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Volume 2, Issue 2
April - June 2016


Paper Published on Aerosol/Cloud Interactions

Global map for long-term (1981-2011) averaged monthly mean aerosol optical thickness (AOT)

Global map for long-term (1981-2011) averaged monthly mean aerosol optical thickness (AOT)
(click to enlarge)

A recently published paper used cloud climate data records (CDRs) from Pathfinder Atmospheres Extended (PATMOS-x) and aerosol CDRs (see image) derived from PATMOS-x to conduct a multi-decadal analysis of the impact of aerosol on multiple cloud parameters for marine water-phased clouds. The analysis was able to show aerosol impacts on cloud optical depth, cloud particle size, cloud water path, and cloud fraction and found the results stratified into three distinct regimes. For the first time from satellite observations, the long-term trend in AIE over the global oceans is also examined. (A. Heidinger, andrew.heidinger@noaa.gov, A. Walther, CIMSS, andi.walther@ssec.wisc.edu)

Zhao, X.; Heidinger, A.K., Walther, A., 2015, Climatology Analysis of Aerosol Effect on Marine Water Cloud from Long-Term Satellite Climate Data Records. Remote Sens., DOI: 10.3390/rs8040300.

GOES-14 1-Minute Imagery

GOES-14 Visible image over Texas on 4/20/2016

GOES-14 Visible image over Texas on 4/20/2016
(click to enlarge)

GOES-14 collected 1-minute imagery during April and May 2016. CIRA collected the imagery, made the necessary data conversions, and sent out the data via LDM to the National Weather Service. The Hazardous Weather Testbed also started this week and its participants are taking a close look at how the imagery is useful in operations. The data collection covered the massive rains over Texas (see image). To better showcase the rapid scan imagery, the Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) programmed a "twitter bot" to automatically post recent 1-minute imagery. (T. Schmit, tim.j.schmit@noaa.gov D. Lindsey and D. Molenar, dan.lindsey@noaa.gov, debra.molenar@noaa.gov, K. Micke, CIRA, 970-491-8446, kevin.micke@colostate.edu)

 

Article on Volcanoes, ENSO, & AMOC

Long-lasting effects on the ENSO and the AMOC

Long-lasting effects on the ENSO and the AMOC
(click to enlarge)

CICS-MD Scientist Leon Chafik (NESDIS/STAR/SOCD/OPB) co-authored an article that has been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America about the climate impacts of large high-latitude volcanic eruptions. Model simulations show that these eruptions have global and long-lasting effects on both the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) (see image). In the first year following the start of the eruption, El Niño-like anomalies develop over the equatorial Pacific. The large high-latitude eruptions also trigger a strengthening of the AMOC in the first 25 years after the eruption, which is associated with an increase in ENSO variability. This is then followed by a weakening of the AMOC lasting another 30-35 years, associated with decreased ENSO variability.

The image shows temperature, precipitation, and wind anomalies following the eruption. (A) Ensemble average change (ENSv minus ENSnv) in the zonal-mean surface temperature (blue) and precipitation (green) over the Pacific basin (150°E to 90°W), for the period 4-9 months following the start of the eruption (September to February). Shading shows the approximate 95% confidence intervals (twice the SEM) of the change seen in all 20 pairs of experiments. The bold green dashed lines show the ensemble-averaged position of the ITCZ in the no-volcano and volcano simulations. (B) Ensemble average changes in near-surface wind (arrows) and SST (shading) 4-9 months following the start of the eruption. The box shows the Nino3.4 area. The contours delineate the areas where the SST anomalies are significant at the 95% confidence level using a Student t test. (C) Ensemble average changes in Nino3.4 index due to the eruption.

Collocation of NUCAPS Retrievals with CIRA Radiosonde Launches

Radiosonde temperature and dewpoint temperature profile (solid) and collocated NUCAPS retrieval (dashed) from 5/7/2016

Radiosonde temperature and dewpoint temperature profile (solid) and collocated NUCAPS retrieval (dashed) from 5/7/2016
(click to enlarge)

As part of its effort to validate NOAA Unique CrIS ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) retrievals in pre-convective environments, CIRA has begun launching radiosondes to supplement the special radiosondes launched by the NWS in anticipation of severe weather. After a test launch, two additional launches were performed from approximately 50km east of Fort Collins, CO, synchronized with the overpass of the SNPP satellite, which occurs around 1930 UTC. These launches will typically be from eastern Colorado, an area which frequently observes severe weather, but due to its elevation, it has a different environment than the central and southern plains. CIRA purchased a total of 20 radiosondes, and hopes to launch them in the next two months. The data from these balloon releases will also be shared with local NWS offices, as well as the Storm Prediction Center. The temperature and moisture profile from the radiosonde launch of 1830 UTC 7 May 2016, along with the collocated NUCAPS retrieval, is shown in the image. Above 850mb, the temperature retrieval from NUCAPS agrees quite well with the radiosonde values. The dewpoint temperature had many small scale variations which the NUCAPS retrieval, with its coarse resolution, could not capture. The broad-scale features are reasonably represented, though. Below 800mb, the NUCAPS retrieval struggled in both temperature and dewpoint temperature. This behavior is not too surprising, however, as satellite retrievals are not known to perform well near the surface. Part of the goal of this research is to blend boundary layer observations and/or model output with the NUCAPS soundings to achieve a good representation of the atmosphere in pre-convective environments. (J. Dostalek, J. Haynes, CIRA, D. Lindsey, jack.dostalek@colostate.edu, john.haynes@colostate.edu, dan.lindsey@noaa.gov)

New operational products and capabilities at JTWC

(left),(middle) Wind radii estimates based on Dvorak intensity and position estimates, and (right) radii from the NHC best track

(left),(middle) Wind radii estimates based on Dvorak intensity and position estimates, and (right) radii from the NHC best track
(click to enlarge)

Several methods developed in partnership with RAMMB have transitioned to operations at Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC). These include, a method to provide surface wind structure from routine Dvorak intensity fixes and the matching digital infrared image, an update of an objective best track analysis package that make use of these and other NESDIS produced Tropical Cyclone fixes, and a consensus method for providing wind radii forecasts (RVCN) has been implemented on the Automated Tropical Cyclone Forecast at JTWC. Both the methods to provide wind structure information on routine Dvorak intensity/location fixes and the wind radii consensus have also been recently documented in the refereed literature in (see image). (J. Knaff, K. Musgrave, C. Slocum, CIRA, john.knaff@noaa.gov, kate.musgrave@colostate.edu, chris.slocum@colostate.edu)

Knaff, J. A., C. J. Slocum, K. D. Musgrave, C. R. Sampson, and B. R. Strahl, 2016, Using Routinely Available Information to Estimate Tropical Cyclone Wind Structure. Mon. Wea. Rev., 144:4, 1233-1247, DOI: 10.1175/MWR-D-15-0267.1.

Sampson, C. R., and J.A. Knaff, 2015, A Consensus Forecast for Tropical Cyclone Gale Wind Radii. Wea. Forecasting, 30, 1397-1403, DOI: 10.1175/WAF-D-15-0009.1.

CIMSS Contributions to the Latest Operational GDAS/GFS:

On 11 May 2016, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) released a significant upgrade to the Global Data Assimilation System/Global Forecast System (GDAS/GFS). Included in the new GDAS are contributions by these NOAA-sponsored Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) projects: (1) The Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) funded a project to improve the quality control (QC) of satellite-derived winds from polar satellites titled: "MODIS- and AVHRR-derived Polar Winds Experiments using the NCEP GDAS/GFS" (NA10NES4400011; PI: Santek, Co-I: Jung). The updated QC algorithm, the Log Normalized Vector Departure (LNVD), improves on the previous QC method as it's based on vector departure, rather than wind component speed thresholds, as compared to the background. The forecast impact was generally neutral, except for a statistically significant improvement in the day-4 and day-5 500hPa Anomaly Correlation Coefficient (ACC) score for a southern hemisphere, autumn 2012 experiment. The LNVD method is now in the operational model and will be used for the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) polar winds, which are currently being monitored. (2) The National Weather Service (NWS) funded a Sandy Supplemental proposal to evaluate the impact of including Aircraft Meteorological Data Relay (AMDAR) moisture observations in the global model, titled: "Quality Control and Impact Assessment of Aircraft Observations in the GDAS/GFS" (NA13NWS4830022; PI: Santek; Co-I: Petersen). By including moisture observations from the commercial aircraft-borne Water Vapor Sensing System version two (WVSS-II) instrument in the GDAS, a statistically significant positive impact on both the moisture and precipitation forecasts at short-range was found in a 2014 warm season experiment. As a result, the WVSS-II moisture observations are now being assimilated in the operational GDAS/GFS. (D. Santek, CIMSS, B. Hoover, CIMSS, R. Petersen, CIMSS, J. Jung, CIMSS)

Snowfall Rate Update at OSPO

Water equivalent snow fall rate computed from Metop-B (left) and NOAA-19 (right) satellites on 3/3/2015

Water equivalent snow fall rate computed from Metop-B (left) and NOAA-19 (right) satellites on 3/3/2015
(click to enlarge)

Huan Meng updated the operational MHS Snowfall Rate (SFR) algorithm at OSPO on May 17. The algorithm applies to four satellites: NOAA-18, NOAA-19, Metop-A, and Metop-B (see image). The update is the result of a new algorithm calibration against National Severe Storm Laboratory (NSSL) Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor (MRMS) radar precipitation data. The main achievement of the calibration is a reduced bias in snowfall rate estimation.

Analysis of Troposheric Relative Humidity Variation in the Tropics

Depicts from top to bottom are for the Megha-Tropiques SAPHIR channels 1-6 from December and January

Depicts from top to bottom are for the Megha-Tropiques SAPHIR channels 1-6 from December and January
(click to enlarge)

CICS Scientist Isaac Moradi, Phil Arkin, and Ralph Ferraro have published an article in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. The article discusses an analysis of tropospheric relative humidity variation in the tropical region. Using measurements from the Sondeur Atmosphérique du Profil d'Humidité Intertropicale par Radiométrie (SAPHIR) onboard the low inclination Megha-Tropiques satellite. The research team calculated the mean, amplitude and diurnal peak time of relative humidity for each gridpoint in the tropical region. The results showed great variability in these critical factors, with peak times occurring at different times of day, as shown in the image. While the diurnal amplitudes is less than 10% in the middle to upper troposphere, it is up to 30% in the lower troposphere over land.

Moradi, I., P. Arkin, R. Ferraro, P. Eriksson, and E. Fetzer, 2016, Diurnal Variation of Tropospheric Relative Humidity in Tropical Regions. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 6913-6929, DOI: 10.5194/acp-16-6913-2016.

BAMS Article on the Evolution of Violent Tornadoes

An article titled "Evolution of a Long-Track Violent Tornado within a Simulated Supercell," by Leigh Orf (Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, CIMSS), is in press in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS). The article describes an ultra-high resolution simulation of a supercell that produces a long-track violent tornado. Utilizing state-of-the-art visualization and analysis software, the evolution of the tornado is described, as well as associated computational challenges related to the simulation. (L. Orf, CIMSS)

Orf, L., R. Wilhelmson, B. Lee, C. Finley, and A. Houston, 2016, Evolution of a Long-Track Violent Tornado within a Simulated Supercell. B. Am. Meteorol. Soc., DOI: 10.1175/BAMS-D-15-00073.1.

Arctic Composite Satellite Imagery Product Now Operational

Arctic composite imagery product produced using data collected on 2/5/2011

Arctic composite imagery product produced using data collected on 2/5/2011
(click to enlarge)

The Arctic Composite Satellite Imagery product developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) and Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) transitioned to operations on June 9, 2016. The product provides an hourly mosaic of geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite data over the Arctic region, which can be used to examine the evolution of weather phenomena through time series of images animations (see image). The satellite data used in the Arctic products include visible, infrared, and water vapor imagery from GOES-13, GOES-15, Meteosat-7, Meteosat-10, Himawari-8, NOAA-18, NOAA-19, Metop-A, Metop-B, Aqua, and Terra. The products can be viewed in the web-based monitoring tool (here and here). The products will be used to improve operational forecasting for the North Pacific and North Atlantic for maritime and aviation operations (Weather and Water, Local Forecast and Warning, Commerce and Transportation). NOAA operational users include Ocean Prediction Center, Weather Prediction Center, NWS Alaska, Geographic Information Network of Alaska (supporting NWS Alaska), National Ice Center, and NOAA Aircraft Operations Center. (M. Lazzara, SSEC; D. Mikolajczyk, SSEC; J. Key, jkey@ssec.wisc.edu)

New Himawari Products on RAMSDIS Online

Full-disk image of the EUMETSAT Natural Color RGB composite

Full-disk image of the EUMETSAT Natural Color RGB composite
(click to enlarge)

The Himawari-8 webpage of RAMSDIS Online has been updated with new imagery products. The EUMETSAT Dust RGB algorithm is now being produced for sectors where dust is likely to be present, including Australia, Eastern China, and Eastern Russia. A full disk version of the EUMETSAT Natural Color RGB composite (see images) is also now being produced. These products are made available in realtime on the RAMSDIS Online website (C. Seaman, D. Watson, CIRA, curtis.seaman@colostate.edu, dave.watson@colostate.edu)

 
EUMETSAT Dust RGB composite, showing dust (magenta) spreading from eastern Mongolia into northern China

EUMETSAT Dust RGB composite, showing dust (magenta) spreading from eastern Mongolia into northern China
(click to enlarge)

 

Thomas Smith Awarded 2016 NOAA Gold and Bronze Medals

NOAA medal

Thomas Smith of the Satellite Climate Studies Branch was part of a group of scientists that were awarded a NOAA bronze medal in the category, "innovations in climate science" for providing the authoritative source of sea surface temperature data for global climate monitoring and assessment. The other team members were: T. Peterson, H.-M. Zhang, B. Huang, V. Banzon, and J. Lawrimore. The Bronze Medal is the highest honor award granted by the NOAA Undersecretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, and recognizes superior performance by federal employees.

The Global Surface Temperature Dataset Team, including Tom Smith, was selected by the Secretary of Commerce to receive a Group Gold Medal for Scientific/Engineering Achievement. The other team members include: J. Lawrimore, A. Arguez, B. Huang, M. Menne, R. Vose, H.-M. Zhang, V. Banzon, B. Gleason, and C. Williams, all from NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). The team was nominated by NESDIS for ground-breaking research using NOAA's global surface temperature dataset to show there was no "hiatus" in global warming over the past 15 years.

CIRA and RAMMB Scientists Win Annual STAR Award for Best Paper

StAR Best Paper Award

StAR Best Paper Award
(click to enlarge)

John Knaff (CoRP), Scott P. Longmore (CSU), and Debra A. Molenar (CoRP) won the "Best Paper" award for the most recognized or influential peer reviewed paper among STAR publications at the 2016 third annual STAR awards ceremony that was held on June 23, 2016. Their paper is considered a "highly cited paper" by Thomson Reuters' Web of Science.

Knaff, J. A., S. P. Longmore, and D. A. Molenar, 2014, An Objective Satellite-Based Tropical Cyclone Size Climatology. J. Climate, DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-13-00096.1.

NWS San Juan Ready for New Satellite Imagery

On 25 April 2016, Jordan Gerth and Liam Gumley from the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) visited the staff at the National Weather Service (NWS) forecast office in San Juan, Puerto Rico to talk about the operational benefits of polar-orbiting satellite imagery. From 25 to 27 April, Gerth incorporated Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) spectral band imagery collected with the Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, L/X-band direct broadcast antenna into the NWS San Juan Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) funded CIMSS to install the antenna in Mayaguez to improve the timely integration of polar-orbiting satellite data into numerical weather prediction models. Meteorologists at NWS San Juan are motivated to apply this imagery to forecast challenges in Puerto Rico as a result of the interaction and the availability of new imagery in AWIPS. (J. Gerth, CIMSS)

GOES-R Direct Broadcast Receiving Station Inaugurated at CIRA

Fig. 1, Left to right: Jeff Collett, Greg Mandt, Steve Goodman, David McLean, Chris Kummerow, and Alan Rudolph

Fig. 1, Left to right: Jeff Collett, Greg Mandt, Steve Goodman, David McLean, Chris Kummerow, and Alan Rudolph
(click to enlarge)

GOES-R System Director, Greg Mandt, inaugurated the direct broadcast receiving antenna at RAMMB/CIRA on 25 April at CIRA (Figure 1). The antenna was a cost-sharing project between NOAA and Colorado State University. Visitors included Chris Kummerow (Director of CIRA), Steve Goodman (GOES-R Chief Scientist), Jaime Daniels (STAR AWG lead) visited Jeff Collett (Department Head, Atmospheric Science), David McLean (Dean of Engineering), and Alan Rudolph (VP for Research). The antenna project was started in 2015, in anticipation of the GOES-R launch in October 2016. The visit included slide presentations by several of the principal project scientists who are benefitting from GOES-R funding directed to CIRA. Attendees were also invited to the daily weather discussion at CIRA which has been an ongoing event at RAMMB since the 1980s. The telemetry was successfully tested by pointing the antenna at GOES-13 in May (Figure 2). Using this antenna, CIRA will be able to obtain GOES-R rebroadcast data, provide experimental products to the NWS in real time, and develop new algorithms and products. (D. Hillger, D. Lindsey, D. Molenar, J. Knaff, and numerous CIRA personnel, don.hillger@noaa.gov, dan.lindsey@noaa.gov, deb.molenar@noaa.gov, john.knaff@noaa.gov)

 
Fig. 2, GOES-R antenna outside the CIRA building (left), and graph showing the successful telemetry test (right)

Fig. 2, GOES-R antenna outside the CIRA building (left), and graph showing the successful telemetry test (right)
(click to enlarge)

 

High Resolution IDEA-I VIIRS AOD forecast of Fort McMurray Wildfire Plume

Fort McMurray wildfire plume

Fort McMurray wildfire plume
(click to enlarge)

New high resolution Infusing satellite Data into Environmental Applications - International (IDEA-I) smoke trajectory forecasts are shown to accurately predict the transport of smoke over Madison, WI that originated from wildfires burning near Fort McMurray in northeastern Alberta. The IDEA-I high resolution smoke trajectory forecasts use the North American Model (NAM) 3km resolution forecasts to predict trajectories initialized with aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP). AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) AOD measurements at the University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) confirms the arrival of the smoke plume over Madison WI at 23Z on May 05, 2016 (see image). Development of the high resolution VIIRS AOD trajectories is supported by the JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction Program and is part of the JPSS Fire and Smoke Initiative. In the image, the upper map shows the IDEA-I high resolution VIIRS AOD trajectory forecast valid at 23Z on May 05, 2016. The middle figures show the trajectory longitude (left) and latitude (right) distributions verses pressure. The trajectories are colored by their initial AOD value. The lower panel shows AERONET AOD measurements as a function of wavelength from the UW-Madison SSEC instrument located in Madison, WI (R.B. Pierce, brad.pierce@noaa.gov)

GOES-14 Rapid Scan Support for Fort McMurray Wildfire

GOES-14 3.9 μm image from 5/5/2016 at 2127 UTC centered over the Fort McMurray wildfire

GOES-14 3.9 μm image from 5/5/2016 at 2127 UTC centered over the Fort McMurray wildfire
(click to enlarge)

On the evening of 4 May 2016, the GOES-14 1-minute sector was moved to cover the wildfire currently affecting Fort McMurray, Alberta (Canada). Real-time links for imagery hosted at RAMMB were provided to Environment Canada forecasters, as well as the Alberta Forestry Service. One-minute imagery of the 3.9 µm band, which is used to detect hot spots, provides a significant upgrade over 15- or 30-min imagery given how quickly the fire was spreading. The image shows is example image from the afternoon of 5 May. The yellow to orange to red pixels indicate increasingly hotter temperatures associated with the most active parts of the fire. (D. Lindsey and D. Molenar, K. Micke, CIRA, dan.lindsey@noaa.gov, debra.molenar@noaa.gov, kevin.micke@colostate.edu)

GOES-R Preview for Broadcasters

The short course: "GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite)-R Preview for Broadcasters" was successfully held on June 14, 2016 preceding the AMS (American Meteorological Society) Broadcasters' Conference in Austin, Texas. There was a diverse geographic mix of 20 broadcasters from coast to coast. The goal of the course was to make broadcasters aware of GOES-R capabilities, how they can improve services to the viewing public, where to find additional information on GOES-R, and what equipment upgrades are needed to handle the new data and products. There was a mix of presentations and hands-on exercises on the ABI (Advanced Baseline Imager), the lightning mapper, and derived products. The feedback from the participants included, "Very informative, great overview, great job by the entire staff, great course!" and a request for "additional GOES-R sessions post launch." More information, including the presentations, is available at here. (T. Schmit, tim.j.schmit@noaa.gov; M. Gunshor, CIMSS, 608-263-1146; J. Gerth, C. Schmidt, S. Lindstrom)

Appointments to SPRWG

Steve Ackerman and Chris Velden from the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) have been formally reappointed to the NOAA/NESDIS Space Platform Requirements Working Group (SPRWG). The 15-member working group has been tasked by The Office of System Architecture and Advanced Planning to serve as an important advisory committee to the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture (NSOSA) study. NSOSA is exploring options for the U.S. operational satellite observing system beyond the GOES-R and JPSS series. The SPRWG will meet again in mid-July in Boulder to begin cycle 2 of their study. (C. Velden, CIMSS; S. Ackerman, CIMSS)

 
image: tag cloud of research-related words

Holz, R. E., Platnick, S., Meyer, K., Vaughan, M., Heidinger, A., Yang, P., Wind, G., Dutcher, S., Ackerman, S., Amarasinghe, N., Nagle, F., & Wang, C. (2016). Resolving Ice Cloud Optical Thickness Biases between Caliop and MODIS Using Infrared Retrievals. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 16(8), 5075-5090. DOI: 10.5194/acp-16-5075-2016">[10.5194/acp-16-5075-2016

Huang, B., Thorne, P. W., Smith, T. M., Liu, W., Lawrimore, J., Banzon, V. F., ... Menne, M. (2016). Further Exploring and Quantifying Uncertainties for Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST) Version 4 (v4). J. Climate, 29(9), 3119–3142. DOI: 10.1175/jcli-d-15-0430.1

Koner, P. K., Harris, A., & Maturi, E. (2016). Hybrid cloud and error masking to improve the quality of deterministic satellite sea surface temperature retrieval and data coverage. Remote Sensing of Environment, 174, 266–278. DOI: 10.1016/j.rse.2015.12.015

Koner, P., & Harris, A. (2016). Improved Quality of MODIS Sea Surface Temperature Retrieval and Data Coverage Using Physical Deterministic Methods. Remote Sensing, 8(6), 454. DOI: 10.3390/rs8060454

Liu, Y., Key, J., & Mahoney, R. (2016). Sea and Freshwater Ice Concentration from VIIRS on Suomi NPP and the Future JPSS Satellites. Remote Sensing, 8(6), 523. DOI: 10.3390/rs8060523

Miyazaki, Y., Coburn, S., Ono, K., Ho, D. T., Pierce, R. B., Kawamura, K., & Volkamer, R. (2016). Contribution of dissolved organic matter to submicron water-soluble organic aerosols in the marine boundary layer over the eastern equatorial Pacific. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16(12), 7695-7707. DOI: 10.5194/acp-16-7695-2016

Moradi, I., Arkin, P., Ferraro, R., Eriksson, P., & Fetzer, E. (2016). Diurnal variation of tropospheric relative humidity in tropical regions. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16(11), 6913-6929. DOI: 10.5194/acp-16-6913-2016

You, Y., Wang, N.-Y., Ferraro, R., & Meyers, P. (2016). A Prototype Precipitation Retrieval Algorithm over Land for ATMS. Journal of Hydrometeorology, 17(5), 1601-1621. DOI: 10.1175/jhm-d-15-0163.1

Zhao, X., Heidinger, A., & Walther, A. (2016). Climatology Analysis of Aerosol Effect on Marine Water Cloud from Long-Term Satellite Climate Data Records. Remote Sensing, 8(4), 300. DOI: 10.3390/rs8040300

 

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