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NOAA Science Seminar Series

NOAA Science Seminar Series

The NOAA Science Seminar Series began in 2004 and is a voluntary effort by over 70 NOAA seminar coordinators to integrate and distribute a list of NOAA-hosted, publicly accessible science seminars. In 2020 we shared listings for over 500 seminars!

 

How to Subscribe

Send an email with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov, or:

Visit: https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and submit your e-mail address to the subscription form. If you have difficulty with subscribing or unsubscribing from the list, please contact us at hernan.garcia@noaa.gov for assistance.

Once you have subscribed, you will receive a weekly e-mail every Monday morning that summarizes upcoming seminars.

 

Add the NOAA Science Seminar Series to your Google Calendar

If you would like to add the NOAA Science Seminar Series to your own Google calendar view:

Add the seminar calendar, screen 1

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  • Open your Google Calendar:
    https://calendar.google.com/
  • On the lower left hand side, look for 'Other calendars'
  • Click the plus sign + to 'Add other calendars'
Add the seminar calendar, screen 2

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  • Click the blue button that says 'Add Calendar'
  • Close the 'Settings' panel for your calendar
  • You should now see the NOAA - HQ - Seminar Series events on your own calendar view.

Listings in Google Calendar Format

Google calendar of seminar listings

 

How to Contribute

 

All seminar are listed in Eastern Time

23 July 2024

Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar and Urban Heat and Infrastructure
Presenter(s): Chris Fuhrmann, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia; Peter Crank, University of Waterloo
Date & Time: 23 July 2024
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Climate and the U.S. Caribbean

Presenter(s): Climate Overview
Chris Fuhrmann | Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview
Todd Hamill | NWS Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update
Pam Knox | University of Georgia

Urban Heat: The Role of Buildings, Shade, and Green Infrastructure on Urban Heat Islands
Peter Crank | University of Waterloo

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System

Seminar Contact(s):
Meredith Muth meredith.muth@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/8682607369122465111

Abstract: The Southeast Climate monthly webinar series is held on the fourth Tuesday of each month at 10:00 am ET. This series is hosted by the Southeast Regional Climate Center, in partnership with the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) and the NOAA National Weather Service. These webinars provide the region with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods, and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as agriculture production, water resources, wildfires, and ecosystems.

The special topic for the July 2024 webinar is "Urban Heat and Infrastructure."

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Will be available here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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Title: Predicting Coastal Impacts from Tropical Cyclones using the ADCIRC Prediction System / Forecasting HurricaneHazards and Impacts on US East Coasts and Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Rick Luettich, Uni. North Carolina - Chapel Hill; Maitane Olabarrieta, Arthriya Subgranon, Univ. Florida; John C. Warner, USGS
Date & Time: 23 July 2024
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Predicting Coastal Impacts from Tropical Cyclones using the ADCIRC Prediction System / Forecasting Hurricane Hazards and Impacts on US East Coasts and Gulf of Mexico (NOPP Hurricane Coastal Impacts Forum)

Presenter(s): Rick Luettich (Univ. North Carolina - Chapel Hill), Maitane Olabarrieta, Arthriya Subgranon (Univ. Florida), John C. Warner (USGS)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

SeminarContact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.goto.com/169059917
You can also dial in using your phone.
Access Code: 169-059-917
United States: +1 (872) 240-3212

Abstract: As part of the NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling seminar, we team up with the National Oceanographic Partnership Program (NOPP) to present you the NOPP Hurricane Coastal Impacts Forum. 6 weeks (June 18 - July 23), 5 seminars, 10 talks.
1:00 pm: Predicting Coastal Impacts from Tropical Cyclones using the ADCIRC Prediction System (Rick Luettich, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)A modular system has been developed for predicting coastal impacts from severe weather events such as tropical cyclones. The system is based on ECMWF's ecFlow workflow and utilizes the MetGet multi-model meteorological API, either the ADCIRC+SWAN or ADCIRC+WWIII core for waves and surge, and XBeach for morphology change. Recent additions include coupling to either HEC-RAS or SFINCS to represent compound flooding. Results and lessons learned utilizing the navy's COAMPS-TC tropical cyclone meteorological model as forcing for hurricanes Ian 2022 and Idalia 2024 will be used to demonstrate capabilities and ongoing directions of development.1:30 pm: Forecasting Hurricane Hazards and Impacts on US East Coasts and Gulf of Mexico (Maitane Olabarrieta, Arthriya Subgranon - Univ. Florida, John C. Warner - USGS)Hurricanes are one of the major causes of coastal impacts within the US East coast and Gulf of Mexico and these impacts are expected to increase in the future due to the intensification of hurricanes and the increase of coastal population. Within the NOPP Hurricane Coastal Impacts project, our team has developed a forecasting system based on the COAWST mode lto predict the major hazards due to hurricanes (water levels and waves). Using Machine Learning techniques, we have developed a forecasting system to predict hurricane impacts on residential buildings. This this talk, we will show the applications of this forecasting system to recent hurricanes (e.g. Hurricane Ian 2022 and Hurricane Idalia 2023).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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Title: U.S. Intermountain West Drought & Climate Outlook
Presenter(s): Gretel Follingstad, Intermountain West DEWS Coordinator, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES)/CU Boulder, NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS); Erinanne Saffell, Arizona State Climate Office at Arizona State University; Matthew Hurteau, University of New Mexico; Lauren Kramer, USDA Agricultural Research Service Jornada Experimental Range
Date & Time: 23 July 2024
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Intermountain West Drought Conditions & Outlook

Presenter(s):
  • Welcome and Brief Snow Drought Overview: Dr. Gretel Follingstad, Intermountain West DEWS Coordinator, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES)/CU Boulder, NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)
  • Intermountain West Drought Conditions and Outlook: Erinanne Saffell | Arizona State Climate Office at Arizona State University
  • Understanding Forest Health & Wildfire Risk in a Changing Climate: Research & Tools for Restoration and Adaptation: Matthew Hurteau | University of New Mexico, Lauren Kramer | USDA ARS Jornada Experimental Range


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System

Seminar Contact(s): Gretel Follingstad gretel.follingstad@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2175235761926764631

Abstract: These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

A summary and recording of this webinar will be available at drought.gov/webinars after the event. Email subscribers will receive an email when the summary and recording are available. Please subscribe to regional email updates below to receive an email when the summary and recording are available.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Will be available here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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24 July 2024

Title: Methodological Comparison Informs Natural Resource Management Strategies for Texas Estuaries 
Presenter(s): Felipe Urrutia, Graduate Student, CCME II, NOAA Office of Education, Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions
Date & Time: 24 July 2024
11:00 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Methodological Comparison Informs Natural Resource Management Strategies for Texas Estuaries

Presenter(s): Felipe Urrutia, CCME II, NOAA Office of Education, Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI)

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science Centers

Seminar Contact(s): Audrey.Trotman@noaa.gov, oed.epp10@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Google Meet joining infoVideo call link: meet.google.com/qzr-jpqk-otrOr dial: (US) +1 513-757-0143 PIN: 267 537 369#More phone numbers: https://tel.meet/rqj-oora-joi?pin=5027389115473

Accessibility: Google Meet closed captioning available.

Abstract: Methodologies for exploring environmental, ecosystem, and fisheries data are complex. As novel approaches emerge, evaluating how they can be incorporated into management decisions and the additional information they offer is essential. This study, conducted during a NOAA EPP/MSI CSC NERTO graduate internship project mentored by Dr. Chris Kelble at NOAA/OAR/AOM, compared two methodologies for predicting habitat suitability and distribution of estuarine species. Generalized Additive Models (GAMs) and Vector Autoregressive Spatio-Temporal (VAST) models are used to analyze species abundances influenced by environmental factors, although they differ in approach. Both models were calibrated, parameterized, and validated using long-term fishery-independent juvenile fish and invertebrate surveys from 1976to 2022. GAMs can provide detailed responses to variations in specific environmental parameters, illustrating how changes in these parameters influence species abundance. In contrast, VAST models offer a more comprehensive and holistic perspective, accounting for multiple environmental parameters simultaneously that collectively impact species populations rather than isolating individual environmental effects, as seen in GAMs. Together, these models elucidate how different environmental drivers affect species distributions solely and in conjunction with species abundances, highlighting individual and combined impacts on habitat suitability. The outcome of this joint modeling approach enables more effective prediction, management, and conservation efforts as a tool for natural resource management, depending on the objective and goal, and aligns with NOAA CCME-II's coastal intelligence research goal of using observations and models to understand and prepare for impacts of climate change on marine resources and habitats.

Bio(s): Felipe Urrutia is pursuing an M.S. degree in marine biology at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi (TAMU-CC) and a NOAA EPP/MSI Center for Coastal and Marine Ecosystems (CCME)-II, Cohort-II Scholar. Working under Dr. Daniel Coffey in the Movement Ecology Lab, his thesis research is dedicated to developing habitat suitability maps and models for juvenile estuarine-dependent nekton (fish and invertebrates), showing their response to climate change stressors in Texas coastal estuaries. These models can serve as management tools for the Texas Water Development Board, aiding in strategic freshwater releases to boost nekton recruitment, maintain population levels, and enhance survival. This project supports NOAA's mission by increasing understanding of how juvenile nekton is affected by climate and anthropogenic stressors and sharing valuable insights that can be applied to managing and conserving Texas estuarine ecosystems and beyond. Felipe's work aligns with the NOAA Coastal Intelligence theme, utilizing new and old datasets to understand impacts on coastal ecosystems. During his three-month internship at the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), he conducted a comparative analysis of habitat suitability modeling and the VAST framework used in NOA ecosystem assessments. His work there is expected to lead to a publication post-graduation. Looking forward, Felipe aims to refine ecosystem assessment methodologies to better address the impacts of climate change and anthropogenic pressures on coastal inhabitants and ecosystems. Ultimately, Felipe aspires to work as a data analyst for NOAA or other governmental entities, focusing on climate-impacted ecosystems and resources. This project has also deepened the intern's understanding of NOAA's mission in science, stewardship, and service, honing skills in climate-based science, conservation and management practices of coastal ecosystems, and promoting healthy, resilient ecosystems. For more information access the webpage for the Cooperative Science Centers, https://www.noaa.gov/office-education/epp-msi/csc/20212022-awards and NERTO, www.noaa.gov/eppnerto/.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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25 July 2024

Title: Lessons from the U.S. West Coast: Results from GC5 and Future Seas climate change and fisheries research
Presenter(s): Isaac Kaplan and Barbara Muhling, NOAA/NMFS NWFSC and SWFSC
Date & Time: 25 July 2024
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Lessons from the U.S. West Coast: Results from GC5 and Future Seas climate change and fisheries research

Presenter(s): Isaac Kaplan and Barbara Muhling, NOAA/NMFS NWFSC and SWFSC

Sponsor(s): U.S. Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov Location: Webinar

Remote Access: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the One NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: The Path to Justice40: Indicators and Metrics for Assessing and Engaging Frontline Communities
Presenter(s): Gwendolyn Damestoit, Graduate Student, CCESSRST II, NOAA Office of Education,Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions
Date & Time: 25 July 2024
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: The Path to Justice40: Indicators and Metrics for Assessing and Engaging Frontline Communities

Presenter(s): Gwendolyn Damestoit, CESSRST II, NOAA Office of Education, Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI)

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science Centers

Seminar Contact(s): Audrey.Trotman@noaa.gov, oed.epp10@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Google Meet joining infoVideo call link: meet.google.com/tno-cjyc-ggzOr dial: (US)+1 786-701-0398 PIN: 483 546 162#More phone numbers: https://tel.meet/qxn-bcdw-xax?pin=7976460330548

Accessibility: Google Meet closed captioning available.

Abstract: This research aimed to investigate the decision-making processes within the Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments Program (RISA) teams concerning community engagement, with a specific focus on frontline communities. The objective was to comprehend how RISA projects are scoped, benefits are identified, and community partnerships are established. The study was particularly relevant in the context of supporting federal agencies' response to the Justice40Initiative (EO14008, Sec223), which seeks to ensure that 40% of the benefits from federal investments in climate change are directed towards "disadvantaged" communities. Under this initiative, federal agencies are required to define and geographically identify the communities meeting the criteria of "disadvantaged" to receive funding. The primary task involves identifying the diverse metrics and considerations employed by RISA teams in determining their project locations and community collaborators. Thiswas achieved through informal interviews with principal investigators andprogram managers within RISA teams. Qualitative analysis techniques wereutilized to discern common metrics across the network and region-specificindicators. Furthermore, the research compares these metrics with existingenvironmental justice and social vulnerability tools to develop a framework foridentifying beneficiary communities in alignment with the Justice40 initiative.The outcomes of this study contribute to enhancing the effectiveness of theRISA program in addressing climate and social justice concerns while aligningwith the broader equity priorities of the administration.Theresults are from the NOAA EPP/MSI CSC NERTO graduate internship project thatwas conducted with NOAA mentor Dr. Ariela Zycherman and Dr. Chelsea Combest-Friedmanof the NOAA Climate Program Office. The NERTO aligns with the NOAACSC's Center for Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Technologies II(CESSRST II) goal of enhancing climate adaptation and mitigation. The NERTO The Path to Justice40: Indicators and Metrics for Assessing and Engaging Frontline Communities also deepened the intern's understanding of NOAA engagement and effectiveness in addressing climate/environmental justice.

Bio(s): Gwendolyn Damestoit is a third year Ph.D. student in the Public Policy program at University of MD Baltimore County (UMBC), with a specialization in emergency management. Her research is primarily focused on health and socio-economical inequities in disaster management and natural hazards research, specifically in the Caribbean Region. Gwendolyn works as a UMBC Social Vulnerability and Resilience Lab (SOLVER) graduate research fellow under the mentorship of Dr. Fernando Tormos-Aponte, supporting research that advances policies that reduce disaster-related inequalities. She also participates in UMBC's Disaster Health Research Lab (DHRL), under the mentorship of Dr. Lauren Clay, working in interdisciplinary research on public health impacts of disasters with a focus on food and nutrition security and measuring direct and indirect health effects of disasters. Gwendolyn is a NOAAEPP Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Scholar under the mentorship of Drs. Yusuke Kuwayama and Fernando Tormos-Aponte. For more information access the webpage for the Cooperative Science Centers, https://www.noaa.gov/office-education/epp-msi/csc/20212022-awards and NERTO, www.noaa.gov/eppnerto/. Subscribe to the NOAA Science SeminarSeries weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit theNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!
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Title: Implementation and Sustainability of the UNESCO/IOC Tsunami Ready Program
Presenter(s): Wendy Prudencio, Graduate Student, CESSRST II, NOAA Office of Education, Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions
Date & Time: 25 July 2024
2:35 pm - 3:05 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series


Title: Implementation and Sustainability of the UNESCO/IOCTsunami Ready Program

Presenter(s): Wendy Prudencio, CESSRST II, NOAA Office of Education, Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI)

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science Centers

Seminar Contact(s): Audrey.Trotman@noaa.gov, oed.epp10@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Google Meet joining infoVideo call link: meet.google.com/mfn-yhxq-nxfOr dial: (US)+1 407-917-1139 PIN: 547 443 649# More phone numbers: https://tel.meet/eqy-gdfr-zap?pin=8362890628661

Accessibility: Google Meet closed captioning available.

Abstract: Tsunamis are natural hazards that are caused by other hazards, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, submarine landslides, and meteorites. Tsunamis can be life-threatening, and therefore, mitigation and preparedness for these events are necessary. In 2001, the National Weather Service (NWS) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) established the Tsunami Ready Program in coordination with the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) to assist coastal communities throughout the United States (Bernard,2005). The Tsunami Ready Program promotes mitigation, awareness, preparedness, and response to tsunamis through community-based efforts. This program has paved the way for the International Tsunami Information Center to support the piloting, establishment, and ongoing implementation of the UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Tsunami Ready Recognition Programme. Implementation and sustainability of the Tsunami Ready Program are crucial to coastal communities in order to improve resiliency and reduce the impact on life, property, and livelihoods. The results are from the NOAA EPP/MSI CSC NERTO graduate internship project that was conducted with NOAA mentor Dr. Christa G. von Hillebrandt-Andrade of the International Tsunami Information Center Caribbean Office of NWS. The NOAA Experiential Research and Training Opportunity (NERTO) graduate internship aligns with the NOAA Center for Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Technologies II (CESSRST II) goal to Conduct NOAA mission-aligned collaborative research. The NERTO Implementation and Sustainability of the UNESCO/IOC Tsunami Ready Program also deepened the intern's understanding of NOAA's tsunami hazard mitigation strategies, which enhanced their capacity to support coastal community preparedness and resilience initiatives effectively.

Bio(s): Wendy Prudencio is a doctoral candidate in the Public Policy Program at University of MD Baltimore County specializing in Emergency Management. She is concurrently working on her Graduate Certificate in Geographic Information Systems. Wendy obtained her master's in science in Emergency Health Services, and she also specialized in Emergency Management. Wendy is a NOAA CESSRST-II fellow and a Vice Admiral Lautenbacher Graduate Scholar. Her research interests include disaster response and recovery in low-lying coastal areas, flood insurance, energy justice, and policy implementation. She has a passion for advocacy and public service to underrepresented BIPOC communities in the continental U.S. and its territories. Her current research focuses on the impact of disasters on coastal housing and displacement in Puerto Rico during Hurricane Irma and Maria. For more information access the webpage for the Cooperative Science Centers, https://www.noaa.gov/office-education/epp-msi/csc/20212022-awards and NERTO, www.noaa.gov/eppnerto/.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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Title: Not Just a Buzzword: Bringing Meaningful Engagement to Life
Presenter(s): Hannah Ramage, Lake Superior NERR; Laura Reynolds, University of Florida; Arianna Stokes, NERRS Science Collaborative; Doug George, NOAA OCM; Caitlin Young, NOAA RESTORE
Date & Time: 25 July 2024
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Not Just a Buzzword: Bringing Meaningful Engagement to Life

Presenter(s):
  • Hannah Ramage, Lake Superior National Estuarine Research Reserve
  • Laura Reynolds, University of Florida
  • Arianna Stokes, NERRS Science Collaborative


Sponsor(s): This webinar is co-sponsored by the NERRS Science Collaborative and NOAA RESTORE Seminar Contacts: Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)

Remote Access: https://umich.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_hiG4WWU3TwWtgwyVg8RtkAAbstract
You've probably heard the phrase meaningful engagement. Maybe you've even used the phrase yourself. But have you ever found yourself wondering, what exactly do we mean by meaningful engagement and how do we achieve it?Many of us recognize that engaging meaningfully with partners is at the heart of effective collaboration. However it's not always easy to define what meaningful engagement is, and what it means in practice. The NERRS Science Collaborative offered a webinar in January 2024 to outline a framework for understanding meaningful engagement. In this upcoming webinar, the NERRS Science Collaborative and the NOAA RESTORE Science Program are teaming up to dive into the practical realities of meaningful engagement. This webinar will feature the voices of two collaborative science project teams who will share their project-specific experiences with meaningful engagement. Together, we'll dig into examples of what meaningful engagement is, what it looks like in practice, and what strategies we might use to foster it during collaboration.We'll also save time for questions from the audience, so come ready to engage (meaningfully)! Bring questions or submit them in advance via the registration form.Collaborative Science ConversationsThe NOAA RESTORE Science and NERRS Science Collaborative programs are back at it, teaming up to bring you the voices of project teams from the field through our Collaborative Conversations webinar series. These sessions dig into the unique value of collaborative science, what it feels like in practice, and tips and strategies for success.

Bio(s): Please visit here for more information about the webinar.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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Title: Monitoring and evaluation to assess Reduce Land-Based Sources of Pollution (LBSP) management effectiveness on Culebra, Puerto Rico (RECORDED)
Presenter(s): Bernardo Vargas-Angel, NOAA Restoration Center
Date & Time: 25 July 2024
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminars

Title: Monitoring and evaluation to assess Reduce Land-Based Sources of Pollution (LBSP) management effectiveness on Culebra, Puerto Rico

Presenter(s): Bernardo Vargas-ngel, NOAA Restoration Center


Sponsor(s): NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.donovan@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Video call link: https://meet.google.com/pgn-asvi-kgp
Or dial: (US) +1 402-921-2224 PIN: 488 546 477#

Abstract: Coastal development that alters natural land cover, together with increased nutrient inputs from undertreated sewage, are the principal source of land-based pollution in Culebra. Since 2010, NOAA, along with its partners, has developed watershed management approaches to reduce the impacts of LBSP to Culebra's nearshore marine habitats. Starting in 2017, NOAA funded management strategies and actions to mitigate these impacts, including 1) stabilization of unpaved roads through the construction of best management practices (BMPs), and 2) installation of floating treatment wetlands at the wastewater treatment plant. Currently, an integrated and spatiotemporally coordinated ridge-to-reef performance monitoring program is underway that implements effective physical and biological indicators for watershed pollutant loads, nearshore pollutant exposure, and seagrass biological responses. This, together with baseline assessments for water quality and seagrass community condition completed in 2014, represent the basis to assess temporal changes in LBSP stressors, exposure, and responses over time at watershed management sites as well as the corresponding nearshore drainage points to evaluate success. This information provides Culebra resource managers with the basis to establish actionable water quality targets and advise adaptive management needs.

Bio(s): Dr. Bernardo Vargas-ngel works for NOAA's Restoration Center in the capacity of Caribbean Watershed Restoration and Monitoring Coordinator. Bernardo holds a Ph.D. degree from University of the Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, and has dedicated his professional carrier to the monitoring of coral reef ecosystems in the U.S. Pacific and Caribbean with special emphasis on structural and functional ecology, natural and anthropogenic disturbance dynamics, and diseases. The focal point of his current position is the evaluation of LBSP management effectiveness on the island of Culebra, Puerto Rico. NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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29 July 2024

Title: Building Resilience: Environmental Trends and Variability in Coastal Fisheries in Mobile Bay
Presenter(s): John Lehrter, PhD, Professor of Marine Sciences, University of South Alabama and Dauphin Island Sea Lab; Blair Morrison, Science and Monitoring Program Lead, Mobile Bay National Estuary Program
Date & Time: 29 July 2024
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Building Resilience: Environmental Trends and Variability in Coastal Fisheries in Mobile Bay.

Part 2 of 4 in NOAA's RESTORE Science Program Seminar Series: Applications of Long-Term Research in the Gulf of Mexico



Presenter(s): John Lehrter, PhD, Professor of Marine Sciences, University of South Alabama and Dauphin Island Sea Lab.Blair Morrison, Science and Monitoring Program Lead, Mobile Bay National Estuary Program.

Sponsor(s): NOAA RESTORE Science Program, and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series.

Seminar Contacts: Moe Nelson, david.moe.nelson@noaa.gov ; and Katie Loesser, katherine.loesser@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/noaa_restore_science_seminar_july_29/event/registration.html . You may enter the webinar via your browser or the Adobe Connect app (download here).Test your ability to use Adobe Connect here. After the webinar, a link to the recording will be posted online.

Accessibility: TBD

Abstract: In 2019, five projects were funded by the NOAA RESTORE Science Progam's Long-Term Trends competition to investigate trends in living coastal and marine resources in the Gulf of Mexico and the processes driving them. These projects were funded for five years with the potential to be renewed for up to ten years of continuous funding. This seminar series will highlight these projects and their efforts to connect their results with the end user community. Join this series to learn more about these exciting efforts and hear lessons learned from teams that have prioritized end user-driven processes in their research.This week's focus will be on Building Resilience: Environmental Trends and Variability in Coastal Fisheries in Mobile Bay. The abundance of oysters, blue crabs, and spotted seatrout is rapidly declining in the Gulf of Mexico. These species have provided valuable food, raw material, recreation, and cultural resources to humans since the Gulf was settled. Today, the ecosystem services provided by these species are threatened, or near collapse in Gulf estuaries. This is partially due to human activities and environmental trends such as fisheries harvest and changes in water and habitat quality. Many of the underlying mechanisms that relate long-term trends and short-term variability in the environment to changing populations of oyster, blue crab and spotted seatrout are unquantified or unknown. This project is working to identify temperature, salinity (freshwater), oxygen (hypoxia), and pH (acidity) thresholds for oyster, blue crab, and spotted seatrout populations based on current and future habitat conditions, including climate variability and human-induced stressors. The project team will provide Mobile Bay decision-makers a process for evaluating various scenarios, management actions, and outcomes based on single and multiple thresholds for oyster, blue crab, and spotted seatrout populations. This information will help identify what individual or combined stressors affect these economically and culturally important species plus evaluate how management actions may improve the resilience of these populations to environmental change.

Bio(s): John Lehrter, PhD, Professor of Marine Sciences, University of South Alabama and Dauphin Island Sea Lab.Blair Morrison, Science and Monitoring Program Lead, Mobile Bay National Estuary Program.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
The webinar will be recorded, and the video will be archived in Adobe Connect. A pdf of the slides may be provided upon request.

Subscribe / Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

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30 July 2024

Title: U.S. Eastern Region NOAA Climate Services: 2024 Heat Season Update
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Morgan Zabow, NOAA/OAR/CPO/National Heat Health Information System, NIHHIS
Date & Time: 30 July 2024
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Eastern Region NOAA Climate Services

Remote Access: DOT Climate and Transportation Resilience

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; Morgan Zabow, NOAA/OAR/CPO/National Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS)


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service / National Centers for Environmental Information / Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s): Ellen Mecray

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract: The webinar will feature a recap of July conditions and Morgan Zabow will offer an update on the heat season, extreme heat, and community-scale work with NIHHIS.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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Title: The role of surface potential vorticity in the vertical structure of mesoscale eddies
Presenter(s): Wenda Zhang, Princeton University
Date & Time: 30 July 2024
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The role of surface potential vorticity in the vertical structure of mesoscale eddies

Presenter(s): Wenda Zhang (Princeton University)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

SeminarContact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US)+1414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: Ocean mesoscale eddies constitute a majority of oceanic kinetic energy and play a pivotal role in the mixing of momentum, heat, salt, carbon, and other properties in the ocean. State-of-the-art ocean climate models, which partially resolve mesoscale eddies (i.e., eddy-permitting), requires parameterizations to account for the missing eddy feedback to large-scale circulations. This work formulates and implements a parameterization for the vertical structure of and energetics of mesoscale eddies in idealized eddy-permitting simulations of Modular Ocean Model (MOM6). The parameterization emphasizes the primary role of the surface potential vorticity (PV) in setting the energy source and cascade of eddies. Due to isopycnal outcropping and interior PV homogenization, the surface meridional PV gradient is substantially stronger than the interior PV gradient, yielding surface-trapped baroclinic instability. Eddies generated through this instability have a surface-intensified vertical structure dependent on their horizontal scales. Based on this understanding, we formulate a scale-aware parameterization that captures the vertical structure of the eddy kinetic energy and its dependence on model resolution. This vertical structure is then combined with an energy backscatter parameterization to represent the momentum flux from subgrid eddies. The parameterization improves the simulation of global kinetic energy distributions, large-scale circulation pathways, and isopycnal structures in idealized eddy-permitting models, indicating an important role of the vertical structure in the parameterization of eddy energetics.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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Title: Spruce beetles under changing climate conditions
Presenter(s): Nancy Fresco, UAF Scenarios Network for Alaska + Arctic Planning
Date & Time: 30 July 2024
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Spruce beetles under changing climate conditions

Presenter(s): Nancy Fresco, UAF Scenarios Network for Alaska + Arctic Planning

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/spruce-beetles/

Abstract: Historically, Alaska's cold climate has protected much of the state from major outbreaks of spruce beetles. Interior Alaska has primarily been protected by rapid fall cooling and extremely cold winters, while other regions have been protected by cool summers that limit beetle maturation. A new integrated model suggests that ongoing climate change will remove these protections across large parts of Alaska. Northern forest managers will increasingly need to undertake management planning that no longer relies on the protection of historically cold climate.

Bio(s): Nancy Fresco is a Research Associate Professor at the International Arctic Research Center (IARC) at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. Her academic background is in biology, landscape ecology, and forestry. For the past 16 years she has been the Network Coordinator for the Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning, SNAP. SNAP's scientists, programmers, spatial analysts, and communications experts create resources to aid in adaptation planning by connecting northern climate data and model projections to the real-world needs.of a wide range of stakeholders and collaborators

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

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31 July 2024

Title: Early Encounters on a Western Frontier: The Search for Svyatoy Nikolai (1807-1808)
Presenter(s): Katie Wrubel, Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, Resource Protection Specialist and Madeline Roth, PhD Graduate Student in Integrated Coastal Sciences, East Carolina University
Date & Time: 31 July 2024
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Early Encounters on a Western Frontier: The Search for Svyatoy Nikolai (1807-1808)NOAA Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Katie Wrubel, Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, Resource Protection Specialist and Madeline Roth, PhD Graduate Student in Integrated Coastal Sciences, East Carolina University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Library and Ocean Exploration

Seminar Contacts: library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://vimeo.com/event/4427700


Accessibility: Captions are available during the live presentation and once uploaded to the NOAA Library YouTube Channel automatic captions are added. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The Svyatoy Nikolai, a survey vessel for the Russian American Company, was lost at the turn of the 19th century in the waters of today's Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS). In 1808, the ship and crew (composed of men and women; Russian, English, and Aleut) departed Alaska to map the Pacific coastline and identify potential locations for an Oregon-based colony. The ship was driven ashore and abandoned at the Washington coast. To better understand this history, and the larger region's maritime heritage, a remote sensing and archaeological survey was undertaken during the summer of 2023. Funded by NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, this presentation discusses the results of the 2023 fieldwork and the broader maritime heritage of the Olympic Peninsula.

Keywords: Shipwreck, Russian-America, Heritage

Bio(s): Katie Wrubel has served as the resource protection specialist for Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS) since 2020. Katie completed her master's degree in environmental science at Washington State University Vancouver in 2013 where she was a NOAA Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar. After graduate school, she was a Washington Sea Grant Marc Hershman Marine Policy Fellow at the Nature Conservancy where she focused on marine spatial planning with tribal and nontribal partners. From 2014-2020, Katie worked as the Natural Resource Policy Analyst for the Makah Tribe in Neah Bay, Washington.

Madeline Roth is a maritime archaeologist and PhD student at East Carolina University. Madeline worked for the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Maritime Heritage Program where she developed an interest in Euro-Pacific encounters in the Pacific Northwest. She is currently pursuing an Interdisciplinary PhD in coastal resource management. Her research addresses community participatory research and heritage governance in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and Guam.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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1 August 2024

Title: Considerations for designing and implementing a successful close-kin mark-recapture project to estimate abundance and mortality of data-limited marine species
Presenter(s): John Swenson, PhD candidate, University of Massachusetts
Date & Time: 1 August 2024
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Considerations for designing and implementing a successful close-kin mark-recapture project to estimate abundance and mortality of data-limited marine species (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s): John Swenson, PhD candidate, University of Massachusetts

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA Library

Seminar Contact(s): Dr. Bai Li (bai.li@noaa.gov) and Library Seminars

Remote Access: https://vimeo.com/event/4456661/register

Accessibility: You are able to get live closed captions during the presentation by selecting the CC button in your Vimeo player. Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.


Abstract: Close-kin mark-recapture (CKMR) is a genetics-based method for estimating population abundance and mortality that has much promise for improving stock assessments and monitoring programs, especially for data-limited species. In this talk, I will describe the theory behind CKMR and discuss its practical advantages and challenges, including sampling and lab work considerations for robust and unbiased genotyping and kin-finding. Notable applications of CKMR, both recent and ongoing, will be highlighted. Finally, I will delineate the major cost categories and suggest rough sample size requirements and timelines for planning a CKMR project.Keywords: Abundance, Genomics, Conservation Management


Bio(s): John is a late-stage PhD candidate in the Molecular Ecology and Conservation Lab at the University of Massachusetts. His research endeavors to inform the conservation and management of vulnerable marine species (e.g., many elasmobranchs) using the close-kin mark-recapture framework, which fuses cutting-edge genomic techniques with recent advances in bioinformatics and population dynamics modeling.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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7 August 2024

Title:
New
Providing guidance on accessing high-resolution and COMSAR data for government use
Presenter(s): Brenda Ellis, Contractor, USGS
Date & Time: 7 August 2024
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Providing guidance on accessing high-resolution and COMSAR data for government use.
IOCM Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Brenda Ellis, KBR Contractor suporting the Technical Support Services Contract at the USGS EROS Data Center in Sioux Falls, SD

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Office of Coast Survey (OCS)

Seminar Contact(s): iwgocm.staff@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Virtual only. GoToWebinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7126461965352183894

Accessibility: Please email iwgocm.staff@noaa.gov at least 5 days before the webinar with requests.

Abstract: High-resolution imagery and COMSAR data are available from several sources and can be leveraged for a variety of purposes. The goal is to provide guidance on accessing this data from sources that are freely available to US Government employees. The Commercial Remote Sensing Space Policy (CRSSP)is a program implemented by the USGS in partnership with NOAA, NGA, and other Federal civil agencies. The CRSSP Imagery-Derived Requirements (CIDR) tool is the platform that Federal agency employees can use to request remotely sensed data by detailing specific data requirements.

Bio(s): Brenda Ellis - Lead IT Customer Support Analyst. She leads the Commercial data and Emergency Operations Team at EROS as well as provides support for the Commercial Remote Sensing Space Policy Imagery-Derived Requirements (CIDR) tool and Earthexplorer site.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Materials will be emailed to all registrants after the seminar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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Title: Catch and Release: Large Whale Entanglement Response and the Science that Goes with it
Presenter(s): Ed Lyman, Large Whale Entanglement Response Coordinator, NOAA's Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 7 August 2024
8:00 pm - 9:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Catch and Release: Large Whale Entanglement Response and the Science that Goes with it

Presenter(s): Ed Lyman, Large Whale Entanglement Response Coordinator, NOAA's Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NOS Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2248154272551019613

Abstract: Join Ed Lyman, the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary's Large Whale Entanglement Response Coordinator, to learn about the risks posed by entanglement threat to one of our large whale species " the humpback whale, and the authorized network response to free them and other whales from life-threatening entanglements. Ed has been responding to entangled large whales for 30 years and has been involved in over a hundred entanglement response efforts. The talk will focus on sanctuary and nearby waters that are the humpback whales' principal breeding/calving grounds in the North Pacific. Discover how trained and experienced responders free 40-ton entangled whales using cutting-edge tools, techniques and technologies through some exciting imagery. While freeing a whale is beneficial and rewarding, it is the science associated with the effort, such as the use of telemetry, drones, AI image recognition, and photogrammetry, that facilitates the response and helps us better understand the threat as to reduce it in the future for whales and humans alike.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

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16 August 2024

Title: August NOAA NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 16 August 2024
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: August NOAA NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing


Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/aug2025-climate-outlook/

Abstract: We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, discuss forecasting tools, and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for September 2024 and the fall season. Join the gathering online to learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Bio(s): Rick Thoman is the Alaska Climate Specialist with ACCAP and has many years of experience producing reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities, and the media.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

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21 August 2024

Title:
New
Highlighting the Useability of NOAA NESDIS Information in the Formal and Informal Sectors
Presenter(s): Lesley-Ann Dupigny-Giroux, Distinguished Professor and Vermont State Climatologist, University of Vermont
Date & Time: 21 August 2024
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Highlighting the Useability of NOAA NESDIS Information in the Formal and Informal Sectors

Presenter(s): Lesley-Ann Dupigny-Giroux, Distinguished Professor and Vermont State Climatologist, University of Vermont

Sponsor(s): System Architecture and Engineering (SAE) and the NESDIS User Engagement Council (UEC)Seminar Contacts: Zach Thal, (zach.thal@noaa.gov) and Amber Hill, (amber.hill@noaa.gov)Location: WebinarRegistration Link: (Registration requested) NESDIS Meet the Users Speaker Series Registration Form_LesleyAnn - Google Forms

Abstract: Dr. Lesley-Ann Dupigny-Giroux will discuss the multiple ways in which she, as a teacher, scholar, and Vermont State Climatologist, uses NESDIS information in Vermont. These applications include: a) Using Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and earth-observation imagery to explain 3-D concepts in introductory atmospheric sciences classes; b) Incorporating data from the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), National Weather Service (NWS), and National Climate Assessment (NCA) in the drafting of Vermont's initial Climate Action Plan and c) Applying GOES imagery to demonstrate the process-based dynamics of the 2023 and 2024 catastrophic flooding in Central Vermont.

Bio(s): Dr. Dupigny-Giroux, a Professor of Climatology at the University of Vermont, has long been a pivotal figure in climate science and education. Since 1997, Dr. Dupigny-Giroux has served as the Vermont State Climatologist, overseeing crucial meteorological data and providing expertise on local climate impacts. From 2020 to 2022, she led the American Association of State Climatologists, influencing climate policy and collaboration nationwide. In academia, Dr. Dupigny-Giroux teaches a range of climatology courses, including Physical Geography, Remote Sensing, and Land-Surface Processes, often engaging students in Service-Learning initiatives with municipalities and federal entities like NOAA. Her research spans interdisciplinary fields such as hydroclimatic natural hazards, climate literacy, and geospatial climate and land-surface processes, all crucial in understanding our evolving climate. A recognized authority on floods, droughts, and severe weather, Dr. Dupigny-Giroux examines their profound impacts on Vermont and communities around the U.S. Northeast. To learn more about how Lesley-Ann and the University of Vermont are using NOAA data, please contact meet.the.users@noaa.gov.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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Title: Life Lessons from a New eDNA Laboratory
Presenter(s): Nicole Housley, Microbiologist, Azura Consulting LLC-National Seafood Inspection Laboratory, NOAA
Date & Time: 21 August 2024
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Life Lessons from a New eDNA Laboratory

Part of the NOAA Omics Seminar Series



Presenter(s): Nicole Housley, Microbiologist, Azura Consulting LLC-National Seafood Inspection Laboratory, NOAA



Sponsor(s): NOAA Omics



Seminar Contact(s): Nicole Miller, NOAA 'Omics Portfolio Specialist, noaa.omics@noaa.gov



Remote Access: Register Here



Abstract: In response to the new NOAA Omics Strategy that was released in February of 2020 NOAA laboratories are now venturing into new omics-based analyses. Specifically, focus is shifting to eDNA analyses that will be essential to increasing sampling efficiency, ecosystem assessments, and decreasing environmental impacts. However, it can be overwhelming trying to determine where or how to start, especially if this is a new technique to the laboratory. Recently, the National Seafood Inspection Laboratory embarked on a pilot project to learn how to do all things related to eDNA. Through gel images and sequencing analyses this poster will discuss the approach taken, why certain decisions were made, and which choices ultimately led to the success of the pilot project.



Bio(s): Nicole Housley graduated in 2004 from the University of Mississippi with a B.A. in Biochemistry with a minor in Biology. Nicole worked for 16 years at the University of South Alabama performing microbiology research before moving to the National Seafood Inspection Laboratory to become the contractor Microbiologist performing analyses on animal by-products for the Seafood Inspection Program.



Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of this presentation will be made available on the NOAA Omics website. View past omics seminar recordings here: https://sciencecouncil.noaa.gov/NOAA-Science-Technology-Focus-Areas/NOAA-Omics



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

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22 August 2024

Title: Teaching Hope: Blue Carbon and Climate Change
Presenter(s): Sara Hutto, Conservation and Climate Program Coordinator and Jennifer Stock, Education and Outreach Coordinator, Greater Farallones Association and Greater Farallones and Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 22 August 2024
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Teaching Hope: Blue Carbon and Climate Change

Presenter(s): Sara Hutto, Conservation and Climate Program Coordinator and Jennifer Stock, Education and Outreach Coordinator, Greater Farallones Association and Greater Farallones and Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NOS Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8139042905077563996

Abstract: Drought, fires, floods, bleaching corals...as impacts from our changing climate become increasingly publicized, and with climate anxiety on the rise among our youth, it's critical that educators bring messages of hope into their classrooms. In this webinar, you'll learn from a NOAA educator and scientist about the inspiring role the ocean plays in mitigating the climate crisis as a carbon sponge. You'll learn about the role of "blue" carbon - the species and habitats that absorb and store carbon in the ocean - and how NOAA is working to better understand and protect these vital resources. You'll also hear about the new Blue Carbon Education and Communication Toolkit, so you can bring these messages into your classroom (or wherever you interact with young people!). Please join us to explore messages of hope in a time of a changing climate.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

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28 August 2024

Title: Carbon Sequestration and Storage in Puerto Rico Mangroves
Presenter(s): Jahnelle Howe, NOAA EPP/MSI Graduate Fellowship Program, City College of the City University of New York
Date & Time: 28 August 2024
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Carbon Sequestration and Storage in Puerto Rico Mangroves



Presenter(s): Jahnelle Howe, NOAA EPP MSI Graduate Fellow



Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of Education (OED), Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI)



Seminar Contact(s): Natasha White; NOAA/OED/EPP/MSI, natasha.white@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar



Remote Access: Please register for the seminar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6094444959284406880



Abstract: Mangroves are coastal forests that persist in the ocean-land continuum and provide critical habitats for fish and wildlife. They contribute to coastal resiliency by acting as natural barriers to storm surges and preventing erosion, flooding, and disasters. Mangrove ecosystems contribute to global carbon cycles by acting as a sink of atmospheric CO2, thereby having the potential to mitigate climate change. Blue carbon refers to the carbon sequestered in litter and soil in coastal ecosystems and the oceans, having a particularly high rate of carbon storage. However, due to anthropogenic and natural hazards and climate change, the loss of mangroves poses a risk of releasing sequestered carbon stored deep within the soil into the atmosphere once exposed. This work is particularly important for Puerto Rico as mangroves are essential for coastal protection from storms (wave action, erosion, lessening impacts to communities) and critical for economically significant artisan fishers. This study focuses on two mangroves in Puerto Rico, La Parguera and Laguna Grande, for blue carbon quantification and assessing whether extreme events, including hurricanes and environmental factors such as temperature and precipitation, impact these ecosystems and their capacity to sequester blue carbon. Furthermore, this study also reviews the socio-economic conditions influencing blue economy building and blue carbon sequestration related to coastal communities' dependency on values and services provided by these ecosystems in Puerto Rico.



Bio(s): Ms. Jahnelle Howe is a NOAA EPP/MSI Center for Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Technology (CESSRST) fellow and a doctoral candidate pursuing a degree in earth and environmental sciences at the CUNY Graduate Center, New York. Ms. Howe is the recipient of the 2023 NOAA EPP MSI Graduate Fellowship. Under the guidance and mentorship of NOAA mentor Dr. Ashok Deshpande and Academic Co-Advisor Dr. Shakila Merchant, Jahnelle conducted her one-year internship at the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) facility in the James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sandy Hook, NJ. Before pursuing her doctoral degree, Ms. Howe completed her undergraduate degree in environmental science from Lehman College in 2018 and her Master's degree in earth and atmospheric sciences, CCNY in 2020 - both degrees supported by the NOAA EPP/MSI CESSRST Program. During her Master's degree, Ms. Howe had the opportunity to sail aboard the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer, conducting sea-floor mapping research. She also conducted a 12-week NOAA Experiential Research and Training Opportunity (NERTO) internship at the NOAA Ocean Service Office of Coastal Management in Charleston, South Carolina. Ms.Howe is passionate about science communication and actively engages in blogging through her website - Epiphany of Science. During her tenure as a NOAA fellow, Ms. Howe engaged in CUNY summer bridge and outreach and mentored many undergraduates and NYC high school students. Ms. Howe plans to work for a government agency that aligns with her passion for science, service, and engagement.

Are your webinars recorded?: Yes, a link to the recorded webinar will be provided to all registrants after the event.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

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29 August 2024

Title: U.S. Eastern Region NOAA Climate Services: 2024 Hurricane Season Update
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Matt Rosencrans, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 29 August 2024
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Eastern Region Climate Services

Remote Access: DOT Climate and Transportation Resilience

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Matt Rosencrans, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service / National Centers for Environmental Information / Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s): Ellen Mecray

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract: The webinar will feature a recap of August conditions and Matt Rosencrans will offer an update on the 2024 US Atlantic Hurricane season.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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Title: NOAA Fisheries research geared towards climate-ready fisheries management in the northeast U.S.
Presenter(s): Vincent Saba, NOAA/NMFS NEFSC
Date & Time: 29 August 2024
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Fisheries research geared towards climate-ready fisheries management in the northeast U.S.

Presenter(s): Vincent Saba, NOAA NEFSC

Sponsor(s): U.S. Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov Location: Webinar

Remote Access: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the One NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: U.S. Surgeon General’s Framework for Workplace Mental Health and Wellbeing: A NOAA Perspective
Presenter(s): Wellness Program Coordinator, Alexandra Brown and Mindful NOAA Co-program manager, Kaitlyn Shaw; Mia Infante, Communications Specialist, NESDIS Chief of Staff Office; Nicole Fernandes, Policy Analyst, NOAA's National Ocean Service Policy and Constituent Affairs Office; Brittany Struck, Natural Resource Management Specialist; Andrelyn, C. Moore, Diversity Equity Inclusion & Accessibility Specialist, NOAA's Office of Inclusion and Civil Rights; Sudhir Raj Shrestha, Technical Manager for NWS Office of Water Prediction Web and Data Services program
Date & Time: 29 August 2024
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Surgeon General's Framework for Workplace Mental Health and Wellbeing: A NOAA PerspectiveNOAA Library Seminars
Moderators: Wellness Program Coordinator, Alexandra Brown and Mindful NOAA Co-program manager, Kaitlyn Shaw

Panelists:
  • Mia Infante, Communications Specialist, NESDIS Chief of Staff Office
  • Nicole Fernandes, Policy Analyst, NOAA's National Ocean Service Policy and Constituent Affairs Office
  • Brittany Struck, Natural Resource Management Specialist Panelist
  • Andrelyn, C. Moore, Diversity Equity Inclusion & Accessibility Specialist, NOAA's Office of Inclusion and Civil Rights (OICR)
  • Sudhir Raj Shrestha, Technical Manager for NWS Office of Water Prediction (OWP) Web and Data Services(WDS) program


Sponsor(s): NOAA Library



Seminar Contact(s): NOAA Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov);

Remote Access: https://vimeo.com/event/4443056


Accessibility: Captions are available during the live presentation and once uploaded to the NOAA Library YouTube Channel automatic captions are added. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Video premier of NOAA employee's perspective on the Surgeon General's Framework for Mental Health and Wellbeing followed by a panel discussion with participants on implementation of the framework at NOAA. Event will be hosted by Wellness Program Coordinator, Allie Brown and Mindful NOAA Co-program manager, Kaitlyn Shaw.

Keywords: Wellness, Wellbeing, Mental Health

Bio(s): See speaker bios on website: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/seminars/upcoming

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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26 September 2024

Title: Environmental Drivers of Poor Fish Recruitment in the South Atlantic
Presenter(s): Ana Vaz, NOAA SEFSC
Date & Time: 26 September 2024
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Environmental Drivers of Poor Fish Recruitment in the South Atlantic

Presenter(s): Ana Vaz, NOAA SEFSC

Sponsor(s): U.S. Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov Location: Webinar

Remote Access: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the One NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Developer - Lori K. Brown