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GOES-T Launch Success - photo of Atlas rocket carrying GOES-T satellite during liftoff

GOES-T Launch Success

1 March 2022 - NOAA’s GOES-T, the third in a series of four advanced geostationary weather satellites, blasted into orbit aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 541 rocket at 4:38 p.m. EST on March 1 from NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.

GOES-T will become operational as GOES West and track destructive wildfires, lightning, Pacific Ocean-based storms, dense fog, and other hazards that threaten the U.S. West Coast, Hawaii and Alaska. It will also monitor solar activity and space weather to provide early warnings of disruptions to power grids, communications and navigation systems.

STAR teammates contributed to this launch's success and will be involved in the post-launch testing, ongoing cal/val work and operational implementation of the satellite and its data.

 
ABI Blended 'High Wind Event' Imagery Composite

ABI Blended 'High Wind Event' Imagery Composite

STAR Shines at AMS 2022

18 February 2022 - STAR sends a full complement of presenters to the AMS Conference every year, and STAR’s tradition of participation continued at the 2022 conference. AMS 2022: “Environmental Security: weather, water and climate for a more secure world” ran from 23-27 January as a 100% virtual conference due to concerns about Omicron. AMS 2022 featured an eye-popping 638 sessions, 2,454 talks, and 976 posters.

The STAR Science Seminar Series has published a set of one-page summaries from STAR and CIMSS AMS contributors including 43 talks and 8 posters. There were nearly 100 STAR contributors to these talks and posters, which is 30% of STAR’s entire staff roster! Topics included restoring satellite instruments to full use after anomalies, product improvements in precipitation, rainfall, snow measurement, sea ice, and winds; AI applications in data assimilation; detection of blowing dust from imagery; new user training activities; even the creation of a GOES image displaying the plumes of gas & heat from rockets. The breadth of STAR AMS contributions is impressive, and we thank all the contributors!

 

STAR 2021 Annual ReportSTAR 2021 Annual Report

17 December 2021 - STAR published their 2021 Annual Report this week. This report highlights the variety of our work - hurricane predictions, ocean temperatures, launching new satellites, restoring old satellites, artificial intelligence, volcanoes, drought - STAR's work touches every part of NOAA's remote sensing missions.

 

Shobha KondraguntaShobha Kondragunta’s Banner Year

29 October 2021 - STAR's Shobha Kondragunta's timely work on COVID-driven emissions changes, which included 9 research articles, a website, an article in AGU's EOS and print media coverage, has earned a bumper crop of awards and recognition, including:

  • DOC Administrator's Award
  • Two NOAA Bronze Medals
  • the 2021 NESDIS Collaboration Award
  • Read more
 


GOES-17 ABI Captures Hunga-Tonga Eruption

GOES-17 satellite image: Eruption of underwater volcano Hunga Tonga–Hunga Ha'apai on 15 January 2022 at 4:10 UTC. Location: 20.55 deg S 175.38 deg W
click image to play video

18 January 2022 - At 4:10 UTC on 15 January 2022, the Hunga-Tonga Volcano in the South Pacific erupted. The eruption occurred about 40 miles north of Tonga's capital Nuku'alofa on Tongatapu, the country's main island. Tonga consists of 170 islands scattered over about 700,000 sq km. The archipelago is located east of Australia and northeast of New Zealand. About 100,000 people live in Tonga, the bulk of them on Tongatapu Island.

The underwater volcano Hunga Tonga–Hunga Haʻapai eruption caused waves over 3' to crash into Tonga. Local authorities have confirmed at least one death and communications are crippled due to damage to fiber optic cables, making it difficult to establish the scale of damage. A magnitude 4.0 earthquake accompanied the eruption.

The GOES-17 ABI captured images of the eruption, as seen in this video. The initial dust cloud from the eruption spanned more than 400 miles wide. Tsunami watches were issued to Pacific coastal areas by the National Weather Service, with surf observed to be several feet above expected levels in the Pacific Northwest.



2022 NOAA CoRP Science Symposium - CIRA - Colorado State University - 25-27 July 2022

16 May 2022 - This year’s CoRP Science Symposium will be held in person from July 25 to 27 at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere of Colorado State University located in Fort Collins, CO. The Symposium brings together members from the NOAA and academic community to discuss the latest developments in satellite remote sensing research and applications, targeting multidisciplinary research with a focus on early-career scientists. The Symposium is part of a larger strategy to promote federal and academic partnerships and collaborations.

This year's event will focus on building stronger connections between NOAA's Cooperative Institutes and Cooperative Science Center faculty and students to promote a more diverse NOAA workforce in the future, with an emphasis on CI-affiliated students, postdocs, and junior scientists as conduits for collaboration.

  • Registration is now closed as the event has reached capacity; check the conference web site for updates.



Latest STAR Publications

Updated: Fri, 22 Jul 2022

Title:
Exploring VIIRS Night Light Long-Term Time Series with CNN/SI for Urban Change Detection and Aerosol Monitoring
Authors:
Cao CY, Zhang B, Xia F and Bai Y
Journal:
Remote Sensing 14(13)
DOI: 10.3390/rs14133126
Date:
Jul 2022
Title:
Optimizing the Assimilation of the GOES-16/-17 Atmospheric Motion Vectors in the Hurricane Weather Forecasting (HWRF) Model
Authors:
Lim AHN, Nebuda SE, Jung JA, Daniels JM, Bailey A, Bresky W, Bi L and Mehra A
Journal:
Remote Sensing 14(13)
DOI: 10.3390/rs14133068
Date:
Jul 2022
Title:
Bayesian Deep Learning for Passive Microwave Precipitation Type Detection
Authors:
Orescanin M, Petkovic V, Powell SW, Marsh BR and Heslin SC
Journal:
IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters 19:1-5.
DOI: 10.1109/LGRS.2021.3090743
Date:
Jul 2022
Title:
Arctic Sea-Ice Surface Elevation Distribution from NASA's Operation IceBridge ATM Data
Authors:
Yi DH, Egido A, Smith WHF, Connor L, Buchhaupt C and Zhang DX
Journal:
Remote Sensing 14(13)
DOI: 10.3390/rs14133011
Date:
Jul 2022
Title:
Development and evaluation of the Aerosol Forecast Member in the National Center for Environment Prediction (NCEP)'s Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS-Aerosols v1)
Authors:
Zhang L, Montuoro R, McKeen SA, Baker B, Bhattacharjee PS, Grell GA, Henderson J, Pan L, Frost GJ, et al.
Journal:
Geoscientific Model Development 15(13):5337-5369.
DOI: 10.5194/gmd-15-5337-2022
Date:
Jul 2022

View all of STAR's latest research articles.

 

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