimilation " Accelerated Representer (NAVDAS-AR). Adjoints of NAVGEM and NAVDAS-AR are used toexamine the Forecast Sensitivity to Observation Impact (FSOI), which showschange in a 24-hour forecast error norm due to assimilation of anobservation. We will also present ourpreliminary results of the statistical fit of the first-guess and analysisdepartures, Jacobians from the CRTM, and some impacts particularly from theFSOI metric. There is some indicationthat the previous truncated CrIS data with coarser spectral resolution has theslightly improved noise performance, and the AIRS spectrometer at this point isdelivering the most consistent results though work is ongoing.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Mar 30-Apr 2: Arctic Observing Summit (AOS) 2020 Program – Virtual Meeting is Free!
Presenter(s): Many; see https://aos2020agenda.org/speakers/
Date & Time: 30 March 2020
7:00 pm - 11:30 pm ET
Location: Online only,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Mar 30-Apr 2: Arctic Observing Summit (AOS) 2020 Program - Virtual Meeting is Free!
https://aos2020agenda.org/ Note: The conference time is Iceland time (GMT+0 or ET+4)

Presenter(s):
Many; see https://aos2020agenda.org/speakers/

Sponsor(s):
See here: https://www.assw2020.is/partners. TheNOAA point of contact for this notice on the NOAA seminar calendar is sandy.starkweather@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

How to join: https://aos2020agenda.org/how-to-join/

Abstract:

ASO2020 is a three-day VIRTUAL, FREE conference; more on sessions, working groups here: https://aos2020agenda.org/

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information

31 March 2020

Title: Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Northeast: Spring Flood Outlook
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center and Ed Capone, Senior Service Hydrologist at NOAA/NWS' Northeast River Forecast Center
Date & Time: 31 March 2020
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: via Zoom webinar (registration required),
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Northeast: Spring Flood Outlook

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and
Ed Capone, Senior Service Hydrologist at NOAA/NWS Northeast River Forecast Center.


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:
Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:

The webinar will feature a review of March conditions and a discussion on the spring flood potential in the Northeast U.S.

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

 

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