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NOAA Science Seminar Series
2016 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

19 December 2016

Title: Use of Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) in the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Hydrology Initiative
Presenter(s): Andi Walther, Samantha Tushaus, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Date & Time: 19 December 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: 8th floor Aerospace Building - 10210 Greenbelt Rd, Lanham MD 20706
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Andi Walther, Samantha Tushaus, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS), University of Wisconsin-Madison Andrew Heidinger, NOAA/NESDIS Madison, WI

Sponsor(s): JPSS Science Seminar for December POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov Remote Access 877-402-9225 pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mc290bf3203ede98fb8bd79ade2e32a2c Meeting number: 743 105 446 Host key: 613704 Meeting password: Jpss2016!

Abstract: The JPSS Hydrological Initiative aims to build a forum for hydrology-related project teams to coordinate activities including algorithm development, comparison studies and engaging users of our products. The algorithm working group at University of Wisconsin-Madison focus on developing cloud and precipitation retrievals using the visible and near-IR range of the spectrum. In this seminar talk we will present the status of cloud microphysical properties retrievals at day and night. present the development of rain detection and rain rate retrievals using co-located NEXRAD data. outline a path to come to spectrally consistent liquid water path from VIIRS

15 December 2016

Title: Applying deep-sea coral science to fishery management in New England
Presenter(s): Michelle Bachman, New England Fishery Management Council
Date & Time: 15 December 2016
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Michelle Bachman, New England Fishery Management Council Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6358301299655438340

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of a NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program webinar series to highlight research, exploration, and management of deep-sea corals and sponges around the U.S. Seminar POC: Heather.Coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract: The New England Fishery Management Council has recognized the importance of protecting deep-sea coral habitats from the negative effects of fishing since 2005, when Lydonia and Oceanographer Canyons on the southern flank of Georges Bank, U.S.A. were closed to monkfish fishing. Since then, the Council has designated additional canyons and seamounts as habitat areas of particular concern to highlight their biodiverse, vulnerable deep-sea communities. Currently, the Council is developing a comprehensive plan to protect deep-sea corals off the New England coast from the impacts of fishing gear. Fishery managers are required to use the best available science in the development of their plans. The Council has consulted with experts on the forefront of deep-sea exploration and research in order to ensure that we are using the most up-to-date information. These collaborations have afforded the opportunity to guide study plans so that data are available to support management decisions. In 2011, only a few of the Georges Bank canyons were considered well studied by the Council's Habitat Plan Development Team, but the body of coral science in New England has grown significantly in recent years. Presently, direct visual sampling, high resolution terrain data, and habitat suitability modeling provide a robust foundation for the design of coral management zones. Fishery managers are key consumers of data products about deep-sea ecosystems, and it is important for the scientific community to continue to make these products accessible to a range of stakeholders involved in the fishery management process, including managers, fishermen, and environmental groups.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: In-situ measurements of environmental variables at three Hawaiian deep sea coral beds
Presenter(s): Frank Parrish, NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 15 December 2016
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Frank Parrish, NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6358301299655438340

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of a NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program webinar series to highlight research, exploration, and management of deep-sea corals and sponges around the U.S. Seminar POC: Heather.Coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract: Current meters were used to measure the flow rate, direction, and temperature of water movement at three sites where the sea floor morphology and the dominant coral community differed (even-bottom with Coralliidae, ledgetop site with Keratoisidinae & Kulamanamana haumeaae, pinnacle summit with K. haumeaae). Duration of the deployments ranged between 7 and 30 months and covered periods running from 2005-2013. The average flow rate was found to be slowest (4.5 cm/sec) at the ledge-top site, and fastest (13.6 cm/sec) at the even-bottom site where the north-south orientation of the current remained the most consistent. The timing and intensity of flow appeared related to tidal forces, but the temporal scale of the cycle was markedly different between the ledge-top site which was located on the west coast of the Big Island of Hawaii and the two other beds located at the southeast end of the island of Oahu. Smaller-scale differences in flow rates within and just outside each coral bed were identified using independent flow meters placed to estimate a range of values acceptable to coral settlement and growth. Understanding the composition of these coral assemblages and relating in-situ environmental observations to broader scale oceanography can improve our ability to model deep sea coral occurrence.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: FishStats: A toolbox for combining stock assessment, habitat, ecosystem, and climate research
Presenter(s): Dr. James Thorson, Statistical Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 15 December 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3, Room 3404, 1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. James Thorson (Statistical Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Fisheries Quantitative Ecology and Socioeconomics Training (QUEST) Program Point of Contact for questions about this seminar: Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov Remote Access Information: https://goo.gl/M8b0Q8

Abstract: NOAA conducts a wide variety of research, ranging from global physical-ocean models to assessment models for small-scale fisheries. Researchers have developed different approaches and software tools to provide advice about climate impacts, essential fish habitat, and fish stock status (among others). However, recent developments in spatio-temporal modelling promise to provide a single framework for conducting climate, habitat, ecosystem, and fishery assessments. In this talk, James Thorson introduces www.FishStats.org, a toolbox of public software ranging from index standardization (SpatialDeltaGLMM) to multispecies models of environmental drivers and fish interactions. SpatialDeltaGLMM has been used in stock assessments in the Pacific and North Pacific Fisheries Management Councils, and could be applied nation-wide to generate a consistent picture of abundance trends and environmental impacts. However, nationwide use faces two major hurdles: (1) improved and harmonized access to regional survey and fishery data, and (2) regional testing and evaluation relative to existing methods. He hypothesizes that clearing the bar for use in stock assessment (i.e., review by regional Scientific and Statistical Committees) will allow for rapid adaption of spatio-temporal models to habitat, ecosystem, and climate assessments. About the speaker: James Thorson is a member of the Stock Assessment team at the NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA. He received a Master's degree studying with Jim Berkson at Virginia Tech, and a Ph.D. studying with Andr Punt at the University of Washington, where he was also a NOAA Fisheries/Sea Grant Fellow. His research interests include life history theory, meta-community models, biological variation across space and time, and meta-analysis. Archive of past seminars: http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/quest/quest-webinars

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Predator effects on host-parasite interactions
Presenter(s): Jenna Malek, 2016 Knauss Executive Fellow, US Marine Mammal Commission
Date & Time: 15 December 2016
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jenna Malek, 2016 Knauss Executive Fellow, US Marine Mammal Commission For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: Both parasitism and predation may strongly influence population dynamics and community structure separately or synergistically. Predator species can influence host'parasite interactions, either by preferentially feeding on infected (or uninfected) hosts"and thus altering parasite prevalence patterns"or by affecting host behavior in ways that increase host susceptibility to parasites. In this study, we tested if predators (the mud crab, Panopeus herbstii, and the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus) influence interactions between the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica and 2 of its most prevalent parasites, Perkinsus marinus and Haplosporidium nelsoni. Using a combination of field and laboratory experiments, we tested for predatory effects on the prevalence and intensity of parasite infections and on oyster immune response (phagocytic activity). Our results consistently demonstrated that crabs do not influence parasite infections in oysters at either individual or population levels. Thus, even though predators often have strong top-down direct and indirect effects on marine communities, we found their influence on host'parasite interactions to be minimal in this system.

Bio(s): Originally from Connecticut, Jenna's love of the ocean took her to the University of Maine for her Bachelors before starting a graduate career studying oysters. After completing a MS right down the road in College Park, she earned her PhD at the University of Georgia studying how the environment affects host-parasite interactions in coastal systems.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The Scientific Heritage of the December 1976 Argo Merchant Oil Spill
Presenter(s): Doug Helton, Regional Operations Supervisor, NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration
Date & Time: 15 December 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Doug Helton, Regional Operations Supervisor, NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is laurie.bauer@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. For Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN only) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin at bottom of plugin page works fine.

Abstract: On December 15, 1976, the tanker Argo Merchant ran aground on Nantucket Shoals, off the Massachusetts Coast. A week later, the vessel broke in half, spilling nearly 8 million gallons of heavy fuel oil. The incident is still one of the largest oil spills in U.S. history, and one of the first spills where NOAA had a significant scientific response role. But not the last. Lessons learned from the Argo Merchant and other spills over the past 40 years have improved NOAA's ability to respond and restore the impacts of oil spills. This presentation will summarize the environmental and scientific heritage of the Argo Merchant oil spill and it's pivotal role in the history of NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration.

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Performance of Potomac River's "Dominant" Vallisneria americana Genotypes in Greenhouse Mesocosm Competition Experiments
Presenter(s): Shanie Gal-Edd, 2016 Knauss Executive Fellow, Strategic Policy & Planning Analyst; Office of Policy, Planning & Evaluations; NOAA-OAR
Date & Time: 15 December 2016
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Shanie Gal-Edd, 2016 Knauss Executive Fellow, Strategic Policy & Planning Analyst; Office of Policy, Planning & Evaluations; NOAA-OAR For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: The population of Vallisneria americana within the Potomac River appears to be dominated by two genotypes. In order to test the hypothesis that their dominance is due to phenotypic superiority in terms of clonal propagation and growth, a series of greenhouse mesocosm experiments were conducted to compare the dominant genotypes with other rare genotypes from the Potomac River.

Bio(s): Shanie is currently a Master's student in University of Maryland's Plant Science program studying Conservation & Restoration Ecology of the Chesapeake Bay. She earned her B.S. in Biology & Ecology while conducting entomology research at the USDA Agricultural Research Station. Prior to studying ecology, she earned a B.A. in Psychology with concentrated coursework in Business and Economics. Most recently, Shanie was a U.S. Fish & Wildlife Directorate Fellow in the Migratory Birds Program Branch of Population and Habitat Assessment, where she initiated and managed Project FlockTogether, a crowdsourcing platform to enable mass-processing of aerial migratory waterbird survey photos.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

14 December 2016

Title: New England Cod Collapse and the Climate (Reprise)
Presenter(s): Kyle Meng, Assistant Professor, Bren School and Dept. of Economics, University of California, Santa Barbara
Date & Time: 14 December 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 10153
Description:

OneNOAAScience Seminar Series Due to limited phone lines the first time this seminar was presented (on 11/3/16), we are offering it again.

Presenter(s): Kyle Meng, Assistant Professor, Bren School and Dept. of Economics, University of California, Santa Barbara. Speaker will be presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; Seminar; seminar host is david.moe.nelson@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Despite aggressive management efforts, New England's iconic cod fisheries have been declining for over three decades, leading recently to a controversial sixmonth ban on all Gulf of Maine cod fishing. The cause of this decline remains debated, though recent fishery literature highlights the potential role of environmental conditions. This paper quantifies and details the mechanism behind a key environmental driver: climate. Since 1980, 17% of the decline in Gulf of Maine adult biomass can be attributed to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the dominant climatic phenomenon in the North Atlantic. Because NAO has a recruitment effect that persists as larval cod mature, our finding implies that observed NAO events can help forecast future cod biomass.

Bio(s): An economist with training in engineering and atmospheric physics, Kyle examines past empirical settings that inform upon a future under anthropogenic climate change. His research explores the relationship between adverse local weather due to the El Nin Southern Oscillation and global spatial patterns of violence and food trade; quantifies climatic drivers for fishery collapse, and examines how policies can induce low-carbon energy transitions. Kyle has published in Nature, PNAS, PLOS ONE, and the American Economic Review. He received his PhD from Columbia University and bachelor's from Princeton University.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Promises and Challenges in Assimilation of Infrared and Microwave All-sky Satellite Radiances for Convection-Permitting Analysis and Prediction
Presenter(s): Professor Fuqing Zhang, Penn State University
Date & Time: 14 December 2016
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP Auditorium, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Professor Fuqing Zhang, Penn State University Seminar sponsor: Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation Audio / conference call: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479 Passcode: 9457557 International: 1-517-345-5260

Abstract: The impacts of assimilating GOES-R all-sky infrared brightness temperatures on tropical cyclone analysis and prediction were demonstrated through a series of convection-permitting observing system simulation experiments using an ensemble Kalman filter under both perfect and imperfect model scenarios. Assimilation of the high temporal and spatial resolution infrared radiances not only constrained well the thermodynamic variables, including temperature, moisture and hydrometeors, but also considerably reduced analysis and forecast errors in the wind fields. The potential of all-sky radiances is further demonstrated through an additional proof-of-concept experiment assimilating real-data infrared brightness temperatures from GOES-13 and Himawari-8. An empirical flow-dependent adaptive observation error inflation (AOEI) method is proposed for assimilating all-sky satellite brightness temperatures with an ensemble Kalman filter. The AOEI method adaptively inflates the observation error when the absolute difference (innovation) between the observed and simulated brightness temperatures is greater than the square root of the combined variance of the uninflated observational error variance and ensemble-estimated background error variance. This adaptive method is designed to limit erroneous analysis increments where there are large representativeness errors, as is often the case for cloudy-affected radiance observations. To better assimilate all-sky microwave radiance from polar-orbiting satellites, we begin to modify the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) to ensure that the cloud and precipitation particle scattering properties for calculating microwave radiances are consistent with the particle properties and size distributions internal to microphysics parameterization schemes. Using microphysics-consistent cloud scattering properties generates much greater variety in the simulated brightness temperature fields across the different microphysics schemes than the traditional use of effective radius. It is our expectation that the use of microphysics-consistent cloud scattering properties in the CRTM will help developing a more self-consistent tool for analyzing and constraining microphysics schemes, and to improve all-sky microwave radiance assimilation for convection-permitting analysis and prediction. See http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Introducing the NOAA Institutional Repository
Presenter(s): Stanley Elswick, Sarah Davis and Jennifer Fagan-Fry, NOAA Central Library, IR Team
Date & Time: 14 December 2016
11:00 am - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAAScience Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Stanley Elswick, Sarah Davis and Jennifer Fagan-Fry, NOAA Central Library IR Team

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library; seminar host is library.reference@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6. The 11:30AM webinar will be recorded and archived on the NOAA Central Library website.

Abstract: Join us to learn about the newest NOAA Library service: the NOAA Institutional Repository (IR). Attend a special presentation and demo at 11:30 ET or get one-on-one assistance at any time to get your questions answered. Refreshments will be served. Who Should Attend? Anyone interested in NOAA research and scientific literature.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

13 December 2016

Title: Enhancing Global Climate Change Adaptation Capacity in the Pacific Small Island Developing States
Presenter(s): Britt Parker, Senior Climate and International Specialist, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program and John J. Marra, PhD, Climate Service Director, Pacific Region, NOAA's NCEI
Date & Time: 13 December 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Britt Parker, Senior Climate and International Specialist, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program and John J. Marra, PhD, Climate Service Director, Pacific Region, NOAA's NCEI

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is david.moe.nelson@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Pacific leaders continue to call for assistance as they strive to understand, predict, and adapt to a changing climate. The development and delivery of actionable information about climate patterns and trends - and their impacts on communities, businesses and ecosystems - is essential to many aspects of policy, planning, and decision-making. Consultation with decision makers is critical to ensuring such information is useful, useable and used. NOAA, working through the Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), undertook a two-year, $2.0 million program from 2012-2014 to support climate change adaptation in the Pacific Small Island Developing States by conducting a series of activities to enhance scientific and technical capacity. These activities were designed to strengthen end-to-end climate services and adaptation capabilities working with the Pacific Island Meteorological Services and other regional organizations to support robust and sustained capacity development consistent with the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS). With an emphasis on engagement and consultation between service providers and users, activities carried out over the life of the project included the Pacific Islands Climate Services Forum, a series of in-country climate service dialogues, updated products and services, the advancement of core capabilities of the countries to deliver products and services focused on regional issues, and culminated in the release of the climate services storybook electronically and via web presence (http://pacificislandsclimate.org/csstories/).

Bio(s): Britt Parker is the Senior Climate and International Specialist for NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program. Britt serves as the Climate and International Coordinator for the NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program. She works with the Federal, State/Territorial, Local and International partners to coordinate planning, inform policies and activities to address the impacts of climate change to coral reef ecosystems and dependent communities. She also coordinates international program activities and engages with key international partners to improve management of coral reefs globally in the face of climate change, unsustainable fishing, and land-based sources of pollution. She has provided technical expertise to multiple USAID related programs and projects including the US Coral Triangle Support Program, the NOAA-USAID Marine Support Partnership, and the NOAA-USAID Enhancing Global Climate Change Adaptation Capacity in Pacific Small Island Developing States project. John J. Marra, PhD., is the NOAA/NCEI Climate Services Director for the Pacific Region, based in Honolulu, HI. For over 20 years he has been working to bridge science, policy, and information technology to address issues related to natural hazards risk reduction and climate adaptation planning. His particular area of expertise is the development and dissemination of data and products associated with coastal inundation and erosion. John served as the lead on the NOAA-USAID Enhancing Global Climate Change Adaptation Capacity in Pacific Small Island Developing States project.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

9 December 2016

Title: How NOAA Views Snow from Space: A Product Survey
Presenter(s): Peter Romanov, CUNY/CREST and NOAA/NESDIS, College Park, Maryland and Jeff Key, NOAA/NESDIS, Madison, Wisconsin
Date & Time: 9 December 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC2, Room 8246,1325 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and remotely
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series NESDIS-STAR/OWP Seminar

Presenter(s): Peter Romanov, CUNY/CREST and NOAA/NESDIS, College Park, Maryland and Jeff Key, NOAA/NESDIS, Madison, Wisconsin

Remote Access: Remote attendance is via GotoWebinar. Registration link is below. Dial-in information is provided after registration. https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6080416228760286466

Abstract: The NOAA Satellite and Information Service has a variety of satellite products for estimating snow cover and snow properties from both geostationary and polar-orbiting satellites. Visible imagers provide the extent of snow cover as binary maps, and also the fraction of snow cover within each image element (pixel). Passive microwave instruments provide snow cover, snow depth, and snow water equivalent. There are also snow products that use multiple instruments, and others that have an interactive element. This presentation will provide an overview of NOAA's snow products, briefly describing each and providing a high-level assessment of their strengths and weaknesses. International snow product intercomparison projects will also be discussed.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

8 December 2016

Title: A Tale of Two Canyons: ROV Surveys Highlight Differences in Species Composition and Abundances of Deep-Sea Corals off New England
Presenter(s): Martha Nizinski, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service National Systematics Laboratory
Date & Time: 8 December 2016
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Martha Nizinski, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service National Systematics Laboratory Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1899112046442171396

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of a NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program webinar series to highlight research, exploration, and management of deep-sea corals and sponges around the U.S. Seminar POC: Heather.Coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract: Numerous submarine canyons incise the continental margin of eastern North America. As part of the Northeast Regional Deep-Sea Coral Initiative (2013-2015), several under-explored canyons were selected to document occurrences of deep-sea corals and to characterize benthic ecosystems and habitats. Two canyons of particular interest, Nygren and Heezen canyons, are relatively large, shelf-incising canyons that occur furthest northeast within US waters. Prior to 2013, little was known about these canyons; virtually no contemporary coral data were available. Two expeditions, using ROVs, were conducted in these canyons to collect contemporary data relative to deep-sea coral distributions, abundances, and habitats. In total, nine ROV surveys were completed in these canyons, during which more than 60 hrs of video were taken. Although similar in size, these canyons differ in morphology, in coral diversity and abundances of corals, and the assemblage structure of corals also differs within each canyon. Significant differences, which correlate with habitat and depth, were observed in species composition and distribution of corals. Defining the composition and distribution of fauna inhabiting vulnerable marine ecosystems is critical for effective management and conservation of these living resources. Findings suggest coral habitats in these canyons are good candidates for conservation priorities.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Understanding the Online Positioning User Service - OPUS (National Geodetic Survey)
Presenter(s): Dave Hatcher, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 8 December 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dave Hatcher, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/235389319211059969. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States:+1 (562) 247-8321 Access Code: 876-400-222 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar.

Abstract: OPUS is a popular NGS tool which helps survey-grade GPS users tie their local surveys to the National Spatial Reference System. By leveraging the processing software used to manage the Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS) network, OPUS improves raw GPS results to within a few centimeters of accuracy. We will describe how various OPUS options work, explain typical OPUS reports and errors, and discuss emerging issues and opportunities.

Bio(s): Dave Hatcher, a geodesist in the NGS Spatial Reference System Division, leads the OPUS help desk and improvements to OPUS outreach.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Seminar cancelled - Vancouver Fraser Port Authority Enhancing Cetacean Habitat and Observation (ECHO) program: working to reduce the impact of vessel traffic on cetaceans
Presenter(s): Jason Wood, PhD. Senior Research Scientist, SMRU Consulting North America and Orla Robinson, M.Sc. Program Manager, ECHO Program, Vancouver Fraser Port Authority
Date & Time: 8 December 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Seminar is cancelled

Presenter(s): Jason Wood, PhD. Senior Research Scientist, SMRU Consulting North America and Orla Robinson, M.Sc. Program Manager, ECHO Program, Vancouver Fraser Port Authority.

Sponsor(s): Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov WEBINAR Join WebEx meeting: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D480225282%26UID%3D4294960187%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAJQ0s2_XDx1rVETZI1uMVOoi2TtpPSuQwdaNebSMODcNZAGPL9sHhVA4VgNavoJCRh8-eJwoXFQaBqeBSMfW0hV0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm18b52160ce1b8634eec0d875acd0f3d8 Join by phone 1 (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 806 453 453 ABSTRACT The ECHO program is a collaborative initiative aimed at better understanding and managing the cumulative impact of commercial vessel activities on at-risk whales throughout the southern coast of British Columbia, Canada and shared US waters. Underwater noise produced by commercial vessels has been identified as a key threat by Fisheries and Oceans Canada in a number of at-risk whale recovery strategies. With primary shipping routes through the region transiting critical habitat for an endangered resident killer whale population comprising just 80 individuals, the collaborative initiative is advancing a series of individual research projects to inform the development of mitigation and management options that will lead to a quantifiable reduction of noise impacts from vessels. Orla Robinson will provide an overview of the ECHO Program and projects, as well as progress towards reducing vessel noise threats. Jason Wood will highlight key findings from two ECHO projects including: regional ambient noise baseline analysis and a comparison of Southern Resident killer whale response to noise from commercial vessels (ships) and whale watch boats. BIOs "rla Robinson provides strategic advice and direction to Vancouver Fraser Port Authority on issues that intersect both port related activities and at-risk whale species. She has led the development of, and is Program Manager for, the Enhancing Cetacean Habitat and Observation (ECHO) Program. The ECHO program is a collaborative research and management initiative which coordinates the efforts and resources of multiple stakeholders to better understand and manage the potential threats to at-risk whale species that may arise from commercial vessel activities throughout the southern coast of British Columbia. "rla is an experienced environmental specialist with over 18 years technical experience working on a broad range of environmental projects, including: collaborative research programs; environmental impact assessments; regulatory approvals; hydrogeological and hydrological assessments; water resource assessments; contaminated site investigations and soil and groundwater remediation projects. "rla holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Earth Sciences from University College Cork, Ireland and a Masters degree in Hydrogeology and Groundwater Resources from University College London, UK. Jason Wood manages the SMRU Consulting North America offices (USA and Canada). He has over 15 years of experience studying acoustic ecology and behaviour in airborne, substrate (i.e. seismic), and waterborne communication. Following his PhD at the University of California, Davis, he held post-doctoral fellowships at Stanford University in the Geophysics and Otolaryngology departments. Following this he taught an undergraduate field based bioacoustics course through the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories for Beam Reach and is currently an affiliate assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Washington. He also led the research department at The Whale Museum in Friday Harbor. For the past decade his work has focused on marine mammals and the potential impacts of anthropogenic sounds on these animals. These studies have involved the development of complex study designs and the implementation of acoustic, statistical and, spatial analyses and modelling.

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Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 8 December 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: Demonstrating Relevance: Applying Lessons on Management Effectiveness at Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Sarah Fangman, Superintendent, Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 8 December 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sarah Fangman, Superintendent, Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8722150141802774274

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract: Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary is a small, remote marine protected area off the coast of Georgia that hosts a vibrant and diverse community of marine life. The reef's scattered rocky outcroppings and ledges provide home for an abundance of marine life including over 200 species of fish and more than 900 species of invertebrates. While the sanctuary protects an abundance of marine life, very few people know about it, and even fewer visit. With few users and very little awareness the sanctuary even exists, sanctuary staff began an evaluation process to examine the MPA's relevance and how to move the site forward into the future. This webinar will describe how the site designed and completed an analysis of the sanctuary's education, outreach and resource protection programs and how staff are working to bring more awareness to a small, remote marine protected area and ensure management effectiveness.

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Title: Two Decades of Science Collaboration with Cuba
Presenter(s): Fernando Bretos Trelles, Curator of Ecology, Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science
Date & Time: 8 December 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC-3 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Fernando Bretos Trelles, Curator of Ecology, Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Library; point of contact is Judith.Salter@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 ext. 135).

Remote Access: For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: The larvae of fish, coral and crustaceans as well as migratory sea turtles, sharks and marine mammals flow between our countries, depending on healthy habitats for survival. The US lies upstream from Cuba and hence depends on Cuban biodiversity for the health of its coastal habitats from south Texas to coastal Massachusetts.In light of the recent rapprochement between the US and Cuba, science diplomacy has proven a powerful force to bring together two countries after decades of isolation. Mr. Bretos will discuss his efforts since 1998 to study Cuba's coral reefs and marine wildlife and discuss the challenges facing Cuba in light of an impending wave of tourism and market pressure.

Bio(s): Mr. Bretos directs the Cuba Marine Research and Conservation Program CubaMar.org, a Project of The Ocean Foundation. He has directed major marine biodiversity expeditions, coral reef health studies and marine wildlife conservation programs. He has studied a population of green sea turtles on seven beaches at Guanahacabibes National Park located on the extreme western tip of Cuba. Mr. Bretos also directs the Trinational Initiative for Marine Science and Conservation in the Gulf of Mexico and Western Caribbean, a multinational program initiated in 2007 to restore coastal and marine resources shared by the three nations of the Gulf of Mexico: Cuba, Mexico and the United States. Since 1998 his work has built bridges between our countries through joint research on marine resources shared by countries that are separated by only 90 miles of ocean. The larvae of fish, coral and crustaceans as well as migratory sea turtles, sharks and marine mammals flow between our countries, depending on healthy habitats for survival. The US lies upstream from Cuba and hence depends on Cuban biodiversity for the health of its coastal habitats from south Texas to coastal Massachusetts. Mr. Bretos is also Director of MuVE (www.miamisci.org/muve) at the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science (www.miamisci.org) a volunteer based habitat restoration project that empowers South Florida residents to restore urban coastal ecosystems such as mangroves, dunes and tropical hardwood forests. As Curator of Ecology he is also helping design marine science based exhibits for a 250,000 square foot state-of-the-art museum and aquarium where the Museum will soon relocate. A 2011 Kinship Fellow and 2010 Audubon Together Green Fellow, he holds a Master's degree in Marine Affairs and Policy from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and a bachelor's degree in biology from Oberlin College.

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Title: Fine-scale Habitat Use and Behavior of a Nearshore Fish Community: Nursery Functions, Predation Avoidance, and Spatiotemporal Habitat Partitioning
Presenter(s): Stuart Munsch, NSF Graduate Research Fellow/Alumnus, presenting same quarter as defending; University of Washington School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: 8 December 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Stuart Munsch, NSF Graduate Research Fellow/Alumnus, presenting same quarter as defending; University of Washington School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Abstract: We have a limited understanding of habitat use and behavior in nearshore fish communities because they are rarely observed in situ. Consequently, ecologists recommend a process-based conceptualization of nursery habitats, but lack knowledge of nursery processes on fine scales along shore, and studies in controlled settings suggest that context-dependent behaviors allow fish to balance predation avoidance with other objectives, but there is little observational corroboration of these behaviors in situ. We used a long-term dataset of underwater observations to quantify the fine-scale habitat use and behavior of a shallow estuarine fish community. We asked, Within species, how does behavior vary with habitat context and developmental stage?' and Do species partition habitats in space and time?' We found that smaller fish occupied shallower depths where predators were less abundant; smaller fish schooled in larger groups; pelagic fish schooled in larger groups in deeper water; demersal fish schooled in larger groups when occupying the water column; and species partitioned habitats by depth and season. Additionally, smaller fish were proportionally less abundant along deep shorelines created by intertidal armoring. Overall, habitat use was suggestive of nursery functions, including ontogenetic habitat shifts, provision of predator refuge, and appropriate food/predation risk tradeoffs. Additionally, fish behaved in a manner consistent with adaptive decision-making to avoid predation, and time and space may be important axes on which transient juveniles partition habitats. Some nursery functions appeared to be mediated by a shallow depth gradient, which may be compromised by shoreline infrastructure and rising sea levels along built shorelines.

Bio(s): I'm a nearshore ecologist that primarily studies fish ecology along modified shorelines. I recently earned a Ph.D. from the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences where my research focused on ecological effects of seawalls and piers on nearshore fish. This research is being applied to improve fish habitats along the urban Elliott Bay (WA) waterfront as part of a seawall rebuild. Prior to attending UW, I earned a B.S. in Biology from Gonzaga University, completed a research apprenticeship with Friday Harbor Laboratories, and interned with US Naval Facilities Engineering Command Northwest and the Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group.

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7 December 2016

Title: Seasonality in zooplankton and fish assemblages over the eastern Bering Sea shelf in cold years
Presenter(s): Dr. Elizabeth Siddon, Alaska Fisheries Science Center and Dr. Lisa Eisner, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 7 December 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL - Oceanographer Room (Bldg 3 Room 2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115 Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Elizabeth Siddon (Auk Bay Laboratory) and Lisa Eisner (Auk Bay Laboratory) Seminar sponsor: AFSC/PMEL EcoFOCI Fall Seminar Series; seminar host is Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/895817277 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 895-817-277

Abstract: Climate-mediated oceanographic changes have led to protracted periods of above- or below-average water temperatures over the eastern Bering Sea shelf in recent years. Various ecosystem components, from phytoplankton to marine birds, have shown dichotomous responses to these temperature stanzas. Understanding within-stanza responses have enabled modeling projections of the ecosystem under future climate scenarios. To expand this understanding, zooplankton and fish assemblages were examined seasonally across three cold years to understand seasonal and interannual variability within a climate stanza. Within each season, differences in assemblage structure by year and spatially (relative to a priori defined ecoregions) over the shelf were examined. Environmental indices of temperature, salinity, and sea ice were assessed to determine what variables delineate species assemblages. Zooplankton assemblage variations were due to species composition and life history stage. Assemblages varied more across seasons and ecoregions than among years. Below pycnocline temperature and salinity, and sea ice (spring) were related to spatial and interannual changes in assemblages. Walleye Pollock, Sebastes spp., Sand Lance, and Northern Rock Sole contributed to the spring fish assemblages in every year, with the greatest variation in species occurring in 2009.Within each season, fish assemblages were delineated along longitudinal and latitudinal gradients. Overall, patterns of assemblage structure were not consistent with pre-defined ecoregions, but tended to follow broader environmental and spatial gradients. In addition, assemblage structure in 2009 was unique and indicates that within-stanza variability may complicate modeling projections based on ecosystem-level responses to climate changes.

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Title: Regional and Climate Forcing on Forage Fish and Apex Predators in the California Current: New Insights from a Fully Coupled Ecosystem Model
Presenter(s): Jerome Fiechter, Research Scientist, Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: 7 December 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jerome Fiechter, Research Scientist, Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Abstract: A fully coupled ecosystem model is used to describe the impact of regional and climate variability on changes in abundance and distribution of forage fish and apex predators in the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem. The ecosystem model consists of a biogeochemical submodel embedded in a regional ocean circulation submodel, and both coupled with a multi-species individual-based submodel for two forage fish species (sardine and anchovy) and one apex predator (California sea lion). Output from the model demonstrates how regional-scale (i.e., upwelling intensity) and basin-scale (i.e., PDO and ENSO signals) physical processes control species distributions and predator-prey interactions on interannual time scales.The results also illustrate how variability in environmental conditions leads to the formation of seasonal hotspots where prey and predator spatially overlap. While specifically focused on sardine, anchovy and sea lions, the modeling framework presented here can provide new insights into the physical and biological mechanisms controlling trophic interactions in the California Current, or other regions where similar end-to-end ecosystem models may be implemented.

Bio(s): Dr. Jerome Fiechter is a research scientist at the University of California in Santa Cruz. Over the past few years, his research has been focused on using state-of- the art modeling tools to investigate ecosystem variability and trophic interactions in the broader California Current region. More specifically, he studies linkages between environmental variability, prey availability, and the foraging ecology of key marine species at local and regional scales. In addition to research activities, he has been involved as a member of a PICES working group on regional climate modeling, as well as an invited contributor to NOAA workshops on ecosystem tipping points and on projecting marine mammal distributions in a changing climate.

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6 December 2016

Title: Gulf of Mexico Migratory Blueways: Pathways and Conservation
Presenter(s): Dr. Jorge Brenner, Associate Director of Marine Science, The Nature Conservancy, Houston, Texas. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: 6 December 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Jorge Brenner, Associate Director of Marine Science, The Nature Conservancy, Houston, Texas. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: The Nature Conservancy is working with numerous partner institutions and researchers to increase the understanding of marine migratory species in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, corridors, and aggregation areas as well as the barriers that impact their ability to complete their migratory cycles. Data on migration pathways and stepping stones from 26 different migratory fish, sea turtle, marine mammal and bird species has been gathered, synthesized, and analyzed in GIS. Spatial hotspots for diversity and multi-species migratory corridors were derived to determine which regions of the Gulf are the most critical for the migration of these species. Corridors were analyzed in conjunction with the extent of spatial threats that may represent barriers for completing migratory cycles. Recently the Conservancy released the reports of phase I of this project. These reports provide a series of science-based recommendations to increase the viability of these populations and opportunities for conserving their capacity to migrate throughout the Gulf of Mexico. Results from this initiative aim at improving our capacity to assess and manage the areas that these species depend on and suggest a series of geographic priorities for restoring the habitats they use as stepping stones while migrating in the Gulf and Caribbean Sea.

Bio(s): Dr. Jorge Brenner is an Associate Director of Marine Science with The Nature Conservancy. The focus of his work is marine biodiversity conservation, spatial analyses, ecological economics, climate change adaptation and spatial tools development. He has experience conducting research in marine species ecology, biodiversity informatics, coastal zone management, ecosystem services valuation, geographic information systems (GIS), sea-level rise and coastal resilience and spatial conservation planning. He has worked in the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea of Cortez and Mediterranean. He has a MSc. in GIS and Remote Sensing from Monterrey Tec in Mexico, and a Ph.D. in Marine Science and Ecosystem Services from the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya in Spain. In his current position with The Nature Conservancy in the Gulf of Mexico large marine ecosystem he oversees species to habitat to whole system conservation projects, supports multinational conservation planning efforts, online coastal resilience and biodiversity decision support tools development and collaborates with a variety of partnership networks, including Mexico and Cuba. Dr. Brenner is currently a member of several initiatives around the Gulf that seeks its restoration, and has previously participated with the National Academies.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Nitrogen cycling in eutrophic systems: Case studies in Lakes Erie and Taihu
Presenter(s): Silvia Newell, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University
Date & Time: 6 December 2016
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Silvia Newell, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: margaret.lansing@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6163754811897031172

Abstract: Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (HABs) in Lake Taihu and western Lake Erie are driven largely by agricultural nitrogen (N) and phosphorus. Cyanobacterial community dominance and HAB development may depend on ammonium (NH4+) availability, and increased NH4+ has been linked to increased toxin production. Microcystis, the dominant toxic cyanobacterial genus in both lakes, cannot fix atmospheric N2; consequently, it must compete for NH4+ with other primary producers. Understanding the factors that govern N cycling and NH4+ availability is therefore crucial for identifying conditions that stimulate and maintain HABs.

Bio(s): Silvia Newell is an Assistant Professor at Wright State University in Dayton, OH. She has a Ph.D. in Geosciences from Princeton University. Her dissertation focused on biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in low-oxygen marine environments in Chesapeake Bay and the Arabian Sea. For her post-doctoral work, first at Princeton and then at Boston University, she continued her exploration of the nitrogen cycle in the Sargasso Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, and Cape Cod. Currently, her work at Wright State focuses on hypereutrophic Lake Erie, Lake Okeechobee, and Lake Taihu in China, as well as local research on the Great Miami River and small lakes.

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2 December 2016

Title: A look back at the History of the NOAA Corps
Presenter(s): Albert "Skip" Theberge, Acting Chief of Reference, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 2 December 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Albert "Skip" Theberge, Acting Chief of Reference, NOAA Central Library

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6. NOTE: The recording of the webinar is now available in the archives: http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/news/archivebrownbags.html For NOAA Corps meeting info please contact: Eric Johnson (eric.t.johnson@noaa.gov) and Skip Theberge (albert.e.theberge.jr@noaa.gov)

Abstract: This presentation will look back at the history of the Commissioned Service of the Department of Commerce including its origins in the Coast and Geodetic Survey, some of its outstanding leaders, and some of its accomplishments. The time period covered will extend from the Civil War up to 1970 when NOAA came into being and the Commissioned Service became known as NOAA Corps.

Bio(s): Albert "Skip" Theberge has been with NOAA and its predecessor since 1969. He served twenty-seven years with NOAA Corps, retiring as a Captain in 1995. He became associated with the NOAA Central Library shortly after retirement and is presently Acting Chief of Reference. He commanded two NOAA ships, served as field party chief of both hydrographic and geodetic survey crews, and managed two major mapping projects - a NOAA/DOE mapping geothermal mapping program and the NOAA NOS Exclusive Economic Mapping Program that pioneered many aspects of multi-beam mapping and GPS use within NOAA during his career in NOAA Corps. He has received both Department of Commerce and NOAA awards including a NOAA Distinguished Career Award, a DOC Gold Medal as part of the NOAA Science Team that helped design the Sant Ocean Hall of the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History, and recently NOAA Administrator's Awards as part of the teams that discovered and identified the wreck of the Coast Survey Steamer Robert J. Walker and helping recognize the sacrifice of four Weather Bureau personnel lost on an Ocean Weather Station vessel during World War II.

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1 December 2016

Title: Lionfish: Alien Invaders from the Indo-Pacific
Presenter(s): Kelly Drinnen, NOAA Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary and Marlies Tumulo, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 1 December 2016
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Webinar - See Description for more details
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kelly Drinnen, NOAA Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary and Marlies Tumulo, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/808023776495815681 Location: Online Webinar

Title: Lionfish: Alien Invaders from the Indo-Pacific

Abstract: Lionfish"venomous fishes native to the Indo-Pacific and Red Sea"are the first invasive species of fish to establish themselves in the Western Atlantic. Join us to learn about the impacts these voracious predators are having on Atlantic, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico ecosystems. Learn what NOAA and its partners are doing to combat this invasion. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: From population structure to eDNA: Next-generation sequencing technology opens a window into the biology of deep-sea corals
Presenter(s): Meredith Everett, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 1 December 2016
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Meredith Everett, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6999533182439150596

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of a NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program webinar series to highlight research, exploration, and management of deep-sea corals and sponges around the U.S. Seminar POC: Heather.Coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract: One of the primary challenges in the study of deep-sea corals remains the ability to collect samples. Emerging sequencing technologies are enabling additional understanding of deep sea corals by overcoming the analysis concerns associated with small sample sizes and providing opportunities for increased non-destructive sampling. We are applying sequencing techniques to determine levels of connectivity among populations of Primnoa pacifica across southeast Alaska. Next-generation sequencing also has the potential to increase our opportunities for sampling by enabling us to look at environmental DNA (eDNA). Environmental DNA methods require only a sample of water from close proximity to the specimen in question, and thus may be easier to obtain on a greater number of expeditions.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: U.S. Fisheries and Deep-Sea Coral Habitats: Policy, Science and Conservation
Presenter(s): Tom Hourigan, NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program
Date & Time: 1 December 2016
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 12514 and Online Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Tom Hourigan, NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6999533182439150596

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of a NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program webinar series to highlight research, exploration, and management of deep-sea corals and sponges around the U.S. Seminar POC: Heather.Coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Abstract: Over the last decade, the United States has begun to take a systematic approach to protect deep-sea coral habitats from fishing impacts. This presentation reviews the coordinated steps in policy, research, and management that NOAA has taken to advance conservation of vulnerable deepwater habitats. In 2009, NOAA's Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program began a series of multiyear, regional research programs to collect information that can be directly translated into conservation action. Research priorities have been developed in collaboration with fishing and management communities. Compilation of both new and historic data, and a systematic application of species distribution modeling has allowed extrapolation from study sites to larger areas relevant to management. Examples from the northwest Atlantic and northeast Pacific illustrate how this new, finer-scale information is being applied to understand and manage fisheries impacts, and point to areas where additional progress is needed.

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Title: Winners and Losers in Rocky Mountain Streams: Mining Old Data to Elucidate Impacts of Climate Change
Presenter(s): Lisa Eby, PhD.Associate Professor of Aquatic Vertebrate Ecology; Undergraduate Program Director, Ecosystem Science and Restoration, College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana
Date & Time: 1 December 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Lisa Eby, PhD.Associate Professor of Aquatic Vertebrate Ecology; Undergraduate Program Director, Ecosystem Science & Restoration, College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana

Sponsor(s): Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov WEBINAR Join WebEx meeting: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D480225282%26UID%3D4294960187%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAJQ0s2_XDx1rVETZI1uMVOoi2TtpPSuQwdaNebSMODcNZAGPL9sHhVA4VgNavoJCRh8-eJwoXFQaBqeBSMfW0hV0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm18b52160ce1b8634eec0d875acd0f3d8 Join by phone 1 (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 806 453 453 ABSTRACT Documented effects of shifts in species distribution in response to climate change remain relatively rare in inland aquatic systems. Yet modelled projections of species distributions from changing water temperatures indicate there should be measurable shifts over the last few decades. We took a retrospective approach and used dynamic co-occupancy models to unravel the potential influences of warmer stream temperatures, increased wildfire severity and potential expansion of exotic predators on the distribution several species in southwestern MT (bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, slimy sculpin and longnose dace). We focused the Bitterroot River Basin, MT, which is a well-connected watershed, had increases in stream temperatures (~ 0.3 C /decade), severe riparian wildfire, and part of the core conservation area for bull trout. We found large declines in slimy sculpin distributions (>40% reductions) at low elevation, warmer sites over the last 3 decades. Small barriers on the landscape are having significant impacts on the capacity of sculpin to shift their distribution in response to warming stream temperatures and wildfire. In addition, dynamic co-occupancy models indicate that the expansion of the nonnative brown trout in this basin is decreasing colonization probabilities for bull trout potentially reducing resilience for bull trout metapopulations as habitat turnover continues to increase through drought and wildfire. In contrast to these negative impacts, westslope cutthroat trout remain abundant in the basin and appear to be benefitting from of the increased insect productivity measured in the previously burned stream segments. BIO Dr. Eby received her B.S. in Zoology and M.S. in Limnology and Oceanography from the University of Wisconsin in Madison and Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology from Duke University. After working as a postdoctoral researcher at Arizona State University, she move to the University of Montana into an Aquatic Ecologist faculty position. She is currently a faculty member in the Wildlife Biology Program and Director of the Ecosystem Science and Restoration Program. Her work is broadly focused around examining the impacts of natural disturbances and anthropogenic changes on aquatic biota and ecosystems.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Progress on establishing protected areas in the Southern Ocean: the Ross Sea region MPA
Presenter(s): Mi Ae Kim, Foreign Affairs Specialist, Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection, NMFS
Date & Time: 1 December 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Mi Ae Kim, Foreign Affairs Specialist, Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection, NMFS Register at: Register for the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3252815366896112130.

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract: The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) has been working to establish marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean, which would contribute to its objective " the conservation of Antarctic marine living resources. On October 28, 2016, CCAMLR agreed to the establishment of the Ross Sea region MPA, an area of exceptional ecological value and scientific importance. An overview of CCAMLR's MPA efforts will be provided during the webinar, including details about the recently adopted MPA in the Ross Sea. See CCAMLR's webpage for background on CCAMLR MPAs. https://www.ccamlr.org/en/science/marine-protected-areas-mpas

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Title: Does NOAA Need Research?
Presenter(s): Dr. Richard Spinrad, Chief Scientist of NOAA
Date & Time: 1 December 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 1W611 OR via webinar - see login info below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Rick Spinrad, Chief Scientist of NOAA, presenting in person.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov Webinar Login: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone, US or CAN: 1-888-566-7703, code is 61161 PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS A DIFFERENT NUMBER AND PASSCODE THAN THE USUAL For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: NOAA's research enterprise has been an important part of the evolution of our mission and our organization. But how much research is needed? In order to answer this question we need a clear model of our research portfolio logic. Like any investment, our venture in research must be guided by clear principles and defensible and manageable processes. If we had one more dollar to spend, or had to cut our research budget by one person, how would we make that decision, and why? The approach we've taken to developing a model for making these decisions will be presented for a lively discussion.

Bio(s): Dr. Rick Spinrad is Chief Scientist of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). An internationally recognized scientist and executive, Dr. Spinrad drives policy and program direction for NOAA's science and technology priorities. He has been focused on ocean issues throughout his career. Prior to this appointment, he served as vice president for research at Oregon State University. From 2003 until 2010, he led NOAA's National Ocean Service and then NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research. Dr. Spinrad has served as a research director with the Office of Naval Research and Oceanographer of the Navy, held faculty appointments at three universities, directed a major national non-profit organization, presided over a private company, and worked as a research oceanographer. He was instrumental in starting the National Ocean Sciences Bowl for high school students. Dr. Spinrad has a B.A. from The Johns Hopkins University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from Oregon State University.

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30 November 2016

Title: Patterns and processes: spatial and temporal variability in ichthyoplankton assemblages across the Gulf of Alaska
Presenter(s): Dr. Esther Goldstein, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 30 November 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL - Oceanographer Room (Bldg 3 Room 2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115 Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Esther Goldstein (Alaska Fisheries Science Center) Seminar sponsor: AFSC/PMEL EcoFOCI Fall Seminar Series; seminar host is heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/913417101 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (646) 749-3112 Access Code: 913-417-101

Abstract: The talk will focus on seasonal and interrannual patterns of larval fish assemblages in the eastern and western Gulf of Alaska and potential drivers of those patterns.

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Title: Applications of Climate Extremes and Variability in Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Kari St.Laurent, Ph.D., Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science; and Sasha Land, Chesapeake Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve-Maryland
Date & Time: 30 November 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kari St.Laurent, Ph.D., Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science; and Sasha Land, Chesapeake Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve-Maryland

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin at bottom of page plug-in works fine.

Abstract: From an ecological standpoint, climate extremes and variability are often more pertinent to the physiological thresholds and environmental boundaries of specific organisms than mean annual changes. Thus, we sought to assess how climate variability and extreme change will affect Chesapeake Bay's shallow water ecosystems. In this study, we calculated the 26 climate extreme indices defined by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices which determine the absolute intensity, duration, and frequency of temperature- and precipitation-based events. Our goals were to 1) reconstruct climate extreme patterns and variability from the observed record using 18 weather stations from the Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily data, 2) establish a present day baseline, and 3) and use this historically-referenced data to assess an ensemble of near-future global climate model projections under two emission scenarios using the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 model output. This climate extreme synthesis was then used to provide insight on targeted ecological problems which were iteratively identified in collaboration with researchers, educators, and managers from Chesapeake Bay National Estuarine Research Reserves (CBNERR) of Maryland and Virginia. Collectively, we have targeted four ecological 'vignettes': 1) frequency of warm summer days and nights with submerged aquatic vegetation diebacks, 2) annual precipitation frequency with total nitrogen load in Chesapeake Bay tributaries, 3) changes in the start and end of the thermal growing season length, and 4) extension of Vibrio vulnifericus and Vibrio cholerae probability due to warming. By focusing on observed climate events that resonate in the public memory, we can develop educational materials and exhibits which support and encourage coastal stewardship, decision-makers, and the general public to contemplate and create adaptation plans and mitigation strategies that will enhance their resilience to future climate changes and events.

Bio(s): Kari St.Laurent (Kari.StLaurent@state.de.us) is the Research Coordinator for the Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve. She recently finished her post-doctoral research at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (Horn Point Laboratory) investigating climate extremes and variability in Chesapeake Bay. She got her Ph.D. from the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island studying black carbon in the Subtropical Atlantic Ocean. Sasha Land is the Coastal Training Program Coordinator for the Chesapeake Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve-Maryland.Sasha graduated from St. Mary's College in Maryland with a BA in Biology and has worked over for over a decade on Chesapeake Bay conservation and policy issues.

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29 November 2016

Title: Social and Economic Effects of Severe Winter Storms: New York City Case Study
Presenter(s): Jeff Adkins, Senior Economist, NOAA's Performance, Risk, and Social Science Office
Date & Time: 29 November 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAAScience Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jeff Adkins, Senior Economist, NOAA's Performance, Risk, and Social Science Office. Speaker will be presenting remotely from Charleston, SC.

Sponsor(s): NWS Point of contact for questions and seminar host: David.Soroka@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Online Access Only; Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/156073854914793473

Abstract: In the United States, severe weather and climate-related disasters frequently result in economic losses that exceed $1 billion. More than 40 "billion-dollar disasters" have occurred since 2011, with 10 occurring in 2015. The 2015 disasters included a major drought, 2 floods, 5 severe storms, a wildfire, and a winter storm -- each with damages exceeding $1 billion and collectively resulting in the deaths of 155 people. An important part of the mission of the National Weather Service is to provide products and services that will reduce the economic and human impacts of severe weather. A social science study on Severe Winter Storms in New York City will answer: What is at risk? What are the losses? To what extent can these losses be mitigated by improved weather information? What are the attributes of the information needed to achieve these loss-reductions? About the speaker: Jeffery Adkins is an economist with the I.M. Systems Group (IMSG) working for NOAA's Chief Economist. The economics of hazard resilience is a key focus of Jeff's work. Current projects include studies of the impacts of severe winter storms and space weather events. Other interests include the measurement of the U.S. ocean-based economy (through NOAA's Economics: National Ocean Watch project), the economic valuation of government products and services, and the contribution of NOAA's observational missions to the production of final products and services. Jeff has worked as an economist for the federal government since 1979.

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Title: Knowledge, Attitudes & Beliefs of Communities Near Reefs: The Socioeconomic Component of the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program
Presenter(s): Matt Gorstein, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and Peter Edwards, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program. Other NCRMP team members include Jarrod Loerzel, NOAA NCCOS and Arielle Levine, NOAA CRCP
Date & Time: 29 November 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Matt Gorstein (presenting remotely), NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and Peter Edwards (presenting at seminar in Silver Spring), NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program. Other NCRMP team members include Jarrod Loerzel, NOAA NCCOS and Arielle Levine, NOAA CRCP

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts, the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: The socioeconomic component of the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program (NCRMP) includes gathering information on human variables such as population change, use of coral reef resources, and knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of coral reef resources and management. The overall goal of the socioeconomic monitoring component is to track relevant information regarding each jurisdiction's social and economic structure in order to investigate both the impacts of society on coral reefs, and the contributions of healthy corals to nearby communities. Data are being collected through surveys of residents in US coral reef jurisdictions and from existing secondary sources such as the US Census and local government agencies. The surveys will be administered every 5-7 years to monitor changes in residents' knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of coral reefs, as well as changes in the socioeconomic characteristics of coral reef-adjacent communities. The data collected will be used to operationalize a suite of indicators that were developed in consultation with stakeholders, partners, and other scientists. The outputs will be used by jurisdictional resource managers, educators, and other key partners for monitoring changes in coral reef dependent communities to better inform effective management, education/outreach, and conservation programs. NCRMP socioeconomic surveys have already been completed in South Florida, American Samoa, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Guam. Surveying in the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands is currently underway, and efforts in the US Virgin Islands are in early stages of development. Initial results for the surveyed jurisdictions show a widespread general support for coral reef management initiatives as well as familiarity with the various threats posed to coral reefs. Respondent perceptions concerning the change in the condition of marine resources over the last 10 years have been largely negative, indicating that residents of these coral reef-adjacent communities have observed a recent decline in the quality of marine resources. NCRMP Team Member

Bio(s): Matt Gorstein is a natural resource economist/social scientist with NOAA NCCOS sitting at the Hollings Marine Lab in Charleston, SC. Much of his work is focused on economic valuation and statistical analysis, as well as data collection and data management. Matt is interested in indicator development, non-market economic valuation methods, and in using numbers to tell stories. Peter Edwards is an economist and serves as the social science coordinator for NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program. His primary activities involve leading the team responsible for implementing the social science component of CRCP's National Coral Reef Monitoring Program. Peter is also involved in a number of other NOAA wide projects, including a survey of subsistence fishers in the U.S. Virgin Islands, as well as working on a team dedicated to assisting NOAA with incorporating ecosystem services (and their values) into the agency's operations and research activities. He most enjoys the interdisciplinary nature of his work and being able to work across various scientific disciplines to integrate ecological and social sciences in a cohesive setting. Jarrod Loerzel is a social scientist with NOAA NCCOS and works at the Hollings Marine Lab in Charleston, SC. Among other things, Jarrod's work is focused on the development, theory, and application of a variety of survey methods. He is interested in the spatial aspects of social phenomena, particularly as they relate to place attachment and environmental resource condition. Arielle Levine is a regional social scientist with NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program and an Associate Professor of Geography at San Diego State University. Her work focuses on better understanding human-environment interactions, particularly in coastal and coral reef ecosystems.

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28 November 2016

Title: South Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation: Pathways and Modes of Variability AND Predictability of North Atlantic Ocean Heat Content
Presenter(s): Renellys Perez, University of Miami - RSMAS and Martha Buckley, George Mason University
Date & Time: 28 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Deputy's Conference Room- 12708, Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Renellys Perez (University of Miami - RSMAS) and Martha Buckley (George Mason University) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Research, Climate Program Office, Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program (http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars). These webinars will be recorded and the video will be available on this page after the presentation. Seminar POC for questions: hunter.jones@noaa.gov

Remote Access: http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Abstract: Numerous modeling studies have suggested that the North Atlantic is a region of enhanced predictability of sea surface temperatures and that initialization of the ocean circulation is key to making predictions in this region. However, the degree of predictability in the North Atlantic varies substantially between models. In this presentation I will discuss a novel diagnostic for ocean predictability, the heat content integrated over the wintertime mixed layer depth. Then, I will present three measures of predictability of the heat content derived from control runs of CMIP5 models. Predictability timescales vary substantially between models, but predictability timescales are generally longer in subpolar regions. Between forty and eighty percent of the regional variance of predictability timescales in the North Atlantic can be explained simply by variations in the wintertime mixed layer depth. See http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

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21 November 2016

Title: Unified Modeling for Marine Applications
Presenter(s): Charles Stock, NOAA/OAR Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Isaac Kaplan, NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Kirstin Holsman, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 21 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Charles Stock (NOAA/OAR Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory), Isaac Kaplan (NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center), Kirstin Holsman (NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center) Seminar sponsors: OAR/CPO MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: heather.archambault@noaa.gov

Remote Access: WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e712077349246c3f2445fe6873c1f5880 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx -- Charles Stock - Earth system predictions for marine resource management across space and time scales

Abstract: Climate variability and change can drive abrupt ecosystem shifts that challenge marine resource management. Earth system predictions may anticipate such shifts, improving ecosystem-based management decisions and helping sustain coastal communities. Management decisions, however, are required across a broad range of space and time-scales, challenging NOAA's Earth System modeling capacity. This talk will describe efforts to provide earth system predictions and projections across decision-relevant space/time scales. Under multi-decadal global warming, results emphasize dynamic yet uncertain regional physical and biogeochemical trends capable of driving pronounced changes in regional marine resource distributions and fisheries yields. Improved constraints on these impacts are essential, and most likely with integrated advances in both global and regional marine ecosystem projections. Use of seasonal to decadal physical climate predictions for marine resource management is rapidly expanding, but earth system prediction at these scales is still in its infancy. Early analyses, however, suggest that the predictability of ocean biogeochemical properties can exceed that of physical climate properties. This, together with the strong linkages between biogeochemical properties and marine resource responses, motivates ongoing efforts to fully integrate biogeochemistry with existing seasonal to decadal climate prediction systems. -- Isaac Kaplan - J-SCOPE (JISAO's Seasonal Coastal Ocean Prediction of the Ecosystem): seasonal ocean forecasts for fisheries management

Abstract: J-SCOPE (http://www.nanoos.org/products/j-scope/) is a joint NOAA-University of Washington project that provides short term (six to nine month) forecasts of ocean conditions for the US Pacific Northwest and southern British Columbia. J-SCOPE links NOAA's Climate Forecast System (CFS) to a high resolution regional model (ROMS). J-SCOPE forecasts reflect impacts of climate variability on sardine spatial distributions and on aragonite saturation state, which is relevant to plankton susceptible to ocean acidification. Initial J-SCOPE efforts focused on ocean conditions such as sea surface temperature and fish in the upper water column. However, model skill is better for bottom conditions including temperature and oxygen, and present efforts aim to hone J-SCOPE forecasts for bottom species such as Dungeness crab and groundfish. Following advice from CSIRO (Australia), we aim to tailor our forecasts to inform specific seasonal fishery management decisions, with appropriate lead times and feedback from stakeholders. 3) Kirstin Holsman (NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center) - A stress test for fisheries management: using coupled physical-biological-socioeconomic models to evaluate alternative management approaches in Alaska.

Abstract: The Bering Sea (AK) has long supported some of the most productive fisheries in the US, representing nearly 50% of annual catches nationally while maintaining harvest rates below overfishing limits. Productivity in the region is strongly influenced by considerable variability in climate-driven changes to structuring processes and trophic interactions. Ensuring that regional fisheries management continues to be sustainable requires understanding how different fisheries management approaches attenuate or amplify climate-driven changes to fish and shellfish biomass. The 3 year ACLIM project was developed to address this need, and brings together climate, ecosystem, fishery management, and socioeconomic experts to evaluate the interacting effects of climate variability, trophic-dynamics, socioeconomic processes, and management measures on fish and fisheries dependent communities. The project provides a proof-of-concept implementation of an end-to-end Management Strategy Evaluation (MSE) framework for assessing the performance of fisheries management strategies under different climate scenarios. Here we discuss challenges and approaches to coupling global climate and regional circulation models to multiple climate-enhanced biological and socio-economic models. -- Navigate to http://cpo.noaa.gov/mapp/webinar to view recordings from the past five years of MAPP webinars on a variety of topics including hurricanes, drought, precipitation and heat extremes, prediction, model development, climate projections, and many other topics. --

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: JPSS SPARKS: A unique research and training model to create a diverse STEM workforce in NOAA mission-related sciences
Presenter(s): Shakila Merchant, NOAA CREST Center, City College of New York, NY, Murty Divakarla and Mike Wilson, I.M. Systems Group, Inc IMSG
Date & Time: 21 November 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: 8th floor Aerospace Building - 10210 Greenbelt Rd, Lanham MD 20706
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Shakila Merchant, Murty Divakarla and Mike Wilson

Sponsor(s): JPSS Science Seminar for November POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Remote Access: NOTE: REMOTE ACCESS CHANGE 877-915-7510 pc: 35894360 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m135cd00401064079e2473dca883857dd Meeting number: 742 910 396 Host key: 562839 Meeting password: 2016!Yes

Abstract: NOAA CREST center goals resonates/aligns with NOAA's Strategic Science and Education Mission and Goals. Since 2001, NOAA CREST program, majorly funded by NOAA's Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institution (EPP/MSI) has been able to conduct NOAA mission aligned sciences and at the same time recruit, train and graduate more than 700 students in NOAA sciences who have been able to join the workforce in NOAA STEM related fields " in Academia, Private Sector and Government. The JPSS " Students Professional and Academic Readiness with Knowledge in Satellites (JPSS-SPARKS) initiative was created in 2015-2016 through funding from JPSS program - to help specifically address potential employers' (particularly NOAA and NOAA Contractors) needs and hone the core-competencies and job-ready skill-sets of the graduating students (particularly from Underrepresented Minority Group) to increase the NOAA and NOAA contractors' diverse workforce. JPSS-SPARKS is a result of the synergistic partnership between Academia (CUNY-Private Sector (IMSG) and the Government (NOAA-JPSS) which institutionalized its first summer workforce training in summer 2016. Four CREST graduate students participated in the 10-week summer 2016 training hosted by a team of IMSG scientists and was housed in IMSG in coordination and support from ESSIC, UMD and NCWCP, College Park, MD. The overarching objectives of the summer training was (1) to introduce the early career scientists to JPSS satellite missions and advance their understanding to Science Product; Algorithm Development, Calibration/Validation and Research to Operations protocols in the real-world environment. The interns also learnt various programming skills in Fortran 90, C++, and PERL, besides they were immersed in series of seminars/workshops. Through this seminar, the authors will share their success stories and future plans on JPSS "SPARKS.

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18 November 2016

Title: Climate Adaptation in the North-Central California Coast and Russian River Watershed: A Resilient Lands and Waters Site
Presenter(s): Maria Brown, Superintendent, Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, San Francisco, CA; Natalie Cosentino-Manning, Restoration Program Manager, NOAA Fisheries Restoration Center, Santa Rosa, CA; and Sara Hutto, Ocean Climate Program Coordinator, Greater Farallones NMS, San Francisco, CA
Date & Time: 18 November 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Maria Brown, Superintendent, Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, San Francisco, CA; Natalie Cosentino-Manning, Restoration Program Manager, NOAA Fisheries Restoration Center, Santa Rosa, CA; and Sara Hutto, Ocean Climate Program Coordinator, Greater Farallones NMS, San Francisco, CA Presenting at NOAA Silver Spring, MD

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: The California North-Central Coast and Russian River Watershed Resilient Lands and Waters site brings together 3,295 square miles of coast and ocean and 1,485 square miles of the Russian River watershed. Within this area, multiple federal, state, county, city and local governments, as well as universities, non-profit organizations and private land owners are working to understand the impacts of climate change on this region. Because of this, the California North-Central Coast and Russian River Watershed was designated as one of President Obama's priority areas under the Resilient Lands and Waters Initiative in 2016. This designation allowed for additional collaborative efforts between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Department of the Interior (DOI) to develop key recommendations and to provide examples of climate adaptation within this region. Two offices within NOAA, The National Ocean Service (Office of National Marine Sanctuaries) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (Restoration Center and West Coast Region) combined with DOI's Bureau of Land Management California office have developed a story map to address climate-related issues in the region and detail current and proposed climate adaptation activities.

Bio(s): Maria Brown is the Superintendent of the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary and has been leading climate change efforts in a marine protected area since 2007 and has advised on international climate change actions in marine protected areas. She has guided developing site climate impact reports, site climate indicators, vulnerability assessments, and adaptation strategies as well as greening of site operations. Currently she is piloting climate adaptation strategies in the sanctuary. Maria has a Bachelor of Science in Conservation Biology from the University of California at Berkeley and a Masters in Urban and Environmental Policy from Tufts University. Natalie Cosentino-Manning has worked for NOAA for over twenty years on large-scale restoration and conservation programs to recover anadromous salmonids, shellfish, and seagrasses in ecosystems including northern California rivers, San Francisco Bay, and the Gulf of Mexico. She is currently working on assessing impacts and planning restoration from the Cosco Busan, Deep Water Horizon, and Refugio Beach oil spills as well as coordinating the Russian River Habitat Focus Area - part of NOAA's Habitat Blueprint Initiative. She has a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Biology from Humboldt State University and a Masters of Science in Environmental Science and Management from the University of San Francisco. Sara Hutto is the Ocean Climate Program Coordinator for Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary where she integrates climate-smart adaptation into Sanctuary management and provides training for marine protected area managers around the country to undertake climate-smart adaptation planning. Sara's background is in rocky intertidal ecology, and she holds a Master of Science in Marine Science from Moss Landing Marine Laboratories.

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17 November 2016

Title: The Chukchi Sea Shelf Habitat and EcoLogy of Fish and Zooplankton (SHELFZ) project: an interdisciplinary ecosystem study linking nearshore and offshore Arctic marine habitats
Presenter(s): Libby Logerwell, PhD. Fisheries Interactions Team Lead, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management Division, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 17 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Libby Logerwell, PhD. Fisheries Interactions Team Lead, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management Division, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov WEBINAR Join WebEx meeting: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D480225282%26UID%3D4294960187%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAJQ0s2_XDx1rVETZI1uMVOoi2TtpPSuQwdaNebSMODcNZAGPL9sHhVA4VgNavoJCRh8-eJwoXFQaBqeBSMfW0hV0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm18b52160ce1b8634eec0d875acd0f3d8 Join by phone 1 (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 806 453 453 ABSTRACT A group of scientists from AFSC, University of Washington, University of Alaska Fairbanks and the North Slope Borough Department of Wildlife surveyed the fish and invertebrate community from the beach to the shelf of the northeast Chukchi Sea during August-September 2013. The goal of this project, SHELFZ, is to collect baseline data and mechanistic information needed to detect and predict impacts of changing environment and increased human activities on arctic ecosystems. The project is funded by the State of Alaska Coastal Impact Assistance Program, and lead by the North Slope Borough Department of Wildlife Management in Barrow, Alaska. The focus is on areas and resources integral to subsistence communities of the North Slope of Alaska. The work was conducted on two chartered vessels. The F/V Alaska Knight surveyed the offshore area, deeper than 20 m depth, while the Ukpik surveyed the nearshore area, shallower than 20 m. Both vessels sampled with bottom trawls, midwater trawls, fishery acoustics, zooplankton nets and oceanographic instruments. Scientists on the nearshore boat, Ukpik, also deployed beach seines. This talk will explore species composition of fish and invertebrate communities in the benthic and pelagic habitats. Similarities and differences between the offshore and nearshore will be examined. Spatial distribution will also be investigated, with particular attention to the role of water mass type, transport and the distribution of prey in determining fish and invertebrate distribution and community structure. Because water mass productivity and transport are expected to be impacted by loss of sea ice and other climate-change related processes, these results help illustrate the mechanistic linkages between climate change and Arctic marine communities. BIO I graduated from Standford University in 1988 with a degree in Biological Sciences. I earned my PhD from University of California Irvine in 1997, where I studied the at-sea foraging distribution of North Pacific seabirds. My first post-doc was at Southwest Fisheries Science Center, studying the bioenergetics of sardine in the California Current. My second post-doc was at the School of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences at UW. My primary research was on the environmental factors driving variability in at-sea survival of coho salmon. I came to AFSC in 2001. For 15 years, I was lead of the Fishery Interaction Team, studying the effects of commercial fishing on Steller sea lion prey fields. Recently I have lead fish surveys in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. I am now part of the joint AFSC and PMEL EcoFOCI (Ecosystems and Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations) Program. A common theme throughout my research career has been fisheries (or seabird) oceanography and habitat use.

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Title: A genesis potential index for Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) modulation of tropical cyclone genesis AND Quantifying feedbacks between convection and radiation during the MJO using DYNAMO observations and climate models
Presenter(s): Bin Wang, University of Hawaii and Simon de Szoeke, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 17 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871, Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Bin Wang (University of Hawaii) and Simon de Szoeke (Oregon State University) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Research, Climate Program Office, Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program (http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars). These webinars will be recorded and the video will be available on this page after the presentation. Seminar POC for questions: hunter.jones@noaa.gov

Remote Access: http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Abstract: TBD. See http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Engaging dis-advantaged youth in marine science
Presenter(s): Ellen Spooner, 2016 Knauss Executive Fellow, Ocean Science Educator/Communications Specialist with NOAA Fisheries Communications Office and Smithsonian Natural History Museum Ocean Education
Date & Time: 17 November 2016
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ellen Spooner, 2016 Knauss Executive Fellow, Ocean Science Educator/Communications Specialist with NOAA Fisheries Communications Office and Smithsonian Natural History Museum Ocean Education For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: From squid dissections to experiments on icebergs, come learn about the ways in which Ellen Spooner has engaged minority and dis-advantaged youth with marine science. Diversity of marine science professionals does not match the diversity of people in the United States. This is due to a variety of reasons but many people are working to change this and make the marine science field reflect the unique and talented population in the U.S. You will hear stories of inspiration, techniques she has gained and challenges faced during her fellowship.

Bio(s): Ellen went to the University of Arizona for undergrad studying Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Then the University of Michigan to study conservation ecology. Her current host offices are shared between NOAA Fisheries Office of Communications and Smithsonian Natural History Museum Ocean Education.

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Title: CSI Chesapeake Bay: Who Killed the Copepods?
Presenter(s): Katherine Slater, 2016 Knauss Executive Fellow, Ecosystem Science and Management Specialist with NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 17 November 2016
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Katherine Slater, 2016 Knauss Executive Fellow, Ecosystem Science and Management Specialist with NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: The population of copepod Acartia tonsa, a key species in the Chesapeake Bay's food web, significantly dropped 50% in summer. Since hypoxia, jellyfish bloom and Bay Anchovy spawning are prevalent in summer, the effects of hypoxia, jellyfish predation and anchovy predation were evaluated to understand the reasons for the copepod population decrease. We measured environmental factors and collected zooplankton, jellyfish and fish samples on six cruises in the main channel of the Chesapeake Bay from May to September in 2010 and 2011. Besides applying the common definition of hypoxia (DO < 2mg/ L), we also estimated whether the temperature-specific oxygen demands were met for supporting the basic metabolism of A. tonsa. By comparing the oxygen supply and demand, we found the hypoxia severity was underestimated with the traditional fixed standard especially in summer. With the new biological standard, the hypoxic water could occupy up to 70% of the water column in the Bay. We found less copepods and less anchovies but more jellyfish under hypoxic conditions. The non-predatory mortality was estimated with neutral red uptake, and predation impacts were estimated from jellyfish and anchovy gut contents. Our results indicated that higher copepod mortalities were due to the combinations of hypoxia and predations, and the relative importance of these stressors varied with environmental conditions. Hypoxia directly caused copepod mortality, but the importance of predation increased with temperature and hypoxia severity. Different hypoxia tolerance also changed the composition of copepod predators, from mostly juvenile anchovies to 50% comb jellyfish when the environment became warm and severely hypoxic. In conclusion, hypoxia in the Bay was underestimated, and temperature and species differences should be considered when evaluating water quality in the future. Hypoxia directly caused copepod mortality, and indirectly boosted predation especially under warmer temperature. Warmth and hypoxia together drove more energy flow to jellyfish instead of to more desirable forage fish.

Bio(s): Katherine is a doctoral candidate in biological oceanography at the University of Maryland, College Park. She was working at UMCES' Horn Point Laboratory, studying predator-prey interactions between marine species in low-oxygen ecosystems in the Chesapeake Bay. Katherine has a M.S. in marine science from the National Sun Yat-sen University in Taiwan, where she is from. She is now working as a fishery ecosystem science and management specialist in the NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Tough choices for tough times - can triage save coral reefs?
Presenter(s): Ken Anthony, Principal Research Scientist, Australian Institute of Marine Science, Australia
Date & Time: 17 November 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ken Anthony, Principal Research Scientist, Australian Institute of Marine Science, Australia

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact for this seminar are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Britt Parker@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): Ken Anthony is an ecologist with a passion for coral reefs. Ken started his career as an engineer, but quit when he first donned a dive mask in Hawaii in 1986. He now calls the Great Barrier Reef home. Ken's call in life is to understand how we can sustain coral reefs in the face of climate change, ocean acidification and pressures from pollution and overfishing. Using tools from decision science and business strategy, Ken works with reef conservationists, environmental managers and policy makers to find solutions that work. Such solutions are actions that protect coral reef biodiversity while maintaining ecosystem services that support economies, industries and the livelihoods of millions of people.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The Global Observing System for Climate Implementation Needs: Focus on the Ocean
Presenter(s): Dr. Katherine -Katy- Hill, World Meteorological Organisation, Geneva, Switzerland
Date & Time: 17 November 2016
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Katherine (Katy) Hill, World Meteorological Organisation, Geneva, Switzerland

Abstract: The new GCOS Implementation Plan has been developed by the GCOS Community during 2016, and recently submitted to the UNFCCC COP-22 meeting in Marrakech for approval. UNFCCC members have committed to observing the climate, guided by this plan, so recommendations and actions have visibility and weight within national governments. The plan strengthens the focus on observing climate cycles, and also has a stronger focus on impacts, adaptation and mitigation. This talk will summarize the main developments in the new plan, particularly focusing on the ocean chapter, which draws on a strengthened multidisciplinary GOOS programme. It will also highlight challenges for the coming years.

Bio(s): Dr. Katy Hill works within the international system to support the development of sustained ocean observing systems. She is part of the GCOS and GOOS programme offices as secretariat for Ocean Observations Panel for Climate on observing system requirements, design and evaluation, and also works with JCOMM Observations Coordination Group, members of which are the main globally coordinated networks, on the technical aspects of observing system implementation; she also facilitated the establishment of the Tropical Pacific Observing System, TPOS 2020 Project. Katy has an interest in multi institutional collaborative programmes nationally and internationally, and has worked and studied in the UK, Canada and Australia before her current role. Previously, Katy worked for Australia's Integrated Marine Observing System, and also the International CLIVAR Project Office.

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16 November 2016

Title: A Collaborative Multi-model Study: Understanding Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) Variability Mechanisms and their Impacts on Decadal Prediction
Presenter(s): Young-Oh Kwon, WHOI and Yohan Ruprich-Robert, NOAA / GFDL / Princeton University, and Alicia Karspeck, UCAR
Date & Time: 16 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871, Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Young-Oh Kwon (WHOI) and Yohan Ruprich-Robert (NOAA / GFDL / Princeton University) and Alicia Karspeck (UCAR) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Research, Climate Program Office, Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program (http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars). These webinars will be recorded and the video will be available on this page after the presentation. Seminar POC for questions: hunter.jones@noaa.gov

Remote Access: http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Abstract: TBD. See http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/.
Title: Geographic and temporal variation in elemental composition of age-0 walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) otoliths in the western Gulf of Alaska, September 2007 and 2011
Presenter(s): Dr. Matt Wilson, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 16 November 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL - Oceanographer Room (Bldg 3 Room 2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115 Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Matt Wilson (Alaska Fisheries Science Center) Seminar sponsor: AFSC/PMEL EcoFOCI Fall Seminar Series; seminar host is Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/772964829 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (312) 757-3121 Access Code: 772-964-829

Abstract: Otolith chemistry can potentially be used to reveal juvenile-adult population connectivity and improve our understanding of recruitment processes and sub-stock structure of economically and ecologically important marine fishes. We focused on the initial step of demonstrating meaningful geographic variation in the chemistry of otoliths of age-0 juvenile walleye pollock in the western Gulf of Alaska (GOA). Study objectives were to first statistically test the hypothesis that otolith chemistry did not differ geographically among 3 hydrographic sub-regions and then to explore inherent geographic and temporal variation in the elements most responsible for hypothesis rejection. Laser ablation, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used to measure 17 isotopes in 228 otoliths of fish collected by midwater trawling in the sub-regions during late-summer 2007 and 2011. The cold, saline Kodiak Island sub-region was distinguished from relatively warmer, fresher sub-regions due mostly to higher strontium:calcium and lower barium:calcium ratios. Otolith chemistry distinguished sub-region for 62% (2007) and 68% (2011) of the fish. Inherent geographic variation was largely consistent with our a priori sub-region delineation, which was based on the relative apparent influence of the Alaska Coastal Current (ACC) (warmer, fresher water) versus oceanic water (colder, saltier). Interestingly, fish in sub-regions most influenced by the ACC exhibited a pronounced and synchronous decline and recovery in strontium:calcium ratios prior to capture consistent with sporadic ACC-related freshening of the coastal environment. Thus, as will be discussed, otolith chemistry appears to have utility for studying potential habitat-related effects on the process of walleye pollock recruitment in the western GOA.

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Title: Comparative Toxicity of Three Shoreline Cleaner Products in Estuarine Organisms: Mesocosm and Laboratory Exposures
Presenter(s): Marie DeLorenzo. Co-authors: Mike Fulton, Pete Key, Ed Wirth, Paul Pennington, Katy Chung, Emily Pisarski, Brian Shaddrix, Joe Wade, Blaine West, James Daugomah, Cynthia Cooksey, JD Dubick - NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCEHBR, and Sarah Baxter, College of Charleston
Date & Time: 16 November 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Marie DeLorenzo, Research Ecologist, NOAA/NCCOS CCEHBR. Speaker will be presenting remotely from Charleston. Co-authors include: Mike Fulton, Pete Key, Ed Wirth, Paul Pennington, Katy Chung, Emily Pisarski, Brian Shaddrix, Joe Wade, Blaine West, James Daugomah, Cynthia Cooksey, and JD Dubick, from NOAA NCCOS, CCEHBR, and Sarah Baxter, from the College of Charleston.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Oil spills that occur in estuaries, bays, or enclosed harbors have the potential to contaminate docks, bulkheads, ship hulls, and sensitive estuarine habitat. Depending on the situation and location, shoreline cleaners may be applied to oiled surfaces within inshore areas. Decisions as to where and when individual products will be utilized depend on understanding the efficacy, environmental fate, and environmental effects of these compounds. This study evaluated the efficacy and possible ecotoxicity of three shoreline cleaner products (Accell Clean, PES-51, and Cytosol) using a salt marsh mesocosm test system and laboratory exposures. Ceramic tiles were used to represent oiled seawall. The mesocosms were dosed with oil, followed by shoreline cleaner application to the oiled tiles. Samples were collected at multiple time-points during the 30-day experiment. The Oil+Accell treatment significantly reduced fish, mud snail, and clam survival compared to the control. Both the Oil+Accell and Oil+Cytosol treatments significantly reduced amphipod and polychaete survival. Sublethal effects were observed on clam and marsh grass growth, and dissolved oxygen content was reduced in the shoreline cleaner treatments. While the Oil+Accell treatment had the greatest animal mortality, it had the highest bacterial (heterotrophic and Vibrio) densities. Bacterial densities returned to pre-dose levels after 30d. The Oil+Accell treatment had significantly higher measured hydrocarbons (TEH and Total PAH_50) in the water column 24h post-cleaner application than the oil alone treatment, the Oil+PES treatment and the control. The results of this study will help inform management decisions regarding the use of shoreline cleaners in oil-spill response, particularly with regard to estuarine species

Bio(s): Dr. Marie DeLorenzo is a research ecologist with the NOAA, National Ocean Service,National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research (CCEHBR) laboratory in Charleston, SC, where she has worked for 16 years. Dr. DeLorenzo received a B.S. in Environmental Resource Management with a minor in Marine Science from Penn State University, followed by a M.S. degree in Ecology from Penn State. She earned her Ph.D. at Clemson University in Environmental Toxicology. Within the CCEHBR laboratory's Estuaries and Land Use Branch, Marie is the Program Lead of the Environmental Physiology and Microbiology Program. Dr. DeLorenzo serves on the graduate faculty at the College of Charleston, the Medical University of South Carolina, and Florida A&M University's School of the Environment. Marie is the NOAA representative to the National Water Quality Monitoring Council and is vice president of the Carolinas Chapter of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. Dr. DeLorenzo's research at NOAA includes environmental toxicology of estuarine species, physiological mechanisms of contaminant effects, climate change and multi-stressor assessments, and coastal resource management.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Science On a Sphere (SOS) Cafe: GIS Day
Presenter(s): Brian Shaw, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 16 November 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SOS room, 1315 East-West Hwy., Silver Spring, Md
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Brian Shaw (National Geodetic Survey) Sponser: NOAA Office of Education, Science On a Sphere Point of Contact: erik.macintosh@noaa.gov

Remote Access: none - in-person only

Abstract: GIS Day Come celebrate Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Day Wednesday November 16 during Geography Awareness Week at the Science On a Sphere (SOS). Brian Shaw will be presenting on how GIS is being used with the SOS and how it is such a good tool for spatial data visualization and analysis. Many popular data sets will be presented showing the power of visualizing space and place including oceanic and atmospheric circulation, air traffic, the planets and a view of galaxy. Science On a Sphere is a room-sized, global display system that uses computers and video projectors to display planetary data onto a six foot diameter sphere, analogous to a giant animated globe. For more information, visit sosinssmc.education.noaa.gov.

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15 November 2016

Title: Observed changes in terrestrial wildlife linked to 20th century warming in Arctic Alaska
Presenter(s): Ken Tape, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 15 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ken Tape, University of Alaska Fairbanks ACCAP Alaska Climate Webinar Registration and more information available at:https://accap.uaf.edu/habitat_shift POC: Tina Buxbaum (ACCAP) tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or 907-474-7812

Remote Access: To register for the webinar, please fill out the form available at: https://accap.uaf.edu/habitat_shift

Abstract: Data linking climate change to observed changes in arctic marine and terrestrial wildlife populations are scarce, despite substantial changes in sea ice and arctic vegetation that constitutes wildlife habitat. Here, we mine observational records from the Alaskan Arctic to identify changes in distribution or behavior of many terrestrial wildlife species during the last century. We show that the increase in productivity of arctic vegetation and expansion of deciduous shrubs resulting from longer and warmer summers starting in the mid-1800s triggered the establishment of novel tundra herbivores moose in the 1930s and snowshoe hares in the 1970s, both which depend on shrubs protruding above the snow for forage in winter. Earlier spring onset has led to a 3-10 day earlier return of 16 species of migratory birds since 1964, though the effect of the altered timing on population sizes is unknown. Complicated interactions associated with predation, disease, trophic mismatch, competition, and other factors compromise predictions, underscoring the need to analyze observed wildlife changes and to maintain long-term studies.

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Title: Understanding and Improving Global Circulation Model (GCM) Simulations of MJO Initiation over the Tropical Indian Ocean using DYNAMO Field Observations AND Estimating convection’s moisture sensitivity: a model-observation synthesis using DYNAMO data
Presenter(s): Hailan Wang, SSAI & NASA and Brian Mapes, U. Miami
Date & Time: 15 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871, Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Hailan Wang (SSAI & NASA) and Brian Mapes (U. Miami)

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Research, Climate Program Office, Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program (http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars). These webinars will be recorded and the video will be available on this page after the presentation.
Seminar POC for questions: hunter.jones@noaa.gov

Abstract: Deep convection depends on humidity throughout the troposphere, a sensitivity that is poorly represented in the simplistic convection schemes in GCMs. To understand this sensitivity, in hopes of improving the models, we need a quantitative framework, and then some data. Building up a quantitative framework is easiest with process models (convection resolving simulations) and GCMs expressing how a convecting column interacts with dynamics. But then what's the role for observations? We have developed a strategy in which a CRM-derived moisture sensitivity function (expressed as a mathematical matrix) can be used in a GCM, and edited based on hypotheses derived from regression analyses of field data. Output from this matrix-coupled GCM can then be used to estimate its (known) sensitivity function via similarly designed regression analyses, to gain confidence that those regression analyses are relevant to teasing apart the complex coupled system that observations always sample from. These interlocking approaches bring us closer to filling the gap between data from DYNAMO and the quantitative, PDE-based, model-oriented large-scale dynamical questions that motivated the campaign. See http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

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Title: What's New in EndNote X8 and Q&A for NOAA
Presenter(s): Donna Kirking, EndNote Trainer, Clarivate Analytics
Date & Time: 15 November 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: (Online class) NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring (and online. Please pre-register individually with the ThomsonReuters link below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Donna Kirking, EndNote Trainer, Clarivate Analytics

Sponsor(s): NOAA Library, POC: Judith Salter Duration: approximately 1 hour Class summary: this class will cover the new features in EndNote X8. Then we'll open it up for questions on anything having to do with EndNote. Location (Online): Online access: To register for online access to this live group EndNote training session, please register individually using this link: https://thomsonreuters.webex.com/thomsonreuters/k2/j.php?MTID=t4e10c7313701a22e7084c1a623d6a021 Each attendee logging in will need to register in advance because each person receives a unique link to the class"and only one person can use that link. If people will be meeting as a group in a conference room, only the person logging in needs to register. Note: this training will be an not be archived by the library, but we will post the links to the EndNote recording in our archives. Download EndNote Product Keys for NOAA staff at: https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/nites-endnote/

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14 November 2016

Title: A Complex Past: Exploring Nonlinear Dynamics in Fisheries through Time
Presenter(s): Emily S Klein, PhD. Postdoctoral Research Fellow, NOAA/NMFS/Southwest Fisheries Science Center & the Farallon Institute
Date & Time: 14 November 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 or via Webinar - see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Emily S Klein, PhD. Postdoctoral Research Fellow, NOAA/NMFS/Southwest Fisheries Science Center & the Farallon Institute. Emily will be presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring MD

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts; the temporary plugin at the bottom of plugin page works fine too.

Abstract: As nonlinear dynamics are increasingly demonstrated in natural systems, how do we interpret such dynamics and what do they mean for our evolving knowledge of ecosystems and our management of natural resources? In marine fisheries ecosystems, such dynamics have primarily been associated with exploited species, suggesting an anthropogenic stressor may explain their prevalence. However, earlier work did not fully control for either differences between species or the reality of indirect and long-lasting human impacts. Here, for the first time, nonlinear dynamics were investigated using both historical (1870s to 1920s) and contemporary data (1960-2014), allowing the exploration of complex nonlinear dynamics for the same species through time. Results revealed nonlinear signatures prevalent prior to heavy industrial exploitation, and that these dynamics were highly deterministic. Comparison with contemporary data demonstrated a strong reduction in deterministic dynamics following unprecedented change in exploitation pressure, suggesting that fishing can impact populations in complex ways and render fisheries data less predictable for management. Collectively, the work shows that complex and nonlinear dynamics are not always caused by human intervention, and exhibits their importance in ecosystem science and management.

Bio(s): Dr. Emily Klein holds a B.Sc. in Ecology, Behavior, and Evolution from the University of California at San Diego (UCSD). She then worked with Dr. Andrew A. Rosenberg at the University of New Hampshire, where she received a M.Sc. in Environmental Conservation and a PhD in Natural Resources and Earth Systems Science (NRESS). She was awarded a Nancy Foster Scholarship to support her doctoral research, which explored long-term change in marine ecosystem dynamics and structure using novel nonlinear time series analysis and modeling approaches as well as first-hand accounts from fishermen and marine managers in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Post-graduation, Dr. Klein completed postdoctoral research with Dr. Simon Levin at Princeton University exploring fishermen behavior and how their decisions are impacted by ecosystem conditions, marine management, and existing social ties. She is currently a postdoc with Dr. George Watters, on a joint appointment with the NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center and the Farallon Institute. There, she is using ecosystem models to understand climate impacts and trade-offs between krill fisheries and krill-dependent predators in the Southern Ocean, providing advice to the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). She also serves as co-chair for the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) Working Group on the History of Fish and Fisheries (WGHIST), and sits on the Executive Board of the international Oceans Past Initiative (OPI). Emily is deeply concerned about diversity in marine science and STEM fields more broadly. She served multiple years on the President's Commission on the Status of Women and the President's Commission on Inclusive Excellence at UNH. She has also helped initiate the Women in Science Partnership (WISP) at Princeton University, as well as Diversity Hour within the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department there.

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10 November 2016

Title: A better future for U.S. Fisheries: Three modest ideas
Presenter(s): Daniel Bromley, Phd, Anderson-Bascom Professor of Applied Economics, Emeritus, Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Date & Time: 10 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Daniel Bromley, Phd, Anderson-Bascom Professor of Applied Economics (Emeritus), Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Sponsor(s): Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov WEBINAR Join WebEx meeting: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D480225282%26UID%3D4294960187%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAJQ0s2_XDx1rVETZI1uMVOoi2TtpPSuQwdaNebSMODcNZAGPL9sHhVA4VgNavoJCRh8-eJwoXFQaBqeBSMfW0hV0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm18b52160ce1b8634eec0d875acd0f3d8 Join by phone 1 (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 806 453 453

Abstract: TBD

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Title: Using Calibration Base Lines (National Geodetic Survey)
Presenter(s): Kendall Fancher, Instrumentation and Methodologies Branch Chief, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 10 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kendall Fancher, Instrumentation and Methodologies Branch Chief, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2813523084508593921. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States:+1 (415) 930-5321 Access Code: 391-748-417 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar.

Abstract: Since 1976, in cooperation with various government agencies, universities and others, NGS has established more than 400 Calibration Baselines (CBLs), with at least one CBL located in every state. The program was initiated to provide the surveying and engineering community with a locally accessible means of calibrating and standardizing their EDMI to the national standard unit of length. Owners of Electronic Distances Measuring Instrumentation (EDMI) in every state can self-test their equipment and procedures at publicly accessible facilities, traceable to the national standard of length. This presentation will provide an overview of the program, introduce proposed changes, and solicit live feedback from the webinar audience.

Bio(s): Kendall Fancher, Instrumentation and Methodologies Branch Chief, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. He has 32 years of experience in geodetic surveying activities with NGS.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 10 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: Interactions between anomalous wave activity and a strong El Nino
Presenter(s): Sam Lillo and Prof. David Parsons, University of Oklahoma
Date & Time: 10 November 2016
1:10 pm - 2:10 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sam Lillo and Prof. David Parsons, University of Oklahoma Point of Contact: Malaquias Mendez, malaquias.pena.mendez@noaa.gov Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the eminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Remote Access: GoTo meeting https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/394131965 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (872) 240-3311 Access Code: 394-131-965 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 394-131-965

Abstract: The winter of 2015-16 featured a strong El Nino with enhanced tropical convection in the central Pacific, forcing classic anomalous Hadley cell and Walker circulations. In addition, poleward Rossby wave dispersion. Meanwhile, the North Pacific was characterized by significant synoptic-scale Rossby wave activity emerging from Asia, including multiple wave packets tracking around the globe during February and March. The interaction of one of these packets with the ENSO-driven subtropical anticyclone resulted in a large wavebreak over the East Pacific, leading to the deepening of a trough over Mexico of unprecedented amplitude on 10 March 2016. This trough had significant ramifications at the surface, including an intense cold wave across central Mexico and snow as far south as Guadalajara. Overall, short-wave Rossby wave activity was more prevalent this past winter across the extratropical Pacific than during past strong El Nino winters. The background flow in the mid-latitudes diverged from canonical strong Nino conditions, with a well-defined waveguide north of the typical zone of refraction in the subtropical jet. The waveguide acted to trap poleward-propagating wave activity from the tropics and maintain the coherence of Rossby wave packets in the mid-latitude jet. Motivated by these observations, we explore implications in high impact weather, as well as its predictability during this past winter.

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Title: Facilitating Collaborative Public Decisions: A Video-Based Training Tool
Presenter(s): Steven L. Yaffee, PhD Professor of Natural Resources and Environmental Policy, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan
Date & Time: 10 November 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Steven L. Yaffee, PhD Professor of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8158370057102416642.

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract: Whether you are a stakeholder, facilitator, agency official, or student, this tool can help you understand and facilitate real-world public decision making processes. Using multimedia examples drawn from the California Marine Life Protection Act Initiative, the tool enables users to explore strategies for facilitating the different stages of collaborative decision making. This tool was created to help a variety of users expand their expertise and increase their understanding of facilitation strategies, challenges, and steps in a collaborative process.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Turning Pretty Pictures into Analytical Tools for Ecosystem Management
Presenter(s): Chris Harvey, PhD., Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 10 November 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Chris Harvey, PhD., Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center. Speaker will be presenting remotely from Seattle.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Abstract: Managing marine ecosystems to achieve and balance conservation goals, economic goals and social goals is notoriously complicated. We have long used "conceptual models"--simplified pictures of the basic elements in a marine ecosystem--to illustrate the complexity of marine ecosystems and communicate the way in which they function. However, a growing number of ecosystem scientists are realizing that these conceptual models are also a basis for testing management questions, using a technique called qualitative network modeling (QNM). Using QNM, we can conduct basic "thought experiments" with the diagrams themselves, both to be sure the diagrams accurately depict what we intend them to, and also to potentially learn about how the ecosystem will respond to some stress or pressure. I will present a series of elegant conceptual models of the marine ecosystem along the U.S. West Coast, and use QNMs to ask how well they represent the role that Pacific salmon play in the food web, in fisheries, and in the well-being of coastal communities. It is my hope that these pretty pictures will become more than just outreach tools but also important and relatively simple analytical tools to assist in complicated ecosystem management questions.

Bio(s): Dr. Chris Harvey has been a research fishery biologist in the Conservation Biology Division at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle since 2002. His interests are primarily in the dynamics of marine food webs along the West Coast. He is one of the science leads of the California Current Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA), a NOAA project to assimilate and synthesize ecological and social science to better inform marine resource management along the West Coast.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Out of the Vault: Maps, Weather & War - Exhibit and Discussion
Presenter(s): Albert 'Skip' Theberge, Acting Head of Reference at the NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 10 November 2016
11:00 am - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC3, 2nd floor, East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Albert 'Skip' Theberge, Acting Head of Reference at the NOAA Central Library Point of contact: Judith.Salter@noaa.gov

Remote Access: For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: In honor of Veterans Day, the NOAA Central Library will host a special exhibit and discussion: Out of the Vault: Maps, Weather, & War. The Exhibit is open 11am - 2pm ET, and the Discussion/Seminar is 11:30- 12pm ET. The exhibit will showcase several unique items from the NOAA Library collection with special significance given to the armed conflicts that NOAA and its predecessor agencies have served. Refreshments will be served. Highlights include: British charts from the Revolutionary War Handwritten coast pilot from the Civil War WW2 reconnaissance maps gathered by the German and Japanese militaries 1944 map of Omaha Beach West, prepared for D-Day Copies of The Buzzard, the C&GS's WW2-era informal interagency newsletter Personal sketches of the Korean War from Weather Squadron service members Wartime photos of Weather Bureau staff in action

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

9 November 2016

Title: CO2 and Greenland Ice Sheet melt - what are the effects on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, and what do Linear Inverse Models tell us?
Presenter(s): Cecile Penland, NOAA/ESRL and Douglas MacMartin, CalTech and Andreas Schmittner, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 9 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871, Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Cecile Penland (NOAA/ESRL) and Douglas MacMartin (CalTech) and Andreas Schmittner (Oregon State University) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Research, Climate Program Office, Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program (http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars). These webinars will be recorded and the video will be available on this page after the presentation. Seminar POC for questions: hunter.jones@noaa.gov

Remote Access: http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Abstract: TBD. See http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/.
Title: High heat hastens an historically huge HAB
Presenter(s): Dr. Ryan McCabe, University of Washington, Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 9 November 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL - Oceanographer Room (Bldg 3 Room 2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115 Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Ryan McCabe (University of Washington) Seminar sponsor: AFSC/PMEL EcoFOCI Fall Seminar Series; seminar host is Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/577035565 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (669) 224-3212 Access Code: 577-035-565

Abstract: A description of the 2015 west coast-wide toxic algal bloom.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

8 November 2016

Title: Current Coastal Change Research/Management Projects and Priority Information Needs from Cook Inlet through Southeastern Alaska
Presenter(s): Michaela Swanson, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 8 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: IARC/Akasofu 407 University of Alaska Fairbanks 930 Koyukuk Drive Fairbanks, AK 99775
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Michaela Swanson, University of Alaska Fairbanks ACCAP Alaska Climate Webinar Registration and more information available at:https://accap.uaf.edu/habitat_shift POC: Tina Buxbaum (ACCAP) tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or 907-474-7812

Remote Access: To register for the webinar, please fill out the form available at: https://accap.uaf.edu/NPLCC_webinar

Abstract: Research on coastal change in the north pacific has increased rapidly in recent years, making it challenging to track existing projects, understand their cumulative insights, gauge remaining research gaps, and prioritize future work. The goals of this project were to foster better coordination about coastal change studies, help practitioners and scholars learn from one another, identify existing research gaps, make it more transparent and easily accessible to stakeholders in the region, and provide a framework for better understanding how projects interact. We identified current coastal change projects in the region by conducting an extensive internet search utilizing existing databases and online resources and sending out requests for information to stakeholders from a diverse range of university, state, federal, tribal and local institutions. This webinar will present the results of this research.
Title: Submarine Cable Systems for Future Societal Needs
Presenter(s): Dr. Bruce Howe, Ocean and Resources Engineering, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Date & Time: 8 November 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Bruce M. Howe, Ocean and Resources Engineering, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: More than a million kilometers of submarine cables traverse the world's oceans, bringing Internet service to billions of people. These remarkable systems connect people, nations, and economies, but this infrastructure could provide even more, adding invaluable environmental data for understanding the ocean above and the Earth beneath the seafloor. In light of this potential, an international joint task force (JTF) of three United Nations agencies (ITU/WMO/IOC) is working to incorporate environmental monitoring sensors into transoceanic submarine cable systems. Adding small external environmental sensors (e.g., temperature, pressure, acceleration) to the optical amplifiers/repeaters (spaced every ~60 km) of such systems would provide an unparalleled global network of real-time data for ocean climate and sea level monitoring and disaster mitigation from earthquake and tsunami hazards--a Science Monitoring and Reliable Telecommunications (SMART) network. The SMART cable concept and the effort to bring it to fruition will be described.

Bio(s): To further ocean observing, Dr. Bruce Howe has worked over the years developing and applying ocean acoustic tomography and sensor network infrastructure. The acoustics work included moving ship tomography, Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate (ATOC) and the North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory, demonstrating both large area high resolution ocean mapping as well as basin-scale heat content observations. Howe helped establish on-going Ocean Observatories efforts, working on fixed infrastructure (cable power systems and moorings), mobile platforms (gliders as acoustic/nav/comm nodes), and hybrids (moored vertical profilers). A long-term goal is to integrate acoustics systems in ocean observing for science, navigation, and communications. At Station ALOHA 100 km north of Oahu, Dr. Howe installed and operates the ALOHA Cabled Observatory in 4728 m water depth -- the planet's deepest plug-and-play cabled science observatory. He is part of an international effort (JTF SMART Cables) to incorporate sensors into commercial trans-ocean submarine telecommunication cable systems. Dr. Howe is currently a professor at the University of Hawaii. He received engineering degrees from Stanford and the PhD in oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. From 1986 to 2008 he worked at the Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Rescheduled to 11/30: Enhancing Global Climate Change Adaptation Capacity in the Pacific Small Island Developing States
Presenter(s): Britt Parker, Senior Climate and International Specialist, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program and John J. Marra, PhD, Climate Service Director, Pacific Region, NOAA's NCEI
Date & Time: 8 November 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Britt Parker, Senior Climate and International Specialist, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program and John J. Marra, PhD, Climate Service Director, Pacific Region, NOAA's NCEI

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Pacific leaders continue to call for assistance as they strive to understand, predict, and adapt to a changing climate. The development and delivery of actionable information about climate patterns and trends - and their impacts on communities, businesses and ecosystems - is essential to many aspects of policy, planning, and decision-making. Consultation with decision makers is critical to ensuring such information is useful, useable and used. NOAA, working through the Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), undertook a two-year, $2.0 million program from 2012-2014 to support climate change adaptation in the Pacific Small Island Developing States by conducting a series of activities to enhance scientific and technical capacity. These activities were designed to strengthen end-to-end climate services and adaptation capabilities working with the Pacific Island Meteorological Services and other regional organizations to support robust and sustained capacity development consistent with the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS). With an emphasis on engagement and consultation between service providers and users, activities carried out over the life of the project included the Pacific Islands Climate Services Forum, a series of in-country climate service dialogues, updated products and services, the advancement of core capabilities of the countries to deliver products and services focused on regional issues, and culminated in the release of the climate services storybook electronically and via web presence (http://pacificislandsclimate.org/csstories/).

Bio(s): Britt Parker is the Senior Climate and International Specialist for NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program. Britt serves as the Climate and International Coordinator for the NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program. She works with the Federal, State/Territorial, Local and International partners to coordinate planning, inform policies and activities to address the impacts of climate change to coral reef ecosystems and dependent communities. She also coordinates international program activities and engages with key international partners to improve management of coral reefs globally in the face of climate change, unsustainable fishing, and land-based sources of pollution. She has provided technical expertise to multiple USAID related programs and projects including the US Coral Triangle Support Program, the NOAA-USAID Marine Support Partnership, and the NOAA-USAID Enhancing Global Climate Change Adaptation Capacity in Pacific Small Island Developing States project. John J. Marra, PhD., is the NOAA/NCEI Climate Services Director for the Pacific Region, based in Honolulu, HI. For over 20 years he has been working to bridge science, policy, and information technology to address issues related to natural hazards risk reduction and climate adaptation planning. His particular area of expertise is the development and dissemination of data and products associated with coastal inundation and erosion. John served as the lead on the NOAA-USAID Enhancing Global Climate Change Adaptation Capacity in Pacific Small Island Developing States project.

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7 November 2016

Title: Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research (PEER): Informational presentation and Q&A on the PEER grant program
Presenter(s): Thomas J Colvin and Callie Raulfs-Wang, USAID
Date & Time: 7 November 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Callie Raulfs-Wang, PEER Program Manager, USAID

Remote Access: For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: Last year, NOAA joined USAID and several other US agencies/programs to participate in the Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research (PEER) program. Administered by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), PEER is a competitive grants program that invites scientists in developing countries to partner with US government-supported collaborators, and apply for funds to support research and capacity-building activities on topics with strong potential development impacts.This year, the program is soliciting projects in several focus areas relevant to NOAA's mission and work, including: Rapid Assessment of Tuna Fish Stock in the South China and Sulu-Sulawesi Seas; Assessment of Fish Natural History in the Lower Mekong Region; Biodiversity Conservation in Indonesia; Biodiversity and Climate Resilient Development in Madagascar; Climate Resiliency in Bangladesh; among others. PEER is designed to leverage agency resources and investments in scientific research and training, while supporting the work of developing country scientists. The program creates opportunities for cross-disciplinary and multi-sectoral research collaboration, and aims to expand the scope of research for both US agencies and their partners. In last year's cycle, two projects supported by NOAA-funded scientists were selected for funding. Pre-proposals for this year's cycle are due January 13, 2017. During this informational presentation, program managers from USAID will explain the PEER program and this year's focus areas, and will be available for questions/answers on the specifics of the program. If you already have active partnerships in this year's priority regions/topics areas, or if you are interested in developing new connections to scientists in developing countries, please attend! POC: For more information contact, Abby Lunstrum abby.lunstrum@noaa.gov

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3 November 2016

Title: Low-Frequency North Atlantic Variability in the CESM Large Ensemble AND Signature of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation in the North Atlantic Dynamic Sea Level
Presenter(s): Who Kim, UCAR and Jianjun Yin, University of Arizona
Date & Time: 3 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871, Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Who Kim (UCAR) and Jianjun Yin (University of Arizona) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Research, Climate Program Office, Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program (http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars). These webinars will be recorded and the video will be available on this page after the presentation. Seminar POC for questions: hunter.jones@noaa.gov

Remote Access: http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Abstract: TBD. See http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/.
Title: Scales of change in the California current: examining eelgrass and Chinook salmon in space and time
Presenter(s): Ole Shelton, PhD, Conservation Biology Division, NWFSC
Date & Time: 3 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ole Shelton, PhD, Conservation Biology Division, NWFSC

Sponsor(s): Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov WEBINAR Join WebEx meeting: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D480225282%26UID%3D4294960187%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAJQ0s2_XDx1rVETZI1uMVOoi2TtpPSuQwdaNebSMODcNZAGPL9sHhVA4VgNavoJCRh8-eJwoXFQaBqeBSMfW0hV0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm18b52160ce1b8634eec0d875acd0f3d8 Join by phone 1 (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 806 453 453 ABSTRACT Nearly all data used in ecological studies and fisheries is spatio-temporal data. Traditionally, researchers tended to focus one aspect - either understanding time-series patterns or spatial patterns - but not space and time simultaneously. Recent decades have seen an explosion of novel statistical methods and computational power that enable sophisticated analysis of spatio-temporal data. I will discuss two ongoing projects that illustrate the value of embracing spatially explicit approaches for management relevant questions. First, I describe the dynamics of eelgrass (Zostera marina), an important habitat-forming and indicator species, in the nearshore waters of Puget Sound. I use more than 160,000 observations collected over 40 years by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to understand trends and spatial patterns of change in Puget Sound nearshore habitats. Second, I use the coded wire tag (CWT) database to provide calibrated estimates of ocean distribution and abundance of fall Chinook salmon stocks originating from central California to British Columbia. I build on previous investigations of Chinook and build a dynamic model that incorporates spatial and temporal information on commercial and recreational fishing effort, variation in juvenile survival, and spatially variable maturation schedules. For both studies discuss these approaches provide new information about the basic biology each species and may be used to inform management of fisheries and protection of endangered species. BIO I have been a research ecologist with the Nearshore Ecology Team in the Conservation Biology Division at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center since 2012. My research spans a diversity of organisms - including seagrasses to herring to groundfish to salmon - and approaches - including field observations and experiments, a range of statistical modeling and simulation methods. Broadly, I am interested in understanding the causes and consequences variation in marine systems and developing statistical techniques to use existing biological data in new ways. I completed a Ph.d from the University of Chicago in 2009 and a postdoctoral fellowship at University of California, Santa Cruz (2009-2012) before moving to NWFSC.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Adaptive Management of Marine Protected Areas: Predicting Responses to MPA Implementation for Comparison to Monitoring Data
Presenter(s): Louis W. Botsford, Distinguished Professor, Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology, University of California, Davis
Date & Time: 3 November 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Louis W. Botsford, Distinguished Professor, Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology, University of California, Davis Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4647383140551475201

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract: The state of California established a statewide network of marine protected areas through the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) process. Managers and scientists must now figure out how to employ adaptive management of these MPAs (i.e. to compare outcomes to predicted effects, a requirement of the act). The first step was to initiate baseline monitoring of sites inside the new MPAs and at select reference sites outside of them. Next, with support from California Sea Grant, researchers developed computer models for adaptive management of Central California's MPAs for commercially and recreationally important species such as blue rockfish, black rockfish, lingcod and cabezon. The spatial population models incorporated what is known about species' larval dispersals, adult movement patterns, and key species interactions to simulate how fish populations might respond to spatial closures and other factors, such as fishing pressure outside the no-fishing zones. Output from the simulations has provided insights on how soon managers should expect to see increases in fish population abundances and when and why there may be time lags in some species' responses, given factors such as pre-MPA fishing pressure and pre-MPA fish population abundance. The models also offer predictions for how much individual fish sizes might be expected to increase over time. Yet other computational modeling focused on determining "spill-over" distances for MPAs and their implications for siting monitoring reference sites. The scientists report that simply comparing sites inside and outside MPAs can produce misleading results and that consistent evaluation of each over time is more important for accurate assessments of MPA performance than comparing inside and outside MPAs at a set time. This group is working collaboratively with state wildlife managers to develop the science necessary to monitor and adaptively manage the state's new MPAs.

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Title: Using internet search volume to improve quota monitoring for the Gulf of Mexico red snapper recreational sector
Presenter(s): Dr. David Carter, Economist, NOAA Fisheries, Southeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 3 November 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3, Room 3404, 1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. David Carter (Economist, NOAA Fisheries, Southeast Fisheries Science Center)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Fisheries Quantitative Ecology and Socioeconomics Training (QUEST) Program Point of Contact for questions about this seminar: Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov Remote Access Information: https://goo.gl/VTwLaL

Abstract: This presentation will show how Google Internet Search Data can be used to improve recreational quota monitoring. Estimates of recreational fishing harvest are often unavailable until after a fishing season has ended, complicating efforts to stay within the quota. A simple way to monitor quota within the season is to use harvest information from the previous year. This works well when fishery conditions are stable, but is inaccurate when fishery conditions are changing. We develop regression-based models to improve our ability to monitor within-season recreational fishing harvest even when fishery conditions are changing. Our basic model accounts for seasonality, changes in the fishing season, and important events in the fishery. Our extended model uses Google Trends data on the internet search volume relevant to the fishery of interest, in this case Gulf of Mexico red snapper. The recreational sector in the Gulf of Mexico overharvested red snapper nearly every year from 2007 to 2013. Our results confirm that data for the previous year work well to predict within-season harvest for a year (2012) where fishery conditions are consistent with historic patterns. However, for a year (2013) of unprecedented harvest and management activity, our regression model using internet search volume for the term red snapper season generates within-season estimates that are 27% more accurate than the basic model without the internet search information and 29% more accurate than the prediction based on the previous year. More accurate estimates of within-season harvest will increase the likelihood that the Gulf of Mexico red snapper fishery can stay within quota. Our approach using internet search volume might have the potential to improve quota management in other fisheries where conditions change year-to-year. About the speaker: David W. Carter is an economist at the NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center in Miami. He has spent nearly 15 years conducting research on the marine recreational fisheries from North Carolina to Texas. His estimates of the economic value of sportfish are routinely used in the analysis of recreational fishing policy. Dr. Carter has also developed models to forecast recreational fishing effort and harvest using novel indicators outside the fishery such as climate and internet search volume. He is an adjunct professor at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science where he regularly advises graduate students and conducts lectures. Dr. Carter completed his M.S. and Ph.D. in resource economics from the University of Florida and his undergraduate studies at Stetson University. Archive of past seminars: http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/quest/quest-webinars

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: New England Cod Collapse and the Climate
Presenter(s): Kyle Meng, Assistant Professor, Bren School and Dept. of Economics, University of California, Santa Barbara
Date & Time: 3 November 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAAScience Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kyle Meng, Assistant Professor, Bren School and Dept. of Economics, University of California, Santa Barbara. Speaker will be presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Despite aggressive management efforts, New England's iconic cod fisheries have been declining for over three decades, leading recently to a controversial sixmonth ban on all Gulf of Maine cod fishing. The cause of this decline remains debated, though recent fishery literature highlights the potential role of environmental conditions. This paper quantifies and details the mechanism behind a key environmental driver: climate. Since 1980, 17% of the decline in Gulf of Maine adult biomass can be attributed to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the dominant climatic phenomenon in the North Atlantic. Because NAO has a recruitment effect that persists as larval cod mature, our finding implies that observed NAO events can help forecast future cod biomass.

Bio(s): An economist with training in engineering and atmospheric physics, Kyle examines past empirical settings that inform upon a future under anthropogenic climate change. His research explores the relationship between adverse local weather due to the El Nin Southern Oscillation and global spatial patterns of violence and food trade; quantifies climatic drivers for fishery collapse, and examines how policies can induce low-carbon energy transitions. Kyle has published in Nature, PNAS, PLOS ONE, and the American Economic Review. He received his PhD from Columbia University and bachelor's from Princeton University.

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1 November 2016

Title: Interrogating Tropical Cold Pools with DYNAMO Observations and Modeling AND Intraseasonal variability of the upper ocean in the Seycelles-Chagos Thermocline Ridge Region and its impact on MJO initiation and development
Presenter(s): Paquita Zuidema, U. Miami and Saulo Soares, U. Hawaii
Date & Time: 1 November 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871, Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Paquita Zuidema (U. Miami) and Saulo Soares (U. Hawaii) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Research, Climate Program Office, Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program (http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars). These webinars will be recorded and the video will be available on this page after the presentation. Seminar POC for questions: hunter.jones@noaa.gov

Remote Access: http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Abstract: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: US Virgin Island's and Puerto Rico's Maritime Economy
Presenter(s): Jeff Adkins, Senior Economist, NOAA's Performance, Risk, and Social Science Office. Speaker will be presenting remotely from Charleston, SC.
Date & Time: 1 November 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jeff Adkins, Senior Economist, NOAA's Performance, Risk, and Social Science Office. Speaker will be presenting remotely from Charleston, SC.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show that more than 19 percent of the U.S. Virgin Islands workforce are in ocean-related jobs, as are 7 percent of Puerto Rico's workforce. A new report on NOAA's Digital Coast, Describing the Ocean Economies of the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, uses local data to show that the contribution of the ocean to these economies is even greater than national statistics would indicate. These data do not include informal economic activity, such as subsistence fishermen who routinely sell part of their catch through fishing cooperatives. This is particularly problematic in the Caribbean, as so many jobs fall into these informal categories. Conventional definitions of the ocean economy fail to account for the large share of retail trade that, in the island territories, is supported by ocean tourism. To provide a more complete picture of the ocean's importance to the economy, the report includes local data to capture these activities.

Bio(s): Jeffery Adkins is an economist with the I.M. Systems Group (IMSG) working for NOAA's Chief Economist. Measurement of the U.S. ocean economy is a key focus of Jeff's work; he serves as the lead economist for NOAA's Economics: National Ocean Watch (ENOW) project, which produces time-series data for six economic sectors that depend on the oceans and Great Lakes. Other interests include the economics of hazard resilience (e.g., meteorological and space weather events), the economic valuation of government products and services, and the contribution of NOAA's observational missions to the production of final products and services. Jeff has worked as an economist for the federal government since 1979.

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27 October 2016

Title: Were North Pacific maritime communities impacted by prehistoric regime shifts? Evidence from archaeology and paleoecology
Presenter(s): Ben Fitzhugh, PhD., Director, Quaternary Research Center, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Washington
Date & Time: 27 October 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ben Fitzhugh, PhD., Director, Quaternary Research Center, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Washington

Sponsor(s): Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov WEBINAR Join WebEx meeting: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D480225282%26UID%3D4294960187%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAJQ0s2_XDx1rVETZI1uMVOoi2TtpPSuQwdaNebSMODcNZAGPL9sHhVA4VgNavoJCRh8-eJwoXFQaBqeBSMfW0hV0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm18b52160ce1b8634eec0d875acd0f3d8 Join by phone 1 (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 806 453 453

Abstract: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Forty Years of Change: a seabird responds to a melting Arctic
Presenter(s): George Divoky, PhD, Arctic Biologist, founder of Friends of Cooper Island
Date & Time: 27 October 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): George Divoky, PhD, Arctic Biologist, founder of Friends of Cooper Island

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: George Divoky has studied seabirds in arctic Alaska since 1970 and has participated in studies and assessments related to oil and gas development and regional climate change. Since 1975 he has maintained a continuing study of Black Guillemots on Cooper Island, Alaska, in the western Beaufort Sea. The study is one of the longest longitudinal bird studies in the Arctic and its findings on the consequences of decadal-scale reductions in snow and sea ice provide some of the best examples of the biological consequences of climate change.

Bio(s): George Divoky began his studies of seabirds in the summer of 1969 when, as part of a Canadian Wildlife Service program, he conducted shipboard observations off Newfoundland on Bedford Institute of Oceanography research vessels. That experience led to him becoming a Research Associate at the Smithsonian Institution in 1970 where he was selected to participate in the U.S. Coast Guard's initial surveys of the Beaufort Sea adjacent to the newly-discovered Prudhoe Bay oil fields. Since then he has studied Alaskan seabirds annually, working on a diverse group of conservation issues including the Alaska Native Land Claims Settlement Act, oil and gas exploration of the outer continental shelf, the Exxon Valdez oil spill, and regional climate change. In 1975 he began a study of Black Guillemots, a diving arctic seabird, on Cooper Island, Alaska, 35 km east of Point Barrow, Alaska, that he still maintains. The four-decade study is one of the few long-term seabird studies in the Arctic and its findings on the consequences of recent snow and sea ice reductions provided some of the first examples of the biological consequences of climate change. Dr. Divoky's research was featured in a cover story in the New York Times Magazine entitled George Divoky's Planet, in the PBS's Scientific American Frontiers program Hot Times in Alaska with Alan Alda, and on ABC Nightly News and Nightline. He has appeared on The Late Show with David Letterman, and has been interviewed on NPR's Talk of the Nation. His research and experiences on Cooper Island were featured in a play about climate change, Greenland, staged by the Royal National Theatre in London in 2011. Polar Sea, a 10-hour documentary addressing changes in the Northwest Passage featured his work in the episode examining climate change in Alaska. The documentary aired in Canada, France and Germany in December 2014 and is available online in those countries. U.S. distribution is anticipated in the near future. Divoky helped found and has twice been chair of the Pacific Seabird Group, an international organization working to advance conservation and research of Pacific Basin seabirds since 1972. Currently, as Director of the nonprofit organization Friends of Cooper Island, he is working to ensure the continuation of research on Cooper Island seabirds in coming decades, when they will have to deal with the complete disappearance of summer ice, offshore drilling, increased shipping and commercial fishing. Divoky was born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, has Bachelor's and Master's degrees from Michigan State University and a doctorate from the University of Alaska Fairbanks. When not in the field on Cooper Island from June through early September each year, he lives in Seattle, Washington. More information is available at the Friends of Cooper Island website - cooperisland.org

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 October 2016

Title: Evaluating fishery management strategies under different climate change scenarios in the Bering Sea - initial report from the Alaska Climate Integrated Modeling (ACLIM) project
Presenter(s): PMEL/JISAO)
Date & Time: 26 October 2016
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Anne Hollowed, Kirstin Holsman, Alan Haynie, NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center; Al Herman, (PMEL/JISAO)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Fisheries Alaska Fisheries Science Center and Office of Science and Technology Seminar POC for questions: anne.hollowed@noaa.gov

Remote Access: For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: What are the best fishery management strategies for resilient fish stocks and fisheries in a changing climate? The Alaska CLimate Integrated Modeling (ACLIM) project is designed to assess the performance of fishery management strategies under different climate change scenarios in the Eastern Bering Sea. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary project is developing new techniques to link global climate models to regional ocean, ecosystem and social-economic models to evaluate the results of different fishery management strategies under a range climate and ecosystem conditions. This seminar will describe the project framework and initial results of this innovative 3 year project.

Bio(s): Dr. Anne Hollowed is a Senior Scientist with the Alaska Fisheries Science Center (NOAA Fisheries). She is also an Affiliate Professor with the School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences at the University of Washington and has been a member of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council Scientific and Statistical Committee for 14 years. Her research is on the effects of climate and ecosystem change on fish and fisheries, and the intersection of fisheries oceanography and fisheries management. She leads the Status of Stocks and Multispecies Assessment program (SSMA link) and has led the design and implementation of large interdisciplinary research programs. She served as a lead author for part of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5), and has received numerous awards including Gold and Silver Medals from the US Department of Commerce. Dr. Kirstin Holsman is a research scientist with the Alaska Fisheries Science Center (NOAA Fisheries). Her current work is developing quantitative methods for ecosystem-based approaches to fisheries management, and methods to assess and manage climate-change impacts on fish and fisheries. Kirstin's work includes climate specific multi-species stock-assessment models for the Bering Sea (AK, USA), Integrated Ecosystem Assessments, bioenergetics and food-web models, and field studies of climate and fishery interactions with marine ecosystems. Dr. Alan Haynie (alan.haynie@noaa.gov) is an economist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center. Alan's research is focused on the analysis of fisheries under changing environmental, biological, management, and market conditions and improving management in light of this understanding. Alan's work also explores the design and implementation of bycatch reduction incentives and the benefits and costs of dynamic and fixed spatial closures. Alan was a PI in the Bering Sea Integrated Ecosystem Research Program and is a member of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council's Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Groundfish Plan Team. Alan oversees the spatial economics toolbox for fisheries (FishSET), a NOAA Fisheries initiative to improve the spatial modeling of fisheries. Dr. Albert Hermann is a Principal Research Scientist with the University of Washington's Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, and an Affiliate Associate Professor with the UW School of Oceanography. As a member of the Fisheries Oceanography Coordinated Investigations (Eco-FOCI) group at NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, he collaborates with physical oceanographers and biologists on numerical models of circulation, plankton and fish dynamics in the Gulf of Alaska, the Bering Sea and the Pacific Northwest. These models are designed to help synthesize past conditions, and provide both seasonal and multi-decadal projections of the future marine environment. A related body of work centers on immersive 3D visualization of model output. He received a NOAA Gold Medal as a contributor to the Bering Sea Integrated Ecosystem Research Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (Anne Hollowed, Kirstin Holsman, Alan Haynie, NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center; Al Hermann,
Title: (Un)frozen boundaries: Examining the role of sea ice in the socio-legal dynamics of the Bering and Beaufort Seas
Presenter(s): Kristen Shake, PhD Candidate at the Graduate School of Geography, Clark University, Worcester, MA
Date & Time: 26 October 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL - Oceanographer Room (Room 2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115 Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kristen Shake (PhD Candidate at the Graduate School of Geography, Clark University) Seminar sponsor: AFSC/PMEL EcoFOCI Fall Seminar Series; seminar host is Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/783884061 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 783-884-061

Abstract: Sea ice is a dynamic physical element of the greater Arctic marine system, one that has a myriad of connections to human systems on a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Changes to the spatial extent of sea ice simultaneously permits and endangers maritime operations, as well as impacts current debates over maritime boundaries, presenting an interesting challenge for more traditional notions of stationary, terrestrially constructed legal systems. Sea ice is not a stationary object; it moves through time and space in response to the physical forces of wind, ocean currents, and heating. It has a tangible, material and substantive role in contestations over territory, resources and marine boundaries in both the Beaufort and Bering Seas, especially within the broader context of fisheries resources. Here, I suggest that the material nature of sea ice in these marine regions continuously challenges stationary conceptions of law in complex and sometimes contradictory ways. Building on recent work on the human geographies of sea ice, the dynamic field of legal geography and recent contributions to the growing field of ocean-space geographies, this talk will outline how the dynamism of sea ice could influence notions of boundary, fisheries resources and climate change in ocean-spaces of the greater Arctic region.

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Title: Science On a Sphere (SOS) Cafe: Marine Protected Areas
Presenter(s): Gonzalo Cid, National Marine Protected Areas Center
Date & Time: 26 October 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SOS room, 1315 East-West Hwy., Silver Spring, Md
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Gonzalo Cid (National Marine Protected Areas Center) Sponser: NOAA Office of Education, Science On a Sphere Point of Contact: erik.macintosh@noaa.gov

Remote Access: none - in-person only

Abstract: Marine Protected Areas Join us for a discussion about Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). MPAs are important management tools for conserving some of the most biologically and culturally important areas in the ocean. There are thousands of different MPAs worldwide (with different sizes and purposes), but the total area they cover is just a small portion of world's oceans. The areas under strict or no-take protection are an even smaller fraction of the total MPA area. This talk will explore important ecosystems in the oceans and how different types of Marine Protected Areas can protect those areas. Examples of MPAs in the United States and abroad will be used to examine the importance of the MPAs to reduce the effects of external threats and provide protection to marine ecosystems and communities. Science On a Sphere is a room-sized, global display system that uses computers and video projectors to display planetary data onto a six foot diameter sphere, analogous to a giant animated globe. For more information, visit sosinssmc.education.noaa.gov.

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25 October 2016

Title: Telling the Ocean Acidification Story
Presenter(s): Tullio Rossi, Marine scientist and communicator, Adelaide, Australia
Date & Time: 25 October 2016
7:30 pm - 8:30 pm ET
Location: Virtual attendance only; register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5315712487759550978
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Tullio Rossi, Marine scientist and communicator

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program and Office of National Marine Sanctuaries; point of contact is jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register for this webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5315712487759550978

Abstract: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5315712487759550978 Good communicators speak the way they want to speak. Great communicators speak the way people listen. The interesting thing is that people listen in a formulaic way. Join this SOARCE webinar to discover the communication formula that Dr. Tullio Rossi, author of several award-winning animation videos, uses to communicate climate and ocean acidification science. You will learn about key principles of storytelling and communication and how to implement these in your future work. Not interested in animation video? This is still relevant to you because the ideas that are going to be discussed are applicable to any type of media.

Bio(s): "Since I finished high school I have dedicated my life to my greatest passion: the ocean. I undertook studies in marine biology, which brought me from Italy to the USA and then in Australia, where I recently completed a PhD in ocean acidification science. I always wanted to positively impact the world through science, however, during my PhD I realized that research alone is not enough. Science needs effective communication in order to make a difference. With this new awareness, I invested time and energy into becoming a proficient science communicator. This took many forms and radically shifted my career aspirations from academia to science communication. Parallel to my education, I worked as a graphic designer for more than 10 years. Now that my education in science is complete, I feel I am connecting the dots between my scientific and design backgrounds. The two are coming together beautifully! Thanks to this mixed background I can offer unique services which combine a solid understanding of science, the familiarity with the use of visual media and the principles of story telling. I am currently working as a freelance science communicator. I utilize my mixed skillset to help scientists and institutions communicate their complex ideas in a simple but effective way. The main services that I offer are animation video, scientific illustration and infographic design. I also run science communication workshops targeted to students and researchers. You can watch some of my award-winning videos on my educational YouTube channel The Coral Garden. I consider myself a citizen of the world but I am currently based in Adelaide (Australia). In my spare time I love traveling to exotic places, exploring the underwater world, dancing latin rhythms and talking to people about the ocean!"

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Convective Development and Organization Associated with the MJO from a Multiscale Interaction Perspective During DYNAMO AND Diagnosis of Multiscale Interactions Involving Air-Sea Fluxes during the MJO's Initiation Phase
Presenter(s): Kazuyoshi Kikuchi, U. Hawaii and Leslie Hartten, NOAA/ESRL
Date & Time: 25 October 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871, Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kazuyoshi Kikuchi (U. Hawaii) and Leslie Hartten (NOAA/ESRL) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Research, Climate Program Office, Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program (http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars). These webinars will be recorded and the video will be available on this page after the presentation. Seminar POC for questions: hunter.jones@noaa.gov

Remote Access: http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Abstract: See http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

24 October 2016

Title: The role of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership in the El Nino Rapid Response Field Campaign
Presenter(s): Chris Barnet, Senior Scientist, Science and Technology Corporation
Date & Time: 24 October 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: 8th floor Aerospace Building - 10210 Greenbelt Rd, Lanham MD 20706
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Chris Barnet, Senior Scientist, Science and Technology Corporation

Sponsor(s): JPSS Science Seminar for October POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Remote Access: 877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m4ea4494f33c4fd6690d692d32cdd00f6 Meeting number: 811 667 402 Host key: 286431 Meeting password: Jpss2016!

Abstract: By the summer of 2015 forecast models indicated a strong El Nio was very likely during winter 2015-16. Leveraging their extensive field campaign experience, scientists at NOAA/OAR/ESRL/PSD initiated an ambitious field campaign, called the El Nio Rapid Response (ENRR). The primary objective of ENRR was to determine the initial tropical atmospheric response linking El Nio to its global impacts. The field campaign focused on a remote, data-sparse region over the central Pacific Ocean - near the heart of the El Nio - and conducted intensive observations that included numerous radiosonde launches from the NOAA Gulfstream IV aircraft, Kiritimati (Christmas) Island, and the Ronald H. Brown research vessel. Also, the NOAA SHOUT (Sensing Hazards with Operational Unmanned Technology) program conducted 3 coordinated flights in the extratropical North Pacific using the NASA Global Hawk. The Scripps Institution of Oceanography organized complementary Air Force C-130 flights targeting atmospheric rivers over the North Pacific. The JPSS program supported ENRR in three ways. First, the Community Satellite Processing Package (CSPP) was used to provide real time NOAA-Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) products to support flight operations. Second, comparison to the ENRR campaign's in-situ measurements allowed both situational awareness as well as characterization of the operational NUCAPS products in this unique weather and climate regime. Finally, NUCAPS is contributing to the overall scientific analysis of this historic El Nio to advance the understanding and to identify model deficiencies in representing tropical-extratropical physical processes with the ultimate goal of improving weather and climate predictions.

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Title: Environmental Intelligence to support a resilient nation; an ocean of possibilities
Presenter(s): Carl Gouldman, IOOS
Date & Time: 24 October 2016
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:



Presenter(s): Carl Gouldman, Deputy Director, U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) Program

Remote Access: For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: Carl Gouldman, Deputy Director of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) program, will provide an overview of the IOOS as a national-regional partnership to provide data, tools, and forecasts needed for tracking, predicting, managing, and adapting to changes in our ocean, coastal and Great Lakes environment. IOOS helps to improve safety, facilitate economic activity, and protect the Nation's coastal environment. Mr. Gouldman will share some recent successes and a look forward for the program. U.S. IOOS is composed of: 17 Federal agencies; 11 regional associations; the Alliance for Coastal Technologies (ACT), a technology validation and verification organization; and the U.S. IOOS Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed. The U.S. IOOS Program, housed in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, works to implement the program in collaboration with to the Interagency Ocean Observation Committee, and with partners, including other federal agencies, the IOOS Association, and the IOOS Regional Associations. Authorizing Legislation: ICOOS Act 2009 Public Law No. 111-11 (33 U.S.C. 3601-3610).

Bio(s): Carl Gouldman is the Deputy Director, U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) Program. NOAA is the lead federal agency for implementing the U.S IOOS as called for in the Integrated Coastal and Ocean Observation System Act of 2009. Carl joined NOAA as a program coordinator at the Coastal Services Center in 2000 and then spent a year at NOS headquarters staffing the NOAA Ocean Council during NOAA's review of the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy Report before joining the IOOS program full time in 2004. He has been a member of the IOOS team since then and served as a Steering Team member for the U.S. IOOS Summit in 2012 and as Acting Deputy Director for the Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) for 4 months in 2013. He has been IOOS Deputy since 2014. Prior to NOAA, Carl was a senior manager for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation where he led field programs teaching students about bay ecology and conservation. He holds a B.S. in political science from Duke University and a MEM in Coastal Environmental Management from the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke. Carl lives in Bethesda with his wife and son while his daughter is now off to college. Carl has been a NOAA fan for life and enjoys spending as much free time outdoors as possible.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

20 October 2016

Title: Indigenous health indicators: Connecting human and ecosystem health
Presenter(s): Jamie Donatuto, Swinomish Community Environmental health Analyst
Date & Time: 20 October 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jamie Donatuto, Swinomish Community Environmental health Analyst

Sponsor(s): Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov WEBINAR Join WebEx meeting: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D480225282%26UID%3D4294960187%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAJQ0s2_XDx1rVETZI1uMVOoi2TtpPSuQwdaNebSMODcNZAGPL9sHhVA4VgNavoJCRh8-eJwoXFQaBqeBSMfW0hV0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm18b52160ce1b8634eec0d875acd0f3d8 Join by phone 1 (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 806 453 453

Abstract: How health is defined and assessed is a priority concern for Indigenous peoples due to considerable risks faced from impacts to homelands, and because what is "at risk" is often determined without their input or approval. Native Coast Salish communities (Washington State and British Columbia) developed and pilot-tested a set of Indigenous Health Indicators (IHI) that reflect non-physiological aspects of health (community connection, natural resources security, cultural use, education, self-determination, resilience) on a community scale, using constructed measures that allow for concerns and priorities to be clearly articulated without releasing proprietary knowledge. In this presentation we will discuss the meanings and uses of IHI and how they demonstrate the myriad connections between human and ecosystem health for Coast Salish peoples. BIO Larry is the Community Health Specialist in the recently formed Swinomish Community Health Program. Larry is also involved in Intergovernmental Relations and Cultural Resource Planning. He has been involved for over 30 years in Swinomish Indian Tribal Community governmental committees, intergovernmental affairs, public relations, community development, spiritual traditions and cultural activities. Larry is a distinguished Swinomish tribal elder. For the past 25 years, the greater part of Larry's work has involved the interrelationships between tribal, local, regional, national, and international governmental programs. He has presented numerous times on inter-governmental relations, cultural, spiritual and historical issues. He works closely with Dr. Jamie Donatuto in developing and pilot-testing health indicators responsive to Indigenous health, a project Larry and Jamie have been collaborating on for more 15 years. Dr. Jamie Donatuto is an Environmental Community Health Analyst for the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, located in the beautiful Salish Sea in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. For 15 years, Jamie has been enacting investigations on behalf of the Tribe, including researching toxics in local traditional foods, tribal health-related impacts from climate change, and developing community-based indigenous health indicators. The Indigenous Health Indicators project is a collaborative effort with long-time colleague Swinomish elder, Larry Campbell. Jamie and Larry most recently launched the Swinomish Community Health Program and they work extensively with community education and outreach projects. Dr. Donatuto completed her doctoral studies at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, in the interdisciplinary graduate program of Resource Management and Environmental Studies.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: How Natural Resource Management Institutions Promote or Detract from Resilience in Socio-ecological Systems: The Copper River Salmon Fishery as a Case Study
Presenter(s): Erin Shew, 2016 Climate Preparedness Fellow, White House Council on Environmental Quality
Date & Time: 20 October 2016
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Erin Shew, 2016 Climate Preparedness Fellow, White House Council on Environmental Quality

Sponsor(s): NOAA Knauss Brown Bag series; point of contact is katheryn.patterson@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract: Institutions, both formal and informal, serve as a link between the social and ecological components of socio-ecological systems (SESs). They determine important factors such as who has rights and access to resources, and when and how those rights can be exercised. Thus, institutions that are a good "fit" to the SES can promote resilience, while those that are not can create vulnerabilities within the system. The Copper River watershed, which stretches from interior Alaska to Prince William Sound, is heavily dependent on the five Pacific Salmon species for ecological sustainability, economic health, and cultural identity. An analysis of salmon management institutions reveals that the formal management system is a good fit for the watershed while the SES is in a steady state, but lacks the robustness to deal with environmental and social changes that are currently stressing the system. Additionally, informal institutions such as cultural norms and economic systems have created a rigidity trap that generates disincentives to adopt more resilient approaches to management.

Bio(s): Erin Shew is a masters candidate in the University of Alaska Fairbanks Department of Arctic and Northern Studies, focusing on Environmental Policy. She spent several years working as a forest ecology researcher, hiking the backcountry of Alaska's boreal forests. Prior to beginning the Knauss Fellowship, she worked as a cultural anthropologist for the State of Alaska, conducting research on the use of wild, subsistence resources in rural Alaska and the impacts that drivers such as climate change, proposed development projects, and cultural shifts have had on food security and health. She is currently the Climate Preparedness Fellow at the White House Council on Environmental Quality, where she works on instituting climate equity considerations in policy, including building resilience in Arctic communities and developing policy to assist communities with relocation and managed retreat as an adaptation response to the impacts of climate change.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Climate Change Impacts on Human Health and Community Resiliency in the U.S. Arctic
Presenter(s): Becca Derex, M.S., 2016 2016 Ocean and Coastal Policy Fellow, NOS Policy and Constituent Affairs Division
Date & Time: 20 October 2016
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Becca Derex, M.S., 2016 Ocean and Coastal Policy Fellow, NOS Policy and Constituent Affairs Division

Sponsor(s): NOAA Knauss Brown Bag series; point of contact is katheryn.patterson@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract: The Arctic is impacted by climate change more severely than any other region on the planet. Unprecedented rates of warming, extensive loss of seasonal sea ice cover, and coastal erosion are only some of the challenges faced by Arctic communities. These environmental changes drive many emerging health risks in both human and wildlife populations. Understanding the intricate linkages between environmental conditions, ecosystem responses to change, and human health is critical to establish long-term community resilience against climate change. A holistic One Health approach, which incorporates environmental, animal, and human health factors and engages a diverse group of stakeholders to collectively evaluate risks and develop effective responses, is the most promising strategy for addressing climate-driven health challenges in the Arctic. Many organizations, including the Arctic Council Sustained Development Working Group and the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, are successfully incorporating the One Health concept into regional resiliency efforts.

Bio(s): Becca Derex received a Master of Science degree from the College of Charleston Graduate Program in Marine Biology, with specializations in Marine Physiology and Aquatic Toxicology. Her graduate research explored the underlying cell signaling pathways involved in crustacean responses to environmental hypoxia. Prior to beginning the Knauss Fellowship, she worked as a research specialist in the Neurosciences Department at the Medical University of South Carolina where her work focused on the cellular mechanics of neurodegeneration in Down's syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. Currently, Becca is the Ocean and Coastal Policy Fellow at the National Ocean Service, where she covers a broad portfolio that includes NOAA's Arctic Program and NOAA's One Health Working Group.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

19 October 2016

Title: Delivering Impactful Coastal Science Services to Strengthen Communities
Presenter(s): Dr. Jesse Feyen, Deputy Director, NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
Date & Time: 19 October 2016
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Jesse Feyen, Deputy Director, NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: margaret.lansing@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1637315028733554436

Abstract: NOAA is a science agency whose mission focuses on sharing science knowledge as actionable information for decision-makers; that is, providing environmental intelligence. Meeting this mission requires multiple factors to be successful: an understanding of science information users and their needs; effective management of programs and projects; leveraging of partnerships; transitioning science to operational applications; and an overarching vision to coordinate these activities. These principles will be highlighted in recent successful NOAA science efforts on coastal hazards, including social science studies on users's understanding of storm surges, development and testing of new coastal flood products for National Weather Service forecasts, and transition of ADCIRC coastal inundation models to application and operations. Finally, lessons learned will be used to discuss how the needs of Great Lakes communities can be met by delivering science information, products, and services.

Bio(s): Dr. Feyen assumed the position of Deputy Director for NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory in June 2016, where he is responsible for overseeing laboratory business operations. Previously he was the Deputy Chief of the Office of Coast Survey's Development Laboratory at NOAA HQ in Silver Spring, Maryland. From 2010 to 2015 he was the Project Portfolio Manager of NOAA's Storm Surge Roadmap, an agency-wide R&D program that saw vast improvements occur in storm surge products and services. He originally joined the National Ocean Service as a coastal hydrodynamic model developer. He has a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Notre Dame (South Bend, Indiana) and a bachelor's in civil engineering from Calvin College (Grand Rapids Michigan). On a personal note, Jesse lived near the Great Lakes for 29 years so has a personal connection to the region and is excited to be back.

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18 October 2016

Title: Protecting Peru's Precious Ocean & Coastal Resources
Presenter(s): Ole Varmer, Attorney-Advisor, International Section Office of General Counsel, NOAA
Date & Time: 18 October 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ole Varmer, Attorney-Advisor, International Section Office of General Counsel, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Abstract: NOAA is well-regarded around the world for its scientific research and management as our nation's ocean agency. Working with the Department of State, NOAA has been providing technical assistance to Peru regarding its amazing coastal resources and the Humboldt Current Large Marine Ecosystem off the coast of Peru and Chile. Ole Varmer will be speaking about the recent opportunity he had to travel to Peru through our US Embassy in Lima and assist Peru's Ministry of Environment. His work on integrated coastal management and marine spatial planning, particularly plans for marine protected areas, highlight the importance to the world that these areas are preserved and sustainably developed, and thus the reason DoS and NOAA provide technical assistance and capacity building, including legal assistance. This presentation will include lots of great travel photos as well, focused on the coastal environment as well as the local cultural heritage!

Bio(s): Ole Varmer started his legal career in 1981 and worked as a legal assistant at several law firms before graduating from Yeshiva University's Benjamin Cardozo School of Law in 1987. He joined the Department of Commerce Office of General Counsel in 1987 and later moved to NOAA's Office of General Counsel in 1990 where he became lead attorney in establishing a number of National Estuarine Research Reserves and National Marine Sanctuaries including the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. He has been serving in his current position in the NOAA GC International Section since 1998. As an attorney-advisor, he works on a variety of international issues and is primarily responsible for providing advice on subject areas involving heritage resources, marine spatial planning, marine protected areas, jurisdiction and maritime zones.

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17 October 2016

Title: An in depth look at the Finite Volume Cubed-Sphere Dynamical Core (FV3)
Presenter(s): Shian-Jiann Lin, NOAA/GFDL
Date & Time: 17 October 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series The presentation is posted at: http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2016/Lin_FV3_workshop_2016.pptx Youtube record https://youtu.be/JsMIGmA5vuk Tar file for all presentations http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2016/FV3_20161017.tar

Presenter(s): Shian-Jiann Lin, GFDL

Title: An In-Depth Look at the Finite Volume Cubed-Sphere Dynamical Core (FV3) POC: Fanglin Yang fanglin.yang@noaa.gov Please attend in person, if possible. If you are interested in remote access, please contact Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov to reserve the line. Ligia Bernardet - NOAA Affiliate will organize a conference call. Louisa Nance will organize a conference call from NCAR GTM call without reservation or telephone call without Audio pin may be dismissed when line become full or any one start making noise. Remote Access 1: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/361489453 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (646) 749-3122 Access Code: 361-489-453 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 361-489-453 3. Not at your computer? Click the link to join this meeting from your iPhone, iPad, Android or Windows Phone device via the GoToMeeting app. Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the eminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook. Topics: What made it unique and why it excels with advanced cloud microphysics, dust-aerosol chemistry, and data assimilation.

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13 October 2016

Title: Improvements to National Geodetic Survey (NGS) Online Map Products
Presenter(s): Brian Shaw, Geodesist, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 13 October 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Brian Shaw, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov POC: Christine Gallagher

Remote Access: Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8905960994480517633. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (631) 992-3221 Access Code: 527-832-323 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar.

Abstract: Map applications are an efficient way to identify geodetic information in your area of interest, including continuous GNSS sites (CORS) and GNSS-derived coordinates at survey marks (OPUS Share solutions). NGS recently released new map applications for CORS sites and OPUS Share solutions and is interested in customer feedback regarding these beta products. These new maps scale to fit your device, include clustering of features for quicker loading, and contain added functionality for searching and filtering. This presentation will demonstrate how to use these responsive maps, highlight their enhancements, and show how improved mapping applications and GIS tools improve the accessibility of NGS data.

Bio(s): Brian Shaw is a Geodesist at NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. Mr. Shaw is the NGS representative to the National States Geographic Information Council (NSGIC) and is the leader of the NGS GIS team.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Fisheries in 3D: 10 years of collaborative research
Presenter(s): Pete Lawson, Ph.D, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 13 October 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Pete Lawson, Ph.D, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries

Sponsor(s): Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov WEBINAR Join WebEx meeting: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D480225282%26UID%3D4294960187%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAJQ0s2_XDx1rVETZI1uMVOoi2TtpPSuQwdaNebSMODcNZAGPL9sHhVA4VgNavoJCRh8-eJwoXFQaBqeBSMfW0hV0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm18b52160ce1b8634eec0d875acd0f3d8 Join by phone 1 (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 806 453 453

Abstract: Faced with Klamath River Chinook fishery restrictions, a collaboration of commercial salmon fishermen, scientists, and seafood marketers initiated Project CROOS (Collaborative Research on Oregon Ocean Salmon) in 2005, and the West Coast Genetic Stock Identification Collaboration (WCGSI) in 2006, to explore the potential of genetic stock identification (GSI) to provide fisheries managers with better data to manage harvest. The short-term objective was to improve knowledge of Chinook salmon stock distributions in the hope of enabling fishermen to avoid weak stocks. The ultimate goal is to develop a coast-wide data network with flexible tools to serve the full spectrum of needs and services supporting a variety of West Coast fisheries. Fishermen bar-coded each fish caught, recorded the location using global positioning system (GPS) devices, collected fin clips (for GSI) and scales (for aging), along with fish length and depth caught. Many also attached temperature/depth (T/D) loggers to their gear, providing an in situ T/D record from the fishing grounds. Data were used to map changing distributions, by stock, throughout the fishery and to relate fine-scale catch distributions to changes in local oceanographic conditions. In 2010, Oregon and California ocean fisheries were sampled weekly from May through September, providing the first broad-scale application of this technique. Over 80,000 samples have now been collected in Washington, Oregon, and California. Management applications have been explored, but are slow to develop, in part because we have not yet achieved a systematic, representative sampling of the fishery. In 2014 a natural experiment provided a window into the response of Chinook to the Warm Blob. Potential applications include coast-wide fishery management, scientific investigations of salmon migratory behavior in relation to the dynamic ocean environment, tracking and branding fish for marketing, and as a resource for individual fishermen to understand and plan their fishing operations. Success of the project depends on the active inclusion of all segments of the fishery, from fishermen to managers. BIO Before coming to the Pacific Northwest, Pete Lawson was a field ornithologist in Northeastern Mexico studying maroon-fronted parrots and flying radio-controlled gliders to lure peregrine falcons from their cliffs. After getting an M.S. and a Ph.D. in stream ecology at Idaho State University, Pete joined the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife as a fisheries modeler. He produced predictors for Oregon coho salmon, wrote a harvest model for Klamath River fall chinook, studied the species-specific selectivity of commercial fishing gears, developed a method for modeling mark-selective fisheries, and created a habitat-based life-cycle model of Oregon coastal natural coho. Since he joined the NWFSC in 1997, Pete has developed an interest in environmental influences on coho salmon survival, integrating climate effects across freshwater and marine phases of the coho life cycle. For the past 11 years he has been working with salmon fishermen to map Chinook catch distributions in the ocean at a fine scale for use in science, marketing, and management. In addition to his research, Pete served on the Scientific and Statistical Committee of the Pacific Fishery Management Council from 1988 to 2016 and was a member of the Coho Technical Team of the Pacific Salmon Commission.

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Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 13 October 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: Gulf of Maine Harmful Algal Blooms: In-situ Observations and Numerical Modeling
Presenter(s): Yizhen Li, Computational Ecologist and Research Oceanographer, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Date & Time: 13 October 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Yizhen Li, Research Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCMA and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): Yizhen Li is a computational ecologist and research oceanographer at NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). He is also a guest investigator at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. His research interests include coastal circulation dynamics; coupled bio-physical interactions; especially harmful algal blooms and larval dispersal modeling, variational data assimilation, and satellite oceanography. He earned a BA and an MS at the Ocean University of China. He earned a second MS and then a PhD at North Carolina State University. Yizhen has worked as a research assistant and postdoctoral research associate at North Carolina State University, and a postdoctoral scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He recently joined NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, where he serves as an ecologist and research oceanographer.

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11 October 2016

Title: Potential roles of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and Maritime Continent in MJO initiation AND Use of the Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Model (OLAM) with Cloud System-Resolving Refined Local Mesh to Study Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Initiation
Presenter(s): Chidong Zhang, University of Miami and Eric Maloney, Colorado State University
Date & Time: 11 October 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871, Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Chidong Zhang (University of Miami) and Eric Maloney (Colorado State University) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Research, Climate Program Office, Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program (http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars). These webinars will be recorded and the video will be available on this page after the presentation. Seminar POC for questions: hunter.jones@noaa.gov

Remote Access: http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Abstract: This study explores possible connections between the ITCZ and MJO initiation over the tropical Indian Ocean. Large-scale and convective characteristics of the ITCZ and MJO during different stages of its initiation were compared using TRMM precipitation feature data and a reanalysis product. A precipitation tracking method was used to identify MJO initiation, and the ITCZ was selected according a set of criteria. The comparison revealed distinctions between the ITCZ and MJO initiation on both convective and large scales. These distinctions suggest that a transition between the ITCZ to MJO initiation is not merely a relocation of active convection, but is an evolution in both convective characteristics and large-scale environment. See http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars for more information.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 October 2016

Title: Fishing for Nutrition
Presenter(s): Edward Allison, Professor, School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, University of Washington
Date & Time: 6 October 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Edward Allison, Professor, School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, University of Washington

Sponsor(s): Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov WEBINAR Join WebEx meeting: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D480225282%26UID%3D4294960187%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAJQ0s2_XDx1rVETZI1uMVOoi2TtpPSuQwdaNebSMODcNZAGPL9sHhVA4VgNavoJCRh8-eJwoXFQaBqeBSMfW0hV0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm18b52160ce1b8634eec0d875acd0f3d8 Join by phone 1 (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 806 453 453 Need help? https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

Abstract: Fisheries policy is currently focused on eliminating illegal, unregulated and unreported fishing, rebuilding stocks and maximizing the monetary value of the fishery sector, through maximizing rents and contributions to trade revenues. Aquaculture development has been production-orientated and often trade-focused too. Fish and seafood are normally left out of food security analyses, or treated simplistically as sources of 'protein' - a macronutrient that is rarely deficient and often over-consumed. This is changing, as the nutrition value of micronutrients in fish are increasingly discussed in food policy circles and fisheries sector research and policy advisory circles. Fisheries policy is, however, not yet orientated towards maximizing nutrition and health benefits - arguably the most important function this relatively minor economic sector can make to maximize global social good. What would a fishery and aquaculture policy focused on 'maximum nutritional yield' look like? BIO Eddie Allison's research centers on the human connection to natural resources. His primary areas of focus are 1) the contribution of fisheries and aquaculture to food and nutrition security and coastal livelihoods, 2) governance of small-scale fisheries and aquaculture production and the human rights of fisherfolk, and 3) the vulnerability and adaptation to climate change of people dependent on marine and freshwater resources. His work spans the globe, holding past positions in the field of fisheries and aquaculture management and development in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, Oceania, Latin America and Europe, as researcher or technical and policy advisor for various international organizations. He has held faculty appointments at the University of East Anglia, and was the director of Policy, Economics, and Social Science at the WorldFish Center in Malaysia prior to coming to the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs. Dr. Allison received his Ph.D. in Fisheries Science from the University of Liverpool, England.

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Title: EndNote X7.7 Training
Presenter(s): Donna Kirking, EndNote Trainer, ThomsonReuters
Date & Time: 6 October 2016
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Donna Kirking, EndNote Trainer, (ThomsonReuters) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Central Library Contact(s): Judith Salter, Librarian, NOAA Central Library (judith.salter@noaa.gov); or the NOAA Central Library Reference Desk (library.reference@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Online access: To register for online access to this live group EndNote training session, please register individually using this link: https://thomsonreuters.webex.com/thomsonreuters/k2/j.php?MTID=t76dab1a06f30e4a62f1c239a931594b9 Each attendee logging in will need to register in advance because each person receives a unique link to the class"and only one person can use that link. If people will be meeting as a group in a conference room, only the person logging in needs to register. You are also welcome to follow the presentation along with Librarian Judith in the Brown Bag area of the NOAA Central Library.

Abstract: This class will focus on the following: Creating an EndNote library, importing references using online search and direct export, importing PDFs, using Find Full Text, searching for and removing duplicates, creating a journals term list, Cite While You Write in Microsoft Word and EndNote Sync and Library Sharing. Download EndNote Product Keys for NOAA staff at: https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/nites-endnote/

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Balanced Dynamics and Convection in the Tropical Atmosphere
Presenter(s): David Raymond, Physics Dept. and Geophysical Research Center New Mexico Tech
Date & Time: 6 October 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar Speaker David Raymond, Physics Dept. and Geophysical Research Center New Mexico Tech POC: Sergio Abarca Sergio.Abarca@noaa.gov remote access: contact POC

Abstract: This talk presents a conceptual picture of balanced tropical tropospheric dynamics inspired by recent observations. The most important factor differentiating the tropics from middle and higher latitudes is the absence of baroclinic instability; upward motion occurs primarily via deep convective processes. Thus, convection forms an integral part of large-scale tropical motions. Since convection itself is small-scale and chaotic in detail, predictability lies in uncovering the hidden hands that guide the average behavior of convection. Two appear, balanced dynamics and thermodynamic constraints. Contrary to conventional expectations, balanced dynamics plays a crucial role in the tropical atmosphere. However, due to the smallness of the Coriolis parameter there, non-linear balance is more important in the tropics than at higher latitudes. Two thermodynamic constraints appear to play an important role in governing the average behavior of convection outside of the cores of tropical storms. First, the production of precipitation is extraordinarily sensitive to the saturation fraction of the troposphere. Second, ''moisture quasi-equilibrium'' governs the saturation fraction, with moister atmospheres being associated with smaller moist convective instability. The moist convective instability is governed by the balanced thermodynamic response to the pattern of potential vorticity, which in turn is slowly modified by convective and radiative heating. The intricate dance between these dynamic and thermodynamic processes leads to complex behavior of the tropical atmosphere in ways that we are just beginning to understand.

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5 October 2016

Title: NOAA Climate Stewards: Building Resilience through Education and Action
Presenter(s): Molly Harrison and Bruce Moravchik, Project Coordinators, Climate Stewards
Date & Time: 5 October 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Molly Harrison and Bruce Moravchik, Project Coordinators, Climate Stewards

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Abstract: The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is a NOAA-wide effort promoting experiential and place-based education to enhance the connections between human actions and their effects on natural Earth systems. Reaching over 1000 educators across the United States - and growing - CSEP provides sustained professional development, collaborative tools, and support to build a climate-literate public actively engaged in climate stewardship. CSEP also supports educators in the development and implementation of climate stewardship (mitigation or adaptation) projects to increase the understanding of climate science and engage in practical actions to reduce the impacts of climate change. The project is part of NOAA's portfolio of activities to strengthen ocean, climate, and atmospheric science education. Learn more about the methods and outcomes of CSEP's distance learning, face to face workshops, success stories of educator's stewardship projects, and how your office can get the word out about the important climate related work you are doing.

Bio(s): Molly Harrison is an education program leader for NOAA Fisheries Service and NOAA's National Ocean Service focusing on climate change, protected marine species, and US fisheries. Prior to joining NOAA, she was a classroom teacher and a Country Desk Officer for the Peace Corps. Molly holds degrees in International Business, Education, and Instructional Systems Development. Bruce Moravchik is an educator in NOAA's National Ocean Service. He develops and promotes original content and problem-based learning initiatives which convey NOAA's research, technology, and activities. Bruce has taught at the high school and university level in Rhode Island, oceanography on tall ships in the Caribbean, researched lobster population dynamics in New England and coral reef ecology in the Red Sea.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body

4 October 2016

Title: A Quantitative Analysis of Convective Mass Flux Parameterizations Using Direct Observations from DYNAMO
Presenter(s): Chris Fairall, NOAA/ESRL
Date & Time: 4 October 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871, Remote access also available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Chris Fairall (NOAA/ESRL) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Research, Climate Program Office, Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars Seminar POC for questions: hunter.jones@noaa.gov

Remote Access: http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Abstract: The 2011 DYNAMO investigation of the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) included an elaborate, multiplatform observation field study with ships, islands, and aircraft in the Indian Ocean. The R/V Revelle was a primary platform for surface-based near-surface, boundary-layer, cloud, and precipitation observations. We have used selected data from DYNANO to investigate convective mass flux approximations form the core of must cumulus parameterizations (see Lappen and Randall, Toward a Unified Parameterization of the Boundary Layer and Moist Convection', Parts I, II, and III) including application to shallow convection, which has historically been neglected because of the observational difficulty " conventional scanning precipitation radars are not suitable for non- or weakly-precipitating clouds. The analysis used two unique NOAA ship-based remote sensors: the 94-GHz cloud Doppler radar and the Doppler lidar " but also drawing on other sources of data (microwave radiometer, ceilometer, surface fluxes, rawinsondes, and the C-band radar). The time series of radar in-cloud turbulence profiles were combined with time series of lidar clear-air turbulence profiles. This allows direct observations of updraft/downdraft structure with sufficient time/space resolution to measure profiles of convective velocity distributions with the shallow convective cloud explicitly partitioned in the time series. Characterization of the convective mass flux profiles will then allow us to address directly the role of shallow convection in the transport of moisture from the boundary layer into the lower troposphere.

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Title: Ocean Highlights from the IUCN World Conservation Congress
Presenter(s): Lauren Wenzel, Director NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center; Carl Gustaf Lundin, Director IUCN Global Marine and Polar Programme; and, Dan Laffoley, IUCN Principal Advisor, Marine Science and Conservation for the Global Marine and Polar Programme, and Marine Vice-Chair for the World Commission on Protected Areas
Date & Time: 4 October 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Lauren Wenzel, Director NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center Carl Gustaf Lundin, Director IUCN Global Marine and Polar Programme Dan Laffoley, IUCN Principal Advisor, Marine Science and Conservation for the Global Marine and Polar Programme, and Marine Vice-Chair for the World Commission on Protected Areas Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2082589748291185154

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract: The 2016 World Conservation Congress, held Sept.1-10 in Honolulu, Hawaii, marked the first time this meeting of conservation leaders from across the world has been held in the United States. Held every four years, the WCC provides an opportunity to share conservation lessons, celebrate accomplishments and make new commitments. This year, the WCC attracted over 8,000 participants and -- with its island setting -- had a strong oceans focus. Learn about the major products and future directions for oceans coming out of this meeting.

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29 September 2016

Title: Building a framework for ecosystem level management strategy evaluation under climate change
Presenter(s): Philipp Neubauer, Ph.D., Fisheries Scientist, Dragonfly Data Science, Wellington, New Zealand
Date & Time: 29 September 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Philipp Neubauer, Ph.D., Fisheries Scientist, Dragonfly Data Science, Wellington, New Zealand

Sponsor(s): Monster Seminar Jam (http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov WEBINAR Join WebEx meeting : https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D480225282%26UID%3D4294960187%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAJQ0s2_XDx1rVETZI1uMVOoi2TtpPSuQwdaNebSMODcNZAGPL9sHhVA4VgNavoJCRh8-eJwoXFQaBqeBSMfW0hV0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm18b52160ce1b8634eec0d875acd0f3d8 Join by phone 1 (650) 479-3207 Access code and meeting #: 806 453 453 ABSTRACT Climate change impacts on ocean ecosystems are often explored using complex models to make projections decades into the future under various climate change and fishing scenarios. However, studies using this approach rarely explore possible management scenarios to find desirable outcomes. An alternative approach would be to explore strategies that maintain resilient ecosystems under climate change, given a range of models of future changes in marine communities. This approach a management strategy evaluation that explores our ability to adapt to or mitigate climate change impacts at the ecosystem level " an adaptation strategy evaluation (ASE). For this talk, I will outline the humble beginnings of a size-based ASE model. The framework starts with a novel eco-physiological model of temperature and oxygen effects on ectotherm bio-energetics at the individual level. This model is easily scaled to populations, and integrated into existing size-based ecosystem models to explore secondary effects of size-based predation and fishing strategies under climate change. New methods to parametrize these ecosystem models for application in real ecosystems will allow us to represent key uncertainties about ecosystem model parameters and climate change impacts. I suggest that this framework can be used to assess the robustness of management strategies to an uncertain future in a range of ecosystems with varying degrees of data availability. BIO Philipp is a fisheries scientist at Dragonfly Science, a small science consulting firm in Wellington, New Zealand. He enjoys developing statistical models to test ecological theory and enable informed decision making for marine resource management. Phil works on fisheries questions that range from local small scale fisheries management - he leads research into new fine-scale monitoring and management programmes for New Zealand's abalone fisheries - to aspects of ecosystem based fisheries management. Funded by a 2014 Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden Fast-Start grant, Philipp's current work uses size-based models to research the combined effects of fishing and climate change on marine ecosystems. Using a combination of theoretical and statistical modelling, his research explores the application of these models for strategic decision making under climate change. After growing up in Germany, Philipp moved to seaside Marseille, France to study for a Masters in marine ecology and ecological modeling at the Universite de la Mditerrane. He completed a PhD in quantitative ecology at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand in 2011, followed by a post-doc at Rutgers University, studying the patterns and drivers of decline and recovery in fish stocks. He joined Dragonfly Science in Wellington, New Zealand in 2013.

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Title: Unified Weather-Climate Modeling: Challenges and Opportunities
Presenter(s): David Walters, Met Office, Cecelia Deluca, NOAA ESRL, Rob Pincus, University of Colorado Boulder and NOAA ESRL, Gabriel Vecchi, NOAA GFDL
Date & Time: 29 September 2016
9:30 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): David Walters (Met Office), Cecelia Deluca (NOAA ESRL), Rob Pincus (University of Colorado, Boulder and NOAA ESRL), Gabriel Vecchi (NOAA GFDL) Seminar sponsors: OAR/CPO MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: heather.archambault@noaa.gov

Remote Access: WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=eef69e63e8fdf19c94687e09554903198 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx -- David Walters -- The Met Office Unified Model: seamless development for weather and climate prediction ABSTRACT For over 25 years, the Met Office have developed and used a Unified Model for global and regional prediction of the Earth's weather and climate systems. The original motivation for this approach was to consolidate the technical infrastructure of our modelling codes. Since then, we have increasingly moved towards more scientifically unified systems so that we can take advantage of the synergies between weather and climate modelling. This talk will present our experience of the unified modelling approach and how this helps us achieve our mission. It will include examples of the scientific, organisational and technical benefits this brings, as well as some of the challenges it presents and our approaches to address them. -- Cecelia Deluca -- Software infrastructure for a unified modeling system ABSTRACT ESMF-based software infrastructure is used in modeling systems that span predictive time scales from weather to climate. ESMF coupling infrastructure supports specialized approached for conservative interpolation, such as the exchange grid, explicit approaches that use a central mediator, and simple connectors that transfer fields directly between components. The construction of a unified modeling system that spans weather to climate scales requires careful consideration of the applicability of these and other coupling options, and the scientific and computational trade-offs that may arise from using the same model components and/or coupling techniques for all timescales. It also calls into question what exactly is meant by "unified". The NOAA Environment Modeling System (NEMS) aspires to be a unified modeling system, and participants in development are in the process of identifying open questions, and, with community partners, formulating strategies to address them. This talk discusses the current status and plans. -- Rob Pincus -- A new radiation code for atmospheric models across scales ABSTRACT Radiation is the fuel for the atmospheric heat engine and the fundamental driver for circulations at all scales. Thus all but the most idealized models require a radiation parameterization and errors can have systematic impacts forecast quality. As a modeling capability, radiation parameterizations are unique in being conceptually isolated, have clear benchmark results, and applicable essentially unchanged across two or more orders of grid resolution. A well-designed radiation parameterization is crucial since radiative transfer is often a significant portion of an atmospheric model's computational cost. In this presentation I'll briefly introduce RRTMGP, the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for General Parallel applications, a new radiation parameterization with roots in the well-regarded and widely-used RRTMG parameterization. RRTMGP increases accuracy relative to RRTMG by introducing new spectroscopic information but the majority of changes are aimed at making the model more efficient, on the one hand, and more flexible and easily adapted to use across scales and other contexts on the other hand. The flexibility is achieved through the use of Fortran 2003 that users may extend to efficiently and correctly couple the parameterization to their host model without modifying the underlying code. Efficiency is achieved by isolating computational tasks into simple kernels that may be highly optimized or replaced with architecture-specific implementations. -- Gabriel Vecchi -- Toward a unified system for understanding, predicting and projecting regional hurricane activity across timescales ABSTRACT A family of high-resolution (50km and 25km atmospheric/land resolution) global coupled climate models provide a unified framework towards the understanding, intraseasonal-to-decadal prediction and decadal to multi-decadal projection of regional and extreme climate, including tropical cyclones. Initialized predictions of global hurricane activity show skill on regional scales, comparable to the skill on basin-wide scales, suggesting that regional seasonal TC predictions may be a feasible forecast target. The 25km version of the model shows skill at seasonal predictions of the frequency of the most intense hurricanes (Cat. 3-4-5 and Cat. 4-5). It is shown that large-scale systematic errors in the mean-state are a key constraint on the simulation and prediction of variations of regional climate and extremes, and methodologies for overcoming model biases are explored. Improvements in predictions of regional climate are due both to improved representation of local processes, and to improvements in the large-scale climate and variability from improved process representation. These models are used to explore the the response of tropical cyclones, both globally and regionally, to increasing greenhouse gases and to internal climate variations, and for initialized seasonal predictions. -- Navigate to http://cpo.noaa.gov/mapp/webinar to view recordings from the past five years of MAPP webinars on a variety of topics including hurricanes, drought, precipitation and heat extremes, prediction, model development, climate projections, and many other topics. --

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28 September 2016

Title: NEFSC/WHOI Panel Discussion on Transitioning Technology to Operations
Presenter(s): Drs. Bill Karp, Sofie Van Parijs, and Dvora Hart, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, MA and Dr. Scott Gallager, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA
Date & Time: 28 September 2016
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Clark Conference Room, NEFSC Aquarium, 166 Water Street, Woods Hole, MA 02543
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Drs. Bill Karp, Sofie VanParijs, and Dvora Hart, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, and Dr. Scott Gallager, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Sponsor(s): Joint Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) Seminar. Point of Contact: Mike Jech, NEFSC, michael.jech@noaa.gov

Abstract: The Northeast Fisheries Science Center and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution have hosted eight seminars over the past two years highlighting technological advancements in the sampling and monitoring of the living marine resources and protected species here in the waters of New England. This panel discussion brings together experts in acoustic and optical technologies with experts in resource management and protected species to synthesize recent work, discuss new advancements and opportunities, and most importantly, how to integrate and effectively utilize technologies for conserving and protecting our resources.

Bio(s): Dr. Bill Karp is the soon-to-retire Director of the NEFSC. Dr. Sofie VanParijs coordinates the passive acoustics group at the NEFSC. Dr. Dvora Hart is the lead scientist for the scallop assessments. Dr. Scott Gallager is an Associate Scientist with tenure at WHOI and is the primary developer of HabCam.

Archive of Past Seminars: An archive of past seminars can be found at the Cooperative Institute for the North Atlantic Region (CINAR) website: http://www.cinar.org/seminars

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Title: Science On a Sphere (SOS) Cafe: The Arctic: Earth's Most Rapidly Changing Region
Presenter(s): David Herring, Climate Program Office
Date & Time: 28 September 2016
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Science On a Sphere, SSMC#3
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): David Herring (Climate Program Office) Sponser: NOAA Office of Education, Science On a Sphere Point of Contact: erik.macintosh@noaa.gov

Remote Access: none - in-person only

Abstract: The Arctic: Earth's Most Rapidly Changing Region The Arctic is the most rapidly changing regions on Earth, driven primarily by global warming and other associated climatic and environmental changes. This presentation, featuring NOAA's Science On A Sphere, will offer a multi-faceted look at the causes and effects of changes ongoing in Arctic, as well as future changes that scientists project are likely to occur this century. This talk will also explore ways in which Arctic changes are linked to changes happening in other regions of the globe, to show how "what happens in the Arctic doesn't stay in the Arctic." On September 28, 2016, science ministers from across the globe will gather in Washington, DC, for the first-ever White House Arctic Science Ministerial. One of the NOAA commitments is to develop new content and programs for Science On a Sphere that will allow SOS Network members around the world to use arctic science as a vehicle for science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education and citizen empowerment. For more information on the White House Arctic Science Ministerial, visit: https://www.arctic.gov/aesc/ministerial.html Science On a Sphere is a room-sized, global display system that uses computers and video projectors to display planetary data onto a six foot diameter sphere, analogous to a giant animated globe. For more information, visit sosinssmc.education.noaa.gov.

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Title: Temporal trends in abundance and habitat preferences of deep reef fish off the coast of South Carolina
Presenter(s): Sean Paul Yeckley, MD, MHS, Savannah State University, Marine Science Graduate Student and NOAA Deep Coral Research and Technology Program Fellow
Date & Time: 28 September 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presenter (remote): Sean Paul Yeckley, MD, MHS, Savannah State University, Marine Science Graduate Student and NOAA Deep Coral Research and Technology Program Fellow

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Abstract: Demersal deep reef stocks are in peril globally due to overharvesting and life history parameters characterized by slow growth, late maturation, and longevity. These factors make population recovery and achieving sustainability a slow, gradual process. Currently, there is insufficient data on the abundance of demersal fish of deep reefs preventing evaluation of the effectiveness of past fishery regulations within the South Atlantic Bight region of the NW Atlantic (Ross, 2006). In an effort to help fulfill this critical gap in scientific knowledge, ROV and submersible video footage filmed in 1985, 2002, and 2010 from the Charleston Lumps live, hard bottom habitat located NE of Charleston, SC in depths ranging from 175 " 300 m were meticulously reviewed to assess temporal trends in demersal fish abundance and bottom habitat preferences.The main purpose of this long-term assessment of deep reef fish abundance and bottom habitat associations was to determine if important deep reef fish populations have recovered since the development and implementation of the snapper/grouper fishery management plan in 1983 (SAFMC, 2010). With the results of this research, effective regulations can be legislated to achieve sustainable fishery management and essential habitat conservation for the benefit of future generations.

Bio(s): Possessing a medical background having graduated from the Medical College of Georgia and specializing in microbiology, immunology, and pathology, Sean Yeckley's ultimate goal is to discover new pharmaceuticals from the oceans for the treatment of cancer. With the ocean covering 71% of the earth's surface, the life it contains represents an enormous resource for the development of cures for human disease and cancer. Specifically, Sean is interested in studying anti-cancer drugs obtained from tunicates and sponges who, through evolution and natural selection have developed particularly strong innate immune and chemical defense systems. Being sedentary they have no other means to protect themselves.Sharks also have developed a high resistance to malignant tumors through the combination of possessing both a widely protective innate immunity against an array of cancers and a potent angiogenesis inhibitor preventing the vascularization of these tumors. With 95% of the ocean remaining unexplored there is a vast potential for the discovery and development of new safe and effective chemotherapies from marine organisms. Being a wildlife and outdoor enthusiast, Sean is passionate about nature preservation and a staunch supporter of marine conservation. He wants to help implement new policies to foster recovery of marine environments to their native, natural states from the negative impact of humankind. Sean is completing a masters in marine science thesis on temporal trends in deep reef fish abundance and bottom habitat preferences.

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Title: Pilot Societal Outcome Indicators for the NWS Weather Ready Nation (WRN) Program
Presenter(s): Dr. Lou Nadeau, Ph.D., Economist and ERG Vice President
Date & Time: 28 September 2016
9:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Lou Nadeau, Ph.D., Economist and ERG Vice President

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library POC: Judith.Salter@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 ext 135), or library.reference@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: The National Weather Service and The Office of Performance, Risk, and Social Science would like to invite NOAA staff across all line offices for a presentation on societal outcome indicators for the NWS Weather Ready Nation (WRN) Program. This presentation will describe the work being done to design societal outcome indicators for the National Weather Service's (NWS's) Weather Ready Nation (WRN) program. NWS routinely tracks a set of internal performance metrics related to efficiency and accuracy such as false alarm rates and forecast accuracy. NWS, however, has become more interested in measuring its impact on societal outcomes. In this presentation, I will discuss the steps we took to design societal outcome measures for the WRN program, including the design and implementation of data collection efforts. We developed four sets of societal outcome metrics under the project: measures of public knowledge, measures of public preparedness, measures of the actions taken by the public once an event occurs, and measures of the reduced impact on weather-related injuries. A key aspect of the design was to leverage existing data sources within NWS for cost-effective long-term implementation. Although the initial focus of the work was on WRN, the results of the project can be seen as having a broader application to many NWS activities that are centered around providing information with the goal of influencing individual behavior.

Bio(s): Dr. Lou Nadeau, a Ph.D. economist and ERG vice president, is an expert in econometrics, statistical analysis, survey design, and process analysis. Lou developed and currently manages ERG's program evaluation and performance measurement practice, which focuses on two areas: evaluating the impacts of federal programs (including developing performance metrics) and valuing ecosystem services. Government agencies such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Food and Drug Administration, Department of Labor, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Commission for Environmental Cooperation have used Lou's services to learn where their programs are making impacts, discover ways to improve program effectiveness, and provide a data-based foundation for enhanced management decision-making.

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27 September 2016

Title: The overview of JMA activity: numerical prediction division, RSMC Tokyo, and Meteorological Research Institute
Presenter(s): Masahiro Sawada, NCWP/ERMC-JMA/MRI
Date & Time: 27 September 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction,Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Masahiro Sawada NCEP/EMC-JMA/MRI POC: Michiko Masutani michiko.masutani@noaa.gov Presentation: to be posted Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the eminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook. Remote Access 1. Please join my meeting, Sep 27, 2016 at 11:30 AM EDT. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/911929917 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (872) 240-3212 Access Code: 911-929-917 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 911-929-917

Abstract: This presentation provides three recent activities related to Japan Meteorological Agency and Meteorological Research Institute. First, I introduce current status of operational NWP system (Global, Meso-scale, and Local model) by numerical prediction division of JMA. Future plan of model development at JMA is shown. Second, RSMC Tokyo products related to TC analysis and forecast are introduced. This includes early Dvorak technique, TC track and genesis prediction based on ensemble forecasts at several NWP centers, and storm surge prediction. Third, I present one of the collaborative projects of MRI with the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Global 7-km mesh nonhydrostatic Model Intercomparison Project for improving TYphoon forecast (TYMIP-G7). This project is designed to understand and statistically quantify the advantage of high-resolution nonhydrostatic global atmospheric models for improvement of tropical cyclone (TC) prediction.

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Title: Experiments with Seasonal Forecasts of Pacific Northwest Ocean Conditions to Aid Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Samantha Siedlecki, Research Scientist, Joint Institute for the Atmosphere and Ocean, University of Washington
Date & Time: 27 September 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Samantha Siedlecki, Research Scientist, Joint Institute for the Atmosphere and Ocean, University of Washington

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Abstract: Resource managers at the state, federal, and tribal levels make decisions on a weekly to quarterly basis, and fishers operate on a similar timeframe. To determine the potential of a support tool for these efforts, a seasonal forecast system is experimented with here. JISAO's Seasonal Coastal Ocean Prediction of the Ecosystem (J-SCOPE) features dynamical downscaling of regional ocean conditions in Washington and Oregon waters using a combination of a high-resolution regional model with biogeochemistry and forecasts from NOAA's Climate Forecast System (CFS). Model performance and predictability were examined for sea surface temperature (SST), bottom temperature, bottom oxygen, pH, and aragonite saturation state through model hindcasts, reforecast, and forecast comparisons with observations. Results indicate J-SCOPE forecasts have measurable skill on seasonal timescales. Experiments suggest that seasonal forecasting of ocean conditions important for fisheries is possible with the right combination of components. Those components include regional predictability on seasonal timescales of the physical environment from a large-scale model, a high-resolution regional model with biogeochemistry that simulates seasonal conditions in hindcasts, a relationship with local stakeholders, and a real-time observational network. Multiple efforts and approaches in different regions would advance knowledge to provide additional tools to fishers and other stakeholders.

Bio(s): Samantha Siedlecki is a research scientist at the Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Oceanography (JISAO) at the University of Washington. She obtained her PhD from the University of Chicago in 2010, and was a Post Doctoral Fellow at JISAO until 2012. Her research focuses on coastal biogeochemical cycles through the use of models. One example includes understanding the mechanisms for exchange of iron between the coastal and open ocean in an upwelling system. She has been working with the Coastal Modeling Group at UW alongside collaborators at NOAA-PMEL to develop oxygen and ocean acidification models for the coastal region of Washington and Oregon as well as the Gulf of Alaska. Currently, she is working on forecasting ocean acidification and hypoxia in the coastal ocean of Washington and Oregon on various timescales.

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26 September 2016

Title: Sea Ice Retreat and Ocean Surface Warming in Arctic Seas
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Steele, Senior Oceanographer, Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington
Date & Time: 26 September 2016
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Steele, Senior Oceanographer, Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington Seminar Host: Sheekela.Baker-Yeboah@noaa.gov, or Ashley.Chappell@noaa.gov, Librarian: Judith Salter judith.salter@noaa.gov. Webinar Login Info: For remote access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: Arctic sea ice extent has been declining in recent years. Many papers tend to focus on interannual variations in the end-of-summer extent and the means to predict this quantity. Here, we instead explore spatial and interannual variations in the pace of sea ice retreat during the spring and summer. We have found that some areas tend to start their ice retreat earlier, relative to other areas at the same latitude, and that this retreat can be predicted with a several month lead time in some cases. We have also found that the ice edge retreats northward at a highly nonlinear rate, i.e., sometimes it moves quite quickly, while other times it "loiters" in place for days on end. This loitering behavior is the result of an interesting interaction between surface winds, sea ice floes, and open water surface temperature. Finally, we find that the maximum ocean surface warming achieved in any given year depends on the timing of sea ice retreat relative to the atmospheric warming cycle, i.e., on the "phenological" or seasonal relationships between sea ice, ocean temperature, and atmospheric warming. About the speaker: Dr. Michael Steele is a Senior Oceanographer with the Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington. Dr. Steele is interested in the large-scale circulation of sea ice and water in the Arctic Ocean. He uses observations collected by in situ sensors and by satellites, as well as numerical model simulations to investigate time and space variations in sea ice and ocean properties. His analysis of ocean observations has focused on the upper layers, which are generally quite cold and fresh. Dr. Steele has active field programs in which data are collected in the field by his team and others, using aircraft, ships, and autonomous sensors like buoys and profiling floats. He is also involved with efforts to improve computer models of the arctic marine system, via the Forum for Arctic Modeling and Observational Synthesis, or FAMOS. Funding for his research comes from the National Science Foundation, NASA, the Office of Naval Research, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency (NOAA). He is involved with many "outreach" programs such as lectures to K-12 and college students. Dr. Steele has been with the Polar Science Center since 1987.

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22 September 2016

Title: Assessing threats to leatherback turtle populations in the Atlantic; genetic techniques reveal insights to population specific pressures
Presenter(s): Kelly Stewart, PhD. The Ocean Foundation and NOAA NMFS, Marine Mammal and Turtle Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 22 September 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kelly Stewart, PhD. The Ocean Foundation and NOAA NMFS, Marine Mammal and Turtle Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NMFS and Lenfest Ocean Program For questions about this webinar, please contact info@lenfestocean.org For remote access: Visit: https://pewcharitabletrusts.webex.com/pewcharitabletrusts/onstage/g.php?MTID=e3fbac932d93b85a42989974a61dc3068 Event number: 634 391 543 Event password: leatherback2016 For teleconference audio: In the U.S. and Canada, dial 1-303-927-3275 or toll-free 1-855-214-7745. For a list of global numbers, click here. The conference code is 909 707 1631.

Abstract: Through genetic analysis, we have determined that there are nine demographically independent populations of leatherbacks that nest on beaches in the Atlantic basin. Leatherbacks are considered Vulnerable in the Atlantic by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, and the U.S. Endangered Species Act lists leatherbacks as endangered throughout their range. Assessing threats to individual populations is essential to determine status accurately. Making an assessment of threats for a marine animal with transboundary migration habits is difficult. In particular, on foraging grounds or along migratory pathways, leatherbacks are susceptible to a variety of threats: bycatch in various fishing gear, ship strikes, natural predation (e.g., sharks), and entanglement in or ingestion of marine debris. Using genetic techniques, we are able to evaluate individual leatherbacks throughout their range, no matter where they are encountered, caught, or stranded dead, and assign them to their population of origin. This helps us pinpoint population specific threats in order to improve management of individual jurisdictions. It also highlights where mitigation may be required, or where threats may need further scrutiny. We present findings from several studies that illustrate the utility of integrating multiple techniques for achieving comprehensive population assessments to better inform and develop management objectives.

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21 September 2016

Title: Bring the Ocean into Your Classroom with National Marine Sanctuaries
Presenter(s): Claire Fackler, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 21 September 2016
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Claire Fackler, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Abstract: Learn about marine protected areas, including what a national marine sanctuary is. Free STEM educational resources to increase ocean and climate literacy with your students will be highlighted.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Point of contact for questions about this webinar: sanctuary.education@noaa.gov Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5391920732998151683 After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Important Notes for Participating in the Webinar 1. Plan to log into the webinar at least five (5) minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar is continually upgrading their software and we want to be sure that your computer has time to access any upgrades to enable you access to the webinar presentation. 2. When using the VOIP option for this webinar, you must use a headset or ear-bud headphones for the best quality audio. This will will also keep your output audio from re-entering your microphone, which causes distortion. 3. If you have difficulty logging in to this webinar, go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The Webinar ID is 134-440-123.

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20 September 2016

Title: Current development of JMA's operational ensemble prediction systems
Presenter(s): Takuma Yoshida, UMD-JMA
Date & Time: 20 September 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Takuma Yoshida, University of Maryland-JMA POC: Michiko Masutani michiko.masutani@noaa.gov Presentation: to be posted Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the eminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Remote Access: 1. Please joint the meeting https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/760677693 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (872) 240-3212 Access Code: 760-677-693 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 760-677-693

Abstract: This talk mainly focuses on introducing the current development of NWP systems which are operated by Climate Prediction Division of Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). One of them is One-month Ensemble Prediction System (EPS), an atmospheric global EPS used for the extended-range (from the second to the fourth week) forecast. We are working to introduce one unified global EPS unifying One-month EPS and two other EPSs operated in Numerical Prediction Division, JMA (Typhoon EPS and One-week EPS). The new global EPS will include the following upgrades: updated model resolution and physics, initial perturbations from Ensemble Kalman Filter combined with Singular Vectors perturbation, and newly introduced perturbation on sea surface temperature. The other system is JMA/MRI-CPS2 (Japan Meteolorogical Agency/Meteorological Research Institute-Coupled Prediction System version 2), a coupled EPS used for three-month prediction, warm and cold season prediction and ENSO outlook. The system was implemented into operation in June 2015, replacing the previous system (JMA/MRI-CPS1). Thanks to the increased resolution and model improvements, the system showed overall improvements compared to JMA/MRI-CPS1, both in hindcast verification and operational forecasts.

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19 September 2016

Title: The Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System (GSICS)
Presenter(s): Mitch Goldberg, JPSS Program Scientist, NESDIS JPSS Program
Date & Time: 19 September 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building, 8th Floor Conference Room, Lanham MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Mitch Goldberg (JPSS Program Scientist, NESDIS JPSS Program) Seminar sponsor: NESDIS JPSS Program Seminar POC for questions:Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Remote Access: 877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m18d8fc2c71c3032705e97840b241c9f9 Meeting number: 742 525 274 Host key: 878529

Abstract: The Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System (GSICS) is an international collaborative effort initiated in 2005 by WMO and the Coordination Group for Meteorological Satellites (CGMS). Within GSICS, satellite operators and science teams collaborate to define, implement and share community-agreed best practices, standards, procedures and tools. These enable users to monitor, improve and harmonize the calibration of instruments aboard operational meteorological, climate and other environmental satellites of the Global Observing System (GOS). The focus of GSICS is the systematic generation of on-orbit inter-calibration information to correct the individual calibration of Level 1 satellite data. This is however part of a comprehensive strategy, which involves a range of activities including, prelaunch instrument characterization, instrument bias monitoring, level 1 data quality control and validation, on-orbit instrument intercomparison and calibration, traceability to absolute calibration standards, metadata provision (provenance, lineage), enabling recalibration of archived data, and documenting state-of-the-art calibration techniques. Through these activities, GSICS promotes greater understanding of instrument absolute calibration and root causes of biases, supports instrument global inter-operability and measurement quality, and enables better accuracy and global consistency of Level 2 environmental, climate and weather forecasting products. GSICS promotes capacity building within the operational agencies of CGMS. We ensure that each agency has the tools and expertise to be responsible for their own calibration and intercalibration of their satellites. This ownership enriches the entire international community because we not only work together, we learn together and we can rely on the accuracy of each other's satellite observations because consistent and understandable methodologies are being used.

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Title: Continental-Scale Operational Hydrologic Modeling: Version 1.0 of the National Water Model
Presenter(s): Brian Cosgrove, NWS - Office of Water Prediction, Analysis and Prediction Division
Date & Time: 19 September 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP, Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553 also remote access available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Brian Cosgrove, NWS - Office of Water Prediction, Analysis and Prediction Division POC: Ralph Ferraro - ralph.r.ferraro@noaa.gov Presentation: to be posted

Sponsor(s): NWS Office of Water Prediction and NOAA / NESDIS / STAR Remote Access via Webex Event name: 998 405 595 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 998 405 595 Webex address: https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=e4f57e7344d0f4c138faba7cceb56ebda Webex Password: NWSNWM

Abstract: The National Weather Service (NWS) Office of Water Prediction (OWP), in conjunction with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the NWS National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) recently implemented version 1.0 of the National Water Model (NWM) into operations. This model is an hourly cycling uncoupled analysis and forecast system that provides streamflow for 2.7 million river reaches and other hydrologic information on 1km and 250m grids. It provides complementary hydrologic guidance at current NWS river forecast locations and significantly expands guidance coverage and type in underserved locations. The core of this system is the NCAR-supported community Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-Hydro hydrologic model. It ingests forcing from a variety of sources including Multi-Sensor Multi-Radar (MRMS) radar-gauge observed precipitation data and High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR), Rapid Refresh (RAP), Global Forecast System (GFS) and Climate Forecast System (CFS) forecast data. WRF-Hydro is configured to use the Noah-Multi Parameterization (Noah-MP) Land Surface Model (LSM) to simulate land surface processes. Separate water routing modules perform diffusive wave surface routing and saturated subsurface flow routing on a 250m grid, and Muskingum- Cunge channel routing down National Hydrogaphy Dataset Plus V2 (NHDPlusV2) stream reaches. River analyses and forecasts are provided across a domain encompassing the Continental United States (CONUS) and hydrologically contributing areas, while land surface output is available on a larger domain that extends beyond the CONUS into Canada and Mexico (roughly from latitude 19N to 58N). The system includes an analysis and assimilation configuration along with three forecast configurations. These include a short-range 15 hour deterministic forecast, a medium-Range 10 day deterministic forecast and a long-range 30 day 16-member ensemble forecast. United Sates Geologic Survey (USGS) streamflow observations are assimilated into the analysis and assimilation configuration, and all four configurations benefit from the inclusion of 1,260 reservoirs. About Brian Cosgrove Brian is the Project Leader for the National Water Model (NWM) at the National Weather Service Office of Water Prediction (NWS/OWP), where he plans and executes implementations of the model with NCAR and NCEP partners, and serves as the OWP-NCEP liaison, coordinating hydrologic activities between OWP and NCEP Centers such as the Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) and the Weather Prediction Center (WPC).

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15 September 2016

Title: What is a healthy coral: Tissue-loss diseases affecting staghorn corals in the Upper Florida Keys
Presenter(s): Katheryn W. Patterson, Ph.D., 2016 Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA Fisheries Office of Law Enforcement
Date & Time: 15 September 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Katheryn W. Patterson, Ph.D. 2016 Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA Fisheries Office of Law Enforcement

Sponsor(s): NOAA Knauss Brown Bag series; point of contact is alex.atkinson@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract: The combined effects of anthropogenic stressors, including global climate change and ocean acidification, increases in coral diseases, and frequency and duration of coral bleaching, put coral-reef ecosystems at high risk. Tissue-loss diseases have caused dramatic declines in Acropora cervicornis (staghorn coral) populations across the Caribbean and tropical western Atlantic Ocean, resulting in the listing of the species as threatened under the United States Endangered Species Act and critically endangered on the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List. Tissue-loss diseases affecting A. cervicornis were investigated using histopathological examinations and bacterial 16S rDNA next-generation sequencing. The microbiomes of apparently healthy A. cervicornis, affected A. cervicornis, and adjacent sediment samples were compared. Sediment associated microbial communities were significantly more diverse than those associated with coral tissue, and microbial communities associated with apparently healthy A. cervicornis were more diverse than communities associated with affected coral tissue. This study confirmed the presence of Vibrionaceae and Rickettsiaceae, both of which have been previously associated with coral diseases. Linear Discriminant analysis revealed that communities associated with the tissue-loss margin of a disease lesion were significantly more enriched with Vibrionaceae than apparently healthy communities. This study also supports the notion that coral tissue-loss diseases are polymicrobial diseases associated with an imbalance of residential bacterial populations and proposes that the increase in bacteria from family Vibrionaceae is a biomarker of tissue-loss disease-affected A. cervicornis colonies. Histopathological examinations of all coral tissues, even apparently healthy tissues, revealed moderate to severe hypertrophy in epidermal mucocytes, dissociation of mesenterial filaments, necrosis of cnidoglandular bands, and atrophy of the calicodermis. This study provides histological and molecular evidence that A. cervicornis health was in decline prior to the presentation of a tissue-loss lesion.

Bio(s): Katheryn is originally from sweet home Alabama but have called Florida home over the last 13 years. She has over a decade of experience working in marine science, policy, education, and outreach, particularly in the Caribbean. She received her bachelor's degree in biology from Spring Hill College in 2006, her master's degree in environmental science and policy from George Mason University (GMU) in 2010, and hold a Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Public Policy from GMU (2015)

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14 September 2016

Title: High-resolution Dynamically Downscaled Climate Projections for the Great Lakes Region
Presenter(s): Dr. Andre R. Erler, Post-doctoral Scientist, Aquanty Inc., University of Toronto
Date & Time: 14 September 2016
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Andre R. Erler, Post-doctoral Scientist, Aquanty Inc., University of Toronto Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: margaret.lansing@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7452933293433243148

Abstract: The regional impact of climate change, in particular on the hydrological cycle, is of great interest to society and policy makers. The Laurentian Great Lakes exert a significant influence on the climate of the surrounding regions; however, they are often only poorly or not at all represented in Global Climate Models. The work presented here is based on an ensemble of dynamically downscaled regional climate projections for the Great Lakes region at a resolution of 10km, which is forced by a smaller suite of global climate projections, as well as ERA-interim reanalysis. The regional climate model employed for this work is the Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF V3.4), which, for this purpose, was coupled to an interactive fresh water lake model (FLake; c.f. Gula & Peltier 2012). The representation of the regional climate as well as lake surface properties will be discussed and compared to observations. Particular emphasis will be placed on the representation of the lake effect in the lee of the Great Lakes; time permitting, sensitivity tests with different representations of the lakes and different moist physics parameterizations will also be discussed. Based on these simulations, the potential longer term (i.e. 2050 and 2100) climate change impacts will be analyzed, including changes to the hydrological cycle in watersheds within the Great Lakes region. Particular emphasis will be put on the effect of climate change on the lakes themselves, as well as the impact on hydro-climatic extremes such as heavy precipitation, floods and droughts.

Bio(s): Dr. Erler is a Climate Scientist at Aquanty Inc. His main expertise lies in regional climate modeling and applications to hydrology and hydro-climatic extremes. Originally from Germany, he received the equivalent of a M.Sc. in Meteorology from the University of Mainz in 2008 and a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Toronto in 2015. Other interests also include open source software, sustainable development, and food security. For his dissertation he performed high resolution climate simulations for western Canada and studied hydrological impacts of climate change in the Athabasca and Fraser river basins, as well as changes in precipitation extremes due to climate change. Andre joined Aquanty in 2016 in order to study the impact of climate change on water resources and agriculture in Canada and provide insights into climate change impacts to end-users. Andre is an early-career researcher and climate modeler; he runs regional and global climate models at the SciNet High Performance Computing facility and analyses their output. He uses Python and its scientific software stack for data handling (or "data plumbing"), analysis and visualization, and develops tools for these tasks. Andre is also interested in machine learning and the use of data science techniques in and outside of climate science, and is somewhat concerned about the state of software development in science. He cares deeply about open source software, open science, the environment and sustainable global development.

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Title: Mapping ecological priorities and human impacts to support land-sea management of Puerto Rico's Northeast Ecological Corridor
Presenter(s): Simon Pittman, Marine Spatial Ecologist, NOAA NCCOS CCMA Biogeography Branch
Date & Time: 14 September 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Simon Pittman, Marine Spatial Ecologist, NOAA NCCOS CCMA Biogeography Branch and Project Team: Christopher F.G. Jeffrey, Charles Menza, Gustav Kgesten, Angela Orthmeyer, Daniel S. Dorfman, Daniel Mateos-Molina, Varis Ransibrahmanakul, Ayman Maybrouk (CCMA) and Antares Ramos lvarez (NOAA/OCM/CRCP)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Bio(s): Simon Pittman is a marine spatial ecologist working with the NOAA NCCOS Biogeography Branch. For the past 20 years he has focused on the ecology of tropical coastal seascapes and the applications of spatial data to marine management.

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13 September 2016

Title: Community-based Social Marketing: Fostering Sustainable Behavior
Presenter(s): Doug McKenzie-Mohr, PhD, McKenzie-Mohr and Associates
Date & Time: 13 September 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Doug McKenzie-Mohr, PhD, McKenzie-Mohr & Associates

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Dr. Doug McKenzie-Mohr will provide an overview of community-based social marketing. Using examples from his work in Queensland, Australia, he will discuss how community-based social marketing can be applied to foster sustainable behavior, particularly in regards to coral reef conservation. The main goal of this seminar is to encourage you to think about different ways social marketing can be used as a tool to foster sustainable behaviors in your place of work, as well as to encourage communities to sustainably manage coastal resources.

Bio(s): Dr. Mckenzie-Mohr, an environmental psychologist, is a former Professor of Psychology at St. Thomas University in New Brunswick, where he coordinated the Environment and Society Program. He is the founder of community-based social marketing and has published three books on the topic. One of his books, Fostering Sustainable Behavior, has been recommended by Time magazine. Dr. McKenzie-Mohr has worked with a diverse array of governmental and non-governmental agencies, helping them identify barriers to behavior change, as well as to develop and evaluate strategies to overcome these barriers.

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8 September 2016

Title: NADCON5: your tool for easy, consistent coordinate transformations
Presenter(s): Dr. Dru Smith, NSRS Modernization Manager, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey; and Dr. Andria Bilich, Geodesist, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 8 September 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836 or via webinar - see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Dru Smith, National Spatial Reference System Modernization Manager, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey; and Dr. Andria Bilich, Geodesist, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4725926748443565057. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (562) 247-8321 Access Code: 426-083-301 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar.

Abstract: NGS's North American Datum Conversion Utility (NADCON) and GEOCON tools help users move between various datums, but these tools are poorly documented; applied inconsistently across datums; known to contain numerous errors; and difficult to use. Thus NGS has developed NADCON5, a complete re-creation of all transformation grids, that uses consistent and well-documented methods. Specifically, NADCON5 supports transformations between all 3-dimensional geometric reference frames and nearly all traditionally-determined 2-dimensional horizontal datums of the National Spatial Reference System, dating back to the 1890's. The improved tool will be available as the latest expansion to NGS's new web-based geodetic toolkit, and this presentation will discuss the motivations for building NADCON5, as well as the data and products which support the tool.

Bio(s): Dr. Dru Smith is the National Spatial Reference System Modernization Manager at NOAA's National Geodetic Survey, and Dr. Andria Bilich is a geodesist in the Geosciences Research Division of NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.

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Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 8 September 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: Growing Emission of Methane from the Warming Arctic Ocean? Year-round Satellite Data
Presenter(s): Leonid Yurganov, Senior Research Scientist, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology
Date & Time: 8 September 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Leonid Yurganov, Senior Research Scientist, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Warming of the Arctic stimulated speculations about dissociation of methane hydrates in the Arctic seabed and a new climatic positive feedback that could induce a run-away global warming. Measurements of methane concentrations over the Arctic seas are rare and non-systematic. Here, for the first time, methane low tropospheric satellite data, provided by the NOAA retrieving code NUCAPS over the Arctic from AIRS/Aqua, IASI/MetOp-A, and IASI/MetOp-B were validated and analyzed. Methane retrievals over open water with a high vertical thermal contrast in the troposphere were found to be reliable. The methane seasonal cycles and long-term variations over the Arctic ocean were in good agreement with surface coastal measurements. Persistent methane anomalies were registered at several areas of the Arctic Ocean during autumn-winter, but not in spring-summer. Preliminary, this effect is explained by the thermal stability of the water column in summer and enhanced mixing in winter caused by seawater convection coupled with turbulent diffusion due to storms. In the 2015/2016 winter season methane concentrations around Svalbard and in other Arctic areas were record high. Annual mean methane emission was estimated from the measured anomalies. Emission from the Western Arctic seas prevails over that from ESAS (East Siberian Arctic Shelf). The total methane emission from the Arctic Ocean may be as high as~2/3 of methane from terrestrial Arctic sources.

Bio(s): Dr. Leonid Yurganov is a senior research scientist at the Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology at the University of Maryland in Baltimore. He received his Masters in physics and atmospheric optics at Leningrad State University and earned his PhD in atmospheric physics at the institute of Atmospheric Physics in Moscow. He has worked as senior researcher and visiting professor at several institutions - the Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Moscow; the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia; the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks; the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto, and the Frontier Research Center for Global Change in Yokohama, Japan. Dr. Yurgaov has over 53 peer-reviewed papers and his research interests include: IR atmospheric spectroscopy methods applied to problems of atmospheric gaseous composition, climate change connected with greenhouse gases, Arctic warming, and using satellite-based instruments for investigating atmospheric composition

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7 September 2016

Title: Species in the Spotlight, Part 9 of 9: Cook Inlet Beluga Whale
Presenter(s): Greg Balogh, Protected Resources Field Office Supervisor, Protected Resources Division, Alaska Regional Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA
Date & Time: 7 September 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Greg Balogh, Protected Resources Field Office Supervisor, Protected Resources Division, Alaska Regional Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: In May 2015, NOAA Fisheries released the Recovering Threatened and Endangered Species FY 2013-2014 Report to Congress and launched Species in the Spotlight, an initiative focused on stabilizing populations of nine endangered species at very high risk of extinction. With this effort we are marshaling our resources to turn around the decline towards extinction of these eight species by focusing efforts to stabilize their populations by 2020 and put them on the road to recovery. This talk will delve into the details of recovery and conservation for Cook Inlet Beluga Whale.

Bio(s): Greg Balogh's career trajectory exemplifies brownian motion. After graduating from Ohio State with a degree in Wildlife Management expecting to manage a small state wildlife area until he retired, he instead stayed on for a couple more degrees in Environmental Biology and Zoology. His Master's research was on an invasive plant. During 27 years at the Fish and Wildlife Service, he worked on the Exxon Valdez oil spill, designed and flew aerial surveys for waterfowl, did some innovative GIS before it was menu-driven, worked on listing and recovery of endangered species like the spectacled eider and short-tailed albatross, got into climate change science when he headed up the Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative during its initial years of cooperating, and then jumped land and moved to NMFS. He now supervises the Anchorage Office of the Protected Resources Division, where, once again, he is not an expert on anything.

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Title: Ecosystem Services Assessment using Bioextraction for Removal of Nitrogen for Estuarine Water Quality Improvement in Choptank Habitat Focus Area
Presenter(s): Maya Spaur, NOAA Hollings Scholar; Student, Environmental Science & Technology and Government & Politics, University of Maryland College Park
Date & Time: 7 September 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Maya Spaur, NOAA Hollings Scholar; Student, Environmental Science & Technology and Government & Politics, University of Maryland College Park

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Worldwide, excess nutrients cause eutrophication, habitat loss, algal blooms, hypoxia, low water clarity, and fish kills, threatening coastal ecosystem health and valuable functions they perform. Oysters, a filtering bivalve, are a keystone species that support complex marine ecosystems by performing all four categories of ecosystem services, cultural, provisioning, regulating, and supporting; this work focuses on regulating by water filtration. Scientific literature recognizes shellfish as a potential nutrient management method. Harris Creek within Choptank Habitat Focus Area (HFA) hosts the largest oyster restoration sanctuary in Chesapeake Bay (350 acres). This study assesses nitrogen inputs to and nutrient-related conditions in Choptank HFA. The Assessment of Estuarine Trophic Status (ASSETS) model was applied to Harris Creek and Choptank River to evaluate eutrophic conditions and compare to previous ASSETS ratings. Preliminary results indicate Harris Creek has high susceptibility, moderate eutrophic condition, and future outlook for improving conditions. Preliminary results find Choptank River has high influencing factors today compared to moderate in 2007. Eutrophic condition has improved from high (2007) to moderate high, and future outlook indicates no change. High chlorophyll a drives eutrophic conditions for both systems. The Farm Aquaculture Resource Management (FARM) model evaluates effectiveness of oyster aquaculture to reduce excess nutrient impacts, and found preliminary estimates of 1080 lbs/ acre nitrogen removed per year in Harris Creek, comparable to 105 " 1356 lbs/ acre at simulated sites in Rose et al. 2014. Economic valuation of ecosystem services provided by filtering bivalves would incentivize growth and adoption of aquaculture as a nutrient management tool.

Bio(s): Maya Spaur is a rising senior, and in addition to her internship for Dr. Suzanne Bricker this summer, she works for an Ecology and Health Lab (otherwise known as theMosquito Lab) at the University of Maryland; she also serves as Director of the SGA Student Sustainability Committee.

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6 September 2016

Title: USGCRP Climate & Health Assessment, Part 6: Impacts of Extreme Events on Human Health and, Climate Change and Vector-Borne Diseases
Presenter(s): Dr. Jesse E. Bell, NOAA's Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellite, and Dr. Andrew Monaghan, atmospheric scientist at UCAR's National Center for Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 6 September 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Jesse E. Bell, Research Associate at NOAA's Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites, and Dr. Andrew Monaghan, atmospheric scientist at UCAR's National Center for Atmospheric Research

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: This seminar will discuss the findings of the USGCRP's scientific assessment on the impacts of climate change on human health in the United States. This report was developed over the course of three years by over 100 experts from across 8 federal agencies, and represents a significant improvement in scientific confidence in the link between climate change and a broad range of threats to public health. The goals of the seminar series include providing background on the development of the report, highlighting the overarching messages from the report, and describing some of the key findings across each of the chapters in more detail. In addition, presenters will provide a brief description of publicly accessible materials and where they can be found.

Bio(s): Dr. Andrew Monaghan is an atmospheric scientist at UCAR's National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado. He is a guest researcher with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and a co-leader of the NCAR Weather, Climate and Health Program. His research interests include a broad range of interdisciplinary regional climate topics, with an emphasis on the use of model-based techniques to study climate-sensitive health and disease issues. Dr. Jesse Bell's research primarily explores the relationship between ecohydrological processes and climate change. He is specifically interested in understanding the links between climate extremes to terrestrial water cycle and the role these changes have on society. To better explore these interactions, he uses combinations of in situ observations, experimental research, remote sensing, modeling, and statistical analysis of large datasets. He is interested in below- and above-ground processes, small and large spatial scales, and all research that deals with understanding the biosphere. Dr. Bell's research is important in understanding the implications of future climate change on the environment and exploring the common patterns across different ecosystems. Dr. Bell is currently working on a number of projects associated with developing the US Climate Reference Network (USCRN) for drought monitoring purposes. USCRN recently added soil moisture and temperature observations to its list of climate monitoring instruments. He is relating these measurements to satellite vegetation observations for better understanding of ecosystem processes to changes in soil climate. Dr. Bell is also active in understanding the link between climate and human health. His research in this area primarily involves combining climate data observations with morbidity and mortality data. He serves as a climate science advisor for the Climate and Health Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He is also a lead author on a chapter for the USGCRP Climate and Health Assessment that focuses on the impacts of extreme events on human health. Dr. Bell joined CICS- NC as a Research Associate on October 30, 2010. He is also an adjunct professor at Emory University.

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1 September 2016

Title: USGCRP Climate and Health Assessment, Part 5: Food Safety, Nutrition and Distribution
Presenter(s): Lewis Ziska, PhD, Plant physiologist, USDA's Agricultural Research Service
Date & Time: 1 September 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Lewis Ziska, PhD, Plant physiologist, USDA's Agricultural Research Service

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: This seminar will discuss the findings of the USGCRP's scientific assessment on the impacts of climate change on human health in the United States. This report was developed over the course of three years by over 100 experts from across 8 federal agencies, and represents a significant improvement in scientific confidence in the link between climate change and a broad range of threats to public health. The goals of the seminar series include providing background on the development of the report, highlighting the overarching messages from the report, and describing some of the key findings across each of the chapters in more detail. In addition, presenters will provide a brief description of publicly accessible materials and where they can be found.

Bio(s): Dr. Ziska is a Plant Physiologist with the USDA's Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, Maryland. After graduating from the University of California, Davis, he began his career as a Smithsonian fellow, and then took up residence as the Project Leader for global climate change at the International Rice Research Institute in the Philippines before joining USDA. Since joining USDA, Dr. Ziska has published over 100 peer-reviewed research articles related to climate change and rising carbon dioxide that address: (1) Agriculture and Food Security; (2) Weeds and weed management; (3) Invasive species; (4) Plant biology and public health. Dr. Ziska is a contributor to the 2014 International Panel on Climate Change report (Food Security Chapter); the 2014 National Climate Assessment (Public Health Chapter); and most recently, The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States: A Scientific Assessment. He is the author of Weed Biology and Climate Change (with Jeff Dukes, Wiley Press) and the editor of Invasive Species and Global Climate Change (with Jeff Dukes, CABi Press).

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31 August 2016

Title: A Transdisciplinary Approach to Valuing Ecosystem Services from Natural Infrastructure
Presenter(s): Dr. Steven Dundas, Assistant Professor, Department of Applied Economics, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 31 August 2016
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Steven Dundas, Assistant Professor, Department of Applied Economics, Oregon State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: This research advances the transdisciplinary science of coastal ecosystem services. Our focus is on natural infrastructure, which we define broadly as a physical stock (i.e., durable physical quantities) that constitutes restoration of, or extension to natural ecosystem components. We aim to understand the nature and determinants of socially-optimal investment in natural infrastructure in coasts and estuaries from an economic perspective. The economic theory of investment provides the conceptual foundation for our planned research. Socially-optimal investment maximizes total economic value (TEV): uncertain benefits of an investment net of costs over time. Focusing on a selection of natural infrastructure types, we will measure the expected benefits of an investment to society, expected direct costs, and expected co-benefits from provision of ancillary ecosystem services using a portfolio of empirical and mathematical modeling techniques. We will then develop optimal investment plans for each infrastructure type along coast and estuaries of Oregon.

Bio(s): Dr. Dundas is an environmental economist focused on issues in the areas of coastal ecosystem services & resilience, adaptation to climate change, non-market valuation, and public policy evaluation.
Title: Species in the Spotlight, Part 8 of 9: Southern Resident Killer Whale
Presenter(s): Lynne Barre, Marine Species Branch Chief, Protected Resources Division, West Coast Region, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA
Date & Time: 31 August 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Lynne Barre, Marine Species Branch Chief, Protected Resources Division, West Coast Region, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: In May 2015, NOAA Fisheries released the Recovering Threatened and Endangered Species FY 2013-2014 Report to Congress and launched Species in the Spotlight, an initiative focused on stabilizing populations of eight endangered species at very high risk of extinction. With this effort we are marshaling our resources to turn around the decline towards extinction of these eight species by focusing efforts to stabilize their populations by 2020 and put them on the road to recovery. This talk will delve into the details of recovery and conservation for Southern Resident Killer Whale.

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30 August 2016

Title: Science On a Sphere (SOS) Cafe: Engaging Smithsonian visitors with NOAA science
Presenter(s): Ellen Spooner, Knauss Fellow
Date & Time: 30 August 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SOS room, 1315 East-West Hwy., Silver Spring, Md
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ellen Spooner (NMFS, Smithsonian Institution) Sponser: NOAA Office of Education, Science On a Sphere Point of Contact: erik.macintosh@noaa.gov

Remote Access: none - in-person only

Abstract: Engaging Smithsonian visitors with NOAA science How can NOAA tap into the 7 million visitors that pass through the Smithsonian Natural History Museum each year? One way is through the Science on a Sphere exhibit in the Sant Ocean Hall. NOAA Fisheries and the Smithsonian have a long standing relationship that continues today. Come learn about different visitor engagement strategies that have been tested to share NOAA and Smithsonian's science using the sphere. We will discuss methods of engagement that are most effective, least effective and why. Science On a Sphere is a room-sized, global display system that uses computers and video projectors to display planetary data onta a six foot diameter sphere, analagous to a giant animated globe. For more information, visit sosinssmc.education.noaa.gov.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body

29 August 2016

Title: Extending the HIRS Data Steam to continue more than three decades of tracking global cloud and moisture properties
Presenter(s): Paul Menzel, CIMSS, University of WI
Date & Time: 29 August 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building - Greenbelt MD, 8th Floor Conference Room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Paul Menzel Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) University of WI

Sponsor(s): JPSS Science Seminar POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov 877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m2b95ad208e5b8e73c7422eb6be5bf6cd Meeting number: 749 992 752 Host key: 549665 Meeting password: Jpss2016!

Abstract: The High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) has been flown on seventeen satellites starting with Nimbus-6, then TIROS-N through NOAA-19, and concluding with METOP-A and "B; this adds up to a 40-year data record. Sensor to sensor radiance calibration differences have been mitigated using high spectral resolution infrared data from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) as a reference to adjust spectral response functions in the recent HIRS data (NOAA-15 through NOAA-19). Satellite Nadir Overpasses (SNOs) have been used to intercalibrate the HIRS sensors before IASI (NOAA-6 through NOAA-14). Thirty five of the forty HIRS years have been reprocessed to form a record reaching four decades; hemispheric trends in detection of high clouds and estimation of total column moisture will be compared. Continuation of the cloud and moisture property determinations with IASI and CrIS will also be discussed.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body

25 August 2016

Title: Climate and Health Assessment of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), Part 4: Climate Impacts on Water-Related Illness and Impacts of Extreme Events on Human Health
Presenter(s): Juli Trtanj, One Health Lead, Climate Program Office, OAR, NOAA
Date & Time: 25 August 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Juli Trtanj, One Health Lead, Climate Program Office, OAR, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: This seminar series will discuss the findings of the USGCRP's scientific assessment on the impacts of climate change on human health in the United States. This report was developed over the course of three years by over 100 experts from across 8 federal agencies, and represents a significant improvement in scientific confidence in the link between climate change and a broad range of threats to public health. The goals of the seminar series include providing background on the development of the report, highlighting the overarching messages from the report, and describing some of the key findings across each of the chapters in more detail. In addition, presenters will provide a brief description of publicly accessible materials and where they can be found.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body

24 August 2016

Title: Species in the Spotlight, Part 7 of 9: Sacramento River Winter-run Chinook Salmon
Presenter(s): Brian Ellrott, Recovery Coordinator, West Coast Region, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA
Date & Time: 24 August 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Brian Ellrott, Recovery Coordinator, WCR, NMFS, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: In May 2015, NOAA Fisheries released the Recovering Threatened and Endangered Species FY 2013-2014 Report to Congress and launched Species in the Spotlight, an initiative focused on stabilizing populations of eight endangered species at very high risk of extinction. With this effort we are marshaling our resources to turn around the decline towards extinction of these eight species by focusing efforts to stabilize their populations by 2020 and put them on the road to recovery. This talk will delve into the details of recovery and conservation for Sacramento River Winter-run Chinook Salmon.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body

23 August 2016

Title: Sharks of the Channel Islands
Presenter(s): Dr. Chris Lowe, California State University, Long Beach Shark Lab
Date & Time: 23 August 2016
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Chris Lowe, Ph.D. California State University, Long Beach Shark Lab

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Point of contact for questions about this webinar: sanctuary.education@noaa.gov Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2381764659891442435 After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Important Notes for Participating in the Webinar 1. Plan to log into the webinar at least five (5) minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar is continually upgrading their software and we want to be sure that your computer has time to access any upgrades to enable you access to the webinar presentation. 2. When using the VOIP option for this webinar, you must use a headset or ear-bud headphones for the best quality audio. This will will also keep your output audio from re-entering your microphone, which causes distortion. 3. If you have difficulty logging in to this webinar, go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The Webinar ID is 125-477-483.

Abstract: There is evidence that White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) populations are recovering along the California coast and as populations increase, more sharks are being seen off the coastline. This talk will cover how management actions have lead to a conservation success for this species and how these highly mobile predators move between move between habitats.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: Moved to Oct.18: Protecting Peru's Precious Ocean & Coastal Resources
Presenter(s): Ole Varmer, Attorney-Advisor, International Section Office of General Counsel, NOAA
Date & Time: 23 August 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ole Varmer, Attorney-Advisor, International Section Office of General Counsel, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Abstract: NOAA is well-regarded around the world for its scientific research and management as our nation's ocean agency. Working with the Department of State, NOAA has been providing technical assistance to Peru regarding its amazing coastal resources and the Humboldt Current Large Marine Ecosystem off the coast of Peru and Chile. Ole Varmer will be speaking about the recent opportunity he had to travel to Peru through our US Embassy in Lima and assist Peru's Ministry of Environment. His work on integrated coastal management and marine spatial planning, particularly plans for marine protected areas, highlight the importance to the world that these areas are preserved and sustainably developed, and thus the reason DoS and NOAA provide technical assistance and capacity building, including legal assistance. This presentation will include lots of great travel photos as well, focused on the coastal environment as well as the local cultural heritage!

Bio(s): Ole Varmer started his legal career in 1981 and worked as a legal assistant at several law firms before graduating from Yeshiva University's Benjamin Cardozo School of Law in 1987. He joined the Department of Commerce Office of General Counsel in 1987 and later moved to NOAA's Office of General Counsel in 1990 where he became lead attorney in establishing a number of National Estuarine Research Reserves and National Marine Sanctuaries including the Florida Keys Sanctuary. He has been serving in his current position in the NOAA GC International Section since 1998. As an attorney-advisor he works on a variety of international issues and is primarily responsible for providing advice on the subject areas involving heritage resources, marine spatial planning, marine protected areas, jurisdiction and maritime zones.

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18 August 2016

Title: Drivers of Peatland Soil Carbon Composition and Potential Greenhouse Gas Production: A Global Perspective
Presenter(s): Anna Normand, Knauss Marine Policy Fellow, Senate Commerce Committee, Minority Staff
Date & Time: 18 August 2016
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Anna Normand- 2016 Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in the Senate Commerce Committee, Minority Staff

Sponsor(s): NOAA Knauss Brown Bag series; point of contact is laura.early@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract: With the onset of climate change, there has been increased focus on the drivers of soil carbon (C) cycling. Peatlands store up to 20% C (~529 Pg C) of the global terrestrial soil. While all peatlands store C, the composition of the soil C may vary, which in turn influences the stability of soil organic matter (SOM), potential production of greenhouse gasses (GHG) and associated soil processes. We used 13C Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR) to quantify organic matter composition from 110 freshwater peatlands across the globe. Redundancy Analysis (RDA), constrained 52% of data variation along axis 1 representing a decomposition and stability. The model showed statistical significance of the dominant drivers " climate zone, vegetation inputs, land use, and C to nitrogen (N) ratio, but not pH. We incubated soils from peatlands spanning climate, vegetation, and land use in the laboratory under aerobic and anaerobic conditions to measure potential carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) production. Regression models of C chemistry from all sites predicted greenhouse gas production underscoring the importance of C chemical composition on carbon cycling. Understanding peatland stability and GHG production aids in projecting the fate of peat SOM chemical composition. Therefore, results of this study concerning the drivers and contrasting chemical composition of peatland SOM should be considered when developing management strategies and postulating peatland soil stability and response to climate and anthropogenic changes.

Bio(s): Originally from southwest Louisiana, Anna attained a B.S. degree in Chemistry at Louisiana State University. As a NSF Graduate Research Fellow, Anna is in the final stages of her PhD program at University of Florida in the Soil and Water Sciences Department. With a love of wetlands and outreach, Anna focuses on wetland biogeochemistry with a minor in extension education.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: POSTPONED: Climate and Health Assessment of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), Part 3: Outdoor Air Quality
Presenter(s): Christopher G. Nolte, Ph.D., Research Physical Scientist, US EPA Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory
Date & Time: 18 August 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 or via webinar - see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Christopher G. Nolte, Ph.D., Research Physical Scientist, US EPA Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: This seminar will discuss the findings of the USGCRP's scientific assessment on the impacts of climate change on human health in the United States. This report was developed over the course of three years by over 100 experts from across 8 federal agencies, and represents a significant improvement in scientific confidence in the link between climate change and a broad range of threats to public health. The goals of the seminar series include providing background on the development of the report, highlighting the overarching messages from the report, and describing some of the key findings across each of the chapters in more detail. In addition, presenters will provide a brief description of publicly accessible materials and where they can be found.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: Knowledge Exchange and Stakeholder Engagement in Natural Resource Science and Management
Presenter(s): Laura Ferguson, 2016 Knauss Marine Policy Fellow at NMFS Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 18 August 2016
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Laura Ferguson - 2016 Knauss Marine Policy Fellow at : NMFS Office of Science and Technology

Sponsor(s): NOAA Knauss Brown Bag series; point of contact is laura.early@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract: Natural resource science and management is complex and increasingly requires transdisciplinary approaches which integrate diverse scientific and societal bodies of knowledge to ask and answer questions that are relevant to both spheres. I compare and contrast three transdisciplinary science strategies to outline how, in what context, and to what end transdisciplinary science is conducted. I discuss how including indigenous and local ecological knowledge in natural resource science extends disciplinary coverage to answer broader ecological questions. Then I explore the NOAA Fisheries Cooperative Research Program as it works with stakeholders to gather data to answer fisheries management questions. Finally, I examine a university-based stakeholder engagement process within a water modeling project. Each transdisciplinary science strategy combines different knowledge types to arrive at an answer greater than the sum of its parts with a greater impact than simply increasing disciplinary or interdisciplinary scientific knowledge. Working with stakeholders and societal knowledge-keepers to ask and answer conservation questions can increase scientific literacy, produce more relevant science, and encourage buy-in of the results and resulting conservation policies. Knowledge exchange through stakeholder engagement can engage citizens, encourage behavior change, improve compliance with policies, integrate multiple disciplines, and promote long-term collaboration through network formation.

Bio(s): Laura Ferguson is serving her Knauss Fellowship as the Ecosystem and Sea Turtle Coordinator in NMFS Office of Science and Technology. She comes to us from Oregon State University where she earned an M.S. in Marine Resource Management in September 2015. Her thesis was an Oregon Sea Grant-OSU collaboration studying the way in which research team members engage with diverse stakeholders to develop a relevant model of water availability and ecosystem processes in the Willamette Valley. She focused on the experiences of the engagement process participants to identify the challenges and successes of the process. Laura earned a B.S. in marine biology and a B.A. in Spanish from the College of Charleston in 2010. From there she served in the United States Peace Corps in the Peruvian Andes as a community-based environmental management volunteer. Laura is interested in responsible resource use and conservation, scientific outreach and engagement, and marine and aquatic ecosystem dynamics, including one of their most influential members, humans. Outside of the office Laura has too many interests to fit into her free time including: running races, playing volleyball, yoga, singing, playing music, knitting, baking, hiking, and camping. This talk attempts to meld some of her thesis research with her work this year.

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Title: Unified deep cumulus parameterization for numerical modeling of the atmosphere
Presenter(s): Chien-Ming Wu, National Taiwan University
Date & Time: 18 August 2016
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2890
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Chien-Ming Wu, National Taiwan University POC: Sergio Abarca Presentation: http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2016/WuCM_unified_parameterization.pdf Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the eminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook. Go To meeting https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/336456341 Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (669) 224-3412 Access Code: 336-456-341 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 336-456-341

Abstract: A generalized framework for cumulus parameterization applicable to any horizontal resolution between those typically used in general circulation and cloud-resolving models is presented. It is pointed out that the key parameter in the generalization is , which is the fractional area covered by convective updrafts in the grid cell. Practically all conventional cumulus parameterizations assume , at least implicitly, using the gridpoint values of the thermodynamic variables to define the thermal structure of the cloud environment. The proposed framework, called unified parameterization, eliminates this assumption from the beginning, allowing a smooth transition to an explicit simulation of cloud-scale processes as the resolution increases. If clouds and the environment are horizontally homogeneous with a top-hat profile, as is widely assumed in the conventional parameterizations, it is shown that the dependence of the eddy transport is through a simple quadratic function. Together with a properly chosen closure, the unified parameterization determines for each realization of grid-scale processes. The parameterization can also provide a framework for including stochastic parameterization. Additional analyzed fields include the vertical structure of the dependence of vertical and horizontal eddy transports of moist static energy and horizontal momentum and that of cloud microphysical sources. For the momentum transport, the analysis results clearly show the limits of the traditional approach of parameterization based on an effectively one-dimensional model. For cloud microphysical conversions, it is shown that those taking place primarily inside and outside the updrafts are roughly proportional to and, respectively.

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17 August 2016

Title: Species in the Spotlight, Part 6 of 9: Pacific Leatherback Sea Turtle
Presenter(s): Scott Benson, Research Fish Biologist, Protected Resources Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA
Date & Time: 17 August 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Scott Benson, Research Fish Biologist, Protected Resources Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: In May 2015, NOAA Fisheries released the Recovering Threatened and Endangered Species FY 2013-2014 Report to Congress and launched Species in the Spotlight, an initiative focused on stabilizing populations of eight endangered species at very high risk of extinction. With this effort we are marshaling our resources to turn around the decline towards extinction of these eight species by focusing efforts to stabilize their populations by 2020 and put them on the road to recovery. This talk will delve into the details of recovery and conservation for Pacific Leatherback Turtle.

Bio(s): Scott Benson is the lead investigator of the leatherback turtle ecology program at SWFSC and coordinates studies of the distribution, abundance, movement patterns, foraging ecology, and health of endangered western Pacific leatherback turtles along the U.S. West Coast and throughout the Pacific. His research integrates bio-telemetry, aerial surveys, vessel-based sampling, and satellite remote sensing to enhance understanding of how oceanographic processes influence the occurrence and behavior of this species, and to aid U.S. and international conservation and recovery efforts. Since 1986, Scott has been involved in ecological research and conservation of marine vertebrates in the Pacific Ocean, including integrated studies of marine mammals and seabirds along the U.S. West Coast. Stationed at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, his education includes a B.A. from San Diego State University and an M.S. in Marine Science from San Jose State University.

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15 August 2016

Title: Cetacean Research and Conservation in Taiwan, with a focus on the Chinese White Dolphin (Sousa chinensis) Population
Presenter(s): Lien-siang Chou, Ph.D., Professor, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
Date & Time: 15 August 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Lien-siang Chou, Ph.D., Professor, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at http://www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6

Abstract: The presentation starts with a summary of whale and dolphin resources in the seas around Taiwan and a brief history of cetacean research and conservation there. The discussion then focuses on the studies and current status of the IUCN critically endangered population of the East Taiwan Strait (ETS) Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis), also known as the ETS Chinese white dolphin, off the west coast of Taiwan. In addition, the talk highlights some recent conservation progresses on the marine protect area for the ETS Chinese white dolphin population, concerns on potential impacts from planned offshore wind farms construction in the area, and proposed monitoring and mitigation measures as well as future conservation studies. About the speaker: Dr. Lien-siang Chou is a professor at the National Taiwan University's Institute of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the founder and past president of the Taiwan Cetacean Society. Professor Chou's research interests include cetacean morphology and genetic phylogeography, comparative study of life-history strategies, fisheries interaction, and impacts from whale watching. Since 1990, Professor Chou and her lab have been actively involved in both research and conservation of cetaceans, as well as operating a cetacean stranding response network in Taiwan. Professor Chou received her B.S. and M.S. degrees in zoology from the National Taiwan University and her Ph.D. degree in Ecology from the University of California, Davis.

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11 August 2016

Title: Understanding Information on National Geodetic Survey (NGS) Datasheets
Presenter(s): John Ellingson, Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 11 August 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): John Ellingson, Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA NGS POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7539531923945606145. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (213) 929-4212 Access Code: 860-932-004 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar.

Abstract: NGS datasheets include extensive information about survey control marks that can be found around the country. Learn how to find the information you need from a datasheet and how to avoid misusing it, which happens more frequently than you think.

Bio(s): John Ellingson currently serves as the State Geodetic Advisor to Wisconsin for NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. He is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin - Madison with a degree in Civil Engineering with an emphasis in surveying and additional studies in geodesy. He is a licensed Professional Engineer and a licensed Professional Land Surveyor in Wisconsin.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 11 August 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: Climate and Health Assessment of the U.S. Global Change Research Program, Part 2: Temperature-Related Death and Illness
Presenter(s): Marcus Sarofim, PhD, Environmental Scientist in the Climate Change Division at the Environmental Protection Agency
Date & Time: 11 August 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Marcus Sarofim, PhD, Environmental Scientist in the Climate Change Division at the Environmental Protection Agency

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: This seminar will discuss the findings of the USGCRP's scientific assessment on the impacts of climate change on human health in the United States. This report was developed over the course of three years by over 100 experts from across 8 federal agencies, and represents a significant improvement in scientific confidence in the link between climate change and a broad range of threats to public health. The goals of the seminar series include providing background on the development of the report, highlighting the overarching messages from the report, and describing some of the key findings across each of the chapters in more detail. In addition, presenters will provide a brief description of publicly accessible materials and where they can be found.

Bio(s): Marcus Sarofim is an environmental scientist in the Climate Change Division at the Environmental Protection Agency. He was the lead author on the Temperature-Related Death and Illness chapter of the Climate and Health Assessment, which he will be presenting on today. He received his PhD from MIT, where he worked with the Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, and spent two years as a AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow at the EPA before taking a full time position there.

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Title: The Past, Present, and Future of Ecosystem Services Research and Practices
Presenter(s): Dr. Robert Costanza, Australian National University, Canberra Australia
Date & Time: 11 August 2016
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, Floor 2, SSMC Building 3, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Robert Costanza, Australian National University, Canberra Australia

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Chief Economist and the Office of Performance, Risk, and Social Science Points of Contact:Dr. Monica Grasso, NOAA's Chief Economist, monica.grasso@noaa.gov or Dr. Valerie Were, Social Scientist, valerie.l.were@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast: www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: Ecosystems are connected to human well-being in a number of complex ways at multiple time and space scales. The challenge of ecosystem services science (ESS) is understanding and modeling these connections, with a range of purposes including raising awareness and providing information to decision-makers to allow them to better manage our natural capital assets. In order for ecosystem services to occur, natural capital must interact with other forms of capital including: built or manufactured capital, human capital and social capital. Thus ESS is inherently an integrated, transdisciplinary science that is concerned with the way these four forms of capital contribute to human well-being and the synergies and trade-offs among them. The process of valuation of ecosystem services is about quantifying and modeling these synergies and trade-offs. This talk will summarize progress on ecosystem services valuation and management and future directions, including spatially explicit modeling of regional landscapes and new approaches to integrating these models with sophisticated game interfaces to both inform players about system dynamics and to elicit valuation information based on player choices. The talk emphasizes that valuation of eco-services (in whatever units) is not the same as commodification or privatization. Many eco-services are best considered public goods or common pool resources, so conventional markets are often not the best institutional frameworks to manage them. However, these services must be (and are being) valued, and we need new, common asset institutions, like common asset trusts, to better take these values into account. The seminar describe ongoing initiatives in this area as well.

Bio(s): Professor Robert Costanza is a Vice Chancellor's Chair in Public Policy at the Crawford School of Public Policy at the Australian National University. He is also currently a Senior Fellow at the National Council on Science and the Environment in the US, a Senior Fellow at the Stockholm Resilience Center, an Affiliate Fellow at the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, and a DeTao Master of Ecological Economics at the DeTao Masters Academy, China. Professor Costanza's transdisciplinary research integrates the study of humans and the rest of nature to address research, policy and management issues at multiple time and space scales, from small watersheds to the global system. He is co-founder and past-president of the International Society for Ecological Economics, and was founding editor of the society's journal, Ecological Economics. He currently serves on the editorial board of ten other international academic journals. He is also founding editor in chief of Solutions (www.thesolutionsjournal.org) a unique hybrid academic/popular journal.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body

10 August 2016

Title: Species in the Spotlight, Part 5 of 9: Central California Coho Salmon
Presenter(s): Charlotte Ambrose, California Programs Coordinator, West Coast Region, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA
Date & Time: 10 August 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Charlotte Ambrose, California Programs Coordinator, West Coast Region, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: In May 2015, NOAA Fisheries released the Recovering Threatened and Endangered Species FY 2013-2014 Report to Congress and launched Species in the Spotlight, an initiative focused on stabilizing populations of eight endangered species at very high risk of extinction. With this effort we are marshaling our resources to turn around the decline towards extinction of these eight species by focusing efforts to stabilize their populations by 2020 and put them on the road to recovery. This talk will delve into the details of recovery and conservation for Central California Coho Salmon.

Bio(s): Charlotte Ambrose is the California Programs Coordinator for NOAA Fisheries in Sacramento, California, and she has worked for NOAA over 17 years. She recently served in the capacity of Recovery Coordinator responsible for developing and implementing recovery plans for central coast coho salmon, Chinook salmon and steelhead. She is currently the statewide liaison in California for NOAA Fisheries on salmon and steelhead programs, and coordinates both internally and externally on initiatives of regional significance such as the State Fisheries Restoration Grant Program, State Monitoring Program, Interagency Ecological Program, Hatchery Policy, Science Center coordination and others. She has experience in both the private and public sectors and is most widely recognized for her NOAA leadership on California forestry issues.

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9 August 2016

Title: Ocean Acidification in Alaska: Current status, monitoring efforts, and potential impacts to marine life
Presenter(s): Natalie Monacci, Deputy Director Ocean Acidification Research Center University of Alaska Fairbanks, and Bob Foy, Laboratory Director Kodiak Fisheries Research Center
Date & Time: 9 August 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Natalie Monacci, Deputy Director Ocean Acidification Research Center University of Alaska Fairbanks, and Bob Foy, Laboratory Director Kodiak Fisheries Research Center

Sponsor(s): ACCAP Climate Webinars (https://accap.uaf.edu/webinars) Tina Buxbaum via e-mail (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu) or call (907) 474-7812.

Remote Access: Register at https://accap.uaf.edu/OA_Alaska ABSTRACT Scientists estimate that the ocean is 30% more acidic today than it was 300 years ago, traceable to increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from fossil-fuel combustion and land-use change. Lowering the pH of seawater affects the ability of shell-building organisms to build and maintain their shells, which puts stress on the entire marine food chain. Alaska is expected to experience the effects of ocean acidification sooner and more seriously than lower latitudes due to its temperature and circulation patterns. This presentation will cover what we know about OA in Alaska, statewide monitoring efforts to track changes in seawater, and results of lab work to test the impacts of higher-acidity waters on commercially important species. It will also highlight resources available through the new Alaska Ocean Acidification Network, which was recently launched to help connect scientists and stakeholder communities, identify knowledge gaps, share data, and determine best practices for monitoring in Alaska.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

8 August 2016

Title: GSI-based Hybrid Ensemble-Variational Data Assimilation for Global, Hurricane and Storm-scale Numerical Weather Prediction
Presenter(s): Dr. Xuguang Wang, University of Oklahoma
Date & Time: 8 August 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Xuguang Wang, University of Oklahoma POC: Avichal Mehra avichal.mehra@noaa.gov Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP , Seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars from EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook as well. GoToMeeting https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/870300213 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (872) 240-3412 Access Code: 870-300-213 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 870-300-213

Abstract: GSI-based hybrid ensemble-variational data assimilation (DA) system including both 3DEnVar and 4DEnVar improved US NWS global forecast significantly. This seminar will discuss our recent research and development of the system for a variety of scales including global, hurricane and storm scales. A method which effectively increases the size of the ensemble incurring minimum cost is implemented in GSI-based 4DEnVar. Experiments with GFS configured similarly to the 4DEnVar pre-implementation test were conducted. It was found that the GFS forecast was further improved. Research and development have also been made to extend the GSI-based hybrid DA system for regional modeling systems. The hybrid EnKF-Var DA system is extended with the operational HWRF modeling system to improve high-resolution, convection allowing tropical cyclone prediction. An end-to-end, continuously cycled hybrid DA system was developed using a newly developed directed moving nest strategy. Experiments were conducted for hurricane Edouard (2014) in which all operational observations including conventional in-situ data, satellite wind, tcvital, satellite radiances, and tail Doppler radar observations were assimilated. It was found that: a) the dual resolution hybrid DA improved upon the coarser, single resolution hybrid; b) vortex initialization and relocation in the control and relocation of the ensemble background improved the forecasts; c) using 4DEnVar DA in the TDR-involved cycles improved the intensity forecasts for early lead times compared to 3DEnVar DA; and d) the hybrid system improved intensity forecasts relative to operational HWRF during the intensification period due to the alleviation of the spin-down issue because the hybrid better analyzed the structures of an intensifying storm. Issues associated with the vortex initialization will also be discussed. The GSI-based hybrid DA system is also extended with the convection resolving WRF ARW and NMMB models for multi-scale assimilation of both conventional in-situ observations and radar observations to improve convective scale hazardous weather forecasts over the Continental US (CONUS). Systematic comparison of GSI based 3DVar and EnKF was first conducted in the context of multiscale data assimilation where scales ranging from convective scales to synoptic scales were resolved by both the model and the observations. The cases include many examples of both discrete cellular convection and organized Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). It was found that convective scale precipitation forecasts initialized by GSI-based EnKF were much more skillful than GSI-based 3DVar. The positive impact of assimilating radar data lasted much longer in EnKF than 3DVar. Design, implementation and performance of the GSIbased convection-allowing ensemble based data assimilation and forecast system in support of the 2015 PECAN field experiment will also be discussed. In addition, a new method to directly assimilate reflectivity observations was proposed and implemented in the GSI-based EnVar system. This new method avoids the use of the tangent linear and adjoint of the nonlinear reflectivity operator and therefore overcomes the issues of using hydrometeors or logarithm of hydrometeors in GSI variational minimization. The newly proposed method is examined on the analysis and prediction of the 8 May 2003, Oklahoma City, tornadic supercell storm at 2km model grid. Both the probabilistic forecast of a strong low-level vorticity and the maintenance of the strong updraft and vorticity in the new method are more consistent with the reality than in option-logarithm and option-mixing-ratio. Detailed diagnostics suggest that a more realistic cold pool due to the better analyzed hydrometeor mixing ratios in the new method than in other methods leads to the constructive interaction between the surface gust front and the updraft aloft associated with the mid-level mesocyclone. Challenges, implications and future research under the NGGPS paradigm will be discussed at the end of the seminar.

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4 August 2016

Title: Risk Communication Strategies and Research
Presenter(s): Dr. Timothy L. Sellnow and Dr. Deanna D. Sellnow, University of Central Florida
Date & Time: 4 August 2016
10:00 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, 2nd Floor, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Timothy L. Sellnow and Dr. Deanna D. Sellnow (Nicholson School of Communication at the University of Central Florida) Seminar sponsors: NOAA PRSS and the NOAA Central Library. Contact(s): Judith Salter, Librarian, NOAA Central Library (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Dr. Denna Geppi, Risk Communication Social Scientist, NOAA Performance, Risk, and Social Science Office (denna.geppi@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at http://www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Chief Economist and the Office of Performance, Risk, and Social Science would like to invite NOAA staff across all line offices for a presentation on effective risk communication. The objectives of this presentation are: 1. Develop an understanding of risk communication key concepts: including inoculation, uncertainty reduction, and self-efficacy. 2. Discuss specific risk communication recommendations for communication practitioners. 3. Advance knowledge of social science to create effective impact based messaging. Participants can expect to: Identify/list/document the key concepts and topical research areas associated with risk communication. Identify the needs of the user community related to risk. Identify steps to move forward. About the speakers: Timothy L. Sellnow is a professor of strategic communication in the Nicholson School of Communication at the University of Central Florida. Dr. Sellnow's research focuses on bioterrorism, pre-crisis planning, and strategic communication for risk management and mitigation in organizational and health settings. He has conducted funded research for the Department of Homeland Security, the United States Department of Agriculture, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the United States Geological Survey. He has also served in an advisory role for the National Academy of Sciences and the World Health Organization. He has also published numerous referred journal articles on risk and crisis communication and has co-authored five books on risk and crisis communication. Dr. Sellnow's most recent book is entitled, Theorizing Crisis Communication. Dr. Sellnow is a recipient of the National Communication Associations Gerald M. Phillips Award for Distinguished Applied Communication Research. Deanna D. Sellnow is a professor of communication in the Nicholson School of Communication at the University of Central Florida. Dr. Sellnow's research focuses on strategic instructional communication in a variety of contexts including risk, crisis, health, and online settings. She has conducted funded research for the United States Geological Survey, Department of Homeland Security, and Centers for Disease Control and Protection. She has also collaborated with agencies such as the International Food Information Council about food security across the globe. She has published her work in numerous refereed articles in national and international journals, as well authored or co-authored several textbooks including Effective Speaking in a Digital Age, Communicate!, and The Rhetorical Power of Popular Culture.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

3 August 2016

Title: Species in the Spotlight, Part 4 of 9: White Abalone
Presenter(s): Melissa Neuman, PhD, NOAA Fisheries Abalone Recovery Coordinator, Protected Species Conservation & Recovery, West Coast Regional, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA
Date & Time: 3 August 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Melissa Neuman, PhD, NOAA Fisheries Abalone Recovery Coordinator, Protected Species Conservation & Recovery, West Coast Regional, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: In May 2015, NOAA Fisheries released the Recovering Threatened and Endangered Species FY 2013-2014 Report to Congress and launched Species in the Spotlight, an initiative focused on stabilizing populations of eight endangered species at very high risk of extinction. With this effort we are marshaling our resources to turn around the decline towards extinction of these eight species by focusing efforts to stabilize their populations by 2020 and put them on the road to recovery. This talk will delve into the details of recovery and conservation for White Abalone.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body

1 August 2016

Title: Freezing Precipitation and Freezing Events over Northern Eurasia and North America
Presenter(s): Pavel Groisman, Ph.D., AGU Fellow, NEESPI Project Scientist, UCAR Project Scientist at NCEI
Date & Time: 1 August 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 - SmConf - 4702
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Pavel Groisman, Ph.D., AGU Fellow, NEESPI Project Scientist,UCAR Project Scientist at NCEI

Sponsor(s): NCEI Arctic Team (POC: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Phone: 1-877-725-4068 (8634769#). Number of callers is limited to 25 on a first come first served basis. For Webcast access go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c

Abstract: The issue of near 0C precipitation is linked with several hazardous phenomena including heavy snowfall/rainfall transition around C; strong blizzards; rain-on-snow events causing floods; freezing rain and freezing drizzle; and ice load on infrastructure. In our presentation using more than 1,500 long-term time series of synoptic observations for the past four decades, we present climatology and the empirical evidence about changes in occurrence, timing, and intensity of freezing events over most of the extratropics. Summary: Near 0C precipitation events are widespread and may represent/create natural hazards; their frequency and intensity are changing in contemporary climatic changes, and these changes are not yet well understood and/or documented. Automation (where it was introduced) and temporal paucity (e.g., 3-h. versus 1-h. reports) affect the homogeneity of reporting of freezing events (especially, for freezing drizzle and intense freezing events). Three-hourly reporting (e.g., in the Eastern Europe and the Russian Federation) seriously underestimates the daily frequency of freezing events. Using more than 1,500 long-term time series of synoptic observations for the past four decades, we present climatology and the empirical evidence about changes in occurrence, timing, and intensity of freezing rains and freezing drizzles across North America, Europe, Russia, Belarus, and Kyrgyzstan and their changes in the past decade. The regions with the highest frequency of freezing rains (from 3 to 10 days per year) reside in the northeastern quadrant of the conterminous United States and adjacent areas of southeastern Canada south of 50N, over the south and southwest parts of the Great East European Plain, and Central Europe. The frequency of freezing drizzle exceeds the frequency of freezing rain occurrence in all areas. During the last decade, substantial changes in the annual freezing rain occurrence were found: " On the southern edge of our study domain (southeastern U.S., Central Europe, southern Russia), the frequencies of freezing events decreased along with the duration of the cold season; " In the Arctic (Norway, north of North America, some taiga areas in Russia) and at high elevations (The Tian Shan Mountains), the frequencies of freezing events followed the expansion of the short warm season; " Changes in the occurrence of freezing drizzle were estimated only for Russia. We found a statistically significant nationwide decrease in this element. Possible reasons of observed changes will be discussed. About the speaker: UCAR Project Scientist at NOAA NCEI PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION: 1975 - 1980 State Hydrological Institute, Russian Federation: Ph. D. in Geophysics 1968 - 1973 Mathematical faculty of the Leningrad State University, Russian Federation Master degree in Probability Ttheory and Mathematical Statistics. 1966 " 1968 Physico-mathematical High School #239, Leningrad, Russian Federation. APPOINTMENTS: 2012- present RAS Institute of Oceanology, Moscow, Russia: Lead Scientist 1990- present U.S. National Climatic Data Center at Asheville, NC U.S. National Research Council Senior Associate (1990 to 1993); UCAR Project Scientist (1993 to Sep. 1994, Sep. 1996 to present) 1993-present Hydrology Science and Services Corp., Asheville, NC. Vice-President 1994 - 1998 Dept. of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, MA: Research Associate Professor 1975 " 2014 State Hydrological Institute at St. Petersburg, Russia: Scientist (1975 to 1984), Senior Scientist (1984 to 2014). RESEARCH INTERESTS: Climatic variability, global change, parameterization of climatic processes using observational data for climate and environment change research, in situ observational network measurements (with focus on precipitation, temperature, wind, and snow cover), water balance studies. PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS: Russian Geographical Society, American Geophysical Union, American Meteorological Society Awards/Recognition: 2010 AGU Fellow PUBLICATIONS: More than 135 papers in refereed journals and book chapters 46 of which were published since 2008 (2 more papers are in review). Editor (and co-author) of 4 books and 5 Special Journal Issues (Environ. Res. Lett. and Glob. Planet. Change).

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28 July 2016

Title: NOAA Coordination with Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN)
Presenter(s): Dr. Tony Reale, SMCD/OPDB at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 28 July 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Conference Room #2552-3, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Tony Reale, SMCD/OPDB at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Science Seminar Series Remote Access Information: Event name: NOAA GRUAN Coordination Webex address: https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=ea8619cd642d5eec2c7e2b896f8ae9bbd

Abstract: The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN) is a reference observing network designed to provide long-term, climate quality atmospheric data from the troposphere and stratosphere (and surface). GRUAN reference (mainly radiosonde at this time) observations are calibrated through an unbroken traceability chain to SI or community standards with the uncertainty interval in each step in the chain fully characterized, meaning the resulting estimates can be used with high confidence that the true measurement is within the interval. Among the primary objectives of GRUAN is the constraining and inter-calibration of data from other more spatially extensive observing systems such as satellites and the current radiosonde (RAOB) network. In this context, GRUAN and NOAA have coordinated to create a baseline dataset of collocated GRUAN radiosonde and global satellite observations. This is embodied in the NOAA Products Validation System + (NPROVS+) which has routinely compiled collocations of GRUAN RAOB and satellite sounding observations (from multiple satellites) since 2013, roughly the time that sounding products from hyper-spectral infer-red and microwave sensor suite onboard the S- NPP satellite began being produced. NPROVS+ also integrates JPSS funded radiosondes synchronized to S-NPP overpass at DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites and also for selected data intensive experiments typically targeting the Tropics. These radiosondes are subsequently processed into reference observations courtesy of GRUAN providing the "sweetest of fruit" not only for sounding Cal/Val but also satellite sensor and associated atmospheric Radiative Transfer (RT) model assessments. The following seminar presents current status of GRUAN and NPROVS+ and highlights their impact on the JPSS Cal/Val program for operational atmospheric sounding products. Topics include the integration of GRUAN uncertainty estimates for more robust Cal/Val, special value of the synchronized "reference" observations and examples of feedback to GRUAN. Tony Reale's bio: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/Reale_A.php

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27 July 2016

Title: Species in the Spotlight, Part 3 of 9: Atlantic Salmon
Presenter(s): Dan Kircheis, Fishery Biologist, Protected Resources Division, Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA
Date & Time: 27 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dan Kircheis, Fishery Biologist, Protected Resources Division, Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: In May 2015, NOAA Fisheries released the Recovering Threatened and Endangered Species FY 2013-2014 Report to Congress and launched Species in the Spotlight, an initiative focused on stabilizing populations of eight endangered species at very high risk of extinction. With this effort we are marshaling our resources to turn around the decline towards extinction of these eight species by focusing efforts to stabilize their populations by 2020 and put them on the road to recovery. This talk will delve into the details of recovery and conservation for Atlantic salmon.

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Title: Coupled Atmospheric Chemistry Schemes for Modeling Regional and Global Atmospheric Chemistry
Presenter(s): Emily M. Saunders and William R. Stockwell, Howard University
Date & Time: 27 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Emily M. Saunders and William R. Stockwell, Howard University POC: Jeff McQueen (Jeff.Mcqueen@noaa.gov) Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP , Seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars from EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook as well. Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/839364261 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 839-364-261

Abstract: Atmospheric chemistry models are used for air quality forecasting and these require chemical reaction mechanisms to simulate the production of air pollution. Chemical boundary conditions are another necessity for the simulations. Global models may be used to provide boundary conditions to regional models. NOAA/NCEP uses the Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) for air quality forecasting and one of its standard chemical mechanisms is the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism, Version 2 (RACM2). The goal of this project is to develop the Global Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (GACM), a global version of RACM2. GACM is intended for use in global scale atmospheric chemistry models to provide chemical boundary conditions for regional scale simulations by models such as CMAQ. GACM includes additional chemistry for marine environments while reducing its treatment of the chemistry needed for highly polluted urban regions. This keeps GACM's size small enough to allow it to be used efficiently in global models. GACM's chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOC) is highly compatible with the VOC chemistry in RACM2 allowing a global model with GACM to provide VOC boundary conditions to a regional scale model with RACM2 with reduced error. The GACM-RACM2 system of mechanisms should yield more accurate forecasts by regional air quality models such as CMAQ.

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26 July 2016

Title: A Collaboration with rural Alaskans: The driftwood harvest in a changing climate
Presenter(s): Dr. Chas Jones, ORISE Post-doctoral Research Fellow, US Environmental Protection Agency
Date & Time: 26 July 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Chas Jones, ORISE Post-doctoral Research Fellow, US Environmental Protection Agenc

Sponsor(s): ACCAP Climate Webinars (https://accap.uaf.edu/webinars) Tina Buxbaum via e-mail (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu) or call (907) 474-7812.

Remote Access: Register at https://accap.uaf.edu/?q=driftwood. You will receive an email after registering that directs you to the webinar link. ABSTRACT This study examined flood events in the Yukon River with the goal of understanding how actual or perceived changes in driftwood availability are related to river hydrology and how future changes in hydrology may affect the driftwood harvest. We combined information gathered from informant interviews, USGS gauging stations, U.S. Census data, and numerical models of past driftwood harvest rates to estimate changes in future driftwood harvest rates. We determined that neither average date of spring break-up nor the June Rise floods had changed significantly between 1977 and 2012, but the date of the June Rise had become much more variable since 1993. Our model indicated that hydrologic factors alone were responsible for a small (3%) decrease in the annual wood harvest. However, the installation in the village of wood-fired boilers in 2007 increased the annual community demand by more than 80%. Thus, greater uncertainty of accessing driftwood has been accompanied by a higher demand for this important fuel source. We also identify a driftwood harvest threshold and suggest that when flows exceed 325,000 cfs at the USGS Gaging Station at Stevens Village on the Yukon River, driftwood can be predicted to flow past Tanana approximately 2 days later. Modeling various climate scenarios illustrate how the driftwood model estimates that increasing hydrologic variability would be expected to increase vulnerability of the driftwood harvest. Examination of the economics associated with using driftwood versus fuel alternatives shows that other wood sources require more time and money to harvest. Furthermore, the use of oil or electricity as alternative fuels cost substantially more, but save considerable amounts of time.

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Title: Seminar Series: U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) Climate and Health Assessment, Part 1: Assessment Overview, Populations of Concern, & Climate Change Effects on Mental Health & Wellness
Presenter(s): Allison Crimmins, Environmental Scientist in EPA's Office of Air and Radiation, Climate Change Division, and Daniel Dodgen, Ph.D., Director, Division for At-Risk Individuals, Behavioral Health, and Community Resilience, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Date & Time: 26 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 or via webinar - see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Allison Crimmins, Environmental Scientist in EPA's Office of Air and Radiation, Climate Change Division, specializing in climate change risks and impacts. Ms.Crimmins is also the lead author and coordinator of the U.S. Global Change Research Program's assessment on climate change and human health. and Daniel Dodgen, Ph.D., Director, Division for At-Risk Individuals, Behavioral Health, and Community Resilience (ABC), Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone, dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join" on the lower right of the page, click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts; the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: This seminar series will discuss the findings of the USGCRP's scientific assessment on the impacts of climate change on human health in the United States. This report was developed over the course of three years by over 100 experts from across eight federal agencies, and represents a significant improvement in scientific confidence in the link between climate change and a broad range of threats to public health. The goals of the webinar include providing background on the development of the report, highlighting the overarching messages from the report, and describing some of the key findings across each of the chapters in more detail. In addition, presenters will provide a brief description of publicly accessible materials and where they can be found.

Bio(s): Allison Crimmins is the lead author and lead coordinator of the U.S. Global Change Research Program's assessment on climate change and human health. She is an environmental scientist in EPA's Office of Air and Radiation, Climate Change Division, and specializes in climate change risks and impacts. Prior to joining EPA, she worked at MIT's Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change and has a Master of Science in oceanography from San Francisco State University and Master in Public Policy from the Harvard Kennedy School. Dr. Daniel Dodgen is Director of the Division for At-Risk Individuals, Behavioral Health, and Community Resilience at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. Dr. Dodgen is a clinical psychologist and a recognized expert in disaster behavioral health having supported the response to numerous national disasters including the 1992 Los Angeles Riots, the September 11th terrorist attacks, Hurricane Katrina, and the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. He is lead author of the Mental Health and Wellness chapter of the USGCRP Climate and Health Assessment and is currently involved in extensive work concerning the behavioral health impacts of climate change.

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22 July 2016

Title: Hunting the Rift - Finding Fracture Zones: The First Heezen-Tharp Map
Presenter(s): Albert "Skip" Theberge, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 22 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Albert "Skip" Theberge, NOAA Central Library Contact(s): Judith Salter, Librarian, NOAA Central Library (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Skip Theberge, NOAA Central Library (albert.e.theberge.jr@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at http://www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: Various histories, both in published books and found on the Internet, give Bruce Heezen, Marie Tharp, and Maurice Ewing credit for the discovery of the central rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and by extension the world-wide rift system. According to Heezen and Tharp, they discovered the rift valley both by developing bathymetric profiles of the North Atlantic seafloor and by tracking earthquake epicenters. However, a little known paper published prior to World War II by the German scientist Gunter Dietrich, clearly establishes Dietrich's priority of discovery of the Mid-Atlantic rift valley. It will be shown that Heezen was aware of this paper and engaged in a form of bathymetric plagiarism by following Dietrich's tracklines throughout the North Atlantic and claiming Dietrich's discoveries for himself and Marie Tharp. Ironically, in doing so, Heezen was the first to encounter large Atlantic fracture zones, but because of confusion and possibly fear of ridicule suppressed this information for over ten years. As a result, the first Physiographic Map of the Atlantic Ocean had errors approaching 100 nautical miles in the location of the rift valley and no indication of fracture zones. Heezen and Tharp ignored their own data in production of this map and followed the time-honored method of placing the legend over their area of greatest confusion. Surprisingly, Heezen's apparent fascination with Dietrich continued into the 1960's when he formed a polygon with ship trackline that enclosed Dietrich's "most striking depression" and declared the existence of the Kane Fracture Zone. About the speaker: Skip Theberge, presently acting head of reference at the NOAA Central Library, retired from NOAA Corps in 1995 after 27 years of primarily hydrographic surveying and seafloor mapping. He headed the NOS Ocean Mapping Section in the late 1980's during the EEZ mapping program. Since retirement from NOAA Corps he has remained active in the ocean mapping community having served for 12 years on the Advisory Committee for Undersea Features of the United States Board on Geographic Names and for three years on its international counterpart. He was part of the NOAA science team that helped design the Sant Ocean Hall of the Smithsonian Institution Museum of Natural History. He is the history editor of Hydro International magazine and the author of over 80 papers dealing with the history of hydrographic and geodetic surveying, seafloor mapping, and various aspects of oceanography.

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21 July 2016

Title: Economic Consequence Analysis Tool (E-CAT) for Natural Disasters
Presenter(s): Dr. Adam Rose, University of Southern California
Date & Time: 21 July 2016
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, Floor 2, SSMC Building 3, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Adam Rose, University of Southern California

Sponsor(s): The event is sponsored by NOAA's Chief Economist and the Office of Performance, Risk, and Social Science; point of contact Dr. Monica Grasso - NOAA's Chief Economist - monica.grasso@noaa.gov Dr. Valerie Were - Social Scientist - valerie.l.were@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast: www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: The Economic Consequences Analysis Tool (E-CAT) is intended for policymakers and analysts who need rapid estimates of the economic impacts of natural disasters, technological accidents, and terrorist attacks. It is programmed in Excel and Visual Basic to facilitate its use. This presentation will explain the E-CAT framework, its theoretical and empirical underpinnings, and illustrate its derivation and use for the cases of an oil spill and a flood disaster. E-CAT is the culmination of 10 years of research at the Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events (CREATE) in advancing Economic Consequence Analysis (ECA) by incorporating resilience and behavioral responses to a broad range of threats. The theme of this research has been integrating broader features of consequences into the state-of-the-art tool of macroeconomic simulation and policy analysis -- computable general equilibrium (CGE) modeling. The essence of the methodology involves running numerous CGE simulations that yield synthetic data for regression equations for each threat based on the identification of key explanatory variables, including threat characteristics and background conditions. This transforms the results of a complex model, which is beyond the reach of most users, into a reduced form model that is readily comprehensible. We have built functionality into E-CAT such that users can switch various impact drivers on and off in order to generate customized profiles of economic consequences of numerous disaster events. E-CAT involves a 7-step process beginning with the enumeration of a broad range of potential impacts for each threat, quantification of direct impact drivers, linkage of these drivers to variables in a national CGE model, running the CGE model hundreds of times while varying key parameters particular to each threat, generating regression estimates from the CGE simulation results, incorporating uncertainty, and transporting the reduced-form regression results to a user-friendly spreadsheet program. E-CAT can meet policy-makers' needs for a tool to evaluate the magnitude of various threats in order to make decisions on how to allocate budgets across interdiction, mitigation and resilience options. E-CAT can also be used to provide rapid estimates of recent events that require immediate disaster assistance. A book on E-CAT will be available from Springer Publishers in autumn of this year. About the Speaker Dr. Adam Rose is a Research Professor in the University of Southern California (USC) Sol Price School of Public Policy, and a faculty affiliate of USC's Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events (CREATE). His primary research interest is the economics of disasters, including natural hazards, terrorism and technological accidents. He has spearheaded the development of CREATE's comprehensive economic consequence analysis framework and has done pioneering research on resilience at the level of the individual business/household, market/industry and regional/national economy. He has also completed dozens of case studies of disaster consequences and recovery, including the September 11 terrorist attacks. He is currently the PI on an NSF grant to study dynamic economic resilience to disasters, with an application to SuperStorm Sandy, and on a contract for FEMA with formulate a deductible for post-disaster assistance. He is also the project leader of the Economic Consequence Analysis Working Group on Maritime Cyber Security. He recently served as an advisor on disaster resilience to the United Nations Development Programme and to the World Bank on financing disaster risk management. He was the research team leader on the Multi-Hazard Mitigation Council report to the U.S. Congress on net benefits of FEMA hazard mitigation grants. His other major research area is the economics of energy and climate change policy, where he has done extensive work on international burden sharing and on the economic impacts of state-level climate action plans in the U.S.

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Title: From Observing Systems to Operational Modeling
Presenter(s): Neil Jacobs and Peter Childs, Panasonic
Date & Time: 21 July 2016
1:10 pm - 2:10 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Neil Jacobs and Peter Childs from Panasonic Weather Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP , Seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars from EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook as well. Remote Access GoToMeeting https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/703126781 Meeting ID: 703-126-781 Dial-in Number: 1-866-685-5896 Passcode: 8108134 Presentations can be downloaded from: ftp://ftp.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/exper/nova/branchmtg/

Abstract: Panasonic Weather (formerly AirDat) has been in the weather space since the late 1990s and running global models since 2007. This talk will focus on Panasonic's global modeling program, including new observing systems, quality control processes, data assimilation, ensemble configuration, various aspects of radiation and physics schemes, air-sea coupling, parallel testing and R2O, as well as computational resource and hardware management. Additionally, a brief overview will also be provided on nested limited area models, and how optimizations to those models feed back enhancements to the global model.

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Title: South American summer monsoon variability since the last ice age
Presenter(s): Kyrstin Fornace, Ph.D., Knauss Marine Policy Fellow at NOAA Research- Sea Grant/OWAQ/CPO
Date & Time: 21 July 2016
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kyrstin Fornace, Ph.D. 2016 Knauss Marine Policy Fellow, Integrated Water Coordinator, NOAA Research (joint position between Sea Grant/OWAQ/CPO)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Knauss Brown Bag series; point of contact is laura.early@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract: The South American summer monsoon (SASM) is a dominant feature of South American climate, producing widespread precipitation across the Amazon basin, central Andes, and southern Brazil during peak monsoon season in austral summer. Characterizing SASM dynamics on geological timescales provides critical context for identifying different influences on South American precipitation patterns and investigating present and future hydroclimate trends. I will present on my work reconstructing hydrologic variability in tropical South America over the past ~50,000 years and discuss current understanding of the controls on SASM precipitation on glacial-interglacial, orbital, and millennial timescales. In general, existing climate records suggest increased SASM precipitation during cold periods in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes or periods of high local summer insolation. However, discrepancies between records from different regions within the SASM domain also point to complex expression of local and remote forcing during the last glacial period.

Bio(s): Kyrstin is a Knauss Fellow in NOAA Research in a joint position between Sea Grant, Office of Weather and Air Quality, and Climate Program Office. She received a PhD in chemical oceanography from the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in 2015. Her dissertation research focused on past monsoon variability and the effects of past climate change on terrestrial carbon cycling in tropical South America.

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Title: Migrating without a map - how a non-homing fish finds a suitable river
Presenter(s): Trevor Meckley, Ph.D., Knauss Marine Policy Fellow at NOS-National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research-CSCOR
Date & Time: 21 July 2016
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - 2nd Floor NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Trevor Meckley, Ph.D. - 2016 Knauss Marine Policy Fellow at : NOS-National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research (CSCOR)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Knauss Brown Bag series; point of contact is laura.early@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract: The sea lamprey spawning migration in river systems and the role larval odor and sex pheromones play in tributary and mate selection behavior have been immensely studied. By comparison, virtually nothing is known about lamprey behavior in large lacustrine and oceanic environments. We made an unprecedented attempt to understand how sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, return to coastal environments, locate river plumes and enter rivers of the Laurentian Great Lakes during their spawning migration. VEMCO acoustic arrays provided high resolution (30s intervals, <5m accuracy) 3D paths of sea lamprey movement in an offshore array with 3 km^2 of coverage over 3 km from a coastline and on the coast in front of the Ocqueoc River (2 km^2 of coverage). The offshore array revealed that 81% of individuals arrived at the nearest coast within 72 hours and sea lamprey achieved arrival by following local bathymetric contours towards shallower water. The coastal array captured sea lamprey movement in front of a river under two conditions, (1) a low larval sea lamprey population following removal (2010); and, (2) higher larval population following larval recruitment (2011). Although larval odor did not significantly influence river plume encounter or river mouth localization, the coastal array revealed that larval odor does influence the decision of sea lamprey to enter rivers.

Bio(s): Originally from Gettysburg Pennsylvania, Trevor attained a B.S. degree in Biology at Millersville University (PA). He received a M.S. and Ph.D. at Michigan State University from the Fisheries and Wildlife Department while studying under the guidance of Dr. Mike Wagner. At MSU Trevor studied many aspects of the invasive Great Lakes sea lamprey migration (https://msu.edu/~meckleyt/index.html).

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Title: Impacts of Climate Change and Ocean Acidification on Coral Reef Fisheries
Presenter(s): James Palardy, Ecologist, and Elena Besedin, Economist, Abt Associates, Inc.
Date & Time: 21 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): James Palardy, Ecologist, and Elena Besedin, Economist, Abt Associates, Inc.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov Webinar Info: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Coral reefs are highly productive shallow marine habitats at risk of degradation due to global ocean changes, including ocean acidification and rising sea temperature. One of the consequences of coral reef habitat loss is reduced reef fisheries production. To begin estimating the impacts of climate change on commercial coral reef fisheries, we developed a global model of annual demand for reef fish in regions with substantial coral reef cover. We then used this economic model to project consumer surplus losses from a coupled climate, ocean, and coral biology simulation model (CO2-COST). Under a high emission scenario (IPCC RCP 8.5), 92% of coral cover is lost by 2100. Policies reaching lower radiative forcing targets (e.g., IPCC RCP 6.0) may partially avoid habitat loss, thereby preserving an estimated $14 to $20 billion in consumer surplus through 2100 (2014$ USD, 3% discount). Avoided damages vary annually, are sensitive to biological assumptions, and appear highest when coral ecosystems have moderate adaptive capacity. These welfare loss estimates are the first to monetize ocean acidification impacts to commercial finfisheries and complement the existing estimates of economic impacts to shellfish and to coral reefs generally.

Bio(s): Dr. James Palardy, Associate at Abt Associates, is a biologist with expertise identifying and quantifying human impact on ecosystems and goods and services they produce. A primary focus of his research includes the development of models that estimate the impacts of climate change and ocean acidification on coral reefs and on a wide range of shellfish populations. Dr. Elena Besedin, Principal Associate at Abt Associates, is an economist with expertise in estimating market and non-market values of environmental goods and services. Her recent work has focused on water resource management and policy, particularly on the development of novel approaches to improve the monetization of environmental benefits within the regulatory context.

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20 July 2016

Title: Species in the Spotlight, Part 2 of 9: Hawaiian Monk Seal
Presenter(s): Angela Amlin, Monk Seal Recovery Coordinator-Acting, Protected Resources Division, Pacific Islands Regional Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA
Date & Time: 20 July 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Angela Amlin, Monk Seal Recovery Coordinator (Acting), Protected Resources Division, Pacific Islands Regional Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: In May 2015, NOAA Fisheries released the Recovering Threatened and Endangered Species FY 2013-2014 Report to Congress and launched Species in the Spotlight, an initiative focused on stabilizing populations of eight endangered species at very high risk of extinction. With this effort we are marshaling our resources to turn around the decline towards extinction of these eight species by focusing efforts to stabilize their populations by 2020 and put them on the road to recovery. This talk will delve into the details of recovery and conservation for Hawaiian Monk Seal.

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Title: Internal tides and waves in the global ocean
Presenter(s): Dr. James Richman, Senior Scientist, Center of Ocean Atmospheric Prediction Studies, Florida State University
Date & Time: 20 July 2016
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. James Richman, Senior Scientist, Center of Ocean Atmospheric Prediction Studies, Florida State University Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: margaret.lansing@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5831370245011442177

Abstract: The gravitational forcing of the sun and moon plus the self-attraction and loading (SAL) for the solid earth and ocean tides has been applied to an eddy resolving, global ocean circulation model. A technique borrowed from data assimilation, Augmented State Ensemble Kalman Filter (ASEnKF), has been used to correct for poorly estimated SAL and errors in bathymetry, geometry and numerics to generate a surface (or barotropic) tide with a global rms error of 2.6 cm. The surface tide generates an internal tide. Except near the generation regions, the internal tide is not stationary nor phase locked to the surface tide. In the model, the loss of stationarity is not associated with strong dissipation. The internal tide generates internal gravity waves. The model internal wave spectra resemble observations and the predictions of the Garrett-Munk internal wave spectrum.

Bio(s): Dr. James Richman is a Senior Scientist in the Center for Ocean and Atmosphere Prediction Studies (COAPS) at Florida State University. Dr. Richman received his Ph.D. from MIT Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). Prior to jointing FSU in 2015, he was a professor at Oceanography Department at Oregon State University, program manager at NASA and Oceanographer at the Naval Research Laboratory. His current research projects include high-resolution global ocean models, and internal tides.

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19 July 2016

Title: A Collaboration with rural Alaskans: The driftwood harvest in a changing climate
Presenter(s): Dr. Chas Jones, ORISE Post-doctoral Research Fellow, US Environmental Protection Agenc
Date & Time: 19 July 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Dr. Chas Jones, ORISE Post-doctoral Research Fellow, US Environmental Protection Agenc

Sponsor(s): ACCAP Climate Webinars (https://accap.uaf.edu/webinars) Tina Buxbaum via e-mail (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu) or call (907) 474-7812.

Remote Access: Register at https://accap.uaf.edu/?q=driftwood. You will receive an email after registering that directs you to the webinar link. ABSTRACT This study examined flood events in the Yukon River with the goal of understanding how actual or perceived changes in driftwood availability are related to river hydrology and how future changes in hydrology may affect the driftwood harvest. We combined information gathered from informant interviews, USGS gauging stations, U.S. Census data, and numerical models of past driftwood harvest rates to estimate changes in future driftwood harvest rates. We determined that neither average date of spring break-up nor the June Rise floods had changed significantly between 1977 and 2012, but the date of the June Rise had become much more variable since 1993. Our model indicated that hydrologic factors alone were responsible for a small (3%) decrease in the annual wood harvest. However, the installation in the village of wood-fired boilers in 2007 increased the annual community demand by more than 80%. Thus, greater uncertainty of accessing driftwood has been accompanied by a higher demand for this important fuel source. We also identify a driftwood harvest threshold and suggest that when flows exceed 325,000 cfs at the USGS Gaging Station at Stevens Village on the Yukon River, driftwood can be predicted to flow past Tanana approximately 2 days later. Modeling various climate scenarios illustrate how the driftwood model estimates that increasing hydrologic variability would be expected to increase vulnerability of the driftwood harvest. Examination of the economics associated with using driftwood versus fuel alternatives shows that other wood sources require more time and money to harvest. Furthermore, the use of oil or electricity as alternative fuels cost substantially more, but save considerable amounts of time.

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Title: Next Generation Global Prediction System Atmospheric Dynamic Core Evaluation
Presenter(s): Tim Schneider of ESRL, Vijay Tallapragada of EMC, and Jeff Whitaker of ESRL)
Date & Time: 19 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Tim Schneider(ESRL), Vijay Tallapragada (EMC) and Jeff Whitaker(ESRL)

Title: Next Generation Global Prediction System Atmospheric Dynamic Core Evaluation Date, Time, Place: Tuesday July 19, 2016 at noon, NCWCP Rm 2155 Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP , Seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars from EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook as well. Remote Access Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/809600501 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (646) 749-3122 Access Code: 809-600-501

Abstract: The Next Generation Global Prediction System (NGGPS) Project is an NWS initiative for designing/developing/implementing a non-hydrostatic global modeling system into operations with the goal of providing world's best global operational forecast guidance. Other objectives include accelerating development of advanced physics and data assimilation techniques and position NWS for next generation high performance computing. The Dycore Test Group (DTG) was established with a dedicated team of scientists comprising of various candidate modeling groups and three independent consultants for making recommendations for the selection of non-hydrostatic dynamic core. This presentation will summarize the findings of various tests conducted by DTG and it's assessment of results obtained thus far, and next steps associated with the decision making process.

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18 July 2016

Title: Optimizing Global Hawk flight tracks relative to meteorological features and supplemental observations to maximize TC model intensity and structure forecast improvements
Presenter(s): Peter Black, Cherokee Nation Technologies, LLC
Date & Time: 18 July 2016
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2890
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Peter Black, Cherokee Nation Technologies, LLC

Title: Optimizing Global Hawk flight tracks relative to meteorolog Date, Time Room: Monday July 18th, 2016, at 3pm in Rm 2890 Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. POC: Avichal Mehra Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP , Seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars from EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook as well.

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/507063285 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (312) 757-3121 Access Code: 507-063-285

Abstract: Flight tracks from several Global Hawk flights from 2012-2016 in three field programs will be reviewed relative to feature identification and timing: 1) HS3, 2) SHOUT Hurricane and 3) SHOUT El Nio Rapid Response. This evaluation is being driven by a shift in Global Hawk use from a research platform to an operational platform. Most flights used one of three standard pattern types: 1) Racetrack, 2) Alpha (or Figure 4') and 3) Butterfly, the latter two being flown relative to the moving storm center. A review of recent studies involving use of Global Hawk flight data in TC prediction models suggest that improvements in feature structural definition and model impact can be anticipated based upon pattern re-alignment relative to: 1) supporting aircraft and satellite data coverage, 2) feature orientation, 3) feature motion, 4) environmental wind shear as well as phasing relative to: i) anticipated intensity change times, ii) feature diurnal variation and iii) model Data Assimilation time/ duration. The importance of these considerations vs issues such as observational focus on predicted uncertainty regions in various ensemble model guidance will be briefly commented upon.

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Title: New Techniques in Bathymetric Mapping and Coastal Change Analysis: from UAVs to Satellites
Presenter(s): Christopher Parrish, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geomatics in the School of Civil and Construction Engineering at Oregon State University
Date & Time: 18 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Christopher Parrish, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geomatics in the School of Civil and Construction Engineering at Oregon State University

Sponsor(s): NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and presenter host: Gretchen.Imahori@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. For Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code needed for web.

Abstract: In support of NOAA, NASA and USGS, researchers at Oregon State University are investigating new techniques for coastal mapping, charting and change analysis. New processing methods for bathymetric lidar waveforms are enabling enhanced information about seafloor habitat in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Satellite data is proving useful for mapping bathymetry and assessing coastal change. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), combined with structure from motion (SfM) software are providing new techniques for inexpensive, high-resolution, repeat topographic surveys of coastal areas. This presentation will cover the latest results from ongoing research in these areas and thoughts on future trends in coastal mapping.

Bio(s): Christopher Parrish is an Associate Professor of Geomatics in the School of Civil and Construction Engineering at Oregon State University. His research focuses on full-waveform lidar, topographic-bathymetric lidar, hyperspectral imagery, uncertainty modeling, and UAVs for coastal applications. Chris holds a Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering with an emphasis in Geospatial Information Engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and an M.S. in Civil and Coastal Engineering with an emphasis in Geomatics from the University of Florida. Chris is the Director of OregonView, a statewide consortium under AmericaView, dedicated to applied remote sensing research, STEM education, workforce development, and technology transfer. Prior to joining OSU, Chris served as lead physical scientist in the Remote Sensing Division of NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. He also holds an affiliate faculty position in the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping - Joint Hydrographic Center (CCOM-JHC) at the University of New Hampshire.

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Title: Motivation for a Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) SO2 Initiative
Presenter(s): Mike Pavolonis, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 18 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building - Greenbelt MD, 8th Floor Conference Room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Mike Pavolonis, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR

Sponsor(s): JPSS Science Seminar POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov 877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m40770ded58b2b649f88045e76e9977b8 Meeting number: 747 039 241 Host key: 425213 Meeting password: Jpss2016!

Abstract: SO2 is an abundant volcanic gas that is hazardous to human health, infrastructure and the environment, and is often a very effective tracer for volcanic ash, which is a major aviation hazard. In addition, regular monitoring of volcanic SO2 emissions can help scientists better characterize volcanic unrest, forecast eruptions, and assess the climate impacts of very large eruptions. Despite the importance of SO2 monitoring, JPSS is underutilized for this application, and the existing single sensor JPSS SO2 products from OMPS and CrIS have several important limitations. The UV-based OMPS SO2 loading product is very useful, especially in the presence of dense cloud cover, but is limited by solar zenith angle restrictions (sufficient sunlight is required), a relatively large spatial footprint, and noise. Currently the IR-based CrIS is only being used to generate a yes/no flag when SO2 is suspected. While the spatial footprint of the CrIS is also fairly large, CrIS is capable of providing much more information than a yes/no flag. CrIS can be used to retrieve SO2 mass loading and height, independent of solar zenith angle. Further, VIIRS is capable of quantitatively mapping SO2 with revolutionary spatial detail for a meteorological satellite sensor, but is not being utilized for that application at the present time. VIIRS, however, lacks the spectral resolution and coverage needed to accurately retrieve SO2 mass loading and cloud height, and the detection capabilities are particularly limited in the presence of background cloud cover. Given the limitations of each sensor, JPSS SO2 products should be derived using a combination of VIIRS, CrIS, and OMPS measurements. Fusing information from VIIRS, CrIS, and OMPS will help ensure that NOAA can provide high quality, objectively derived, environmental intelligence on SO2. The SO2 information is critical for volcano monitoring, volcanic ash tracking, and understanding the impacts of volcanic aerosols on weather and climate in the wake of a large eruption. A significant collaborative effort is needed to ensure that an optimal JPSS based SO2 product suite can be created, validated, and utilized in weather, dispersion, and climate models.

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14 July 2016

Title: VDatum: NOAA's Vertical Datum Transformation Tool
Presenter(s): Stephen White, Cartographer, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 July 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Stephen White, Cartographer, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA NGS POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to register for the webinar or join at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8994030776353733377. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (213) 929-4232 Access Code: 226-023-755 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar

Abstract: VDatum is a free software tool being developed jointly by NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS), Office of Coast Survey (OCS), and Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). VDatum is designed to vertically transform geospatial data among a variety of tidal, orthometric and ellipsoidal vertical datums - allowing users to convert their data from different horizontal/vertical references into a common system and enabling the fusion of diverse geospatial data in desired reference levels.

Bio(s): Stephen White is the Program Manager for VDatum, serving as the lead for NOAA's cross-office effort to develop the Vertical Datum Transformation Tool (VDatum). In addition, he works on projects that involve evaluating new remote sensing technologies/systems for integration into NOAA programs, such as the Coastal Mapping Program. A primary focus, has been utilizing topobathy lidar, with the assistance of a vertical datum transformation tool, for extracting consistent, non-interpreted shoreline vectors and shallow water bathymetry.

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Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 July 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: Takeaways from the 13th Int'l Coral Reef Symposium
Presenter(s): Paulo Maurin, NOAA Coral Program, Hawaii Management Liaison; Jason Philibotte, NOAA Coral Program, International Coordinator for Pacific Region; and Bob Richmond, Kewalo Marine Laboratory Director, and ICRS Meeting Organizer
Date & Time: 14 July 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Paulo Maurin, NOAA Coral Program, Hawaii Management Liaison Jason Philibotte, NOAA Coral Program, International Coordinator for Pacific Region Bob Richmond, Kewalo Marine Laboratory Director, and ICRS Meeting Organizer Register at: TBA

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The MPA Center series is co-sponsored by MPA News, OpenChannels.org, and the EBM Tools Network. Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract: ICRS is the primary international meeting focused on coral reef science and management. The Symposium will bring together an anticipated 2,500 coral reef scientists, policy makers and managers from 70 different nations in a forum to present the latest research findings, case histories and management activities, and to discuss the application of scientific knowledge to achieving coral reef sustainability. This 13th iteration of ICRS expands outside its traditional science realm to also include policy and management, with the overall theme of "Bridging Science to Policy." Alongside the symposium, a concurrent Leadership Forum with heads of state from the Pacific are convening to talk about the most pressing issues their local reefs are facing. The presentation will cover outcomes from the Leadership Forum, as well as share the high-level scientific findings highlighted at the conference, drawing direct links to management and policy.

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Title: The Impacts of Numerical Schemes on Asymmetric Hurricane Intensification
Presenter(s): Steve Guimond, Univ.of Maryland/ESSIC and NASA/GSFC
Date & Time: 14 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Steve Guimond, Univ.of Maryland/ESSIC and NASA/GSFC POC: Avichal Mehra Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP , Seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars from EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook as well. Remote Access Go To Meeting 1. GoToMeeting - https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/703126781 Meeting ID: 703-126-781 2. Dial-in Number: 1-866-685-5896 Passcode: 8108134

Abstract: The fundamental pathways for tropical cyclone (TC) intensification are explored by considering axisymmetric and asymmetric impulsive thermal perturbations to balanced, TC-like vortices using the dynamic cores of three different nonlinear numerical models. Attempts at reproducing the results of previous work, which used the atmospheric science community model WRF (Nolan and Grasso 2003; NG03), revealed a discrepancy with the impacts of purely asymmetric thermal forcing. The current study finds that thermal asymmetries can have an important, largely positive role on the vortex intensification whereas NG03 and other studies find that asymmetric impacts are negligible. Analysis of the spectral energetics of each numerical model indicates that the vortex response to asymmetric thermal perturbations is significantly damped in WRF relative to the other models. Spectral kinetic energy budgets show that this anomalous damping is primarily due to the increased removal of kinetic energy from the vertical divergence of the vertical pressure flux, which is related to the flux of inertia-gravity wave energy. The increased kinetic energy in the other two models is shown to originate around the scales of the heating and propagate upscale with time from nonlinear effects. The results of this research indicate that the numerical treatment of small-scale processes that project strongly onto inertia-gravity wave energy can lead to significant differences in asymmetric TC intensification. Sensitivity tests with different time integration schemes suggest that diffusion entering into the implicit solution procedure may be responsible for the anomalous damping of energy. Extensions of this work to analyze the effects of various physical parameterizations will be discussed.

13 July 2016

Title: Runaway Change in the Arctic? Extreme 2016 Temperatures
Presenter(s): James Overland, Oceanographer, NOAA Research Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory and Muyin Wang, Meteorologist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Oceans
Date & Time: 13 July 2016
4:30 pm - 5:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Western Regional Center, Building 3, Room 2104 (Oceanographer Room), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): James Overland, Oceanographer, NOAA Research Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory and Muyin Wang, Meteorologist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Oceans

Sponsor(s): PMEL Seminar POC: Adi Hanein, adi.hanein@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/653131781 You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (571) 317-3122

Abstract: There were extensive record Arctic temperature extremes in January and February 2016 that continued into April. For January, the Arctic-wide averaged temperature anomaly was 2.0 C above the previous record of 3.0 C based on four Reanalysis products. Two regions of low geopotential height were seen as a major split in the tropospheric polar vortex over the Arctic. Warm air advection north of Alaska and central Eurasia reinforced the ridge that split the flow near the North Pole and contributed to the persistence. 2016 shows that there can be major Arctic contributions from midlatitudes. Whether Arctic amplification feedbacks are accelerated by the combination of recent thinner, more mobile Arctic sea ice and occasional extreme atmospheric circulation events from midlatitudes is an interesting conjecture.

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Title: Science On a Sphere (SOS) Cafe: Crowd-sourcing weather reports with mPING
Presenter(s): Kim Elmore, National Severe Storms Laboratory
Date & Time: 13 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SOS room, 1315 East-West Hwy., Silver Spring, Md
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kim Elmore (National Severe Storms Laboratory) Sponser: NOAA Office of Education, Science On a Sphere Point of Contact: erik.macintosh@noaa.gov

Remote Access: none - in-person only

Abstract: Crowd-sourcing weather reports with mPING Weather forecasters have a difficult time depicting, analyzing, and predicting surface precipitation during winter weather events. The National Severe Storms Laboratory has a major initiative to help better classify precipitation based on numerical model and dual polarization radar data. Such a task requires many observations, and too gather these observations, the University of Oklahoma in concert with NSSL hosts the meteorological Phenomena Identification Near the Ground (mPING) project, which uses a smartphone app to collect a large number surface precipitation type observations from citizen scientists. This history of this app and some of its characteristics will be presented. Along the way, the quality of mPING observations is addressed because, if the observations aren't any good there's no point in continuing. A straightforward mPING application is to assess numerical model precipitation type performance, which will be shown, but a more comprehensive application is to use the observations to drive a winter surface precipitation classification algorithm. A candidate approach is presented that explicitly uses these observations to drive an artificial intelligence or machine learning classification technique called a random forest. Random forests are very fast, resistant to over-fitting and are among the most powerful and general artificial intelligence classification tools available. Some random forest results will be shown. Science On a Sphere is a room-sized, global display system that uses computers and video projectors to display planetary data onta a six foot diameter sphere, analagous to a giant animated globe. For more information, visit sosinssmc.education.noaa.gov.

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Title: Species in the Spotlight Series, Part 1 of 9: Species and Overview
Presenter(s): Therese Conant, Fisheries Biologist, Endangered Species Conservation Division, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA
Date & Time: 13 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Therese Conant, Fisheries Biologist, Endangered Species Conservation Division, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is tracy.gill@noaa.gov Note: A PDF copy of the presentation is now available; send request to tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: In May 2015, NOAA Fisheries released the Recovering Threatened and Endangered Species FY 2013-2014 Report to Congress and launched 'Species in the Spotlight', an initiative focused on stabilizing populations of eight endangered species at very high risk of extinction. With this effort we are marshaling our resources to turn around the decline towards extinction of these eight species by focusing efforts to stabilize their populations by 2020 and put them on the road to recovery. In just one year, the initiative has resulted in benefits for the Spotlight Species. Examples of success include California's commitment to extend their Fisheries Restoration Grants Program to the Central Valley to support projects that may benefit Sacramento Winter-Run Chinook and an increase in funding from Maine for culvert removals to increase passage for fish, including Atlantic Salmon.

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11 July 2016

Title: Diversity and evolution of genetic sex determination in fish
Presenter(s): Yann Guiguen, Ph.D., Fish Physiology and Genomics Institute, Rennes, France Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, INRA
Date & Time: 11 July 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) Montlake Auditorium
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Yann Guiguen, Ph.D., Fish Physiology and Genomics Institute, Rennes, France Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, INRA

Sponsor(s): Monster Seminar Jam: Special seminar at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center Contact: Diane Tierney, NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator (Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov) ABSTRACT Sexual reproduction is one of the most highly conserved processes in evolution. However, the genetic and cellular mechanisms making the decision of whether the undifferentiated gonad of animal embryos develops either towards male or female are manyfold and quite diverse. In vertebrates, sex-determining mechanisms range from environmental to simple or complex genetic mechanisms and different mechanisms have evolved repeatedly and independently. In species with simple genetic sex determination, master sex-determining genes lying on sex chromosomes drive the gonadal differentiation process by switching on a developmental program, which ultimately leads to testicular or ovarian differentiation. So far very few sex-determining genes have been identified in vertebrates and apart from mammals and birds, these genes are apparently not conserved over a larger number of related orders, families, genera or even species. To fill this knowledge gap and to better understand genetic sex determination we propose a strategy (RAD-Sex) that makes use of next generation sequencing technology to identify genetic markers that define sex-specific segments of the male or female fish genome. We applied this RAD-Sex strategy in more than 40 rayfin fish species and were able in some of them to delineate sex-specific chromosomal regions and to identify candidate sex determining genes. BIO Yann Guiguen is a fish physiologist working at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA, Rennes, France). He received a PhD (1992) in Physiology from the University of Rennes on sex inversion in the Asian seabass, Lates calcarifer and was recruited as a research scientist at INRA in 1994. He is currently the team leader of the Sex, Oogenesis and Behavior team at the Fish Physiology and genomics INRA Institute, where he is involved in the development of pan-genomic approaches to understand the evolution of sex-determination and sex-differentiation mechanisms in fish. He is a recognized scientist in the fish field for his work on the implication of steroid hormones in the gonadal sex differentiation process, for providing many fish genomic resources including the first genome of the rainbow trout and for the discovery of a conserved sex-determining gene in salmonid species. He is Co-Principal Investigator with Manfred Schartl (University of Wurzburg, Germany) and John H. Postlethwait (University of Oregon, Eugene, USA) of the Phylosex* Project Evolution of Sex Determining genes in Fishes.

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Title: Insights into Earth's energy imbalance from multiple sources
Presenter(s): Dr. Kevin E Trenberth, Distinguished Senior Scientist, NCAR
Date & Time: 11 July 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kevin E Trenberth, Distinguished Senior Scientist (NCAR) Seminar sponsors: NOAA OAR and the NOAA Central Library. Contact(s): Judith Salter, Librarian, NOAA Central Library (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Dr. Emily A. Smith, OAR, Climate Observations Division, Program Manager and Communications Lead (emily.a.smith@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at http://www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: The current Earth's energy imbalance (EEI) is mostly caused by human activity, and is driving global warming. The absolute value of EEI represents the most fundamental metric defining the status of global climate change, and can best be estimated from changes in ocean heat content (OHC), complemented by radiation measurements from space. Sustained observations from the Argo array of autonomous profiling floats and further development of the ocean observing system to sample the deep ocean, marginal seas and sea ice regions are crucial to refining future estimates of EEI. New estimates of EEI and corresponding rates of change of OHC will be presented to highlight major outstanding issues that include lack of sufficient continuity in many OHC estimates. The energy imbalance problem can also be done locally and the framework provides a new way of dealing with surface fluxes in the context of a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere system. For instance, we can estimate observed meridional ocean heat transports observed by the Rapid Array indirectly. Combining multiple measurements in an optimal way holds considerable promise for estimating EEI and thus assessing the status of global climate change, improving climate syntheses and models, and testing the effectiveness of mitigation actions. Progress can be achieved with a concerted international effort. About the speaker: Dr. Kevin E. Trenberth is a Distinguished Senior Scientist in the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. He was a lead author of the 1995, 2001 and 2007 Scientific Assessment of Climate Change reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize which went to the IPCC. Recently his primary research has focused on the global energy and water cycles and how they are changing. His work mainly involves empirical studies and quantitative diagnostic calculations. Trenberth is a primary advocate for the need to develop a climate information system that is an imperative for adaptation to climate change.

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7 July 2016

Title: Mesopelagic fish responses to environmental discontinuities in the California Current Ecosystem: oxygen minimum zones and oceanic fronts (Amanda Netburn)
Presenter(s): Amanda Netburn Ocean Exploration Fellow, NOAA Research Office of Ocean Exploration and Research
Date & Time: 7 July 2016
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Amanda Netburn, Ocean Exploration Fellow with NOAA Research Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (NOAA Knauss Fellow) Seminar Sponsors/POC: NOAA Knauss Fellow Program and the NOAA Central Library. Contact(s): Judith Salter, Librarian, NOAA Central Library (judith.salter@noaa.gov) or library.reference@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at http://www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: Mesopelagic fish responses to environmental discontinuities in the California Current Ecosystem: oxygen minimum zones and oceanic fronts. Throughout the ocean, there are abundant and diverse fishes aggregated at mesopelagic (200-1000 m) depths that are critical for pelagic food webs and carbon transport. Understanding their vulnerabilities to predicted environmental changes can inform ecosystem-based management efforts.These animals encounter environmental gradients, including reduced oxygen at depth and oceanic fronts. There is evidence that mesopelagic fish habitat is limited by hypoxia at depth, and studies have shown that fronts can influence abundance, composition, and reproduction of marine animals. For the first study I will present, I measured activities of metabolic enzymes in mesopelagic fish in varied oxygen conditions throughout the southern California Current Ecosystem to investigate response to declining oxygen. For the second study, I compared the abundance, compositions, and reproduction of mesopelagic fish assemblages at frontal systems. My results suggest that deoxygenation may cause metabolic suppression, while fronts can alter the assemblage structure and reproduction of mesopelagic fishes.

Bio(s): Amanda Netburn is a Knauss Fellow in the NOAA Research Office of Ocean Exploration and Research where she leads the effort to develop water column priorities and sampling protocols within the exploration context. Dr. Netburn also provides policy, engagement, and scientific support to the program. Netburn received her PhD in Oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego in 2016 and her Masters in Marine Conservation and Biodiversity in 2010.

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Title: Hanging by a thread: Seasonal weakening of mussel attachment strength is predicted by high temperature and low pH
Presenter(s): Dr. Laura Newcomb, Program Analyst Fellow, NOAA Research Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes
Date & Time: 7 July 2016
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Laura Newcomb, Program Analyst Fellow with NOAA Research Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes (NOAA Knauss Fellow) Seminar Sponsors/POC: NOAA Knauss Fellow Program and the NOAA Central Library. Contact(s): Judith Salter, Librarian, NOAA Central Library (judith.salter@noaa.gov) or library.reference@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at http://www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug-in (or run the plug-in as a temporary application) for WebEx before the seminar starts. During the presentation, please mute your phone by pressing *6.

Abstract: Hanging by a thread: Seasonal weakening of mussel attachment strength is predicted by high temperature and low pH. Mussel aquaculture is an economically important industry worldwide, where mussels are commonly farmed on lines suspended beneath rafts or long lines. Mussels mold individual tethers, known as byssal threads, forming stretchy attachments to the aquaculture rope or other mussels. These byssal threads are critical in keeping mussels attached to the lines. Weakened byssal threads increase the chance of "fall-off" from aquaculture lines, reducing farm yields. We use laboratory studies to identify two environmental conditions, low pH (below 7.6) and high temperature (above 18 C), that weaken byssal threads in the mussel M. trossulus (native to the eastern Pacific). However, it is unknown whether these conditions are encountered in the field, or if they lead to weak mussel attachment. Therefore, we measure mussel attachment strength and a suite of water conditions including temperature and pH. We find mussel tenacity is stronger in the winter than in the summer. We find high temperature (> 14 C) and low pH (< 7.5) best predict periods where attachment strength is weak. These results suggest ocean warming and ocean acidification may increase fall-off and threaten mussel aquaculture. Monitoring these conditions near farms can identify periods when attachment is expected to be weak and adapting alternative farming practices could produce higher yields.

Bio(s): Laura Newcomb is a Knauss Fellow in the NOAA Research Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes. Dr. Newcomb received her PhD in Biology from the University of Washington in 2015.

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30 June 2016

Title: Biofouling - Mitigation approaches and current solutions
Presenter(s): Hank Lobe, Severn Marine Technologies
Date & Time: 30 June 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 - 2504.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Hank Lobe, Severn Marine Technologies

Sponsor(s): U.S. IOOS (POC: Gabrielle.Canonico@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Instant Net Conference Details: ------------------------------- Meeting Number: 747742192 Meeting Passcode: IOOS Meeting Host: IOOS PROGRAM Join Instructions for Instant Net Conference: 1. Join the meeting now: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=747742192&p=IOOS&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed.

Abstract: The presentation would introduce problems with biofouling and approaches tried to date to deal with it. It will address the limits of present mitigation techniques and technologies and provide an overview of emerging technologies. It will include case studies of deployments and results as they relate to various oceanographic applications. One of the technologies covered will be the ClearSignal passive foul release coating (the speaker represents the developers of ClearSignal), but the presentation will cover other emerging techniques such as UV, liquid sterilization and overall best practices such as streamlining.

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Title: Observations, Ray-tracing, and Data Assimilation in Aerosol Assessment
Presenter(s): Steve Albers, NOAA/ESRL
Date & Time: 30 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Conference Center
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Steve Albers, NOAA/ESRL POC: Jeff McQueen Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP , Seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars from EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook as well. Remote Access Go To Meeting Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/356895621 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 356-895-621

Abstract: Observations, Ray-tracing, and Data Assimilation in Aerosol Assessment S. Albers(1,2), Y. Xie(2) and Z. Toth(2) 1 Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80521; 303-497-6057, E-mail: steve.albers@noaa.gov 2NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Systems Division (GSD), Boulder, CO 80305

Abstract: By tracing rays from natural (Sun, Moon, and other astronomical objects) and artificial (city) light sources and assessing how they are affected by the atmosphere, aerosols, and land / ocean surface, full-color visually realistic images of the environment can be created based on 3D Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) analyses or model forecasts. Simulated Weather IMagery (SWIM) can be compared with observed images (camera or other photometric measurements) to (1) validate existing ray tracing and NWP analyses / forecast algorithms, or (2) assimilate observed images affected by atmospheric, aerosol, and surface variables into numerical analyses (NWP Data Assimilation, DA). As for (1), in clear daytime skies, radiance patterns depend on the aerosol optical depth (AOD, see Fig. 1) and size distributions. The appearance of the sky during twilight, on the other hand, is most sensitive to the presence of stratospheric aerosols. Other relationships and observation platforms will be discussed in the presentation. Since aerosols affect both simulated and observed weather images, we will use DA techniques to synthesize all aerosol related observational information into analysis states expanded by aerosol related 'control' variables. AOD, scale height, single scattering albedo, and other aerosol parameters that are currently manually prescribed using a subjective estimation of visibility will be variationally estimated as 2- or 3D control variables, influenced by aerosol related observations (e.g., camera, photometer, LIDAR, AERONET, aerosonde, satellite) and a 'first guess' forecast from an aerosol resolving numerical model such as GSD's WRF- or FIM-Chem.

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Title: Marine Planning off British Columbia: The Great Bear Sea
Presenter(s): Karen Anspacher-Meyer, Executive Director of Green Fire Productions
Date & Time: 30 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Karen Anspacher-Meyer, Executive Director of Green Fire Productions

Sponsor(s): NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract: Ocean planning is taking off around the world! In the US, the Northeast just released a draft plan, the Mid-Atlantic will do the same at the end of June, and the West Coast has recently started their planning. Come get inspired about this wave of ocean stewardship by watching the new documentary film The Great Bear Sea, which focuses on British Columbia's marine plans. The Great Bear Sea is a wild expanse of ocean where whales, wolves, bears and humans thrive in rich coastal ecosystems. It's also a place where worlds collide - a place full of historic conflicts, emerging struggles over ocean resources, and now, globally leading solutions.

Bio(s): Karen Anspacher-Meyer is the executive director of Green Fire Productions, a nonprofit media production company. Green Fire uses the power of film to move audiences to action and influence decision makers and the public on conservation issues. Karen has produced dozens of award-winning films and implemented effective film distribution and outreach campaigns.

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Title: CILER and GLERL's alliance studying the Great Lakes: Where have we been, and where to from here?
Presenter(s): Bradley Cardinale, Director, Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research, CILER
Date & Time: 30 June 2016
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Lake Superior Hall - Also via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Bradley Cardinale, Director, Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research (CILER) Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: margaret.lansing@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/952290694780898307

Abstract: This seminar will be part introduction, part reflection, and part anticipation. As the new Director of the Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystem Research (CILER), I will take this opportunity to first introduce myself and tell you a bit about my background, interests, and why I am excited to lead CILER in its partnership with GLERL. I will then spend time reflecting on some of the successes we've had meeting sustainability challenges in the Great Lakes, focusing on the role that interactions between academia and government have played in success. I will then turn attention towards the future, and discuss some of the contemporary challenges we face on Great Lakes sustainability, as well as how a new era of collaboration between CILER and GLERL can meet these challenges more holistically that any group of researchers could do alone.

Bio(s): Dr. Brad Cardinale is an ecologist who uses mathematical models, novel experiments, observational studies and meta-analyses of existing data to examine how human activities impact biological diversity, and to predict how changes in biodiversity affect the goods and services ecosystems provide to humanity. His research, teaching, and professional service are all tied together by a common thread, which is to produce and distribute the knowledge needed to conserve and restore the variety of life on Earth. He works mostly in freshwater ecosystems, but frequently extends into marine and terrestrial habitats to gain new insight and find generalities. His research program features two primary branches. The first seeks to identify how changes in biodiversity impact ecological processes that are essential to the functioning of ecosystems, and the goods and services ecosystems provide to society. A second branch of his research focuses on restoration of species and the processes they perform to ecosystems that have been degraded.

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29 June 2016

Title: Valuing Ecosystem Services Following Superstorm Sandy: Restoration and Coastal Protection in New Jersey and New York
Presenter(s): Lou Nadeau, PhD, Vice President/Sr. Economist, Eastern Research Group, Inc.- ERG
Date & Time: 29 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Lou Nadeau, PhD, Vice President/Sr. Economist, Eastern Research Group, Inc. (ERG)

Sponsor(s): NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract: This presentation will focus on work that Dr. Nadeau and ERG performed for NOAA's Office for Coastal Management to assess the economic trade-offs in ecosystem services related to restoration work in the wake of Superstorm Sandy. The project had four main components. First, the project looked at post-Sandy salt marsh restoration work being performed at Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (FNWR) in New Jersey using a choice experiment survey. The choice experiment allowed ERG to estimate how people value salt marsh ecosystem services, but also to assess the value trade-offs that people make between salt marsh ecosystem services. Second, ERG used a contingent valuation method to look at the preferences people have between living shorelines and hardened structure for shoreline protection on Jamaica Bay in New York City. Third, ERG developed a series of guidelines to use applying benefit transfers for valuing restoration decisions and applied the guidelines in two case studies reflecting post-Sandy restoration decisions in Jamaica Bay. Finally, ERG also developed an estimate for the value of carbon-related benefits of the FNWR salt marsh restoration projects.

Bio(s): Lou Nadeau is a PhD economist with Eastern Research Group, Inc. (ERG) in Lexington, MA. For the past seven years, Dr. Nadeau has been assisting NOAA's Office for Coastal Management with using social science to explore coastal and other issues of interest to NOAA. Overall, Dr. Nadeau has 20+ years of experience in applying economic and other social science methods to federal government projects related to the environment.

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28 June 2016

Title: Arctic 2020: Building a Sustained Observing System
Presenter(s): Jeremy Mathis, Director NOAA Arctic Research Program
Date & Time: 28 June 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presented by: Jeremy Mathis, Director NOAA Arctic Research Program (ARP)

Sponsor(s): ACCAP Climate Webinars (https://accap.uaf.edu/webinars)
Tina Buxbaum via e-mail (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu) or call (907) 474-7812.

DIAL-OUT (Audio Option 1) if your computer has a slower Internet connection, no speakers and/or no microphone, OR you would like to ask questions via voice this option will allow the webinar to call you so you can hear the meeting via your phone. - Preferred Phone Option
DIAL-IN (Audio Option 2) if your phone service does not accept incoming calls or you will not be using the adobe connect interface to see the slides or will be listening only. Dial 1-877-248-7649 (US and Canada). Enter conference code: 1655320267 Use this option only if the other two options do not work or if you are only listening to the webinar and not viewing online
USING MICROPHONE (Audio Option 3) if your computer has a fast (DSL, LAN) Internet connection and speakers. Note you will not be able to ask questions via voice (only via chat) with this option.

ABSTRACT
With critical past, and potential future environmental changes affecting Alaska and the Arctic Region, the United States needs to rapidly expand long-term observing of the ice and marine environment across the greater Arctic Ocean Basin, as well as conditions across the state of Alaska. This will allow us to better monitor changes across the region, and support stakeholders with improving prediction capabilities for weather, marine ecosystems, sea-ice, and climate.

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Title: The Chemical Aquatic Fate and Effects (CAFE) Database: Past, Present and Future
Presenter(s): Jim Farr, PhD, Chemist, NOAA/NOS/OR&R Western Regional Center, Emergency Response Division; Adriana Bejarano, PhD, Aquatic Toxicologist, Research Planning, Inc. and Valerie Chu, Staff Informational Specialist, Genwest Systems, Inc./NOAA Western Regional Center, Emergency Response Division
Date & Time: 28 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars Series

Presenter(s): Jim Farr, PhD, Chemist, NOAA/NOS/OR&R Western Regional Center, Emergency Response Division; Adriana Bejarano, PhD, Aquatic Toxicologist, Research Planning, Inc. and Valerie Chu, Staff Informational Specialist, Genwest Systems, Inc./NOAA Western Regional Center, Emergency Response Division

Sponsor(s): NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract: Every year, more than a hundred large oil and chemical spills occur in aquatic environments. These spills can severely impact ecosystems by compromising the health of aquatic plants and animals, and their surroundings. The Chemical Aquatic Fate and Effects (CAFE) Database was designed to aid responders in their assessment of the environmental fate and relative toxicity of the spilled chemical or oil. Toxicity data are summarized in the form of Species Sensitivity Distributions (SSDs), which can be used to characterize the potential risks of the spilled chemical to aquatic communities. CAFE recently released version 1.2 in June 2016, which includes updated fate and toxicity data and the presenters will comment on the planned future direction of the project.

Bio(s): Dr. James K. Farr is a chemist and advises the Scientific Support Team to the U.S. Coast Guard provided by NOAA's Emergency Response Division for oil and chemical spills. He has provided on-site and off-site emergency consultation and scientific support related to the potential consequences associated with oil and hazardous chemical incidents , including hazard characterization and potential risks of chemicals released to the environment. He has been the Team Lead for several software projects including The Chemical Reactivity Worksheet, CAMEO Chemical Database, as well as The CAFE software. Dr. Adriana C. Bejarano is an aquatic toxicologist affiliated with Research Planning Inc. (RPI), and the University of South Carolina where she is an Adjunct Professor at the Department of Environmental Health Sciences. Through RPI, Dr. Bejarano has been part of the Scientific Support Team to the U.S. Coast Guard provided by the NOAA's Emergency Response Division for oil and chemical spills. She has provided on-site and off-site emergency consultation and scientific support related to the potential environmental consequences associated with oil and hazardous chemical incidents, including risk characterization and potential toxicological effects to aquatic receptors, and quantitative reports and analyses of potential levels of concern. Valerie Chu is an environmental scientist and provides software and scientific support for NOAA's Emergency Response Division through Genwest Systems, Inc. She has served as the data manager for the CAFE database and has provided extensive quality assurance/quality control for the CAFE database and other software projects. She has also provided environmental assessments

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27 June 2016

Title: Sea Ice Back to 1850: A Longer Observational Record for Assimilation By Models and Use In Reanalyses
Presenter(s): Florence Fetterer, National Snow and Ice Data Center, CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder
Date & Time: 27 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 - SmConf - 4702
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Florence Fetterer (National Snow and Ice Data Center, CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder)

Sponsor(s): NCEI Arctic Team (POC: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Phone: 1-877-725-4068 (8634769#). Number of callers is limited to 25 on a first come first served basis. For Webcast access go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c

Abstract: Gridded Monthly Sea Ice Extent and Concentration, 1850 Onward is the title of a new data set available from the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center. Observations from 13 historical sources such as whaling ship logs, compilations by naval oceanographers, and analyses by national ice services cover 1850 through 1978, while 1979-2013 ice concentration fields are derived from satellite passive microwave data. The sea ice concentration and source variables are provided in a NetCDF-4 file. The observation-based data product meets a need for longer records to use in reanalysis and climate diagnostic applications. It extends the record of an earlier version of this pan-Arctic data set that is heavily used by modelers, and improves upon it by incorporating newly available historical sources, using a more accurate data set for the satellite era, and by filling temporal gaps using an analog method. The resulting sea ice concentration fields have realistic values and variability throughout the record; in earlier versions, unvarying climatological values often fill gaps. The historical data vary greatly in their observational methods and came to us as both original data (e.g. a transcription of shipboard ice observations), or as observations to which some synthesis or analysis has already been applied (e.g. the Danish Meteorological Instituted yearbooks of charts). Each required different treatment before it could be used in our product, ranging from simple regridding to digitization and interpretation. The current version spans 1850-2013. With it, we can more confidently address questions like "Is the present reduction of sea ice coverage indeed unique relative to the historical record extending back to 1850?" And "Is the rapidity of the retreat of ice in the years since 2000 unique in the longer historical record?" We hope to continue improving the product with refinements to the gap filling method, additional historical sources, and assessment of the consistency of pre and post satellite period data, and yearly updates. About the speaker: Florence Fetterer is with the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and has been NSIDC's liaison to NOAA since 1996. With support from NOAA NESDIS NCEI she manages NOAA@NSIDC, where many of NSIDCs non-satellite and pre-satellite era data sets reside. She is especially interested in developing sea ice data products that can be used by the general public as well as by researchers. Florence has an M.S. in Physical Oceanography from Old Dominion University. See http://nsidc.org/noaa, http://nsidc.org/noaa/news.html and http://nsidc.org/research/bios/fetterer.html for more information.

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24 June 2016

Title: NWS Alaska Region Climate Forecast Briefing
Presenter(s): Richard Thoman,Climate Science and Services Manager, NWS Alaska Region
Date & Time: 24 June 2016
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: 407 Akasofu Building, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Richard Thoman, Climate Science and Services Manager, NWS Alaska Region Seminar

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, Point of Contact: accap@uaf.edu

Remote Access: Register at https://events-na11.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1083313451/en/events/event/shared/1178050388/event_registration.html?sco-id=1487801699&_charset_=utf-8

Abstract: This webinar will review recent conditions and current state of the climate system in and near Alaska and the status of important global climate drivers, review guidance available for the monthly and seasonal scale outlooks and finish up with the official outlooks by NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.

Bio(s): Richard Thoman works as the Climate Science and Services Manager, for NWS Alaska Region Headquarters. He works closely with NOAA line offices and partners throughout Alaska providing information on climate monitoring, analysis and forecasting at the two week to one year time frame

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23 June 2016

Title: Tropical cyclones, derelict fishing gear, and the future of the south Florida commercial lobster fishery
Presenter(s): Amy V. Uhrin, Chief Scientist, NOAA, NOS, OR&R, Marine Debris Division
Date & Time: 23 June 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Amy V. Uhrin, Chief Scientist, NOAA, NOS, OR&R, Marine Debris Division

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine

Abstract: Derelict commercial spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) traps may move hundreds of meters during high wind events, resulting in tissue abrasion, breakage, and often complete removal of critical habitat elements such as seagrass, sponge, and coral. Ghost traps continue to confine lobsters, often resulting in mortality. The legacy of trap debris in the Florida Keys (USA) combined with possible increased inputs of trap debris resulting from tropical cyclone intensification presents an immediate challenge for this fishery where social, economic, and ecological vulnerabilities to disturbance are intrinsically linked. Predictions of percent monthly trap loss in relation to maximum wind speed (km/hr) under three scenarios of tropical cyclone intensification were evaluated across four levels of fishing effort (number of traps used). The scenarios suggest that were Existing fishing effort to be maintained in the coming decades, tropical cyclone-related trap loss could exceed 11 million over 60 years depending upon the rate of storm intensification. The net increase in derelict traps and debris generated from their degradation will only be exacerbated under potential tropical cyclone intensification. This study underscores the need for using scenarios for future exploration of these issues, particularly incorporation of fisher responses to changes in climatic, economic, and management drivers (i.e., storms, market demand, gear reduction) that may affect trap deployment patterns.

Bio(s): Amy joined the Marine Debris Division (NOS/ORR) in June 2015 and serves as the Division's Chief Scientist. Previously, Amy spent 15 years with NOS/NCCOS conducting original applied research focusing largely on seagrass restoration ecology and the role of hydrodynamic drivers in shaping seagrass spatial patterns as well as marine debris issues, specifically derelict fishing gear impacts to benthic and coastal habitats. She holds a BS in Biology from St. Bonaventure University, a MS in Marine Science - Biological Oceanography from the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagez, and is currently working towards her PhD (Ecosystem and Landscape Ecology) at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

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Title: Alternative Livelihood Opportunities for Coastal Communities in the Eastern Caribbean by Eastern Caribbean Marine Managed Areas Network (ECMMAN)
Presenter(s): Joan Norville, Programme Officer, OECS; Roland Baldeo MPA Coordinator, Grenada Fisheries Division; and Michael Savarin, President, Tan Tan Development Corporation, Dominica
Date & Time: 23 June 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - See event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Joan Norville (Programme Officer, OECS), Roland Baldeo (MPA Coordinator, Grenada Fisheries Division) and Michael Savarin (President, Tan Tan Development Corporation, Dominica). Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6950682974112616961

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by MPA News, OpenChannels.org, and the EBM Tools Network. Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract: To relieve fishing pressure and provide supplementary income to coastal communities surrounding MPAs, the Eastern Caribbean Marine Managed Areas Network (ECMMAN) is implementing sustainable, alternative livelihood projects on six islands. Supported by the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), small livelihood grants were made available to qualified applicants selected by a regional committee. Projects range from eco-tourism cooperatives, agriculture projects, mooring sites, and training a network of fishers and vendors to catch and market invasive lionfish. The projects have effectively equipped displaced fishers and community members with the skills and investment needed to launch micro-enterprises. In this webinar we will hear about the Livelihood Support Fund concept and implementation, as well as from the facilitators of two national projects.

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22 June 2016

Title: Use Of Satellites To Detect Flooding And Water Inundation
Presenter(s): Dr. Xiaofeng Li, GST at NESDIS/STAR/SOCD, College Park, MD; Donglian Sun & Sanmei Li, Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA; Mitch Goldberg & William Sjoberg, JPSS Program Office, Lanham MD
Date & Time: 22 June 2016
1:00 pm - 2:15 pm ET
Location: SSMC2, Room 8246, 1325 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Xiaofeng Li, GST at NESDIS/STAR/SOCD, College Park, MD; Donglian Sun & Sanmei Li, Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA; Mitch Goldberg & William Sjoberg, JPSS Program Office, Lanham MD From NWC-STAR Science Seminars: Use Of Satellites To Detect Flooding And Water Inundation This is a 2 part seminar: Part 1: Coastline Detection and Coastal Zone Type Classification From Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery, by Dr. Xiaofeng Li Slides, Recordings Other Materials: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2016/Li20160622.pdf Part 2: Automatic Near-Real-Time Flood Detection using Suomi-NPP/VIIRS Data by Dr. Donglian Sun Slides, Recordings Other Materials: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2016/Sun20160622.pdf Please register for the NWC/NESDIS seminar: Water flooding and inundation from satellites on Jun 22, 2016 1:00 PM EDT at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8787576579837249283 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Contact: David.Kitzmiller@noaa.gov Part 1

Abstract: Near real-time satellite-derived flood maps are invaluable to river forecasters and decision-makers for disaster monitoring and relief efforts. With the support from the JPSS (Joint-Polar Satellite System) Proving Ground and Risk Reduction Program (JPSS/PGRR), a flood detection package has been developed using SNPP/VIIRS (Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership/ Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) imagery to generate daily near real-time flood maps automatically for National Weather Service (NWS)-River Forecast Centers (RFC) in the USA. In this package, a series of algorithms have been developed including water detection, cloud shadow removal, terrain shadow removal, minor flood detection, water fraction retrieval and flooding water determination. The package has been running routinely with the direct broadcast SNPP/VIIRS data since 2014. Flood maps were carefully evaluated by river forecasters using airborne imagery and hydraulic observations. Offline validation was also made via visual inspection with VIIRS false-color composite images on more than 10,000 granules across a variety of scenes and comparison with river gauge observations year-round and NOAA flood outlook and warning products. Evaluation of the product has shown high accuracy, and the promising performance of the package has won positive feedback and recognition from end-users. Part 2

Abstract: Near real-time satellite-derived flood maps are invaluable to river forecasters and decision-makers for disaster monitoring and relief efforts. With the support from the JPSS (Joint-Polar Satellite System) Proving Ground and Risk Reduction Program (JPSS/PGRR), a flood detection package has been developed using SNPP/VIIRS (Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership/ Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) imagery to generate daily near real-time flood maps automatically for National Weather Service (NWS)-River Forecast Centers (RFC) in the USA. In this package, a series of algorithms have been developed including water detection, cloud shadow removal, terrain shadow removal, minor flood detection, water fraction retrieval and flooding water determination. The package has been running routinely with the direct broadcast SNPP/VIIRS data since 2014. Flood maps were carefully evaluated by river forecasters using airborne imagery and hydraulic observations. Offline validation was also made via visual inspection with VIIRS false-color composite images on more than 10,000 granules across a variety of scenes and comparison with river gauge observations year-round and NOAA flood outlook and warning products. Evaluation of the product has shown high accuracy, and the promising performance of the package has won positive feedback and recognition from end-users.

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Title: Scientific Review for NOAA/OAR's Air Resources Laboratory Day 2
Presenter(s): NOAA/OAR Air Resources Laboratory
Date & Time: 22 June 2016
8:30 am - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Public access via webinar - see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR's Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) in College Park, MD will be holding their periodic science review on June 21-22, and those who wish to join online can do so by using the link below. Webinar thru GotoMeeting: https://docs.google.com/a/noaa.gov/forms/d/106huB67HC7uu-nF-rJhXQk4Zl6gsmRFs3ez7ZBT2yfA/viewform?c=0&w=1 Point of contact: Shanie Gal-Edd, OAR Office of Policy, Planning & Evaluation, shanie.gal-edd@noaa.gov, 301-792-1704 Description: Scientific reviews are conducted every 4-5 years to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted at the OAR laboratories. These reviews help to strategically position laboratories in their planning of future science and are intended to ensure that OAR laboratory research is linked to the NOAA Next Generation Strategic Plan, remains relevant to the NOAA research mission and its priorities, and is consistent with NOAA planning, programming, and budgeting processes. Agenda: http://www.arl.noaa.gov/LR2016_Agenda.php

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21 June 2016

Title: Science on a Sphere (SOS) Cafe: El Nino is dead
Presenter(s): Tom DiLiberto, Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 21 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Science On a Sphere (SOS) room, 1315 East-West Hwy., Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Tom DiLiberto (Climate Prediction Center)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of Education, Science On a Sphere Point of Contact: erik.macintosh@noaa.gov

Remote Access: none - in-person only

Abstract: El Nio is dead. Long live El Nio The El Nio of 2015-2016 will go down as one of the three strongest on record dating back to 1950. And it's dead. Come learn about how El Nios form, grow and end, looking specifically at how this El Nio became the behemoth that it did. The talk will make sure to highlight El Nios impacts across the world from drought to floods, and heat waves to cyclones. And we'll even talk about some expected impacts that never arose. If El Nio is over, what's next? A discussion will be had focusing on what the latest ocean observations and climate models are currently telling us. For in El Nios ashes might arise its counterpart, La Nia. Science On a Sphere is a room-sized, global display system that uses computers and video projectors to display planetary data onta a six foot diameter sphere, analagous to a giant animated globe. For more information, visit sosinssmc.education.noaa.gov.

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Title: Scientific Review for NOAA/OAR's Air Resources Laboratory Day 1
Presenter(s): NOAA/OAR Air Resources Laboratory
Date & Time: 21 June 2016
8:30 am - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Public access via webinar - see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR's Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) in College Park, MD will be holding their periodic science review on June 21-22, and those who wish to join online can do so by using the link below. Webinar thru GotoMeeting: https://docs.google.com/a/noaa.gov/forms/d/106huB67HC7uu-nF-rJhXQk4Zl6gsmRFs3ez7ZBT2yfA/viewform?c=0&w=1 Point of contact: Shanie Gal-Edd, OAR Office of Policy, Planning & Evaluation, shanie.gal-edd@noaa.gov, 301-792-1704 Description: Scientific reviews are conducted every 4-5 years to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted at the OAR laboratories. These reviews help to strategically position laboratories in their planning of future science and are intended to ensure that OAR laboratory research is linked to the NOAA Next Generation Strategic Plan, remains relevant to the NOAA research mission and its priorities, and is consistent with NOAA planning, programming, and budgeting processes. Agenda: http://www.arl.noaa.gov/LR2016_Agenda.php

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20 June 2016

Title: CIMSS Near-Real-Time Satellite Data Assimilation and Forecast System for Improving JPSS and GOES-R Applications
Presenter(s): Jun Li, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Date & Time: 20 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building 10210 Greenbelt Rd, Lanham MD 8th Floor Conference Room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series:

Presenter(s): Jun Li, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Sponsor(s): JPSS Science Seminar - Jun 2016 POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mc0be6ca415ef75d2870470aec5dc584e Meeting number: 811 961 830 Meeting password: Jpss2016! Telecon 877-401-9225 pc: 53339716

Abstract: Under the NOAA JPSS and GOES-R program support, scientists from Cooperative Institute of Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) at University of Wisconsin-Madison have recently developed a near realtime regional Satellite Data Assimilation system for Tropical storm forecasts (SDAT). With its core system built with GSI/WRF, SDAT can assimilate GOES, AMSUA/AMSUB, HIRS, MHS, ATMS, AIRS and IASI radiances. In addition, SDAT is able to assimilate satellite-derived total precipitable water (TPW), the layered precipitable water (LPW) and atmospheric motion vector (AMV) products into the system. Using SDAT as a research testbed, studies have been conducted on improving the use of JPSS/GOES-R satellite data in NWP models, for example, how to better perform cloud detection for hyperspectral IR sounder radiance assimilation and assimilate CrIS radiances in cloudy skies, how to better use the high temporal resolution moisture in NWP for local storm forecasts. Since the fall of 2013, the SDAT system has been running in near real time. The 2015 hurricane forecasts in the Northern Atlantic Ocean are analysed for the whole season and compared with other operational models.

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17 June 2016

Title: Responses of Alaskan Groundfishes to Ocean Acidification
Presenter(s): Thomas Hurst, Research Fisheries Biologist with the NOAA-NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in the Fisheries Behavioral Ecology Program, located at Oregon State University's Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, OR
Date & Time: 17 June 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 10153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Thomas Hurst, Research Fisheries Biologist with the NOAA-NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in the Fisheries Behavioral Ecology Program, located at Oregon State University's Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, OR

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. For Audio, dial toll-free (in US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# The webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: In this talk, I will review a series of experimental studies of the effects of elevated CO2 levels on the early life stages of commercially-important Alaskan groundfish. Experiments have been conducted with walleye pollock, Pacific cod, northern rock sole,and speckled sand dab. Initial work examined the direct effects of elevated CO2 on growth, survival, and energetic condition of fish. More recent work has expanded to look at the behavioral impacts of ocean acidification (OA) and the potential interactions between nutritional and physiochemical stress on larvae. These results are being incorporated into analyses of the risk that OA plays to Alaskan communities.

Bio(s): Thomas Hurst is a Research Fisheries Biologist with the NOAA-NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in the Fisheries Behavioral Ecology Program located at Oregon State University's Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, OR. Tom also holds an appointment as a Courtesy Assistant Professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. His research blends field studies and laboratory experimentation to examine the ecology of early life stages of marine species and the constraints imposed on this ecology by the environment. Much of this work focuses on the pervasive influence of temperature variation and ocean acidification on aspects of behavior, habitat selection, growth energetics, and larval ecology. His research is focused on species of commercial importance in Alaska: walleye pollock, Pacific cod, northern rock sole, and Pacific halibut.

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16 June 2016

Title: Lessons from Cognitive Psychology to Guide Science Communication to Managers
Presenter(s): Josh Nowlis, Research Associate, Economic and Social Science Research Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring - FRAM Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA
Date & Time: 16 June 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see login info below) or at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112 Map and Directions
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Josh Nowlis, Research Associate, Economic and Social Science Research Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring (FRAM) Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Webinar Login Info: Join WebEx meeting https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m0d6a604678d61bd6f3268dfb7f8a1388 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code and meeting number: 283 881 307

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Jam, coordinator is Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Abstract: Conventions can get in the way of good communication. Take this abstract as an example. I am expected to write something serious and scholarly, but to what purpose? The abstract is my main opportunity to convince you to attend my talk, and there are other ways to appeal to you besides serious/scholarly. Similar considerations can also improve our scientific advice to managers. Serious/scholarly is only one of several useful tools. This talk will explore the difference in mindset between scientists and managers, with particular emphases on conflicting objectives and on the cognition of uncertainty. And for those prefer them, I promise to include rigorous academic elements in the talk. I hope to see you there!

Bio(s): For more than two decades, Dr. Nowlis has performed science and provided scientific advice to make environmental policies more effective and efficient. He has a doctorate in Ecology from Cornell University, a Master's Degree in Economics from Stanford University, and a Bachelor's Degree in Biology from Brown University. He has worked as an academic, a scientific adviser to diverse interest groups, and more recently, a government scientist. Dr. Nowlis seeks out opportunities to bridge the gap between scientific and policy worlds, and has served in that capacity, both formally and informally, to management bodies throughout the U.S., Caribbean, and Latin America. He is currently a Research Associate on contract to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Northwest Fisheries Science Center, where he collaborates with economists and stock assessment scientists to assess the economic and ecological consequences of recreational fishing policies in Oregon and Washington.

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Title: Finding Forced Trends in Oceanic Oxygen
Presenter(s): Matthew Long, Scientist,Oceanography Section of the Climate and Global Dynamics Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 16 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Matthew Long, Scientist,Oceanography Section of the Climate and Global Dynamics Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Co-authors are Curtis Deutsch and Taka Ito

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. For Audio, dial toll-free (in US and CAN) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# The webcast is at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Dissolved oxygen is critical for marine life and plays an important role mediating biogeochemical cycles. There is very little doubt that human-driven climate warming will ultimately result in widespread oceanic deoxygenation; however, substantial natural variation in dissolved oxygen concentrations and sparse observational records make detection of this forced trend challenging. Here we present a novel Earth system modeling approach to address this detection problem. We analyzed a large ensemble of integrations conducted with the Community Earth System Model. The large ensemble enables us to precisely distinguish between natural and forced variability, thus permitting quantification of the point in time when human-influence is evident in oceanic oxygen. The model suggests that detection of human-driven changes in dissolved oxygen is possible in many oceanic regions now and will be widespread in the next 15 years, though in many cases, this requires better observational records than actually exist.

Bio(s): Matthew Long is a scientist in the Oceanography Section of the Climate and Global Dynamics Laboratory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. He has two degrees in Environmental Engineering from Tufts University, and a PhD in Oceanography from Stanford. Matthew also served two years in the US Peace Corps, teaching high school Physics in Tanzania. His research interests include the interactions of biogeochemical cycles with climate. He works on the development and application of the Community Earth System Model, with a focus on problems related to ocean ecosystems.

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15 June 2016

Title: A unified approach to land modeling
Presenter(s): Martyn Clark, National Center for Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 15 June 2016
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Martyn Clark, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) POC: Youlong Xia youlong.xia@noaa.gov Sponsor EMC seminar. Please invite more people using One NOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP , Seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars from EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook as well. Remote Access by GoTo Meeting https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/963133205 Join the conference call: Call in via telecon: 866-685-5896 Pass code 8108134# Meeting ID: 963-133-205 Abstract This presentation will describe a unified approach to land modeling to enable a controlled and systematic evaluation of multiple model representations (hypotheses) of physical processes and scaling behavior. Our approach, which we term the Structure for Unifying Multiple Modeling Alternatives (SUMMA), formulates a general set of conservation equations, providing the flexibility to experiment with different spatial representations, different flux parameterizations, different model parameter values, and different time stepping schemes. In this paper, we introduce the general approach used in SUMMA, detailing the spatial organization and model simplifications, and how different representations of multiple physical processes can be combined within a single modeling framework. In particular, we discuss how SUMMA can help tackle major modeling challenges, including defining the appropriate complexity of a model, selecting among competing flux parameterizations, representing spatial variability across a hierarchy of scales, identifying potential improvements in computational efficiency and numerical accuracy as part of the numerical solver, and improving understanding of the various sources of model uncertainty.

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14 June 2016

Title: Tracing Deepwater Horizon into Coastal Marine Bacterial Communities
Presenter(s): Tiffany C. Baskerville, PhD candidate, Florida A&M University, Environmental Cooperative Science Center/ NOAA Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions - EPP/MSI, Graduate Research & Training Program - GRTSP Fellow
Date & Time: 14 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Tiffany C. Baskerville, PhD candidate, Florida A&M University, Environmental Cooperative Science Center/ NOAA Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI) Graduate Research & Training Program (GRTSP) Fellow

Sponsor(s): NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web. Abstract. One year after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, samples were collected from Barataria Bay, LA (impacted), Pensacola Bay, FL (moderately-impacted), and Apalachicola Bay, FL (un-impacted) to evaluate spill effects on indigenous bacterial communities. Natural Delta 14 C and del 13 C abundances were used to trace in situ bacterial hydrocarbon remineralization to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Barataria Bay DIC samples were significantly deplete in Delta 14 C (-109.98 to +12.48) relative to that for Apalachicola Bay (+36.31) indicating hydrocarbon remineralization at the BaratariaBay site. Using dual isotope three endmember mixing models we estimate that between 1 to 12% of the respired DIC at Barataria Bay can be attributed to hydrocarbon remineralization. Bacterial abundances were an order of magnitude higher in Barataria Bay when compared to Apalachicola Bay which correlated with higher DOC concentrations at the Barataria Bay site. Clone libraries indicate distinct differences in bacterial community structure between sites due to the presence of known oil degrading bacteria in Barataria Bay and Pensacola Bay. Collectively, these results demonstrate that such a combined biogeochemical and biomolecular approach can be a powerful tool for evaluating oil intrusion into marine food webs. About the Speaker. Tiffany Baskerville is a PhD candidate at Florida A&M University, the lead institution of the NOAA Environmental Cooperative Science Center (ECSC). Tiffany graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology from Fort Valley State University and chose to forego her Master's Degree to enter directly into the FAMU Environmental Science Ph.D. program. Having been born and raised in the coastal community of Hampton Roads, Virginia, she was excited to have the opportunity to learn more about the coastal issues that impact the area she calls home while also integrating her love of science with her desire to serve her community by engaging in meaningful research. As a graduate research assistant in the Aquatic Sciences Laboratory at FAMU, Tiffany has collaborated in several research campaigns including a 3 week Deep Ocean Refractory Carbon Expedition in the Gulf of Alaska led by Dr. Dennis Hansell. Most recently, she was awarded the NOAA EPP-MSI Graduate Research & Training Program Fellowship in which she has partnered with the NCCOS Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research under the mentorship of Dr. Marie DeLorenzo.

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Title: Evaluating the Accuracy of the High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) Model Using Satellite Infrared Brightness Temperatures
Presenter(s): Jason Otkin, CIMSS/SSEC/Univ.Wisc
Date & Time: 14 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jason Otkin (CIMSS/SSEC/University of Wisconsin-Madison) POC: Geoff Dimego geoff.dimego@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s): EMC seminar: Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP , Seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars from EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook as well.

Remote Access: Go To Meeting https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/579474421 Join the conference call: Call in via telecon: 866-685-5896 Pass code 8108134# Meeting ID: 579-474-421

Abstract: Infrared sensors onboard geostationary satellites provide detailed information about cloud top properties and the water vapor distribution with high spatial and temporal resolutions that make them very useful as a numerical weather prediction model validation tool. To promote the routine use of these observations for this purpose, we developed a near real-time GOES-based verification system for the High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) model that provides operational forecasters objective tools to determine the accuracy of current and prior HRRR model forecasts when they are creating or updating short-range forecasts. This capability has become increasingly more important in recent years due to the implementation of rapidly updating numerical models with many overlapping forecast cycles. Besides serving as a useful forecaster model evaluation tool, long-term statistics accumulated using this system also provide an excellent means to assess the accuracy of the cloud and water vapor fields in the HRRR model forecasts. For this presentation, we will describe the capabilities of the near real-time verification system and present results from several ongoing model validation projects. Synthetic GOES 10.7 m infrared brightness temperatures are generated for each HRRR forecast cycle using the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and are then compared to real GOES observations using various statistical methods to assess the model accuracy at each model forecast time. These methods include dimensioned metrics such as root mean square error and bias, neighborhood-based metrics such as the Fractions Skill Score, and object-based verification tools using the Method for Object-Based Diagnostic Evaluation (MODE) system. The model accuracy was assessed for two one-month periods during August 2015 and January 2016. Overall, the results show that the simulated brightness temperatures are often too warm during the first hour of the forecast, indicating that the HRRR model initialization is deficient in upper-level clouds. This warm bias, however, is quickly replaced by a large cold bias due to the rapid generation of upper level clouds, with the negative bias often lasting for many hours into the forecast before the excessive cloud cover dissipates. Detailed analysis of the MODE results showed that the HRRR initialization contains too many small cloud objects, especially during August; however, the number of cloud objects becomes too low by forecast hour 2. This behavior is consistent with the changes in the brightness temperature bias and indicates that the simulated cloud objects become too large after a few hours.

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9 June 2016

Title: A framework to evaluate changes in Pacific halibut bycatch quota allocation in Bering Sea Aleutian Islands groundfish fishery
Presenter(s): Kotaro Ono, Ph.D., Post-doctoral Research Associate, Alaska Fisheries Science Center &University of Washington through JISAO
Date & Time: 9 June 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Presented by: Kotaro Ono, Ph.D., Post-doctoral Research Associate, Alaska Fisheries Science Center &University of Washington through JISAO

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m0d6a604678d61bd6f3268dfb7f8a1388 Join by phone 1-650-479-3207 Access code and meeting number: 283 881 307 NWFS directions: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm ABSTRACT Pacific Halibut is a commercially and economically important species in the Pacific northwest managed jointly by the US and Canada. Since the days of joint venture arrangements with foreign vessels fishing within the US exclusive economic zone, this species has constrained fisheries targeting other groundfish in Alaska. The limited amount of available bycatch quota (called prohibited species catch or PSC) available to these fisheries has resulted in fishermen developing measures to reduce the relative rate of Pacific halibut bycatch in order to improve yields from other stocks. Over the last decade, Pacifichalibut population has been declining and is presently stabilizing. However, during the same period, the PSC has been mostly constant (with a decrease that will go into effect in 2016). This disparity indicates that the proportional impact of the bycatch on the halibut stock was increasing. The extent of this effect on the directed Pacific halibut fishery is unknown but is of obvious concern. Consequently, there is a growing interest in evaluating the extent of this impact and also developing approaches which link Pacific halibut PSC to trends in the overall halibut population. In this talk, we present an analytical framework that will address the impacts of alternative PSC limits indexed to the trends in halibut abundance. These impacts include both the effect on the complex and tightly constrained and monitored BSAI groundfish fishery and the directed Pacific halibut fishery. The multispecies technical interaction model combines the extensive observer data available on species compositions for different mtiers with the assessment and catch limit specification process so that alternative management measures can be more realistically evaluated. BIO Kotaro Ono is a post-doctoral research associate with a joint appointment at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center and the University of Washington through JISAO. He graduated from the University of Washington with a PhD and MS in Fishery Science in 2014. His primary research interests are focused on sustainable fisheries management practices and encompasses data analysis, statistical modelling, stock assessment, and management strategy evaluations.

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Title: Down to Earth: Absolute Gravity at NGS
Presenter(s): Derek Van Westrum, Geodesist, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 June 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Derek Van Westrum, Geodesist, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA NGS POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://global.gotowebinar.com/join/4531525393310386690/185818018. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (914) 614-3221 Access Code: 295-227-719 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar. Webinar ID: 125-467-339

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): Derek van Westrum is a Geodesist at NOAA's National Geodetic Survey focusing on gravity observations and instrumentation. Prior to his position at NGS, he spent 14 years at Micro-g LaCoste specializing in absolute gravimetry. He has a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Colorado.

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Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 June 2016
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: Integrating Ecophysiology and Downscaled Climate Models to Forecast Climate Change Impacts on San Francisco Bay-Delta fishes
Presenter(s): Lisa Komoroske, Ecologist, NOAA/NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Protected Resources Division
Date & Time: 9 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Lisa Komoroske, Ecologist, NOAA/NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Protected Resources Division, and University of California at Davis. Authors of paper: Lisa M Komoroske (1,2 below), Larry Brown (3), and Kenneth Jeffries (2), Richard Connon (2) and Nann Fangue, (2) Affiliations: 1 NOAA NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center 2 University of California at Davis 3 United States Geological Survey

Sponsor(s): NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract: Forecasting impacts on sensitive species and integrating them into climate change assessments is a substantial challenge for biological resource management. This is due to a multitude of factors, including differential sensitivities among species and life stages, detecting sublethal effects on fitness, and mismatches between global climate forecasts and local or regional conservation planning. Here, we discuss how we used ecophysiological and behavioral measures to quantify differential sensitivities to changes in environmental conditions among threatened estuarine native fishes in the San Francisco Estuary, California, and then coupled those results with downscaled climate model predictions to forecast future habitat suitability. Our results indicate certain species and life stages may be at higher risk for impact, providing guidance for management and restoration to focus efforts on mitigating these impacts, in combination with those from other anthropogenic threats. Collaboratively integrating tools and knowledge across disciplines offered a more comprehensive picture of climate impacts on these species. The application of this approach could be similarly useful for other systems and species of conservation concern, particularly those with active management and conservation initiatives.

Bio(s): Lisa Komoroske is a National Research Council Post-Doctoral fellow at the NOAA/NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center in La Jolla, CA. Broadly, her research integrates ecological, quantitative, physiological and molecular approaches to study anthropogenic impacts on sensitive species, ultimately contributing to conservation goals. For her post-doctoral work, she is applying new genomic tools (RAD-Sequencing and capture arrays) to understand fine-scale population stock structure and fisheries bycatch impacts on leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) in the Pacific Ocean. She completed her dissertation in Ecology at the University of California at Davis, focused on climate change effects on threatened endemic fish in the San Francisco Estuary in California, and her Master'\'s in Biology at San Diego State University. During her PhD, she was a California Sea Grant-Delta Science Fellow and an NSF teaching fellow in the Coastal, Atmospheric, and Marine Environmental Observing Studies GK-12 program at Bodega Marine Laboratory (UC Davis).

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8 June 2016

Title: Flash Droughts over the United States
Presenter(s): Dr. Kingtse C. Mo, Climate Prediction Center, NOAA/NWS/NCEP
Date & Time: 8 June 2016
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access or at NOAA's Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Conference Room 2890, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Kingtse C. Mo, Climate Prediction Center, NOAA/NWS/NCEP

Sponsor(s): NOAA Climate Test Bed Point of Contact: Jin.Huang@noaa.gov

Remote Access: GOTO meeting: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/714576893 Meeting ID: 714-576-893 Dial-in number: 1-877-680-3341, Participant passcode: 858747

Abstract: Flash drought refers to relatively short periods of warm surface temperature and anomalously low and rapid decreasing soil moisture (SM). Based on the physical mechanisms associated with flash droughts, we classify these events into two categories: heat wave and precipitation (P) deficit flash droughts. We study flash droughts based on the UCLA/UW P and surface temperature (Tair) analyses and SM and evapotranspiration (ET) reconstructed using land surface models. The base period is from 1916 to 2013. Both types of flash droughts are manifested by SM deficits, which cause damage to crops. Therefore, both are agricultural droughts. The heat wave flash droughts are initialized by the warm air temperature, which increases ET, and decreases soil moisture (SM). The preferred regions for heat wave flash droughts to occur are the North Central, the Ohio Valley and the Pacific Northwest. They tend to occur in the vegetation dense areas. The P deficit drought is initialized by P deficits. The lack of P decreases SM. In the areas where SM and ET anomalies have a linear relationship, ET decreases. That leads to the increase of sensible heat and high temperature. In this sense, high temperatures are the consequence of P deficits. P deficit flash droughts are more common than heat wave flash droughts. They are most prevalent over the southern United States with maxima over the Southern Great Plains and the Southwest. The CFSv2 seasonal forecasts are able to capture the preferred regions for flash droughts to occur. However, the model over forecasts flash drought events of both types in comparison to analyses. Seminar flyer: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/ost/CTB/Forthcoming/CTB_KMo.pdf

Bio(s): Dr. Mo is a senior physical scientist at the Climate Prediction Center/National Centers for Environmental Prediction (CPC/NCEP), having collaboratively worked with the hydro-climate community for 29 years. Her earlier research more focused on atmospheric sciences. She chaired the AMS Science and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) on Meteorology and Oceanography of the Southern Hemisphere for the 6th International Conference on Southern Hemisphere Meteorology and Oceanography in Santiago, Chile in 2000. She actively participated in the North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) and served on the Variability of the American Monsoon Systems (VAMOS) Panel. In 2006, CPC recognized the importance of the water resources management and started to build research activities to support Drought Monitoring and Outlook. Since the monthly drought briefing started in 2007, her work has more focused on drought monitoring and prediction. Dr. Mo is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society.

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Title: Phragmites -- Coming to your backyard: Can anything be done about it?
Presenter(s): Dennis Whigham, PhD, Senior Botanist with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, or SERC
Date & Time: 8 June 2016
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dennis Whigham, PhD, Senior Botanist with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC). Dennis is also the Founding Director, North American Orchid Conservation Center

Sponsor(s): NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
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