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NOAA Science Seminar Series

NOAA Science Seminar Series

The NOAA Science Seminar Series began in 2004 and is a voluntary effort by over 70 NOAA seminar coordinators to integrate and distribute a list of NOAA-hosted, publicly accessible science seminars. In 2020 we shared listings for over 500 seminars!

  • NOAA Science Seminars Contributors
  • For general questions about the NOAA Science Seminar Series, the calendar, and weekly e-mail, contact Hernan Garcia, Tracy Gill, or Lori Brown.
  • For questions specific to a particular seminar, email the contact listed in the seminar description.
  • During the COVID-19 Pandemic: All NOAA seminars will be presented via webinar only.
 

How to Subscribe

Send an email with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov, or:

Visit: https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and submit your e-mail address to the subscription form. If you have difficulty with subscribing or unsubscribing from the list, please contact us at hernan.garcia@noaa.gov for assistance.

Once you have subscribed, you will receive a weekly e-mail every Monday morning that summarizes upcoming seminars.

 

Add the NOAA Science Seminar Series to your Google Calendar

If you would like to add the NOAA Science Seminar Series to your own Google calendar view:

Add the seminar calendar, screen 1

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  • Open your Google Calendar:
    https://calendar.google.com/
  • On the lower left hand side, look for 'Other calendars'
  • Click the plus sign + to 'Add other calendars'
Add the seminar calendar, screen 2

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  • Click the blue button that says 'Add Calendar'
  • Close the 'Settings' panel for your calendar
  • You should now see the NOAA - HQ - Seminar Series events on your own calendar view.

Listings in Google Calendar Format

Google calendar of seminar listings

 

How to Contribute

 

Past Seminars

All seminar are listed in Eastern Time

2 February 2023

Title: Incorporating salmon behavior into conservation: lessons on predation and bycatch
Presenter(s): Megan Sabal, Ph.D. Fisheries Conservation Scientist, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
Date & Time: 2 February 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Incorporating salmon behavior into conservation: lessons on predation and bycatch

Presenter(s): Megan Sabal, Ph.D. Fisheries Conservation Scientist, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS.NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access:
JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 2761 153 2344
Meeting password: PEujfwth654JOIN BY PHONE: +1-415-527-5035 US Toll Global call-in numbersJOIN FROM A VIDEO SYSTEM OR APPLICATION
Dial 27611532344@noaanmfs-meets.webex.com
You can also dial 207.182.190.20 and enter your meeting number. CAN'T JOIN? CONTACT SUPPORT
https://collaborationhelp.cisco.com/article/WBX000029055Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

ABSTRACT

Pacific salmon face diverse threats, yet an understanding of salmon behavioral ecology is often not fully incorporated into conservation and management. Two threats to salmon populations include predation on vulnerable out-migrating juveniles and fisheries bycatch on adults. In this talk, I will describe how a behavioral ecology perspective can inform creative conservation in response to both threats. To examine out-migrating juvenile salmon antipredator behavior, I designed novel behavioral assays, which found that salmon changed behavior (speed) in response to predator cues, but the pattern of response was context-dependent on salmon origin (hatchery vs. natural) and habitat. Using an optimality model, I further explored the risk-reward tradeoffs between natural and altered shorelines during out-migration. As adults, Chinook salmon are caught as bycatch in the US West coast Pacific hake fishery. We evaluated whether two Chinook salmon depth-use behaviors - diel vertical migration and seeking thermal refugia - influenced bycatch and whether these patterns varied among stocks. Our results suggest that Chinook salmon moved deeper at night and when sea surface temperatures were warm, which increased spatial overlap with deeper-dwelling hake and exacerbated bycatch. Incorporating a salmon behavioral ecology perspective on the issues of predation and bycatch has potential to inform management. For example, restoring habitat to support salmon antipredator behavior, understanding the value and limitations of night fishing restrictions in the hake fishery, and knowledge that Chinook salmon bycatch may intensity under climate change.

BIO
Megan Sabal is a Fisheries Conservation Scientist with ODFW. She completed her Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California Santa Cruz and a B.S. in Environmental Science from Miami University of Ohio. She recently completed a postdoctoral appointment at Oregon State University studying Chinook salmon bycatch in the Pacific hake fishery. Her prior research has focused on salmon ecology including predation, migration, and foraging ecology in both freshwater and marine life stages.
NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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Title: Minimum Information Management and Price-Abundance Relationships in a Fishery
Presenter(s): Akbar Marvasti, Economist, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, NOAA
Date & Time: 2 February 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Minimum Information Management and Price-Abundance Relationships in a Fishery (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s): Akbar Marvasti, Economist, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA's Central Library (NCL)Seminar Contacts: Abby Furnish (abigail.furnish@noaa.gov) and Library SeminarsLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6654803351787252063

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.


Abstract: We explore the information content of dockside prices and fishing costs in the estimation of stock abundance. We find a statistically significant correlation between biometric estimates and changes in a price-based indicator that is robust to the inclusion of confounding factors.Keywords: Forecasting, Bayesian VAR, MIDAS


Bio(s): Akbar Marvasti has been working as an economist at the SEFSC since 2010. He has taught at a few universities including University of Miami, University of Southern Mississippi and Pomona College in the past. His current research focus is on seafood trade, insurance, offshore oil rigs and wind energy.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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Title: Subseasonal Precipitation Forecasts of Opportunity over Southwest Asia Related to ENSO and the MJO
Presenter(s): Dr. Melissa Breeden, NOAA Climate and Global Change C&GC Postdoctoral Program
Date & Time: 2 February 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Subseasonal Precipitation Forecasts of Opportunity over Southwest Asia Related to ENSO and the MJO

Presenter(s): Dr. Melissa Breeden, NOAA Climate and Global Change (C&GC) Postdoctoral Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA Climate Program Office and The Cooperative Programs for the Advancement of Earth System Science (CPAESS)

Seminar Contacts: clara.deck@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1250484895666327568

Abstract: Southwest Asia is a semi-arid region that includes several food-insecure countries where cool season precipitation determines the water available for agriculture and consumption. Consequently, subseasonal precipitation forecasts in support of the Famine Early Warning Systems Network are provided for southwest Asia from November to May. Forecasts are generated using a linear stochastic model " namely a linear inverse model " which can assess the confidence of its own forecasts based on the forecast signal-to-noise ratio. We find that forecasts with high confidence are more skillful than the remaining forecasts, and that the likelihood of a high confidence forecast increases related to Nio3.4 and RMM index values, used to consider El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) events of appreciable amplitude. Consistent with past research, La Nia conditions and MJO phases 2-3 often precede anomalously dry forecasts, while El Nio conditions and MJO phases 6-7 precede anomalously wet forecasts.This webinar is part of a series featuring NOAA Climate and Global Change (C&GC) Fellows in the NOAA Science Seminar Series. C&GC is supported by NOAA's Climate Program Office and managed by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR).

Bio(s): Dr. Melissa Breeden is a research scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at CU Boulder and the NOAA Physical Sciences Laboratory, where she studies subseasonal-to-seasonal prediction and predictability of variables relevant to hydroclimate. Before joining CIRES in 2021, Melissa was a NOAA Climate and Global Change postdoctoral fellow at the NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory, where she studied the variability of deep stratosphere-to-troposphere exchange. She earned her B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2013 and 2018, respectively.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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6 February 2023

Title:
New
Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, February 2023: Improving Atmospheric Models by Accounting for Chaotic Physics, and Neural network-based methods to post-process probabilistic weeks 3-4 precipitation accumulation forecasts
Presenter(s): Prashant Sardeshmukh, CIRES, University of Colorado, and Rochelle Worsnop, CIRES, University of Colorado
Date & Time: 6 February 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Improving Atmospheric Models by Accounting for Chaotic Physics, and Neural network-based methods to post-process probabilistic weeks 3-4 precipitation accumulation forecasts



Presenter(s): Dr. Prashant D. Sardeshmukh, CIRES, University of Colorado; Dr. Rochelle Worsnop, CIRES, University of Colorado



Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Weather Program Office S2S Program and NOAA NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration Modeling Program Division

Seminar Contacts: Mark Olsen, mark.olsen@noaa.gov



Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/8426465125700931856



Abstract: This monthly webinar series was created to share ongoing work within NWS and OAR at the Weeks 3-4 and S2S timescales. We would like to foster a relaxed, informal dialogue among forecasters, modelers and researchers. This month, Dr. Prashant Sardeshmukh will speak about "Improving Atmospheric Models by Accounting for Chaotic Physics." Dr. Rochelle Worsnop will speak about "Neural network-based methods to post-process probabilistic weeks 3-4 precipitation accumulation forecasts."



Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available on the Weeks 3-4/S2S Webinar Series website: https://vlab.noaa.gov/web/weeks-3-4-s2s-webinar-series



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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7 February 2023

Title:
New
Impacts and Dynamics of Hurricane-induced Ocean Adjustments along the U.S. Southeast coast
Presenter(s): Kyungmin Park, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Date & Time: 7 February 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Impacts and Dynamics of Hurricane-induced Ocean Adjustments along the U.S. Southeast coast

Presenter(s): Kyungmin Park (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar contact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US) +1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: Oceanic adjustments associated with a hurricane have received less attention than direct hurricane impacts (e.g., wind, pressure and precipitation), although they play critical roles in determining coastal sea levels. The main goals of this study are to develop multi-scale, three-dimensional, high-resolution coastal models (SHYFEM and SCHISM) to investigate the spatiotemporal impacts and dynamics of the oceanic adjustments during and after hurricane events (e.g., Hurricanes Matthew in 2016 and Dorian in 2019). In the study, I reveal the importance of relative peak timing between oceanic forcing (e.g., change in Gulf Stream, Ekman transport and coastally trapped waves) and local atmospheric forcing (e.g., wind and pressure forcing) on the U.S. Southeast coast. Importantly, the variability of the peak timing can control storm surges by increasing the peak level by up to 30 % for Hurricane Matthew (2016) and 50 % for Hurricane Dorian (2019). In the following study, I expand the numerical modeling capability and domain over the entire U.S. East Coast to examine the shelf-scale high water levels in a post-hurricane period. Numerical experiments reveal that oceanic adjustments to hurricane forcing determine the magnitude and persistency of the shelf-scale high water levels for several weeks. In contrast, atmospheric forcing controls the fluctuation of the abnormal water levels along the coast. The abnormal water levels can pose potential flood damage even after a hurricane because the post-hurricane water levels are significant and comparable to the projected 100-year flood level induced by future tropical cyclones (44 cm). The lessons learned from the studies provide new insights into the extreme water levels related to the oceanic adjustments, both during and after hurricane events, and fill critical knowledge gaps and data needs necessary to inform best practices to scientists, engineers and policymakers.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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8 February 2023

Title: Multidecadal Intensification of Atlantic Tropical Instability Waves
Presenter(s): Dr. Philip Tuchen, NRC Postdoctoral Research Associate, NOAA/AOML Physical Oceanography Division, PhOD
Date & Time: 8 February 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Multidecadal Intensification of Atlantic Tropical Instability Waves

Presenter(s): Dr. Philip Tuchen, AOML PhOD/NRC

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Atlantic Oceanic Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

Seminar Contact(s): Matthieu Le Henaff; matthieu.lehenaff@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access:

Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://meet.goto.com/828343949

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (669) 224-3412

Access Code: 828-343-949

Get the app now and be ready when your first meeting starts:
https://meet.goto.com/install

Abstract: In the equatorial Atlantic, temperature, salinity, sea level anomaly, and ocean velocity variations on time scales of tens of days are dominated by the presence and westward passage of large-scale Tropical Instability Waves (TIWs). Several decades of satellite and surface drifter data as well as moored velocity observations show a long-term intensification of TIW activity in all of these variables in the tropical North Atlantic where TIWs are most pronounced. We find that increased high-frequency flow variability, and not long-term changes of the mean zonal current system, drives the TIW intensification. One consequence of increased Atlantic Ocean TIW activity is the corresponding intensification of the horizontal eddy temperature advection pattern in boreal summer leading to stronger cooling of surface waters north of the equator. This equates to an increase in TIW-driven sea surface temperature cooling of 74% 53% in the tropical North Atlantic during the last 3 decades. The presented multidecadal TIW trends are strongly modulated by interannual variations such as the 2021 Atlantic Nio. We further explore potential large-scale drivers of the TIW intensification, including changes in high-frequency wind variability.

Bio(s): Dr. Tuchen received his Ph.D. in 2020 from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany. After a Postdoc period at the same institute, he joined NOAA/AOML in January 2022 as a Postdoc supported by an NRC Postdoctoral Research Associateship Award.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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Title:
New
Participatory Modeling to Support Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 8 February 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Participatory Modeling to Support Ecosystem-Based Fisheries ManagementNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Carissa Gervasi, Postdoctoral Associate and NOAA Affiliate, Southeast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC) & University of Miami

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4702291695240836368
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: In this research we used participatory modeling to gain an understanding of Gulf of Mexico red snapper populations in the context of the larger social-ecological system in which they occur. Based on information collected from fishery stakeholders, we identified several factors that may affect red snapper population dynamics and the stock assessment process. Participatory models also allowed us to assess downstream effects and feedback loops associated with various current and potential future management actions. Our research highlights the benefits of participatory modeling for Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management.

Keywords: Participatory modeling, red snapper, EBFM

Bio(s): Carissa Gervasi is a postdoctoral associate and NOAA Affiliate of the Southeast Fisheries Science Center through the University of Miami. As part of the Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) team, Carissa works closely with stakeholders and uses socio-ecological methods to improve fisheries stock assessments and better inform Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management. She earned her Ph.D. in Natural Resource Management in 2022 from Florida International University.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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Title: Estimating phytoplankton size fractions using satellite models in the Chukchi and Bering seas
Presenter(s): Dr. Jens M. Nielsen, Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 8 February 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Estimating phytoplankton size fractions using satellite models in the Chukchi and Bering seas

Presenter(s): Dr. Jens M. Nielsen, Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)


Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://meet.goto.com/654250301
or by phone, Access Code: 654-250-301 United States: +1 (571) 317-3129 Canada: +1 (647) 497-9391
Location: Webinar

Abstract: Here, we compare empirical models which can be used with satellite ocean color data to estimate phytoplankton size-fractionated chlorophyll in the Bering and Chukchi seas. We compared models using total chlorophyll as the predictor for three size-fractions (<5, 5-20 and > 20 m). First we assess existing size fraction models, with their global original parameters, and compare them to models which were regionally-tuned using 266 in-situ surface chlorophyll samples for each size, collected in 2017 and 2019. In addition, we tested if other input variables (e.g. sea surface temperature (SST), spatial location) improve predictions of chlorophyll size fractions.

Finally, we assess and compare the utility of general additive and Random Forest models. Comparison among models show the regionally tuned models perform best regardless of size fraction, with total chlorophyll being the most important predictor. SST appears to improve the models primarily for the smallest size fraction. Future implementation of these models with long-term satellite ocean color data can help us understand the effects of long-term environmental change in the Bering and Chukchi ecosystems, and aid the prediction of future trophic scenarios, which is necessary for ecosystem management.

Bio(s): I am an aquatic ecologist. Focusing primarily on plankton ecology, my research aims to understand community and trophic dynamics in ecosystems. I am further interested in how chemical, physical and biological factors influence the functioning of ecosystems, and how ecological research can inform ecosystem management. My current research focuses on analyzing long-term ichthyoplankton data in an effort to develop biological indicators of ecosystem changes along the US west coast from California to Alaska. My past research has centered on food web ecology and diet tracing techniques through a variety of empirical, modeling and syntheses studies. Before joining NOAA, I worked as a post-doctoral fellow at University of Washington and at Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom. I hold a PhD in Marine Ecology from Stockholm University, Sweden.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php. For more information visit: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

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Title: Reconstructing the Flower Garden Banks from the Inside Out
Presenter(s): Bill Precht, Director of Marine and Coastal Programs, Dial Cordy and Associates, Inc.
Date & Time: 8 February 2023
7:30 pm - 8:30 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Reconstructing the Flower Garden Banks from the Inside Out

Presenter(s): Bill Precht, Director of Marine and Coastal Programs, Dial Cordy and Associates, Inc.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8030943308200006491

Abstract: Who knew, that hidden beneath the beautiful reefs we know and love, lay ancient reefs of a different nature? In 2006-2007, while conducting annual long-term monitoring activities at the Flower Garden Banks, researchers discovered remnants of a fossil reef comprised of elkhorn and staghorn corals, species almost non-existent on our reefs today. This discovery has dramatically altered our understanding of reef development at the Flower Garden Banks and the response of coral communities to changing climate through time.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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9 February 2023

Title: Temporal dynamics of fish migration
Presenter(s): Stephane Gauthier Ph.D., Research Scientist, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, DFO
Date & Time: 9 February 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Temporal dynamics of fish migration

Presenter(s): Stphane Gauthier, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, DFO

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS.NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access:
JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 2761 153 2344
Meeting password: PEujfwth654JOIN BY PHONE: +1-415-527-5035 US Toll Global call-in numbersJOIN FROM A VIDEO SYSTEM OR APPLICATION
Dial 27611532344@noaanmfs-meets.webex.com
You can also dial 207.182.190.20 and enter your meeting number. CAN'T JOIN? CONTACT SUPPORT
https://collaborationhelp.cisco.com/article/WBX000029055Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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Title: NOAA CoastWatch: Sound and Color; Seagrass Mapping
Presenter(s): Ryan Vandermeulen, NOAA; Megan Coffer, GST
Date & Time: 9 February 2023
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title 1: Sound and Color " An Immersive Dive into Music Generated from Satellite Data

Presenter 1: Ryan Vandermeulen, NMFS

Abstract 1: In this art-science crossover, we experimented with translating satellite data used to study the Earth's oceans into music, offering a unique accessibility and perspective on a traditionally visually based branch of science. With no underlying subjectivity, the data creates natural compositions, a mixture of chaos and uncertainty, but also a sophisticated order, representing the product of life and photosynthesis in the ocean.

Title 2: Providing a Framework for Seagrass Mapping in Coastal Systems Using High Spatial Resolution Satellite Imagery

Presenter 2: Megan Coffer, GST

Abstract 2: Satellite imagery from Maxar's WorldView-2 and WorldView-3 high spatial resolution, commercial satellite platforms was leveraged to provide a consistent classification approach for monitoring seagrass at eleven study areas across the continental United States, representing geographically, ecologically, and climatically diverse regions. Satellite classification performed best in areas of dense, continuous seagrass compared to areas of sparse, discontinuous seagrass and provided a suitable spatial representation of seagrass distribution within each study area.

Sponsor(s): NOAA CoastWatch (STAR)

Seminar Contact(s): Victoria.Wegman@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet link: https://meet.google.com/uco-uboz-cmk
Or dial: (US) +1 406-838-3189 PIN: 768 242 663#

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

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13 February 2023

Title:
New
Connecting Ancestral Memory Through the History and Archaeology of Slave Ships
Presenter(s): Kamau Sadiki, Diving With A Purpose
Date & Time: 13 February 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Submerged NC: Connecting Ancestral Memory Through the History and Archaeology of the So Jos Paquete de Africa and the Clotilda Slave Shipwrecks



Presenter(s): Kamau Sadiki, Board of Directors member and Lead Instructor with Diving With A Purpose



Sponsor(s): NOAA, ONMS, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary and the NC Office of State Archaeology

Seminar Contact(s): Shannon.Ricles@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register
at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3686317669578082646

Abstract: On December 27th, 1794, the slave ship So Jos Paquete de Africa crashed into the rocks off Clifton Beach in Cape Town, South Africa, 212 of more than 500 captured Africans lost their lives. In June 2015, the Slave Wrecks Project, a partnership between the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American Culture (NMAAHC), Izeko Museums of South Africa, George Washington University, and Diving With a Purpose (DWP), announced the discovery of the So Jos Paquete de Africa shipwreck. It represented the first slave shipwreck ever discovered that sunk with captured Africans on board.

On July 9, 1860, the Clotilda sailed into the Mobile Bay, ending an illegal mission as the last slave ship to bring captured Africans into the U.S. to be enslaved. There were 110 imprisoned human souls from present day Benin in its cargo hold. In June 2018, the wreckage of the Clotilda was located in the Mobile River.

Join Kamau Sadiki as he talks about his participation in the underwater archaeological work on the wrecks of the So Jos Paquete de Africa and the Clotilda as a strategic partner with the Slave Wrecks Project, SEARCH Inc., and NMAAHC. The presentation will highlight the work of DWP, a non-profit organization of scuba divers whose primary mission is to bring back into memory the stories of shipwrecks involved in the commodification and enslavement of Black bodies. He will also explore the intersectionality of transoceanic slave trade systems and the making of the modern world through the histories and wrecking events of the So Jos Paquete de Africa and the Clotilda shipwrecks, two critically important ships of the 18th and 19th centuries. Additionally, the meaning of memory and cultural heritage in the context of the Transatlantic Era of African Enslavement will be discussed, along with highlighting a few other significant slave shipwrecks of importance during this period.

Bio(s): Kamau Sadiki is a Board of Directors member and Lead Instructor with Diving With A Purpose (DWP), an organization committed to resurrecting the stories of shipwrecks involved in the Transatlantic Era of African Enslavement (TEAE) through underwater archaeology documentation. He is a certified Professional Association of Dive Instructors (PADI) Divemaster with over 1,400 logged SCUBA dives.Kamau was featured in the cover story of the March 2022, National Geographic magazine and companion podcast entitled Into the Depths that explores the work of DWP and the exceptional journey of NatGeo Explorer Tara Roberts as she follows Black scuba divers across the globe in search of slave shipwrecks. Kamau has actively worked on the search and underwater documentation of five TEAE shipwrecks, including the pirated ship Guerrero in southern Florida.Kamau was a member of the archaeology field team that confirmed the location of the TEAE shipwreck Clotilda in the Mobile River in Alabama, the last ship to bring captured Africans into the U.S. He is one of only two African-American divers that have entered into an actual cargo hold of a TEAE shipwreck, the space in which captured Africans experienced the terror and trauma of the Atlantic Middle Passage crossing. He is featured in the October 2022 Netflix release of the documentary film DESCENDANT that tells the story of the Clotilda descendant community of Africatown near Mobile, Alabama.Kamau has conducted numerous lectures and presentations on TEAE shipwrecks, memory and resistance. He has worked on multiple shipwreck sites around Mozambique Island, Mozambique, South Africa, and shipwrecks in the NOAA Thunder Bay and Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuaries and Biscayne National Marine Park off the southern Florida coast, Cahuita National Park, Costa Rica, and in St. John, US Virgin Islands.

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; once captioned it will be hosted on the archived webpage: https://monitor.noaa.gov/gallery/webinar-archive.html.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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Title: Arctic Report Card: Background and Key Finding
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP Climate Specialist, John Walsh, ACCAP Co-Investigator and Climate Scientist, Robb Kaler, USFW Migratory Bird Management
Date & Time: 13 February 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Arctic Report Card: Background and Key Finding

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman (ACCAP Climate Specialist), John Walsh (Climate Scientist) and Robb Kaler (USFW Migratory Bird Management)

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/arctc-report-card-2022/

Abstract: During this month's VAWS webinar, we will review the process used to create the Arctic Report Card, the value of the information that is provided, and key findings from this year's report. The Arctic Report Card checks in annually on the state of the Arctic by examining key vital signs, ranging from air and ocean temperature to sea ice and snow. The report also discusses emerging topics like increased Arctic ship traffic. It is supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration with international author teams and released at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union.


Bio(s): Rick Thoman is the Alaska Climate Specialist with ACCAP and has many years of experience producing reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities, and the media.

John Walsh is an expert in Arctic climate, weather, climate change adaptation and sea ice. He specializes in climate modeling, addressing regional vulnerabilities, as well as downscaling models, designing research studies, and developing, testing, and evaluating research information products and tools.

Robb Kaler joined the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2010 and works as a seabird specialist in the Division of Migratory Bird Management in Anchorage.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

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14 February 2023

Title: Moose on the Move: Science to Prevent Moose-Vehicle Collisions in a Changing Climate
Presenter(s): Calum Cunningham, University of Washington
Date & Time: 14 February 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Moose on the Move: Science to Prevent Moose-Vehicle Collisions in a Changing Climate

Presenter(s): Calum Cunningham, University of Washington

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/limiting-moose-vehicle/

Abstract: Wildlife-vehicle collisions imperil humans, wildlife and property. Collisions with moose are the most consequential form of collision across much of Alaska and Canada, and they are likely influenced by the effect of snow on moose movements. This webinar will draw a link between seasonal changes in driving difficulty and moose movements that lead to a predictable spike in moose-vehicle collisions during winter. We can use this knowledge to predict the times and places where collision risk is highest, and ultimately reduce avoidable human and animal suffering.

Bio(s): Dr Calum Cunningham is a wildlife ecologist and postdoctoral researcher at the University of Washington. His work investigates the effect of rapidly changing snowscapes on the movements, distributions and interactions among wildlife species.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

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15 February 2023

Title: Making eDNA Count - Towards Quantitative Metabarcoding
Presenter(s): Dr. Zachary Gold, Group Lead, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Omics Program, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 15 February 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Making eDNA Count - Towards Quantitative MetabarcodingPart of the NOAA Omics Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Zachary Gold, Group Lead, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) Omics Program, Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s): NOAA Omics Working Group

Seminar Contact(s): Katharine Egan, NOAA 'Omics Coordinator, noaa.omics@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1136700837965059421

Abstract: Metabarcoding data from environmental DNA (eDNA) and microbiome studies provide important information for ecology, conservation, management, and health. Presently, metabarcoding studies struggle to link genetic observations to underlying biology in a quantitative way, but many applications require quantitative information about the taxa or systems under scrutiny. As metabarcoding studies proliferate in ecology following decades of microbial and microbiome work using similar techniques, it becomes more important to develop ways to make them quantitative to ensure that their conclusions are adequately supported. Here we link previously disparate sets of techniques for making such data quantitative, showing that both the underlying PCR mechanism and the subsampling processes explain the observed patterns of amplicon data in a general way. Through simulations and empirical data we demonstrate that, for a given species, the biological signal (observed read counts) and noise (rate of non-detections among technical replicates) are a function of (1) deterministic amplification biases during PCR and (2) stochastic sampling of amplicons during sequencing " both of which we can model " but also by (3) stochastic sampling of rare molecules prior to PCR, which remains a frontier for quantitative metabarcoding. Our approach opens the door to improving the use of metabarcoding data in a wide range of applications in ecology, public health, and related fields. Specifically, we use this framework to 1) demonstrate the application to a set of 23-year longitudinal CalCOFI ichthyoplankton samples and 2) explore Cook Inlet Beluga seasonal foraging patterns alongside changes in anadromous fish assemblage abundances. Our process based modeling framework for deriving quantitative estimates from eDNA metabarcoding opens the door to reconstructing the dynamics of species assemblages from modern and archived samples worldwide.

Bio(s): Zachary Gold is the new 'Omics Group Lead at the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle leading the development and application of genomic methods to understanding how marine ecosystems are responding to warming, ocean acidification, and hypoxia. Previously, he served as a jointly appointed scientist with the Southern California Coastal Watershed Research Project and California Cooperative Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) leading the application of eDNA efforts to Southern California marine ecosystem monitoring. Before working in San Diego, Zack was postdoctoral researcher at CICOES at the University of Washington and the Northwest Fisheries Science Center at NOAA working with Dr. Kim Parsons and Prof. Ryan Kelly using eDNA to better understand the trophic ecology and foraging behavior of endangered Cook Inlet Beluga Whales. He received his Ph.D. from UCLA in 2020 under Professor Paul Barber developing and optimizing eDNA efforts to survey inside and outside of Southern California Marine Protected Areas. In 2015, Zack graduated with a B.S. in Marine Biology with Honors from Stanford University. As an avid underwater photographer, former ocean lifeguard, and National Geographic Young Explorer growing up in Santa Monica, he has a deep passion for coastal communities and the marine environment.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of this presentation will be made available on the NOAA Omics website. View past omics seminar recordings here: https://sciencecouncil.noaa.gov/NOAA-Science-Technology-Focus-Areas/NOAA-Omics

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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Title:
New
AI-aided Projection Methods for High-fidelity Simulation of Incompressible Flows
Presenter(s): Prof. Qinghai Zhang, Zhejiang University
Date & Time: 15 February 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Hybrid
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: AI-aided Projection Methods for High-fidelity Simulation of Incompressible Flows

Presenter(s): Prof. Qinghai Zhang, Zhejiang University

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Building 3, Seattle, WA 98115

Seminar Contact(s): Adi Hanein, adi.hanein@noaa.gov, 206-526-6810

Remote Access: https://meet.goto.com/731400325You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (408) 650-3123
Access Code: 731-400-325

Abstract: I will start with internal-wave phenomena such as Saint Andrew's Cross (SAC) in density-stratified flows to motivate the need of high-order efficient numerical solvers for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and Boussinesq equations. Then we will discuss the main ideas of GePUP, a family of fourth-order projection methods that retains a number of important physical properties such as the decay of kinetic energy. Furthermore, GePUP has been augmented to adaptive mesh refinement, parallel computing, and complex geometries with the help of artificial intelligence and machine learning. Results of numerical experiments for SAC and a few other problems confirm the high fidelity of GePUP. This talk will focus on the reasons and applications of the proposed numerical tools rather than proofs and technical details.

Bio(s): Qinghai Zhang got his bachelor and master degrees both in hydrodynamics at Tsinghua University and obtained his Ph.D. in coastal engineering at Cornell University. He then proceeded to pursue his interests in computational mathematics by doing postdocs at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and University of Utha. He is now the chair professor of the department of computational mathematics at Zhejiang University. His work focuses on numerical studies of multiphase flows. He has published dozens of papers in prestigeous Journals such as SIAM Review, PNAS, Math. Comput., SIAM J. Numer. Anal., SIAM J. Sci. Comput., CMAME, J. Comput. Phys., and Coastal Engr.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: This presentation will be recorded. By joining and participating in the meeting consent is being given to the recording. The recording will be made available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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Title: Exploring a Future Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Tom Bright, retired Director, Texas Sea Grant
Date & Time: 15 February 2023
7:30 pm - 8:30 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Exploring a Future Sanctuary

Presenter(s): Tom Bright, retired Director, Texas Sea Grant

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/336049664116678485

Abstract: For three decades, between 1960 and 1990, researchers explored the reefs and fishing banks off Texas and Louisiana using scuba tanks and submarines. They even contemplated installing an underwater habitat that would allow them to live and work underwater for extended periods of time. All this was done largely to satisfy their curiosity, but also to protect and conserve. And then, in 1992, we established a sanctuary! Join us for a trek down memory lane with Tom Bright, father of Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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16 February 2023

Title: Pilina, Indigenous Literacy, and ʻĀina Momona: Healthy and Thriving Communities of People and Place
Presenter(s): Pelika Andrade, founder and Executive Director of Na Maka Onaona, a Hawaii based non-profit, Extension Agent for the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program
Date & Time: 16 February 2023
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Pilina, Indigenous Literacy, and ina Momona: Healthy and Thriving Communities of People and Place

Presenter(s): Pelika Andrade, founder and Executive Director of Na Maka Onaona, a Hawaii based non-profit, Extension Agent for the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6821244123579572825

Abstract: This presentation will introduce participants to a philosophy and pathway of ina Momona: thriving and productive communities. On behalf of N Maka Onaona and many partnerships, Pelika will introduce two tools that address how relationships and the growing awareness of indigenous literacy can support our engagements and understandings of ourselves, our communities, and the world around us. This is a collective journey to help guide, inform, and advise the decisions and contributions we collectively make to support the ability of our people, places, and akua (natural world) to thrive.

In celebration of Mahina lelo Hawaii, we invite you all to learn how lelo Hawaii is one of many elements embedded in iwi (Native Hawaiian) knowledge systems, values, and practices to support iwi communities in creating adaptive biocultural resource management across Hawai'i Paeina (Hawaiian Archipelago) including Papahnaumokukea.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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17 February 2023

Title: Indigenous Leadership and Partnerships in Estuary Stewardship
Presenter(s): Deanna Erickson, Lake Superior NERR, deanna.erickson@wisc.edu; Bree Turner, NOAA Office for Coastal Management, bree.turner@noaa.gov; Lea Anne Burke, Puget Sound Partnership, lea-anne.burke@psp.wa.gov; Tehani Malterre, University of Hawaii at Mnoa, tehani.malterre@noaa.gov; Alice Yeates, South Slough NERR, alice.yeates@dsl.oregon.gov; Ashley Russell, Confederated Tribes of Coos Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw and Indians, arussell@ctclusi.org
Date & Time: 17 February 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Date & Time: 17 February 2023, 2 - 3 pm ET



Title: Indigenous Leadership and Partnerships in Estuary Stewardship



Presenter(s):

  • Lea Anne Burke, Tribal Affairs Manager, Puget Sound Partnership

  • Tehani Malterre, Senior Undergraduate Student studying Global Environmental Science, University of Hawaii at Mnoa

  • Alice Yeate, Stewardship Coordinator, South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve

  • Ashley Russell, Assistant Director of the Culture and Natural Resources Department, Confederated Tribes of Coos Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw and Indians

  • Deanna Erickson, Director, Lake Superior National Estuarine Research Reserve

  • Bree Turner, Senior Coastal Management Specialist on contract with NOAA's Office for Coastal Management



Sponsor(s): This webinar is co-sponsored by the NERRS Science Collaborative and NOAA RESTORE



Seminar Contact(s): Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)



Remote Access: https://umich.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ZkVlysYwRFaB3aXp4iIsOQ

Abstract
As highly productive social-ecological systems, estuaries have continuously been central to Indigenous lifeways. Indigenous science, stewardship practices, and co-management can strengthen well-being for lands, waters, and people. This session advances understanding of the concerns of Indigenous Peoples and Tribal Nations to help coastal practitioners address social and environmental justice with a focus on Pacific Northwest coastal systems. Presenters share ways that land stewards can support thriving relationships with estuaries, sustaining cultural knowledge and practices.

Tribal Nations are sovereign governments with needs distinct from other coastal stakeholders. Estuarine lands and waters in the US may have been ceded via treaties, remain unceded, or ceded with important rights retained. While formal government-to-government consultation with Tribal governments or Indigenous governance organizations is required by certain state or federal policies, other types of tribal engagement can still be rigorous, productive, and supportive of conservation and restoration goals. Learn from examples at the South Slough Reserve, Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua, Siuslaw, the NOAA EPP/MSI program, and the Puget Sound Partnership.



Bio(s): Please visit here for more information about the webinar.

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Title:
New
February 2023 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 17 February 2023
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: February 2023 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/february-2023-climate-outlook/

Abstract: We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for March 2023 and the early spring season. Join the gathering online to learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Bio(s): Rick Thoman is the Climate Specialist at the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy. He has many years of experience producing reliable Alaska climate change information describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

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21 February 2023

Title:
New
Forecasting ocean waves and rogue waves with and without artificial intelligence
Presenter(s): Thomas Breunung, University of Maryland
Date & Time: 21 February 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: Forecasting ocean waves and rogue waves with and without artificial intelligence

Presenter(s): Thomas Breunung (University of Maryland)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar contact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US)+1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: TBASlides, Recordings, OtherMaterials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website formore information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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22 February 2023

Title: Coral Forensics in the Deep Flower Garden Banks
Presenter(s): Luke McCartin, Graduate Student, Lehigh University
Date & Time: 22 February 2023
7:30 pm - 8:30 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Coral Forensics in the Deep Flower Garden Banks

Presenter(s): Luke McCartin, Graduate Student, Lehigh University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5925574254078768727

Abstract: Like all marine animals, corals leave behind genetic traces in their environment. Scientists refer to these genetic traces as environmental DNA or eDNA. Similar to forensics, marine biologists can sequence this eDNA to determine what animals have passed through an area, or are nearby but not easily seen. Learn how Luke McCartin sequences eDNA to better understand the corals that live in the deepest waters of Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary, even when he can't see them!

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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23 February 2023

Title: Assessing the largest with the least: Case study of Pacific sleeper shark stock assessment and management in Alaskan fisheries
Presenter(s): Cindy Tribuzio Ph.D., Research Biologist, AFSC, Auke Bay Laboratories
Date & Time: 23 February 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Assessing the largest with the least: Case study of Pacific sleeper shark stock assessment and management in Alaskan fisheries

Presenter(s): Cindy Tribuzio Ph.D., Research Biologist, AFSC, Auke Bay Laboratories

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS.NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov
Location: Webinar

Remote Access:
JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 2761 153 2344
Meeting password: PEujfwth654JOIN BY PHONE: +1-415-527-5035 US Toll Global call-in numbersJOIN FROM A VIDEO SYSTEM OR APPLICATION
Dial 27611532344@noaanmfs-meets.webex.com
You can also dial 207.182.190.20 and enter your meeting number. CAN'T JOIN? CONTACT SUPPORT
https://collaborationhelp.cisco.com/article/WBX000029055Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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28 February 2023

Title:
New
Understanding and Applying Climate Projections
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Russ Vose, NOAA/NESDIS/National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)
Date & Time: 28 February 2023
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Understanding and Applying Climate Projections

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Russ Vose, NOAA/NESDIS/National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s): Ellen Mecray

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract: The webinar will feature a recap of January conditions and Russ Vose will brief on climate projections and their use.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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1 March 2023

Title: Marine fish eDNA Metabarcoding: Promising Developments and Early Applications
Presenter(s): Mark Stoeckle, Senior Research Associate and Jesse Ausubel, Director, Program for the Human Environment, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY
Date & Time: 1 March 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Marine fish eDNA Metabarcoding: Promising Developments and Early Applications

Part of the NOAA Omics Seminar Series



Presenter(s): Mark Stoeckle, Senior Research Associate and Jesse Ausubel, Director, Program for the Human Environment, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY



Sponsor(s): NOAA Omics Working Group

Seminar Contacts: Katharine Egan and Nicole Miller, noaa.omics@noaa.gov



Remote Access: Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6936402573317020761



Abstract: Environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding is often considered a qualitative tool best suited for presence/absence surveys. In this update, we present evidence that adding a DNA standard to metabarcoding PCRs quantifies marine bony fish eDNA over a wide range of copies per reaction. With Riaz 12S primers, we do not find significant PCR bias among teleost species. In New Jersey trawl water samples, converting eDNA reads to copies improved correlation with trawl biomass. Our findings support incorporating a DNA standard in 12S metabarcoding. We extend discussions in other seminars in this series about eDNA rarity as a major challenge and show ways to help overcome the rarity problem. We also highlight how allometric scaling of biomass and a new software tool for it can improve eDNA correlation and briefly explore potential applications of eDNA data to ecosystem mapping. We conclude with promising early applications.



Bio(s):

Mark Stoeckle is Senior Research Associate in the Program for the Human Environment at The Rockefeller University. Beginning in 2003, he helped organize the early meetings that laid the foundation for the DNA barcoding initiative. His DNA barcoding projects with high school students attracted front-page coverage in The New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal. Since 2015 he has been researching environmental DNA in New York Bight as a tool for monitoring marine animal populations. He published the first time-series eDNA study of the lower Hudson River estuary in 2017, and helped organize the First National Conference on Marine Environmental DNA, held at Rockefeller University in 2018. In collaboration with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Stoeckle led the first large-scale bottom trawl-eDNA comparison, with results published in 2021.

Jesse Ausubel directs The Rockefeller University's Program for the Human Environment (PHE), which aims to elaborate the technical vision of a large, prosperous society that emits little harm and spares large amounts of land and sea for nature. Mr. Ausubel initiated and helped lead the Census of Marine Life, Barcode of Life Initiative, and ongoing International Quiet Ocean Experiment. In 2018 PHE hosted the first US National Conference on Marine eDNA. Mr. Ausubel is an adjunct scientist of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, University Fellow of Resources for the Future, and member of NOAA's Science Advisory Board.



Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of this presentation will be made available on the NOAA Omics website. View past omics seminar recordings here: https://sciencecouncil.noaa.gov/NOAA-Science-Technology-Focus-Areas/NOAA-Omics



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

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2 March 2023

Title: A decade of using stock assessment ensembles on a great big flatfish
Presenter(s): Ian Stewart Ph.D., Quantitative Scientist, International Pacific Halibut Commission -IPH-), Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 2 March 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A decade of using stock assessment ensembles on a great big flatfish

Presenter(s): Ian Stewart Ph.D., Quantitative Scientist, International Pacific Halibut Commission -IPH-), Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS.NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 2761 153 2344
Meeting password: PEujfwth654
JOIN BY PHONE: +1-415-527-5035 US Toll Global call-in numbersJOIN FROM A VIDEO SYSTEM OR APPLICATION
Dial 27611532344@noaanmfs-meets.webex.com
You can also dial 207.182.190.20 and enter your meeting number. CAN'T JOIN? CONTACT SUPPORT
https://collaborationhelp.cisco.com/article/WBX000029055Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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9 March 2023

Title: Evaluating California's Marine Protected Area Network across habitats, regions, and lenses
Presenter(s): Kerry Nickols Ph.D., Associate Professor, CSU Northridge
Date & Time: 9 March 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Evaluating California's Marine Protected Area Network across habitats, regions, and lenses

Presenter(s): Kerry Nickols Ph.D., Associate Professor, CSU Northridge

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS.NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 2761 153 2344
Meeting password: PEujfwth654
JOIN BY PHONE: +1-415-527-5035 US Toll Global call-in numbersJOIN FROM A VIDEO SYSTEM OR APPLICATION
Dial 27611532344@noaanmfs-meets.webex.com
You can also dial 207.182.190.20 and enter your meeting number. CAN'T JOIN? CONTACT SUPPORT
https://collaborationhelp.cisco.com/article/WBX000029055Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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15 March 2023

Title: A New Toolkit for Engaging Youth on Ocean Health and Conservation
Presenter(s): Ajay Sawant, Indira Gandhi National University; Julia Lara Navarrete, Autonomous University of Baja California; Rebecca Allen, Western Washington University; Serag Heiba, Chinese University of Hong Kong; Summer Snell, Brookes University; Frances Lang, The Ocean Foundation
Date & Time: 15 March 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ajay Sawant, Indira Gandhi National University
Julia Lara Navarrete, Autonomous University of Baja California
Rebecca Allen, Western Washington University
Serag Heiba, Chinese University of Hong Kong
Summer Snell, Brookes University
Frances Lang, The Ocean Foundation

Sponsor(s): NOAA National MPA Center and OCTO

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6659430095749340761

Abstract:
With support from The Ocean Foundation and National Geographic Society, a group of young writers between the ages of 18-25 are creating a youth ocean action toolkit focused on the ocean literacy principles and marine protected areas (MPAs). This toolkit " written by youth for youth " provides community examples of how youth can take action to conserve their ocean; demonstrates the benefit of MPAs for ocean conservation; includes links to resources and multimedia content; and features a strong social media component. The toolkit will be available this summer in English and Spanish. This webinar featuring some of the toolkit's youth authors will provide an overview of the content and techniques to engage and empower young people around the world.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/archive.html)

Seminar POC for questions: Zac Cannizzo, zac.cannizzo@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

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30 March 2023

Title:
New
Eastern Region Spring Flood Outlook
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Jason Elliott and Rob Shedd, NOAA/NWS/Northeast and Mid-Atlantic River Forecast Centers
Date & Time: 30 March 2023
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Eastern Region Spring Flood Outlook

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; Jason Elliott and Rob Shedd, NOAA/NWS/Northeast and Mid-Atlantic River Forecast Centers


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s): Ellen Mecray

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract: The webinar will feature a recap of February conditions and Jason Elliott and Rob Shedd will brief on the spring flooding outlook for the Eastern Region.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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