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NOAA Science Seminar Series
Past 2022 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

30 June 2022

Title: Assessing the vulnerability of coastal communities to marine heatwaves: a comparison of the U.S. and Australia
Presenter(s): Sally Dowd, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Date & Time: 30 June 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Assessing the vulnerability of coastal communities to marine heatwaves: a comparison of the U.S. and Australia.

Presenter(s): Sally Dowd, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

29 June 2022

Title: Drone the System Wide Monitoring Program (SWMP): Assessing the Utility of Drones for Monitoring Coastal Wetlands
Presenter(s): Brandon Puckett, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, brandon.puckett@noaa.gov; Whitney Jenkins, North Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserve, whitney.jenkins@ncdenr.gov; Cristiana Falvo, Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab, cristiana.falvo@duke.edu; Justin Ridge, Duke University Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab, justin.ridge@duke.edu; Brittany Morse, North Inlet " Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, brittany@baruch.sc.edu; Allix North, Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve, Allix.North@dep.state.fl.us; Erik Smith, North Inlet " Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, erik@baruch.sc.edu
Date & Time: 29 June 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesDate & Time: 29 June 2022, 3 - 4 pm ET

Title: Drone the System Wide Monitoring Program (SWMP): Assessing the Utility of Drones for Monitoring Coastal Wetlands

Presenter(s):
  • Brandon Puckett, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
  • Whitney Jenkins, North Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserve
  • Cristiana Falvo, Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab
  • Justin Ridge, Duke University Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab
  • Brittany Morse, North Inlet " Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve
  • Allix North, Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve
  • Erik Smith, North Inlet " Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve


Sponsor(s): This webinar is sponsored by the NERRS Science CollaborativeSeminar Contacts: Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8648906221675140110

Abstract:
Tidal wetland monitoring is critical for detecting changes and managing these vulnerable coastal ecosystems. Wetland monitoring programs typically use ground-based measurements or satellite observations to track changes at small and large scales " but these approaches may miss important processes that occur at intermediate spatial scales or result from discrete events such as extreme storms. Mounting sensors on unmanned aerial systems (UAS) - commonly known as drones - offers an opportunity to radically improve tidal wetland monitoring programs by providing high spatial resolution, coverage, and customization on the operator's schedule.This project team worked with the six National Estuarine Research Reserves in the Southeast and Caribbean to develop, assess, and collaboratively refine a protocol for drone operation, data management, and data analysis. In this webinar, which will consist of a presentation and panel discussion, members of the project team will talk about their approach " which pairs ground-based validation and drone-based observation to estimate common wetland monitoring parameters " as well as the collaborative process that enabled them to develop the protocols. They will also share lessons learned, products developed, and benefits that have emerged from this work.

Bio(s): Please visit here for more information about the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

28 June 2022

Title: Estuarine salt-plug formation by an along-shelf buoyant current: a numerical model approach
Presenter(s): Braulio Juarez, Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanolgicas, Universidad Autnoma de Baja California, Ensenada, Mxico
Date & Time: 28 June 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Estuarine salt-plug formation by an along-shelf buoyant current: a numerical model approach

Presenter(s): Braulio Juarez (Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanolgicas,Universidad Autnoma de Baja California, Ensenada, Mxico)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar Contact(s): Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US)+1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: TBD


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Readiness Levels, Transition Plans, and Knowledge Transfers, Oh My! Demystifying Social and Behavioral Science Research to Applications (R2X)
Presenter(s): Gina Eosco, OAR Weather Program Office, Social Science and The Forecasting a Continuum of Environmental Threats FACETS program manager; Castle Williams, FedWriters supporting the OAR Weather Program Office, Social Science R2X Coordinator
Date & Time: 28 June 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Readiness Levels, Transition Plans, and Knowledge Transfers, Oh My! Demystifying Social and Behavioral Science Research to Applications (R2X)

Presenter(s): Gina Eosco, OAR Weather Program Office, Social Science and The Forecasting a Continuum of Environmental Threats (FACETS) program manager; Castle Williams, FedWriters supporting the OAR Weather Program Office, Social Science R2X Coordinator

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Seminar Contact(s): Francis Choi (francis.choi@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2525976654775848203

Abstract: Together, the Weather Program Office (WPO) Social Science Program (SSP) and the National Weather Service continue to evaluate how best to transition social science research findings into applications and share operational challenges to inform research. Through various engagements1,2, WPO learned that R2X misunderstandings exist among the social and physical research and operational communities. By implementing meaningful process changes, WPO SSP will highlight recommendations and best practices for transitioning social science research by emphasizing knowledge transfer and nurturing trust between researchers and operational practitioners.

Keywords: social science, R2X, transitions

Bio(s): Dr. Gina Eosco is a social scientist and risk communication expert managing NOAA's Weather Program Office's Social Science and Forecasting a Continuum of Environmental Threats (FACETS) Programs. Gina's focus is on prioritizing social and behavioral science (SBS) research needs within the weather community, determining ways to translate social science research into applications, and learning from operational meteorologists and practitioners to understand the next research challenge. She is an active member of both the American Meteorological Society, as well as the National Weather Association and is also the 2019 recipient of the AMS Award for Early Career Professional Achievement. Dr. Eosco earned her M.S. and PhD in weather risk communication from Cornell University, and a B.S. in Environmental Science and Policy from the University of Maryland.

Dr. Castle Williams is a contractor supporting Dr. Gina Eosco and the WPO Social Science Program as the Social Science R2X Coordinator. Prior to joining WPO, Castle was a research assistant and Co-PI in the Department of Geography at the University of Georgia, where he conducted research-to-applications (R2X) social science research related to weather risk and visual communication. His dissertation offered a definition of message consistency' for the weather enterprise and explored the implications of inconsistent Convective Outlook graphics on lay public end users. Using his personal experiences with the NOAA grant process and his knowledge of NOAA transition plans as an academic researcher, Castle brings a wealth of knowledge, excitement, and enthusiasm to the R2X process, and more importantly, aims to improve this process for principal investigators that wish to translate and transition social science research into various NOAA applications. Dr. Williams earned his M.S. and PhD in Geography from the University of Georgia, and a B.S. in Geography, a B.S. in Psychology, and an Atmospheric Sciences certificate from the University of Georgia.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + 2022 Hurricane Outlook
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia; Matthew Rosencrans, NOAA Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 28 June 2022
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + 2022 Hurricane Outlook

Presenter(s):
Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center (Climate Overview)

Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center (Water Resources Overview )

Pam Knox, University of Georgia (Agriculture Impact Update)

Matthew Rosencrans | NOAA Climate Prediction Center (2022 Hurricane Outlook)

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

The June 28 webinar will feature a special presentation on the 2022 Hurricane Outlook.

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/9215585718468903438

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here: (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

27 June 2022

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Zach Hoylman, Montana Climate Office; Karin Bumbaco, Office of the Washington State Climatologist, Joe Casola, NOAA NCEI Western Regional Climate Services Director
Date & Time: 27 June 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar

Presenter(s):

Climate Recap & Current Conditions
Karin Bumbaco | Office of the Washington State Climatologist

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Joe Casola | NOAA NCEI Western Regional Climate Services Director

Drought Assessment Has Been Outpaced by Climate Change: Empirical Arguments for a Paradigm Shift
Zach Hoylman | Montana Climate Office

Seminar Contact(s): Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
According to the June 7, 2022 U.S. Drought Monitor, 53.2% of the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) is in drought, with 17.8% of the region in Extreme/Exceptional Drought (D3/D4). On a positive note, this is down from just over 75% of the region in drought at the beginning of 2022. Much of the region has been getting steady precipitation along with cool temperatures during this time. However, parts of southern OR and ID have missed out on much of the moisture, as has been the case for many years now. This webinar will provide more information on the current conditions and outlooks, as well as a presentation on a new NIDIS-funded study from the Montana Climate Office on "Drought assessment has been outpaced by climate change: empirical arguments for a paradigm shift."

These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4493424066685411340

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

24 June 2022

Title: Three Minute Thesis Webinar on NOAA’s Extreme Heat Efforts
Presenter(s): Kim McMahon, Public Services Program Manager, NOAA National Weather Service, Analyze, Forecast, and Support Office; Jared Rennie, Physical Scientist, NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, NESDIS; Morgan Zabow, Climate and Heat Health Lead, NOAA Office of Atmospheric Research, Climate Program Office; Hunter Jones, Climate and Health Project Manager at NOAA Office of Atmospheric Research, Climate Program Office; Paul Iiguez, Science and Operations Officer, NOAA National Weather Service Forecast Office - Phoenix, AZ; Aja Szumylo, NOAA West Regional Coordinator, NOAA Regional Collaboration Network; Michael Jacox, Research Oceanographer, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center and and NOAA Physical Sciences Laboratory; Derek Manzello, Coral Reef Watch Manager, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program; Teri King, Aquaculture and Marine Water Quality Specialist Washington Sea Grant
Date & Time: 24 June 2022
12:45 pm - 1:45 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Three Minute Thesis Webinar on NOAA's Extreme Heat Efforts

Presenter(s): Kim McMahon, Public Services Program Manager, NOAA National Weather Service, Analyze, Forecast, and Support Office; Jared Rennie, Physical Scientist, NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, NESDIS; Morgan Zabow , Climate and Heat Health Lead, NOAA Office of Atmospheric Research, Climate Program Office; Hunter Jones, Climate and Health Project Manager at NOAA Office of Atmospheric Research, Climate Program Office; Paul Iiguez, Science and Operations Officer, NOAA National Weather Service Forecast Office - Phoenix, AZ; Aja Szumylo, NOAA West Regional Coordinator, NOAA Regional Collaboration Network; Michael Jacox, Research Oceanographer, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center and and NOAA Physical Sciences Laboratory; Derek Manzello, Coral Reef Watch Manager, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program; Teri King, Aquaculture and Marine Water Quality Specialist Washington Sea Grant

Sponsor(s): NOAA Regional Collaboration Network

Seminar Contact(s): Keli Pirtle, keli.pirtle@noaa.gov and Nicole Fernandes, nicole.fernandes@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register -- https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2717028894937947152 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract: Nine NOAA colleagues each have one slide and three minutes to share experiences and information about NOAA's role related to extreme heat. From national and local efforts to build awareness and mitigate the effects of extreme heat, to innovative terrestrial and marine research - audience members will have the chance to hear straight from the experts on a wide array of heat-related topics. In addition, presenters will address questions from the audience.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be made available shortly after the seminar at: https://www.noaa.gov/regions/central-region-thesis-webinar-recordings

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

23 June 2022

Title: Collecting User Needs for Retrospective Satellite Data
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 23 June 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Collecting User Needs for Retrospective Satellite DataBriefer: Mike Brewer, Chief, Climatic Information Services Branch, NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information, Climatic Science and Services Division (CSSD), Asheville NC

Sponsor(s): NOAA JPSS Program


Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)Remote Access
meet.google.com/uzf-xzou-gkpPhoneNumbers(US)+1 617-675-4444PIN: 464 983 578 8107#


Abstract:
In addition to hosting one of the largest and most significant archives of environmental data across the world, NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) is a leading science and services agency for climate and other environmental information. In order to assess the impact of NOAA data, information, and services, it is critical for NCEI to understand the uses and benefits of the data it provides to users. NCEI also uses this information to evolve its suite of use-inspired data and information and to ensure the data is applicable to planning and decision making. Over the past several years, NCEI has made a concerted effort to understand and document the benefits of its data to decision makers in multiple sectors of the Nation's economy. This includes research, reports, documenting customer use cases, and general user engagement. This presentation provides an overview of the benefits derived by end users of NOAA information and services provided from NCEI. It also will focus on users, uses, and benefits of JPSS data and information.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!(Mike Brewer, Chief, Climatic Information Services Branch, NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information, Climatic Science and Services Division (CSSD), Asheville NC)


Title: Physical Heights of Inland Lakes
Presenter(s): Dr.Nico Sneeuw, University of Stuttgart, Germany
Date & Time: 23 June 2022
9:00 am - 10:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Physical Heights of Inland Lakes

Presenter(s): Dr. NicoSneeuw, Institute of Geodesy, University of Stuttgart, Germany

Sponsor(s): National Geodetic Survey


Seminar Contact(s): Carla Kirby - Carla.Kirby@noaa.gov

Remote Access: meet.google.com/gcr-vkeq-opnPhone Numbers
(US)+1 409-420-8301
PIN: 714 457 506#

Abstract: Inlandsatellite altimetry is routinely used to monitor the water levels of rivers,lakes, and reservoirs. Although well understood in physical geodesy, quantificationof the orthometric height variation of a lake surface is lacking. How orthometric height variation depends ongravity variation and on height will be explained.

Bio(s): Adjunct Professor, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Iran:; Professor and Director Institute of Geodesy, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering and Geodesy, University of Stuttgart, Germany: and Luojia Chair (honorary professorship), Wuhan University, China. Expertise is in Spaceborne Gravimetry, Hydro-Geodesy and Geodetic Earth System Science, and Theory of Satellite Geodesy.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Contact Carla Kirby for presentation slides after the talk.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

22 June 2022

Title: Community-Based Queen Conch Aquaculture in Puerto Rico
Presenter(s): Megan Davis, Ph.D., Research Professor, Aquaculture & Stock Enhancement, FAU Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute; Raimundo Espinoza, Executive Director, Conservacin ConCiencia; Randie Hovatter, Communications Specialist, NOAA Office of Aquaculture
Date & Time: 22 June 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Community-Based Queen Conch Aquaculture in Puerto Rico

Presenter(s): Megan Davis, Ph.D., Research Professor, Aquaculture & Stock Enhancement, FAU Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute; Raimundo Espinoza, Executive Director, Conservacin ConCiencia; Randie Hovatter (Moderator), Communications Specialist, NOAA Office of Aquaculture.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of Aquaculture

Seminar Contact(s): Randie Hovatter (randie.hovatter@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Register at https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?RGID=r631df511f8dfdc5eea3d111d7a5cdc13

Abstract: This installment of the NOAA Science Seminar Series is presented by the NOAA Office of Aquaculture. The webinar will consist of a 30-40 minute presentation, followed by moderated Q&A for the remainder of the hour. It is open to internal NOAA and external attendees. This session will be captioned and recorded. For your convenience, please register in advance. If you have any questions, please contact Randie Hovatter (randie.hovatter@noaa.gov).
The queen conch (Aliger gigas) is an important fishery species in the Caribbean. Over the past several decades there has been a significant decline of the conch in the region due to overfishing and habitat degradation. The conch, also known as carrucho,' is fished in Puerto Rico for local consumption, with very little export. With the decline in populations in the Puerto Rico state and federal waters, closed seasons, and disruption of conch habitats from hurricanes, conch is a prime candidate aquaculture species.The project goal for the Saltonstall-Kennedy NOAA Awards is to assist with restoration of the queen conch fishery in Puerto Rico by producing 2,000 conch per year in a fishers-operated pilot-scale hatchery and nursery facility. In June 2021, the conch hatchery and seawater system were completed at the Naguabo Commercial Fishing Association. The fishers collect up to three small sections of conch egg masses every one to two weeks during their fishing trips. In the hatchery, the egg masses incubate in a recirculating saltwater system. On the fourth day, each egg mass hatches in a 68-L larval tank. The conch veligers (larvae) are cultured for 21-28 days and fed microalgae (Isocrysis galbana and Chaetoceros gracilis). In July 2021, the first culture of larvae successfully metamorphosed in shallow trays in a recirculating tank system. Detrital seagrass blades were used as the metamorphic cue and the conch were provided with flocculated C. gracilis food. Multiple batches of larvae have been raised and the juveniles are grown in a recirculating nursery tank system with sand substrate. At this stage the conch are fed a gel-diet for 12-months prior to release (at 7-8 cm) in nearby seagrass beds. This project serves as a model that can be transferred to other fishing communities in Puerto Rico and elsewhere in the Caribbean.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to oneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: NOAA User Engagement- Vanessa Escobar
Presenter(s): Dr. Vanessa Escobar, NOAA/NESDIS
Date & Time: 22 June 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA User Engagement

Presenter(s): Vanessa Escobar, NOAA/NESDIS

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Abstract: coming soon!

Bio(s): Dr. Escobar is the Sr Scientist/Policy Advisor for NOAA NESDIS User Engagement and previously was Lead Scientist for NASA/NOAA GEO-XO User Engagement based at Goddard. She has held other contractor positions at NASA Applied Sciences Program. She also is an Army veteran, with 12 or more years of service. Dr. Escobar earned her B.S. degree in Geology from Sonoma State University, an M.S. degree from Arizona State University in Geology/Water Management/Policy, and a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland.

Remote Access: Join from your computer, tablet or smartphone https://meet.goto.com/973068557Or dial in: United States: +1 (571) 317-3116 Canada: +1 (647) 497-9373
Access Code: 973-068-557Slides, Recordings Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php

Title: Global Deep Sea Capacity Assessment Results
Presenter(s): Dr. Katy Croff Bell, President and Founder, Ocean Discovery League; Maud Quinzin, Capacity Assessment Project Manager, Ocean Discovery League
Date & Time: 22 June 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Global Deep Sea Capacity Assessment Results

Presenter(s): Dr. Katy Croff Bell (President and Founder, Ocean Discovery League) and Maud Quinzin (Capacity Assessment Project Manager, Ocean Discovery League). https://drive.google.com/file/d/1s-cCYRMusVc2tXE1zXrwwjKG6FoMYG66/view?usp=sharing

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and NOAA Central Library.

Seminar Contact(s): Joanne Flanders (joanne.flanders@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2726402231330937099

Accessibility: Closed Captioning Link: https://das.1capapp.com/session/341226/view?sessid=r2pj44vaadpock2gdipgsn37m1

Abstract: Exploration and research in the 93% of our planet's ocean that lies deeper than 200m is typically conducted by only a handful of countries with the required financial and personnel resources. But just how many countries actually have the capacity to access and work in the deep ocean? This knowledge is essential to make deep-sea exploration and science more inclusive and equitable. The Global Deep Sea Capacity Assessment is a baseline survey of the technical and human capacity for deep sea science and exploration in every coastal nation with deep waters (200m+) around the world. The assessment, conducted throughout 2021, was led by Dr. Katy Croff Bell, National Geographic Explorer and Founder of Ocean Discovery League. This assessment is the broadest survey ever conducted on current capabilities to explore and study the deep sea, including more than 120 countries, of which 100 were developing economies and Small Island Developing States. In addition to the survey responses, the results include detailed research conducted by a global team of research assistants.

Bios: Dr. Katy Croff Bell (President and Founder, Ocean Discovery League) and Maud Quinzin (Capacity Assessment Project Manager, Ocean Discovery League).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording will be available after the webinar on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to: OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Hydrogeodesy - Space Gravimetry and its applications
Presenter(s): Dr. Jrgen Kusche, University of Bonn
Date & Time: 22 June 2022
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Hydrogeodesy - Space Gravimetry and its current and future applications in drought monitoring, water resource assessment and regional climate monitoring.


Presenter(s): Dr. Jrgen Kusche, University of Bonn, Germany


Sponsor(s): NOAA/NOS National Geodetic Survey

Seminar Contact(s): Carla Kirby, Carla.Kirby@noaa.gov

Remote Access: meet.google.com/xjk-nsqt-fxnPhone Numbers
(US)+1 424-341-5990
PIN: 523 859 999#

Abstract: Dr. Jrgen Kusche will present GRACE and GRACE-FO in terrestrial water cycle monitoring quantification and monitoring of droughts, assessment of water resources, contribution to sea level rise, etc. and data assimilation toward high resolution models for applications in terrestrial water cycle, precipitation on soil moisture, etc.

Bio(s): Dr. Jrgen Kusche at University of Bonn is a world-renowned expert in geodesy whose work is highly cited in the field. Over his more than 30 years experiences in geodesy, he takes a wide variety range of roles such as: the Head of Section 1.3 Gravity Field and Gravimetry at Helmholtz Centre Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ); Associate professor at Dept. of Earth Observation and Space Systems; Delft University of Technology (The Netherlands); Speaker of DFG collaborative research centre CRC1502 (Regional Climate Change: Disentangling the Role of Land Use and Water Management); Co-speaker of DFG research group 2630 (Understanding the global freshwater system by combining geodetic and remote sensing information with modeling using a calibration / data assimilation approach; Vice Dean for Research and Young Academics, Director of Graduate School; Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Geodesy; Coordinator gravity field research in the DFG priority program 1778 Dynamic Earth; Member board of directors of the Geoverbund ABC/J (Aachen-Bonn-Cologne-Jlich); Speaker DFG priority program 1257 Mass transports and mass distributions in system Earth.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Contact Carla Kirby for presentation slides after the talk.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

21 June 2022

Title: Monitoring and Predicting the Mediterranean and Black Seas from Regional to Coastal Scales
Presenter(s): Leonardo Lima & Giovanni Choppini, Centro Euro-Mediterraneo sui Cambiamenti Climatici, Lecce, Italy
Date & Time: 21 June 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Monitoring and Predicting the Mediterranean and Black Seas from Regional to Coastal Scales

Presenter(s): Leonardo Lima & Giovanni Coppini (Centro Euro-Mediterraneo sui Cambiamenti Climatici, Lecce, Italy)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar Contact(s): Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US)+1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: TBD


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

17 June 2022

Title: June 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy
Date & Time: 17 June 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: June 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov) & Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/june-2022-nws-climate-briefing/

Abstract: We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools, and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for July 2022 and the summer season. Join the gathering online to learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

16 June 2022

Title: National Marine Sanctuaries: Where We've Been and Where We're Headed
Presenter(s): John Armor, Director, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 16 June 2022
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: National Marine Sanctuaries: Where We've Been and Where We're Headed

Presenter(s): John Armor, Director, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/753425373229203980

Abstract: Nearly fifty years ago, a new era of ocean conservation was born by creating a system of national marine sanctuaries. Since then, the National Marine Sanctuary System has grown into a nationwide network of 15 national marine sanctuaries and two marine national monuments that conserve more than 620,000 square miles of spectacular ocean and Great Lakes waters, an area nearly the size of Alaska. As we approach the 50th anniversary of the System, we're taking time to look back on all that's been accomplished, celebrate where we've gotten to, and plan for the future, to elevate national marine sanctuaries and their effectiveness (as well as other types of MPAs) as part of a future strategy for ocean and Great Lakes conservation.This presentation is part of the Third Thursday By the Bay Presentation Series at Mokuppapa Discovery Center, which is the visitor center for Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument in Hilo, Hawaii. This lecture series is also supported by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation through a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Beth Hall, Indiana State Climatologist
Date & Time: 16 June 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook

Presenter(s): Beth Hall | Indiana State Climatologist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

June 2022 topics include drought changes and longer term impacts, continued risk and improvement for drought and flash drought potential, and summer wildfire potential updates. Additional topics include recent and potential climate/weather impacts including, but not limited to, continuing La Nia and what it could mean for the region, soil moisture update and recharge outlook (both too wet and too dry), flooding concerns (record flooding and precipitation), and temperature and more specifically heat outlooks.

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7528179497868100876

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Coral Symbiosis Under Future Ocean Conditions
Presenter(s): Mariana Rocha de Souza, 2022 Knauss Fellow at NOAA's Global Ocean Monitoring and Observing Program
Date & Time: 16 June 2022
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Coral Symbiosis Under Future Ocean Conditions (2022 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Mariana Rocha de Souza, 2022 Knauss Fellow at NOAA's Global Ocean Monitoring and Observing Program (GOMO)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Abstract: Algal symbiont community composition of corals changes in response to their environment, and this response is dependent on both the coral species and their site of origin
Keywords: corals, symbiosis, bleaching

Bio(s): Mariana got her PhD in Marine Biology at the University of Hawaii, Manoa, where she studied the interaction of corals and their algal symbiont and how they respond to climate change. She is currently placed at the Global Ocean Monitoring and Observing Program at NOAA.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

15 June 2022

Title: NOAA’s Regional Climate Services (RCS) Program: what does it do and how does it work with other entities?
Presenter(s): Eric James, NOAA Global Systems Laboratory
Date & Time: 15 June 2022
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: VAWS: NOAA's Regional Climate Services (RCS) Program: what does it do and how does it work with other entities?

Presenter(s): Dr. Jessica Cherry, RCS Director for Alaska

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov), Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu), & Danielle Meeker (demeeker@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/vaws-june-2022/

Abstract: This talk provides an overview of the National Centers for Environmental Information's Regional Climate Services Program and what services are specifically available for Alaska. Products available from NCEI's parent organization, the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) will also be discussed, as well as the contractual relationship with the Regional Climate Centers. Within NOAA, coordination with the National Weather Service's Climate Services Branch, Environmental Science and Services Divisions, Regional Integrated Science and Assessment Programs, Co-operative Institutes, and Regional Teams is essential. The RCS Directors also coordinate with state and federal partners such as the State Climatologists, the USDA Climate Hubs, FEMA, and the USGS Climate Adaptation Science Centers. Listeners should come away with an understanding of what Alaska's Regional Climate Services Director can provide.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Upper Atmosphere and Ionosphere Forecast at NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (NCEP/EMC Seminar)
Presenter(s): Tzu-Wei Fang, NOAA NCEP/SWPC
Date & Time: 15 June 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Upper Atmosphere and Ionosphere Forecast at NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center

Presenter(s): Tzu-Wei Fang, NCEP/SWPC

Sponsor(s): NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) Seminar Series

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/qwt-qqjt-zid
(US) +1 413-276-7219 PIN: 343 063 905#

Abstract: At NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC),multiple thermosphere-ionosphere models have been developed and transitioned into operation. These models, including the data-assimilative model GloTEC andthe coupled Whole Atmosphere Model and Ionosphere Plasma sphere Electrodynamics model (WAM-IPE), are utilized to provide real-time ionospheric specification aswell as forecasts a few days in advance. Ionospheric products including total electron content (TEC), maximum usable frequency (MUF), and ionosphere irregularity activities are used to issue warnings and alerts for radiocommunication and GNSS-based navigation for supporting the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) space weather information service. Based on the forecasts provided by the WAM-IPE, SWPC is exploring new products for thermospheric expansion and satellite drag. In this talk, we will describe the needs for space weather forecasts, the development of various models, and th eongoing collaboration between EMC and SWPC on the FV3 version of WAM.
Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Creating readily-consumable information products to communicate climate risks
Presenter(s): Ed Kearns, Chief Data Officer, First Street Foundation
Date & Time: 15 June 2022
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Seminar Series

Title: Creating readily-consumable information products to communicate climate risks

Presenter(s): Dr. Ed Kearns, Chief Data Officer, First Street Foundation

Sponsor(s): Cooperative Institute for Satellite and Earth System Studies (CISESS) Science Webinar Series


Seminar Contact(s): Douglas Rao (yrao5@ncsu.edu)

Remote Access: https://ncsu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEldeurqTMtGNORPocI1jh0oLqT1ZanW-dy

Accessibility: Live transcript will be available.

Abstract: The nonprofit First Street Foundation has created publicly-accessible information products for the U.S. to quantify and communicate climate risk, built upon open government data from NOAA, USGS, USACE, FEMA, USFS, and other government agencies. The methodology behind the creation of flood and wildfire risk products will be described, as well as the strategies for the communication and use of those information products. Challenges in the creation and application of these information products to address climate risk across the US will also be discussed.

Bio(s): As the Chief Data Officer, Dr. Kearns provides leadership for the First Street Foundation's science and data activities. He previously served as Chief Data Officer for the U.S. Department of Commerce, overseeing the governance and management of data assets from its 12 bureaus. Appointed as NOAA's first Chief Data Officer in 2017, he led the development of strategies and practices for managing NOAA's data as a national asset. He promoted new uses and wider understanding of federal data through new public-private partnerships and technologies, such as the NOAA Big Data Project, and he helped develop the first Federal Data Strategy for the White House's Leveraging Data as a Strategic Asset initiative. He currently also serves as a member of the Applied Sciences Advisory Committee within NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Dr. Kearns holds a B.S. in Physics and Marine Science from the University of Miami, and he holds a Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography from the University of Rhode Island.

Recordings: Recording will be shared after the webinar with all who register for the webinar.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

14 June 2022

Title: ​NOAA’s Role in the Whole-of-Government Effort to Address the Climate Crisis
Presenter(s): Wayne Higgins, Ph.D.; Director of NOAA's Office of Oceanic Research, Climate Program Office
Date & Time: 14 June 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA's Role in the Whole-of-Government Effort to Address the Climate Crisis
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series. These webinars are open to the public, in or outside of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Presenter(s): Wayne Higgins, Ph.D.; Director of NOAA's Office of Oceanic Research, Climate Program Office

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/higgins/event/registration.html
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Sponsor(s): This event is part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series with sponsorship from the NOAA Science Council. The NOAA-wide NELS provides examples of NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. The NELS are presented as part of the NOAA Science Seminar Series For NELS questions, contact nels@noaa.gov.

Abstract: Since its inception in 1970, NOAA has built a strong, foundational climate service driven by state-of-the-art research using essential global observations to deliver the information the nation needs to understand and respond to climate change. The agency is poised to receive a once in a generation infusion of investments over the next decade through the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, the disaster supplemental, the Build Back Better Act (pending passage) as well as the FY22 and proposed FY23 budget. Through these investments, NOAA will support a whole-of-government effort to address the climate crisis and promote economic development by building a Climate Ready Nation by 2030. NOAA recognizes that the impacts of climate change fall disproportionately on underserved communities, which requires a renewed commitment to equity and environmental justice. The agency is committed to delivering products and services in a way that is effective, equitable, and advances environmental justice, supportive of Executive Order 14058: Transforming Federal Customer Experience and Service Delivery to Rebuild Trust in Government. As the Director of NOAA's Climate Program Office, Dr. Higgins is responsible for advancing the agency's top climate priorities, which include establishing the agency as the U.S. Federal government's authoritative source for climate products and services. This environmental leadership seminar will examine the actions that NOAA and the Department of Commerce (DOC) are taking to address the climate crisis. From this discussion, participants will learn how the White House, DOC, and NOAA's activities (intra-agency, interagency and international) are accelerating the whole-of-government effort to combat the climate crisis with targeted investments aimed at building resilience in the face of climate hazards.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Bio(s): https://cpo.noaa.gov/Contact/Dr-Wayne-Higgins

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:This session to be recorded. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

10 June 2022

Title: Objective counterfactual analysis: Re-evaluating risk from North Atlantic hurricanes
Presenter(s): Tom J. Philp, Maximum Information/London School of Economics
Date & Time: 10 June 2022
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Objective counterfactual analysis: Re-evaluating risk from North Atlantic hurricanes

Presenter(s): Tom J. Philp, Maximum Information/London School of Economics

Sponsor(s): NOAA / OAR / Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

Seminar Contact(s): Shirley Murillo webinar host, shirley.murillo@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.goto.com/523560829

Abstract:
Downward counterfactual analysis " or estimating how our observed history could have been worse " is increasingly being used by the re/insurance industry to quantify the potential impacts of previously unseen catastrophic events. In the case of North Atlantic Hurricanes, an example downward counterfactual could be "what would losses have been if Hurricane Matthew (2016) had followed one of its early forecast paths and made a double landfall in Florida?" While these downward counterfactuals are useful for site-specific adaptation strategies, the focus on downward (i.e., "worse-only") scenarios precludes us from assigning probabilities to the occurrence of these scenarios.

Here it is hypothesized that combined upward and downward counterfactual analysis (i.e., how history could have been either better or worse) may allow us to obtain novel information about historical events' probability of occurrence. To test the hypothesis, we create 10,000 counterfactual North Atlantic Hurricane histories from unrealized reforecast data for the period 1985-2016 and compare the statistics to our observed history. While in this formative experiment, the counterfactual histories show systematic under-prediction of US landfall risk, the results still point to an improved understanding of relative risk of landfalls along the US coastline. It is hoped this talk will allow others to attach to the concept and evolve methods appropriately to remove biases; this will ultimately help to better predict and manage the risk of high-impact hurricane landfalls on the US coastline.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be made available shortly after the webinar at: https://www.aoml.noaa.gov/seminars/

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

9 June 2022

Title: NOAA CoastWatch Seminar: Chesapeake Bay Shoreline Mapping
Presenter(s): Ceniceros/Nezlin, NOAA
Date & Time: 9 June 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

1-

Title: CEOS COAST shoreline and SAR work in Chesapeake Bay.

1-

Presenter(s): Nick Nezlin, NOAA Affiliate


(Julio Ceniceros' talk has been cancelled - sorry for the late notice)

Sponsor(s): NOAA CoastWatch (STAR)

Remote Access: Video call link: https://meet.google.com/uco-uboz-cmk
Or dial: (US) +1 406-838-3189 PIN: 768 242 663#
More phone numbers: https://tel.meet/uco-uboz-cmk?pin=1330913488741


Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Abstract: the NOAA CoastWatch Seminar Series features two speakers from the NOAA CoastWatch Application Team presenting information that will be of interest to NOAA CoastWatch Users and the CoastWatch Team. If you are a NOAA CoastWatch user, or think you might want to be, you are welcome to attend this webinar.
Slides, Recordings Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php

Title: Thinking toward the future of hard coral data findability, interoperability, and reusability
Presenter(s): Erica Towle, NOS CRCP, Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 9 June 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Thinking toward the future of hard coral data findability, interoperability, and reusability

Presenter(s): Dr. Erica Towle, National Coral Reef Monitoring Program Program Manager, CRCP, Silver Spring, MD

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program

Seminar Contact(s): Caroline Donovan, caroline.donovan@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Adobe Connect
1. To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/
2. Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: For the first time, a group of experts including coral scientists and data managers from across U.S. federal agencies and regional groups came together to better understand and seek to improve data collection, archiving, and interoperability for hard coral cover. The group made recommendations that seek to reconcile how coral cover is captured as an Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) core variable with how hard coral cover is captured as a Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) Essential Ocean Variable. The group also made several recommendations on data standardization (e.g., Darwin Core Standards) and asserts the need for greater coordination across U.S. federal agencies and regional groups. The ability to more easily facilitate re-use of data collected for disparate projects for a variety of management needs has national and global implications. For example, adopting these recommendations allows for more consistent reporting at broad geographic scales, which could facilitate a more accurate understanding of the status and trends of coral reef ecosystems. Furthermore, the recommendations are key to make data products that inform a multitude of coral-related administration priorities, such as strengthening natural infrastructure and mitigating and combating climate change. To implement these solutions, agencies and their leadership must make data interoperability a priority.

Bio(s): Dr. Erica Towle (pronounced Toll) (she/her/hers) is a marine biologist who currently serves as the Program Manager for the internationally-recognized National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Coral Reef Monitoring Program (NCRMP). The NCRMP is a long-term, national-scale program to understand the status and trends in U.S. Pacific, Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico states and territories with coral reefs. Towle is in charge of facilitating and maintaining internal and external collaborations within NOAA, other federal agencies, state/territorial agencies, non-governmental organizations, and academia; providing technical scientific expertise on all coral monitoring program decisions; budget planning and execution of all monitoring missions and program expenditures; maintaining data stewardship, quality assurance and control, reporting, and data archival; and representing the program at national and international meetings and conferences. Prior to leading the program, Towle was an advisor to the Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere. Towle is the recipient of the NOAA Knauss Fellowship, and served as a Fellow in the U.S. Senate's Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee, Subcommittee for Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries, and Coast Guard. Towle earned her Ph.D. in Marine Biology and Fisheries from the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, and her research has been featured in National Geographic and The Miami Herald.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: METplus Verification and Diagnostics Framework - Updates, Plans and Challenges
Presenter(s): Tara Jensen - NCAR/RAL and DTC
Date & Time: 9 June 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: METplus Verification and Diagnostics Framework - Updates, Plans and Challenges Part of the UFS Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Tara Jensen - NCAR/RAL and DTC

Sponsor(s): Office of Science and Technology Integration (OSTI) Modeling Division, National Weather Service of NOAA. If you would like to recommend a speaker and topic please email:
ufs.modeling@noaa.gov and provide information on speaker and topic along with email addresses of speakers.

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Mackell (stacy.mackell@noaa.gov) and Caroline Delgado (caroline.delgado@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/6980235688648784143

Abstract: The enhanced Model Evaluation Tools (METplus) is a very comprehensive verification and diagnostic software package for use with a wide range of temporal and spatial prediction and available to the Unified Forecast System (UFS) developers and users via the Developmental Testbed Center (DTC). Recent emphasis has been on addressing the needs of the UFS Research to Operations (R2O) project, the findings from the 2021 DTC UFS Evaluation Metrics Workshop, the DTC Testing and Evaluation activities, and numerous other projects. This talk will review what has been added, what is in the development pipeline, and some of the challenges the METplus team is facing while trying to ensure that all of the additions will be able to move into operations successfully.

Bio(s): Tara Jensen is Project Manager II at NCAR/RAL in the Joint Numerical Testbed Program and the DTC Deputy Director at NCAR. She has a Master's Degree from Colorado State University with extensive experience in in-situ and remove observations, numerical modeling, and verification. For the past 7 years, she has been co-leading the DTC verification team in the development of METplus. This framework has its roots in tropospheric weather verification but over the years has been extended to also include applications such as upper atmosphere and space weather, atmospheric composition, marine and cryosphere, and extended range prediction.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:All PowerPoints and recordings from past webinars can be accessed at the UFS webinar web page.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Advancing observational and analytical methods to support science-based management
Presenter(s): Josh Stewart, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 9 June 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Advancing observational and analytical methods to support science-based management

Presenter(s): Josh Stewart, Oregon State University

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 199 208 1054
Meeting password: QKdp3p4SMe6JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Global call-in numbers https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/globalcallin.php?MTID=m3142650430de6a3cadba4efb1ef4af96

Abstract: TBD


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: It’s 2022 - Are You Done Yet?
Presenter(s): Dru Smith, Ph.D., NSRS Modernization Manager, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 June 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: It's 2022 - Are You Done Yet?

Presenter(s): Dru Smith, Ph.D., NSRS Modernization Manager, NOAA National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NOS National Geodetic Survey.

Seminar Contact(s): sonja.bowen@noaa.gov, NOAA National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4083717449829912591
Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Abstract: This talk provides the latest information on NSRS Modernization, an effort ongoing at NGS since 2007. It will briefly discuss what NSRS Modernization is, but will focus more on what has been accomplished recently. Examples and teasers of upcoming data and tools will be presented. An estimated timeline, including initial roll-out and follow-on tool building will also be presented.

Technical Content Rating: Intermediate - Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.


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Title: The ONo Index: Detecting novel ocean conditions for MPA management
Presenter(s): Steven Manaoakamai Johnson, Arizona State University
Date & Time: 9 June 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The ONo Index: Detecting novel ocean conditions for MPA management

Presenter(s): Steven Manaoakamai Johnson, Arizona State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA National MPA Center and OCTO

Seminar Contact(s): Zac Cannizzo, zac.cannizzo@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_A1QpSGLGQAmz3srqm16Tpw

Abstract:
A fundamental challenge in ocean conservation is translating the results of climate models into forms that managers and others can use to plan for the future. Using techniques from information theory, the Ocean Novelty (ONo) Index provides a simple and intuitive way to understand how climate change will alter key ocean biogeochemical variables. This measure can help MPA managers know what they need to prioritize in their planning and design policies and regulations that help their MPA keep pace with expected shifts in the ecosystem state. This webinar will share how the ONo Index is calculated and walk through an application for large MPAs. We will also be asking attendees to share their experiences and challenges using climate change data and scenarios in their MPA planning.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here (https://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/archive.html)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

8 June 2022

Title:
New
Northeast Regional Habitat Assessment
Presenter(s): Christopher Haak, Monmouth University; Tori Kentner, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council
Date & Time: 8 June 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Northeast Regional Habitat Assessment (EBM/EBFM)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Christopher Haak, Monmouth University and Tori Kentner, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4702291695240836368
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The Northeast U.S. Regional Marine Fish Habitat Assessment (NRHA) is a collaborative, multi-disciplinary effort to develop decision support products for fish habitat management. Employing a novel spatiotemporal joint-species distribution modeling framework, the team evaluated habitat use patterns for marine fish and invertebrate communities on the northeast shelf, relating catch data from the NOAA Fisheries bottom trawl surveys to an array of environmental predictor variables. Simultaneously, the team developed an R shiny application to facilitate the analysis, visualization, and exploration of state and federal fisheries independent datasets in estuarine, coastal, and offshore environments, and to host NRHA products online.

Keywords: Joint-Species Distribution Models, Fish Habitat, R-Shiny

Bio(s): Dr. Christopher Haak is a research scientist at Monmouth University working in cooperation with NOAA NEFSC. From shallow back-reef habitats of The Bahamas to the NE continental shelf, his interests lie in understanding how physical and ecological processes interact to shape marine fish communities.

Tori Kentner recently joined the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council as a Fishery Management Specialist. Her specialty is spatial data analysis and visualization, programming, and GIS. Previously she was a GIS specialist at NOAA Fisheries for wind energy, deep sea corals and species modeling.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: HydroSMAC: Combining Habitat Suitability and Physical Oceanography for Targeted Discovery of New Benthic Communities on the West Florida Slope
Presenter(s): Dr. Sandra Brooke and Dr. Jeroen Ingels, Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory
Date & Time: 8 June 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: HydroSMAC: Combining Habitat Suitability and Physical Oceanography for Targeted Discovery of New Benthic Communities on the West Florida Slope

Presenter(s): Dr. Sandra Brooke and Dr. Jeroen Ingels (Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory).

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and NOAA Central Library.



Seminar Contact(s): Ashley Marranzino ashley.marranzino@noaa.gov and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6343773497260330254

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The HydroSMAC NOAA Ocean Exploration expedition (RV Point Sur, ROV Global Explorer) studied benthic communities off the West Florida Escarpment (WFE). The mission focused on morphological and molecular exploration of deep (>1,000m) habitats of the WFE, with particular emphasis on hard-bottom communities such as corals and sponges, and the microscopic meiofauna that live in sediments. Our objectives were to generate new data on distribution of coral species in this understudied area, and to assess whether we can use meiofauna communities as indicators of ambient current regimes. Together with NOAA collaborators, our data will be incorporated into NOAA Habitat Suitability Models and used to ground truth' oceanographic current models.

Keywords: Deep Sea, Corals, Meiofauna

Bio(s): Sandra Brooke is a member of the Research Faculty at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab. Her research focuses on coral communities in shallow and deep waters, specifically understanding their ecology, distribution and community structure, and how they are affected by human activities. She has worked on shallow coral reefs in the Gulf of Mexico and south Florida and deep-sea coral ecosystems in Alaska, Norway, Western Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico.Jeroen Ingels is a marine biologist from Belgium who has been at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory since 2017. His lab, the @Meiolab, investigates diversity and functions of organisms on the seafloor, particularly meiofauna, microscopic animals that live in between the sediment grains. He has studied benthic ecosystems from the coastline to the abyss for nearly 20 years in the Atlantic, Pacific, Polar oceans, and the Gulf of Mexico, focusing on biodiversity and ecosystem function questions, and how benthic life is affected by anthropogenic stressors.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

6 June 2022

Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, June 2022: Surface Impacts of the January 2021 Sudden Stratospheric Warming With S2S Ensemble Forecasts, and IRI SubX-based Real-Time Subseasonal Precipitation and Temperature Forecasts
Presenter(s): Nicholas Davis, NCAR, and Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Climate School, Columbia University
Date & Time: 6 June 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Direct Assessment of the Surface Impacts of the January 2021 Sudden Stratospheric Warming With S2S Ensemble Forecasts, and IRI SubX-based Real-Time Subseasonal Precipitation and Temperature Forecasts



Presenter(s): Dr. Nicholas Davis, NCAR, and Dr. Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Climate School, Columbia University



Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Weather Program Office S2S Program and NOAA NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration Modeling Program Division

Seminar Contacts: Mark Olsen, mark.olsen@noaa.gov



Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7349203213382390032



Abstract: This monthly webinar series was created to share ongoing work within NWS and OAR at the Weeks 3-4 and S2S timescales. We would like to foster a relaxed, informal dialogue among forecasters, modelers and researchers. This month, Dr. Nicholas Davis will speak about "Direct Assessment of the Surface Impacts of the January 2021 Sudden Stratospheric Warming With S2S Ensemble Forecasts." Dr. Andrew Robertson will speak about "IRI SubX-based Real-Time Subseasonal Precipitation and Temperature Forecasts."



Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available on the Weeks 3-4/S2S Webinar Series website: https://vlab.noaa.gov/web/weeks-3-4-s2s-webinar-series



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: OEAB recognition
Presenter(s): Dr. Joshua Nowlis, President & Founder, Bridge Environment
Date & Time: 6 June 2022
6:00 am - 6:30 am ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Adaptive, Implementable Management (AIM): A New Take on and Old Paradigm (EBM/EBFM)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Dr. Joshua Nowlis, President & Founder, Bridge Environment

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4702291695240836368
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Implementing fisheries management systems can face resistance due to a perception of insufficient data and other management resources or skepticism of the ability to engage with and inspire compliance by fishers. Adaptive, Implementable Management (AIM) addresses these barriers by making fishery objectives the top consideration and then using as much science as is available to help achieve them. AIM further engages fishing communities by establishing rules for immediate action and committing to revisit and adjust these actions to better-achieve objectives. These concepts will be illustrated by applying them to several fisheries systems.

Keywords: fishery management systems, supplement to Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management

Bio(s): For more than two decades, Dr. Nowlis has performed science and provided scientific advice to make environmental policies more effective and efficient for NOAA and NOAA partners around the globe. He applies lessons learned from a Ph.D. in Ecology from Cornell University and a Master's in Economics from Stanford University. More than any other subject, he specializes in making analysis of complex systems useful and understandable to scientists and non-scientists alike.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

2 June 2022

Title: Incorporation of Environmental Effects into Stock Assessments and Habitat Modelling: Lessons Learned from American Lobster in the Gulf of Maine
Presenter(s): Dr. Cameron Hodgdon, Stony Brook University, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences
Date & Time: 2 June 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Incorporation of Environmental Effects into Stock Assessments and Habitat Modelling: Lessons Learned from American Lobster in the Gulf of Maine (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s): Dr. Cameron Hodgdon, Stony Brook University, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA's Central Library (NCL)Seminar Contacts: Kristan Blackhart and Library Seminars

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.


Abstract: Under climate change, the need for dynamic and thermallyexplicit processes in stock assessment, forecasting, and habitat modelling arebecoming increasingly more essential. Using American lobster in the Gulf ofMaine as a case study, this presentation is split into 3 parts. Part 1 willfocus on a framework to test the necessity of inclusion of environmentaleffects into stock assessments; part 2 will explore alternative avenues ofinclusion of environmental effects in the stock assessment process includingspawning biomass/recruitment relationships; and part 3 will focus onlimitations and challenges of modelling and forecasting habitat.Keywords: Stock Assessment; Habitat Modelling; Climate Change


Bio(s): Cameron is a postdoc at Stonybrook University's School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences where he works under Dr. Yong Chen. He recently received his PhD from the University of Maine also under the advisement of Dr. Yong Chen. His dissertation work was focused on climate effects in scallop and lobster modelling processes and his current research is focused on simulating the Gulf of Maine lobster fishery under different management and climate scenarios.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Mechanistic population projections for small pelagic fish in the California Current
Presenter(s): Stefan Koenigstein, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 2 June 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Mechanistic population projections for small pelagic fish in the California Current

Presenter(s): Stefan Koenigstein, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 199 208 1054
Meeting password: QKdp3p4SMe6JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Global call-in numbers https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/globalcallin.php?MTID=m3142650430de6a3cadba4efb1ef4af96

Abstract: Small pelagic fish are important marine fisheries resources and forage for top predators, such as seabirds and marine mammals. Their vulnerability to changing climate, fisheries exploitation and ecosystem shifts poses challenges for management and climate change adaptation. In the California Current upwelling system, Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax) has supported important fisheries in the past, but contrary to expectations, remains at low biomass despite recent warm ocean conditions.

We developed a process-based population model which reproduces fluctuations of the US Pacific sardine population based on ocean temperature, early life stage and adult food, and upwelling strength. An ensemble model configuration set fit to observations is used to bracket ecological uncertainty. Population abundance, catch and spatial distribution for the 21st century are projected from high-resolution, downscaled ocean-biogeochemical simulations under three earth system models (ESM).

The model demonstrates that the lack of sardine recovery after 2014, despite suitable warm ocean conditions and no fisheries, can be explained by reduced food availability. Ensemble projections show a likely recovery to early 2000's abundance and catch by mid-century driven by increased recruitment success, as a function of warming temperatures and modulated by food availability. Even for a fish species presumably favored by warmer conditions, there are risks of stock declines in food-limited years and when passing unknown thermal optima. Ecological process uncertainty is of the same magnitude as uncertainty associated with different ESM projections. After 2065, uncertainty related to the thermal optimum of early life stages dominates in faster-warming ESM projections. A marked northward shift of spawning habitat leads to increasing availability to the Pacific Northwest fishing fleet.

Adaptation of the model to Northern anchovy and other small pelagic fish species is ongoing. This work assesses the combined impacts of multiple environmental drivers, and quantifies sources of uncertainty to population projections of marine fish stocks under novel conditions, opening pathways for environment-responsive fisheries management strategies to mitigate climate change impacts.

BIOGRAPHY

I study climate impacts on marine ecosystems and sustainability of marine fisheries, combining concepts and methods from ecology, physiology and social-ecological system dynamics. I'm using ecological models as integrative tools to increase our understanding of system responses, feedbacks and possible future trajectories, incorporating observational and experimental data, regional ocean and earth system model output and stakeholder input.

I'm currently a postdoctoral Project Scientist at University of California Santa Cruz and NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, working on integrative population dynamics models for forage fish species in the California Current within the FutureSeas 2.0' project. A specific focus of my modeling work is to improve incorporation of biological processes, ecological interactions and assessment of uncertainty, thereby increasing the potential for linking to observational and experimental data, and for extrapolating into the future under multiple changing environmental drivers and changing ecosystems.

Previously I've worked in similar interdisciplinary research projects in Norway and Peru, linking marine ecology to fisheries, with an additional focus on incorporating local stakeholder input for participatory development of models and an assessment of climate governance and adaptation strategies. Furthermore I have led the development of an educational table-top / role-playing game for high schools and environmental education groups, on ocean systems and their stakeholders (Ocean Limited', www.ocean-limited.com).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Drought Update and Wildfire Outlook Webinar for California and the Southwest
Presenter(s): Dan McEvoy, Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute, National Interagency Fire Center; Christina Restaino, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Date & Time: 2 June 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Drought Update and Wildfire Outlook Webinar for California and the Southwest

Presenter(s):
Dan McEvoy, Western Regional Climate Center/Desert Research Institute, National Interagency Fire Center.
Christina Restaino, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension.

Sponsor(s): NOAA, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), California-Nevada Applications Program (a NOAA RISA team), USDA Southwest Climate Hub, Southwest Drought Learning Network

Seminar Contact(s): Amanda Sheffield (amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov), Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Wildfire season across the Southwestern U.S. has begun, with multiple destructive fires burning in Arizona and New Mexico. Across the U.S., over 1 million acres have already burned this year. Drought's relationship to wildland fire is complex, but the current drought combined with this summer's climate outlooks show high potential for elevated significant wildland fire in the Southwestern U.S. including California. Wildfires have far reaching impacts, including threats to human safety, degrading regional and national air quality, stressing water management, and local economic losses across a variety of sectors including recreation.

The Drought Update and Wildfire Outlook Webinar for California and the Southwest will provide timely information on the current drought status and outlook and wildland fire potential outlook. Additionally, this webinar will cover the Living with Fire resource as well as an emphasis on how to find wildfire and smoke risk information throughout wildfire season.

This webinar is a special joint region webinar, combining the California-Nevada DEWS Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar Series, which is produced in partnership with the California-Nevada Applications Program (a NOAA RISA team), and Southwest Drought Briefings, which are produced by the Intermountain West DEWS and the USDA Southwest Climate Hub as part of the Southwest Drought Learning Network.

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1255594319505372429

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Beyond Our Borders: Hurricane Forecast Collaboration in the Caribbean
Presenter(s): Evan Thompson, Director Jamaica Meteorological Service & President, World Meteorological Organization Region IV, and Dr. Cody Fritz, Acting Storm Surge Team Lead, NHC/NWS
Date & Time: 2 June 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Beyond Our Borders: Hurricane Forecast Collaboration in the Caribbean
Part of the 2022 Hurricane Awareness Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Evan Thompson, Director Jamaica Meteorological Service & President, World Meteorological Organization Region IV, and Dr. Cody Fritz, Acting Storm Surge Team Lead, NHC/NWS

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Southeast and Caribbean Regional Team (SECART), 2022 Hurricane Awareness Webinar Series

Seminar Contact(s): region.SECarib@noaa.gov, Shirley Murillo, webinar host: Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9147275259339296782

Abstract: Our partnerships with other countries are key when it comes to issuing forecasts. Ever wonder how it's done? Join us to hear from the speakers how that coordination is done and new storm surge capabilities NHC is undertaking.

Bio(s): Evan Thompson is the Director of the Jamaica Meteorological Service. He is also President of the World Meteorological Organization Region IV. Meteorologist Dr. Cody Fritz is Acting Storm Surge Team Lead, NHC/NWS.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be made available shortly after the webinar at: https://www.noaa.gov/regional-collaboration-network/regions-southeast-and-caribbean/2022-hurricane-awareness-webinars

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Topic modeling as a method to speed literature review
Presenter(s): Trevor Riley, Head of Public Services, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 2 June 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Topic modeling as a method to speed literature review

Presenter(s): Trevor Riley, Head of Public Services, NOAA Central Library


Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library
Seminar Contacts: NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)
Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2498573527048910860
Summary: Developing a search strategy and gathering literature on a topic or research question can be extremely time-consuming, especially in the environmental sciences where evidence often draws on cross-disciplinary research. While precision searching can often ensure quick retrieval of relevant literature, it is often important to develop a more sensitive search strategy in order to lower the risk of missing relevant literature and capture the highest number of relevant resources. In an effort to speed up various phases of the literature gathering process, the NOAA Central Library Research Services integrates a number of text mining methods to assist in search strategy development and literature screening. This seminar will focus on the application of topic modeling as a method to increase the capture of exemplar or "seed" articles in the initial phase of research, as well as review the use case for topic modeling for pre-screening literature. Keywords: methods, research, literature review
Accessibility/Recording: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Davidson Fellowship Research in Gulf NERRs (National Estuarine Research Reserve System)
Presenter(s): Matthew Virden, PhD, candidate at Mississippi State University; Kristine Zikmanis, PhD candidate at Florida International University ; Philip Souza, Ph.D. candidate at University of Texas Marine Science Institute; Mai Fung , Ph.D. candidate at the University of South Alabama; Kira Allen
Date & Time: 2 June 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Davidson Fellowship Research in Gulf NERRs (National Estuarine Research Reserve System)

Presenter(s): Matthew Virden, Kristine Zikmanis, Philip Souza, Mai Fung, Kira Allen

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NOS Office of Coast Management & the NOAA/NOS Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts:
Matt Chasse and Varis.Ransi@noaa.gov

Remote Access: You can register here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/davidsongulfnerrs/event/login.htmlYou may enter via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. If entering via a browser, PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use IE. Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer.
If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register at link above.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: National Estuarine Research Reserves across the nation work to address key coastal management questions to help scientists and communities understand challenges that may influence future policy and management strategies on our coasts. The NERRS Margaret A. Davidson Graduate Fellowship program provides opportunities for university graduate students to conduct research at reserves that can help address these questions. Through their fellowships, they participate in NOAA-provided career-focused training and professional development opportunities like the NERRS Annual Meeting or GOMCON. During this time, they are also building their professional contacts with their fellowship class, professionals across the reserve system, and throughout NOAA. In the Gulf of Mexico, Davidson Fellows at each of the five Gulf Reserves are in the process of completing their 2 year research fellowships. Working with their Reserve mentor, the fellows have conducted some exciting research at our gulf sites. In this session, each fellow will share some specifics about their research, how they worked with the reserve and their findings. Through their work, the fellows are improving our understanding of our Gulf of Mexico estuaries and bringing together universities, communities and reserves to help solve key coastal management questions.

Bio(s):
Matthew Virden - Matthew is a PhD candidate at Mississippi State University. His research interest is coastal conservation and restoration, including living shorelines and oyster reef restoration. And his dissertation and Davidson Fellowship research is focused on evaluating the effectiveness of nearshore oyster reef restoration. His research also includes work with wave energy, wave-plant dynamics, and the use of unmanned aerial systems in coastal conservation and restoration.Kristine Zikmanis - Kristine is a PhD candidate at Florida International University in the Heithaus Lab for Marine Community & Behavioral Ecology. Her primary interest is in the potential impacts of changing environmental conditions on top level predators, particularly in relation to ecological restoration. Her dissertation research is focused on investigating the impacts of spatiotemporal variation in freshwater flow on juvenile bull sharks in the Ten Thousand Islands. She is aiming to use this knowledge to help predict how bull sharks may respond to the completion of the Picayune Strand Restoration Project.
Philip Souza - Philip is a Ph.D. candidate in the Brandl " fish and functions lab at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute. He is interested in the impacts of climate change and human modification on the health and function of estuarine communities. And his dissertation work uses passive acoustic and cryptobenthic fish sampling techniques to understand how fish distribution, behavior, and community structure change with local disturbance.Mai Fung - Mai is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of South Alabama. She came from a public health background and worked in consulting for four years before beginning her PhD in marine sciences. As a consultant, I looked at the world from a human health perspective and I wanted to transition to looking at the world from a broader, ecosystem health perspective. And her dissertation work focuses on understanding different drivers of eutrophication, and how toxins such as mercury are affected by eutrophication.Kira Allen - Kira is a Master's student at the University of Central Florida in the Lewis Lab of Applied Coastal Ecology and the Davidson Fellow at Apalachicola NERR. Her broad research interests include food web ecology, fisheries science and climate change impacts. Her Master's thesis and Davidson Fellowship work involves modeling the Apalachicola Bay food web response to freshwater reduction and sea level rise.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, recording and a summary of chat will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar. Or email matt.chasse@noaa.gov.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: NOAA's Veteran and Conservation Corps Partnership
Presenter(s): Eric Vichich, NOAA GulfCorps Manager and Marine Habitat Resource Specialist, NOAA Fisheries Office of Habitat Conservation Restoration Center or the NOAA Restoration Center; Laurel Jennings, Marine Habitat Resource Specialist, NOAA Restoration Center; John Floberg, Marine Habitat Resource Specialist, NOAA Restoration Center; Ruth Goodfield, Marine Habitat Resource Specialist, NOAA Restoration Center
Date & Time: 2 June 2022
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA's Veteran and Conservation Corps Partnership
NOAA Gulf of Mexico Forum Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Eric Vichich, NOAA GulfCorps Manager, Marine Habitat Resource Specialist, NOAA Fisheries Office of Habitat Conservation Restoration Center (NOAA Restoration Center) with: Laurel Jennings, Marine Habitat Resource Specialist, NOAA Restoration Center, John Floberg, Marine Habitat Resource Specialist, NOAA Restoration Center, and Ruth Goodfield, Marine Habitat Resource Specialist, NOAA Restoration Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaboration Team, a part of NOAA's Regional Collaboration Network

Seminar Contact(s): Kristen Laursen, Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov , NOAA Fisheries and Regional Collaboration Network

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6878004206741470479After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For your awareness, this webinar will be recorded and shared.

Abstract: NOAA veteran and conservation corps efforts are creating a community of habitat restoration practitioners across the nation made up of veterans, young adults, and others. The programs are boosting coastal communities by recruiting, training, mentoring, and employing workers to implement habitat restoration projects in support of long-term coastal restoration.


Bio(s): Eric Vichich is a project manager working on Deepwater Horizon restoration efforts around the Gulf of Mexico dealing with sea turtles, marine mammals, hydrology, marsh creation, and NOAA's GulfCorps program. Twenty years ago today he was a Student Conservation Association intern managing black bears in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. Now he gets to support, and hopefully inspire, young folks as they explore their own careers in conservation.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Please contact Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov for the recording and/or PDF.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

1 June 2022

Title: Discover NOAA Resource Collections: Coral Reef and Kelp Forest Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Claire Fackler and Chloe McKenna, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 1 June 2022
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Discover NOAA Resource Collections: Coral Reef and Kelp Forest Ecosystems

Presenter(s): Claire Fackler and Chloe McKenna, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5745881063847878157

Abstract: As part of our 50th anniversary campaign, we have been launching a new robust resource collection each month. Explore each collection of NOAA videos, lesson plans, webinars, web stories, virtual reality, and much more. In this new era of ocean conservation, we encourage formal and informal educators and other interested people to take advantage of the robust educational materials available in each topically-based collection. During this webinar, we will be focusing on the Coral Reef and Kelp Forest Ecosystems Resource Collections.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Heat vulnerability in a changing climate – can we acclimatize?
Presenter(s): Scott Sheridan, Ph.D., Professor and Departmental Chair, Department of Geography, Kent State University
Date & Time: 1 June 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Please share with anyone (NOAA or not) who might be interested; thanks.

Title: Heat vulnerability in a changing climate " can we acclimatize?

Presenter(s): Scott Sheridan, Ph.D., Professor and Departmental Chair, Department of Geography, Kent State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Varis.Ransi@noaa.gov, co-coordinator NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series

Remote Access: This seminar is over but you can view the recording here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pnfa1ory5ioz/You may enter the webinar via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. If you enter via a browser, PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use the IE browser.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download it but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download info is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register at link above.
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Heat has been known to be the deadliest atmospheric hazard across the US over recent decades. Our vulnerability to the heat, however, has decreased somewhat, as health care has improved, air conditioning has become more prevalent, and much greater awareness exists. Nevertheless, recent extreme heat waves across the globe have shown that populations can still be significantly affected by the heat. Moving forward, what can we expect in terms of how societies can cope with these events, and whether we can adapt to an increasing frequency, duration, and intensity of heat waves in the decades to come?

Bio(s): Dr. Scott Sheridan is a professor of climatology, and Chair of the Department of Geography at Kent State University. He has authored over 110 peer-reviewed articles, that cover many aspects of applied climatological research, and has been funded by NASA, NIH, NOAA, and EPA. At the core of his research experience has been the study of extreme temperature events, as well as their impact on human health, which he has done for over 20 years. He currently is the President Elect of the International Society of Biometeorology, editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Biometeorology, and Associate Editor of Science of the Total Environment.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:Within a few days of the webinar, alink to the recording,
usually a PDF of the slides, and sometimes a summary of the chat will be sentto all who registered.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science SeminarSeries website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

31 May 2022

Title: Expanding the biophysical ensemble: Hybrid dynamical-statistical downscaling methods based on spatial/temporal scale
Presenter(s): Albert Hermann, University of Washington
Date & Time: 31 May 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Expanding the biophysical ensemble: Hybrid dynamical-statistical downscaling methods based on spatial/temporal scale

Presenter(s): Dr. Albert Hermann (University of Washington, Cooperative Institute for Climate Ocean and Ecosystem Studies, Seattle, WA, United States)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar Contact(s): Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US)+1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: We explore the use of statistical and Machine Learning methods to assist in the downscaling of global model projections to regional ocean dynamics. Ongoing research programs use dynamical downscaling to predict conditions in the Bering Sea and other regions; here finely resolved dynamical regional models are forced by global seasonal forecasts (e.g. from the NOAA Climate Forecast System) and multi-decadal projections (e.g. from CMIP under alternative carbon mitigation scenarios). Such high-resolution regional models are typically more computationally expensive to run than the global models which drive them. This severely limits the ultimate size of any downscaled regional ensemble, which in turn severely constrains the skill and uncertainty estimates of the regional forecasts, needed for their effective use in fisheries management. First, we present Principal Component-based statistical methods, which summarize the dominant patterns generated by the regional model in response to dominant patterns of the coarse-scale atmospheric/oceanic forcing. We use this hybrid statistical summary to estimate the regional responses that would have been obtained if a larger dynamical downscaling ensemble had been computationally affordable. Second, we explore an extension of this approach using unsupervised Machine Learning methods (in particular, the Long-Short Term Memory method), trained using our dimensionally reduced global model forcings and regional model responses. As a sanity check, these ML-based results are compared with those from a simpler, linear regression-based method.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

26 May 2022

Title: Advancing the Understanding and Prediction of Tropical Cyclones Using NOAA Aircraft Observations
Presenter(s): Rob Rogers. Lead Meteorologist, Hurricane Research Division/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/OAR/NOAA
Date & Time: 26 May 2022
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Advancing the Understanding and Prediction of Tropical Cyclones Using NOAA Aircraft Observations


Presenter(s): Rob Rogers, Ph.D.

Sponsor(s): NOAA / OAR / Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

Seminar Contact(s): Shirley Murillo webinar host: Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.goto.com/339257677

Abstract: The primary goal of NOAA/OAR/AOML's Hurricane Research Division (HRD) is to improve the understanding and prediction of tropical cyclones (TCs). While this improvement can be accomplished from a variety of approaches, a unique capability of HRD is the routine collection and analysis of airborne observations within the tropical cyclone inner-core and its atmospheric and oceanic environments. This data collection and analysis has formed the core of HRD's mission for many decades. This talk will provide a summary of the recent (past 15 years) accomplishments of HRD's annual Field Campaign, including a discussion of advances in NOAA's airborne observing technologies and how these observations have been used to better characterize, understand, and predict physical processes important for TC intensity change. Finally, a look toward the future will be provided, including a discussion of new foci meant to broaden HRD's goals to include a more comprehensive improvement of forecasting TC hazards.

Bio(s): Rob Rogers, Ph.D. Lead Meteorologist, Hurricane Research Division/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be made available shortly after the webinar at: https://www.aoml.noaa.gov/seminars/

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Recent insights into Chinook salmon marine behavior from fisheries, scientific surveys, and acoustic telemetry
Presenter(s): Cameron Freshwater, PhD; Department of Fisheries and Oceanography, Canada
Date & Time: 26 May 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Recent insights into Chinook salmon marine behavior from fisheries, scientific surveys, and acoustic telemetry

Presenter(s): Cameron Freshwater, PhD; Department of Fisheries and Oceanography, Canada

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 199 208 1054
Meeting password: QKdp3p4SMe6JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Global call-in numbers https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/globalcallin.php?MTID=m3142650430de6a3cadba4efb1ef4af96

Abstract: Spatial distributions regulate dynamics by determining whether populations are exposed to distinct environmental or anthropogenic drivers. Distribution data also inform ecosystem-based management where interactions between species are influenced by the extent to which populations overlap in space and time. Accurate distribution data are particularly critical in the context of Chinook salmon, which exhibit population-specific behaviors, sustain multi-stock fisheries, and provide unique ecosystem services. While long-term trends in Chinook salmon juvenile marine survival and age-at-maturity have diverged, both traits covary among stocks with similar nearshore marine distributions. My colleagues and I are leveraging several distinct field programs to better understand how these and other patterns may be influenced by marine life histories. Recently we used fisheries-dependent data to develop models of stock-specific abundance and identify seasonal patterns of habitat use. Additionally a large-scale and collaborative acoustic telemetry program has provided even more granular distribution data, including estimates of migration speed and depth distribution. Acoustic telemetry data have also been used to estimate survival during nearshore migrations and to identify mortality hotspots that may constrain Chinook salmon recovery.



Bio(s): Cameron received his BSc in Environmental Biology from Queen's University and PhD from the University of Victoria. He joined Fisheries and Oceans Canada as a post-doc in 2017 and is currently a research scientist at the Pacific Biological Station in Nanaimo BC.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: In Spanish: Manteniendo al público informado de eventos peligrosos durante la pandemia (Maintaining the public informed of hazardous events during the pandemic)
Presenter(s): Maria Torres, NWS/NHC Public Affairs Officer & External Affairs - Meteorologist
Date & Time: 26 May 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Manteniendo al pblico informado de eventos peligrosos durante la pandemia (Maintaining the public informed of hazardous events during the pandemic)Part of the 2022 Hurricane Awareness Webinar Series


Presenter(s): Maria Torres, NWS/NHC Public Affairs Officer & External Affairs - Meteorologist

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Southeast and Caribbean Regional Team (SECART), 2022 Hurricane Awareness Webinar Series

Seminar Contact(s): region.SECarib@noaa.gov, Shirley Murillo, webinar host: Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3360210211307557387

Abstract: This webinar will be presented in Spanish: Los meteorlogos de la NOAA presentarn cmo trabajaron durante la pandemia. (Meteorologists from NOAA will present how they issued forecast products and advisories during the pandemic.)

Bio(s): Maria Torres, NWS/NHC Public Affairs Officer & External Affairs - Meteorologist

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be made available shortly after the webinar at: https://www.noaa.gov/regional-collaboration-network/regions-southeast-and-caribbean/2022-hurricane-awareness-webinars

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Charting a RAD-ical future for salmon ecosystems with RAD (Resist, Accept, Direct) frameworks
Presenter(s): John Kocik, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 26 May 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Charting a RAD-ical future for salmon ecosystems with RAD (Resist, Accept, Direct) frameworks

Presenter(s): John Kocik, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: North American salmon ranged from ocean waters near the Arctic Circle southward to southern New England on the Atlantic and Mexico on the Pacific. Colonial and industrial transformation of rivers and oceans led to extinction or endangered status of many southern populations. Three of these are NOAA Species in the Spotlight " Gulf of Maine Atlantic Salmon, Central California Coast Coho Salmon and Sacramento River Winter-Run Chinook. Focusing on Atlantic salmon, I will review progress in understanding made through NOAA Fisheries climate strategy. This work, and especially climate scenario planning, provides a solid foundation for management strategy evaluations. While ESA goals are designed to recover a species and their habitats and seem congruent, habitat and fish conservation have different timetables due to speed of changes in climate, habitat, and biological processes relative to regulatory processes and management plan actions. However, an emerging framework for managing transformational systems called RAD (Resist, Accept, Direct) provides a tool to examine conservation options and confront tough questions. Species in the spotlight have urgent conservation needs. Creative and big solutions are needed to recover salmon and RAD provides a way to examine conservation options to sustain salmon in an era of change.

Bio(s): John Kocik has worked on salmonid population dynamics and ecology since 1984 when his Great Lakes research focused on pink salmon population dynamics then competition between steelhead and brown trout. John joined the Northeast Fisheries Science Center's Woods Hole Lab in 1992 as a research fishery biologist and began working on Atlantic Salmon conservation biology. In 2001, he became Lab Director of the NEFSC Maine Field Station and leads the Atlantic Salmon Ecosystem Research Team in MA and ME. The team studies population dynamics and marine ecology of salmonids and other diadromous fish. His research interests are centered on applied population dynamics, habitat ecology and impacts of climate on salmonids.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Heat, Health and Drought in the U.S. eastern region
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University, and Hunter Jones, NOAA/OAR/CPO/National Integrated Heat Health Information System, and Jesse Bell, University of Nebraska Medical Center
Date & Time: 26 May 2022
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Heat, Health and Drought in the U.S. eastern region

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University, and
Hunter Jones, NOAA/OAR/CPO/National Integrated Heat Health Information System, and
Jesse Bell, University of Nebraska Medical Center


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s): Ellen Mecray

Remote Access: Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract: The webinar will feature a recap of May conditions and Hunter Jones and Jesse Bell will brief on the Urban Heat Island projects in the Eastern Region, and research connecting human health and drought in the east.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

25 May 2022

Title: Measurement and modelling of the organic peroxy radicals in China
Presenter(s): Keding Lu, Peking University
Date & Time: 25 May 2022
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: Measurement and modelling of the organic peroxy radicals in China
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Keding Lu, Peking University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.womack@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5789694403494174736

Abstract: Organic peroxy radicals (RO2) are the key reaction intermediates that determine the production of atmospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols. However, RO2 radical has the characteristics of low concentration, strong activity, and complex reaction mechanism. The precise quantification of its ambient concentrations and the quantification of its budget is the frontier of atmospheric chemistry research. In this study, a systematic study was carried out on the direct measurement and budget analysis of the RO2 radicals in the polluted atmospheric environments in China. Based on laser-induced fluorescence technology, a RO2 radical measurement system was developed which is capable to detect the summed concentrations of all RO2 radicals as well as classification measurement of the simple and the complex RO2 radicals. Based on the chemical ionization mass spectrometry technology, we also developed a direct measurement method for the specialization detection of the complex organic peroxy radicals, and successfully realized the quantitative detection of about ten organic peroxy radicals. To interpret the measurement results of RO2 radicals, we used approaches includes box model simulations and experimental budget analysis to explore the sources and sinks of ambient RO2 radicals in the chemical complex environments. New insights about the fate and sources of RO2 are proposed for both the high and low NOx regimes.

Bio(s): Professor Keding Lu is an Associate Professor at the State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control at Peking University. He received his BSc in Environmental Engineering from Nanjing University, and his PhD in Environmental Science at Peking University. He then did his postdoctoral work at the Forschungszentrum Juelich in Germany before returning to Peking University as an Assistant Professor in 2012. His research interests include spectroscopic measurement techniques and free-radical atmospheric chemistry.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2022,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!
Title: Restoration Success: Linking Social and Ecological Metrics
Presenter(s): Catherine de Rivera, Portland State University, derivera@pdx.edu; Melissa Haeffner, Portland State University, melh32@pdx.edu; Julie Gonzalez, University of California, Davis, Gonzalez@ucdavis.edu; Vanessa Robertson-Rojas, Portland State University, vrobe@pdx.edu; Sabra Comet, South Slough NERR, sabra.comet@dsl.oregon.gov
Date & Time: 25 May 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Restoration Success: Linking Social and Ecological Metrics

Presenter(s): Catherine de Rivera, Portland State University
Melissa Haeffner, Portland State University
Julie Gonzalez, University of California, Davis
Vanessa Robertson-Rojas, Portland State University
Sabra Comet, South Slough NERR

Sponsor(s): This webinar is sponsored by the NERRS Science Collaborative

Seminar Contact(s): Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1092803929435388687

Abstract: Understanding why habitat restoration is, or isn't, viewed as successful is a critical piece of evaluating completed projects and garnering support for future projects. Ecological measures alone may not fully describe the success or shortcomings of restoration projects, and public perceptions of success may be based on an entirely different set of metrics. In fact, restoration metrics rarely include human dimensions even though community support for restoration can make or break potential future projects, and affect long-term success of completed ones.Using South Slough NERR (Oregon) and other restoration projects in the region as case studies, this project deployed a three-pronged approach to understand and improve estuarine restoration outcomes, which includes synthesis of long-term monitoring data, comparisons between manager and public perceptions, and interviews to understand efficacy of ecological metrics. In this webinar, the project team will talk about their approach to understanding restoration success, summarize their findings on the values and perceptions associated with estuarine restoration, and share recommendations for including social and ecological metrics in future restoration projects.

Bio(s): Please visit here for more information about the webinar.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Economic Valuation Trainings and Project Consultations: Lessons Learned
Presenter(s): Dr. Lauren Knapp, CSS Inc. On Contract to Office for Coastal Management, Economist and Kate Quigley, Office for Coastal Management, Economist
Date & Time: 25 May 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Economic Valuation Trainings and Project Consultations: Lessons Learned

Presenter(s): Dr. Lauren Knapp, CSS Inc. On Contract to Office for Coastal Management, Economist and Kate Quigley, Office for Coastal Management, Economist

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library and NOS Office for Coastal Management

Seminar Contact(s): library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/195191224816267280

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: There is an increasing need for state and local partners to conduct economic valuation analyses to capture the benefits of projects, programs and products and submit benefit cost analyses to access funding from federal agencies like the Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA). In many cases, partners conducting and commissioning benefit valuation studies and federal funding applicants are non-economists. The NOS Office for Coastal Management offers trainings and consultation to help community partners understand economic terminology, identify appropriate economic analyses based on project objectives and expertise, determine questions to ask an economic consultant, and do simple valuation analyses. In this presentation, we reflect on recent lessons learned, in an effort to continue to better help non-economists commission or conduct studies in the most effective way possible.

Keywords: economics, valuation, benefit-cost analysis

Bio(s): Dr. Knapp is an environmental economist trained in various methods from cost-benefit analysis to ecosystem services valuation and stated preference estimation. On contract to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Office for Coastal Management (OCM) since 2020, she helps on efforts to value marine economies, train local communities on how to use economics to inform their decision-making, capture benefit data for natural coastal infrastructure, comprehensively value U.S. coral reefs, and use economics to inform other related efforts.

Kate Quigley is a natural resource and environmental economist with the Office for Coastal Management in NOS. Areas of expertise are benefit cost analysis, policy analysis, and blue economy accounting.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording will be available after the webinar on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to: OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

24 May 2022

Title: Fostering convergence to address complex Arctic climate challenges: Identifying opportunities with the Navigating the New Arctic (NNA) Program
Presenter(s): Twila Moon, Navigating the New Arctic Community Office, NNA-CO
Date & Time: 24 May 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Fostering convergence to address complex Arctic climate challenges: Identifying opportunities with the Navigating the New Arctic (NNA) Program


Presenter(s): Twila Moon, Navigating the New Arctic Community Office (NNA-CO)

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov), Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/identifying-opportunities-nna/

Abstract: Convergence research brings together diverse participants to craft " together " new languages of understanding and form new perspectives and solutions pathways around complex societal challenges and opportunities. Convergence is an intentional, careful process requiring relationship building and open sharing of individual perspectives so that groups can create integrated pathways to make progress together, often towards community-level activities or applications. Rapid climate change in the Arctic is causing unprecedented environmental shifts that are intrinsically connected with complex social and community activities and concerns, from food security to infrastructure, conservation to geopolitics. The NSF-funded Navigating the New Arctic Community Office (NNA-CO) is supporting new and future Arctic-focused convergence research. One activity of support is development of four Convergence Working Groups that will bring together researchers, local experts, and engaged community representatives to work together on a focused, self-formed project; for example, hosting community workshops, creating shared Arctic Data Center portals, developing policy briefs, or crafting science storytelling products. The Convergence Working Groups themselves will attempt to apply convergence concepts and act as test beds and examples for best practices. The process for Working Group formation has already been available for community feedback, with an ongoing workflow aimed to solidify areas of focus and participation by early 2023. Join this webinar to find out more about convergence research, formation and activities of upcoming Convergence Working Groups, and broader opportunities for cross-community interaction within the NNA-CO.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Keeping our mariners safe: How NOAA provides information to mariners
Presenter(s): Darren Wright, Marine Program Leader/AFS/NWS, Darin Figursky, Operations Branch Chief/Ocean Prediction Center/NWS and Dr. Chris Landsea, Chief, Tropical Analysis and Forecast Branch/NHC/NWS
Date & Time: 24 May 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Keeping our mariners safe: How NOAA provides information to mariners
Part of the 2022 Hurricane Awareness Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Darren Wright, Marine Program Leader/AFS/NWS, Darin Figursky, Operations Branch Chief/Ocean Prediction Center/NWS and Dr. Chris Landsea, Chief, Tropical Analysis and Forecast Branch/NHC/NWS

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Southeast and Caribbean Regional Team, 2022 Hurricane Awareness Webinar Series

Seminar Contact(s): region.SECarib@noaa.gov, Shirley Murillo and Joel Cline webinar hosts: Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov, Joel.Cline@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3615233137277093387

Abstract: It is National Safe Boating Week and we are highlighting the importance of keeping boaters safe. Hear from our speakers on how NOAA provides information, data and products during hurricane events.

Bio(s): Darren Wright, Marine Program Leader/AFS/NWS, Darin Figursky, Operations Branch Chief/Ocean Prediction Center/NWS and Dr. Chris Landsea, Chief, Tropical Analysis and Forecast Branch/NHC/NWS

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be made available shortly after the webinar at: https://www.noaa.gov/regional-collaboration-network/regions-southeast-and-caribbean/2022-hurricane-awareness-webinars

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Drought and Water Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): David Zierden, Florida Climate Center; Tom Littlepage, ADECA Office of Water Resources; Paul Ankcorn, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Jody Huang, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District; Samantha Lucas, Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve; and Meredith Muth, NOAA NIDIS
Date & Time: 24 May 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Drought and Water Monthly Webinar

Presenter(s): David Zierden, Florida Climate Center; Tom Littlepage, ADECA Office of Water Resources; Paul Ankcorn, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Jody Huang, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District; Samantha Lucas, Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve; Meredith Muth, NOAA NIDIS

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith.Muth@noaa.gov, NOAA/NIDIS

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/1157532176109540365

Abstract: This webinar will provide updated information on the climate, water, and drought status of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin. This drought assessment webinar is brought to you by the Auburn University Water Resources Center and the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS).

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

20 May 2022

Title: May 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy
Date & Time: 20 May 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: May 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov), Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/may-2022-nws-briefing/

Abstract: We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools, and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for June 2022 and the summer season. Join the gathering online to learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Q&A - Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning
Presenter(s): Dr. Paul Roebber, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
Date & Time: 20 May 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NWS - HQ - MDL Goto1
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Roebber Lectures - Q&A Session on Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning

Presenter(s): Dr. Paul Roebber, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Seminar Contact(s): John Schattel (John.Schattel@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7751977408640408588

Abstract: The National Weather Service (NWS) has a long history of leveraging available data in support of weather forecasting efforts. These efforts are ongoing and with the advent of more advanced techniques (e.g., machine learning), the NWS is in the process of determining where and how to apply them.

This lecture is designed to provide an opportunity for attendees to ask questions related to artificial intelligence and machine learning and have Dr. Roebber answer them. Attendees are encouraged to submit their questions in advance by emailing them to john.schattel@noaa.gov.

More information on the lecture series is available in the NOAA Virtual Lab.

Bio(s): Dr. Roebber received his BSc in Meteorology from McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada in 1981. He earned a MS in Meteorology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA in 1983. In 1991, Dr. Roebber returned to McGill University where he completed his PhD in meteorology. Dr. Roebber's research interests include the following:
  • Synoptic and mesoscale meteorology
  • Climate dynamics
  • Systems modeling and data analysis
  • Numerical weather prediction


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: There will be no slides for this presentation. The meeting recording will be shared after the webinar with all who register, or a link where it can be found, or a contact for the recording.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

19 May 2022

Title: Mission: Iconic Reefs - An Ambitious Plan to Restore 7 Sites in the Florida Keys
Presenter(s): Marlies Tumolo, Education & Outreach Team Lead, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 19 May 2022
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Mission: Iconic Reefs - An Ambitious Plan to Restore 7 Sites in the Florida Keys

Presenter(s): Marlies Tumolo, Education & Outreach Team Lead, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2513476304826357773

Abstract: The coral reefs of the Florida Keys were some of the world's most iconic reefs. Over the last 40 years reefs worldwide have suffered dramatic declines. Nearly 90 percent of the live corals that once dominated our reefs have been lost. Emergency action is required to ensure the health of coral reefs in the Keys for future generations. NOAA and partners have developed an ambitious approach to restore corals at seven sites in the Florida Keys. Join staff from Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary to learn about Mission: Iconic Reefs, a 20-year restoration plan to save Florida's coral reefs.

This presentation is part of the Third Thursday By the Bay Presentation Series at Mokuppapa Discovery Center, which is the visitor center for Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument in Hilo, Hawaii. This State of the Monument lecture series is also supported by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation through a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Aaron Wilson, State Climate Office of Ohio
Date & Time: 19 May 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook

Presenter(s): Aaron Wilson | State Climate Office of Ohio

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

May 2022 topics include drought changes and longer term impacts, continued risk for drought, recent spring improvements to drought, and wildfire updates (May-Summer); recent and potential climate/weather impacts including, but not limited to, continuing La Nia and what it could mean for the region, soil moisture update and recharge outlook (both too wet and too dry), Great Lakes & riverine conditions, and mountain snowpack; the latest trends and outlooks for precipitation and temperature through spring and summer (2 weeks to 6 months), and potential late freeze implications across the region (if any).

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7528179497868100876

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Organizing a community of practice to build analytical tools together
Presenter(s): Rick Methot, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 19 May 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Organizing a community of practice to build analytical tools together

Presenter(s): Rick Methot, NOAA Fisheries

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 199 208 1054
Meeting password: QKdp3p4SMe6JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Global call-in numbers https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/globalcallin.php?MTID=m3142650430de6a3cadba4efb1ef4af96

Abstract: The models used to provide quantitative advice for the management of marine fish populations are evolving from a paradigm of individual research projects, to a paradigm of community-developed and centrally supported models to support high quality, standardized assessments and facilitate advancements in research. Here I will tie together four narratives regarding my involvement in this evolution. One is my 40-year history in the development and support of the Stock Synthesis assessment model. The second is the ten-year history of the Center for Advancement of Population Assessment Methods. Third is a new NMFS effort to build a next generation assessment model, Fisheries Integrated Modeling System, as a modular platform involving the efforts of team members from all Centers. Finally, I will reflect on the NOAA wide efforts to build models that link climate, oceanography, ecosystems, and managed species.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Happy as a Clam: Ecology and photosymbiosis of giant clams (Sub-famliy: Tridacninae) in Palau
Presenter(s): Lincoln Rehm, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA / NMFS, Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 19 May 2022
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Happy as a Clam: Ecology and photosymbiosis of giant clams (Sub-famliy: Tridacninae) in Palau (2022 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Lincoln Rehm, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA / NMFS, Office of Science and Technology

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Abstract: Giant clams (Sub-family: Tridacninae) are a group of bivalves that live in symbiosis with dinoflagellates (Family: Symbiodiniaceae) across Indo-Pacific coral reefs. These dinoflagellates are some of the same genera and species that can be found in neighboring coral reefs. Both coral and clam hosts acquire most of their energetic needs via photosynthesis however they use two very different mechanisms to maximize the absorption of light. The goal of my research is to establish a modern baseline of giant clam populations in the Republic of Palau and explore the photosynthetic mechanisms which enable these bivalves to thrive in shallow, nutrient poor coral reefs.
Keywords: photosymbiosis, giant clams, conservation

Bio(s): Lincoln is a current PhD Candidate in Environmental Science at Drexel University. He is currently placed in NOAA's Office of Science & Technology as a data governance and policy fellow. His research focus is on the conservation and photobiology of the giant clam. Before starting grad school, Lincoln worked at Palau International Coral Reef Center as a researcher studying the effects of climate change and conservation and near-shore resources. Outside of work, Lincoln enjoys bouldering, basketball, and board games.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

18 May 2022

Title: Virtual Field Trip to the Channel Islands
Presenter(s): Julie Bursek, NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and Claire Fackler, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 18 May 2022
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Virtual Field Trip to the Channel Islands

Presenter(s): Julie Bursek, NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and Claire Fackler, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6348702606429606668

Abstract: In celebration of Kids to Parks Day, join staff from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on a virtual outdoor adventure from Ventura Harbor in California across the Santa Barbara Channel in Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary to Anacapa and Santa Cruz Islands. The channel crossing will be full of marine life experiences, such as humpback whales breaching, common dolphins surfing the wake of the Island Packers vessel, and sea lions darting in and out of kelp forests. You'll also have a chance to see the largest animal to have ever existed on planet Earth"the elusive blue whale. As you approach the islands, you'll learn more about this special marine protected area that is located in a major upwelling zone where nutrient rich waters rise from the deep-sea to the surface and feed over 28 species of whales and dolphins. Once on land, you'll take a quick hike and then cool off while snorkeling in the lush kelp forests and kayaking in sea caves surrounding the island. Following your exhilarating adventure to the Channel Islands, you will have an opportunity to ask questions about this special national treasure and collect your virtual ParkPassport Badge!

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Open Ocean to Octocorals, Oh My!: Applying ‘Omics tools to the exploration of remote habitats and species
Presenter(s): Dr. Meredith Everett, Biologist, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 18 May 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Open Ocean to Octocorals, Oh My!: Applying Omics tools to the exploration of remote habitats and species

Part of the NOAA Omics Seminar Series



Presenter(s): Dr. Meredith Everett, Biologist, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center



Sponsor(s): NOAA Omics Working Group



Seminar Contact(s): Katharine Egan, NOAA OAR 'Omics Coordinator, noaa.omics@noaa.gov



Remote Access: Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8265170066108222991



Abstract: Deep-sea habitats remain challenging environments for exploration and quantitative surveys. Sampling is often limited and it is impossible to sample every individual in large, diverse communities. Environmental DNA (eDNA) studies provide a unique way to capture a snapshot of community biodiversity in these remote habitats. Across multiple surveys and ocean basins, we have begun to apply eDNA metabarcoding to further understand biodiversity, especially deep-sea coral biodiversity, in the deep sea. eDNA samples have been collected on remote Pacific seamounts, in Essential Fish Habitat zones on the U.S. West Coast, and as part of exploration efforts on the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer on the Blake Plateau. These samples have been sequenced with markers for octocorals, fish, and 18s eukaryotic markers to characterize biodiversity in the water column. By comparing these sequences to comprehensive reference libraries of known species, we can detect a wide range of species in diverse communities, as well as detecting additional species not yet present in our voucher collections. Research going forward can be used to determine areas where additional species voucher collections and sequencing are needed in the future. Additional omics tools, such as RAD sequencing, can help us better understand the taxonomy and connectivity of individual deep-sea species detected in these habitats including octocorals. Most octocorals lack comprehensive reference genomes, but by using reduced-representation libraries and high throughput sequencing, we can develop hundreds to thousands of novel markers in previously unsequenced species, and apply these novel genomic tools to better understand the basic taxonomy and population connectivity of these critical species.



Bio(s): Meredith Everett holds a Ph.D. in marine biology from the Rosenstiel School for Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) at the University of Miami. Applying genetic and genomic tools, she has worked on marine organisms ranging from tiny picoeukaryotes and phytoplankton to salmon to corals. Her current research focuses on using genetic and genomic tools and techniques to study deep-sea coral and sponge communities, to better understand their composition and distribution as well as their importance as habitat to fish and other invertebrates. As part of this work, Meredith has been developing environmental DNA (eDNA) approaches to understand the biodiversity in deep-sea communities, and applying these methods to communities across the Pacific Ocean. When not in the lab or out at sea, Meredith can be found cycling and rock climbing around Washington state, or just hanging out in the garden with her family at home near Puget Sound.



Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of this presentation will be made available on the NOAA Omics website. View past omics seminar recordings here: https://sciencecouncil.noaa.gov/NOAA-Science-Technology-Focus-Areas/NOAA-Omics



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Retaining and Advancing Talent in STEM and other fields: Ensuring Staff Experience an Inclusive Environment with Advancement Opportunities
Presenter(s): Tanja Fransen, Meteorologist-in-Charge, NOAA/NWS Glasgow, MT; DaNa Carlis, Deputy Director, NOAA Global Systems Laboratory, Boulder, CO; Martin Yapur, Deputy Director, Interagency Meteorological Coordination Office-IMCO Interagency Council for Advancing Meteorological Services, OSTP-NOAA
Date & Time: 18 May 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Retaining and Advancing Talent in STEM and other fields: Ensuring Staff Experience an Inclusive Environment with Advancement Opportunities

Presenter(s): Tanja Fransen, Meteorologist-in-Charge, NOAA/NWS Glasgow, MT; DaNa Carlis, Deputy Director, NOAA Global Systems Laboratory, Boulder, CO; Martin Yapur, Deputy Director, Interagency Meteorological Coordination Office-IMCO Interagency Council for Advancing Meteorological Services (OSTP-NOAA)


Sponsor(s): NOAA Science Council and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars - library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5692958270754091533

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.Summary: The presentations will focus on identifying best practices and recommendations within each of the following parameters: growth and engagement of Employee Resources Groups, progress and/or challenges faced in the effort to diversity the STEM workforce, pathways to advancement for the current STEM workforce, training and preparation of internal candidates for high grade positions with emphasis on encouraging participation from diverse candidates, assessing the lack of diversity at the SES level (including SL and ST levels) and establish guidelines on how to make improvements.Keywords: diverse workforce, retention, advancement

Bio(s): Tanja Fransen has been with NOAA/ National Weather Service for 28 years, starting in Cheyenne, WY while a college student at the University of Northern Colorado. She's currently the Meteorologist-in-Charge (MIC) at NOAA/NWS Glasgow, MT and will soon be moving to Portland, OR in the MIC role. She served on the council for the American Meteorological Society (AMS) from 2017-2020, and was the 2021 AMS Virtual Annual Meeting co-chair. She's had numerous recognitions including the Spirit of Montana by US Congressman Gianforte, Montana's Hero for the Day by US Senator Baucus, the AMS Kenneth C Spengler Award, the NOAA Administrator's Award, and two NOAA/ NWS Isaac Cline Awards for Leadership and EEO/Diversity Management. DaNa L. Carlis, Ph.D. is an award winning meteorologist and serves as the Deputy Director at
NOAA's Global Systems Laboratory (GSL). At GSL, he responsible for leading the scientific and information technology efforts of the laboratory. Along with the GSL Director, he leads a laboratory of almost 200 scientists, engineers, and administrators. Prior to GSL, DaNa worked at the Weather Program Office (WPO) in Washington, DC where he was the founding program manager of the Earth Prediction Innovation Center (EPIC) program. DaNa enjoys the fact that he's able to work between science, policy, and society to ensure better products and services to the American people.
Martin Yapur is currently the Deputy Director at the Interagency Meteorological Coordination Office-IMCO (OSTP-NOAA), where he provides support to the White House - Interagency Council for Advancing Meteorological Services (ICAMS). Prior to this position, Martin was the Chief of NOAA/NESDIS office of Technology, Planning and Integration for Observations (TPIO) where he oversaw the development of NOAA's Integrated Environmental Observation and System Enterprise Architecture. Martin has been at the forefront of the collection, standardization, configuration management, and assessment of NOAA's observations, which consists of the blueprint, standards, processes, and investments needed to build and sustain a mission-effective, integrated, adaptable, and affordable observing systems portfolio. Born and raised in La Paz, Bolivia, Martin obtained his Bachelor's degree in Biology from Universidad Mayor de San Andrs (UMSA) and a Master's degree in Atmospheric Science and Remote Sensing from the City College of New York.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

17 May 2022

Title: Exploring Underwater Sound in our National Marine Sanctuaries
Presenter(s): Leila Hatch, Ph.D., Marine Ecologist, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Science and Heritage Division; Claire Fackler, NOAA National Education Liaison; and Chloe McKenna, Education Intern, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 17 May 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Exploring Underwater Sound in our National Marine Sanctuaries

Presenter(s): Leila Hatch, Ph.D., Marine Ecologist, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Science and Heritage Division; Claire Fackler, NOAA National Education Liaison; and Chloe McKenna, Education Intern, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar Contact(s): Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6263784023887504399

Abstract: SanctSound is a three-year project, managed by NOAA and the U.S. Navy, to better understand underwater sound within our national marine sanctuaries. The goal of the SanctSound project is to understand how sound varies in the ocean by collecting the same information in sanctuaries around the United States. SanctSound combines sound data with the other types of observations we make throughout the National Marine Sanctuary System in order to better understand and protect these special places. The SanctSound web portal allows users to explore the sonic features of each sanctuary, and to make comparisons among locations to better understand how similar or different they are from each other. Take a tour of this new portal and the new Ocean Sound and Impact of Noise Resource Collection.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at:
https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: The long and short of it: Learning about forecast products that focus on tropical cyclone genesis
Presenter(s): Jon Gottschalck, Chief Operational Forecast Branch, Climate Prediction Center/NWS, Eric Blake and Brad Reinhart, Hurricane Specialists, NHC/NWS
Date & Time: 17 May 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The long and short of it: Learning about forecast products that focus on tropical cyclone genesis
Part of the 2022 Hurricane Awareness Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Jon Gottschalck, Chief Operational Forecast Branch, Climate Prediction Center/NWS, Eric Blake and Brad Reinhart, Hurricane Specialists, NHC/NWS

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Southeast and Caribbean Regional Team (SECART), 2022 Hurricane Awareness Webinar Series

Seminar Contact(s): region.SECarib@noaa.gov, Shirley Murillo, webinar host: Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4742797704691740176

Abstract: Expand your knowledge of other forecasts products that NOAA issues and how to interpret genesis forecasts and advisories. Come with your questions!

Bio(s): Jon Gottschalck, Chief Operational Forecast Branch, Climate Prediction Center/NWS, Eric Blake and Brad Reinhart, Hurricane Specialists, NHC/NWS

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be made available shortly after the webinar at: https://www.noaa.gov/regional-collaboration-network/regions-southeast-and-caribbean/2022-hurricane-awareness-webinars

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Integrated modeling of the effects of sea level rise on estuaries, marshes and barrier islands
Presenter(s): Davina Passeri, US Geological Survey
Date & Time: 17 May 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:


NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Integrated modeling of the effects of sea level rise on estuaries, marshes and barrier islands

Presenter(s): Dr. Davina Passeri (US Geological Survey)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar contact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US)+1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: TBD

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

16 May 2022

Title: Phytoplankton size class distributions on the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf
Presenter(s): Kimberly J. W. Hyde, Operations Research Analyst, Ecosystem Dynamics & Assessment Branch, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Narragansett, RI and Ryan Morse, Research Scientist, Ecosystem Dynamics & Assessment Branch, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Narragansett, RI
Date & Time: 16 May 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Phytoplankton size class distributions on the Northeast U.S. Continental ShelfBriefer: Kimberly J. W. Hyde, Operations Research Analyst, Ecosystem Dynamics & Assessment Branch, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Narragansett, RIRyan Morse, Research Scientist, Ecosystem Dynamics& Assessment Branch, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Narragansett, RI

Sponsor(s): NOAA JPSS Program

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)Remote Access
meet.google.com/ozz-ispr-oow

Join by phone
(US) +1 617-675-4444
PIN: 611 138 123 3080#

Abstract:
At NOAA Fisheries, ocean color and other satellite data are used for awide range of operational and research applications. Thus, there is a critical need for long-term,high quality, high spectral resolution regionally-tuned satellite products innear shore regions to characterize and detect changes in the phytoplanktoncommunity and living marine resources. Our recent work to optimize phytoplankton size class algorithms for theNortheast U.S. continental shelf is helping us better understand how the phytoplanktoncommunity is affected by changing oceanographic conditions and their potentialimpact on overall ecosystem productivity and fisheries.



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12 May 2022

Title: NOAA CoastWatch and Recent SDG 14.1.1 Work & Learning Portal
Presenter(s): Smail-Ramachandran-Abecassis, NOAA CoastWatch
Date & Time: 12 May 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

1-

Title: Optimizing Single-Sensor Satellite Ocean Color Data for Nearshore Reefs and Tropical Coastal Waters: Two Case Studies

1-

Presenter(s): Emily Smail, GEO Blue Planet & Sathyadev Ramachandran, RIVA followed by Melanie Abecassis, NOAA CoastWatch

2-

Title: NOAA CoastWatch Learning Portal

2-

Presenter(s): Melanie Abecassis, NOAA CoastWatch


Sponsor(s): NOAA CoastWatch (STAR)

Remote Access: https://meet.goto.com/MerrieNeely/noaa-coastwatch-annual-meeting---day-4
You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3129
- One-touch: tel:+15713173129,,940652621#
Access Code: 940-652-621


Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Abstract: the NOAA CoastWatch Seminar Series began in 2022 and features two speakers from the NOAA CoastWatch Application Team presenting information that will be of interest to NOAA CoastWatch Users and the CoastWatch Team. If you are a NOAA CoastWatch user, or think you might want to be, you are welcome to attend this webinar.
Slides, Recordings Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php

Title: Toward better understanding and forecasting of population dynamics
Presenter(s): Floriane Plard La Rochelle University, France
Date & Time: 12 May 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Toward better understanding and forecasting of population dynamics

Presenter(s): Floriane PlardLa Rochelle University, France

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 199 208 1054
Meeting password: QKdp3p4SMe6JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Global call-in numbers https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/globalcallin.php?MTID=m3142650430de6a3cadba4efb1ef4af96

Abstract: Models of population dynamics often predict demographic rates and population size in relation to environmental variations. Indeed, these variations often directly shape demographic rates. However, population models rarely include the diversity of individual responses facing these environmental pressures. But, when resources become scarce, the performances of low-quality individuals are often the first ones to be impacted. I combined the advantaged of two widely used model of population dynamics: integrated population model (IPMpop) and integral projection model (IPMind) into IPM. This last model allowed using individual data to estimate population dynamics while keeping the estimates at population level close to reality. Using simulation analyses, the predictions of IPM were more accurate than the ones made by IPMind and IPMpop. However, the number of assumptions always increases and the consequences of their violation become vague as model complexity increases. Integrated population models combine several datasets to estimate survival and reproduction parameters together with higher precision than is possible using independent models. However, accuracy actually depends on an adequate fit of the model to datasets. I also discuss bias and uncertainty of parameters obtained from integrated population models when assumptions are violated.

Bio(s): Floriane Plard got her PhD in 2014 in The University of Lyon 1, France. She worked as a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University, USA and started this work during her post-doctoral position at the Swiss Ornithological Institute, in Switzerland. She worked as an Assistant Professor in statistics at the University Lyon 2, France and at the university of Holar in Iceland. She is currently working as a research engineer at La Rochelle University. Her research is at the interface between the theory of life-histories, population ecology and quantitative ecology. She developed theoretical and statistical models to provide a better understanding and prediction of population dynamics using individual mechanisms.



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Title: GeMS Validation Survey
Presenter(s): Kevin Ahlgren, Geodesist, Observations and Analysis Division, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 May 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: GeMS Validation Survey

Presenter(s): Kevin Ahlgren, Geodesist, Observations and Analysis Division, NGS

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NOS National Geodetic Survey.

Seminar Contact(s): sonja.bowen@noaa.gov, NOAA National Geodetic Survey

Registration link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1083014977196372240
Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Abstract: In the Fall of 2021, NGS performed a field campaign in south-central Alaska to obtain geodetic observations that will be used by the Geoid Monitoring Service (GeMS) to validate time-dependent geopotential models (geoid, gravity, deflection of the vertical). The observations collected are critical to GeMS and a time-dependent geoid model in order to evaluate two situations: 1) to assess how much geoid change has occurred since 1964, when the Coast and Geodetic Survey performed a very high-accuracy triangulation, leveling, and gravity survey following the 1964 Alaska Earthquake; and 2) to establish a baseline to measure all subsequent geoid change against in the future.

Technical Content Rating: Intermediate - Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.


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11 May 2022

Title: NOAA Fisheries Distribution Mapping and Analysis Portal (DisMAP): Visualizing changing distributions
Presenter(s): Melissa Karp, Fisheries Science Coordinator for NOAA Fisheries' Office of Science & Technology's National Stock Assessment Program, NSAP
Date & Time: 11 May 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Fisheries Distribution Mapping and Analysis Portal (DisMAP): Visualizing changing distributions (EBM/EBFM)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Melissa Karp, Fisheries Science Coordinator for NOAA Fisheries' Office of Science & Technology's National Stock Assessment Program (NSAP)

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4702291695240836368
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The impacts of changing fish distributions reach far beyond the individual species experiencing the shift, to affect entire ecosystems, as well as fisheries interactions, and coastal economies. Robust information on past, current, and expected future distributions of marine species is critical for effective fishery management and fishing sector decision-making. In response to this need NOAA Fisheries developed a new state-of-the-art mapping portal to consolidate information on species distributions into one easily accessible, interactive portal called the Distribution Mapping and Analysis Portal (DisMAP). The portal displays data from NOAA Fisheries bottom trawl surveys for five regions (Northeast, Southeast, Gulf of Mexico, West Coast, and Alaska) and includes a map viewer and graphing capabilities to explore the distributions of over 800 marine fish and invertebrate species caught during the surveys.

Keywords: species distributions, web portal, climate change

Bio(s): Melissa Karp is the Fisheries Science Coordinator for NOAA's Office of Science & Technology's National Stock Assessment Program (NSAP), and leads the Distribution Mapping and Analysis Portal effort. Since joining the NSAP team in 2017 as a Sea Grant John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow, her work has focused on supporting efforts to advance stock assessments methodology in the U.S., particularly related to the incorporation of ecosystem and climate information in the assessment process. Melissa obtained her M.S. in marine science from the College of William and Mary's School of Marine Science, at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 2016 and her B.S. in Biology and Environmental Science from Tufts University in 2013.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


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Title:
New
Northeast Regional Habitat Assessment
Presenter(s): Christopher Haak, Monmouth University; Tori Kentner, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council
Date & Time: 11 May 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Northeast Regional Habitat Assessment (EBM/EBFM)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Christopher Haak, Monmouth University and Tori Kentner, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4702291695240836368
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The Northeast U.S. Regional Marine Fish Habitat Assessment (NRHA) is a collaborative, multi-disciplinary effort to develop decision support products for fish habitat management. Employing a novel spatiotemporal joint-species distribution modeling framework, the team evaluated habitat use patterns for marine fish and invertebrate communities on the northeast shelf, relating catch data from the NOAA Fisheries bottom trawl surveys to an array of environmental predictor variables. Simultaneously, the team developed an R shiny application to facilitate the analysis, visualization, and exploration of state and federal fisheries independent datasets in estuarine, coastal, and offshore environments, and to host NRHA products online.

Keywords: Joint-Species Distribution Models, Fish Habitat, R-Shiny

Bio(s): Dr. Christopher Haak is a research scientist at Monmouth University working in cooperation with NOAA NEFSC. From shallow back-reef habitats of The Bahamas to the NE continental shelf, his interests lie in understanding how physical and ecological processes interact to shape marine fish communities.

Tori Kentner recently joined the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council as a Fishery Management Specialist. Her specialty is spatial data analysis and visualization, programming, and GIS. Previously she was a GIS specialist at NOAA Fisheries for wind energy, deep sea corals and species modeling.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Case Studies for the Atmospheric Transport of Environmental Contaminants: PFAS and Pesticides in Precipitation
Presenter(s): Jennifer Faust, College of Wooster
Date & Time: 11 May 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: Case Studies for the Atmospheric Transport of Environmental Contaminants: PFAS and Pesticides in Precipitation
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jennifer Faust, College of Wooster


Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): jan.kazil@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2817260374948062221

Abstract: Here we will explore two stories of how chemicals move through the atmosphere: PFAS and pesticides. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are long-lived environmental contaminants of concern for human health. When released into the atmosphere, they can undergo long-range transport, followed by return to Earth through deposition. We have quantified 15 PFAS in rainwater from the central United States. During summer 2019, PFAS concentrations ranged from 50-850 ng/L, as measured by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Trifluoroacetic acid accounted for approximately 90% of all PFAS. Levels of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorosulfonic acid (PFOS) were comparable to levels observed over the past two decades in spite of regulatory restrictions. We also detected HFPO-DA (GenX), a replacement for legacy PFAS, at all measurement sites. Analysis by ANOVA modeling and correlation matrices indicated statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in PFAS profiles at sites separated by tens to hundreds of kilometers, highlighting the importance of local point sources on deposition of PFAS in the United States. In our more recent work, we have expanded our precipitation analysis to characterize pesticides in precipitation samples using suspect screening with high-resolution mass spectrometry and air mass back trajectory analysis.

Bio(s): Dr. Jennifer Faust (she/her/hers) joined the faculty at the College of Wooster in fall 2017 as an assistant professor of analytical and environmental chemistry. She previously obtained her PhD in physical chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2015, and she completed a postdoctoral fellowship in atmospheric chemistry at the University of Toronto. Jennifer now leads an undergraduate research group in environmental chemistry at the College of Wooster, where she has mentored one postdoctoral fellow and 29 undergraduate researchers, including 16 senior thesis students. She received a National Science Foundation CAREER award in 2021 to characterize the transport and fate of pesticides in the atmosphere. Other research projects in the Faust group include the formation of brown carbon, the oxidation of rubber, and the occurrence of PFAS in rainwater.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2022,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!
Title: State of the Ecosystem: 2022 Overview
Presenter(s): Kimberly Bastille, Northeast Fisheries Science Center - Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch
Date & Time: 11 May 2022
11:45 am - 12:45 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: State of the Ecosystem: 2022 Overview

Presenter(s): Kimberly Bastille, Northeast Fisheries Science Center - Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch


Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars - library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7063413751651588622

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.Summary: This seminar will highlight the major findings and new indicators presented in the 2022 State of the Ecosystem reports which were delivered to the Mid-Atlantic and New England Fishery Management Councils. These annual reports provide the current status of the Northeast Shelf marine ecosystems (Georges Bank, Gulf of Maine, and the Mid-Atlantic Bight). They inform the councils about social, ecological, and economic aspects of the ecosystem from fishing engagement to oceanographic and climate conditions. The purpose of the reports is to highlight changes and trends in a variety of ecosystem indicators and are intended to inform fishery managers of changing ecosystem conditions.Keywords: IEA, Ecosystem Reporting, State of the Ecosystem

Bio(s): Kim Bastille is a scientific data analyst (contractor) working in ecosystem assessment reporting in the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch. She currently focuses on State of the Ecosystem reports and related projects.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


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Title: Oklahoma Drought Status Webinar
Presenter(s): Gary McManus, Oklahoma Climatological Survey, Oklahoma Mesonet, Victor Murphy , NOAA National Weather Service Southern Region
Date & Time: 11 May 2022
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Oklahoma Drought Status Webinar

Presenter(s):
Gary McManus | OK State Climatologist

Victor Murphy | NOAA National Weather Service Southern Region Climate and COOP Services program manager

Sponsor(s): NOAA, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Oklahoma Mesonet, Oklahoma Climatological Survey

Seminar Contact(s): Joel Lisonbee, NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Despite recent rainfall, drought in western Oklahoma has expanded and worsened during early 2022. The U.S. Drought Monitor shows over 1/3 (36%) of the state in Extreme (D3) Drought and nearly a tenth (9.4%) in Exceptional (D4) Drought. Please join us as Gary McManus, the Oklahoma State Climatologist, and Victor Murphy, from the National Weather Service, talk about current drought conditions, the long-range forecast, and the impact recent precipitation might have on drought conditions across the state.

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/979542137682465039

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here: (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

10 May 2022

Title: NOAA NMFS R UG: Creating reproducible and robust fisheries science workflows using R and GitHub
Presenter(s): Diana Dishman, Em Markowitz, Amanda Bradford, Alan Olson, Eli Holmes, Ben Duffin, Kelli Johnson, Giselle Schmitz, Bai Li, Hem Nalini Morzaria-Luna, Kathryn Doering, Adyan Rios
Date & Time: 10 May 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA NMFS R UG: Creating reproducible and robust fisheries science workflows using R and GitHubNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Diana Dishman (WCRO), Automating BiOps and permits: why regional offices should love R too; Em Markowitz (AFSC), Using R to make survey preparation, communication, and results sharing more efficient!; Amanda Bradford (PIFSC), Design-based line-transect cetacean abundance estimation in R; Alan Olson (WCRO), Multipopulation PNI (Proportionate Natural Influence) modeling tool and Predation, competition, and delayed mortality risk model; Eli Holmes (NWFSC), MARSS: Multivariate Time Series Analysis in R, oh boy!; Ben Duffin (OSF), Points and Polygons: an App for Atlantic HMS EFH; Kelli Johnson (NWFSC), Automated alternative text with ggplot2; Giselle Schmitz (OST) and Bai Li (OST), Automating the backup of GitHub repositories; Hem Nalini Morzaria-Luna (NWFSC), Parallelization and batch processing models with R; Kathryn Doering (NWFSC) and Bai Li (OST), ghactions4r: Use github actions workflows for R packages with less effort; Adyan Rios (SEFSC), Management history processing

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contact(s): NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2309930316478283790

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: These lightning talks (2-3min each) will showcase a diversity of work using R, RMarkdown and GitHub to automate workflows, create user applications, and create reproducible fishery reports in applications such as stock assessment, protected species, ecosystem analyses and single species research.Keywords: Data science, stock assessment, fisheries reports

Bio(s): These lightning talks (2-3min each) from the NOAA Fisheries (NMFS) R User Group will feature speakers from across the six NOAA Fisheries Science Centers.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: ​Researching Resilience: Science for the Largest Environmental, Social, and Economic Challenge of the Century
Presenter(s): Steven Thur, Ph.D., Director, NOAA NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 10 May 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Researching Resilience: Science for the Largest Environmental, Social, and Economic Challenge of the Century
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series. These webinars are open to the public, in or outside of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).



Presenter(s): Steven Thur, Ph.D., Director, NOAA NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science



Sponsor(s): This event is part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series with sponsorship from the NOAA Science Council. The NOAA-wide NELS provides examples of NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. The NELS are presented as part of the NOAA Science Seminar Series For NELS questions, contact nels@noaa.gov (NELS Team: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov, Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov, robert.levy@noaa.gov.



Remote Access: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/eizaplyvrmyp/event/registration.html


Abstract: It is likely that the impacts associated with climate change will be the largest economic, social and environmental challenge of the century. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report Climate Change 2022: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability has a clear message: there are unavoidable climate hazards and increases to risk profiles for both ecosystems and humans. Adaptation and mitigation measures are no longer optional considerations; they are necessities. Science conducted by NOAA's National Ocean Service and partners will be critical to how society adapts to the challenge of the century. Nature-based infrastructure, combining both hardened structures and living components, offers solutions for flood and inundation risk reduction, habitat restoration, threatened and endangered species recovery, and recreation. Assessing and predicting climate impacts on living marine resources and those that make their living from water-dependent activities is foundational to the development of adaptation strategies. Understanding social vulnerability and perceptions of potential mitigation measures will enable decision makers to evaluate alternatives and effectively communicate with affected communities. Addressing the challenge of the century will require a change to our research paradigm. Specifically, we will need to embrace greater risk in our research portfolio, accepting more failure as a tradeoff for the benefits that accrue from research breakthroughs needed to assist society in our rapidly changing world.


Bio(s): https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/staff/steve-thur-phd/Recording: To access the video after the webinar visit the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series
Notice: Please note that the online service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Insight into the past and present cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Superior
Presenter(s): Cody Sheik, Assistant Professor, Swenson College of Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota-Duluth
Date & Time: 10 May 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Insight into the past and present cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Superior

Presenter(s): Cody Sheik " Assistant Professor, Swenson College of Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota-Duluth

Sponsor(s): NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (NOAA GLERL) and the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2538719994808348432

Abstract: Cyanobacteria are extraordinary chemists that are integral to all surficial water ecosystems. As primary producers, they provide carbon and oxygen that drives heterotrophic productivity. Furthermore, the ability of some cyanobacterial species to fix nitrogen gives these groups a multifaceted ecosystem role. However, cyanobacterial overgrowth, e.g., cyanobacterial blooms, is increasing in intensity, duration, and severity in nearly all freshwater ecosystems. While the lower Laurentian Great Lakes (Lake Erie and Ontario) are prone to toxin-producing cHABs, Lake Superior, until recently, has not seen regular cHAB occurrences. The recent uptick in cyanobacterial blooms is unsettling and may be a harbinger of the changing chemical and physical characteristics of the lake. In my presentation I will talk about the changing nitrogen landscape of Lake Superior and focus on the presence of nitrogen fixing cyanobacterial blooms observed in Lake Superior.

Bio(s): Dr. Sheik received his B.S. in Zoology (2004) and PhD in Microbial Ecology (2011) from the University of Oklahoma. After graduation, he completed a postdoctoral position at the University of Michigan before coming to UMD in 2015. Dr. Sheik is a geomicrobiologist whose work in aquatic systems is at the intersection of three fields: microbiology, ecology, and geochemistry/geology. His lab currently investigates the microbiology of the deep subsurface, sediments, surface waters, and harmful algal blooms. His research seeks to understand how microorganisms mediate biogeochemical cycles, with emphasis on carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur in these disparate ecosystems.Recording: A recording of the webinar will be available here within a few days following the seminar. Additional information about the Great Lakes Seminar Series, including upcoming schedules and video recordings from previous events, can be found on our website at https://ciglr.seas.umich.edu/seminar-series/.Notice: Please note that the online service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Tracking Hurricane Ida (2021) through NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration: Preparedness, Response and Recovery
Presenter(s): Charlie Henry, Director, Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center, Kevin Kirsch, Southeastern Regional Manager, OR&R's Assessment and Response Division, Brandi Todd, Scientific Support Coordinator, OR&R's Emergency Response Division, and Caitlin Wessel, Gulf of Mexico Regional Coordinator, Marine Debris Program
Date & Time: 10 May 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Tracking Hurricane Ida (2021) through NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration: Preparedness, Response and Recovery
Part of the 2022 Hurricane Awareness Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Charlie Henry, Director, Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center, Kevin Kirsch, Southeastern Regional Manager, OR&R's Assessment and Response Division, Brandi Todd, Scientific Support Coordinator, OR&R's Emergency Response Division, and Caitlin Wessel, Gulf of Mexico Regional Coordinator, Marine Debris Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Southeast and Caribbean Regional Team, 2022 Hurricane Awareness Webinar Series

Seminar Contact(s): region.SECarib@noaa.gov, Geno Olmi SECART regional coordinator: Geno.Olmi@noaa.gov, Julie Steinberg and Shirley Murillo webinar hosts: Julie.Steinberg@noaa.gov and Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4113063415031641360

Abstract: Tune in and learn how NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration plays an important role before, during, and after hurricane events. The speakers will take us through Hurricane Ida (2021) and how their office took action .

Bio(s): Charlie Henry is the Director of the Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center. Kevin Kirsch is the Southeastern Regional Manager that is part of NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration's (OR&R) Assessment and Response Division. Brandi Todd is the Scientific Support Coordinator for OR&R's Emergency Response Division, and Caitlin Wessel is the Gulf of Mexico Regional Coordinator for the Marine Debris Program.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be made available shortly after the webinar at: https://www.noaa.gov/regional-collaboration-network/regions-southeast-and-caribbean/2022-hurricane-awareness-webinars

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: An Assessment of Coastal Resilience in Great Lakes Communities: Basinwide Resources and Local Efforts in Response to a Changing Coastline
Presenter(s): Anna Kaczmarek and Annika Tomson, University of Michigan Graduate Researchers
Date & Time: 10 May 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: An Assessment of Coastal Resilience in Great Lakes Communities: Basinwide Resources and Local Efforts in Response to a Changing Coastline

Presenter(s): Anna Kaczmarek and Annika Tomson, University of Michigan Graduate Researchers

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library and NOAA Office for Ocean Coastal Management

Seminar Contact(s): library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6402149867446898443

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: High water level events across the Great Lakes Basin in 2017 and 2019 caused widespread flooding and shoreline erosion, damaged property and infrastructure, and increased interest among communities to protect their coastlines and implement resiliency measures. In response, the Basin experienced an influx of resources and funding to assist communities in adopting solutions that have overwhelmed users. Through interviews with local decision-makers and resource-providing organizations, this research confirmed existing gaps and identified potential solutions to improve the implementation of coastal resiliency measures at a local scale.

Keywords: Coastal resilience, capacity, local governance

Bio(s): Anna and Annika are recent graduates of the University of Michigan's School for Environment and Sustainability master's program. Through their work with four additional colleagues, the project has culminated in their increased interest regarding local governance barriers and support post graduation. Anna is interested in supporting collaborative management of US rivers and lakes, while Annika looks toward continuing coastal resilience initiatives in the Great Lakes or salt coasts.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording will be available after the webinar on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to: OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Updated Sea Level Projections
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia; William Sweet, National Ocean Service, NOAA
Date & Time: 10 May 2022
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Updated Sea Level Projections

Presenter(s):
Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center (Climate Overview)

Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center (Water Resources Overview )

Pam Knox, University of Georgia (Agriculture Impact Update)

William Sweet, National Ocean Service, NOAA (Updated Sea Level Projections)

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

The May 10 webinar will feature a special presentation on "Updated Sea Level Projections."

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/7416485623755069963

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here: (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

5 May 2022

Title: Is ignoring predation mortality leading to an inability to achieve management goals in Alaska?
Presenter(s): Grant Adams, University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, PhD Candidate
Date & Time: 5 May 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Is ignoring predation mortality leading to an inability to achieve management goals in Alaska? (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s): Grant Adams, University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, PhD Candidate

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Kristan Blackhart and Library Seminars

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.


Abstract: Time-varying predation mortality is thought to represent a large proportion of mortality for groundfish in Alaska. However, assessment models assume time-invariant natural mortality. Research is needed to identify the relevance of time-varying predation mortality to management performance while also accounting for feedback from continued data collection and assessment. Here I present development of multi-species models and associated R package (Rceattle) developed for groundfish in Alaska and initial results from a management strategy evaluation to assess whether ignoring predation inhibits the performance of single-species management.Keywords: multispecies, management strategy evaluation, stock assessment


Bio(s): Grant (he/him/his) is a PhD student in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington. His current work aims to evaluate the performance of single- and multi-species assessment models and harvest control rules under trophic dynamics and climate change.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Dynamic ocean management for dynamic ocean ecosystems
Presenter(s): Elliot Hazen, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 5 May 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Dynamic ocean management for dynamic ocean ecosystems

Presenter(s): Elliot Hazen, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 199 208 1054
Meeting password: QKdp3p4SMe6
JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Global call-in numbers https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/globalcallin.php?MTID=m3142650430de6a3cadba4efb1ef4af96

Abstract: Highly migratory species are inherently difficult to manage as they regularly move in response to ocean conditions and cross human-imposed jurisdictional boundaries. Many migratory species face multiple threats including being hit by ships and interacting with fishing gear (bycatch). Rapidly changing ocean conditions such as marine heatwaves, are making existing management approaches less effective and creating new human-wildlife conflicts. Managing these highly migratory species in a changing climate requires an understanding of how distribution and abundance varies with the ocean environment. Here I discuss how new approaches to management can conserve top predators while still allowing humans to use the ocean sustainably focusing on two recently developed tools, WhaleWatch for assessing blue whale ship-strike risk (http://www.westcoast.fisheries.noaa.gov/whalewatch/) and EcoCast for maximizing the catch of swordfish while minimizing bycatch of sharks, pinnipeds, and turtles. These studies provide a framework for how dynamic approaches can be applied to other migratory species for which data are available, and emphasizes the utility in using big data analytics.


Bio(s): Dr. Hazen's research interests span oceanography and fisheries ecology to ecosystem modeling, with a focus on predator-prey dynamics and climate ready management approaches for marine ecosystems. He is currently working as part of an interdisciplinary team to use species-habitat relationships to create novel management strategies for the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem, a key component of NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessments. Elliott received his master's in fisheries science from the University of Washington and his doctorate in ecology from Duke University in North Carolina, followed by a National Research Council fellowship with NOAA's Environmental Research Division in Pacific Grove, California. Elliott is currently a Research Ecologist with NOAA with an adjunct appointment in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Institute of Marine Sciences at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and an adjunct appointment at Stanford's Hopkins Marine Station.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: The National Wetlands Inventory: Driving Conservation through Mapping
Presenter(s): Megan Lang, Chief Scientist National Wetlands Inventory, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory Program
Date & Time: 5 May 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The National Wetlands Inventory: Driving Conservation through Mapping
Part of the Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) 2022 Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Megan Lang, Chief Scientist, National Wetlands Inventory, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory Program, Falls Church, Virginia

Sponsor(s): NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) program

Seminar Contact(s): Amber Butler (amber.butler@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6558943523068147983
Please contact amber.butler@noaa.gov for technical connectivity troubleshooting.

Abstract: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) Program has catalyzed the conservation of wetlands through the mapping and monitoring of U.S. wetland and deepwater habitats for over 40 years. The Program provides two distinct products, the NWI Geospatial Dataset and Wetlands Status and Trends Reports to Congress. The Geospatial Dataset contains over 35 million polygons that provide spatially explicit, contiguous information on wetland and deepwater habitat type, location, and extent. The Wetlands Status and Trends Project offers decadal tabular estimates of wetland and deepwater habitat type and area change. These datasets provide complementary information that is used by stakeholders to support a broad array of applications, from conservation-oriented infrastructure planning to Endangered Species Act decision-making. To better meet these needs, the NWI Program has initiated a research and development effort to support the long-term delivery of high-quality wetlands data. This presentation will provide an update on newly available NWI products, progress towards delivering the next Wetlands Status and Trends Report, and ongoing partnerships with NOAA and USGS. The audience will have an opportunity to provide feedback aimed at enhancing partnerships and increasing the utility of NWI products for meeting today's most pressing needs for improved water data.

Bio(s): Megan Lang is Chief Scientist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) National Wetlands Inventory Program and Team Lead for the FWS Wetlands Status and Trends Project. Dr. Lang is an adjunct professor at the University of Maryland Department of Geographical Sciences. She serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal Wetlands and has published over 100 scientific articles and book chapters. Before working for the FWS, Dr. Lang led the U.S. Department of Agricultural Mid-Atlantic Regional Wetland Conservation Effects Assessment Project. She has been working to support the conservation and management of aquatic ecosystems through field and remote sensing-based assessments for over two decades.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:Materials and the recording will be available after the seminar by contacting iwgocm.staff@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: The Ins and Outs of Hiring and Working With Interns from Georgetown University
Presenter(s): Rebecca Cassidy, Georgetown University's Associate Director of Employer Relations
Date & Time: 5 May 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Please share with anyone (NOAA or not) who might be interested; thanks.

Title: The Ins and Outs of Hiring and Working With Interns from Georgetown University

Presenter(s): Rebecca Cassidy, Associate Director of Employer Relations at Georgetown University's Cawley Career Education Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Varis.Ransi@noaa.gov, co-coordinator NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series

Remote Access: This seminar is over but you can view the recording here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p3kq0ex3crc6/You may enter the webinar via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. If you enter via a browser, PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use the IE browser.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download it but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download info is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register at link above. Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Shrinking staff sizes, reduced budgets, and increased workloads put stress on organizations of all types, from governmental agencies to non-profit organizations to for-profit corporations. To handle the increased workload, many organizations rely heavily on internship programs, particularly during busy times of the year. However, there are many details to work through to hire students as interns. There are many details to think through and laws to follow to ensure that the internship is a successful working relationship for both employer and student. Join Rebecca Cassidy, Georgetown University's Associate Director of Employer Relations, to learn more about hiring interns and setting up a formal internship program. During this webinar, Rebecca will cover topics including:
  • - Why many organizations rely on interns
  • - Different types of student help: Intern vs. fellow vs. extern vs. temporary help
  • - How to reimburse your intern: Paid vs. unpaid vs. stipends vs. academic credit
  • - How to stay on the right side of the law
  • - How to manage an intern without it becoming your full-time job
  • - How to engage with universities to hire an intern
There will be time for Q&A to answer questions specific to your organization.

Bio(s): Rebecca Cassidy is the Associate Director of Employer Relations at Georgetown University's Cawley Career Education Center, which serves all undergraduate students at the university. She gained her 15 years' experience in coaching, training and advising students and employers by working a variety of settings both internationally and across the U.S. Her corporate background is in consulting and international nonprofit work and she earned her M.B.A. from The George Washington University, her B.A. in psychology from S.U.N.Y. Binghamton and is certified as a Global Career Development Facilitator through the National Career Development Association.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:Within a few days of the webinar, a link to the recording, usually a PDF of the slides, and sometimes a summary of the chat will be sent to all who registered.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mailto
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

4 May 2022

Title: NOAA's National Marine Ecosystem Status Website - a Tool for Educators
Presenter(s): Willem Klajbor, NOAA Ecosystem Indicators Working Group, Senior Research Associate
Date & Time: 4 May 2022
4:00 pm - 4:45 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA's National Marine Ecosystem Status Website - a Tool for Educators

Presenter(s): Willem Klajbor, NOAA Ecosystem Indicators Working Group, Senior Research Associate


Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars - library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/810858362211721998

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: NOAA's National Marine Ecosystem Status website provides a starting point for educators, outreach specialists, and the interested public to explore the status of seven major U.S. marine ecosystems and the nation at-a-glance. For the first time in one location, it provides easy access to NOAA's wide range of important coastal and marine ecosystem data. In this presentation, Will will introduce the website, it's capabilities, and gather feedback about the applicability of the tool to outreach activities.Keywords: Ecosystem, Tool, Outreach

Bio(s): Will Klajbor is a Senior Research Associate at AOML who coordinates the NOAA Ecosystem Indicators Working Group, which maintains NOAA's National Marine Ecosystem Status website. Will is a transdisciplinary ocean scientist who completed his Masters in Marine Resource Management with a minor in Risk Quantification in Marine Systems at Oregon State University.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Climate Change and Climate Induced Conflict and Migration in Afghanistan / Green Infrastructure, Climate, and Cities
Presenter(s): Haseeb Payab, former Deputy Director General of Plan, Policy and Monitoring at the National Environmental Protection Agency of Afghanistan
Date & Time: 4 May 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Climate Change and Climate Induced Conflict and Migration in Afghanistan / Green Infrastructure, Climate, and Cities CCRUN Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Haseeb Payab, former Deputy Director General of Plan, Policy and Monitoring at the National Environmental Protection Agency of Afghanistan

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA RISA Team.

Seminar Contact(s): Genie Bey, genie.bey@noaa.gov; Sloane Woerdemaz,sjw83@drexel.edu

Remote Access: Register for the webinar here. All seminars are held at 4:00 PM ET on the first Wednesday of every month, typically on Drexel University's campus. Seminars are currently being held monthly as webinars due to the COVID-19 pandemic. All sessions are recorded and archived on the CCRUN website.

Abstract: Four decades of conflict in Afghanistan have destroyed or severely damaged much of the infrastructure in Afghanistan, particularly in rural areas. This coupled with changes in climate, has critically positioned Afghanistan as one of the most vulnerable countries to climate hazards in South Asia, with an increased number of floods and drought events. According to the Global Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN), Afghanistan is ranked 176th (out of 181 countries) with respect to vulnerability and ability to cope with climate change. Factors including the poor state of infrastructure, the burden of environmental and climate stressors, high levels of poverty, lack of livelihood and income-generating opportunities have led to increased climate-related conflict and migration. Despite limited financial resources and little adaptive capacity to effectively manage the impacts of climate change, the government in partnership with international organizations, had started different initiatives to cope with these climate-generated problems. Haseeb Payab, former Deputy Director General of Plan, Policy and Monitoring at the National Environmental Protection Agency of Afghanistan will discuss these issues, challenges, initiatives and opportunities in this seminar.CCRUN hosts a monthly series featuring researchers and practitioners from around the region and country all of whom have new ideas on how to promote resilient, livable, and sustainable cities. The talks focus on urban solutions to global problems associated with increasing temperature and sea level rise, precipitation variability and greenhouse gas emissions. CCRUN is interested in spurring dialogue on the implications of such changes on the complex infrastructure of intensely developed landscapes, and on the health, well-being, and vulnerability of the people who live in them.

Bio(s): Dr. Ahmad Haseeb PAYAB has received his PhD from Eastern Mediterranean University, North Cyprus in 2018. He has over 12 years of work experience with international donors and public organizations in program and project development and management; sustainable development; strategic planning; policy development; teaching and research. Areas of expertise and research interests include water-food-energy nexus, hydro-economic modeling, hydro-climatology, water resources assessment and management, climate change vulnerability and adaptation, drought monitoring, planning and management, groundwater development and management and virtual water and water footprint analysis. He has published several peer-reviewed articles in refereed journals and in international conferences and regularly reviews articles for several international journals.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recordings of the Green Infrastructure, Climate, and Cities CCRUN Seminar Series can be found on the CCRUN website.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Optimizing Single-Sensor Satellite Ocean Color Data for Nearshore Reefs and Tropical Coastal Waters: Two Case Studies
Presenter(s): Dr. Erick Geiger, NOAA Coral Reef Watch
Date & Time: 4 May 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Optimizing Single-Sensor Satellite Ocean Color Data for Nearshore Reefs and Tropical Coastal Waters: Two Case Studies

Presenter(s): Erick Geiger, NOAA Coral Reef Watch

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Abstract: Moderate resolution (hundreds of meters to a few kilometers) satellite ocean color data are underutilized for monitoring water quality in coastal environments due to frequent data gaps from clouds and algorithm complexities in shallow waters. Commonly used data aggregation methods potentially smooth out small-scale variability with ecological importance. Here, we demonstrate an integrated spatiotemporal data aggregating scheme using Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) data at coral reef locations in Maui, Hawaii and Puerto Rico.

Bio(s): Erick Geiger comes from a background in satellite remote sensing, algorithm development, and modeling coastal ocean processes in the Mid-Atlantic region. Erick is currently employed as a Faculty Specialist at the University of Maryland Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center working as a developer and support scientist for NOAA's Coral Reef Watch program. Slides, Recordings Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php

Title: VAWS: High-resolution forecasting of wildfire activity and smoke: The High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) model
Presenter(s): Eric James, NOAA Global Systems Laboratory
Date & Time: 4 May 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: VAWS: High-resolution forecasting of wildfire activity and smoke: The High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) model

Presenter(s): Eric James, NOAA Global Systems Laboratory

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov), Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu), & Danielle Meeker (demeeker@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/vaws-may-2022/

Abstract: Beginning with the implementation of the latest version in Dec 2020, NOAA's High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) model now includes operational prediction of smoke from wildfires. The model simulates smoke from wildland fires in real time with 3-km grid spacing over CONUS and Alaska domains. The modeling system estimates biomass burning emissions and simulates fire plume rise in an inline mode by using the fire radiative power data from the VIIRS (onboard S-NPP and NOAA-20) and MODIS (Terra and Aqua) satellite instruments. The model includes the direct feedback of smoke on radiation, as well as the impact of smoke on near-surface visibility. In this presentation, we describe the model configuration, and show results from retrospective simulations during recent years. We also describe recent work to develop a novel fire weather index, referred to as the Hourly Wildfire Potential (HWP), which is intended for application to a convection-allowing model like the HRRR. The HRRR's ability to represent convective storms and their outflows, as well as its treatment of land surface processes within the RUC Land Surface Model, allows for forecasts of wildfire activity in the next 1-2 days. The HWP index is able to capture a portion of the weather-related variability in fire behavior, in particular the changes in activity related to synoptic and mesoscale wind events, as well as rainfall and snowfall. Comparison with existing fire weather indices illustrates the ability of the HWP index to highlight fire weather conditions and rapidly-changing fire weather. Real-time HWP index forecasts are now being produced for CONUS and Alaska based on the operational HRRR, and for North America based on the experimental Rapid Refresh Forecast System (RRFS), slated to replace the HRRR in operations in several years. This development also paves the way for improved prediction of wildfire smoke emissions in the coming hours and days.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Baleen whale prey consumption, ecosystem services, and conservation in the Anthropocene
Presenter(s): Matthew Savoca, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Scholar, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University; Elliott Hazen, PhD, Researcher on foraging ecology, NOAA's SWFSC
Date & Time: 4 May 2022
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Please share with anyone (NOAA or not) who might be interested; thanks.

Title: Baleen whale prey consumption, ecosystem services, and conservation in the Anthropocene

Presenter(s): Matthew Savoca , Ph.D., Postdoctoral Scholar, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University; Elliott Hazen, PhD, Researcher on foraging ecology, NOAA's SWFSC

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Varis.Ransi@noaa.gov, co-coordinator NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series

Remote Access: The seminar is over but you can see the recording here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p8dfswwdtilp/
You may enter the webinar via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. If you enter via a browser, PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use the IE browser.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download it but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download info is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register at link above.
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Baleen whales are ecosystems engineers through immense prey consumption and nutrient recycling. It is difficult to accurately gauge the magnitude of their current or historic ecosystem role without quantifying feeding rates and estimating prey consumed. Here, we used high-resolution tags deployed on seven baleen whale species in conjunction with acoustic measurements of prey density to calculate daily prey consumption from the Atlantic, Pacific, and Southern Oceans. Prior to industrial whaling, larger whale populations may have supported higher productivity through enhanced nutrient recycling. Rebuilding marine ecosystems is key to restoring the carbon benefits and nutrient recycling services of whales. Baleen whale recovery is hampered by multiple stressors including climate change, ship strikes, and entanglement in fishing gear. New approaches have led to improved assessments of these threats and tools to minimize their impacts, providing a roadmap for whale conservation in the 21st century.

Bio(s): Speaker 1: Matthew Savoca is an ecosystem ecologist who researches anthropogenic change in marine systems. Matthew is currently a National Science Foundation postdoctoral research fellow at the Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University. He is also a visiting researcher at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. Matthew received his PhD in Ecology at the University of California, Davis where his doctoral work focused on plastic ingestion by marine wildlife. After completing his Ph.D., Matthew worked with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as a California Sea Grant Fellow. In addition to his research, he is also passionate about his foster dogs, photography, and popular science writing.

Speaker 2: Elliott Hazen is a quantitative ecologist with NOAA's SWFSC who researches predator-prey interactions, applied ecology, and climate change effects on marine ecosystems. Elliott also holds adjunct positions with UC Santa Cruz and Stanford's Hopkins Marine Station. Elliott received his PhD in Ecology at Duke University where his doctoral work focused on oceanographic forcing of predator-prey interactions. In addition to his research, Elliott has two school-aged children and enjoys almost anything outdoors and on the water.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:Within a few days of the webinar, a link to the recording,
usually a PDF of the slides, and sometimes a summary of the chat will be sent to all who registered.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: POSTPONED: Global Thermostat: Highly Scalable, Flexible, and Low-Cost DAC Platform for Negative Emissions
Presenter(s): Miles Sakwa-Novak, Global Thermostat, Inc.
Date & Time: 4 May 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: Global Thermostat: Highly Scalable, Flexible, and Low-Cost DAC Platform for Negative Emissions
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Miles Sakwa-Novak, Global Thermostat, Inc.


Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.womack@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9002834615658219531

Abstract: Direct Air Capture, or DAC, has gained enormous recognition in recent years as an important technology that can provide negative emissions. Global Thermostat is a Colorado based DAC company and is regarded as the most developed DAC company in the United States. In this talk, we will introduce Global Thermostat and provide an insider's perspective into the status of DAC. We will describe Global Thermostat's DAC technology platform, discuss example application areas and deployment scenarios, and describe current areas of R&D that can reduce the costs of DAC.

Bio(s): Dr. Miles Sakwa-Novak is the Director of Research and Development at Global Thermostat, Inc. He received his BS in Chemical Engineering from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and a PhD in Chemical Engineering from Georgia Tech. He joined Global Thermostat in 2015 as a Lead Scientist, and became the Director of R&D in 2022.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2022,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!
Title: Integrating methods to evaluate Chinook salmon bioenergetic costs during adult migration, holding, and spawning
Presenter(s): Tracy Bowerman, Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board
Date & Time: 4 May 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Integrating methods to evaluate Chinook salmon bioenergetic costs during adult migration, holding, and spawning


Presenter(s): Tracy Bowerman, Science Manager, Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division

Seminar Contact(s): tanya.rogers@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://swfsc.webex.com/swfsc/j.php?MTID=m07961348a4316a4d4a63f0f678a72da5; Password (if needed): 5sNxHn33mN5; Join by phone by dialing +1-415-655-0002 US Toll, Access code: 2498 072 7370

Abstract: Once salmon enter freshwater, they cease feeding and therefore have a fixed energy reserve with which to complete the remaining portion of their life cycle. Anthropogenic or climatic factors that alter energy demands during salmon migration and holding could lead to energetic depletion and subsequent mortality. To examine the effect of environmental and behavioral factors on energy use, we developed an individual-based bioenergetics model for adult Chinook salmon during upstream migration and holding. The model accounts for variations in individual migration rate, timing, and duration, and associated changes in energy use related to water temperature, fish size, and swim speed. We compared predictions of energetic costs based on two distinct bioenergetic functions (equations and associated parameters) available in the literature. Model results differed between the two functions, particularly regarding the effect of fish size and migration timing on energy use. However, both functions adequately estimated the average amount of energy used during each life stage and yielded similar patterns of overall energy use. Increased travel times were energetically costly to the point that individual fish with long travel times were more likely to run out of energy before spawning. Early migrants generally had longer travel times, whereas later migrants were more likely to encounter lethal temperatures in the migration corridor. This applied bioenergetics model allows for detailed evaluation of factors affecting energetic costs for migrating adult salmon and lead us to hypothesize that there is an optimal migration window for Chinook salmon that may shift as a result of climate change.

Bio(s): Tracy has worked in river conservation for the past two decades. She earned a Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology from Utah State University while studying bull trout population dynamics. Her postdoctoral research involved assessing factors affecting salmon prespawn mortality throughout the Pacific Coast and evaluating Chinook salmon migration behavior and energy use. She previously taught at Salish-Kootenai College in Montana and worked in natural resource outreach, education, and policy in Oregon's high desert. Tracy is the Science Manager for the Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board where she works to protect ESA-listed salmonids in north-central Washington. She loves exploring rivers and mountains with her husband and young daughter.

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; link to recording available upon request.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

3 May 2022

Title: La Nina Came to Eden: Bjerknes Meets Hitchcock
Presenter(s): Michael J. McPhaden PhD, Senior Scientist, NOAA PMEL
Date & Time: 3 May 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: La Nina Came to Eden: Bjerknes Meets Hitchcock

Presenter(s): Michael J. McPhaden PhD, Senior Scientist, NOAA PMEL

Sponsor(s): NOAA NESDIS NCEI Science Seminars

Seminar Contact(s): Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2616709453480324109
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract: In July 1929, Dr Friedrich Ritter and his mistress Dore Strauch left their spouses and the turmoil of post-World War I Germany for the remote, uninhabited, and rugged volcanic island of Floreana in the Galapagos archipelago. Their dream was to live self-sufficiently in an idyllic tropical setting unspoiled by civilization. Yachts stopping at Floreana in the early 1930s after Ritter and Strauch established a homestead reported to the outside world on their pioneering enterprise. The news created a sensation that subsequently attracted other settlers to the island, one of whom, a mysterious Austrian faux baroness, vexed Ritter and Strauch to the point of open hostility. Not all the participants in this drama survived the experience of colonizing Floreana though. A prolonged drought that gripped the island from 1933 to 1935 led to food shortages and ultimately the death of Dr. Ritter, who unwittingly ate tainted chicken out of desperation. The bizarre intrigues, extraordinary adventures, and struggles to endure on Floreana were chronicled in Dore Strauch's 1936 memoir Satan Came to Eden and a 2013 Hollywood documentary based on it. A story that has not been told is how climate variability, and in particular an extended period of cold La Nia conditions in 1933-35, led to the drought that caused food shortages on the island. We will use reconstructed sea surface temperatures, an atmospheric reanalysis, and other data sources to describe the evolution of the 1933-35 La Nia and how it affected the human drama that unfolded on Floreana Island. This protracted La Nia event had impacts felt in other parts of the globe as well and in particular was a major influence on the development of the 1930s Dust Bowl in the southern plains of the United States.


Bio(s): Dr. Michael McPhaden is a Senior Scientist at NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, Washington. His research focuses on large-scale tropical ocean dynamics, ocean-atmosphere interactions, and the ocean's role in climate. He received a Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1980. For the past 40 years he has been involved in developing ocean observing systems for climate research and forecasting, most notably the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) moored buoy array in the Pacific for studies of El Nio and the Southern Oscillation.Dr. McPhaden is a Past President of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), an organization of over 60,000 Earth and space scientists from 140 countries. He has published over 300 articles in the refereed scientific literature and is one of the most highly cited authors on the topic of El Nino. He is a Nansen Medalist of the European Geosciences Union, a Sverdrup Medalist of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and a fellow of the Oceanography Society, the AMS and the AGU. For his contributions to assessments of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), he shared the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 with Al Gore and other IPCC participants.

Recording: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1XAZN9TfEwWtt3QEnzHXcdFBMBeUAXzeC/view?usp=sharing

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Title: CANCELLED- Integrating Socioeconomics in the Alaska Climate Integrated Modeling Project (ACLIM)
Presenter(s): Alan Haynie, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 3 May 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesCANCELLED

Title: Integrating Socioeconomics in the Alaska Climate Integrated Modeling Project (ACLIM)

Presenter(s): Alan Haynie, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): AFSC 2022 Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Abigail McCarthy, abigail.mccarthy@noaa.gov; Pearl Rojas, pearl.rojas@noaa.gov

Abstract: The Alaska Climate Integrated Modeling (ACLIM) project is an interdisciplinary collaboration between NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center, the University of Washington, and other partners to examine how predicted warming may impact the Bering Sea ecosystem " and how to ensure that the management system is as prepared as possible for the coming changes. Under different carbon emissions scenarios, ACLIM links regional ocean models with a suite of biological models" ranging from climate-enhanced single-species models to spatial ecosystem models. Each model includes different levels of ecosystem and fishery modeling complexity, which allows us to examine the interaction of sources of climatic and biological variability, change, and uncertainty and how current and potential management measures influence the system. This talk is focused on the socioeconomic scenarios used in the first phase of the project and new scenarios that are currently being developed with stakeholder input. The coupling of these scenarios with the other elements of the ACLIM modeling process will enable fishery managers and other stakeholders on evaluate how different management tools may make the system more resilient in the face of future changes.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Live from the NOAA Hurricane Awareness Tour!
Presenter(s): Ken Graham, Dan Brown, Robbie Berg and John Cangialosi NHC/NWS and Hurricane Hunter Pilots and flight crew
Date & Time: 3 May 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Live from the NOAA Hurricane Awareness Tour!
Part of the 2022 Hurricane Awareness Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Ken Graham (Director, NHC/NWS), Dan Brown, Robbie Berg and John Cangialosi (Hurricane Specialists, NHC/NWS) and Hurricane Hunter Pilots and flight crew

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Southeast and Caribbean Regional Team (SECART), 2022 Hurricane Awareness Webinar Series

Seminar Contact(s): region.SECarib@noaa.gov, Geno Olmi SECART regional coordinator: Geno.Olmi@noaa.gov, Shirley Murillo webinar host: Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3461867757842429968

Abstract: Join us to learn about how NOAA gathers data from inside the storm and why they do it. Hear from the Hurricane Hunter Pilots, Forecasters, and the Director of the NOAA's National Hurricane Center on the importance of data collection and how the forecasters use the data.

Bio(s): Ken Graham (Director, NHC/NWS), Dan Brown, Robbie Berg and John Cangialosi (Hurricane Specialists, NHC/NWS) and Hurricane Hunter Pilots and flight crew

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be made available shortly after the webinar at: https://www.noaa.gov/regional-collaboration-network/regions-southeast-and-caribbean/2022-hurricane-awareness-webinars

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2 May 2022

Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, May 2022: Understanding Predictability of Daily Southeast US Precipitation using Explainable Machine Learning, and Recent Enhancements to METplus for Weeks 3-4 Evaluation and Diagnostics
Presenter(s): Kathleen Pegion, George Mason University, and Tara Jensen, NCAR and Developmental Testbed Center
Date & Time: 2 May 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Understanding Predictability of Daily Southeast US Precipitation using Explainable Machine Learning, and Recent Enhancements to METplus for Weeks 3-4 Evaluation and Diagnostics

Presenter(s): Dr. Kathleen Pegion, George Mason University; and Tara Jensen, NOAA/NCAR and Developmental Testbed Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Weather Program Office S2S Program; and NOAA NWS Office of Science and Technology, Integration Modeling Program Division

Seminar Contacts: Karen Keith, karen.keith@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7565260545208412430

Abstract: This monthly webinar series was created to share ongoing work within NWS and OAR at the Weeks 3-4 and S2S timescales. We would like to foster a relaxed, informal dialogue among forecasters, modelers and researchers. This month, Dr. Kathleen Pegion will speak about "Understanding Predictability of Daily Southeast US Precipitation using Explainable Machine Learning." Tara Jensen will speak about "Recent Enhancements to METplus for Weeks 3-4 Evaluation and Diagnostics."

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available on the Weeks 3-4/S2S Webinar Series website: https://vlab.noaa.gov/web/weeks-3-4-s2s-webinar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

28 April 2022

Title: Modeling the recolonizing gray wolf population in Washington State: challenges and outcomes
Presenter(s): Sarah Converse, Unit Leader, USGS Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Associate Professor, University of Washington
Date & Time: 28 April 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Modeling the recolonizing gray wolf population in Washington State: challenges and outcomes

Presenter(s): Sarah Converse, Unit Leader, USGS Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Associate Professor, University of Washington

Sponsor(s): NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 199 208 1054
Meeting password: QKdp3p4SMe6JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Global call-in numbers https://noaanmfs-meets.webexABSTRACT

Abstract: Modeling a recolonizing population involves challenges that existing tools are poorly adapted to address. Integrated population models (IPMs) support the development of more accurate and precise population models, but existing structures are not appropriate for dealing with detailed movement processes. Individual-based models are useful for capturing detailed movement processes, but traditional applications are data hungry and frequently don't deal well with uncertainty. To model the recolonizing gray wolf (Canis lupus) population in Washington, we developed a novel approach that integrates aspects of IPMs and IBMs to handle the spatially explicit recolonization process alongside demographic processes. The model consists of an IPM over the data period (2009"2020), and a combination of a demographic projection model and individual-based movement model over the projection period (2021 2070). Our results indicate that, absent major changes in the dynamics of the system, the wolf population is likely to meet state-determined recovery goals within the next 10 to 20 years, with wolf populations spreading to the southern Cascades and coastal portions of Washington within that time. Describing the movement process is challenging, but our findings regarding recovery were robust under several different models of movement. This work will support the State of Washington's Periodic Status Review for wolves in the coming months. Our framework also underscores the power of data integration for addressing complex population modeling challenges that cut across aquatic and terrestrial systems.

Bio(s): Sarah J. Converse is the Unit Leader of the Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, and an Associate Professor in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS) and the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (SAFS) at the University of Washington in Seattle. Her research focuses on the development and application of methods to understand the functioning of populations and to improve their management. She works across a broad variety of taxa: terrestrial birds, seabirds, marine and terrestrial mammals, amphibians, fishes, and more. Her research projects reflect two primary themes: (1) development and application of quantitative methods in population ecology, particularly for small and declining populations; and (2) development and application of decision-analytic methods to inform management of populations. Sarah collaborates extensively with managers in federal and state agencies, particularly in Washington and the Pacific Northwest. She also works internationally, with current research projects located in Europe, New Zealand, French Polynesia, and the Arctic. She also advises graduate students and post-doctoral research associates at the University of Washington. Sarah has a B.S. from Michigan State University, a M.S. from University of Nebraska, and a Ph.D. from Colorado State University. You can learn more about Sarah's work at: https://depts.washington.edu/qcons/..com/noaanmfs-meets/globalcallin.php?MTID=m3142650430de6a3cadba4efb1ef4af96


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Title: The Geographic Approach to Our Ocean, Our Future
Presenter(s): Dawn Wright, PhD, Chief Scientist, Environmental Systems Research Institute
Date & Time: 28 April 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Geographic Approach to Our Ocean, Our Future

Presenter(s): Dawn Wright, PhD, Chief Scientist, Environmental Systems Research Institute (aka Esri), from our headquarters in Redlands, CA

Sponsor(s): NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping programSeminar Contacts4(s): IOCM host amber.butler@noaa.gov, Speaker DWright@esri.com

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1294023352707147277

Abstract: Dawn Wright briefly lays out the case for a geographic approach for bringing the importance of the ocean front-and-center in the minds of policy-makers and the public, for making the critical intersection between ocean mapping and climate, and all within the context of the very-important UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development. Included are descriptions of new geospatial applications with end-to-end capability, from creating content to high-end modeling and novel analytics to effective science communication back to communities. This is especially the communities who truly understand that the ocean is not too big to fail or fix. Our very future depends upon it.

Bio(s): After 17 years as a professor of geography and oceanography at Oregon State University, Dr. DawnWright was appointed in October 2011 as Chief Scientist of the Environmental Systems Research Institute (aka Esri), a world-leading GIS software, services and spatial data science company. In this role, Dawn works directly with the CEO on strengthening the scientific foundation for Esri software and services, while also representing Esri to the international scientific community. She maintains an affiliated faculty appointment at OSU.In 1991 Dawn became the first Black female to dive to the deep ocean floor in a research submersible. In June 2022 she will become the first Black person to dive to Challenger Deep, thanks to Victor Vescovo and his Caladan Oceanic crew. In April 2021 Dawn was elected to both the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. She has also served on many advisory boards including theNOAA and EPA Science Advisory Boards. Dawn holds a Ph.D. in Physical Geography and Marine Geology from UCSB, an M.S. in Oceanography fromTexas A&M,and a B.S. in Geology from Wheaton College (Illinois). She enjoys road cycling, 18th-century pirates, her golden retrieverRiley, and SpongeBob Squarepants. Follow her on Twitter @deepseadawn.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Summary materials will be emailed out after the seminar.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Using Regulatory Data to Inform Marine Spatial Planning Efforts
Presenter(s): Deirdre Brannigan, ProtectedSeas
Date & Time: 28 April 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Using Regulatory Data to Inform Marine Spatial Planning Efforts

Presenter(s): Deirdre Brannigan, ProtectedSeas

Sponsor(s): NOAA National MPA Center and OCTO

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3084128337728440847

Abstract: Being able to access rules and regulations in marine protected areas (MPAs) is critical to understanding which MPAs or OECM (other effective conservation measures) have restrictions in place to meet conservation goals. The ProtectedSeas Navigator mapping project is a one-stop resource for policymakers to find out where MPAs are located as well as discover the existing regulations and evaluate their various levels of protection. This regulations-based tool can be used to inform protection analyses and aid in forecasting other areas that need protection. Currently ProtectedSeas has data for over 15,500 MPAs in more than 106 countries "the only place this comprehensive repository of information and data exists. ProtectedSeas is in a formal public-private partnership with the US NOAA MPA Center. This webinar will be of special interest to MPA managers, resource protection staff, policy makers, scientists, and the conservation community who are interested in assessing ocean conservation regulations and protection metrics.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/archive.html)

Seminar POC for questions: Zac Cannizzo, zac.cannizzo@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: Studies of Brown Carbon Particles from Wildfire Smoke
Presenter(s): Rodney Weber, Georgia Tech
Date & Time: 28 April 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: Studies of Brown Carbon Particles from Wildfire Smoke
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rodney Weber, Georgia Tech

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.womack@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8601672300705953547

Abstract: The contribution of smoke from wildfires is having an increasing influence on air quality and climate. One component of these fires are organic aerosol particles that preferentially absorb light at the lower end of the visible spectrum, leading to the name brown carbon (BrC). As more studies have focused on BrC formation and evolution in smoke from fires, the picture is becoming more complex. In this talk I will discuss the results from our studies of BrC in the NASA FIREX-AQ mission, comparing methods for measuring BrC and the evolution of BrC close to the fires and at some distance. These results will be compared to other studies of BrC aging.

Bio(s): Dr. Rodney Weber is a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Science at Georgia Institute of Technology. He earned his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Minnesota. He did his postdoctoral research at Brookhaven National Laboratory before joining the faculty of Georgia Tech in 1998. He has been awarded the American Geophysical Union's Ascent Award in 2014 and the Cullen-Peck Faculty Fellow Award in 2007, among other honors. His research focuses on aerosol formation and growth mechanisms and its effects on air quality and human health.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2022,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!
Title: Biological consequences of a changing climate on pre-recruit life-stages of northeast U.S. finfish: effects of CO2 and thermal environments
Presenter(s): Chris Chambers, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 28 April 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Biological consequences of a changing climate on pre-recruit life-stages of northeast U.S. finfish: effects of CO2 and thermal environments

Presenter(s): Chris Chambers, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

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Title: Precipitation trends in the Northeast and links with Drought
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; Matt Barlow, University of Masachusetts Lowell; and Laurie Agel, University of Massachusetts Lowell
Date & Time: 28 April 2022
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Precipitation trends in the Northeast and links with Drought

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University;
Matt Barlow, University of Massachusetts Lowell; and
Laurie Agel, University of Massachusetts Lowell


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s):
Ellen Mecray

Remote Access:
Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of April conditions and Matt Barlow and Laurie Agel will brief on their research connecting precipitation trends in the northeast with drought conditions.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

26 April 2022

Title: Discover NOAA Resource Collections: Ocean Sound and Whales
Presenter(s): Claire Fackler and Chloe McKenna, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 26 April 2022
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Discover NOAA Resource Collections: Ocean Sound and Whales

Presenter(s): Claire Fackler and Chloe McKenna, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2307347562982045712

Abstract: As part of the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries 50th anniversary campaign, we have been launching a new robust resource collection each month. Explore each collection of NOAA videos, lesson plans, webinars, web stories, virtual reality, and much more. In this new era of ocean conservation, we encourage formal and informal educators and other interested people to take advantage of the robust educational materials available in each topically-based collection. During this webinar, we will be focusing on Ocean Sound and Impact of Noise and the Whales Resource Collections.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Professional Excellence at NOAA: A Diversity of Perspectives
Presenter(s): Dr. Sim Aberson, Meteorologist, NOAA/OAR; JoAnn Becker, Senior Aviation Meteorologist, NOAA/NWS; Degui Cao, Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS; LT Erick Estela, NOAA/OMAO; Dr. Tom Jamir, Senior Advisor on Organizational Excellence, NOAA/NMFS; Artara Johnson, Physical Scientist, NOAA/NOS; John Moore, Meteorologist, NOAA/NWS; and Neavaly Touray, Program and Management Analyst, NOAA/SO/CAO, Dr. Hernan Garcia, Oceanographer, NOAA/NESDIS, Moderator: Dr. Letise Lafeir, Senior Advisor at the NOAA Office of the Under Secretary/Administrator
Date & Time: 26 April 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Pre-recorded webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Professional Excellence at NOAA: A Diversity of Perspectives
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) SeriesWatch Now: https://youtu.be/LZwxvIo6cDs ; This event was pre-recorded

Panel:
  • Dr. Sim Aberson, Meteorologist, NOAA/OAR, Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorology Lab, Miami, FL
  • JoAnn Becker, Senior Aviation Meteorologist, NOAA/NWS/AWC/Aviation Operations Branch, Kansas City, MO
  • Degui Cao, Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS/COOPS/Coastal Hazards Branch, Silver Spring, MD
  • LT Erick Estela, NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps, NOAA/OMAO, Newport, OR
  • Dr. Tom Jamir, Senior Advisor on Organizational Excellence, NOAA/NMFS Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office, Gloucester, MA
  • Artara Johnson, Physical Scientist, NOAA/NOS/COOPS, Business Operations Division, SIlver Spring, MD
  • John Moore, Meteorologist, NOAA/NWS/National Weather Service Operations Center, Silver Spring, MD
  • Neavaly Touray, Program and Management Analyst, NOAA/SO/CAO Facilities Operations Division, SIlver Spring, MD
  • Dr. Hernan Garcia, Oceanographer, NOAA NESDIS NCEI, SIlver Spring, MD
This panel discussion will be moderated by Dr. Letise Lafeir, Senior Advisor at the NOAA Office of the Under Secretary/Administrator, in Washington, DC (bio)

Sponsor(s): This event is part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series with sponsorship from the NOAA Science Council. The NOAA-wide NELS provides examples of NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. The NELS are presented as part of the NOAA Science Seminar Series. For questions, contact nels@noaa.gov (NELS Team: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov,
Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov, and Robert.Levy@noaa.govSeminar Contacts: Webinar host is SandraClaar@noaa.gov, webinar logistics, Robert.Levy@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This event was pre-recorded; the YouTube link to the recording is now available at NELS webpage: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries (https://youtu.be/LZwxvIo6cDs)

Abstract: Evolving the societal value and impact of NOAA's mission of science, service and stewardship hinges on the Agency's resolve to attract, recruit, retain, and develop the most capable individuals from across our diverse American society. This requires making increased investments in professional excellence by evolving the skill, diversity, equity, and inclusion of its workforce. NOAA's Office of Inclusion and Civil Rights demographic data metrics indicate that much more demonstrable effort needs to be done. Data show that individuals in underrepresented groups in NOAA's senior leadership (Senior Executive Service) have decreased from 14% in 2010 to 9% in 2020. Similarly, individuals in underrepresented groups in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics fields (NOAA's most populous occupations) show only a modest increase from 12% in 2010 to 14% in 2020. The data indicate a need to improve NOAA's recruitment, retention, and advancement practices. This panel discussion among a few of NOAA's diverse professional employees provides an opportunity to hear examples of how a diverse, inclusive, and skillful workforce contributes to the Agency's mission.

Accessibility: Closed captioning is provided.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Cetacean distribution in the Gulf of Alaska: Preliminary results from the 2021 PacMAPPS survey
Presenter(s): Kim Goetz & Alex Zerbini, Alaska Fisheries Science Center Marine Mammal Laboratory
Date & Time: 26 April 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Cetacean distribution in the Gulf of Alaska: Preliminary results from the 2021 PacMAPPS survey

Presenter(s): Kim Goetz & Alex Zerbini, Alaska Fisheries Science Center Marine Mammal Laboratory

Sponsor(s): AFSC 2022 Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Abigail McCarthy, abigail.mccarthy@noaa.gov;Pearl Rojas, pearl.rojas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Join by computer at:https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m1ed0abf6ef8744f2d5a296f2450c2e6fWebEx meeting number: 2762 343 8233 Password: Fisheries2022!Or by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 2762 343 8233

Abstract: The Gulf of Alaska provides important habitat for many endangered marine mammal species and is also an area of high anthropogenic activity. Despite this, very few large scale marine mammal surveys have occurred, and abundance estimates are outdated for several key species. To address this, the US Navy-funded Pacific Marine Assessment Program for Protected Species (PacMAPPS) survey was conducted by the Marine Mammal Laboratory (MML/AFSC) in the northern Gulf of Alaska from 1 to 26 August 2021to obtain information on the distribution, density, and abundance of marine mammals. The survey area was split into two strata: coastal (30 m to 500 m depth) and slope (500 m to 4000 m depth). The survey followed distance sampling methods and marine mammal search, detection, and identification were conducted by two independent platforms using 25x big eye binoculars. Real-time passive acoustic monitoring was conducted via sonobuoys deployed approximately every 30nm. Finally, oceanographic data (via an underway water sampling system), daily CTDs, and prey data (via EK80) were collected. A total of 2,592 km of tracklines were surveyed, and 667 marine mammal sightings were documented (including duplicates and possible resights). The two most commonly documented large whale species were humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae) and fin (Balaenopteraphysalus) whales, with 137 and 98 sightings, respectively. Humpback, gray (Eschrichtius robustus), and North Pacific right (Eubalaena japonica) whales were only sighted in the coastal strata. Killer whales (Orcinus orca),identified to ecotype, were distributed throughout the survey area, while sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) were sighted only in deep (>400 m)water. Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) were the most commonly sighted small cetacean (111 sightings). Four critically endangered North Pacific right whales (NPRW) were sighted, the most seen in any survey in the Gulf of Alaska. Two whales were matched to known individuals in the MML/AFSCNPRW catalog, and two were confirmed new animals; none were matched to animals from the Bering Sea. A total of 110 sonobuoys were deployed (96 successful),for over 133 hours of acoustic monitoring. Results were in good agreement with visual sightings; primary species detected include fin, sperm, killer, humpback, and North Pacific right whales. Seismic air guns were detected on 47%of sonobuoys, including in the far northeast corner of the survey area (activities occurring in lower Cook Inlet, AK). Estimates of cetacean abundance and of detection probability on the trackline (g[0]) is currently being computed.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

25 April 2022

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Zach Hoylman, Montana Climate Office; Henry Pai, Northwest River Forecast Center; Kim Hall, The Nature Conservancy; Ann Schwend, Montana Department of Natural Resources
Date & Time: 25 April 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar

Presenter(s):

Climate Recap & Current Conditions
Zach Hoylman | Montana Climate Office

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Henry Pai | Northwest River Forecast Center

Linking Drought Drivers to Response Strategies: A Montana Application of the EcoDIVA Tool
Kim Hall | The Nature Conservancy
Ann Schwend | Montana Department of Natural Resources

Seminar Contact(s): Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
According to the April 5, 2022 U.S. Drought Monitor, 70.7% of the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) is in drought, with 23.3% of the region in Extreme/Exceptional Drought (D3/D4). While water availability in some areas of Washington and Idaho has improved over the winter months, much of southern and eastern Oregon and portions of Idaho recorded their driest 3-month January-March on record. This webinar will provide more information on the current conditions and outlooks, as well as a presentation on "Linking Drought Drivers to Response Strategies: A Montana Application of the EcoDIVA Tool."

These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/240389945145505803

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

24 April 2022

Title: Texas Drought Status Webinar
Presenter(s): Victor Murphy, NOAA National Weather Service Southern Region Climate and COOP Services program manager, John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas State Climatologist
Date & Time: 24 April 2022
2:00 am - 3:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Texas Drought Status Webinar


Presenter(s):
  • Victor Murphy, NOAA National Weather Service Southern Region Climate and COOP Services program manager
  • John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas State Climatologist


Seminar Contact(s): Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Drought in Texas has expanded and worsened during early 2022. The US Drought monitor shows nearly 50% (49.1%) of the state in extreme (D3) or exceptional (D4) drought, the highest percentage since February of 2012. Please join us as John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas State Climatologist, and Victor Murphy, with the National Weather Service, talk about current drought conditions, the long-range forecast, and the impact recent precipitation might have on drought conditions across the state.

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4709106469594731023

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

22 April 2022

Title: April 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy
Date & Time: 22 April 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: April 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office, and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov), Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/april2022-nws-briefing/

Abstract: We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for May 2022 and the early summer season. Join the gathering online to learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Agent-based Models
Presenter(s): Dr. Paul Roebber, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
Date & Time: 22 April 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NWS - HQ - MDL Goto1
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Roebber Lectures - Agent-based Models

Presenter(s): Dr. Paul Roebber, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Seminar Contact(s): John Schattel (John.Schattel@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7751977408640408588

Abstract: The National Weather Service (NWS) has a long history of leveraging available data in support of weather forecasting efforts. These efforts are ongoing and with the advent of more advanced techniques (e.g., machine learning), the NWS is in the process of determining where and how to apply them.

This series of four lectures is designed to provide some background on these techniques. No assumptions will be made regarding the statistical background of participants. The fourth lecture in this series will cover a modeling technique that is quite different from the methods traditionally used in the atmospheric sciences: agent-based modeling (ABM).

ABMs are a form of computer simulation in which a system is governed by the interaction of individual agents which follow a set of local rules. The behavior of the system emerges from the collective behavior of the individual agents. Such models have a natural connection to human decision-making and the social sciences and in the decision support context of the NWS, such techniques can be used as a means for understanding the context in which users employ forecast information. This bottom-up interaction of multiple systems at multiple scales, with concomitant emergent properties, can allow for a deeper understanding of complex systems, such as the weather forecast and warning system employed by the NWS. In this lecture, we will discuss the general concept of ABMs and provide some examples.

More information on the lecture series is available in the NOAA Virtual Lab.

Bio(s): Dr. Roebber received his BSc in Meteorology from McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada in 1981. He earned a MS in Meteorology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA in 1983. In 1991, Dr. Roebber returned to McGill University where he completed his PhD in meteorology. Dr. Roebber's research interests include the following:
  • Synoptic and mesoscale meteorology
  • Climate dynamics
  • Systems modeling and data analysis
  • Numerical weather prediction


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides will be shared after the webinar with all who register, or a link where they can be found. Recording will be shared after the webinar with all who register, or a link where they can be found, or a contact for the recording.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

21 April 2022

Title: The Connections Between Deep-sea Mining, the Monuments and Fisheries
Presenter(s): Dr. Jeff Drazen, Professor, Department of Oceanography, UH Mnoa
Date & Time: 21 April 2022
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Connections Between Deep-sea Mining, the Monuments and Fisheries

Presenter(s): Dr. Jeff Drazen, Professor, Department of Oceanography, UH Mnoa

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3913124920171214859

Abstract: The need for metals, particularly for batteries as we move away from a carbon-based energy sector, has renewed interest in deep-sea mining. On the high seas, twenty-seven global mining exploration licenses covering over 1.5 million km2 of seafloor have been granted by the International Seabed Authority. There are significant risks from these activities to both seafloor and midwater ecosystems over potentially very large areas. Dr. Drazen will outline the potential risks to biodiversity, carbon cycling and particularly fisheries, sharing what we know and don't yet understand. He will discuss the potential of US Pacific Monuments for conserving biodiversity and deep-sea ecosystem health in the face of the developing mining industry.This presentation is part of the Third Thursday By the Bay Presentation Series at Mokuppapa Discovery Center, which is the visitor center for Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument in Hilo, Hawaii. This State of the Monument lecture series is also supported by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation through a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: ENSO, IOD, and the Indonesian Throughflow: interactions and future projections
Presenter(s): Agus Santoso, PhD, Senior Research Scientist, UNSW Climate Change Research Centre, Sydney Australia, and the University of New South Wales, Australia
Date & Time: 21 April 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, OAR - AOML - Happenings Calendar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: ENSO, IOD, and the Indonesian Throughflow: interactions and future projections

Presenter(s): Dr. Agus Santoso, Senior Research Scientist, UNSW Climate Change Research Centre, Sydney Australia, and the University of New South Wales, Australia


Sponsor(s): NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratories (AOML)


Seminar Contact(s): Matthieu Henaff; matthieu.lehenaff@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please join meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.https://meet.goto.com/601854613

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 601-854-613

New to GoToMeeting? Get the app now and be ready when your first meeting starts:
https://meet.goto.com/install

Abstract: The Indo-Pacific region is a major component of the global climate system, hosting some of the most dominant sources of climate variability on the planet, the El Nio Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). The tropical Pacific and Indian Oceans, where ENSO and IOD are respectively sourced, are linked through the atmosphere and oceanic pathway called the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF). Flowing from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean through the Indonesian archipelago, the ITF is influenced by ENSO and IOD through variations in the Walker Circulation that alter upper-ocean heat content and thus pressure gradient across the maritime continent. Changes in the ITF influence heat and freshwater balance in the Indo-Pacific region that is important for climate. Given the significant global-scale environmental and socio-economic impact of ENSO and IOD, it is critical to understand how ENSO, IOD, and their link to the ITF respond to greenhouse forcing which is expected to increase into the future. This presentation will discuss future projections of ENSO and IOD, as well as the impact on the ITF and its representation in climate models used for future projections. A pertinent finding is that ENSO and IOD variability is overall projected to increase, although inter-model spread is large. Determining the implication on ITF requires a consideration of the vertical structure of ITF transport.


Bio(s): Dr. Agus Santoso is a senior research scientist at the UNSW Climate Change Research Centre in Sydney Australia, and an adjunct science leader at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). He received a PhD in physical oceanography from UNSW School of Mathematics in 2006, with research interests in tropical climate variability and global thermohaline circulation. He co-leads a project at the Centre for Southern Hemisphere Oceans Research (CSHOR) investigating the dynamics of the El Nio Southern Oscillation and Indian Ocean Dipole. He is an editor for Journal of Climate and has served in the WCRP CLIVAR Pacific Regional Panel.

Recordings: https://www.youtube.com/user/phodaoml

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Dennis Todey, USDA Midwest Climate Hub
Date & Time: 21 April 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook

Presenter(s): Dennis Todey | USDA Midwest Climate Hub

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

April 2022 topics include drought changes and longer term impacts including continued risk for drought mainly west of the Missouri River and wildfire updates; recent and potential climate/weather impacts including but not limited to continuing La Nia and what it could mean for the region, soil moisture update and recharge outlook (both too wet and too dry), Great Lakes & riverine conditions, and mountain snow pack and accumulations for the year; and the latest trends and outlooks for precipitation, temperature through spring and summer (2 weeks to 6 months), and potential late freeze implications across the region (if any).

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7528179497868100876

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Explaining within-population variation in lifetime success: good traits, good luck, or good timing?
Presenter(s): Asbjrn Vllestad, University of Oslo
Date & Time: 21 April 2022
1:45 pm - 2:45 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Understanding local adaptation in a salmonid fish: the European grayling, Thymallus thymallus

Presenter(s): Asbjrn Vllestad, University of Oslo

Sponsor(s): NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 199 208 1054
Meeting password: QKdp3p4SMe6JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Global call-in numbers https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/globalcallin.php?MTID=m3142650430de6a3cadba4efb1ef4af96

Abstract: TBD


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: 3rd Annual NOAA Hurricane Preparedness Summit - Session 3
Presenter(s): Multiple presenters from across NOAA and partner agencies including CAPT Christian Rathke, NOAA OMAO Office of Health Services; and Cody Fritz, NOAA National Hurricane Center
Date & Time: 21 April 2022
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: 3rd Annual NOAA Hurricane Preparedness Summit - Session 3 - Tools

Presenter(s): Multiple presenters from across NOAA and partner agencies including CAPT Christian Rathke, NOAA OMAO Office of Health Services; and Cody Fritz, NOAA National Hurricane Center.


Sponsor(s): NOAA Disaster Preparedness Program serves as the lead sponsor with University of New Hampshire's Coastal Response Research Center along with support from NOS, NWS, and the NOAA Homeland Security Program Office

Seminar Contact(s): charlie.henry@noaa.gov or kathy.mandsager@unh.edu

Remote Access: Register for this event at: https://crrc.unh.edu/nos-hurricane-summit-2022

Abstract: The NOAA Hurricane Preparedness Summit is a seminar series created to assist in making ready for the approaching hurricane season. The focus is on making ready the safety of our Personnel (our people), our Missions, and Infrastructure(what is commonly called PMI). New for 2022 will be a special evening session to better connect with staff and partners in the Pacific time zones.Day 1: Enhancing support of state and federal partners for the 2022 Hurricane Season by focusing on the readiness of NOAA's Personal (People), Mission and Infrastructure (PMI);

Pacific Islands Session: Addressing the unique challenges to NOAA's Personal, Mission and Infrastructure in the Pacific Islands during Hurricane Season; and

Day 2: Overview of key NOAA tools and resources available for use during the phases of hurricanes


Bio(s): For the complete agenda & speaker descriptions, please use this link: https://crrc.unh.edu/nos-hurricane-summit-2022

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and recordings will be available with the agenda link after the workshop.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Dead Giveaway: Rising mortality rates suggest effectiveness of Lake Erie Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) control
Presenter(s): Kaitlen Lang, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA/OAR, Office of the Assistant Administrator
Date & Time: 21 April 2022
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Dead Giveaway: Rising mortality rates suggest effectiveness of Lake Erie Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) control (2022 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Kaitlen Lang, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA/OAR, Office of the Assistant Administrator

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL), 2022 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Abstract: Invasive grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) in the Laurentian Great Lakes may harm the Great Lakes ecology and economy. Multi-jurisdictional control efforts in Lake Erie are underway. However, the rarity and evasiveness of grass carp in a large, open ecosystem make it difficult to assess whether control is effective. I used three pieces of evidence " total catch (removals), effort, and mortality rates, to examine the effectiveness of grass carp control in the Lake Erie basin. My objectives were to 1) quantify the relationship between removals and effort 2) estimate ages for all grass carp captured in the Lake Erie basin from 2014-2021, 3) estimate annual mortality rates, and 4) describe the relationship between removals and mortality. This study showed that grass carp removal increased with effort and that mortality estimates increased after 2017, the year that grass carp control began. Taken together, my results suggest that control has had a measurable effect on Lake Erie basin grass carp.
Keywords: Invasive species, Great Lakes, fisheries

Bio(s): Kaitlen is a current Masters student at the University of Toledo. She is placed within the Office of the Assistant Administrator at NOAA's Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, where she works on stakeholder engagement in the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science. Outside of her professional life, she enjoys roller-blading, baking roasted garlic and kalamata olive bread, and listening to podcasts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: There and back again: Exploring how a sea anemone (genus Metridium) spread in cold temperate waters
Presenter(s): Heather Glon, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA/NMFS Office of Science & Technology
Date & Time: 21 April 2022
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: There and back again: Exploring how a sea anemone (genus Metridium) spread in cold temperate waters (2022 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Heather Glon, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA/NMFS Office of Science & Technology

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL), 2022 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Abstract: Plumose sea anemones (Metridium senile) are common members of hard-substrate communities in the northern temperate oceans. While populations can be heavily influenced by changes in climate, their ability to withstand temporary environmental extremes have enabled modern-day activities (e.g. marine transportation and the creation of artificial habitat) to influence their distribution. Within this talk I describe how I used sequence-capture genomic-level data to 1) explain the origins and dispersal history of Metridium senile and 2) explore the effects anthropogenic activities have had on their modern-day distribution, including non-native populations in the southern hemisphere.
Keywords: sea anemone; biogeography; anthropogenic impact

Bio(s): Heather recently completed her PhD in Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology with a graduate minor in public policy and management from The Ohio State University. Her Knauss placement is in the National Observer Program within NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology. She obtained her MS in biology from Central Michigan University and has previously been a marine educator, seal rehabilitator, and member of TNC Ohio Board of Trustees. Outside of work she enjoys birding, scuba diving, and horseback riding.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

20 April 2022

Title: 3rd Annual NOAA Hurricane Preparedness Summit - Session 2
Presenter(s): Multiple presenters from across NOAA and partner agencies including CAPT Christian Rathke, NOAA OMAO Office of Health Services; and Cody Fritz, NOAA National Hurricane Center
Date & Time: 20 April 2022
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: 3rd Annual NOAA Hurricane Preparedness Summit - Session 2 - Pacific Island Session

Presenter(s): Multiple presenters from across NOAA and partner agencies including CAPT Christian Rathke, NOAA OMAO Office of Health Services; and Cody Fritz, NOAA National Hurricane Center.


Sponsor(s): NOAA Disaster Preparedness Program serves as the lead sponsor with University of New Hampshire's Coastal Response Research Center along with support from NOS, NWS, and the NOAA Homeland Security Program Office

Seminar Contact(s): charlie.henry@noaa.gov or kathy.mandsager@unh.edu

Remote Access: Register for this event at: https://crrc.unh.edu/nos-hurricane-summit-2022

Abstract: The NOAA Hurricane Preparedness Summit is a seminar series created to assist in making ready for the approaching hurricane season. The focus is on making ready the safety of our Personnel (our people), our Missions, and Infrastructure(what is commonly called PMI). New for 2022 will be a special evening session to better connect with staff and partners in the Pacific time zones.Day 1: Enhancing support of state and federal partners for the 2022 Hurricane Season by focusing on the readiness of NOAA's Personal (People), Mission and Infrastructure (PMI);

Pacific Islands Session: Addressing the unique challenges to NOAA's Personal, Mission and Infrastructure in the Pacific Islands during Hurricane Season; and

Day 2: Overview of key NOAA tools and resources available for use during the phases of hurricanes


Bio(s): For the complete agenda & speaker descriptions, please use this link: https://crrc.unh.edu/nos-hurricane-summit-2022

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and recordings will be available with the agenda link after the workshop.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: VAWS: The NOAA VIIRS Active Fire Product
Presenter(s): Ivan Csiszar, NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research
Date & Time: 20 April 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: VAWS: The NOAA VIIRS Active Fire Product

Presenter(s): Ivan Csiszar, NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov), Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu), & Danielle Meeker (demeeker@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/vaws-april-2022/

Abstract: The Visible Infrared Imaging Spectroradiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on board the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series provides high quality radiometric measurements to enable detection and characterization of active fires. The current primary baseline NOAA operational product includes fire detection and fire radiative power (FRP) at 375m nadir resolution. VIIRS active fire data are generated globally by NOAA's ground system and the algorithm is also available to process direct broadcast data. The product has been used to detect and monitor fire occurrence, and to serve as input to various fire-related modeling applications. This seminar will include a summary of algorithm principles, the history of the evolution of the product, current status and plans for future improvements, and examples of key applications.

Bio(s): Ivan Csiszar is the Branch Chief of the Environmental Monitoring Branch of the Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division at NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR). His work has focused on land surface observations from environmental satellites, in particular active fire detection and characterization. Previously he led multiple research projects aimed at fire mapping, and evaluating fire products and impacts from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the GOES Imager. Currently he is responsible for the operational NOAA baseline fire products, focusing on JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) and GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) measurements and data from relevant partner satellite missions. He is also involved in activities aimed at applications of fire products in disaster and resource management through the NOAA Fire and Smoke Proving Ground Initiative.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Seasonal Ice and Changes in the Chukchi Sea: A Decade of Ice Draft Observations
Presenter(s): Peggy Sullivan, University of Washington Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, & Ecosystem Studies
Date & Time: 20 April 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Seasonal Ice and Changes in the Chukchi Sea: A Decade of Ice Draft Observations

Presenter(s): Peggy Sullivan, University of Washington Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, & Ecosystem Studies

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): EcoFOCI Research Coordinator Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Zooplankton Ecologist Deana Crouser (deana.crouser@noaa.gov).

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: Patterns of change in the Chukchi Sea seasonal ice zone near Icy Cape, Alaska are observed in years-long ice profiler data.

Bio(s): Peggy is a research scientist at the University of Washington's Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, & Ecosystem Studies working with NOAA/PMEL's EcoFOCI program.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: 3rd Annual NOAA Hurricane Preparedness Summit - Session 1
Presenter(s): Multiple presenters from across NOAA and partner agencies including CAPT Christian Rathke, NOAA OMAO Office of Health Services; and Cody Fritz, NOAA National Hurricane Center
Date & Time: 20 April 2022
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: 3rd Annual NOAA Hurricane Preparedness Summit - Session 1


Presenter(s): Multiple presenters from across NOAA and partner agencies including CAPT Christian Rathke, NOAA OMAO Office of Health Services, and Cody Fritz, NOAA National Hurricane Center.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Disaster Preparedness Program serves as the lead sponsor with University of New Hampshire's Coastal Response Research Center along with support from NOS, NWS, and the NOAA Homeland Security Program Office

Seminar Contact(s): charlie.henry@noaa.gov or kathy.mandsager@unh.edu

Remote Access: Register for this event at: https://crrc.unh.edu/nos-hurricane-summit-2022

Abstract: The NOAA Hurricane Preparedness Summit is a seminar series created to assist in making ready for the approaching hurricane season. The focus is on making ready the safety of our Personnel (our people), our Missions, and Infrastructure(what is commonly called PMI). New for 2022 will be a special evening session to better connect with staff and partners in the Pacific time zones.Day 1: Enhancing support of state and federal partners for the 2022 Hurricane Season by focusing on the readiness of NOAA's Personal (People), Mission and Infrastructure (PMI);

Pacific Islands Session: Addressing the unique challenges to NOAA's Personal, Mission and Infrastructure in the Pacific Islands during Hurricane Season; and

Day 2: Overview of key NOAA tools and resources available for use during the phases of hurricanes


Bio(s): For the complete agenda & speaker descriptions, please use this link: https://crrc.unh.edu/nos-hurricane-summit-2022

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and recordings will be available with the agenda link after the workshop.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

19 April 2022

Title: Refining Techniques for High-Frequency Monitoring of Chlorophyll
Presenter(s): Nikki Dix, GTM NERR, Nikki.Dix@dep.state.fl.us; Erik Smith, NIWB NERR, erik@baruch.sc.edu; Hannah Ramage, LSNERR, hannah.ramage@wisc.edu; Dwayne Porter, NERRS CDMO, dwayne.e.porter@gmail.com
Date & Time: 19 April 2022
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Refining Techniques for High-Frequency Monitoring of Chlorophyll

Presenter(s):
  • Nikki Dix, Guana Tolomato Matanzas NERR
  • Erik Smith, North Inlet-Winyah Bay NERR
  • Hannah Ramage, Lake Superior NERR
  • Dwayne Porter, NERRS Centralized Data Management Office


Sponsor(s): This webinar is sponsored by the NERRS Science Collaborative

Seminar Contact(s): Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4025257515277343502Abstract
Many estuaries across the country experience nutrient pollution and algal blooms, which degrade water quality for people and other aquatic life. Carefully tracking chlorophyll ' concentrations - a proxy for phytoplankton biomass - can help managers track the patterns and drivers of algal blooms and eutrophication in estuaries but, to date, technological barriers have limited monitoring to monthly measurements, which may not be enough to track plankton dynamics that fluctuate hourly. Last year, a catalyst project enabled 13 reserves nationwide to develop, test and share standardized protocols for using new YSI EXO Total Algae fluorometric sensors mounted on existing monitoring stations. In this webinar, team members will share how they: 1) assessed the performance of the new sensors; 2) identified sources of sensor interference and developed correction equations; and 3) created and shared tested protocols and recommendations for the Reserve System.

Bio(s): Please visit here for more information about the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: 2022 Alaska River Break-up Preview
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy; Crane Johnson, NOAA/NWS Alaska-Pacific River Forecast Center
Date & Time: 19 April 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: 2022 Alaska River Break-up Preview

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy; Crane Johnson, NOAA/NWS Alaska-Pacific River Forecast Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov), Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu), & Danielle Meeker (demeeker@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/2022-riverbreakup-webinar/

Abstract: There's a deep spring snowpack across Alaska as spring melt approaches. Crane Johnson with the NWS Alaska-Pacific River Forecast Center will review break-up basics and an overview of current conditions. ACCAP Alaska Climate Specialist Rick Thoman will provide the latest subseasonal outlooks that help inform the APRFC's official break-up outlook.

Bio(s): Rick Thoman is the Alaska Climate Specialist at the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP). Rick Thoman is an expert in Alaska climate and weather. He produces reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities and media. Crane Johnson is the Service Coordination Hydrologist for the NOAA/NWS Alaska-Pacific River Forecast Center (APRFC).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Gulf of Alaska Fishing Communities and Climate Change Adaptation
Presenter(s): Marysia Szymkowiak, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 19 April 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Gulf of Alaska Fishing Communities and Climate Change Adaptation

Presenter(s): Marysia Szymkowiak, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS AFSC 2022 Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Abigail McCarthy, abigail.mccarthy@noaa.gov; Pearl Rojas, pearl.rojas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Join by computer at:https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m1ed0abf6ef8744f2d5a296f2450c2e6fWebEx meeting number: 2762 343 8233 Password: Fisheries2022!Or by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 2762 343 8233

Abstract: Climate change is dramatically altering the marine ecosystem of the Gulf of Alaska with downturns in several valuable fisheries, decreasing fish sizes, changes in salmon run timing and strength, and algal and jellyfish blooms. At the forefront of these changes are fishermen whose livelihoods and overall well-being are adversely impacted. Economists and social scientists at NOAA Fisheries Alaska Fisheries Science Center are examining fleet dynamics, community impacts, and adaptation potential in Gulf of Alaska fishing communities associated with climate change as part of an interdisciplinary project called Gulf of Alaska Climate Integrated Modeling (GOA-CLIM). This presentation focuses on the research that is being conducted to understand the adaptation component of the project " what tools fishermen and fishing communities have and need to adapt to these new challenges. The presentation demonstrates the interdisciplinary and multi-faceted approach to conducting this research and preliminary findings about the intersection of science, communication, and decision-making around climate change.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

18 April 2022

Title: Utilizing NUCAPS for Supplemental Observations in a Convective Environment
Presenter(s): Kaitlin Rutt, Meteorologist, National Weather Service Forecast Office, Amarillo, TX
Date & Time: 18 April 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Utilizing NUCAPS for Supplemental Observations in a Convective EnvironmentBriefer: Kaitlin Rutt, Meteorologist, National Weather Service Forecast Office. 1900 English Rd. Amarillo, TX 79108

Sponsor(s): NOAA JPSS Program

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/ric-pwji-fxvPhoneNumbers(US)+1617-675-4444PIN: 966 289 848 1762#

Abstract: Satellites can provide additional observations during convective operations and potentially fill gaps where sometimes models are the best guess. Satellite products are another form of observations from space, which give another viewpoint on storm initiation, strength, intensity and other various components. In addition, satellites have the capability to create an atmospheric profile (NUCAPS) similar to radiosonde observed soundings. Observed soundings are limited in area and time, so models tend to fill that gap. This presentation presents a few case examples of how satellite products, including NUCAPS, provide additional observations and verification into the convective environment and higher resolution models.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

14 April 2022

Title: (1) Recent advances in the satellite monitoring of Sargassum and (2) Characterizing the spatiotemporal population dynamics of the Atlantic Bay Nettle (Chrysaora chesapeakei) in the Patuxent River, MD
Presenter(s): Joaquin Trinanes, NOAA CoastWatch Caribbean-Atlantic Ocean Watch Node Operations Manager, AOML and Nikelene McIene, NOAA Knauss Fellow supporting GEO Blue Planet both at NOAA
Date & Time: 14 April 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title 1: Recent advances in the satellite monitoring of Sargassum

Speaker 1: Joaquin Trinanes, NOAA CoastWatch Caribbean-Atlantic Ocean Watch Node Operations Manager, AOML

Title 2: Characterizing the spatiotemporal population dynamics of the Atlantic Bay Nettle (Chrysaora chesapeakei) in the Patuxent River, MD

Speaker 2: Nikelene McIene, NOAA Knauss Fellow supporting GEO Blue Planet.

Sponsor(s): NOAA CoastWatch

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Google Meet link: https://meet.google.com/uco-uboz-cmk

Or dial: (US) +1 406-838-3189 PIN: 768 242 663#
More phone numbers: https://tel.meet/uco-uboz-cmk?
pin=1330913488741
Slides, Recordings Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php

Title: Is the U.S. EPA Water Quality Criterion for Total Ammonia Nitrogen (TAN) Protective for Coral Reef Organisms?
Presenter(s): Cheryl Woodley, NOS NCCOS, Charleston, SC
Date & Time: 14 April 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Is the U.S. EPA Water Quality Criterion for Total Ammonia Nitrogen Protective for Coral Reef Organisms?

Presenter(s): Dr. Cheryl Woodley, NOS NCCOS Charleston Laboratory, Charleston, SC

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program

Seminar Contact(s): Caroline Donovan, caroline.donovan@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Adobe Connect
1. To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/
2. Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: In U.S. waters 22 species are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act; three additional species are listed as endangered. Anthropogenically derived nutrient pollution (largely due to nitrogen pollution) is dramatically affecting global nitrogen cycling and oligotrophic coral reef ecosystems. Nutrient loading in tropical waters can have detrimental effects on coral reef ecosystems. The total ammonia as nitrogen (TAN) is an important measure of nutrient loading resulting from decaying organic matter, agricultural runoff, or sewage input. Ammonia (NH3) is one of the most toxic constituents of nitrogen pollution in aquatic environments. The current National Water Quality Criteria (WQC) for ammonia in saltwater was set by EPA in 1989 and is based on toxicity studies with crustaceans, bivalve mollusks and fishes. The chronic criterion specifies a 4-day average concentration of 0.035mg/L of unionized ammonia (UAN) not to be exceeded more than once every 3years, the acute criterion specifies a 1-h average concentration of 0.223 mg/LUAN not to be exceeded more than once every 3 years. With recent declines of shallow-water coral reefs, the threat-potential of ammonia toxicity for recently ESA-listed corals is unknown. Understanding the effects of TAN in near shore waters is a critical tool for managing coral reefs and associated recovery efforts. We will present insights into the effects of ammonia on sea urchin embryos and coral at various life stages.

Bio(s): Dr. Cheryl Woodley serves as a Research Scientist with NOAA's National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science at Hollings Marine Laboratory in Charleston, South Carolina. With experience in biochemistry, cellular biology and pathobiology, Cheryl leads a multidisciplinary research team focused on understanding the effects of physical, chemical and/or biological risk factors affecting the conservation and management of vulnerable shallow-water coral reef species. Dr. Woodley also holds a graduate faculty position at the College of Charleston and serves as the coordinator for the Coral Disease and Health Consortium, a working group of the U. S. Coral Reef Taskforce. Dr. Woodley completed her doctorate in Molecular, Cellular and Pathobiology in the Biochemistry Department at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, studying serine proteases in the kallikrein-kinin system and received specialized training in virology at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Pacific sardine: Assessment and evaluating robustness of harvest control rules to variability in recruitment
Presenter(s): Peter Kuriyama, Stock Assessment Scientist at the SWFSC in La Jolla, CA; Robert Wildermuth, Postdoctoral scholar at University of California, Santa Cruz working at SWFSC in La Jolla, CA
Date & Time: 14 April 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Pacific sardine: Assessment and evaluating robustness of harvest control rules to variability in recruitment (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s): Peter Kuriyama, Stock Assessment Scientist at the SWFSC in La Jolla, CA; Robert Wildermuth, Postdoctoral scholar at University of California, Santa Cruz working at SWFSC in La Jolla, CA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Kristan Blackhart and Library Seminars

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.


Abstract: Pacific sardine are short-lived, fast-growing fish that exhibit large, cyclic fluctuations in biomass driven by periods of highly successful recruitment followed by stock collapse. Here, Peter will present an overview of the stock assessment approach and Robert will describe his in-progress management strategy evaluation to assess the robustness of current and alternative harvest control rules (e.g. based on dynamic reference points derived from a simulated stock assessment and a survey-based rule) under a variety of recruitment variability scenarios (e.g. autocorrelated recruitment deviations and environmentally correlated recruitment).Keywords: Pacific sardine, stock assessment, management strategy evaluation


Bio(s): Peter is a stock assessment scientist at the SWFSC in La Jolla and received his PhD from the University of Washington. Robert is a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California, Santa Cruz, working with the NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center testing harvest strategies for coastal pelagic species in a changing climate. He earned his PhD from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and MS from Arizona State University. His research interests involve marine ecosystem-based management, quantitative ecology, and conservation behavior.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Climbing Down Charney's Ladder
Presenter(s): V. Balaji; Princeton University and NOAA/GFDL
Date & Time: 14 April 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Climbing Down Charney's Ladder
Part of the UFS Webinar Series

Presenter(s): V. Balaji; Princeton University and NOAA/GFDL

Sponsor(s): Office of Science and Technology Integration (OSTI) Modeling Division, National Weather Service of NOAA. If you would like to recommend a speaker and topic please email:
ufs.modeling@noaa.gov and provide information on speaker and topic along with email addresses of speakers.

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Mackell (stacy.mackell@noaa.gov) and Caroline Delgado (caroline.delgado@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/6980235688648784143

Abstract: The advent of digital computing in the 1950s sparked a revolution in the science of weather and climate. Meteorology, long based on extrapolating patterns in space and time, gave way to computational methods in a decade of advances in numerical weather forecasting. Those same methods also gave rise to computational climate science, studying the behavior of those same numerical equations over intervals much longer than weather events, and changes in external boundary conditions. Several subsequent decades of exponential growth in the power of computing have brought us to the present day, where models ever grow in resolution and complexity, capable of mastery of many small-scale phenomena with global repercussions, and ever more intricate feedbacks in the Earth system.
The current juncture in computing, seven decades later, heralds an end to what is called Dennard scaling, the physics behind ever smaller computational units and ever faster arithmetic. This is prompting a fundamental change in our approach to the simulation of weather and climate, potentially as revolutionary as that wrought by John von Neumann in the 1950s. One approach could return us to an earlier era of pattern recognition and extrapolation, this time aided by computational power. Another approach could lead us to insights that continue to be expressed in mathematical equations. In either approach, or any synthesis of those, it is clearly no longer the steady march of the last few decades, continuing to add detail to ever more elaborate models. In this prospectus, we attempt to show the outlines of how this may unfold in the coming decades, a new harnessing of physical knowledge, computation, and data.

Bio(s): V. Balaji is at Princeton University's Cooperative Institute on Modeling the Earth System (CIMES), and an Associate of the Princeton Institute for Computational Science and Engineering (PICSciE) and the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI). He is a transdisciplinary scientist with a background in physics and climate science, and an expert in the areas of computational science and machine learning.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:All PowerPoints and recordings from past webinars can be accessed at the UFS webinar web page.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Explaining within-population variation in lifetime success: good traits, good luck, or good timing?
Presenter(s): Stephen Ellner, Cornell University
Date & Time: 14 April 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Explaining within-population variation in lifetime success: good traits, good luck, or good timing?

Presenter(s): Stephen Ellner, Cornell University

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 199 208 1054
Meeting password: QKdp3p4SMe6
JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Global call-in numbers https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/globalcallin.php?MTID=m3142650430de6a3cadba4efb1ef4af96

Abstract: Variation in lifetime success (total reproductive output, longevity, etc.) among individuals within a population is often very high and very skewed. How much of this variation is driven by variation in fixed traits, how much by external factors, and how much by random chance? The effect of trait variation turns out to be a surprisingly small fraction of the total variance, both in empirical case-studies and in general models parameterized from meta-analyses of selection in the wild. This leads to more questions. Is luck dominant at every age/stage, or are traits sometimes more important? Can we relate the relative importance of luck in survival, growth, and environment to life history? Are there generally vulnerable periods when luck in environmental conditions and in demographic transitions are both important, or do the critical periods for environmental and demographic luck differ? To answer these questions we have developed a partitioning of the variance of individual lifetime success into contributions from fixed trait variation; from four forms of demographic luck (birth state, fecundity, survival, and growth) and from two kinds of environment luck (birth environment and environment trajectory). Each of these is further partitioned into contributions at different ages. Case studies, from a variety of contrasting life histories, suggest that luck is nearly always dominant, but which kind of luck matters most varies across life histories, and different kinds of luck are most important at different life stages. This is joint work with Robin Snyder, Giles Hooker, and Peter Adler.

Bio(s): Dr. Ellner received his BA in math from UC Berkeley, and PhD in Applied Math from Cornell (directed by Simon Levin). He has been employed at U. Tennessee Knoxville (Math department), NC State (Statistics department), and Cornell (Ecology & Evolutionary Biology). He is currently the Horace White Professor of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology at Cornell.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Emergency Response Imagery
Presenter(s): Maryellen Sault, Senior Cartographer, Coastal Mapping Program, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 April 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Emergency Response Imagery

Presenter(s): Maryellen Sault, Senior Cartographer, Coastal Mapping Program, NGS

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NOS National Geodetic Survey.

Seminar Contact(s): sonja.bowen@noaa.gov, NOAA National Geodetic Survey

Registration link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7694865478038951691
Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Abstract: NOAA's National Geodetic Survey has responded to emergency response events with medium format digital cameras since 2003. Within hours of landing the plane, aerial imagery is distributed through NOAA's Emergency Response Viewer to aid first-responders, federal and local governments, and the public. This webinar will cover tips on using the emergency response viewer, the unique challenges faced during past hurricane seasons, and frequently asked questions from the public. Imagery applications will also be discussed.


Technical Content Rating: Beginner - No prior knowledge of this topic is necessary.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Artificial Neural Networks and Evolutionary Programs
Presenter(s): Dr. Paul Roebber, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
Date & Time: 14 April 2022
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NWS - HQ - MDL Goto1
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Roebber Lectures - Artificial Neural Networks and Evolutionary Programs

Presenter(s): Dr. Paul Roebber, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Seminar Contact(s): John Schattel (John.Schattel@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/294072501058985996

Abstract: The National Weather Service (NWS) has a long history of leveraging available data in support of weather forecasting efforts. These efforts are ongoing and with the advent of more advanced techniques (e.g., machine learning), the NWS is in the process of determining where and how to apply them.

This series of four lectures is designed to provide some background on these techniques. No assumptions will be made regarding the statistical background of participants. The third lecture in this series will cover a common kind of artificial neural network (ANN), the multilayer perceptron (MLP), and an advanced machine learning approach called evolutionary programming. We will discuss the structure of ANN-MLPs, how the technique of backpropagation assigns the network weights, the variety of training choices, and provide some applications. Then we will discuss evolutionary programs " the conceptual basis and how they can be applied to a variety of problems, with some examples.

More information on the lecture series is available in the NOAA Virtual Lab.

Bio(s): Dr. Roebber received his BSc in Meteorology from McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada in 1981. He earned a MS in Meteorology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA in 1983. In 1991, Dr. Roebber returned to McGill University where he completed his PhD in meteorology. Dr. Roebber's research interests include the following:
  • Synoptic and mesoscale meteorology
  • Climate dynamics
  • Systems modeling and data analysis
  • Numerical weather prediction


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides will be shared after the webinar with all who register, or a link where they can be found. Recording will be shared after the webinar with all who register, or a link where they can be found, or a contact for the recording.

Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Next-Generation Water Resources Modeling: Innovation at the Intersection of Domain, Computer, and Data Sciences
Presenter(s): Dr. Fred Ogden, NWS' Office of Water Prediction; and Trey Flowers, Office of Water Prediction's National Water Center
Date & Time: 14 April 2022
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Next-Generation Water Resources Modeling: Innovation at the Intersection of Domain, Computer, and Data Sciences

Presenter(s): Dr. Fred Ogden, NWS' Office of Water Prediction, Chief Scientist; and Dr. Trey Flowers, Office of Water Prediction's National Water Center, Director of Analysis and Prediction Division


Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library and NOAA Office of Water Prediction

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars - library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/677049995450095627

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The hydrological modeling literature over the past decade suggests creation of water prediction modeling systems that promote interoperability. The NOAA-NWS Office of Water Prediction (OWP) in 2019 envisioned a standards-based model agnostic framework that promotes model interoperability over large areas, making it accessible by domain scientists and engineers with a low barrier to adding and testing new functionality. This seminar introduces the Next Generation (Nextgen) Water Resources Modeling framework and demonstrates how it advances hydrologic model research, development and application. Keywords: water resources, water prediction, hydrological modeling

Bio(s): Since April 2021, Dr. Fred Ogden serves as the Chief Scientist of NOAA's Office of Water Prediction, applying his technical expertise to many aspects of the OWP mission, with a focus on the National Water Model and the Next Generation Water Resources Modeling Framework. Dr. Ogden joins NOAA after more than two decades in academia, where he established an active academic research program in water resources obtaining funding from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Engineering Research and Development Center (ERDC), U.S. Army Research Office (ARO), Dept. of Energy, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, NOAA-NWS, and National Science Foundation.Dr. Trey Flowers is the Director of the Analysis and Prediction Division at NOAA's National Water Center in Tuscaloosa, AL, where he leads the team at the National Weather Service that is responsible for sustaining and enhancing the US Government's freshwater forecasting capabilities. Trey has an undergraduate degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Kentucky and graduate degrees in Environmental Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

13 April 2022

Title:
New
Northeast Regional Habitat Assessment
Presenter(s): Christopher Haak, Monmouth University; Tori Kentner, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council
Date & Time: 13 April 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Northeast Regional Habitat Assessment (EBM/EBFM)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Christopher Haak, Monmouth University and Tori Kentner, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4702291695240836368
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The Northeast U.S. Regional Marine Fish Habitat Assessment (NRHA) is a collaborative, multi-disciplinary effort to develop decision support products for fish habitat management. Employing a novel spatiotemporal joint-species distribution modeling framework, the team evaluated habitat use patterns for marine fish and invertebrate communities on the northeast shelf, relating catch data from the NOAA Fisheries bottom trawl surveys to an array of environmental predictor variables. Simultaneously, the team developed an R shiny application to facilitate the analysis, visualization, and exploration of state and federal fisheries independent datasets in estuarine, coastal, and offshore environments, and to host NRHA products online.

Keywords: Joint-Species Distribution Models, Fish Habitat, R-Shiny

Bio(s): Dr. Christopher Haak is a research scientist at Monmouth University working in cooperation with NOAA NEFSC. From shallow back-reef habitats of The Bahamas to the NE continental shelf, his interests lie in understanding how physical and ecological processes interact to shape marine fish communities.

Tori Kentner recently joined the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council as a Fishery Management Specialist. Her specialty is spatial data analysis and visualization, programming, and GIS. Previously she was a GIS specialist at NOAA Fisheries for wind energy, deep sea corals and species modeling.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Measuring Ecosystem Performance across Multiple Dimensions using Index Numbers
Presenter(s): John Walden, Economist, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 13 April 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Measuring Ecosystem Performance across Multiple Dimensions using Index Numbers (EBM/EBFM)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): John Walden, Economist, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4702291695240836368
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Marine ecosystems provide many outputs that benefit humans, and managers often use several indicators to evaluate an ecosystem's status. However, this leaves an unresolved question of which outputs, or environmental conditions, matter most? We circumvent the problem by developing composite indices with endogenous weights, collapsing multiple outputs and environmental conditions into two indices based on historical performance. This is accomplished using Data Envelopment Analysis, a linear programming technique, and applied to a U.S. ecoregion. Results show that the indices can identify changes in ecosystem performance over a 22 year period.

Keywords: Ecosystems, Index Numbers, Data Envelopment Analysis

Bio(s): John Walden is an economist at the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, where he leads the fisheries performance measures working group. His research interests focus on evaluating economic performance using math programming models for both commercial fishing fleets and ecosystems. Past efforts he led include the National Marine Fisheries Service's measurement of U.S. commercial fishing capacity, and a follow-up study to measure fishing vessel productivity.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Assessing Niche Conservatism and Niche Packing Patterns in African and Southeast Asian Communities of Cyprinoidei
Presenter(s): Laurel Nave-Powers, M.S, University of Washington
Date & Time: 13 April 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Assessing Niche Conservatism and Niche Packing Patterns in African and Southeast Asian Communities of Cyprinoidei

Presenter(s): Laurel Nave-Powers, M.S, University of Washington

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): EcoFOCI Research Coordinator Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Zooplankton Ecologist Deana Crouser (deana.crouser@noaa.gov).

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: Niches of animals can be inferred from the shape of their bodies. By quantifying body shape, the niches of individual species can be compared and niche packing patterns of communities can be examined. Cyprinoidei (Cypriniformes) is a suborder of freshwater fishes that is widely distributed and ecologically variable. By comparing body shape data for communities of cyprinoid fishes across Africa and Southeast Asia, niche conservatism and niche packing patterns can be investigated. It was hypothesized that a similar number of niches would be recovered across localities regardless of species richness (niche conservatism), however, the disparity of niches (niche packing) would decrease with increasing species richness. It was found that a similar number of niches were recovered across localities (niche conservatism) and patterns of niche packing showed an increase in disparity with increases in species richness.

Bio(s): Laurel obtained her masters of science from Southeastern Louisiana University in 2020 where she investigated niche conservatism and niche packing in cyprinids in Southeast Asia and Africa using geometric morphometrics. Currently, Laurel is a PhD student at UW School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences, working in collaboration with NOAA and NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center on the transfer of ichthyoplankton from the groundfish surveys to the UW Fish collection.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Insights on Chemical and Microphysical Properties of Secondary Brown Carbon Aerosols
Presenter(s): Roya Bahreini, University of California, Riverside
Date & Time: 13 April 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: Insights on Chemical and Microphysical Properties of Secondary Brown Carbon Aerosols
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series


Presenter(s): Roya Bahreini, University of California, Riverside

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): jan.kazil@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5008602440912054542

Abstract: Secondary organic aerosols (SOA), formed from multiphase oxidation of biogenic and anthropogenic precursors, are a major component of submicron aerosols, impacting air quality and climate. Although traditionally SOA has been thought to be purely scattering in nature, field and laboratory measurements have observed SOA with strong absorption at near UV and visible wavelengths (with a stronger absorption in the near UV compared to the visible). Specific functional groups and chemical moieties have been identified as the source of chromophores in primary OA and SOA. Here I present a summary of our work aimed at understanding chemical and microphysical properties of SOA that contribute to their light absorption properties and direct impacts on the Earth's radiative budget. The SOA were formed from hydroxyl or nitrate radical oxidation of pure and mixed hydrocarbons (that are typical of biogenic, urban, and biomass burning emissions) under variable oxidation conditions (relative humidity, NOx, or NH3 levels). I present results from online and offline techniques to gain insight into the drivers of SOA optical properties in these different systems.

Bio(s): Dr. Roya Bahreini is a Professor of Atmospheric Science and the Vice Chair in the Department of Environmental Sciences at University of California, Riverside. She specializes in airborne, ground-based, and laboratory measurements of aerosol composition and microphysical properties to understand aerosol sources and formation process, influence on air quality, and direct- and indirect-effects on climate. Dr. Bahreini received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from University of Maryland, College Park (1999), and M.S. (2003) and Ph.D. (2005) degrees in Environmental Science and Engineering from California Institute of Technology. Before joining UC Riverside, she was a CIRES Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow at University of Colorado Boulder (2005-2007), a Research Scientist at CIRES and NOAA ESRL CSD (2007-2012), and University of Denver (2012). She is a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER award, the Thomson Reuters Highly Cited Researchers award (2014), as well as The World's Most Influential Scientific Minds award (2014). In 2019-2020, she served on the Owens Lake Scientific Advisory Panel by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She is currently a Board Member of the American Association for Aerosol Research.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2022

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!

12 April 2022

Title: Olympic Coast as a Sentinel: Resilience Actions for Tribal Community Well-Being in the Face of Ocean Change
Presenter(s): Dr. Melissa Poe, Social Scientist, Washington Sea Grant
Date & Time: 12 April 2022
7:30 pm - 8:30 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Olympic Coast as a Sentinel: Resilience Actions for Tribal Community Well-Being in the Face of Ocean Change

Presenter(s): Dr. Melissa Poe, Social Scientist, Washington Sea Grant

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2113067154194375951

Abstract: Indigenous people have depended on Olympic Coast marine species for their livelihoods, food security and cultural practices for thousands of years. Today, these species"and the tribal communities that depend on them"are at risk from ocean changes including ocean acidification. Dr. Melissa Poe, a social scientist at Washington Sea Grant, works in partnership with the Olympic Coast Treaty Tribes to better understand the risks of ocean change to tribal community well-being, and identify actions that are rooted in Indigenous priorities for resilience.This presentation is part of the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary and Feiro Marine Life Center co-hosted Speaker Series for 2022 which focuses on resilience and adaptation in the face of climate change.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: POSTPONED: Professional Excellence at NOAA: A Diversity of Perspectives
Presenter(s): Dr. Sim Aberson, Meteorologist, NOAA/OAR; JoAnn Becker, Senior Aviation Meteorologist, NOAA/NWS; Degui Cao, Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS; LT Erick Estela, NOAA/OMAO; Dr. Tom Jamir, Senior Advisor on Organizational Excellence, NOAA/NMFS; Artara Johnson, Physical Scientist, NOAA/NOS; John Moore, Meteorologist, NOAA/NWS; and Neavaly Touray, Program and Management Analyst, NOAA/SO/CAO, Dr. Hernan Garcia, Oceanographer, NOAA/NESDIS, Moderator: Dr. Letise Lafeir, Senior Advisor at the NOAA Office of the Under Secretary/Administrator
Date & Time: 12 April 2022
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesPOSTPONED. This recording will be made available in a few weeks.

Title: Professional Excellence at NOAA: A Diversity of Perspectives
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) SeriesPanel:
  • Dr. Sim Aberson, Meteorologist, NOAA/OAR, Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorology Lab, Miami, FL
  • JoAnn Becker, Senior Aviation Meteorologist, NOAA/NWS/AWC/Aviation Operations Branch, Kansas City, MO
  • Degui Cao, Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS/COOPS/Coastal Hazards Branch, Silver Spring, MD
  • LT Erick Estela, NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps, NOAA/OMAO, Newport, OR
  • Dr. Tom Jamir, Senior Advisor on Organizational Excellence, NOAA/NMFS Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office, Gloucester, MA
  • Artara Johnson, Physical Scientist, NOAA/NOS/COOPS, Business Operations Division, SIlver Spring, MD
  • John Moore, Meteorologist, NOAA/NWS/National Weather Service Operations Center, Silver Spring, MD
  • Neavaly Touray, Program and Management Analyst, NOAA/SO/CAO Facilities Operations Division, SIlver Spring, MD
  • Dr. Hernan Garcia, Oceanographer, NOAA NESDIS NCEI, SIlver Spring, MD
This panel discussion will be moderated by Dr. Letise Lafeir, Senior Advisor at the NOAA Office of the Under Secretary/Administrator, in Washington, DC (bio)

Sponsor(s): This event is part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series with sponsorship from the NOAA Science Council. The NOAA-wide NELS provides examples of NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. The NELS are presented as part of the NOAA Science Seminar Series. For questions, contact nels@noaa.gov (NELS Team: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov,
Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov, and Robert.Levy@noaa.govSeminar Contacts: Webinar host is SandraClaar@noaa.gov, webinar logistics, Robert.Levy@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This event will be pre-recorded; the youtube link will be provided at the NELS webpage at https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

Abstract: Evolving the societal value and impact of NOAA's mission of science, service and stewardship hinges on the Agency's resolve to attract, recruit, retain, and develop the most capable individuals from across our diverse American society. This requires making increased investments in professional excellence by evolving the skill, diversity, equity, and inclusion of its workforce. NOAA's Office of Inclusion and Civil Rights demographic data metrics indicate that much more demonstrable effort needs to be done. Data show that individuals in underrepresented groups in NOAA's senior leadership (Senior Executive Service) have decreased from 14% in 2010 to 9% in 2020. Similarly, individuals in underrepresented groups in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics fields (NOAA's most populous occupations) show only a modest increase from 12% in 2010 to 14% in 2020. The data indicate a need to improve NOAA's recruitment, retention, and advancement practices. This panel discussion among a few of NOAA's diverse professional employees provides an opportunity to hear examples of how a diverse, inclusive, and skillful workforce contributes to the Agency's mission.

Accessibility: Closed captioning will be provided.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Dungeness crab in an acidifying ocean: understanding and process
Presenter(s): Paul McElhany, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 12 April 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Dungeness crab in an acidifying ocean: understanding and process

Presenter(s): Paul McElhany, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): AFSC 2022 Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Abigail McCarthy, abigail.mccarthy@noaa.gov; Pearl Rojas, pearl.rojas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m1ed0abf6ef8744f2d5a296f2450c2e6fWebEx meeting number: 2762 343 8233 Password: Fisheries2022!Or by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 2762 343 8233

Abstract: Dungeness crab, the most valuable fishery on the U.S. West Coast, show mixed response to ocean acidification and other climate change stressors. Through species response experiments in controlled aquaria, we explore CO2 sensitivity by looking at a variety of metrics, including those that drive demographic processes (e.g. survival and growth rate) and those that provide insight into the physiological mechanisms underlying the response (e.g. metabolic pathways and calcification).The data are input to models that explore population level processes related to management issues, such as environmental thresholds. The differing sensitivities of different life stages and uncertainties about the factors driving population dynamics complicate predictions of climate change effects on Dungeness crab. In addition to exploring ocean acidification effects on Dungeness crab, we will discuss tools and approaches used for conducting the research that could be applicable to any science effort. These tools and approaches include the Openscapes framework for open data science, GitHub projects for managing work flow, and R Shiny applications for internal data exploration.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Heat and its impacts
Presenter(s): Armel Castellan, MSC ECCC; Dr. Sarah Henderson, BC Centre for Disease Control
Date & Time: 12 April 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Heat and its impacts, ECCC/NWS Webinar Series -

Presenter(s): Armel Castellan, MSC ECCC; and Dr. Sarah Henderson, BC Centre for Disease Control

Sponsor(s): Environment and Climate Change Canada and NOAA/National Weather Service

Seminar Contact(s): Kimberly McMahon, kimberly.mcmahon@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the GoToWebinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6755798985807797263

Accessibility:

Abstract: Historical Heat and its ripple effect on society; Drought, Wildfire, Smoke " Western Canada's Extreme Summer of 2021 " The June 2021 heat dome in British Columbia and Alberta from an ECCC operational perspective and will describe the broad swath of impacts that ensued. Mortality impacts of the 2021 heat dome in British Columbia " Review lessons learned about mortality during the 2021 heat dome and ideas for protecting population health.

Bio(s): Armel Castellan is a Warning Preparedness Meteorologist at Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada, working with emergency management to inform decision making.Dr. Sarah Henderson is the Scientific Director of environmental health at the BC Centre for Disease Control. She oversees a program of applied research and surveillance to support evidence-based environmental health policy and practice in the province - studying the relationship between hot weather and mortality in BC for the past 12 years.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording will be shared after the webinar with all who register, or a link where they can be found, or a contact for the recording.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Valor in the Atlantic Telepresence Expedition Overview
Presenter(s): Tane Casserley, NOAA; Dr. Chris Taylor, NOAA; Chris Southerly, NC OSA; and Karl McLetchie, GFOE
Date & Time: 12 April 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Valor in the Atlantic Telepresence Expedition Overview

Presenter(s): Tane Casserley, NOAA; Dr. Chris Taylor, NOAA; Chris Southerly, NC OSA; and Karl McLetchie, GFOE

Sponsor(s): Monitor National Marine Sanctuary, Submerged NC

Seminar Contact(s): Shannon Ricles; Shannon.Ricles@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2367780018189690639

Accessibility: A recording of the webinar will be captioned and posted online after the webinar

Abstract: Join NOAA and partners as they discuss the upcoming Valor in the Atlantic telepresence expedition due to launch in May of 2022. Learn how NOAA's Monitor National Marine Sanctuary and the National Center for Coastal Ocean Science, along with partners from the Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration(GFOE) and the North Carolina Office of State Archaeology will use cutting edge technology to bring North Carolina's oceanic wonders to all.Using GFOE's Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) and satellite capability, the Valor in the Atlantic telepresence expedition will explore USS Monitor, natural reefs, and the maritime cultural landscape surrounding Monitor National Marine Sanctuary. The NOAA ship Nancy Foster will act as the project's research platform streaming ROV video live, while narrated by national experts to showcase these nationally significant sites and their biological communities to the public. The mission will investigate natural reefs and historic shipwrecks from the U.S. Civil War, World War I, and World War II's Battle of the Atlantic. These sites serve as a uniquely accessible underwater museum and a memorial to generations of mariners who lived, worked, and fought off our shores.Join us as we discuss how these weapons of war transformed into islands of life and learn how to join in the expedition by visiting a museum or from the comfort of your home, school, or office.

Bio(s): Tane Casserley is the resource protection and permit coordinator for Monitor National Marine Sanctuary and Mallows Bay-Potomac River National Marine Sanctuary. Tane's specialties include public outreach, exhibit design, as well as 19th-century warships and deep-water archaeology. Dr. Chris Taylor is a marine ecologist, and senior scientist at NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Habitat Mapping Team. He has two and a half decades of experience conducting research on ocean habitats and fish from Alaska to AntarcticaChris Southerly joined the NC Office of State Archaeology in 2000 and is currently Deputy State Archaeologist-Underwater and Diving Safety Officer directing the Underwater Archaeology Branch and its Queen Anne's Revenge Conservation Lab.Karl McLetchie is a mechanical engineer, specializing in the design and operation of underwater vehicles. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in Ocean and Mechanical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: To learn more about GFOE and the expedition,visit https://www.engineeringfordiscovery.org/valor-in-the-atlantic/

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Acidification in the U.S. Southeast
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia; Emily Hall, Mote Marine Laboratory
Date & Time: 12 April 2022
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center (Climate Overview)

Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center (Water Resources Overview )

Pam Knox, University of Georgia (Agriculture Impact Update)

Emily Hall, Mote Marine Laboratory (Acidification in the U.S. Southeast: Causes, Potential Consequences and the Role of the Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network)

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

The April 12 webinar will feature a special presentation on "Acidification in the U.S. Southeast: Causes, Potential Consequences and the Role of the Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network."

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/7416485623755069963

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here: (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

9 April 2022

Title: NOAA Weather & Navigation for Marine Boating and Fishing
Presenter(s): Lance Franck, Meteorologist, NOAA's NWS in Tallahassee, FL, and Tim Osborn, Physical Scientist with NOAA/NOS Office of Coast Survey
Date & Time: 9 April 2022
10:00 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Please share this with anyone (NOAA or not) who might be interested; thanks!

Title: NOAA Weather and Navigation for Marine Boating and Fishing
Part of the NOAA/National Weather Service (NWS) Weather and Navigation Virtual Seminar Series. This is the ~17th year of this series, serving the Gulf Coast area around north Florida and adjacent states. Each year, NOAA's NWS and Coast Survey have teamed up for conducting the seminar, highlighting the issues and resources that help boaters and fishing interests on the water to be as safe as possible.


Presenter(s): Lance Franck, Meteorologist, NOAA's NWS in Tallahassee, FL, and
Tim Osborn, Physical Scientist with NOAA/NOS Office of Coast Survey.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Weather Service, Office in Tallahassee, FL and
NOAA/NOS Office of Coast SurveySeminar Contacts: Lance.Franck@noaa.gov, Meteorologist with NOAA's National Weather Service in Tallahassee, FL, and Tim.Osborn@noaa.gov, Physical Scientist with NOAA/NOS Office of Coast Survey.

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8858067416721566736

Abstract: NOAA's NWS Office in Tallahassee and NOAA's Office of Coast Survey are teaming up to offer a virtual seminar on safe navigation and hazardous weather. It's free and open to the public. This will be very informative for the ever increasing numbers of recreational boaters on the water. Some of the topics in this 90-minute seminar include: precision navigation, nautical charts, marine forecasts, and weather warnings. Please feel free to share via the attached announcement, Facebook, and Twitter. Information on registering for the webinar is available at this link.

Bio(s):
Lance Franck: Meteorologist with NOAA's National Weather Service Tallahassee's Weather Forecast Office. Their area of responsibility on the coast is from the Okaloosa/Walton County line FL to the Suwanee River FL, including Panama City, Aplachicola, Apalachee Bay, and many others areas that see very large marine boat and fishing activities. Tim Osborn: Navigation Manager for NOAA's Office of Coast Survey, serving the Central Gulf of Mexico Coast.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: The presentation will be recorded, with a link shared afterward.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

7 April 2022

Title: NOAA's Role in Conserving and Restoring America the Beautiful
Presenter(s): Letise LaFeir, Ph.D., Senior Advisor, NOAA
Date & Time: 7 April 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA's Role in Conserving and Restoring America the Beautiful

Presenter(s): Letise LaFeir, Ph.D., Senior Advisor, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library, NOAA Central Library Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4994792575443418127

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: America the Beautiful is a decade-long, interagency initiative to conserve and restore at least 30% of America's lands and waters. It is guided by eight core principles that emphasize collaborative and inclusive approaches, locally-led community efforts, honoring tribal sovereignty, and creating conservation-related jobs among others. Learn what NOAA is doing to support America the Beautiful and how your office can get involved. Keywords: America the Beautiful, Conservation, Inter-Agency

Bio(s): In her role as Senior Advisor, Dr. LaFeir leads many interagency efforts for NOAA, including the America the Beautiful initiative. Prior to joining NOAA, Dr. LaFeir served in both government and NGO roles as Director of Federal Policy at Resources Legacy Fund; California Ocean Policy Manager at Monterey Bay Aquarium; Policy Analyst and later National Outreach Coordinator for NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries; and Director of Government Relations and Education Program Coordinator at the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation. Dr. LaFeir is also an alumna of the Sea Grant Knauss marine Policy fellowship program.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Fisheries science focused on cognitive barriers to climate adaptation
Presenter(s): Mike Litzow, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 7 April 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Fisheries science focused on cognitive barriers to climate adaptation

Presenter(s): Mike Litzow, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 199 208 1054
Meeting password: QKdp3p4SMe6
JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Global call-in numbers https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/globalcallin.php?MTID=m3142650430de6a3cadba4efb1ef4af96

Abstract: Effective climate change adaptation involves several problems in human cognition. Examples include the human tendency to use historical experience to estimate future risks, the complexity of scientific advice as a barrier to decision-making, and a reluctance to attribute change. Alaska has recently experienced system-breaking climate change events that have produced strongly negative consequences for fisheries such as Gulf of Alaska Pacific cod and walleye pollock. This talk will review attempts to advance understanding of climate change effects on these fisheries in a way that may address some cognitive barriers to adaptation. These studies use analytical approaches that are simple, empirically robust, and explicitly tied to climate attribution. We also frame our results to contrast expected fisheries outcomes under past and current climate conditions. The talk will also briefly discuss ecological studies that may address cognitive barriers to climate adaptation by fisheries scientists.

Bio(s): Mike Litzow is the Director of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center Kodiak Lab and leads the group that assesses Bering Sea crab stocks at AFSC. Mike began his career studying the role that climate-forced changes in food availability played in the recovery of seabird populations harmed by the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill. He has spent much of his career focused on community responses to climate variability and change in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea. Mike received his B.S. from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, a M.S from the University of California Santa Cruz, and his PhD from the University of Tasmania.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Community Centered Severe Weather Preparedness and Resilience: VORTEX-SE Research to Application
Presenter(s): Alan Gerard, Chief, Warning Research and Development Division, VORTEX USA and SE Federal Program Coordinator, NOAA's National Severe Storms Laboratory; Tracie Sempier, Coastal Resilience Engagement Specialist and VORTEX-SE Engagement Coordinator, Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium
Date & Time: 7 April 2022
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Community Centered Severe Weather Preparedness and Resilience: VORTEX-SE Research to Application

Presenter(s): Alan Gerard, Chief, Warning Research and Development Division, VORTEX (USA and SE) Federal Program Coordinator, NOAA's National Severe Storms Laboratory; and Tracie Sempier, Coastal Resilience Engagement Specialist and VORTEX-SE Engagement Coordinator, Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaboration Team, a part of NOAA's Regional Collaboration Network. NOAA Gulf of Mexico Forum Webinar Series.

Seminar Contact(s): Kristen Laursen, Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov ,NOAA Fisheries and Regional Collaboration Network

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5047646099142754571
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For your awareness, this webinar will be recorded and shared.

Abstract: TBD


Bio(s): Alan Gerard has been the division director since 2018 and served as the deputy division chief before that beginning in 2015. He came to the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) after a 25 year career with the National Weather Service (NWS), including 17 years as the science operations officer and then meteorologist-in-charge of the NOAA NWS Forecast Office in Jackson, Mississippi. Alan oversees several programs developing new warning techniques for all types of weather hazards, including the Forecasting A Continuum of Severe Threats program, or FACETs, and flash flood forecasting initiatives. During his long tenure with the NWS, he experienced first-hand the impacts of significant severe weather events. He had been on the front lines during tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, and ice storms. He was involved in forecast operations during Hurricane Katrina and the April 2011 tornado outbreak. Having worked closely with those who try to keep people safe (Emergency Managers, public safety officials, etc.), he knew he wanted to help build society's capacity to save lives and reduce weather impacts, not just in the United States, but around the world.

Dr. Tracie Sempier is the Coastal Resilience Engagement Specialist for the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium. She works with local communities, state and federal agencies, non-profit organizations, port authorities, emergency and floodplain managers, residents, and K-12 audiences to try and decrease the negative impacts of coastal storms on families, communities, the environment, natural resources, and property. Tracie is also the VORTEX-SE Outreach Coordinator. In this role, she is creating a model for a regional extension program and synthesizing research findings from the VORTEX-SE program to inform application in local communities. Working closely with the NSSL, NWS, and other partners, she engages with Sea Grant and Land Grant programs and utilizes existing networks to build connections with target audiences. Tracie has over twenty years of professional experience in education/outreach with various audiences in formal/informal learning environments.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Please contact Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov for the recording and/or PDF.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

6 April 2022

Title: A Safe Place to Call Home: Community Options and Considerations for Adapting to Flooding / Green Infrastructure, Climate, and Cities CCRUN Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Katie Spidalieri, Senior Associate at the Georgetown Climate Center; Rachelle Sanderson, Region Seven Watershed Coordinator at Capital Region Planning Commission in Louisiana
Date & Time: 6 April 2022
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A Safe Place to Call Home: Community Options and Considerations for Adapting to Flooding / Green Infrastructure, Climate, and Cities CCRUN Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Katie Spidalieri, Senior Associate at the Georgetown Climate Center; Rachelle Sanderson, Region Seven Watershed Coordinator at Capital Region Planning Commission in Louisiana.

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA RISA Team.

Seminar Contact(s): Genie Bey, genie.bey@noaa.gov; Sloane Woerdemaz, sjw83@drexel.edu

Remote Access: Register for the webinar here. All seminars are held at 4:00 PM ET on the first Wednesday of every month, typically on Drexel University's campus. Seminars are currently being held monthly as webinars due to the COVID-19 pandemic. All sessions are recorded and archived on the CCRUN website.

Abstract: As more and more areas are experiencing new and worsening flood risks caused by climate change, communities are facing challenging questions about how to safely remain in place. For many, leaving their neighborhood and home is not an acceptable option. For others, the potential option of pursuing managed retreat or relocation strategies may increasingly become a part of local conversations. Communities across the country are exploring approaches and mechanisms to keep community ties while building physical resilience to flooding. Katie Spidalieri, Senior Associate at the Georgetown Climate Center will discuss a range of legal and planning tools for managed retreat and the tradeoffs associated with these different options that communities may consider as to think about how to adapt to flooding. Rachelle Sanderson, Region Seven Watershed Coordinator at Capital Region Planning Commission in Louisiana, will introduce the Louisiana Watershed Initiative and discuss how some of these challenges are manifesting on the ground in one watershed region in Louisiana. Katie and Rachelle will also share how locally driven partnerships can help to build resources and capacity to support population transitions and housing needs driven by flooding.CCRUN hosts a monthly series featuring researchers and practitioners from around the region and country all of whom have new ideas on how to promote resilient, livable, and sustainable cities. The talks focus on urban solutions to global problems associated with increasing temperature and sea level rise, precipitation variability and greenhouse gas emissions. CCRUN is interested in spurring dialogue on the implications of such changes on the complex infrastructure of intensely developed landscapes, and on the health, well-being, and vulnerability of the people who live in them.

Bio(s): Katie Spidalieri, a Senior Associate at the Georgetown Climate Center, provides legal and policy analysis and place-based support on adaptation projects at the federal, state, and local levels. Her work focuses on adaptation in the coastal sector, including managed retreat strategies, to adapt to rising seas and flooding. Prior to joining the Climate Center, Katie worked for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and state environmental agencies in Maryland and North Carolina in permitting, environmental compliance, offshore energy and infrastructure development, land use, and community engagement and outreach in the place-based management of national marine sanctuaries and marine national monuments.Rachelle Sanderson is the Regional Watershed Coordinator for Region 7 of the Louisiana Watershed Initiative. In this position, Rachelle combines her passion for science and climate justice by working with communities to incorporate local wisdom into planning efforts while growing capacity and knowledge of challenges and opportunities that increasing flood risk present. Rachelle is an authentic leader who is focused on providing input that is built on an ethical foundation and prioritizes honest relationships. Rachelle is a change maker who sees the intersections of increasing flood risk and people in Louisiana, and across the world, as a catalyst for questioning and re-imagining systems and institutions that are driven by inequities and society's unsustainable relationship with the environment.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recordings of the Green Infrastructure, Climate, and Cities CCRUN Seminar Series can be found on the CCRUN website.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: NOAA Science Reports: A robust and effective research, development, and transition enterprise
Presenter(s): Jeff Craven, Stephen Montzka, Sinead Louise Farrell, Gregory Dusek
Date & Time: 6 April 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A robust and effective research, development, and transition enterprise

Presenter(s): Jeff Craven, Chief Statistical Modeling Division, NOAA/NWS/Meteorological Development Laboratory; Stephen Montzka, Senior Scientist, NOAA's Global Monitoring Laboratory; Sinead Louise Farrell, Associate Professor, Depts. Geographical Sciences and Atmospheric & Oceanic Science, University of Maryland; Gregory Dusek, Senior Scientist, NOAA's National Ocean Service

Sponsor(s): NOAA Science Report Seminar Series, NOAA Central Library and NOAA Research and Development Enterprise Committee

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars - library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9116638467135383311

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The NOAA Science Report is an annual report that highlights NOAA's scientific accomplishments for the year and reflects NOAA's research priorities. Each Science Report seminar features speakers who have contributed to projects highlighted within the Report. The topic of this seminar will be 'Robust and Effective Research, Development, and Transition Enterprise'. Newly released: 2021 NOAA Science Report Keywords: NOAA Science Report, Research, Development

Bio(s): Jeff Craven's career has spanned 33 years as a forecaster, Science and Operations Officer, and supervisor. He has 27 years of experience in operational meteorology settings, having lived and worked in 7 duty locations/states across the nation (PA, LA, KS, NV, OK, MS, WI). Mr. Craven possesses an additional 6 years tenure in GS-15 supervisory positions (meteorology/information technology) at Regional/National Headquarters (MO, MD) where he supported field operations in the National Weather Service (NWS) Office of Science and Technology Integration (OSTI). Jeff has a M.S. in Meteorology from the University of Oklahoma, and a B.S. from San Jose State University in CA.Dr. Steve Montzka's professional career at NOAA has revolved around making and interpreting measurements of greenhouse gases, ozone-depleting gases, and hazardous air pollutants throughout the global atmosphere. He works to advance understanding of natural processes affecting the atmospheric environment and of human-caused influences on atmospheric composition. In addition to his extensive publication record and the leading role he has played in a number of international scientific assessment reports, a particular highlight has been his work advising the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on efforts to heal the stratospheric ozone layer.
Sinad Louise Farrell is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geographical Sciences at the University of Maryland, College Park, with a joint appointment in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science. Dr. Farrell gained her Ph.D. in Space and Climate Physics at University College London in 2007. Her primary research interests are climate change, cryosphere science and remote sensing. She is a principal investigator on both the NASA ICESat-2 and the NOAA/NASA Ocean Surface Topography Science Teams and she is a member of the ESA Mission Advisory Group for the Copernicus Polar Ice and Snow Topography Altimeter. Sinad is a visiting scientist at the NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry, in the Satellite Oceanography and Climatology Division.
Gregory Dusek is a physical oceanographer and the Chief Scientist for the NOAA National Ocean Service (NOS) Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). He is presently on assignment as Executive Strategic Advisor with the Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) as part of his NOAA LCDP participation. His research focuses on coastal oceanographic product development through the intersection of data science with coastal hazards. Greg has been at NOAA for over 10 years, and prior to serving as Chief Scientist, he was an oceanographer on the currents team where he led a range of physical oceanographic field and data projects. Greg's work at NOAA has also included serving as the chair of the NOAA Artificial Intelligence Executive Committee and leading the NOS Science Board and Artificial Intelligence Working Group. Prior to joining NOAA, Greg completed his PhD in physical oceanography at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill where he studied coastal processes and rip currents.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Alaska Coastal and Ocean Spatial Priorities Study
Presenter(s): Karen Gouws, GIS Specialist, NOAA's National Ocean Service, Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping Program
Date & Time: 6 April 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Alaska Coastal and Ocean Spatial Priorities Study
Part of the Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping 2022 Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Karen Gouws, GIS Specialist, NOAA's National Ocean Service, Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping program, Silver Spring MD

Sponsor(s): NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping program

Seminar Contact(s): Amber Butler (amber.butler@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1969075114023801872
Please contact amber.butler@noaa.gov for technical connectivity troubleshooting.

Abstract: This seminar will discuss the analysis of results from the Alaska Coastal and Oceans Spatial Priorities Study. The Spatial Priorities Study was conducted across regional stakeholders to gather information about where different organizations had mapping priorities. This study allowed users to indicate for their programs which coastal and ocean regions had the most mapping needs in the near or longer term. When aggregated, the results can help us allocate resources efficiently, provide a means to reach out to other partners for coordination, and leverage funding assistance where there is a shared mapping need between organizations.Participants entered mapping priorities in late 2021 with an easy-to-use online tool developed by NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). Building from other studies using the NCCOS tool, these results were combined and analyzed using geospatial tools to identify areas of greatest mapping priority, areas of overlapping requirements, and justifications for why mapping data is needed. This is being done as a milestone activity under the National Ocean Mapping, Exploration and Characterization Strategy (NOMEC).

Bio(s): Karen Gouws works as a GIS Specialist in NOAA's Office of Coast Survey for NOAA IOCM. She organized, coordinated, and launched the Alaska Spatial Priorities Study.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:Materials and the recording will be available after the seminar by contacting iwgocm.staff@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Toward Replacing Current NWP with Deep Learning Weather Prediction (NCEP/EMC Seminar)
Presenter(s): Dale Durran, Univ of Washington
Date & Time: 6 April 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Toward Replacing Current NWP with Deep Learning Weather Prediction

Presenter(s): Dale Durran, Univ of Washington

Sponsor(s): NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) Seminar Series

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/ohe-basi-nrk
(US) +1 240-532-2666 PIN: 702950581#
View more phone numbers: https://tel.meet/ohe-basi-nrk?pin=2503071632943&hs=7

Abstract: We compare the performance of an ensemble-weather-prediction system based on a global deep-learning weather-prediction (DLWP) model with reanalysis data and forecasts from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ensemble for subseasonal weather prediction.

The model is trained using ECMWF ReAnalysis 5 (ERA5) data with convolutional neural networks (CNNs) on a cubed-sphere grid using a loss function that minimizes forecast error over a single 24-hour period. The model predicts seven 2D shells of atmospheric data on roughly 150x150 km grids with a quasi-uniform global coverage. Notably, our model can be iterated forward indefinitely to produce forecasts at 6-hour temporal resolution for any lead time. We present case studies showing the extent to which the model is able to reproduce the dynamical evolution of atmospheric systems and its ability to learn model physics to forecast two-meter temperature and precipitation. Sources of ensemble spread and the performance of the ensemble are discussed relative to the ECMWF S2S ensemble forecasts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: BlueMooring: A sustainable solution for managing MPA moorings and financing marine conservation activities
Presenter(s): Yousr Ben Fadhel, BlueSeeds; and Louis Vercauteren, BlueSeeds
Date & Time: 6 April 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: BlueMooring: A sustainable solution for managing MPA moorings and financing marine conservation activities

Presenter(s): Yousr Ben Fadhel and Louis Vercauteren, BlueSeeds

Sponsor(s): NOAA National Marine Protected Areas (MPA) Center and OCTO

Seminar POC for questions: Zac Cannizzo, zac.cannizzo@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1549638915019529739

Abstract: BlueSeeds is a French company that helps MPAs reach financial sustainability and increase the effectiveness of their conservation activities. BlueSeeds believes that one way of supporting MPA managers is to provide them practical tools that can make their day-to-day management work easier while also financing some of their conservation activities. To this end, BlueSeeds has developed a web app that MPA managers can use to manage the booking of their MPA moorings. With this tool, MPA managers can control and monitor the recreational use of the MPA, communicate more easily with visitors, and generate conservation revenues from the paid booking of moorings managed through the web app.

Recordings: Our seminars are recorded, you can find them here (https://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/archive.html)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: Strategic mooring placement for monitoring water mass exchange through channels
Presenter(s): Dr. Emily Lemagie, Ph.D., NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
Date & Time: 6 April 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Strategic mooring placement for monitoring water mass exchange through channels

Presenter(s): Dr. Emily Lemagie, Ph.D., NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): EcoFOCI Research Coordinator Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Zooplankton Ecologist Deana Crouser (deana.crouser@noaa.gov).

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: The exchange between estuaries and the coastal ocean is a key dynamical driver impacting nutrient and phytoplankton concentrations and regulating estuarine residence time, hypoxia, and acidification. Exchange flows are also important mechanisms in the transport and mixing of water masses between inland seas. Estuarine exchange flows can be particularly challenging to monitor because many systems have strong vertical and lateral velocity shear and sharp gradients in water properties that vary over space and time, requiring high-resolution measurements in order to accurately constrain the flux. The Total Exchange Flow (TEF) method provides detailed information about the salinity structure of the exchange and can be used to identify distinct layers of exchange, but requires the observations (or model resolution) that resolve the time and spatial co-variability of salinity and currents. The goal of this analysis is to provide recommendations for how to measure TEF with the mode efficient spatial sampling resolution. Results from three realistic hydrodynamics models were investigated. These model domains included three estuary types: a bay (San Diego Bay), a salt-wedge (Columbia River), and a fjord (Salish Sea). Model fields were sampled using two different mooring strategies, varying the number of mooring locations (lateral resolution) and sample depths (vertical resolution) with each method. The exchange volume was more sensitive than salinity to the sampling resolution. Most (>90%) of the exchange flow magnitude was captured by three to four moorings evenly distributed across the estuarine channel with a minimum threshold of 1-5 sample depths, which varied depending on the vertical stratification. These results can improve our ability to observe and monitor exchange flows in order to track the exchange and transport of water masses efficiently with limited resources.

Bio(s): Emily Lemagie is a scientist and principal investigator at NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), leading studies of the dynamic relationships among climate, fisheries, and the marine environment. She completed her PhD in Physical Oceanography at Oregon State University in 2018. Her research expertise is in estuarine science, river plume dynamics, inner-shelf dynamics, and science communication

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Applications of high-frequency movement data for exploring and modeling fishing behavior
Presenter(s): Jim Sanchirico, University of California, Davis
Date & Time: 6 April 2022
11:15 am - 12:15 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Applications of high-frequency movement data for exploring and modeling fishing behavior


Presenter(s): Dr. Jim Sanchirico, Professor, University of California, Davis

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division

Seminar Contact(s): Tanya Rogers, tanya.rogers@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://swfsc.webex.com/swfsc/j.php?MTID=m07961348a4316a4d4a63f0f678a72da5; Password (if needed): 5sNxHn33mN5; Join by phone by dialing +1-415-655-0002 US Toll, Access code: 2498 072 7370

Abstract: The existence of high-frequency space-time data on human activities and movements is permitting the exploration and prediction of behavior in unprecedented ways. Cellphone data, for example, has been used to understand the differential abilities of income groups to respond to COVID-19 emergency declarations, to better predict traffic patterns, and to understand global mobility patterns. In the fishery context, I will discuss how researchers in the NatuRE Policy lab at UC Davis and collaborators have used satellite tracking data of vessels that report GPS coordinates throughout their voyage to investigate the explore-exploit tradeoff, to identify behavioral typologies of fishing vessels, and to revisit methodologies developed to explore space-time behavior of fishers to better understand their potential strengths and weaknesses for policy analysis.

Bio(s): James N. Sanchirico is a professor of natural resource economics and policy in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy at the University of California, Davis. His main research focus is policy design, implementation, and evaluation for marine and terrestrial species conservation. A large share of his research develops coupled-natural human models for forecasting the effectiveness, efficiency, and equity of policies. He received the Rosenstiel Award for Oceanographic Sciences in 2012 and the UC Davis Distinguished Scholarly Public Service Award in 2014. He is currently Co-Editor at the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, member of the U.S. National Academies of Science Ocean Studies Board and Science Advisory Board of CA Ocean Science Trust, and principal investigator on the NSF-funded Sustainable Oceans National Research Training program at UC Davis.

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; link to recording available upon request.

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5 April 2022

Title: Drivers and Behaviors of International Fishing Fleets in the Pacific: Implications for the Value of US Fisheries
Presenter(s): James Watson, Assistant Professor, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 5 April 2022
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Drivers and Behaviors of International Fishing Fleets in the Pacific: Implications for the Value of US Fisheries - NOAA Inouye Regional Center (IRC) Seminar Series

Presenter(s): James Watson, Assistant Professor, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Inouye Regional Center

Seminar Contact(s): Kate Taylor (kate.taylor@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mb16d3b87ed8f5f5e2891590cd90390aaMeeting Number: 2761 753 1939 and password: NOAACall in information, dial: 1-415-527-5035 and enter access code: 2761 753 1939

Accessibility: Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning areavailable, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: International fishing fleets operating in the highseas provide livelihoods and food security for people globally. Knowledge ofspatial dynamics, such as where vessels from different countries fish and whichcountries share fishing grounds, can inform international relations and fisheriesmanagement in this shared system. Further, new data such as AIS, combined withnew economic theory is enabling us to quantify the value of the oceans, and howit is impacted by climate change and international fleets. This work highlightsthat the high seas are social-ecological systems, and offers new perspectiveson their resilience.

Bio(s): James Watson is an Assistant Professor in theCollege of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University.James leads the Socio-Environmental Analysis Lab which applies tools fromecology, economics, behavioral science, and oceanography to study coupledhuman-natural interactions in the ocean. For his contributions tointerdisciplinary research, James has received the DARPA Young Faculty Awardand the Oceanography Society's Early Career Award. Slides, Recordings,Other materials: Materials and therecording will be available after the seminar by contacting seminar contactlisted above Subscribe to the NOAA Science SeminarSeries weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website formore information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Exploring productivity, growth, and run timing changes of Puget Sound Chum Salmon in the face of environmental variability and competition
Presenter(s): Marisa Litz, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife
Date & Time: 5 April 2022
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: Exploring productivity, growth, and run timing changes of Puget Sound Chum Salmon in the face of environmental variability and competition

Presenter(s): Marisa Litz, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife

Sponsor(s): AFSC 2022 Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Abigail McCarthy, abigail.mccarthy@noaa.gov; Pearl Rojas, pearl.rojas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Join by computer at:https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m1ed0abf6ef8744f2d5a296f2450c2e6fWebEx meeting number: 2762 343 8233Password: Fisheries2022!Or by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035Access code: 2762 343 8233

Abstract: Chum Salmon make up some of the highest returns of Pacific Salmon to Washington State and support robust commercial and recreational fisheries, even at the southernmost extent of their range. However, Chum Salmon productivity (recruits-per-spawner) has been declining in recent decades, which is in stark contrast with current record high abundances of Pink and Chum Salmon in the North Pacific. Washington Chum Salmon resources are closely monitored and managed by the state and Puget Sound Treaty Tribes, yet few studies have explored variation in abundance, growth, or migration timing of these populations over time. In a series of studies, we explored multidecadal shifts in population dynamics, growth, and migration phenology of Chum Salmon with respect to intra- and interspecific competition, harvest, predation, and environmental variability experienced across multiple scales over the life cycle. We found evidence of declining, non-stationary productivity related to large-scale oceanographic indices and odd-year Pink Salmon abundance, as well as density-dependent effects on Chum Salmon growth in the ocean. We also documented a shift towards earlier adult migration timing of South Puget Sound Chum Salmon in recent decades associated with freshwater availability and increasing pinniped abundance. Our results identify new indicators for forecasting and suggest additional ways of monitoring that could benefit in-season Chum Salmon management.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Green-Up in Interior Alaska: When and Why it Matters
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy
Date & Time: 5 April 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:



Title: Green-up in Interior Alaska: When and Why it Matters

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP).

Seminar Contact(s): Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov), Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/greenup-2022/

Abstract: Green-up, that time when leaves burst forth from Alaska's deciduous trees has important implications for the seasonal ecology, society and even meteorology in the state. The unique multi-decadal record of green-up dates in Fairbanks has been used to develop a technique for forecasting this and related events in the Interior and more broadly in the boreal forest regions in Alaska. This webinar will be the third annual review of the green-up forecasting tools and will provide a look-ahead for green-up for Spring 2022. This webinar is co-sponsored by OneTree Alaska.

Bio(s): Rick Thoman is the Alaska Climate Specialist at the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP). Rick Thoman is an expert in Alaska climate and weather. He produces reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities and media.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.



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Title: U.S. Southwest Drought Briefing: A Focus on Snowpack
Presenter(s): Dave Simeral, Desert Research Institute; Jordan Clayton, Utah Snow Survey, USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service
Date & Time: 5 April 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Southwest Drought Briefing: A Focus on Snowpack

Presenter(s): Dave Simeral, Desert Research Institute; and Jordan Clayton, Utah Snow Survey, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USDA Southwest Climate Hub

Seminar Contacts: Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov), NOAA/OAR Climate Program Office

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4639505183515134222

Abstract: The Southwest has experienced an on-again, off-again winter snow pattern. As we prepare for the spring snowmelt, moderate to exceptional drought persists across the region. This drought briefing will focus on winter drought conditions and forecasts for spring for Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, and Utah. It will also take a closer look at April 1 snowpack conditions along with a deeper dive into snow measurement networks and how snowpack is measured across the West.

Recordings: You can find them here: (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Multi-Sensor Nearshore Bathymetric Mapping - IOCM Seminar series
Presenter(s): Christopher Parrish, Associate Professor, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 5 April 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Multi-Sensor Nearshore Bathymetric Mapping
Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping 2022 Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Christopher Parrish, Associate Professor, Oregon State University, College of Engineering, School of Civil and Construction Engineering,

Sponsor(s): NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping Program

Seminar Contact(s): Amber Butler (amber.butler@noaa.gov) or Ashley Chappell (ashley.chappell@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4953642251314704912 Please contact amber.butler@noaa.gov for technical connectivity troubleshooting.

Abstract: The shallow nearshore zone adjacent to the shoreline is the most difficult coastal region in which to collect data, leading to a pervasive nearshore bathymetric data gap. This nearshore data void is so well known that it has been given a name: the coastal white ribbon. Unfortunately, the lack of shallow nearshore bathymetry presents impediments to a number of coastal science and management needs, ranging from inundation modeling to benthic habitat mapping to coastal resilience initiatives. Since no individual technology, platform, to data collection technique affords a complete solution to this challenge, multi-sensor/multi-platform approaches utilizing autonomous systems, UAS, aircraft, and satellites are of growing interest. This presentation will present results from a number of research projects focused on various platforms, sensors, and algorithms for addressing the nearshore data void.

Bio(s): Christopher Parrish is an associate professor at Oregon State University (OSU). Prior to joining OSU in 2014, he served as lead physical scientist in the Remote Sensing Division of NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. Chris is president-elect of the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) and serves on the Science Advisory Council of the NOAA Cooperative Institute at OSU, the Cooperative Institute for Marine Ecosystem and Resources Studies. He is also an affiliate faculty member at the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping " Joint Hydrographic Center (CCOM-JHC) at the University of New Hampshire.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:Materials and the recording will be available after the seminar by contacting iwgocm.staff@noaa.gov

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

31 March 2022

Title: Advancements in the Northeast United States Atlantis ecosystem model
Presenter(s): Joseph Caracappa, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 31 March 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Advancements in the Northeast United States Atlantis ecosystem model

Presenter(s): Joseph Caracappa, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

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Title: Spring Flood Outlook for the U.S. Eastern Region
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University, and Jason Elliott, NOAA/NWS/NERFC, and Rob Shedd, NOAA/NWS/MARFC
Date & Time: 31 March 2022
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Spring Flood Outlook for the Eastern Region

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University,
Jason Elliott, NOAA/NWS/Northeast River Forecast Center, and
Rob Shedd, NOAA/NWS/Mid-Atlantic River Forecast Center


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s):
Ellen Mecray

Remote Access:
Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of March conditions and Jason Elliott will review the NOAA Spring Flood Outlook for the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic River Forecast Center geographies.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

30 March 2022

Title: Going Virtual (and a Bit Stir-Crazy): Lessons from and for Collaborative Science Amid a Pandemic
Presenter(s): Susanne Moser, NERRS Science Collaborative
Date & Time: 30 March 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Going Virtual (and a Bit Stir-Crazy): Lessons from and for Collaborative Science Amid a Pandemic

Presenter(s): Susi Moser, NERRS Science Collaborative, promundi@susannemoser.com

Sponsor(s): This webinar is sponsored by the NERRS Science Collaborative

Seminar Contact(s): Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1512845957114468878

Abstract: In 2020, Susanne Moser - with support from the NERRS Science Collaborative team - began a study to better understand how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted collaborative science projects. While initially focused on the shift to virtual engagement, the study eventually expanded to assess the broader implications of the ongoing pandemic, the conduct and outcomes of collaborative science, and stakeholder engagement under such unusual and strenuous circumstances. Given the continually and rapidly changing conditions from the onset of the pandemic until now, all projects have had to adjust " but some more substantially than others. Drawing on project check-in notes and in-depth interviews with project and collaborative leads, this webinar will report back from this study to share insights on:
  • How projects adjusted;
  • Which techniques and technologies were used and proved useful;
  • What benefits and losses people experienced due to the shifts made during the pandemic;
  • Which successes and failures (or shortcomings in virtual engagement) projects experienced; as well as
  • Lessons learned and good advice interviewees offered to their colleagues.
The webinar will also invite questions on these findings and implications for collaborative science, both generally and for the National Estuarine Research Reserve System going forward.

Bio(s): Please visit here for more information about the webinar.

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Title: Synechococcus abundance and biomass in the Northern Bering and Chukchi seas
Presenter(s): Michael W. Lomas, Ph.D., National Center for Marine Algae and Microbiota (NCMA), Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences
Date & Time: 30 March 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Synechococcus abundance and biomass in the Northern Bering and Chukchi seas

Presenter(s): Michael W. Lomas, Ph.D., National Center for Marine Algae and Microbiota (NCMA), Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): EcoFOCI Research Coordinator Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Zooplankton Ecologist Deana Crouser (deana.crouser@noaa.gov).

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: Size structure of phytoplankton populations has been shown to be an important determinant of the flow of carbon and energy to higher trophic levels in Arctic ecosystems. Phytoplankton populations dominated by small (<10um) pico- and nanophytoplankton cells are generally dominated by eukaryotic flagellates that are tightly grazed by microzooplankton leading to increases in trophic length. General dogma suggests that the picocyanobacteria Synechococcus is detectable but comprises a negligible fraction of phytoplankton carbon in Arctic ecosystems. As part of the Arctic IERP sampling program, we quantified the abundance of the Synechococcus, and other picophytoplankton, during the spring to fall period between 2017-2019 in the Northern Bering and Chukchi Seas. Synechococcus abundances increased from <500 cells/ml in spring to >50,000 cells/ml in the fall around Kotzebue Sound. Furthermore, the spatial extent of regions with elevated Synecococcus abundances in late summer/fall, as well as the absolute abundances, increased from 2017 to 2019, coincident with increasing late summer/fall water temperatures. When integrated over the euphotic zone, Synechococcus contributed up to 40% of estimated total phytoplankton carbon during late summer/fall in Kotzebue sound and the region near Icy Cape. These observations support an increased importance of a previously marginal phytoplankton group during a warming period in the Chukchi Sea. The full implications of these changes in the phytoplankton community remain to be resolved.

Bio(s): Michael W. Lomas is a senior research scientist and director of the National Center for Marine Algae and Microbiota (NCMA) at the Bigelow laboratory of ocean sciences. As a marine biogeochemist he has a broad interest in the role that phytoplankton diversity and physiology plays in mediating the key processes of the biological carbon pump, and associated macronutrient cycles.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Wildland fire behavior and factors contributing to risk in western U.S. events
Presenter(s): Janice Coen, NCAR
Date & Time: 30 March 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: Wildland fire behavior and factors contributing to risk in western U.S. events
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series


Presenter(s): Janice Coen, NCAR

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): jan.kazil@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7352382999330476044

Abstract: A variety of approaches have been used to investigate how wildland fires, both individually and as a population, respond to their environment, how fire behavior might differ in a changing climate, and how we might mitigate or shape these outcomes. Understanding and anticipating such responses have vast and expanding applications including fire management, land management, electric grid operations, insurance assessment, risk assessment, and community planning. No one approach answers all questions. Tools include statistical correlations and computational models ranging from sub-centimeter combustion fluid dynamics models to modules in general circulation models, designed to understand fire responses at different scales, with different levels of physics, and focus on individual vs. populations of fires. Reconciling and integrating conclusions from each is a community work in progress.By linking fire behavior to its environment " both how it responds to the atmosphere, fuels, and topography and how its heat release alters the atmosphere " we have used case studies applying the CAWFE coupled numerical weather prediction " wildland fire environment model to understand the unfolding of dozens of landscape-scale wildland fire events. Past research showed that by reproducing winds at hundreds of meter grid spacing and including the fire feedbacks on the weather, the distinguishing features of wildfire events could be reproduced " even recent outlier events " over a wide range of conditions. Here, we present recent work exploring fire behavior in understudied airflow regimes that are conducive to rapid fire spread in western U.S. fire events. Viewed from this physically-based modeling perspective, we can extract insight both into the mechanisms of why a fire behaved as it did and the relative important of broad factors (drought, fuel accumulation) speculated to be the cause, as well as what this means for assessing risk of similar events.

Bio(s): Dr. Janice Coen holds positions as Senior Research Scientist at the University of San Francisco and Project Scientist in the Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Laboratory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. She received a B.S. in Engineering Physics from Grove City College and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the Department of Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago. She studies fire behavior and its interaction with weather using coupled weather-fire CFD models and flow analysis of high speed IR fire imagery. Her recent work investigated the mechanisms leading to extreme wildfire events, fine-scale wind extrema that lead to ignitions by the electric grid, and integration of coupled models with satellite active fire detection data to forecast the growth of landscape-scale wildfires.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2022, contingent on speaker approval

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Title: Increasing river alkalinity slows ocean acidification in the northern Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Dr. Fabian A. Gomez, Research Scientist at Northern Gulf Institute and NOAA/OAR's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory - AOML
Date & Time: 30 March 2022
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Please share with anyone (NOAA or not) who might be interested; thanks.

Title: Increasing river alkalinity slows ocean acidification in the northern Gulf of Mexico

Presenter(s): Dr. Fabian A. Gomez,Research Scientist at Northern Gulf Institute and NOAA/OAR's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Varis.Ransi@noaa.gov, co-coordinator, NOAA/NOS Science Seminar Series

Remote Access: This event is over. You can see the recording here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p2jgilf0g046/You may enter the webinar via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. If you enter via a browser, PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use the IE browser.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download it but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download info is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register here:
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Ocean Acidification (OA) progression is affected by multiple factors, such as ocean warming, biological production, and river runoff. Here we used an ocean-biogeochemical model to examine the drivers of the OA spatiotemporal variability in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) during 1981-2014. The model showed negative pH and aragonite saturation state trends (Ar), linked to increasing levels of atmospheric CO2, which were close to values reported for the Subtropical North Atlantic. However, significant departures from the basin-mean trends were obtained over the northern GoM inner shelf, where the sign of the trends was positive. Model sensitivity analyses showed that OA progression in this last region was counteracted by enhanced alkalinity from the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River System (MARS). The model results also showed interdecadal changes in the OA indicators linked to the1997-98 climate shift. We detected a stronger OA in the northern GoM shelf during 1999-2014, driven by interdecadal changes in the MARS's ratio of alkalinity to dissolved inorganic carbon. Away from the northern GoM shelf, surface warming during 1981-1998 and a weak surface cooling during 1999-2014 promoted a stronger positive trend for Ar while counteracted the trend changes for pH and partial pressure of CO2. Our findings highlight that river alkalinity is a key driver of the low-frequency carbon system variability and emphasize the need for considering realistic freshwater chemistry fluxes to properly assess acidification in coastal waters.

Bio(s): Fabian Gomez is a Research Scientist at the Northern Gulf Institute and the Physical Oceanography Division at NOAA/OAR's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. He received his Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography from the Oregon State University in 2015 and did his postdoctoral research at University of Southern Mississippi. Dr. Gomez's research focuses on examining plankton and marine chemistry variability using three-dimensional high-resolution ocean-biogeochemical (BGC) models. He has expertise configuring ocean-BGC models in the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS) and the GFDL's Modular Ocean Model (MOM). He is particularly interested in understanding how large-scale climate variability modes (such as ENSO, MJO, and AMO) impact regional marine ecosystems, and examining past and future changes in marine productivity and carbonate chemistry associated with anthropogenic climate change and ocean acidification.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:Within a few days of the webinar, a link to the recording, usually a PDF of the slides, and sometimes a summary of the chat will be sent to all who registered.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science SeminarSeries website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

29 March 2022

Title: A trait-based approach to understanding distribution patterns of reef fish across the Pacific
Presenter(s): Dr. Laura Richardson, Marie Skodowska-Curie Research Fellow at Bangor University, UK
Date & Time: 29 March 2022
8:00 pm - 9:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A trait-based approach to understanding distribution patterns of reef fish across the Pacific - NOAA Inouye Regional Center (IRC) Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Laura Richardson, Marie Skodowska-Curie Research Fellow at Bangor University (UK)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Inouye Regional Center

Seminar Contact(s): Kate Taylor, kate.taylor@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=md8e759f4735a93066e93a7033d51719a
Meeting Number: 2761 781 2496
Password: NOAA
Call-in: 1-415-527-5035, and access code: 2761 781 2496

Accessibility: Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Ecosystems are maintained by diverse, often overlapping, functions carried out by multiple species operating across scales. Trait-based approaches to ecosystem assessment have rapidly evolved in the field of conservation ecology, designed to translate complex multivariate species data into synthetic, complementary, and sensitive indicators of ecosystem state. Providing alternative indices to traditional taxonomic descriptions, they account for the ecological roles of species and offer insight into the processes organizing communities. We use traits-based approaches on NOAA's Pacific RAMP monitoring dataset to understand spatial patterns and natural bounds of reef fish assemblages and identify whether and how humans alter observed patterns of ecological organization on Pacific reefs.

Bio(s): Dr. Laura Richardson is a Marie Skodowska-Curie Research Fellowat Bangor University (UK), working with Gareth Williams (BU, UK) and Adel Heenan (Global Fishing Watch), in collaboration with Tye Kindinger, JamisonGove, and teams at NMFS Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center.

Recording: Recording will be available 48 hours after the seminar. Reach out to the Seminar Contact, listed above.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Practical Applications of Soil Moisture Information
Presenter(s): Richard Heim, NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information; Brad Pugh, NOAA Climate Prediction Center; and Laura Edwards, South Dakota State Climatologist
Date & Time: 29 March 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Tittle: Soil Moisture Webinar Series " Practical Applications of Soil Moisture Information

Presenter(s):
  • Using Soil Moisture to Develop the U.S. Drought Monitor Map " Richard Heim, NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information
  • How Soil Moisture Informs the U.S. Drought Outlooks " Brad Pugh, NOAA's Climate Prediction Center
  • Using Soil Moisture for State-Level Drought Monitoring " Laura Edwards, South Dakota State Climatologist


Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Marina Skumanich (marina.skumanich@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1113625379233505296

Abstract: The National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) and the National Weather Service (NWS) are hosting two webinars on soil moisture data and applications. These webinars are intended to help NWS operational forecasters and other weather & climate service providers better understand soil moisture monitoring and its practical applications.The first webinar, held on March 29, will feature presentations from climate service professionals on how soil moisture informs their decision making.

Recordings: You can find them here: (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Ancient Algal Blooms: Comparing historic and modern cyanobacteria and cyanotoxin dynamics in the tropics and subtropics over the last 5000 years
Presenter(s): Dr. Matthew Waters, Associate Professor of Environmental Sciences, Auburn University
Date & Time: 29 March 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Ancient Algal Blooms: Comparing historic and modern cyanobacteria and cyanotoxin dynamics in the tropics and subtropics over the last 5000 years

Presenter(s): Dr. Matthew Waters, Associate Professor of Environmental Sciences, Auburn University

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Varis.Ransi@noaa.gov, co-coordinator NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series

Remote Access: This event is over. You can find the recodring here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p36nse3exr4p/
You may enter the webinar via a browser or the Adobe Connectapp. If you enter via a browser, PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use the IE browser.
If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download it but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download info is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register at link above.Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: The global occurrence of harmful algal blooms (HABs) is believed to be increasing in response to warming and anthropogenic impacts. Land use change, hydrological modifications, nutrient dynamics, biological interactions and other drivers have been identified as triggers for HAB development. Whereas modern HAB processes are being determined, placing HABs in a historical context could benefit future models and projections of HAB occurrences. Here, paleolimnological tools were applied to tropical and subtropical lakes to document the development of dense cyanobacteria communities from the middle Holocene to the present (last ~5000 years). We utilized paleolimnological techniques to infer past allochthonous inputs (nutrients, organic matter, metals), hydrological modifications, and autochthonous responses (photosynthetic pigments, cyanotoxins) in USA subtropical lakes and Lake Amatitln, Guatemala. Paleolimnological results suggest that historic HABs and cyanobacteria development are linked with hydrological change and alterations to nutrient inputs from terrestrial land use. Lake Amatitln showed historic hypereutrophic conditions due to Prehistoric Maya settlements in the water shed with ancient HABs rivaling modern hypereutrophic conditions. Analysis of sedimentary cyanotoxins show new linkages between known drivers of cyanotoxin production (N and P) and other elements typically not included in modern monitoring efforts (Fe). These results suggest that HAB occurrences are not unique to the modern era and that historic HAB development is triggered by a multitude of drivers.

Bio(s): Dr. Matthew Waters is an Associate Professor of Environmental Sciences at Auburn University where he leads the Auburn Paleoenvironmental Laboratory. Trained as a classic limnologist and paleolimnologist, Dr. Waters and his students attempt to develop and apply geochemical analysis on sediment cores collected from natural lake systems to better understand the ecological dynamics of cyanobacteria and the triggers of cyanotoxin production. His studies focus on the SE USA and Mesoamerica.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:Within a few days of the webinar, a link to the recording, usually a PDF of the slides, and sometimes a summary of the chat will be sent to all who registered.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Automated probabilistic echo solving: a scalable Bayesian inverse approach for fisheries acoustics
Presenter(s): Sam Urmy, PhD, Fisheries biologist, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Midwater Assessment and Conservation and Engineering
Date & Time: 29 March 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Automated probabilistic echo solving: ascalable Bayesian inverse approach for fisheries acoustics

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC) 2022 Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sam Urmy, PhD, Fisheries biologist, NOAA/NMFS Alaska FIsheries Science Center, MIdwater Assessment and Conservation and Engineering (MACE)

Seminar Contact(s): Abigail McCarthy, abigail.mccarthy@noaa.gov; Pearl Rojas, pearl.rojas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Join by computer at:https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m1ed0abf6ef8744f2d5a296f2450c2e6fWebEx meeting number: 2762 343 8233 Password: Fisheries2022!Or by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 2762 343 8233

Abstract: Identifying echo sign is a perennial challenge in fisheries acoustics. Most practitioners classify acoustic backscatter using a combination of direct sampling (such as research trawls)and contrasts between different echosounder frequencies, then estimate abundance by integrating the echo energy at a single frequency. While time-tested, this approach struggles with species mixtures, and discards multi-frequency information when integrating. Inverse methods do not have these limitations, but are seldom used, because their species identifications are often ambiguous and their algorithms complicated to implement. We address these shortcomings with a probabilistic, Bayesian inversion method. Like other inversion methods, it handles species mixtures, uses all available frequencies, and extends naturally to broadband signals. Unlike prior approaches, it leverages Bayesian priors to rigorously incorporate information from direct sampling and biological knowledge, constraining the inversion and reducing ambiguity in species identification. Because it is probabilistic, it can be trusted to run automatically: it should not produce solutions that are both wrong and confident. Unlike some data-driven machine learning models, it is based on acoustical scattering processes, so its inferences are physically interpretable. Finally, the approach is straightforward to implement using existing Bayesian libraries, and is easily parallelized for large datasets. We present examples using simulations and field data from the Gulf of Alaska, and discuss possible extensions and applications of the method. Subscribe to theNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

28 March 2022

Title: California-Nevada Winter Drought & Climate Status Update
Presenter(s): Ben Hatchett, Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute, Nathan Patrick, NWS California-Nevada River Forecast Center, Leslie Roche, University of California Cooperative Extension
Date & Time: 28 March 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Titles and

Presenter(s):

Drought & Climate Update
Ben Hatchett | Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute

Drought & Climate Outlook
Nathan Patrick | NWS California-Nevada River Forecast Center

California Rangeland Status
Leslie Roche | University of California Cooperative Extension

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), National Weather Service, Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Nevada State Climate Office, Desert Research Institute

POC: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Abstract: According to the March 8 U.S. Drought Monitor, 100% of CA/NV is in drought, with 22.2% in Extreme (D3) or Exceptional (D4) Drought. Most of the western U.S. was exceptionally dry in February, with record low total precipitation at over 200 SNOTEL sites. In California, the driest January and February in state history has led to a March 1 statewide snowpack of less than 70% of average, down from 160% at the start of the new year. With low reservoir carryover, the impacts of snow drought will reach into summer and beyond.

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) March 2022 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia)..

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3996806549922998800

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

25 March 2022

Title: Three Minute Thesis Webinar on NOAA's Hydrology Efforts: Water, Water Everywhere!
Presenter(s): Ryan Fliehman, Hydrometeorologist, NOAA National Weather Service Ohio River Forecast Center; Peggy Lee, Techniques and Development Hydrologist, NOAA National Water Center; JJ Gourley, Research Hydrometeorologist, NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory; Scott Young, Hydrologist, NOAA NWS Ohio River Forecast Center; Britt Westergard, Senior Service Hydrologist, NOAA NWS Forecast Office - Albany, New York; Dustin Goering, Senior Hydrologist, NOAA NWS North Central River Forecast Center; Nhan Dang, Hydrologist, NOAA NWS North Central River Forecast Center; Kevin Low, Service Coordination Hydrologist, NOAA NWS Missouri Basin River Forecast Center; Janet Intrieri, Research Scientist, NOAA Physical Science Laboratory
Date & Time: 25 March 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Three Minute Thesis Webinar on NOAA's Hydrology Efforts: Water, Water Everywhere!

Presenter(s): - Ryan Fliehman, Hydrometeorologist, NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Ohio River
Forecast Center;
- Peggy Lee, Techniques and Development Hydrologist, NOAA National Water Center; - JJ Gourley, Research Hydrometeorologist, NOAA OAR National Severe Storms Laboratory;
- Scott Young, Hydrologist, NOAA National Weather Service Ohio River Forecast Center;
- Britt Westergard, Senior Service Hydrologist, NOAA NWS Forecast Office - Albany, New York;
- Dustin Goering, Senior Hydrologist, NOAA NWS North Central River Forecast Center;
- Nhan Dang, Hydrologist, NOAA NWS North Central River Forecast Center;
- Kevin Low, Service Coordination Hydrologist, NOAA NWS Missouri Basin River Forecast Center;
- Janet Intrieri, Research Scientist, NOAA OAR Physical Science Laboratory

Sponsor(s): NOAA Regional Collaboration Network

Seminar Contact(s): Keli Pirtle, keli.pirtle@noaa.gov and Bethany Perry, bethany.perry@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register -- https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1288797374023080208 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract: Nine NOAA colleagues each have one slide and three minutes to share experiences and information about NOAA's role related to hydrology. From studies of the past, current operations and initiatives, to innovative research - the audience will have a chance to hear straight from the experts on a wide array of water-related topics. In addition, presenters will address questions from the audience.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be made available shortly after the seminar at: https://www.noaa.gov/regions/central-region-thesis-webinar-recordings

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

24 March 2022

Title: What determines how well an estuary neutralizes acids? A case study of alkalinity in the Chesapeake Bay’s tidal tributaries
Presenter(s): Raymond Najjar, Ph.D., Professor of Oceanography, The Pennsylvania State University
Date & Time: 24 March 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesThis webinar is over. You may view the recording here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p7vmmq4e8hm2/

Title: What determines how well an estuary neutralizes acids? A case study of alkalinity in the Chesapeake Bay's tidal tributaries

Presenter(s): Raymond Najjar, Professor of Oceanography, The Pennsylvania State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Varis.Ransi@noaa.gov, co-coordinator NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series

Remote Access: This webinar is over. You may view the recording here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p7vmmq4e8hm2/

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Alkalinity, which is the capacity of a water body to neutralize acid, is a useful quantity when studying the cycling of carbon in water bodies, including estuaries. Interest in estuarine alkalinity is growing due to concerns about ocean acidification, which is driven by the invasion of carbon dioxide of human origin (e.g., fossil fuel burning) and the decomposition of algal blooms caused by nutrient over-enrichment. However, there have been few analyses of estuarine alkalinity spanning multiple seasons and years. Here, I present an analysis of more than 25,000 alkalinity measurements made throughout numerous tidal tributaries of Chesapeake Bay, a large coastal-plain estuary in the eastern United States. Average alkalinity levels in tidal fresh regions varied dramatically (a factor of six) among seven tidal tributaries. Alkalinity was found to increase over several decades at several locations, due to alkalinity increases in the rivers draining to Chesapeake Bay and probably a reduction in the processes that remove alkalinity from estuarine waters. Evidence also supports the role of an invasive species, the Asiatic Clam, in the alkalinity removal in the Potomac River Estuary. More generally, I find evidence that tidal tributaries fed by high alkalinity rivers consume alkalinity while tidal tributaries that are fed by lowalkalinity rivers produce alkalinity. For a single estuarine system, the Chesapeake Bay has a wide range of alkalinity levels and a wide variety of processes that influence its alkalinity. Therefore, the Chesapeake Bay can serve as a laboratory for studying the alkalinity of many of the world's estuaries and, more generally, for understanding estuarine acidification.

Bio(s): Raymond Najjar is a Professor of Oceanography in the Department of Meteorology and Atmospheric Science at The Pennsylvania State University, where he has been on the faculty since 1993. He has a Ph.D. in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences from Princeton University and was a post-doctoral fellow at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Dr. Najjar has conducted research on a variety of topics in oceanography, climate science, and hydrology, with current interests focused on how coastal waters are influenced by climate change and pollution.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Within a few days of the webinar, a link to the recording, usually a PDF of the slides, and sometimes a summary of the chat will be sent to all who registered.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Deep, dark, and diverse – an exploration of hydrothermal vent plume community composition and function
Presenter(s): Dr. Matthew Harke, Research Scientist, Gloucester Marine Genomics Institute
Date & Time: 24 March 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Deep, dark, and diverse " an exploration of hydrothermal vent plume community composition and function Part of the NOAA Omics Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Matthew Harke, Research Scientist, Gloucester Marine Genomics Institute

Sponsor(s): NOAA Omics Working Group

Seminar Contact(s): Katharine Egan, NOAA OAR 'Omics Coordinator, noaa.omics@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9124343843845537294

Abstract: Deep under the surface of the ocean, beyond the reach of the sun, hydrothermal activity supports a vast diversity of organisms promoted by chemosynthetic primary production. These biological hot spots are still sparsely sampled, and our current knowledge is limited to snapshots in space in time. As such, it is still difficult to evaluate the role of isolation and dispersal in shaping the biogeography of deep-sea hydrothermal vents, particularly when considering microbial organisms. In July of 2021, as part of the OceanX Young Explorers Program, we set out to explore the Moytirra vent field along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge north of the Azores, with a goal of characterizing the diversity of organisms inhabiting vent plumes and how community composition and function changes with distance from the vent site. A transect was conducted within a plume collecting samples at 200m intervals across 2.4 km following the plume turbidity gradient. Samples were sequenced using both metabarcoding and metatranscriptome to assess the diversity and function of organisms within the plume and how it relates to biogeochemistry and distance from vent origin.

Bio(s): Matt Harke, Ph.D., is a Research Scientist at the Gloucester Marine Genomics Institute (GMGI) leading the Ecosystem Function and Health program. He is a biological oceanographer by training and his research focuses on understanding the diversity and function of microorganisms in the environment and how that relates to ecosystem function and resilience. Before joining GMGI, he was an Associate Research Scientist at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory where he used metatranscriptomics to characterize the distribution, composition, and function of microorganisms in situ and in response to physical and chemical changes. He completed his MS and PhD at Stony Brook University investigating a range of topics including harmful algal bloom ecology (both fresh and marine), benthic-pelagic coupling, and microbial ecology.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of this presentation will be made available on the NOAA Omics website. View past omics seminar recordings here: https://sciencecouncil.noaa.gov/NOAA-Science-Technology-Focus-Areas/NOAA-Omics

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Monitoring the Recovery of the Ozone Layer
Presenter(s): Dr. Larry Flynn, Research Scientist, NOAA NESDIS-STAR & Ozone Team lead
Date & Time: 24 March 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Monitoring the Recovery of the Ozone Layer

Presenter(s): Dr. Larry Flynn, Research Scientist, NOAA NESDIS-STAR & Ozone Team lead

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NESDIS GOES-R Program Office, Satellite Book Club (SBC). Please click here if you would like to subscribe to the Satellite Book Club

Seminar Contact(s): Kashaud.Bowman@noaa.gov, NOAA/NESDIS


Abstract: Fifty years ago the World was faced with a growing threat to the atmosphere. This talk considers the progression from a problem to a solution for the damage to the ozone layer as an example of how the nations of the World responded to a threat. It traces the sequence of advances in recognizing and understanding the problem and in the progression of remote sensing methods and records for quantifying the destruction of atmospheric ozone.

Bio(s): For the last twenty-six years, Dr. Larry Flynn has been a research scientist with NOAA/NESDIS. His duties include research and analysis for validation, algorithm development, and calibration of existing and next generation satellite ozone sensors.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: 2020 YouTube Session Recordings can be found
here. 2021 YouTube Session Recordings can be found here. Recordings posted to VLab can be found here.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

23 March 2022

Title: Best Practice Data Standards for Discrete Chemical Oceanographic Observations
Presenter(s): Dr. Liqing Jiang, NOAA/NCEI
Date & Time: 23 March 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Best Practice Data Standards for Discrete Chemical Oceanographic Observations

Presenter(s): Liqing Jiang, NOAA/NCEI

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Abstract: Effective data management plays a key role in oceanographic research as cruise-based data, collected from different laboratories and expeditions, are commonly compiled to investigate regional to global oceanographic processes. Here we describe new and updated best practice data standards for discrete chemical oceanographic observations, specifically those dealing with column header abbreviations, quality control flags, missing value indicators, and standardized calculations of certain properties. These data standards have been developed with the goals of improving the current practices of the scientific community and promoting their international usage. These guidelines are intended to standardize data files for data sharing and submission into permanent archives. They will facilitate future quality control and synthesis efforts and lead to better data interpretation. In turn, this will promote research in ocean biogeochemistry, such as studies of carbon cycling and ocean acidification, on regional to global scales.

Bio(s): Liqing Jiang (Associate Research Scientist, UMD) is a chemical oceanographer specializing in the study of inorganic carbon cycling and ocean acidification. He received his Ph.D in Oceanography from the University of Georgia in 2009 and did his postdoctoral research at Yale University. Dr. Jiang has been working at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) through the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites (CISESS) since 2011. He is currently the lead principal investigator of the Ocean Carbon and Acidification Data System (OCADS) project, which is partially funded by NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program (OAP). In addition to data management, Dr. Jiang has also been leading the North American coastal synthesis project, and doing a lot of research in terms of the distribution of the global OA indicators. Slides, Recordings Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php

Title: NOAA Science Reports: Sustainable Use and Stewardship of Ocean and Coastal Resources
Presenter(s): Kara Meckley, Dr. Jenny Litz, Dr. Andrea Gomez, and Alex De Robertis, all with NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 23 March 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Sustainable Use and Stewardship of Ocean and Coastal Resources
NOAA Science Report Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Moderator: Michael Liddle, Office of FIS Program Director, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology "Fish Production Calculator a tool for managing Salt Marsh and Seagrass Habitats"
Kara Meckley, Division Chief, Habitat Protection Division, NOAA Fisheries Office of Habitat Conservation"Gulf of Mexico Marine Assessment Program for Protected Species (GOMMAPPS) Provides Updated Spatial Density and Distribution Models for Cetaceans and Sea Turtles in the Gulf"
Dr. Jenny Litz, Marine Mammal Branch Chief, National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Marine Mammal Branch
"Evaluating Satellite-Based Sea Surface Temperatures and In Situ Observations, and Coral Symbioses in Southwestern Puerto Rico" - Dr. Andrea Gomez, Communications Specialist, NOAA Fisheries; Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office"Innovative Sonar Technologies Help Scientists Track Commercially Valuable Fish Stocks in Alaska" - Alex De Robertis, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library and NOAA Research and Development Enterprise Committee

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars - library.seminars@noaa.gov

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The NOAA Science Report celebrates NOAA's R&D by showcasing science highlights, bibliometrics, NOAA's scientific workforce, and more. This seminar features 4 projects from the 2021 NOAA Science Report related to the sustainable use and stewardship of ocean and coastal resources. Keywords: NOAA Science Report, Oceans, Coastal

Bio(s): In her role, Kara is responsible for overseeing the national coordination and strategic implementation of key NOAA Fisheries habitat-related mandates. One of her priorities is working with others to better understand the linkage between habitat availability and fisheries productivity. She continues to explore how this data can be used to inform fishery management decisions and investments in habitat conservation. Prior to joining NOAA Fisheries in 2007, she spent five years as a program analyst in the National Ocean Service supporting the Coral Reef Conservation Program.Dr. Jenny Litz started at the Southeast Fisheries Science Center as a college intern more than 20 years ago and has recently transitioned into the Marine Mammal Branch Chief position. In between, she was a research biologist with a focus on marine mammal health, stranding trends, population structure and the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on marine mammals. She is the Program Manager for the marine mammal portion of the Gulf of Mexico Marine Assessment Program for Protected Species (GoMMAPPS) which will be the focus of today's presentation.
Dr. Andrea Gomez began working with NOAA Fisheries in 2021 as a Communications Specialist. She is originally from California, with a background in marine biology and animal husbandry. She was a NOAA CESSRST EPP Fellow for both her M.S. and doctorate, with her graduate research focused on remote sensing and coral reefs.
Alex De Robertis is a fisheries biologist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Midwater and Conservation Engineering program. He works in a group that conducts acoustic-trawl surveys of fish in Alaska to help manage commercial fisheries and research to improve these surveys. It is challenging and interesting work, focused on improving acoustic, optical, and trawl sampling methods. Alex earned a B.S. in Biology from UCLA and a PhD from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He has been fortunate to interact with a wide variety of interesting colleagues and work with sampling platforms ranging from inflatable boats to icebreakers, buoys, ocean-going robots, and moorings on the seafloor.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: VAWS: Subjective Evaluation of Sea Ice Guidance at Operational Ice Centers
Presenter(s): Eugene Petrescu, NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 23 March 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: VAWS - Subjective Evaluation of Sea Ice Guidance at Operational Ice Centers

Presenter(s): Eugene Petrescu, NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS)

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR Climate Program Office and Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Genie.Bey@noaa.gov, Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu) &
Danielle Meeker (demeeker@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/mar-2022-vaws/

Abstract: Sea ice models have shown significant improvements over the past decade as targeted research to better understand physical processes related to sea ice evolution were incorporated into the models. This has been driven by the rapid changes in sea ice and the impacts on communities and transportation activities in the Arctic. This is also increasing the need for expanded and improved sea ice forecasting capabilities from the US National Ice Center (USNIC) and the Alaska Sea Ice Program (ASIP). With new operational models and improving ice guidance, the ice centers wanted to see how this information could be leveraged to improve sea ice forecasts and potentially expand sea ice services in the future. A Sea Ice Guidance Evaluation Project led by the Arctic Testbed and Proving Ground was initiated to help answer some of these questions and to facilitate feedback between the ice centers and the sea ice modeling community to further improve the guidance. An overview of the project will be presented.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above, under Past Events.



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Title: The zooplankton community in the north Bering Sea responds differently to contrasting warm and cold periods
Presenter(s): David G. Kimmel, Ph.D., NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 23 March 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The zooplankton community in the north Bering Sea responds differently to contrasting warm and cold periods

Presenter(s): David G. Kimmel, Ph.D., NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): EcoFOCI Research Coordinator Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Zooplankton Ecologist Deana Crouser (deana.crouser@noaa.gov).

Accessibility:

Abstract: Time-series observations were used to determine zooplankton community changes in the northern (> 60N) Bering Sea (NBS) over a 17-year period (2002-2018). The overall objective was to determine if the observed changes in zooplankton populations previously described for the southeastern Bering Sea shelf (< 60 N) and during limited years in the NBS were also observed in the NBS over alternating climate stanzas. Particular attention was paid to more recent (2014-2018) years that showed unprecedented losses of sea ice in the NBS (2018) in comparison to a prior warm period (2003-2005) and an intervening cold period (2006-2013). Zooplankton abundance was examined in a multivariate framework (redundancy analysis) to find correlations with environmental conditions and abundance anomalies were used to highlight changes in individual taxa over time. The NBS zooplankton community had contrasting responses across each warm and cold period and the primary driver for the differences in response was sea ice. The zooplankton community had positive anomalies for small copepod and meroplankton abundance and negative anomalies for Calanus spp. abundance during the most recent warm period relative to the cold period. Redundancy analysis demonstrated that the zooplankton community during the second warm period experienced greater variability compared to the prior warm period. This suggested that the zooplankton community may show some resilience to moderate reductions in sea ice, as was observed in 2002-2005, but responded rapidly once a threshold in ice extent and timing of retreat was reached. The shifts in the zooplankton community that we observed may have cascading effects on higher trophic levels and these projected impacts may have already been evident during the latter warm period.

Bio(s): David Kimmel is the lead research oceanographer for the Zooplankton team in support of NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center. He received his PhD in Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Science in 2001 from the University of Maryland. His research expertise is in biological oceanography, zooplankton ecology, coastal ecology, climate impacts on ecosystems, and quantitative ecology.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

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Title: The Harmful Algal Bloom Assessment of Lake Okeechobee (HALO): Innovative monitoring technologies providing multidisciplinary insights into HAB dynamics and internal nutrient loading
Presenter(s): Dr. Jordon Beckler, Assistant Research Professor, Geochemistry and Geochemical Sensing Lab, Florida Atlantic University Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute & Institute for Sensing and Embedded Network Systems Engineering
Date & Time: 23 March 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Harmful Algal Bloom Assessment of Lake Okeechobee (HALO): Innovative monitoring technologies providing multidisciplinary insights into HAB dynamics and internal nutrient loading
Great Lakes Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jordon Beckler " Assistant Research Professor, Geochemistry and Geochemical Sensing Lab, Florida Atlantic University Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute & Institute for Sensing and Embedded Network Systems Engineering (I-SENSE)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (NOAA GLERL) and the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR)

Seminar Contact(s): Mary Ogdahl, ogdahlm@umich.edu

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3540167278645813519

Abstract: Annual blooms of Microcystis aeruginosa on Lake Okeechobee have increased in intensity over the last few decades, drastically affecting lake water quality and ecology as well as the health of surrounding coastal water bodies receiving lake inflows. As part of the State of Florida Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Innovative Technologies program, our team employed a comprehensive suite of innovative monitoring technologies alongside more conventional techniques over CY 2021 to unravel HAB ecological, optical, and biogeochemical dynamics. Some techniques to be highlighted included remote sensing (satellite and a long-duration fixed-location i.e. Seaprism), in situ holography (AUTOHOLO), acoustic sensing (AZFP), an Autonomous Surface Vehicle, and fixed-location water quality sensors (LOBOs). This presentation will focus, however, on novel findings related to sediment biogeochemistry and internal nutrient loading. We combined routine sediment sampling and analyses with deployments of a novel benthic lander for in situ nutrient and toxin flux monitoring. To better understand the controls of sediment nutrient generation and release, we obtained voltammetric (electrochemical) measurements of the sediment respiratory environment (aerobic and anaerobic respiration). Findings suggest that both nitrogen and phosphorous speciation and solubility may be coupled to iron cycling via mineral associations and iron-catalyzed transformations, and that diffusive vs. resuspension fluxes play disparate roles with respect to nitrogen vs. phosphorous benthic fluxes. Overall, these dependencies may regulate both the intensity and timing of HABs over hourly to decadal timescales, with important implications for both passive and active mitigation strategies.


Bio(s): Dr. Beckler is an Assistant Research Professor at Florida Atlantic University, with a joint appointment with the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, the Institute of Sensing and Embedded Network and Systems Engineering (I-SENSE), and the Chemistry Department. As the PI of the Geochemistry and Geochemical Sensing Lab, his group's research centers around unraveling sediment biogeochemical processes in near-surface sediments and connections to ecosystem health. The lab develops and commercializes innovative technologies for monitoring sediment geochemistry (microbial respiration pathways/redox/nutrients) and exchanges with the water column (benthic fluxes). Current projects include monitoring Lake Okeechobee harmful algae blooms (FL DEP, EPA), the fluxes of carbon, iron, and CDOM from continental margin areas (NASA), and the exploration of submarine sink blue holes offshore in the Gulf of Mexico (NOAA).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be made available shortly after the seminar at: https://ciglr.seas.umich.edu/event/032322-jordon-beckler/

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22 March 2022

Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Drought and Water Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): David Zierden, Florida Climate Center; Tom Littlepage, ADECA Office of Water Resources; Paul Ankcorn, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Jody Huang, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District; Samantha Lucas, Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve; and Meredith Muth, NOAA NIDIS
Date & Time: 22 March 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): David Zierden, Florida Climate Center; Tom Littlepage, ADECA Office of Water Resources; Paul Ankcorn, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Jody Huang, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District; Samantha Lucas, Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve; Meredith Muth, NOAA NIDIS

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith.Muth@noaa.gov, NOAA/NIDIS

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/1157532176109540365

Abstract: The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar is part of a monthly (twice a month during drought status) webinar series designed to provide stakeholders, water-resource managers, and other interested parties in the ACF region with timely information on current drought status, seasonal forecasts and outlooks, streamflow conditions and forecasts, groundwater conditions, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir conditions.

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

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Title: Hook, Line, and Sinker: How Puget Sound Recreational Fisheries are Managed
Presenter(s): Dr. Kirsten Simonsen, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife
Date & Time: 22 March 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Hook, Line, and Sinker: How Puget Sound Recreational Fisheries are Managed

Presenter(s): Dr. Kirsten Simonsen, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife

Sponsor(s): AFSC 2022 Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Abigail McCarthy, abigail.mccarthy@noaa.gov; Pearl Rojas, pearl.rojas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.WebEx meeting number: 2762 343 8233 Password: Fisheries2022!Or by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 2762 343 8233

Abstract: Recreational fishing is a multi-million dollar a year industry in Washington state alone, supporting over 15,000 jobs throughout the state, and catering to almost a million anglers annually. Managing these fisheries to ensure sustainability, while providing diverse opportunities, is vitally important. For salmon fisheries in the Puget Sound Region, this task is further complicated by the fact that many Puget Sound salmon stocks, including the iconic Chinook, or King, Salmon, are a listed species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Providing fishing opportunities directed on salmon in the Puget Sound Region is a delicate balancing act between sustainability, rebuilding wild salmon runs, Tribal ceremonial and subsistence fisheries, commercial fisheries, and recreational fisheries. This talk will briefly describe the salmon season setting process, known as North of Falcon, and how this balance isachieved. I will also discuss how in-season monitoring and management is conducted in both the marine and freshwaterenvironment. In the marine areas, acombination of test fishing, boat sampling, and dockside creel sampling are used to collect information on effort and total encounters to ensure fisheries staywithin agreed upon quotas. In thefreshwater areas, salmon can be counted at designated choke points as they moveup the river, allowing managers to estimate the total number of fish that willreach spawning grounds. For each ofthese systems, I will discuss the specific methods used, challenges faced, andproposed ideas to expand monitoring. Withincreasing population size and more pressure on the environment and naturalresources than ever, effective management is critical, and will only beaccomplished through effective monitoring of these resources. Subscribe to theNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

21 March 2022

Title: In search of bioluminescent milky seas with the VIIRS Day/Night Band
Presenter(s): Dr Steve Miller, Director, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Professor, Department of Atmospheric Science. Colorado State University
Date & Time: 21 March 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: In search of bioluminescent milky seas with the VIIRS Day/Night Band

Presenter(s): Dr Steve MillerDirector, Cooperative Institute for Research in theAtmosphere Professor, Department of Atmospheric Science. ColoradoState University

Sponsor(s): NOAA JPSS Program

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/krn-qfqh-cdfPhone Numbers(US)+1 617-675-4444PIN: 961 312 714 6504#

Abstract: Anew generation of low-light sensing satellites has demonstrated the ability todetect a form of widespread marine bioluminescence. The so-called Milky Sea describes a rarelyencountered phenomenon thought to be caused by luminous bacteria. The widespread and steady nature of the glow impartsa "snowfield" effect to large swaths of the ocean surface at night. Captured in the seafaring adventure novels TwentyThousand Leagues under the Seas and Moby Dick, but never on film, MilkySeas remain a modern-day science mystery in terms of their formationmechanisms, structure, composition, life-cycle, and climatological implications.This presentation shows first examples of Milky Seas as detected by theDay/Night Band of the Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), aNOAA-operated satellite sensor on board the Joint Polar Satellite Systemconstellation. We highlight a massive (100,000 square km) Milky Sea thatoccurred south of Java in 2019. The demonstrated capability to observe MilkySeas from the DNB paves the way toward new research and possible physicaldeployment to an event in-progress, bringing scientific closure to along-standing mystery of the high seas, and fantastic tale of maritime lore!

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18 March 2022

Title: March 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy
Date & Time: 18 March 2022
4:00 pm - 4:45 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: March 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR and Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov), NOAA/OAR ClimateProgram Office,
Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu) & Danielle Meeker (demeeker@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/march-2022-nws-briefing/

Abstract: We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for April 2022 and the early spring season. Join the gathering online to learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.



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17 March 2022

Title: Living Between a Rock and Hard Place: Microbial Life in the Deep sea and Potential Impacts of Deep-sea Mining
Presenter(s): Dr. Beth N. Orcutt, Senior Research Scientist, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences
Date & Time: 17 March 2022
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Living Between a Rock and Hard Place: Microbial Life in the Deep sea and Potential Impacts of Deep-sea Mining

Presenter(s): Dr. Beth N. Orcutt, Senior Research Scientist, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3355845148214339087

Abstract: The global market for rare minerals is growing rapidly, which is driving interest in mining these resources from the seafloor as part of the emergent deep-sea mining industry. The recent National Strategy for Mapping, Exploring, and Characterizing the United States Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) prioritizes mapping, exploration and characterization of seafloor resources, including those enriched in critical minerals. In partnership with the Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument (PMNM) and Ocean Exploration Trust, Dr. Orcutt is characterizing mineral and microbial resources of unexplored seamounts within the Monument. She recently had the great honor to participate in the Luuaeaahikiikapapak expedition to explore the Voyager Seamounts in southwestern PMNM, and in April she will be the Lead Scientist on E/V Nautilus expedition Luuaeaahikiikekumu to explore seamounts of the Liliuokalani Ridge in the northwestern PMNM. While the Monument is protected from deep-sea mining activities, this research contributes to the conservation and management of these marine resources within the US EEZ, provides a comparison baseline for similar habitats just outside the US EEZ that might be targeted for resource exploitation, and improves general knowledge of microbial resources and ecosystem services in seamount habitats. In this talk Dr. Orcutt will review what is known about microbes eking out an existence in the deep sea between a rock and a hard place, highlight recent discoveries from the deep sea of the Monument, and discuss what the potential impacts of deep-sea mining could be.This presentation is part of the Third Thursday By the Bay Presentation Series at Mokuppapa Discovery Center, which is the visitor center for Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument in Hilo, Hawaii. This State of the Monument lecture series is also supported by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation through a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: The NOAA Precipitation Prediction Grand Challenge - An Historic R2O Opportunity
Presenter(s): Dr. David Novak, Director, NOAA/NWS Weather Prediction Center
Date & Time: 17 March 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The NOAA Precipitation Prediction Grand Challenge - An Historic R2O Opportunity
Part of the Unified Forecast System (UFS) Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. David Novak, Director, NOAA/NWS Weather Prediction Center

Sponsor(s): Office of Science and Technology Integration (OSTI) Modeling Division, National Weather Service of NOAA. If you would like to recommend a speaker and topic please email:
ufs.modeling@noaa.gov and provide information on speaker and topic along with email addresses of speakers.

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Mackell (stacy.mackell@noaa.gov) and Caroline Delgado (caroline.delgado@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/6980235688648784143

Abstract: The impacts from extreme precipitation are deadly, damaging, and increasing in a warming climate. Knowing when it will rain and how much will fall is crucial to every person and business in the U.S. Further, precipitation processes are an integration of many atmospheric processes and have direct impacts to the ocean, ecosystems, hydrology and the cryosphere. Thus, precipitation is a unifying theme across the Weather, Water, and Climate communities. However, partner expectations of accuracy, specificity, and lead time often exceed current capabilities. Further, NOAA models (global models in particular) have seen marginal improvement in precipitation skill (~15%) over the past 2 decades. In response, NOAA has developed a strategy for a decadal effort to improve forecast precipitation (from mesoscale weather to seasonal timescales) - called the NOAA Precipitation Prediction Grand Challenge. The goal of this effort is to dramatically improve precipitation forecasts in terms of accuracy, extent in time, and reliability. The challenge demands investment across the value chain from basic understanding of precipitation processes and predictability limits, to enhanced observations, data assimilation, improved models, post-processing and tools for the human forecaster, culminating in understandable, actionable, and equitable services -- these services being informed by stakeholder engagement. Thus, it is a grand Research-to-Operations challenge. This initiative and early studies will be described, with attention focused on opportunities for community involvement in R2O.

Bio(s): Dr. David Novak is the Director of the Weather Prediction Center. In this capacity he is responsible for the overall provision of national forecasts of heavy rainfall, snowfall, and hazardous weather up to 7 days in advance. The Center is a catalyst for collaboration among the National Weather Service forecast offices and enables national readiness for extreme weather events " including extreme rainfall events.Throughout his academic and professional career, David has been involved with collaborative research, bringing operational needs to the attention of the research community and integrating promising research into operations.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:All PowerPoints and recordings from past webinars can be accessed at the UFS webinar web page.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Trent Ford | Illinois State Climatologist
Date & Time: 17 March 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook

Presenter(s): Trent Ford | Illinois State Climatologist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

March 2022 topics include major winter events (or lack thereof for many), drought degradation (mostly) with few improvements including continued and increasing risk for drought mainly west of the Missouri River; recent and potential climate/weather impacts including but not limited to continuing La Nia and what it could mean for the region, winter soil moisture update and recharge outlook, Great Lakes & riverine conditions (including ice jams, lack of ice, high/low flows), and lack of mountain, plains and midwest snow (most areas); and the latest trends and outlooks for precipitation, temperature and snow potential through spring and summer (2 weeks to 6 months).

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7528179497868100876

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

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Title: Five Years “Measuring the Muck”: evaluation of extensive tidal flooding biochemical characterization
Presenter(s): Alfonso Macas Tapia, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of Education
Date & Time: 17 March 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Five Years Measuring the Muck: evaluation of extensive tidal flooding biochemical characterization (2022 Knauss Fellows Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Alfonso Macas Tapia, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of Education

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Abstract: With the increase in sea level rise and its localized acceleration in some areas, tidal flooding is both a recurrent and increasing problem for coastal communities. Few studies exist that analyze the biochemical implications of these events on the adjacent estuary and even more scarce are those that do it spatially and temporally extensively. Here I present the data for a multi-year (2017-2020) project in which citizen-science volunteers collected floodwater samples on areas affected by flooding during fall perigean spring tide events. During the talk I will focus on result on floodwater biochemical characterization, the poten