NOAA Center for Satellite Applications and Research banner
 

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Past 2022 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

1 January 2022

Title: NOAA Science Seminar Series Google calendar template
Presenter(s): Presenter Name, Title, Affiliation, here, at the very bottom of the description, inside of curly brackets. No parentheses inside these curly brackets - also NO E-MAIL ADDRESSES or WEB LINKS
Date & Time: 1 January 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Seminar Title here
Name of contributing seminar series here

Presenter(s):
Presenter(s) name(s), job title(s), and affiliation(s) here.
May also include co-authors below presenter info. DO NOT PUT WEB LINKS or E-MAILs under this heading.

Sponsor(s):
Sponsoring organization names.

Seminar Contact(s):
Seminar organizer(s) contact information here; include email at a minimum.

Remote Access:
This heading is for registration, login links, audio directions, passcodes, conference phone numbers, user support, and any other remote-access-related content. PUT WEBINAR URLs in this section ONLY.

Accessibility:
Accessibility information (e.g., captioning, Sign Language interpreter) should be included here.

Abstract:
Place abstract for talk here. Ideally, abstract should be less than 200 words. Should be drafted as a guide to possible attendees, not a formal technical abstract.

Bio(s):
Place speaker bio information here, please keep it brief, under 200 words.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
Supply links here for slides, recordings, and any other supporting materials. You may also note here that materials will be linked here after the seminar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:

Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

4 January 2022

Title: The Missing Layers: Integrating Sociocultural Values into Marine Spatial Planning
Presenter(s): Maria Grazia Pennino, Instituto Espaol de Oceanografa, IEO, CSIC
Date & Time: 4 January 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Missing Layers: Integrating Sociocultural Values into Marine Spatial PlanningYou may view this recording thru adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p9y957adxhy2/

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Maria Grazia Pennino, Instituto Espaol de Oceanografa (IEO, CSIC)Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, coordinator of the NOAA/NOS science seminar series.

Remote Access: Register here: This webinar is over.
After registering, you will receive an email with a login link.You may enter the webinar via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use the IE browser.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download it but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download info is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register here:
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided

Abstract:
Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) is a relatively new approach to ocean management and has been widely implemented worldwide.Ideally, MSP should be established as a public process that analyses anddistributes human activities across space and time to achieve ecological, economic and social goals, which historically have been accomplished exclusively in the political arena. However, in most cases MSP seems to bedriven primarily by economic interests rather than by sociocultural goals. Duringthe seminary, I'll discuss how integrating the missing sociocultural layers into MSP can help to reduce governance rigidity, promote adaptability indecision-making, support environmental justice, and improve MSP acceptance anduptake.
In particular, we focus on identifying possible points of connectionbetween MSP and frameworks based on social-ecological system theory, includingco-management and other democratic and empowering alternatives. Bridging the gap between the dominant economic rhetoric and a de facto sociocultural-ecological system approach, we are likely to improve the chances of the MSP process succeeding on both the human and nature fronts.

Bio(s): Maria Grazia Pennino is a marine biologist, with a master's degree in Biostatistic and a PhD in Mathematics & Statistics. She is currently a researcher at the Instituto Espaol de Oceanografa (IEO, CSIC), (Vigo, Spain). Her research focuses on understanding patterns and processes that characterize marine ecosystems, particularly related with marine resources and ecosystem services, to have a direct application on conservation and management measures. She studies the spatio-temporal dynamics of marine resources related to human activities
(such as fishing, climate change and invasive species) and how these translate into changes in ecosystem functioning. She develops and apply a variety statistical tools to analyse historical data, fisheries statistics, experimental results and field data sets. Slides / Recording: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

5 January 2022

Title: The Commissioning of Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich, the next-generation radar altimeter
Presenter(s): Eric Leuliette, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 5 January 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Note: This seminar will be presented online only.

Presenter(s): Eric Leuliette, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s):
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

Abstract: NOAA's latest partnered satellite radar altimeter, Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich (S6MF),entered routine operations on November 29 after a planned 12-month commissioning. STAR scientists supported the commissioning through leading multiple cal/val teams, completing cal/val work packages, and critical new algorithm development. These cal/val efforts are essential to NOAA users of sea level, wave heights, and wind speeds, and for a wide range of applications from marine wave and wind hazard warnings, hurricane intensity forecasting, coast inundation, marine debris mitigation, and fisheries management.Sentinel-6 was designed to operate in two altimeter modes, Low-Rate and High-Rate, which increased the complexity of the commissioning compared to its predecessor missions in the TOPEX/Jason series. During the development of Sentinel-6, NOAA Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry played a critical role that ensured that altimeter would interleave these modes to provide continuity in the sea surface record, which is essential to the goals of monitoring long-term sea level rise.In the seminar, STAR's unique contributions to the commissioning are highlighted. These include the application of a STAR-developed algorithm, Fully-Focused SAR, in the absolute range calibration. More critically, STAR scientists identified, developed, and delivered a critical correction in wave heights.

Bio(s): Dr. Eric Leuliette is the Branch Chief of the Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry (LSA) in the NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) in College Park, Maryland. The branch includes STAR's Sea Surface Height and Sea Ice science teams. As the NOAA Jason Program Scientist and Project Scientist, he co-chairs the Ocean Surface Topography Science Team and the Sentinel-6 Validation Team.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2022/20220105_Leuliette.pdf
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2022/20220105_Leuliette.mp4

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

6 January 2022

Title: Zebrafish: Models for Cancer Research!
Presenter(s): Varat Max Ransibrahmanakul, a second year student at Georgetown University
Date & Time: 6 January 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording of this webinar thru adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pyxoarg0bhbh/

Title: Zebrafish: Models for Cancer Research!

Presenter(s):
Varat Max Ransibrahmanakul, a second year student Georgetown UniversityWhen: January 6, 12-1pm ET

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, coordinator of the NOAA/NOS science seminar series.

Remote Access: Register here:
This webinar is over.
After registering, you will receive an email with a login link.You may enter the webinar via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use the IE browser.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download it but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download info is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register here:
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided

Abstract:
When you think about cancer research and testing cancer therapies on models what models come to mind? For most people, mice come to mind. However, did you know that zebrafish can be just as effective if not better models than mice? Zebrafish share most of the same types of organs and cells as the human body. They have 70 percent of our genes, and 84 percent of the genes we exhibit that are associated with human disease have a zebrafish counterpart! This allows scientists to optimize zebrafish as a model for studying cancer types and therapies to treat them. Due to the many similarities between zebrafish and humans, we can isolate a sample cancer tissue in a zebrafish, observe its development in embryos, and treat it as if it were present in the human body. Another large appeal to the use of zebrafish as models for cancer research is their availability and accessibility. Scientists can choose to breed different genotypes of zebra fish with ease by simply taking different genotypes of zebrafish together in the same tank and obtaining the eggs of this cross. In addition, zebrafish are extremely inexpensive and obtaining more zebrafish for a controlled experiment is easy, given that we can mate them and isolate their eggs for further study! They mature much faster than mice for example, and they are easy to study given the transparency of their embryos. Zebrafish as models for cancer study offer a plethora of benefits for biomedical research. I look forward to talking about the methods we use in the lab to optimize the methods in which we can treat specific patients with various types of cancer!

Bio(s): Max Ransi is a second year student at Georgetown University. He works in a lab under Principle Investigator Dr. Eric Glasgow where they use zebrafish as models for studying cancer tissue. Max is excited to get together with everyone and talk about the intersections between marine science and biomedical science!

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Climate adaptation and mitigation: Benefits and risks of marine carbon dioxide removal
Presenter(s): Jessica Cross, PhD, Research Oceanographer, NOAA/OAR Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
Date & Time: 6 January 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Climate adaptation and mitigation: Benefits and risks of marine carbon dioxide removal

Presenter(s):
Jessica Cross, PhD, Research Oceanographer, NOAA/OAR Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NMFS.NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam


Seminar Contact(s):
Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Join WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 904 620 457 Meeting password: JRjC7axBx86
JOIN BY PHONE: 1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free, Access code: 904 620 457
Can't join the meeting? Contact support.

Abstract:
Human-induced climate changes already affect every inhabited region across the globe, with potentially dire consequences for many ecosystems and human communities. Under current emissions trajectories, global surface temperatures will continue to rise. With further warming of the Earth system, every region is projected to experience increasingly concurrent climate extremes, associated with clear impact drivers. Limiting warming to levels that avoid extreme risk requires immediate and substantial reductions of greenhouse emissions, as well as the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. While emissions-reduction approaches are the primary component for addressing this challenge, negative emissions strategies will be essential for keeping global temperatures at or below target levels. Many of these techniques are promising in theory, and have garnered significant attention from venture capital, private companies, and large NGOs interested in offsetting their carbon footprints. This in turn has led to the development of new legislation targeted at developing a US strategy for carbon removal. Despite this emerging interest, all carbon dioxide removal of these techniques are currently in their infancy and require additional research to evaluate their effectiveness and scalability and explore potential co-benefits and environmental risk, as outlined by a December 2021 consensus study from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Mathematics. Here, we will profile marine carbon dioxide removal techniques that are relevant for NOAA and NMFS, discuss how the agency may be called on to engage by the current scope of legislation, and provide an opportunity for discussion.

Bio(s): Dr.Jessica Cross is a research oceanographer with NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, where she leads the Alaska ocean carbon observing footprint for NOAA. Dr. Cross has worked in Alaska for the entire span of her career, first studying the carbon system at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, then ocean acidification impacts through the former Cooperative Institute for Alaska Research, branching into applications new technology for Arctic Research at PMEL, and now exploring climate mitigation strategies by exploring carbon dioxide removal.
She leads the NOAA Carbon Dioxide removal task force with elected chairs Dr.s Dwight Gledhill and Colm Sweeney and serves as its primary encyclopedia. If you are interested in participating in the Task Force, it is an open, volunteer effort that meets every other Friday to discuss recent CDR news and understand NOAA's role in the rapidly developing CDR space. You can sign up at https://bit.ly/323PL7Y.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Introducing Casal2 for Assessments (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)
Presenter(s): Ian Doonan, PhD, Population Modelling Group, National Institute of Water and Atmosphere Research, New Zealand
Date & Time: 6 January 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Introducing Casal2 for Assessments (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s):
Ian Doonan, PhD, Population Modelling Group, National Institute of Water andAtmosphere Research (NIWA), New Zealand.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s):
Kristan Blackhart and Library Seminars

Abstract:
Casal2is replacing CASAL, New Zealand's stock assessment package written in 2001. CASAL implements integrated assessments, but it has hard-wired fisheries structures that makes introducing newer concepts impossible. Casal2 was written so that it is easily maintained, and we can implement new concepts. Currently, Casal2 can replicated most features of CASAL, apart from little used ones, and it gives the same parameter estimates as CASAL over a suite of test assessments. Following a review of Casal2's capabilities, an assessment in Casal2 will be demonstrated.Keywords: Casal2,integrated assessment package


Bio(s):
Ian completed a PhD in quantum chemistry at Canterbury University, New Zealand, before moving into fisheries. He has broad experience in the quantitative side of fisheries including survey design, statistical consulting, and stock assessments on deep water species, like orange roughy. In the past, Ian was group manager of the Population Modelling, Voyage Leader for acoustic surveys, and managed the fisheries software development, which included Casal2. He is no longer active in management.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

11 January 2022

Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Hourly Precipitation Trends in the Southeast
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia, Vincent Brown, SCIPP/Louisiana State University
Date & Time: 11 January 2022
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Hourly Precipitation Trends in the SE

Presenter(s):
Climate Overview: Sandra Rayne | Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur/Todd Hamill | NWS Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox | University of Georgia

Spotlight: Hourly Precipitation Trends in the Southeast: Vincent Brown | SCIPP/Louisiana State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Remote Access: Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/7416485623755069963

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NIDIS, (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

The January 11 webinar will now feature a presentation on hourly precipitation trends in the Southeast.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Using Visualization Science to Improve Expert and Public Understanding of Probabilistic Temperature and Precipitation Outlooks
Presenter(s): Dr. Melissa Kenney, Director of Research and Knowledge Initiatives, Research Faculty, Environmental Decision Science, University of Minnesota, Institute on the Environment; Dr. Michael Gerst, Associate Research Professor, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland College Park; Jon Gottschalck, NOAA/NCEP/CPC Chief, Operational Prediction Branch
Date & Time: 11 January 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Using Visualization Science to Improve Expert and Public Understanding of Probabilistic Temperature and Precipitation Outlooks


Presenter(s):
Dr. Melissa Kenney, Director of Research and Knowledge Initiatives
Research Faculty, Environmental Decision Science, University of Minnesota, Institute on the Environment (IonE)
Dr. Michael Gerst, Associate Research Professor, University of Maryland College Park, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center and Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites-Maryland
Jon Gottschalck, NOAA/NCEP/CPC Chief, Operational Prediction Branch


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Climate Program Office and Climate Prediction Center

Seminar Contact(s):
Amanda Speciale (amanda.speciale@noaa.gov)
Nancy Beller-Simms (nancy.beller-simms@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1450269450708856592

Abstract:

Embedding science in decision support tools and representing it in public communications has long been a challenge. This is partly because most scientific information is infused with multiple trends or patterns. Moreover, how to simplify visualizations is often unclear because lack of stakeholder engagement makes it difficult to know which trend or pattern should be highlighted as the key message. As a result, multiple trends are often shown, leading to complicated scientific graphics being reproduced for public use. The existence of uncertainty further complicates use of scientific information because it adds at least one extra variable to be considered and displayed, and decision-makers or the public are less accustomed to reasoning with scientific uncertainty.

Over the past few years, we have been investigating these problems for global change, climate, and water information provided by, respectively, the (1) US Global Research Change Program (USGCRP) indicator suite and 3rd National Climate Assessment graphics, (2) temperature and precipitation outlooks produced by the NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC), and (3) water watch, water quality watch, groundwater watch produced by US Geological Survey (USGS). Tackling these problems requires the integration of visualization science, decision science, and design theory. Using focus groups and control/treatment testing, the combination of these scientific fields leads to the ability to better understand user needs, test whether current designs are meeting them, and compare current products against visualizations modified by best practice design principles.

Our results show that this three-step process can identify problems with current visualizations that are fixable within the typical constraints of legacy scientific products, such as a large engaged user base and being embedded within established institutional workflows. Furthermore, we outline how the process is scalable and customizable to the needs of organizations and their users and to the specifics of visualization products.

This research is funded by NOAA Climate Prediction Center, NOAA Climate Program Office, and USGS Water Mission Area.

Bio(s):
Dr. Melissa Kenney: Dr. Kenney is Director of Research and Knowledge Initiatives at the University of Minnesota's Institute on the Environment where she leads the institute's impact goal initiatives on carbon neutrality, sustainable land use, and safe drinking water. Dr. Kenney is also an environmental decision scientist with expertise in multidisciplinary, team-based science approaches to solving sustainability challenges. Her research team conducts multidisciplinary social science research to increase the use of evidence in climate adaptation and mitigation, ecosystem resilience, interdependent infrastructure decisions, and water quality management. The goal of her program is to understand and improve the processes and tools that aid these decisions, both in the public and private sectors. Notably she has worked to improve the understandability of high-profile indicators and data products produced by the Federal government for the public. She earned a Ph.D. from Duke University, focusing on water quality modeling and decision analysis.

Dr. Michael D. Gerst is an Associate Research Professor at the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center at the University of Maryland (ESSIC). His scientific work is motivated by helping stakeholders identify problems and solutions at the intersection of the environment, technology, and society. As a result of the complexity of these issues, his approach is rooted in systems, data, and decision science, which together allow for a holistic understanding of current knowledge so that stakeholders may assess trade-offs and risks of potential solutions. Dr. Gerst's research portfolio has ranged from participatory development of global change indicators, cost-benefit analysis under uncertainty, life-cycle analysis, and scenario planning to designing and testing the efficacy of visualizations. His application areas have spanned climate change mitigation, food-energy-water nexus, critical materials, healthcare systems, and corporate sustainability. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University, focusing on industrial ecology and techno-economic systems analysis.

Mr. Jon Gottschalck currently works at the Climate Prediction Center (CPC, since 2004) within NOAA's National Weather Service. He is the Chief of the Operational Prediction Branch within CPC and is responsible for outlining the overall direction of operational forecast-related activities. Prior to this, Mr. Gottschalck served as CPC Head of Forecast Operations where he was responsible for overseeing day-to-day routine production and dissemination of CPC's operational forecast products. Mr. Gottschalck also served as the CPC Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) operational team lead that was responsible for managing MJO monitoring, assessment, and outlook activities and their associated impacts both globally and for the U.S. while coordinating the weekly production of the CPC Global Tropics Hazards Outlook. Mr. Gottschalck earned both a B.S. and M.S. degree in meteorology from the Pennsylvania State University in 1994 and 1996 respectively. Prior to CPC, Mr. Gottschalck worked at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami from 1997-2001 and at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center from 2001-2004.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:

Coming soon

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Building the environmental science toolbox to address the complexity of exposures and effects of emerging contaminants
Presenter(s): Rebecca Klaper, Vice Dean, Professor, Director of the Great Lakes Genomics Center, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
Date & Time: 11 January 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Building the environmental science toolbox to address the complexity of exposures and effects of emerging contaminants

Presenter(s): Rebecca Klaper, Vice Dean, Professor, Director of the Great Lakes Genomics Center " University of Wisconsin Milwaukee


Sponsor(s):
NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (NOAA GLERL) and the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR)


Seminar Contact(s):
Mary Ogdahl, ogdahlm@umich.edu

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7755657474861761551

Abstract:
As a human population we use and are exposed to hundreds of chemicals each day, many of which are ultimately emitted into aquatic and terrestrial systems where other organisms are in turn exposed to these same chemicals. Assessing the impact of these chemicals in the environment has been a complex problem. Chemical composition and concentration vary over time and space and contaminants often occur as mixtures and therefore are difficult to characterize. Assessing the risk from these exposures is equally complex as research has shown that chronic low-level exposures have impacts on biochemical pathways that were not normally considered when evaluating safety. In addition, any one compound may occur at a dose that is below a traditional threshold of harm, yet the timing of exposure or exposure to a combination of chemicals ultimately can cause an effect. New chemicals in the marketplace, such as nanomaterials or new pharmaceuticals, present new questions as to their biological interactions and how best to determine their potential environmental impact. Research over the last 20 years has transformed the toolbox available to the field of environmental science to determine the extent to which these emerging contaminants impact organisms in aquatic environments. This presentation will discuss the innovations being made, through for example genomic technologies and in vitro screening, that advance our understanding of the interaction of emerging contaminants and organisms across phyla. Linking these technologies to environmental studies further builds the toolbox that can be used to better determine the safety of new chemicals and their environmental impact across organisms and ecosystems.

Bio(s):
Rebecca D. Klaper is the Vice Dean and a Professor at the School of Freshwater Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Professor Klaper studies the potential impact of emerging contaminants, such as nanoparticles and pharmaceuticals on aquatic life and how we may design these chemicals to have the least environmental impact. In addition, she has examined the transport of these chemicals through the wastewater treatment systems and into the environment and how different treatment technologies may remove them from the waste stream. Her research links the impact of these chemicals on the health of aquatic species to that of human health. She uses genomic technologies to determine how these chemical stressors may impact organisms and how the biochemical response may dictate sensitivity or resistance to stressors. As Director of the Great Lakes Genomics Center she seeks to support other researchers that are using genomic technologies for environmental research. Prof. Klaper has received a Fulbright Scholarship (U.K., 2017-2018) and a AAAS-Science and Technology Policy Fellowship. She has served as an invited scientific expert to both the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative and the international Organization for Economic and Cooperative Development panel on nanotechnology, the Alliance for the Great Lakes and the International Joint Commission regarding the potential impacts of nanomaterials, pharmaceuticals and personal care products and other emerging contaminants. She has served on the National Academies Panel on the Environmental Impact of Currently Marketed Sunscreens and Potential Human Impacts of Changes in Sunscreen Usage and another to Develop a Research Strategy for Environmental, Health, and Safety Aspects of Engineered Nanomaterials as well as the U.S. EPA Board of Scientific Counselors committee on Chemical Safety and Sustainability. Prof. Klaper received her Ph.D. in Ecology from the Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia.

Recordings:
Recording will be made available shortly after the seminar at: https://ciglr.seas.umich.edu/event/011122-rebecca-klaper/


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:

Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php
Title: PAcific cod Tagging (PACT) in Alaskan waters with Pop-up Satellite Archival Tags (PSAT): Developing the PACT Team Seminar
Presenter(s): Susanne McDermott, AFSC RACE GAP
Date & Time: 11 January 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
PAcific cod Tagging (PACT) in Alaskan waters with Pop-up Satellite Archival Tags (PSAT): Developing the PACT Team

Presenter(s):
Susanne McDermott, AFSC RACE GAP
Collaborators: Julie Nielsen (Kingfisher Marine Research), Liz Dawson (AFSC RACE GAP), Rebecca Haehn (AFSC RACE GAP), Kimberly Rand (Lynker Technologies), Charlotte Levy (Aleutian East Borough Natural Resources), Dawn Wehde (Norton Sound Economic Development Corporation), Steve Barbeaux (AFSC-REFM), Ingrid Spies (AFSC-REFM), Charlotte Levy (Aleutian East BoroughNatural Resources), David Bryan (AFSC RACE), Bianca Prohaska (AFSC RACE GAP)

Sponsor(s):
AFSC Special Seminar

Seminar Contact(s):
Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m4e753d37355432546c3b3b45f2aae545
Join by phone


+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
+1-929-251-9612 USA Toll 2
Access code: 2763 063 5982


Abstract:
Warming ocean conditions in recent years have resulted in dramatic shifts in abundance and a northward shift in summer distribution of Pacific cod into the Northern Bering Sea. The Pacific Cod Tagging Team (PACT) has examined the seasonal distribution of Pacific cod with Popup Satellite tags. These tags make it possible to determine movement path and movement behavior of individual fish. We will share results from recent tag releases in the Bering Sea and the Western Gulf of Alaska. Pacific cod have been observed to cross management boundaries and travel distances of up to 1,200 miles from spawning to foraging areas.

Bio(s):
Susanne McDermott is a research fisheries biologist at theAlaska Fisheries Science Center where she has studied abundance estimation,ecology, and life history of Alaskan groundfish since 2003. Susanne was born in Germany where shecompleted her undergraduate work at the University of Tuebingen. She completed her Masters and PhD. inFisheries at the University of Washington School of Aquatic and FisheriesScience in Seattle. Susanne has conducted fish tagging studies since 2003 onseveral Alaskan groundfish. Satellitetagging of Pacific cod has been her most recent research focus where she hasworked collaboratively with AFSC scientists, other research partners and thefishing industry to establish the PACT (Pacific cod tagging program) in Alaskanwaters.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
TBDSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: ​Exploring NOAA Fisheries' Unique Role in the Marine World
Presenter(s): Janet Coit, Acting Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Deputy Administrator, as well as Assistant Administrator for the National Marine Fisheries Service, NMFS
Date & Time: 11 January 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Exploring NOAA Fisheries' Unique Role in the Marine World
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series. These webinars are open to the public, in or outside of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Presenter(s): Janet Coit, Acting Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Deputy Administrator, as well as Assistant Administrator for NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).

Remote Access: This event will be pre-recorded (no live questions) Watch Now: https://youtu.be/r6GGGnzUX_w

Sponsor(s): This event is part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series with sponsorship from the NOAA Science Council. The NOAA-wide NELS provides examples of NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. The NELS are presented as part of the NOAA Science Seminar Series For NELS questions, contact nels@noaa.gov or any of the NELS Team members: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov, Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov.

Bio(s): Janet Coit was named the new assistant administrator for NOAA Fisheries in June 2021. She has worked on environmental issues, natural resource management, and stewardship for more than 30 years. She directed the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) for more than 10 years, where she focused on improving natural resource conservation, promoting locally grown food, including seafood, and addressing the climate crisis. Coit also chaired Rhode Island's Seafood Marketing Collaborative and worked with stakeholders to promote supplying seafood locally and abroad. At DEM, Coit streamlined the permitting process to support environmental and economic interests in the state. Additionally, she provided more opportunities for families and tourists to connect with nature while enhancing the Department's customer service for all clients, including businesses and the public. Among her top achievements were improving morale at the agency, championing the need for more funding in support of parks and open space, clean water, brownfields remediation, and addressing climate change. Before joining Rhode Island DEM in 2011, Coit was the state director for The Nature Conservancy in Rhode Island for 10 years. Prior to that, she was counsel and environmental coordinator in the Providence office of the late Senator John Chafee and, subsequently, then-Senator Lincoln Chafee. Coit also served as counsel to the U.S. Senate Committee on the Environment and Public Works, where she advised on national environmental policy. Coit is a magna cum laude graduate of Dartmouth College. She holds a law degree from Stanford Law School, where she was president of the Environmental Law Society and a member of the Environmental Law Journal. Source: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/contact/janet-coitRecording: To access the video after the webinar visit the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series.
Notice: Please note that the online service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Sea Level Rise: Around the World and Here at Home
Presenter(s): Dr. Ian Miller, Coastal Hazard Specialist, Washington Sea Grant
Date & Time: 11 January 2022
7:30 pm - 8:30 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Sea Level Rise: Around the World and Here at Home

Presenter(s): Dr. Ian Miller, Coastal Hazard Specialist, Washington Sea Grant

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Abstract: Sea level rise is an impact of climate change and is of special concern to coastal communities around the world. Dr. Ian Miller will talk through the current state of the science as it relates to both observed and projected or future sea level globally, and in the waters around Washington State. Ian works with coastal communities and public agencies on the Olympic Peninsula to strengthen their ability to plan for and manage coastal hazards, including tsunamis, chronic erosion, coastal flooding, and other hazards associated with climate change.

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3352353098137871119

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

12 January 2022

Title: Reckoning with the U.S. Role in Global Ocean Plastic Waste
Presenter(s): Margaret Spring, Chief Conservation and Science Officer, Monterey Bay Aquarium; Jenna Jambeck, Professor, University of Georgia; Michelle Gierach, Senior Scientist, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory; and Mary Donohue, Specialist Faculty, University of Hawai'i Sea Grant College Program
Date & Time: 12 January 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view this recording vis Adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p90zl4xs70lk/Seminar

Title: Reckoning with the U.S. Role in Global Ocean Plastic Waste

Presenter(s):
- Margaret Spring, Chief Conservation and Science Officer, Monterey Bay Aquarium;
- Jenna Jambeck, Professor, University of Georgia;
- Michelle Gierach, Senior Scientist, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory; and
- Mary Donohue, Specialist Faculty, University of Hawai'i Sea Grant College Program

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R) Marine Debris Division and the NOAA/NOS Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts:
Amy.Uhrin@noaa.gov, Chief Scientist, NOAA/NOS/ORR/Marine Debris Division and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, coordinator of the NOAA/NOS science seminar series.

Remote Access: This webinar is over - see link to recording near top.
You may enter the webinar via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use the IE browser.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download it but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download info is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register here:
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided

Abstract:
This talk will provide an overview on the recently released National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report on ocean plastic.An estimated 8 million metric tons (MMT) of plastic waste enters the world's ocean each year - the equivalent of dumping a garbage truckof plastic waste into the ocean every minute. Plastic waste is now found in almost every marine habitat, from the ocean surface to deep sea sediments tothe ocean's vast mid-water region, as well as the Great Lakes. This report responds to a request in the bipartisan Save Our Seas 2.0 Act for a scientific synthesis of the role of the United States both in contributing to and responding to global ocean plastic waste.The United States is a major producer of plastics and in 2016, generated more plastic waste by weight and per capita than any other nation. Although the U.S. solid waste management system is advanced, it is not sufficient to deter leakage into the environment. Reckoning with the U.S. Rolein Global Ocean Plastic Waste calls for a national strategy by the end of 2022 to reduce the nation's contribution to global ocean plastic waste at every step - from production to its entry into the environment, including by substantially reducing U.S. solid waste generation. This report also recommends a nationally-coordinated and expanded monitoring system to track plastic pollution in order to understand the scales and sources of U.S. plastic waste, set reduction and management priorities, and measure progress.

Bio(s):
- Margaret Spring is Chief Conservation and Science Officer atMonterey Bay Aquarium, with decades of experience in environmental law and policy. She oversees the Monterey Bay Aquarium's conservation, science, and markets programs, including Seafood Watch, and coordinates the aquarium's environmental sustainability initiatives. - Dr. Mary Donohue serves as specialist faculty at the University of Hawai'i Sea Grant College Program where she conducts research, extension, communications, and program and project management. She also serves as affiliate faculty at the Environmental Sciences Graduate Program at OregonState.

- Dr. Michelle Gierach is a senior scientist in the Water andEcosystems Group at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Her research interests include analysis andapplication of multispectral and hyperspectral (otherwise referred to as imaging spectroscopy) airborne and spaceborne observations to study synoptic to decadalchanges in the aquatic environment.

- Dr. Jenna Jambeck is a Georgia Athletic Association Distinguished Professor in Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering at the University of Georgia (UGA), Lead of the Center for Circular Materials Management and Circularity Informatics Lab in the New Materials Instituteat the University of Georgia and a National Geographic Fellow.Slides / Recording: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management (EBFM): Progress, Importance, and Impacts in the United States (Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series)
Presenter(s): Dr. Tony Marshak, NOAA, NCCOS
Date & Time: 12 January 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management (EBFM): Progress, Importance, and Impacts in the United States (Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series)

Presenter(s): Dr. Tony Marshak, NOAA, NCCOS

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contact(s): EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov), NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4462794963967362828

Abstract: Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management (EBFM) is rapidly becoming the default approach in global fisheries management. The clarity of what EBFM means is sharpening each year and there is a real need to evaluate progress and assess the effectiveness and impacts. We examine a suite of over 90 indicators (including socioeconomic, governance, environmental forcing, major pressures, systems ecology, and fisheries criteria) for 9 major U.S. fishery ecosystem jurisdictions, and systematically track the progress the country has made toward advancing EBFM to an operational reality. We view this progress as synonymous with improved management of living marine resources in general, with the lessons learned in US systems directly applicable for all parts of the global ocean. Much work still remains, but significant progress has occurred.Keywords: ecosystem-level reference points; systems perspective; socio-ecological system

Bio(s): Dr. Tony Marshak is a Program Analyst in NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). Prior to this role, he worked as a Research Associate in the NMFS Office of Science and Technology, where his duties included co-leading its habitat science program and collaborating with the NMFS Senior Scientist for Ecosystem Management.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Overview of the SPARC Reanalysis Intercomparison Project (S-RIP) during 2013-2022
Presenter(s): Masatomo Fujiwara, Hokkaido University
Date & Time: 12 January 2022
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Overview of the SPARC Reanalysis Intercomparison Project (S-RIP) during 2013-2022

Presenter(s): Masatomo Fujiwara, Hokkaido University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series
SeminarContact: jan.kazil@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7525090985867540747

Abstract: The SPARC (Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate) Reanalysis Intercomparison Project (S-RIP) is a coordinated activity to: (1) compare all (or some of the newer) reanalysis data sets for various key diagnostics in the stratosphere, upper troposphere, and lower mesosphere; (2) understand the causes of differences among reanalyses; (3) provide guidance on the appropriate usage of various reanalysis products in scientific studies; and (4) connect such activities with future improvements in the reanalysis products by establishing collaborative links between the reanalysis centers and the SPARC community. In July 2021, the S-RIP published the Final Report with 12 chapters as early online release.The seminar talk will include:
  1. Introduction: Global atmospheric reanalyses and S-RIP
  2. S-RIP Chapter 2: Description of the reanalysis systems
  3. Examples of the S-RIP evaluation
  4. Key findings and recommendations, and future plans


Bio(s): Masatomo Fujiwara received his PhD degree in 1999 from the University of Tokyo, Japan. He has been Associate Professor of Hokkaido University, Japan, since 2003. In the 1990s to 2000s, his main scientific interest was in the dynamical and chemical processes in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Prof. Fujiware participated in various field campaigns in the tropics, in particular in Indonesia, to make balloon-borne ozone and water-vapor measurements. For the interpretation of these measurement results, he extensively used global-atmospheric reanalysis data. In 2011, he proposed a project, SPARC Reanalysis Intercomparison Project, S-RIP (pronounced as "es rip"), which is the topic of the talk.

Recordings: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2022/Subscribe tothe OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' inthe subject or body. For more, visit the NOAA Science SeminarSeries website.

13 January 2022

Title: NOAA's Uncrewed Aircraft Systems - The Force Multiplier
Presenter(s): CDR Paul Hemmick, Chief, NOAA/OMAO Uncrewed Aircraft Systems (UAS) Division and
LT Shelley Devereaux, Operations Officer, NOAA Ship Fairweather
Date & Time: 13 January 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Feel free to share this with anyone (NOAA or not) who might be interested; thanks!

Title: NOAA's Uncrewed Aircraft Systems - The Force Multiplier

Presenter(s):
CDR Paul Hemmick, Chief, NOAA/OMAO Uncrewed Aircraft Systems (UAS) Division and LT Shelley Devereaux, Operations Officer, NOAA Ship Fairweather

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, coordinator of NOAA science seminar series.

Remote Access: Register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/uasforce/event/registration.html
After registering, you will receive an email with a login link.You may enter via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use IE.
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register here:

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided

Abstract:
NOAA's adoption of Uncrewed Aircraft Systems (UAS) has proven to be a force multiplier in how NOAA field teams address data collection and observations challenges and opportunities. These UAS operations present highly innovative, efficient, capable, and cost effective solutions to acquiring those data compared to traditional survey methodologies. From marine mammal surveys, damage assessment, and coastal mapping to facility inspections, atmospheric profiling, and hurricane research, NOAA UAS efforts are changing the game. As the demand signal for UAS operations increases each year, the UAS Division strives to provide key support in helping grow new programs, facilitate existing mature programs, and build a nimble and evolving community of practice. This discussion will focus on the mission and purpose of the UAS Division, the utility of UAS across the Agency, as well as, showcase a prime example of UAS serving as situational awareness and data collecting tools aboard NOAA vessels provided by LT Shelley Devereaux (NOAA Ship Fairweather).

Bio(s):
CDR Paul Hemmick currently serves as the Chief of NOAA's UAS Division under the Uncrewed Systems Operations Center (OMAO). In this role, he oversees UAS fleet policy, training, safety across NOAA's diverse UAS portfolio of projects, platforms, and pilots. Upon receiving his NOAA Commission in 2004, CDR Hemmick has served in multiple operational and staff level assignments throughout his 17 year career to include a sea tour aboard the NOAA Ship Oregon II, OMAO Headquarters Flag Lieutenant, Space Weather Prediction Center Program Manager, and Turbo Commander pilot for NOAA's most challenging low level aerial survey work.
LT Shelley Devereaux is currently sailing aboard the NOAA Ship Fairweather as the Operations Officer and Senior Watch Officer. She coordinates ship personnel to plan and execute hydrographic survey operations, collecting data to update nautical charts of the Alaskan and West Coast. In this role, LT Devereaux has oversight of bathymetric survey data quality and collection methodology. LT Devereaux served as a Junior Officer aboard NOAA Ship Rainier, where she earned her Hydrographer-in-Charge qualification. Her land assignment was the Hydrographic Systems and Technology Branch technical liaison for West Coast vessels, helping integrate new technologies for hydrographic survey vessels.

Slides / Recording:
Slides, recording and summary of chat will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar. Or email tracy.gill@noaa.gov if interested.

NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Adapting to environmental change: strategies for West Coast shellfish growers
Presenter(s): Melissa Ward, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, San Diego State University
Date & Time: 13 January 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science SeminarSeries

Title: Adapting to environmental change: strategies for West Coast shellfish growers

Presenter(s): Melissa Ward, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, San Diego State University

Sponsor(s): NWFSC's Virtual Monster JamSeminar Contacts: Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.govJoinWebEx meeting
Meeting number: 904 620 457
Meeting password: JRjC7axBx86
JOIN BY PHONE
1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free, Accesscode: 904 620 457
Can't join the meeting? Contactsupport.

ABSTRACTThe shellfish aquaculture industry along the West Coast is particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification (OA), given the negative effects of low pH on shellfish survival and growth. The social-ecological system exemplified by this industry serves as an opportunity to identify and address strategies for local adaptation. Through interviews conducted with West Coast shellfish growers, we find that growers are concerned about OA, among many other environmental stressors such as marine pathogens and water temperature. However, growers are often unable to attribute changes in shellfish survival or health to these environmental factors due to a lack of data and the resources and network required to acquire and interpret these data. From these interviews, we identify a list of adaptive strategies growers employ or would like to employ to improve their overall adaptive capacity to multiple stressors (environmental, economic, political), which together, allow farms to weather periods of OA-induced stress more effectively. In particular we explore the challenges, potential benefits, and science surrounding one adaptive strategy " co-locating shellfish aquaculture with eelgrass. We present recent work suggesting that eelgrass can elevate local pH, positively impacting co-located shellfish. However, implementing such a strategy comes with environmental and management challenges, which we explore here.

BIOGRAPHYMelissa Ward received her PhD from the University of California, Davis and is currently a postdoctoral researcher at San Diego State University. Her research explores natural climate solutions, focusing on the biogeochemical processes associated with coastal carbon cycling and on understanding how human communities can adapt to climate change. Specifically, Melissa's current work investigates the ways in which shellfish aquaculture growers can adapt to ocean acidification, and how eelgrass might facilitate or challenge this adaptation.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science SeminarSeries website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: After the spill: Findings from a decade of GoMRI science
Presenter(s): Emily Maung-Douglass, Ph.D., Louisiana Sea Grant College Program, Oil Spill Science Outreach & Public Engagement Specialist
Date & Time: 13 January 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
After the spill: Findings from a decade of GoMRI science

Presenter(s):
Emily Maung-Douglass, Ph.D., Louisiana Sea Grant College Program, Oil Spill Science Outreach & Public Engagement Specialist

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library and the National Sea Grant OfficeSeminar Contacts: Kelly Samek (kelly.samek@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6048416082531553035

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 24 hours before the event.

Abstract: In 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill occurred approximately 41 miles off Louisiana's coastline, releasing more than 172 million gallons of crude oil into the surrounding waters. Nearly 1.8 million gallons of dispersant were applied at the water's surface and at the wellhead more than one mile down, marking the first use of subsea dispersants. With scientific questions looming due to the unprecedented nature of the spill and response, the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) funded $500 million in spill-related research and outreach activities. As GoMRI wraps up a decade later, we will explore a synthesis of big picture findings. Keywords: Oil spill, Gulf of Mexico, GoMRI

Bio(s):
Emily Maung-Douglass, Ph.D. earned her doctorate in Marine Biosciences at University of Delaware. While there, she volunteered for opportunities in science outreach whenever possible and partnered with the Delaware Center for the Inland Bays on a citizen science project. She put her skills and experiences to use for LSG after working as a visiting science fellow in China. Passionate about connecting people with science, she is part of a multi-Sea Grant team focused on sharing oil spill science.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
A recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: GPSonBM: NSRS Modernization Campaign Continues through 2022
Presenter(s): Galen Scott, Constituent Resources Manager, NOAA/NOS National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 13 January 2022
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: GPSonBM: NSRS Modernization Campaign Continues through 2022

Presenter(s): Galen Scott, NGS; Jacob Heck, NGS; and Mick Heblein, Wisconsin DOT

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. POC: Christine Gallagher, National Geodetic Survey


Abstract: NGS has extended the cut-off date for GPS on Bench Mark data to be submitted for use in the 2022 Transformation Tool until December 31st, 2022. This webinar will feature guest stars describing how they made record breaking progress in 2021 and a look forward to some exciting plans for continuing the momentum through 2022.

Technical Content Rating: Intermediate - Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Coordinating the Giant: The Earth Prediction Innovation Center
Presenter(s): Maoyi Huang, PhD, NOAA/OAR Earth Prediction Innovation Center - EPIC
Date & Time: 13 January 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Coordinating the Giant: The Earth Prediction Innovation Center - EPIC

Presenter(s): Maoyi Huang, PhD, NOAA/OAR Earth Prediction Innovation Center (EPIC)

Sponsor(s): Office of Science and Technology Integration (OSTI) Modeling Division, National Weather Service of NOAA. If you would like to recommend a speaker and topic please email: ufs.modeling@noaa.gov and provide information on speaker and topic along with email addresses of speakers.

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Mackell (stacy.mackell@noaa.gov) and Caroline Delgado (caroline.delgado@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/3699451321039575823

Abstract: The Weather Research and Forecasting Innovation Act of 2017 (WRFIA) instructs NOAA to prioritize improving weather data, modeling, computing, forecasting and warnings for the protection of life and property and for the enhancement of the national economy.
The National Integrated Drought Information System Reauthorization Act of 2018 (NIDISRA) instructs NOAA to establish the Earth Prediction Innovation Center (EPIC) to accelerate community-developed scientific and technological enhancements into the operational applications for numerical weather prediction (NWP) with the following responsibilities:1. Leveraging the weather enterprise to provide expertise on removing barriers to improving numerical weather prediction;
2. Enabling scientists and engineers to effectively collaborate in areas important for improving operational global NWP skill, including model development, data assimilation techniques, systems architecture integration, and computational efficiencies;
3. Strengthening NOAA's ability to undertake research projects in pursuit of substantial advancements in weather forecast skill;
4. Utilizing and leverage existing resources across NOAA's enterprise;
5. Creating a community global weather research modeling system that is; 1) Accessible by the public; 2) Meets basic end-user requirements for running on public computers and networks located outside of secure NOAA information and technology systems; and; 3) Utilizes, whenever appropriate and cost-effective, innovative strategies and methods, including cloud-based computing capabilities, for hosting and management of part or all of the system described in this subsectionA fundamental question is how EPIC will accelerate the rate of transitioning innovative research and development into NOAA NWP operational applications. This presentation will highlight several important cultural, organizational and technological developments in the past several years within and external to NOAA that position EPIC to be successful in the near term and in the long term.

Bio(s): Dr. Maoyi Huang is the Earth Prediction Innovation Center Program Manager with the NOAA/OAR Weather Program Office (WPO). Maoyi worked in the National Weather Service's Office of Science and Technology Integration as COASTAL Act Program Manager, and the lead of land, water, coastal and cross-cutting infrastructure program areas before joining WPO. Prior to NOAA, Maoyi was a senior research scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory from 2010-2020, and faculty member at the State University of New York at Buffalo from 2008-2009. Maoyi holds a BS in Geography from Sun Yat-sen University, MS in Atmospheric Sciences from Peking University, and a MS and PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering from University of California at Berkeley. She has authored over 100 peer reviewed articles on topics ranging from observational studies of the terrestrial hydrological and ecosystems to modeling studies using an Earth system modeling approach.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
All the powerpoints and recordings from past webinars can be accessed at the UFS webinar web page.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Toolbox - CoastWatch Data Portal and Vertigo
Presenter(s): Michael Soracco and Peter Hollemans, NOAA
Date & Time: 13 January 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: CoastWatch Toolbox Demonstration - Data Portal and other tools, plus an Intro to Vertigo - a new CoastWatch tool!

Presenter(s): Michael Soracco, RIVA Solutions and Peter Hollemans, Terrenus Earth Sciences-

Sponsor(s): NOAA CoastWatch

Remote Access: Join from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/702621341

You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3116; Canada: +1 (647) 497-9373 Access Code: 702-621-341



Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Abstract: The CoastWatch seminar series will feature 2 speakers per month on CoastWatch-related topics. Talks may be general or technical, concern operations or products, and will always be of interest to the CoastWatch user community and anyone interested in delivery of NOAA operational or experimental services.

The CoastWatch Data Portal is a collection of services that facilitate access and use of data. The Portal's map viewer is an online tool that allows visualization and exploration of many satellite oceanographic datasets leveraging services provided by THREDDS and ERDDAP. The portal viewer provides the ability to find data covering an area of interest, compare data from different time periods, subset and download data, plot point time-series, and much more.

Vertigo is a tool that is currently available in a beta form to everyone including NOAA users. The goal of the Vertigo project is to create an intuitive application for scientific data search and display. This tool is not yet advertised on the CoatWatch website but is on Github:https://github.com/phollemans/vertigo and feedback on it is requested.

Vertigo ties together scientific data of any kind from different data servers in a virtual globe environment and currently supports any THREDDS, ERDDAP, or OPeNDAP servers, CF-compliant NetCDF files including level 2 data, or tiled web map servers such as the STAR OCView (static images) site or ArcGIS and other tiled web map servers (dynamic images). The current development (beta 0.7 on the github link above) has these changes since the last 0.6 beta release:
- Reorganization of the source code so that users can build and run their own copy of the latest beta version (instructions on Github)
- Error logging window now available from within the application to help with beta development and user feedback
- Added support for Mercator projection on ellipsoid Earth model (previously just spherical Earth)
- Fixed window size and empty Earth display issues under Windows

Speaker

Bio(s): Michael Soracco, RIVA Solutions for NOAA, is the HelpDesk Coordinator for NOAA CoastWatch. He specializes in user access by developing and maintaining data products, the "data portal" and the CoastWatch helpdesk. He has served as a commissioned officer in the NOAA Corps where assignments included servicing equatorial moored buoys, conducting hydrographic surveys, and as a NESDIS operations officer. He supports CoastWatch through user engagement, training, and product development.

Peter Hollemans, Terrenus Earth Sciences, has been contracted to NOAA via RIVA Solutions and has been with NOAA's CoastWatch Central since 1997. He writes software for data processing, access, and visualization.
Slides, Recordings Other Materials: available upon request

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php

Title: Coral Reef Conserv. Program's Data Management, Archiving, and Compliance
Presenter(s): Brian Beck, CRCP NCEI
Date & Time: 13 January 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: An Overview of NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program's data management, archiving and compliance

Presenter(s): Brian Beck, Sarah O'Connor, Rebecca Wenker, and Lalitha Asirvadam (National Centers for Environmental Information)

Bio(s): Our presenters make up the CRCP Coral Data Management Team and sit in the National Centers for Environmental Information. One of their main roles is to track, manage, catalog, archive and publish all products that are produced through CRCP funding.

Sponsor(s): Coral Reef Conservation Program

Seminar contact: Caroline Donovan, caroline.donovan@noaa.gov

Remote Access: AdobeConnect
1. To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/
2. Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: This presentation will give an overview of several aspects of CRCP data management. Starting with an overview of the data management policies that all CRCP funded projects must follow, we will provide guidance on structuring data, how to submit data to the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) for archival, submitting journal articles and other publications to the NOAA Institutional Repository (IR) and 508 compliance. This presentation will be recorded so it can be used in the future for a reference.

NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

14 January 2022

Title: Discussion of Future Phragmites Research & Management – we want your input!
Presenter(s): Judith S. Weis, Professor Emerita, Rutgers Univ; Erik Kiviat, Executive Director, Hudsonia; Mollie R. Yacano, PhD Candidate, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Dennis Whigham, Senior Botanist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center; and Tom Mozdzer, Professor, Bryn Mawr College
Date & Time: 14 January 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Discussion of Future Phragmites Research & Management " we want your input!
A NOAA seminar series - Rethinking the Common Reed Grass - Phragmites
Please invite anyone that might be interested!
If you have questions you would like to submit for consideration for discussion, please send them to Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov by Friday morning, 1/14/22, 11am ET, and please put "Phragmites Questions" in the subject line of your email.


Presenter(s): Panelists include:
  • Judith S. Weis, Professor Emerita, Rutgers University;
  • Erik Kiviat, Executive Director, Hudsonia;
  • Mollie R. Yacano, PhD Candidate, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill;
  • Dennis Whigham, Senior Botanist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center;
  • Tom Mozdzer, Professor, Bryn Mawr College; and
  • Karina V.R. Schfer, Ecosystem Ecologist, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National OceanService (NOS) Science Seminar Series Seminar Contacts: Tracy Gill (NOAA/NOSscience seminar coordinator) and
Judith Weis, Professor Emerita, Rutgers University

Remote Access: Register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/phragmites7/event/registration.html
After registering, you will receive an email with a login link.You may enter via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. If entering via browser, PC Windows users should use Google or Edge, and Macusers should use Chrome or Safari. Do not use IE.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, login with the registration link you got in the confirmation email.Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: In this final webinar of the NOAA seminar series, Rethinking the Common Reed Grass - Phragmites, panelists will pose questions for discussion of future Phragmites research and management, and we welcome your questions! Slides/ Recordings / Other Materials: Slides may be shared and the recordingwill be shared, after the webinar with all who register, and with anyone whorequests them from the seminar contacts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series websitefor more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!


 

Hosted at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR for the NOAA Seminar Series
Developer - Lori K. Brown


Data, algorithms, and images presented on STAR websites are intended for experimental use only and are not supported on an operational basis.  More information

Level A conformance icon, W3C-WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 and Valid HTML 4.01 IconDept. of Commerce  •  NOAA  •  NESDIS  •  Website Owner: STAR  •  Contact webmaster  •  Revised: 14 January 2022
Privacy Policy  •  Disclaimers  •  Information Quality  •  Accessibility  •  Search  •  Customer Survey
icon: valid HTML 4.01 transitional. Level A conformance icon, W3C-WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 National Oceanographic & Atmospheric Administration website NOAA Center for Satellite Applications and Research website