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NOAA Science Seminar Series
Past 2022 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

19 December 2022

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Zachary Hoylman, Montana Climate Office/University of Montana; Andrea Bair, NWS Western Region; David Hoekema, Idaho Water Resources Department; Karin Bumbaco, Office of the Washington State Climatologist/University of Washington; Larry O'Neill, Oregon Climate Office/Oregon State University
Date & Time: 19 December 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar

Presenter(s):

Climate Recap & Current Conditions
Zachary Hoylman | Montana Climate Office/University of Montana

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Andrea Bair | NWS Western Region

State Specific Conditions and Outlook Highlights As We Head Into Winter
David Hoekema | Idaho Water Resources Department
Karin Bumbaco | Office of the Washington State Climatologist/University of Washington
Larry O'Neill | Oregon Climate Office/Oregon State University

Seminar Contact(s): Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Abstract:

According to the November 29, 2022 U.S. Drought Monitor, 60.5% of the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) is in drought. In general, we've been stuck in status quo so far this water year, which began with 62.5% of the region in drought as of October 1. This webinar will provide more information on the current regional conditions and outlooks, as well as additional presentations on state specific conditions and outlook highlights as we head into winter.

These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1408321987753140749

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

16 December 2022

Title: December 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy
Date & Time: 16 December 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: December 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov), Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/december-2022-climate-outlook/

Abstract: We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, discuss forecast tools, and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for January 2023 and the winter. Join the gathering online to learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Bio(s): Rick Thoman is an expert in Alaska climate and weather. He produces reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities and media.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

15 December 2022

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Justin Glisan, Iowa State Climatologist
Date & Time: 15 December 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook

Presenter(s): Justin Glisan, Iowa State Climatologist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

December 2022 topics include continuing drought challenges and impacts both short and long term; major river system updates; wildfire potential outlooks/updates/impacts; recent and potential major climate/weather impacts; La Nia for the third winter in a row what does it mean for this region; various conditions (soils, river, reservoirs, snow accumulations); and temperature/Precipitation Outlooks for the next month and season.

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2871399225061558288

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Integrating climate impacts on stock dynamics into a groundfish stock assessment
Presenter(s): Amanda Hart, Gulf of Maine Research Institute
Date & Time: 15 December 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Integrating climate impacts on stock dynamics into a groundfish stock assessment

Presenter(s): Amanda Hart, Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Management Effectiveness Framework
Presenter(s): Kayla Williams, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA / Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, ONMS; Moderated by Carina Fish
Date & Time: 15 December 2022
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) Management Effectiveness Framework (2022 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Kayla Williams, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA / Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS); moderated by Elsa Gutierrez, 2022 Knauss Fellow, Office of Marine and Aviation Operations, NOAA

Sponsor(s): Sea Grant; NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Management effectiveness for marine protected areas (MPAs) can be described as an assessment of how well they are achieving the conservation goals and objectives of the protected area. As countries work toward national and global area-based conservation targets, it is crucial that MPA performance be communicated to stakeholders. To meet this need, the National Marine Protected Areas Center is developing written guidance to communicate to stakeholders how the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) is and can better address and communicate management effectiveness across the system.Keywords: Knauss, Management Effectiveness, Sanctuaries

Bio(s): Kayla received a Master's degree in Marine Affairs from the University of Rhode Island in 2021. Her graduate thesis focused on qualitative measures for measuring the effectiveness of sanctuaries in managing ocean noise impacts on marine mammals. As a Knauss Fellow, her work on management effectiveness has broadened to focus on sanctuary management effectiveness on a wider scale.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Drought Dashboard for Massachusetts
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Viki Zoltay, MA/DCR/Office of Water Resources
Date & Time: 15 December 2022
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Drought Dashboard for Massachusetts

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Viki Zoltay, MA/DCR/Office of Water Resources


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s): Ellen Mecray

Remote Access: Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract: The webinar will feature a recap of December conditions and Viki Zoltay will brief on the Massachusetts Drought Dashboard.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

14 December 2022

Title: Advancing Nature-Based Solutions for Coastal Resilience
Presenter(s): Lauren Long and Tashya Allen, NOAA Office for Coastal Management's Learning Services Division
Date & Time: 14 December 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Advancing Nature-Based Solutions for Coastal Resilience

Presenter(s): Lauren Long and Tashya Allen, NOAA OCM Learning Services Division

Sponsor(s): Coral Reef Conservation Program

Seminar Contacts: Lauren Long (lauren.long@noaa.gov) and Tashya Allen (tashya.allen@noaa.gov), NOAA OCM LSD

Remote Access: 1. To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/
2. Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio.

Accessibility: Close captioning provided.

Abstract: Join us to learn about NOAA's Digital Coast Academy resources to help you work with partners to better understand and communicate coastal hazard risks and nature-based solutions. NOAA's Office for Coastal Management will share learning resources to:
  • Visualize and communicate coastal hazards issues
  • Describe how nature-based solutions can reduce the impacts of hazards and build resilience
  • Communicate the effectiveness of nature-based solutions Finance coastal resilience projects
  • Know where to access additional learning opportunities around nature-based solutions and communication and partner engagement


Bio(s): Lauren Long is an Environment Scientist and Pacific Learning Services Coordinator for NOAA's Office for Coastal Management (OCM). She sits in Honolulu, Hawaii working with Pacific partners on their learning interests, connecting them with OCM resources, and bringing needs back to the national office to inform product development and delivery. Lauren also supports OCM's national nature-based solutions portfolio of learning products and services.
Tashya Allen is the Southeast and Caribbean Learning Services Coordinator with NOAA's Office for Coastal Management (OCM). She's spent the last 20 years working with communities to help build their capacity to assess risks and vulnerabilities and develop nature-based strategies to reduce coastal hazard impacts. Her current efforts focus on providing technical assistance to Southeast and Caribbean partners on OCM products and services related to community resilience.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: The presentation will be made available following the seminar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Building Resiliency in Tribal Fishing Communities: Using Indigenous Aquaculture Techniques to Enhance Clam Production
Presenter(s): Courtney Greiner, Marine Ecologist, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community; Joe Williams, Shellfish Community Liaison, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community
Date & Time: 14 December 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Building Resiliency in Tribal Fishing Communities: Using Indigenous Aquaculture Techniques to Enhance Clam Production

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Courtney Greiner, Marine Ecologist, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community
Joe Williams, Shellfish Community Liaison, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community


Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of Aquaculture

Seminar Contact(s): Alex Horn (alexis.horn@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:

WebEx Meeting Link"
https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?RGID=rb5bb57713e9dbac7047e4d915753afd0 Meeting number: 2762 508 0273
Password: wG2S3Kgpvm7 (94273547 from phones)

Abstract: Clam gardens are intertidal features modified by Northwest Coastal Indigenous people to enhance clam habitat for optimal shellfish production. The Swinomish Indian Tribal Community (SITC) recently initiated a clam garden project to address declining clam populations and community concerns regarding climate change and ocean acidification. This effort will integrate traditional ecological knowledge into contemporary resource management and climate adaptation strategies, encourage local food security and sovereignty, and promote sustainable seafood production. SITC's Fisheries Department and Community Environmental Health Program have co-designed a social-ecological site selection process focused on community participation to promote the long-term success of the project. This presentation will discuss clam gardening and SITC's work to revive the ancient practice into modern day use.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

13 December 2022

Title: Baltic sea ecosystem changes over the last 100 years
Presenter(s): Maciej T. Tomczak, SLU Aqua, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences
Date & Time: 13 December 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Baltic sea ecosystem changes over the last 100 years

Presenter(s): Maciej T. Tomczak (SLU Aqua, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Ground fish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contact: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m161d8630abba4e363a98635052f62a1fOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 2762 418 8254

Accessibility: Seminars will be close captioned by Friends Interpreting Services, LLC.

Abstract: The occurrence of regime shifts in marine ecosystems has important implications for environmental legislation that requires setting reference levels and targets of quantitative restoration outcomes. The Baltic Sea ecosystem has undergone large changes in the 20th century related to anthropogenic pressures and climate variability, which have caused ecosystem reorganisation. Here, we compiled and analysed historical information across biotic and abiotic variables from 1925 to 2005 in the Central Baltic Sea. Our analysis shows that for the entire time period, productivity, climate, and hydrography mainly affected the functioning of the food web, whereas fishing became important more recently.

Bio(s): Dr. Maciej Tomczak receivedhis Ph.D. in Gdansk University, Institute of Oceanology, Poland. Dr. Tomczakworked at DTU-Aqua Denmark, Baltic NEST Institute at Stockholm University andis currently employed at the Institute of Aquatic Resources at SwedishAgriculture University. Dr. Tomczak's research focuses on food-web analysismodelling with a special focus on the Baltic Sea and fisheriesmanagement-related questions.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2022-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Adjoint sensitivity analysis of the sources of a large surface salinity anomaly in the Gulf of Maine
Presenter(s): Julia Levin, Rutgers University
Date & Time: 13 December 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Adjoint sensitivity analysis of the sources of a large surface salinity anomaly in the Gulf of Maine

Presenter(s): Julia Levin (Rutgers University)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar contact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US) +1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: An unusually large positive salinity anomaly was observed across the eastern Gulf of Maine in winter 2017-2018. Buoy measurements in eastern Gulf found this anomaly extended down to at least 100 m, the deepest mixing observed in the past 19 years. Similarly, this is the strongest positive regional salt anomaly ever observed in sea surface salinity (SSS) satellite observations. To determine the source waters driving this event and to diagnose the relative importance of forcing processes, passive tracer adjoint sensitivity experiments are performed using a data assimilating version of the Regional Ocean Modeling System. Modeled upper ocean density and vertical diffusivity from 2007-2021 both show a maximum in January 2018. Winter 2017-2018 is the only period where the enhanced winter mixing extends below 100 m. The adjoint sensitivity analysis suggests that the major factor driving the extreme positive satellite-observed SSS anomaly is a decrease in Scotian Shelf freshwater transport to the Gulf which results in an early winter upper water column salinity surplus. This salinity change weakens the normally haline-controlled vertical stratification across the eastern Gulf which leads to an anomalous vertical entrainment of saltier subsurface Gulf water. Other factors, including a modest increase in wind-forced slope water transport, and positive fall 2017 salinity anomalies on the Scotian Shelf and Slope Sea, appear to play lesser roles in the observed salinification. The adjoint sensitivity analysis demonstrates its utility for back tracing transport pathways for periods of several months.




Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

8 December 2022

Title: NOAA CoastWatch: Marine Heatwaves in the Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Rachel Wegener, UMD
Date & Time: 8 December 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Observing Spatial Variability of Marine Heatwaves in the Chesapeake Bay

Presenter(s): Rachel Wegener, University of Maryland
In this work we use satellite SST over a 19 year period to look for spatial patterns and temporal trends in marine heatwaves in the estuarine environment of the Chesapeake Bay. We consider two satellite products, NOAA Geopolar and NASA MUR, and look at a variety of marine heatwave statistics.

Remote Access: Google Meet link: https://meet.google.com/uco-uboz-cmkOr dial: (US) +1 406-838-3189 PIN: 768 242 663#

Sponsor(s): NOAA CoastWatch (STAR)

Seminar Contact(s): Victoria.Wegman@noaa.gov
Slides, Recordings Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: Tracing the carbon cycle in kelp forest ecosystems with 13C
Presenter(s): Brooke Weigel, PhD; Postdoctoral Researcher University of Washington
Date & Time: 8 December 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Tracing the carbon cycle in kelp forest ecosystems with 13C

Presenter(s): Brooke Weigel, PhD; Postdoctoral Researcher University of Washington

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS.NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m62bee8403f564b780ee336ea913890c1

Meeting number (access code): 2763 830 3906
Meeting password: c63Kb7umFJ2

JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Global call-in numbers https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/globalcallin.php?MTID=m47f3c4812bd5a86fddec9d8af24ec6b8

JOIN FROM A VIDEO SYSTEM OR APPLICATION
Dial sip:27638303906@noaanmfs-meets.webex.com
You can also dial 207.182.190.20 and enter your meeting number.

Can't join the meeting?
https://collaborationhelp.cisco.com/article/WBX000029055
Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: Canopy-forming kelps are foundational species in coastal ecosystems, fixing tremendous amounts of carbon, and are thought to contribute significantly to carbon sequestration at a global scale. Algae, including kelps, release some of their photosynthetic products as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into the seawater. Studies have estimated that ~50% of kelp forest carbon sequestration occurs through the export of DOC, yet we know little about the magnitude and determinants of DOC release in kelp forest ecosystems. Using enriched 13C isotopes as a tool to trace carbon cycling by bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana), this research sheds light on the production and fate of kelp-derived carbon in nearshore ecosystems.

BIO
Dr. Brooke Weigel is currently a Kelp Conservation Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Labs. Brooke received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, advised by Dr. Cathy Pfister, where she studied kelp forest ecology on Tatoosh Island, WA. Her dissertation research focused on kelp-microbe interactions and carbon cycling in kelp forests. Brooke's postdoctoral research at Friday Harbor Labs aims to improve our understanding of how environmental stressors such as high temperatures and low nitrogen concentrations impact the growth, survival, and reproduction of bull kelp in the Salish Sea. To learn more about Brooke's research, visit her website at http://brookeweigel.weebly.com/

NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Mosquito Vector Borne Diseases
Presenter(s): Karen Holcomb, CDC and Trevor Riley, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 8 December 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Mosquito Vector Borne DiseasesNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Dr. Karen Holcomb, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Trevor Riley, Head of Public Services, NOAA Central Library

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2549933918193091085

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Diseases caused by mosquitoes have rapidly increased in the US. For these diseases, climate plays a critical role in the ecology and transmission of the pathogen. This presentation will review the Dr. Holcomb and Mr. Riley's collaborative efforts to gather the current evidence on the use of climate and weather data in predicting cases of vector-borne diseases. They will review the various aspects of the project including an overview of the topic, project scoping, searching, and the use of a machine learning tool to assist in literature screening.

Keywords: Mosquito, Weather, Library

Bio(s): Dr. Karen Holcomb recently completed her training as the Climate and Health postdoc with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). As the postdoc, her research focused on integrating climate data to improve predictions of vector-borne diseases. She is now a Biologist at the CDC's Division of Vector-Borne Diseases and will focus on prediction and control of bacterial vector-borne pathogens.

Trevor Riley is the Head of Public Services at NOAA Central Library and leads the library's Research Services, which he established in 2017. Trevor has integrated best practices in evidence synthesis into the service's processes and continues to explore and develop literature search methodologies in an effort to provide NOAA researchers, analysts, and decision-makers with the best available science. Trevor is currently collaborating on the first NOAA-led Evidence Map, which is on the topic of Bature-based Solutions (NbS). He is also currently leading the development of the R package, CiteSource, to give researchers the ability to analyze the impact and utility of research sources and methodologies.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

7 December 2022

Title: The Passive House Network: a building methodology for drastically reducing energy use and climate warming emissions in the built environment
Presenter(s): Ken Levenson, The Passive House Network
Date & Time: 7 December 2022
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: The Passive House Network: a building methodology for drastically reducing energy use and climate warming emissions in the built environment

Presenter(s): Ken Levenson, Executive Director of The Passive House Network

Sponsor(s): Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA CAP/RISA team

Seminar Contact(s): Nikki Pearl, np868@drexel.edu

Remote Access: Registration link: https://ccrun.us14.list-manage.com/track/click u=0a91fc50a732f70453c95cc23&id=388b8c9483&e=0c38152487

Abstract: Join us as we welcome Ken Levenson, Executive Director of The Passive House Network, to present on their dedication to sustainable building development and reduction of energy use and climate warming emissions in the build environment!

Bio(s): Passive House is the world's most rigorous building energy efficiency standard. What makes it different from other sustainable building approaches is that Passive House focuses on occupant comfort and health as drivers of energy efficiency, and other benefits such as resiliency, healthy indoor air, and reduced carbon emissions. This talk will describe the 5 principles of Passive House and how it can be used to drastically lower energy use in buildings, as well as create a comfortable, healthy indoor environment for those inside. It will demonstrate that the Passive House standard can be used for any type and size of building project - including renovations - from single buildings to entire urban districts.All sessions are recorded and archived on the CCRUN website.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Sample Once, Use Many Times: The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples
Presenter(s): Clint Edrington, Marine Geology Data Manager, NOAA, Alex Hangsterfer, Geological Collections Manager, Scripps
Date & Time: 7 December 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Sample Once, Use Many Times: The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples
Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Speaker 1 - Clint Edrington, Marine Geology Data Manager at Northern Gulf Institute / NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, Marine Geology and Geophysics, Stennis Space Center, MS Gulf Coast. Speaker 2 - Alex Hangsterfer, Geological Collections Manager at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA

Sponsor(s): IOCM OCS NOAA

Seminar Contact(s): amber.butler@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8788350688026332941

Accessibility: Please contact amber.butler@noaa.gov for accessibility requests by November 30th.

Abstract: Geological samples collected from marine and lacustrine environments have had an immense impact on the advancement of earth science over the past decades, with a myriad of applications ranging from paleoclimate to geohazards to benthic habitat mapping. That said, geological data collected from such operationally difficult environments have high acquisition and long-term curation costs, which can be prohibitive to most researchers. A large group of geological sample repositories made up of U.S. and international academic institutions and government agencies recognize the responsibility to sample once, use many times (to borrow a phrase from the mapping community) and so partner with NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) to organize the Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples (IMLGS). The IMLGS is a community designed and maintained resource that enables researchers to discover and access (i) the digital data gleaned from seabed and lakebed geological samples as well as (ii) the actual physical samples archived at partner institutions. This talk will give a broad overview of the workings of the IMLGS, including sample collection, curation, and access at partner repositories as well as the digital data ingest pipeline and discovery and access pieces managed at NCEI.

Bio(s): Clint Edrington works as the Marine Geology Data Manager for NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Working with colleagues and partners, his primary focus now is updating and modernizing the Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples (IMLGS). In the not-too-far-off future, he and NCEI colleagues hope to provide additional data discovery and access tools for marine and lacustrine geological and geotechnical data that fall outside the scope of the IMLGS (i.e., non-curated geological sample data). The aspiration of NCEI Marine Geology is to provide a one-stop-shop for all marine and lacustrine geological data, so that scientists, engineers, and others can use and re-use these data to further the advancement of earth science. Clint obtained his PhD in Oceanography from Louisiana State University in 2013, focusing on the evolutionary history (Holocene) of the Mississippi River Delta. He received a MS in Geology in 2008 also from Louisiana State University and a BS in Geophysics in 2005 from the University of New Orleans. Alexandra Hangsterfer is the Geological Collections Manager at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, CA. The Geological Collections holds about 7,500 deep ocean cores, more than 3,500 deep sea dredges, and approximately 40,000 slides of marine microfossils in the main rock and core collections, and about 10,000 samples of rocks and fossils in the teaching collection. Along with managing the physical sample collections, Alex manages the collections databases and websites; operates the X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) facility; participates in dozens of outreach events annually, both in-person and remotely and goes out to sea on research vessels to facilitate the collection of ocean sediments and rocks. Alex obtained her Master's degree in Oceanography from Scripps in 2009. She studied methane hydrates and has worked with cores from the collection she now manages since 2005. Before coming to Scripps, Alex worked at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Woods Hole, MA. She received her BS with a double major in Environmental Chemistry and Biology from Roger Williams University in Bristol, RI.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Email iwgocm.staff@noaa.gov for summary materials, contact information, and access to the recording.

Recordings: Email iwgocm.staff@noaa.gov for access to the recording.

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Title: Climate Science in Alaska; The Present North Pacific Atmosphere-Ocean System and The Societal Impacts of A Changing Climate
Presenter(s): Nicholas Bond, Ph. D, WA State Climatologist; Elizabeth A. Logerwell, Ph.D, NOAA AFSC
Date & Time: 7 December 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Climate Science in Alaska; The Present North Pacific Atmosphere-Ocean System and The Societal Impacts of A Changing Climate.

Presenter(s): Nicholas Bond, Ph. D., WA State Climatologist; Elizabeth A. Logerwell, Ph.D., NOAA AFSC

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): EcoFOCI Research Physical Scientist Emily Lemagie (emily.lemagie@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Zooplankton Ecologist Deana Crouser (deana.crouser@noaa.gov).

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
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United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

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Abstract: Two presentations will take a reflective look at climate science in Alaska with a review of the present North Pacific atmosphere-ocean system in a historical context followed by a discussion on the emphasis by the Alaska Chapter of the NCA5 on the societal impacts of climate change for Alaska with illustrative examples. Gather information about the mechanisms associated with water temperature transitions around Alaska compared to previous major changes in the regional climate and near surface temperatures. Then, hear about a combination of physical and ecological effects of climate change, which has far-reaching consequences for people statewide.

Bio(s): Nicholas Bond is the Washington State Climatologist. Most of his work has been with FOCI and has focused on variability in climate and atmospheric forcing of the Bering Sea, and topographical effects on coastal winds in Alaska. Libby Logerwell is a Supervisory Research Fishery Biologist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center. She is active in the promotion of Ecosystem-Based Management nationally and internationally through her involvement with the Arctic Council, the North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) and the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

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Title: Informing Florida’s Human Health and Coastal Tourism with NOAA Data
Presenter(s): Dr. Antarpreet Jutla, Associate Professor, University of Florida
Date & Time: 7 December 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Informing Florida's Human Health and Coastal Tourism with NOAA Data

Presenter(s): Dr. Antarpreet Jutla, Associate Professor, University of Florida

Sponsor(s): The Office of System Architecture and Advanced Planning (OSAAP), and the NESDIS User Engagement Council.Seminar Contact: Vanessa Escobar, (Vanessa.Escobar@noaa.gov), Allison Burrell, (Allison.Burrell@noaa.gov)Location: WebinarRegistration link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ekepuyj46qh6/event/event_info.html
Link to join the meeting: (Registration required) https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ekepuyj46qh6/event/login.html

Abstract: This webinar will describe how he uses NOAA information to generate valuable feedback for NOAA's GeoXO and LEO missions and how his work uses NOAA products and services to improve human health and coastal tourism. This is part of the NESDIS User Engagement speaker series, "Meet the Users."Dr. Jutla's research focuses on water quality, air quality, and the use of ocean color data for coastal health. As a NASA Early Adopter for the PACE Ocean Color mission, he is now working with the OSAAP Value Chain and Traceability Team to develop a value chain that traces the uses and benefits of NOAA mission observations, products, and services. This value chain is being developed as part of Dr. Jutla's role in the NOAA Pathfinder Initiative, where information from LEO and GEO is traced to the impacts of coastal tourism in Florida.

Bio(s): Dr. Jutla holds a degree in Agricultural Engineering from Punjab Agricultural University in India, an M.Sc. in Water Resources from the University of Saskatchewan, Canada, and a Ph.D. in Water Resources from Tufts University.

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Title: Diversity and phylogeny of Chaetopterus (Annelida: Chaetopteridae) and associated macroinvertebrates in Djibouti
Presenter(s): Shannon Brown, Lab Manager and Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies, University of Washington, NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Omics Lab
Date & Time: 7 December 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Diversity and phylogeny of Chaetopterus (Annelida: Chaetopteridae) and associated macroinvertebrates in Djibouti

Part of the NOAA Omics Seminar Series



Presenter(s): Shannon Brown, Lab Manager (Research Scientist), Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, & Ecosystem Studies (CICOES), University of Washington, NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) Omics Lab



Sponsor(s): NOAA Omics Working Group



Seminar Contact(s): Katharine Egan, NOAA 'Omics Coordinator, noaa.omics@noaa.gov



Remote Access: Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/260955218187664656



Abstract: The tubulous polychaete, Chaetopterus, found worldwide from the intertidal to the deep ocean, provides a favorable environment for cryptic, symbiotic organisms often overlooked when examining marine biodiversity. Our study employed molecular phylogenetics to examine the diversity of symbiont species associated with Chaetopterus sp., collected from the Gulf of Tadjoura, Djibouti. Fifteen Chaetopterus hosts and their associated symbionts were collected from nine coastal sites off the Republic of Djibouti. Four genomic regions were targeted for PCR amplification in this study: the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rDNA, and the nuclear 18S rDNA and Histone H3. Phylogenetic and morphological analysis confirmed five species associated with Chaetopterus sp. from Djibouti: two crabs, P. pedalis and P. socialis, one nudibranch, P. chaetopterana, one fish, Onuxodon sp., and one amphipod, Leucothoe sp. As only the fourth comprehensive study on Chaetopterus symbionts, our study highlights the diversity and community patterns of symbionts associated with these unique tubulous marine polychaetes.



Bio(s): Shannon Brown is a member of the NOAA PMEL Omics Lab where she assists with numerous omics projects focused on ecosystem biodiversity. She received an MSc in Marine Biology at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, located in Saudi Arabia, in 2020. Her graduate work employed molecular and morphological analyses to uncover more about regional polychaete diversity.



Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of this presentation will be made available on the NOAA Omics website. View past omics seminar recordings here: https://sciencecouncil.noaa.gov/NOAA-Science-Technology-Focus-Areas/NOAA-Omics



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6 December 2022

Title: Laying the Foundation for Resilient Coastal Communities
Presenter(s): Rich Buzard, UAF Arctic Coastal Geoscience Lab
Date & Time: 6 December 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Laying the Foundation for Resilient Coastal Communities

Presenter(s): Rich Buzard, UAF Arctic Coastal Geoscience Lab

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/coastal-erosion/

Abstract: The UAF Arctic Coastal Geoscience Lab uses a combination of remote sensing, ground and aerial surveys and citizen science to measure erosion and flooding in several Alaskan villages. During this webinar Rich will describe their work monitoring coastal erosion and laying the foundation for resilience in coastal Alaskan communities.

Bio(s): Rich Buzard is interested in low cost, low tech, solutions that can assist coastal communities mitigate and respond to environmental risks. He is pursuing a PhD at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) while working with the UAF Arctic Coastal Geoscience Lab. His work has taken him to many communities in Alaska to install community-based erosion monitoring sites and/or collect unmanned aerial survey data in order to create highly detailed elevation models.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

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Title: The Canadian Inshore Lobster Trawl Survey (ILTS) –A lobster focused multi-species trawl survey in the Eastern Gulf of Maine and Bay of Fundy
Presenter(s): Cheryl Denton and Adam Cook, Dept. of Fish. and Oceans, Canada
Date & Time: 6 December 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: The Canadian Inshore Lobster Trawl Survey (ILTS) "A lobster focused multi-species trawl survey in the Eastern Gulf of Maine and Bay of Fundy

Presenter(s): Cheryl Denton and Adam Cook (Dept. of Fish. and Oceans, Canada)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Ground fish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contact: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m161d8630abba4e363a98635052f62a1fOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 2762 418 8254

Accessibility: Seminars will be close captioned by Friends Interpreting Services, LLC.

Abstract: An annual trawl survey is conducted in Southwestern Nova Scotia and the Bay of Fundy to assess the lobster stocks. The survey is conducted with the NEFSC Center Ecosystem Survey Trawl (NEST), a small mesh trawl with a cod end liner, which ensures the capture of various sizes of lobster. Catch from each tow is separated by species, weighed and counted. Length frequency data is collected on select groundfish and crab species, detailed morphometric data is collected on each lobster. Data resulting from the survey provides a primary indicator of lobster stock status.

Bio(s): Cheryl Denton has been working as an Aquatic Science Technician with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans for 25 years, with the majority of her career focused on lobster science. Since 2017, she has been the lead of the Inshore Lobster Trawl Survey.Adam Cook is a Research Scientist with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the lead of the Lobster Ecology and Assessment Team. He has lead various finfish and invertebrate stock assessments and is focused on the inclusion of ecosystem data to further develop such stock assessments.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2022-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-series

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Title: The Art of the USS Monitor
Presenter(s): Kyra Duffley, Multimedia Production Specialist, The Mariners' Museum and Park
Date & Time: 6 December 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:


NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Submerged NC: The Art of USS Monitor

Presenter(s): Kyra Duffley, Multimedia Production Specialist for The Mariners' Museum and Park

Sponsor(s): NOAA, ONMS, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary and the NC Office of State Archaeology

Seminar Contact(s): Shannon.Ricles@noaa.gov

Registration: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3226675628056438284

Abstract: Witness the power and drama of USS Monitor's story, the iconic battle, its sinking, and its recovery as told through a selection of artworks from the collection of The Mariners' Museum and Park. The story of the little ship that saved the nation is a powerful one that has captured the fascination of millions both during its short, revolutionary life and in its legendary rest after its sinking. Its multifaceted story is one of technology, innovation, people, power, loss, and discovery and is one that has inspired many artists in the 160 years since its launching.Join Kyra Duffley, creator and host of the Mariners' monthly art series, Beyond the Frame, as we take an interpretive look at these paintings that bring history to life in a new way! We'll examine the stylistic choices the artists made in their works and how those work together to each tell a part of USS Monitor's story in its own unique and inspired way.

Bio(s): Kyra Duffley is the Multimedia Production Specialist for The Mariners' Museum and Park. She and her teammates produce a monthly art historical video series called Beyond the Frame that focuses on exploring the works of art in the museum's collection in an engaging and empowering way. Her team's goal is to break down stigmas surrounding maritime art and to make it accessible and fun for viewers of all ages and backgrounds.

Kyra is a Newport News, Virginia transplant from Memphis, Tennessee. She studied Art History at The University of Mississippi during which time she had the opportunity to study art abroad in London, England. She received her B.A. in Art History in 2016. She then went on to manage an art gallery in downtown Charleston, South Carolina where she managed over 50 local and emerging artists. She and her husband moved to Newport News five years ago for his naval service and shortly after, Kyra began her work with The Mariners' Museum. In her four years there, she helped to found the Multimedia Production Team. Kyra is passionate that art is for everyone and hopes that her work through The Mariners' Museum helps to share that message both locally and globally through digital content.

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; once captioned it will be hosted on the archived webpage: https://monitor.noaa.gov/gallery/webinar-archive.html.

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Title: Why we need an ocean model to do numerical weather prediction?
Presenter(s): Kristian Mogensen, ECMWF, Reading, UK
Date & Time: 6 December 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Why we need an ocean model to do numerical weather prediction?

Presenter(s): Kristian Mogensen (ECMWF, Reading, UK)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar contact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US) +1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: Since the introduction of coupling into the high-resolution deterministic model (HRES) in June 2018, all ECMWF issued forecasts are based on a coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean-sea-ice model. The importance of having an interactive ocean at sub-seasonal to seasonal time scales are well established, so in the presentation, we will show examples where having an interactive ocean model is important for the atmospheric predictions at medium-range time scales and discuss which atmospheric scores improve with ocean coupling.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

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Title: Wildfire in working landscapes: Causal analysis of relationships between land management, fire regimes, and ecological transformations in the western US
Presenter(s): Dr. Katherine Siegel, NOAA Climate and Global Change (C&GC) Postdoctoral Program
Date & Time: 6 December 2022
12:00 pm - 12:45 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Wildfire in working landscapes: Causal analysis of relationships between land management, fire regimes, and ecological transformations in the western US

Presenter(s): Dr. Katherine Siegel, NOAA Climate and Global Change (C&GC) Postdoctoral Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA Climate Program Office and The Cooperative Programs for the Advancement of Earth System Science (CPAESS)

Seminar Contacts: clara.deck@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7220227203583085068

Abstract: Working landscapes in the western United States " such as forests and rangelands "support biodiversity and human livelihoods but face escalating pressures from climate change and other anthropogenic stressors. While these systems are adapted to wildfire, climate change and land management legacies are interacting to increase the frequency and size of high-severity wildfires, with consequences for humans lives and well-being, as well as ecosystem composition, functioning, and the services provided to humans. This talk will integrate global change ecology, geospatial data science, econometrics, and conservation science to identify and quantify causal relationships between land management, climate change, and wildfire in forests and rangelands in the western US. It will address questions about the relationships between land management and wildfire activity, and the effects of changing wildfire regimes on forest ecosystems. This work seeks to advance climate-adaptive forest and rangeland management at the landscape scale.This webinar is part of a series featuring NOAA Climate and Global Change (C&GC) Fellows in the NOAA Science Seminar Series. C&GC is supported by NOAA's Climate Program Office and managed by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR).

Bio(s): Katherine Siegel is a NOAA Climate & Global Change postdoctoral fellow at the University of Colorado-Boulder. She integrates interdisciplinary approaches from global change ecology, conservation science, and econometrics to identify and quantify drivers of change in social-ecological systems. Her research seeks to inform just and sustainable management of working landscapes for biodiversity and people in the context of rapid environmental change. Her work spans multiple systems, scales, and ecosystems, from national parks in the Amazon Basin to ranches in California. In her current work, Katherine combines econometrics, ecological functional trait analysis, and ecosystem service modeling to understand the links between forest management, wildfire severity, and post-fire ecosystem functioning in the forests of the western US. She received her PhD in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at the University of California-Berkeley in 2021.

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2 December 2022

Title: Toward Improved Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Schemes in High-Wind Conditions using Large-Eddy Simulations and Observations
Presenter(s): Dr. Xiaomin Chen, Assistant Professor, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL and Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/OAR/NOAA}, Miami, FL.
Date & Time: 2 December 2022
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Toward Improved Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Schemes in High-Wind Conditions using Large-Eddy Simulations and Observations

Presenter(s): Dr. Xiaomin Chen, Assistant Professor, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama and Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/OAR/NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

Seminar Contact(s): Shirley Murillo, shirley.murillo@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Join webinar at: https://meet.goto.com/604855757You can also dial in using your phone.
Dial: +1 (224) 501-3412
Access Code: 604-855-757

Meeting ID: 604-855-757

Abstract: Accurately representing planetary boundary layer (PBL) turbulent processes in numerical models is critical for improving hurricane forecasts. However, existing PBL parameterization schemes are mostly designed for low-wind conditions, and assessing their uncertainties in hurricane conditions remains challenging, mostly due to very scarce in-situ turbulence measurements. To fill in the gap, this study develops a modeling framework based on a small-domain large-eddy simulation (LES) to evaluate two types of PBL schemes in hurricane conditions. The novelty of this framework includes the usage of a few input parameters to represent the TC vortex and the addition of a simple nudging term for temperature and moisture to account for the complex thermodynamic processes in TCs. The reference thermodynamic profiles are retrieved from a composite analysis of dropsonde observations of mature hurricanes. This special model setup allows for a fair comparison of PBL schemes under the same controlled thermodynamic conditions against LES. An evaluation reveals the pros and cons of each PBL scheme in hurricane conditions. Using this insight, we recommend suitable PBL schemes for hurricane modeling and propose solutions to address issues identified in these PBL schemes. Specifically, we improve the high-order PBL scheme used in NOAA's next-generation hurricane forecast model, Hurricane Analysis and Forecast System (HAFS). HAFS retrospective runs during the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season demonstrate that the improved PBL scheme leads to better structure and intensity forecasts than the original PBL scheme. Importantly, the improved PBL scheme shows promise to improve the forecast skill of rapid intensification events, which are notoriously challenging to predict. Avenues for future development of PBL parameterizations in high-wind conditions will be discussed.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be available in 2-3 days at website: https://www.aoml.noaa.gov/seminars/

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1 December 2022

Title: Status and Management of Mixed Fisheries: A Global Synthesis
Presenter(s): Dr. Ming Sun, Stony Brook University, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences
Date & Time: 1 December 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Status and Management of Mixed Fisheries: A Global Synthesis (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s): Dr. Ming Sun, Stony Brook University, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Kristan Blackhart and Library Seminars

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.


Abstract: We reviewed twenty-three mixed fisheries worldwide to characterize attributes of mixed fisheries and provide overviews on their assessment and management. We find that stock assessment and management for mixed fisheries are mainly based on single-species approaches, with mixed fisheries considerations taken into account through a variety of approaches. Ecosystem-wide mixed fisheries considerations in management were found positively related to better management performance in terms of conserving stock biomass and avoiding overfishing. The review highlighted the need for developing global consensus on best mixed fisheries management practices.Keywords: EBFM, mixed fisheries, stock assessment


Bio(s): Ming Sun is a postdoc at Stony Brook University working with Prof. Yong Chen. Ming's research interests include stock assessment, data-limited methods, management strategy evaluation, and international fisheries management.

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Title: Newly validated quantitative fatty acid signature analysis reveals killer whale diet compositions across the North Atlantic
Presenter(s): Anas Remili PhD Candidate, Natural Resource Sciences department, McGill University
Date & Time: 1 December 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Newly validated quantitative fatty acid signature analysis reveals killer whale diet compositions across the North Atlantic

Presenter(s): Anas Remili PhD Candidate Natural Resource Sciences department, McGill University

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
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https://collaborationhelp.cisco.com/article/WBX000029055
Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: Quantifying the diet composition of apex marine predators such as killer whales (Orcinus orca) is critical to assess their ecological impacts on food webs, especially in a changing environment. Chemical tracers like fatty acids are valuable for studying diets of marine mammals since they are often located in remote areas and forage below the water's surface, preventing direct and long-term observations. Fatty acids are released from ingested lipid molecules during digestion and deposited into fat stores, many with limited modification. Therefore, comparing fatty acid signatures among species and populations can provide an understanding of diet patterns across regions, over time, and in relation to environmental variation. This approach has been further advanced by developing a model to provide quantitative diet estimates, known as quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA). The QFASA model was originally developed for pinnipeds and subsequently calibrated for polar bears. Applying QFASA to cetaceans was not attempted until recently due to extensive fatty acid stratification in cetacean blubber, typical availability of only outer blubber biopsies, and a lack of calibration coefficients. This talk will detail our new findings on developing QFASA for killer whales using archived full-depth blubber and prey samples. The method was calibrated across the blubber layers to allow for use on outer blubber biopsies from free-ranging whales. The validated method was then applied to nearly 200 killer whales and 900 samples of potential prey to model killer whale diets across the 5,000 km span of the North Atlantic. Diet estimates showed considerable variation, with killer whales mainly consuming other whale species in the western Atlantic, pinnipeds in Eastern Greenland, and fish in the eastern Atlantic (Iceland, Faroe, Norway). However, the dietary contributions of each prey taxa varied significantly within regions. These estimates reveal population- and individual-level variations of killer whale feeding ecology, which helps to assess their impact on the community and ecosystem dynamics in changing North Atlantic marine ecosystems driven by climate change.

BIO
Anas Remili is a PhD candidate at McGill University, in Montreal, Canada. Her research focuses on the role of feeding habits on contaminant accumulations in North Atlantic killer whales. She is also the founder and editor-in-chief of Whale Scientists, an online marine mammal magazine created and written by early-career researchers for the public.

NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Microplastics: What They Are, How to Find the Data, and How to Get Involved
Presenter(s): Jennifer Webster, Research Oceanographer and Coastal Indicators Product Lead, NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information; Jace Tunnell, Director, Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve, University of Texas Marine Science Institute
Date & Time: 1 December 2022
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Microplastics: What They Are, How to Find the Data, and How to Get Involved
NOAA Gulf of Mexico Forum Webinar Series


Presenter(s): Jennifer Webster, Research Oceanographer and Coastal Indicators Product Lead, NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information; Jace Tunnell, Director, Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve, University of Texas Marine Science Institute

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaboration Team, a part of NOAA's Regional Collaboration Network

Seminar Contact(s): Kristen Laursen, Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov , NOAA Fisheries and Regional Collaboration Network

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3691300655166424335

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For your awareness, this webinar will be recorded and shared.


Abstract: Microplastics are very small pieces of plastic (< 5mm) that come from many sources and can be found from the atmosphere to the land to the ocean floor. During this webinar, we will learn about NOAA's new Marine Microplastics database and Map Portal Application, and about the Nurdle Patrol citizen science project, run by the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve. The Marine Microplastics Application provides public access to global data on microplastics in the ocean, and includes information from many different data sources. Nurdle Patrol is an initiative where you can help gather information about where nurdles, or small plastic pellets used as raw materials in manufacturing, are located in Gulf of Mexico environments, remove them, and create awareness about nurdles.


Bio(s):
Jennifer Webster is a research oceanographer with NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information based at the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. Her background is in coastal ecology and remote sensing. Currently she is working with coastal ecosystem indicator products like Harmful Algal Blooms, hypoxia, and most recently, marine microplastics.

Jace Tunnell is the director of the Mission-Aransas Reserve at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute. Jace is the founder of a citizen science project called Nurdle Patrol that tracks plastic pellet concentrations internationally to create awareness of plastics in the ocean and develop new policy based on the data. He currently serves as president of the National Estuarine Research Reserve Association that advocates for the 30 Reserves around the country. His conservation efforts include educating the public about plastic pollution, estuarine science, and protection of our natural resources.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Please contact Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov for the recording and/or PDF.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

30 November 2022

Title: Ecosystem based management at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center, from how ecosystem data is being collected, to how it is being used
Presenter(s): David G. Kimmel, Ph. D., NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center; Robert Suryan, Ph.D., NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 30 November 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Ecosystem based management at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center, from how ecosystem data is being collected, to how it is being used.

Presenter(s): David Kimmel, Ph.D., NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center; and Robert Suryan, Ph.D., NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contacts: EcoFOCI Research Physical Scientist Emily Lemagie (emily.lemagie@noaa.gov); and EcoFOCI Zooplankton Ecologist Deana Crouser (deana.crouser@noaa.gov).

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: Two presentations will cover ecosystem based management at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center, from how ecosystem data is being collected, to how it is being used. Hear about how artificial intelligence and machine learning is being incorporated into rapid in the field analysis in order to get real-time snapshots of the Bering Sea ecosystem. Next, learn about how this data, among a variety of others, are being used directly and indirectly in fisheries management. This overview will help investigators contributing to recruitment and ecosystem studies understand how their data are being used. Additionally, we hope this presentation provides the needed background and sparks additional ideas and interest for investigators to contribute to these efforts

Bio(s):
David G Kimmel is a lead research oceanographer at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center. His area of expertise is Biological oceanography, zooplankton ecology, coastal ecology, climate impacts on ecosystems, and quantitative ecology.
Robert Suryan is the program manager for the Alaska Fisheries Science Center and specializes in integrated ecosystem studies to understand population and community dynamics in response to changing food availability and ocean climate.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: More organized deep convection with contracting ITCZ and possible implications
Presenter(s): Anita Rapp, Texas A&M University
Date & Time: 30 November 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online only
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: More organized deep convection with contracting ITCZ and possible implications
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Anita Rapp, Texas A&M University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): jan.kazil@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5164266903900700688

Abstract: Global climate models indicate a narrowing and intensification of precipitation in the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and ascending branch of the Hadley circulation in a warming climate. However, how these large-scale variations will manifest in the frequency and morphology of deep convective systems within these regions is still uncertain and has major implications for the tropical hydrologic and energy cycles. To shed light on this, we use satellite observations and reanalysis to analyze the variability in ITCZ width, tropical ascent area, and precipitation intensity in the current climate and understand how these variations are related to the population of deep convection and the joint cloud-precipitation-radiation relationships. Analysis shows a contraction and intensification of the ITCZ in the satellite-era that corresponds with a shift toward more organized deep convection as the ITCZ contracts. Column water vapor (CWV) is observed to increase in the ascending regions as they shrink, which may help support this observed shift toward larger, more aggregated deep convective systems. Further analysis of satellite cloud and radiative properties as a function of CWV shows increases in atmospheric radiative heating by deep convective systems outpace the precipitation increase, resulting in deep convective systems that heat the atmosphere more efficiently. Assuming the tropics is in approximate radiative convective equilibrium, as the dry zones expand and the ITCZ contracts, this implies the deep convective systems within the ITCZ must become more efficient at heating the atmosphere.

Bio(s): Anita Rapp is an associate professor with the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at Texas A&M University. Dr. Rapp received her MSc and PhD in atmospheric science from Colorado State University in Fort Collins. She joined Texas A&M University in 2010 where she was appointed assistant professor in 2014 and associate professor in 2019. Dr. Rapp's research interests are in remote sensing of clouds and precipitation and their application in studying Earth's hydrological cycle, energy budget, and climate change. Currently, her focus is on combining data from multiple sensors to investigate intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) deep convection and the role of shallow cumulus and stratocumulus clouds in the tropics and subtropics.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2022,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!

29 November 2022

Title: NOAA Testbeds and Proving Grounds Role in Research Transitions Fireside Chat
Presenter(s): Moderator: Andrea Ray; Introduction: Gary Matlock, Fiona Horsfall; Panelists: Alan Gerard, Mitch Goldberg, Louisa Nance, Joshua Scheck
Date & Time: 29 November 2022
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:


NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Testbeds and Proving Grounds Role in Research Transitions Fireside Chat


NOAA Central Library Seminars

Moderator: Andrea Ray, Chair, Testbeds and Proving Grounds Coordinating Committee, and Coordinator, Hydrometeorological Testbed, Physical Sciences Laboratory, Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, NOAA

Introductions: Gary Matlock, Deputy Assistant Administrator for Science, Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and Fiona Horsfall, Director, Office of Research, Transition, and Application, Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, NOAA

Panelists:
-Alan Gerard, Chief, Warning Research and Development Division, VORTEX (USA and SE) Federal Program Coordinator, and Hazardous Weather Testbed, National Severe Storms Laboratory, NOAA;
- Mitch Goldberg, Chief Scientist, and Satellite Proving Ground, National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, NOAA;
-Louisa Nance, Research Applications Laboratory Program Director and Director, Developmental Testbed Center, National Center for Atmospheric Research;
-Joshua Scheck, Chief, Aviation Support Branch and Aviation Weather Testbed Manager, Aviation Weather Center, National Weather Service, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7415169517071267597


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: NOAA's Testbeds and Proving Grounds facilitate research to operations to research (R2O2R) via the development and pre-deployment testing of research for operations as well as evaluation of suitability and operational readiness. Thus they are crucial for uptake of research into operations at NOAA and other partners, and ultimately for the realization of societal benefits. This Fireside Chat will provide an in-depth look into how Testbeds and Proving Grounds facilitate the research to operations pipeline and feedback to research. It will open with remarks from OAR Deputy Assistant Administrator for Science, Gary Matlock, and feature a discussion among representatives of four Testbeds and Proving Grounds with Q&A from the audience.

Keywords: Research to Operations, Testbeds and Proving Grounds

Bio(s): Speaker Bios

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Coral Reef Watch: Applying operational satellite-based products to predict an unexpected mass coral bleaching event on the Great Barrier Reef; and the Wave-driven Flood-forecasting on Reef-lined Coasts Early warning system (WaveFoRCE)
Presenter(s): William Skirving, PhD, NOAA Coral Reef Watch; and Blake Spady, Ph.D., NOAA Coral Reef Watch and ReefSense Scientist and Product Developer
Date & Time: 29 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Coral Reef Watch: Applying operational satellite-based products to predict an unexpected mass coral bleaching event on the Great Barrier Reef; and the Wave-driven Flood-forecasting on Reef-lined Coasts Early warning system (WaveFoRCE)

Presenter(s): William Skirving, Ph.D., NOAA Coral Reef Watch Senior Scientist/Oceanographer and ReefSense Director; and Blake Spady, Ph.D., NOAA Coral Reef Watch and ReefSense Scientist and Product Developer.

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/SOCD Coral Reef Watch.

Seminar Contacts: William.Skirving@noaa.gov and Blake.Spady@noaa.gov. (011) 61 7 4404 9955.

Remote Access: 1. To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/
2. Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio.

Accessibility: Close captioning provided.

Abstract: The NOAA Coral Reef Watch (CRW) program provides monitoring and forecasting tools to an extensive and diverse user community worldwide, who use them to study, monitor, manage, protect, and even restore coral reef ecosystems. The first half of this seminar will present a case study that used CRW's operational satellite and modeled heat stress products to forecast and remotely monitor an unexpected mass coral bleaching event on the Great Barrier Reef during the 2021/22 austral summer. The second half of the seminar will present the Wave-driven Flood-forecasting on Reef-lined Coasts Early warning system (WaveFoRCE). WaveFoRCE is a multi-national, multi-agency project led jointly by NOAA, the US Geological Survey, and Deltares (Netherlands). The WaveFoRCE project is aimed at providing all coral reef-lined coasts in the world with hindcasts, nowcasts and forecasts for marine flooding and inundation. More specifically, it will provide tools to assist the Small Island Developing States to become more resilient against climate change impacts.

Bio(s): Dr. William Skirving is a Senior Scientist with NOAA Coral Reef Watch (CRW) and is the Director of ReefSense in Townsville, Australia. He has more than 35 years of experience in the use of satellites to measure and monitor environmental stress (e.g., temperature, light, and wave energy) on corals and coral. Dr. Skirving leads the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Task Team on Coral Heat Stress User SST Requirements, the development of the version 4.0 CoralTemp sea surface temperature (SST) dataset and derived Daily Global 5km Satellite Coral Bleaching Heat Stress Monitoring products, the Light Stress Damage product suite, and the Marine Heatwave Watch products. In addition, Dr. Skirving is the NOAA lead scientist on the Wave-driven Flood-forecasting on Reef-lined Coasts Early warning system (WaveFoRCE) project. Dr. Blake Spady is a biologist, programmer, and product developer at NOAA Coral Reef Watch (CRW), who works at the ReefSense office in Townsville, Australia. His primary research focus involves utilizing satellite remote sensing tools to investigate sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies and developing algorithms related to coral reef health. At CRW, Dr. Spady leads the development of the Thermal History and Coral Disease Outbreak Risk product suites and plays a key role in the development, calibration, and validation of the climatology and methodology for the version 4.0 Daily Global 5km Satellite Coral Bleaching Heat Stress Monitoring product suite. Dr. Spady was born and raised in Smithfield, Virginia and spent six years in the greater Washington D.C. area, working and studying as an undergraduate at George Mason University. In 2012, he moved to Queensland (QLD), Australia where he earned his MSc and Ph.D. at James Cook University. He currently resides in Townsville, QLD with his wife.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: The presentation will be made available following the seminar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) Gulf Ecosystem Initiative
Presenter(s): Courtney Scarborough, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis
Date & Time: 29 November 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) Gulf Ecosystem Initiative webinar

Presenter(s): Courtney Scarborough, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis

Sponsor(s): NOAA RESTORE Science Program

Seminar Contacts: Hannah Brown, hannah.brown@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://ucsb.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_QKiVCRJlR3G3guh-2-pOqw

Abstract: The Gulf Ecosystem Initiative is a $3.5 million partnership between the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) in Santa Barbara, CA and the NOAA RESTORE Science Program to fund synthesis science and postdoctoral research. Working groups of scientists and decision makers will collaborate to solve pressing questions across the Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf Ecosystem Initiative's 2023 Request for Proposals asks project teams to propose research that is transdisciplinary and cross-sectoral and, through collaboration and innovation, seeks to tackle pressing scientific and societal challenges focused around three themes in the Gulf of Mexico: fisheries, climate change, and the ecological impact of management actions. Whether it is your first time proposing synthesis science or your tenth, you probably have questions about our new Gulf Ecosystem Initiative call for proposals -- and we are here to answer them! Join us at this informational webinar, where we will review what NCEAS does, how working groups work, and tips for strong applications. There will be ample time for individual questions and answers.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Fishing for science: Enhanced biological sampling with fishing partners for assessment and management of Atlantic halibut and wolffish
Presenter(s): Richard McBride, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 29 November 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Fishing for science: Enhanced biological sampling with fishing partners for assessment and management of Atlantic halibut and wolffish

Presenter(s): Richard McBride, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Ground fish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contact: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m161d8630abba4e363a98635052f62a1fOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 2762 418 8254

Accessibility: Seminars will be close captioned by Friends Interpreting Services, LLC.

Abstract: Atlantic halibut(Hippoglossus hippoglossus),and wolffish (Anarhichas lupus)management in the Gulf of Maine demonstrate a successful collaboration between scientists and fishing partners to overcome sampling obstacles to updating growth and maturity rates for assessment. Routine at-sea monitoring by government agencies produced few fish each year, but with appropriate fishing permits, cooperating fishermen markedly increased sample sizes, seasonal coverages, and fish size ranges. This helped estimate growth and maturity parameters and evaluate reference points.

Bio(s): Richard McBride has worked as a fish and fisheries scientist from the Gulf of Mexico to the Gulf of Maine for almost 40 years. He has published more than 80 papers on the biology and ecology of marine fishes. He is a former associate editor for the journal Transactions of the American Fisheries Society,' and is on the editorial boards of the journals Fishery Bulletin' and Bulletin of Marine Science.' Rich received his B.S. from Eckerd College; his M.S. from Stony Brook University; and his Ph.D. from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, where he earned degrees in biology, marine science, and ecology & evolution, respectively. He has held two post-doctoral positions: first at the Florida Marine Research Institute, as a Research Scientist, and second at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, as a Supervisory Research Fishery Biologist. At the Center, he is in charge of a data-driven branch that collects, processes, and interprets biological samples, contributing to stock and ecosystem assessments in the North Atlantic Ocean. Across NOAA Fisheries' science centers, Rich is a founding member of the MARVLS group, which is advancing research and application of fish Maturity Assessment, Reproductive Variability, and Life Strategies, and he is one of the leads for NOAA Fisheries' Strategic Initiative on genomics, where he contributes his knowledge of biogeography to eDNA metabarcoding studies in the Atlantic Ocean ecosystem.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2022-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Dynamics of supercritical cross-shelf buoyant plumes.
Presenter(s): Alexander Yankovsky, University of South Carolina
Date & Time: 29 November 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Dynamics of supercritical cross-shelf buoyant plumes

Presenter(s): Alexander Yankovsky (University of South Carolina)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar contact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US) +1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: A particular regime of coastal buoyant plumes develops under upwelling wind conditions, when the plume turns upstream (against the Kelvin wave propagation), detaches from the coast and crosses the shelf at an oblique angle with local isobaths as an elongated tongue of buoyant water. Analysis of satellite imagery of the Carolinas continental shelf (the US East Coast) shows frequent occurrences of such plumes. In situ observations reveal important features of the cross-shelf plume dynamics: a supercritical regime in terms of the internal Froude number and the presence of multiple interior fronts with the enhanced mixing/entrainment. We present a suite of high resolution idealized numerical experiments which delineate the formation of cross-shelf plumes. As supercritical buoyant outflow exits the estuarine mouth, it detaches from the bottom (plume's liftoff) and spreads as a thin buoyant layer. Light wind which does not significantly deepen the buoyant layer extends the supercritical regime far offshore, much farther than in the unforced plume. The basic mechanism that constrains the transverse broadening of the plume is the upwind radiation of internal solitons from the downwind front due to advection of high-momentum water from inshore. This process is enhanced by tidally modulated discharge when a train of tidal sub-plumes is produced. As wind increases, so does the eddy viscosity, such that the surface and bottom boundary layers merge nearshore shutting down the cross-shelf plume pattern and resulting in predominantly alongshore advection of the discharged water. Symmetric instabilities contribute to the buoyant layer mixing, especially between the consecutive tidal pulses.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

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Title: ENSO and the Winter Outlook for the Eastern Region
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Michelle L'Heureux, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 29 November 2022
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: ENSO and the Winter Outlook Outlook for the Eastern Region

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Michelle L'Heureux, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s): Ellen Mecray

Remote Access: Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract: The webinar will feature a recap of November conditions and Michelle L'Heureux will brief on the ENSO and inter season outlook for the Eastern Region.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

28 November 2022

Title: Urban Heat Islands and the District of Columbia's Heat Adaptation Strategy
Presenter(s): Melissa Deas, Chief Resilience Officer at the Washington DC Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency
Date & Time: 28 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Urban Heat Islands and the District of Columbia's Heat Adaptation Strategy

Presenter(s): Melissa Deas, Chief Resilience Officer at the Washington DC Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency

Sponsor(s): NOAA NEDTalks 2022
Seminar Contact: rafael.deameller@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Registration link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ef0o230pj01t/event/registration.htmlInformation: https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/events/melissa-deas-urban-heat-islands-and-the-district-of-columbias-heat-adaptation-strategy

Bio(s): Melissa Deas serves as the Chief Resilience Officer at the District's Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency (HSEMA). She leads efforts to ensure the District can thrive in a changing world by pushing forward policies that address shocks (e.g. hurricanes, economic downturns, and pandemics) as well as chronic stressors (e.g. affordable housing, stressed infrastructure, and inequality). Melissa comes to HSEMA from the District's Department of Energy and Environment, where she oversaw the implementation of the District's climate preparedness plan: Climate Ready DC. Before working for the District, Melissa served as a resilience expert for the California Energy Commission, Georgetown Climate Center, and the Union of Concerned Scientists. Melissa received her B.A. in Sociology from Harvard University and her Master of City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: California-Nevada Drought & Climate Update and Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Dan McEvoy, CNAP, WRCC, DRI , Julie Kalansky, CNAP, CW3E, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Nathan Patrick, NOAA NWS California Nevada River Forecast Center
Date & Time: 28 November 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: CA/NV Drought & Climate Update and Outlook Webinar + Preparing Your Winter Toolbox

Presenter(s):
Drought and Climate Update and Outlook
Dan McEvoy | CNAP, WRCC, DRI

Tools and Resources for your Winter Toolbox
Julie Kalansky | CNAP, CW3E, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Nathan Patrick | NOAA NWS California Nevada River Forecast Center

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS); California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP); Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC)

POC: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Abstract: According to the November 8 U.S. Drought Monitor, 99.7% of CA/NV is in drought, with 42.7% in Extreme (D3) or Exceptional (D4) Drought. This webinar will provide an overview of the current conditions and outlooks as well as tools you can use to prepare for, monitor, and respond to the drought conditions this winter.

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) November 2022 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia).

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5359630322138484748

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

21 November 2022

Title: Data, Data, Everywhere! Advancing NWS Flood Prediction and Communication
Presenter(s): Kate Abshire, NOAA National Weather Service - NWS
Date & Time: 21 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Data, Data, Everywhere! Advancing NWS Flood Prediction and Communication

Presenter(s): Kate Abshire, NOAA National Weather Service (NWS)

Sponsor(s): NOAA NEDTalks 2022Seminar Contact: rafael.deameller@noaa.govLocation: Webinar


Remote Access:
Registration link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ewjhfqq4f5uz/event/registration.htmlInformation: https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/events/kate-abshire-data-data-everywhere-advancing-nws-flood-prediction-and-communication

Bio(s): Kate Abshire has served as the National Flash Flood Services Lead in the Water Resources Services Branch since 2017. In that role, she leads the development of flash flood service concepts, prioritized requirements, and operational policies and procedures to enhance flash flood operations, products, and services in close collaboration with the Water Resources Service Program Team and NWS Headquarters personnel.Previously, she worked in the Office of Water Prediction combining a technical background in hydrologic and hydraulic modeling with the field of social science, working on efforts to engage stakeholders about their water resources information and service needs to gather requirements and feedback for the NWS Water Resources Program. Kate contributed to the NOAA Model for Service Delivery and the Service Delivery Guidance and Best Practices document as part of the NOAA Water Initiative. She also coordinates interagency collaboration among NWS, the USGS, USACE, and FEMA through the Integrated Water Resources Science and Services (IWRSS) consortium.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

18 November 2022

Title: November 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy
Date & Time: 18 November 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: November 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov), Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/november-2022-climate-outlook/

Abstract: We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, discuss forecast tools, and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for December 2022 and the winter. Join the gathering online to learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Bio(s): Rick Thoman is an expert in Alaska climate and weather. He produces reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities and media.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Taking a Deeper Dive into Creating Effective Marine Education Materials
Presenter(s): Joanna Grunin, NOAA OAR Intern, SUNY - Stony Brook University
Date & Time: 18 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Taking a Deeper Dive into Creating Effective Marine Education MaterialsNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Joanna Grunin, NOAA OAR Intern (Stony Brook University)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library



Seminar Contact(s): NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6154401313796348176

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: This presentation will explore educational toolkits created to teach middle schoolers about ocean acidification. As we see our climate change, we experience the effects differently by region. Providing educators with interactive, regionally-specific education materials can be beneficial to inspiring the next generation of ocean advocates.

Keywords: Education, ocean acidification, marine outreach

Bio(s): Joanna recently completed a communications internship with OAR and received a Masters in Marine Conservation and Policy from Stony Brook University. She is a passionate advocate for conservation, education, community organizing, and policy reform.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Lower Mississippi River Basin Drought
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 18 November 2022
11:00 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Lower Mississippi River Basin Special Drought Webinar

Presenter(s): TBD

Sponsor(s): NOAA, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Drought conditions in the Lower Mississippi River Basin continue to deteriorate, with over 76% of the Lower Mississippi watershed in moderate to extreme drought and river levels hitting record lows in some areas. To provide the latest information on current drought conditions, impacts felt across economic sectors ranging from river navigation and transportation to agriculture, as well as short-term and long range outlooks, NIDIS is joining with our partners to host a webinar focused on the drought in the Lower Mississippi River corridor. The webinar will raise awareness of the impacts to communities and sectors due to the current low river levels.

Please join us for the Lower Mississippi River Basin Special Drought Webinar on Friday, November 18, 2022 from 10:00am-11:30pm CT. This webinar will include an update on the current drought and river level situation and outlook, and will feature information on the impacts being felt on the ground. This webinar is being hosted by NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with NOAA's National Weather Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1394054727177524236

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here: (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

17 November 2022

Title: Catch Up and Keep Up: A Strategy for Marine Debris Mitigation in Papahānaumokuākea
Presenter(s): Kevin O'Brien, President, and James Morioka, Executive Director, Papahnaumokukea Marine Debris Project
Date & Time: 17 November 2022
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Catch Up and Keep Up: A Strategy for Marine Debris Mitigation in Papahnaumokukea

Presenter(s): Kevin O'Brien, President, and James Morioka, Executive Director, Papahnaumokukea Marine Debris Project

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries


Location: Webinar

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/162893072059196432

Abstract: Last month, the Papahnaumokukea Marine Debris Project (PMDP) wrapped up their 2022 field season, successfully removing over 200,000 pounds of marine debris from the reefs and shorelines of Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument. Despite being one of the most acute problems facing the monument, marine debris is fortunately one of the most easily mitigated problems, given enough time and resources. As federal government cleanups dwindled in the second decade of the 2000s, a backlog of marine debris (particularly derelict fishing gear) began to accumulate in this sensitive environment. Since its inception in 2019, PMDP has been working hard to increase the cadence of removal efforts in the monument to address this. Under PMDP's nonprofit leadership, 2022 marked year #1 of a strategic five-year plan to "catch up" with backlogged accumulation and "keep up" with new annual influx. Through intensive removal, this ambitious goal aims to reduce the impacts of marine debris to their lowest practicable levels, giving the wildlife of Papahnaumokukea the best long-term chance of survival. Join us for an hour of stories from the field highlighting the challenges and successes of this remote and difficult work.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: YDKWYDK: Snowy Plovers and Oil Spills
Presenter(s): Laird Henkel, California Department of Fish and Wildlife Offices of Spill Prevention and Response
Date & Time: 17 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Snowy Plovers and Oil Spills a Review of Response Considerations

Presenter(s): Laird Henkel, California Department of Fish and Wildlife Offices of Spill Prevention and Response

Sponsor(s): Office of Response and Restoration, You Don't Know What you Don't Know Lecture Series
Seminar Contacts: kimberly.albins@noaa.gov, Kyle.Vincent@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://noaaorr.adobeconnect.com/orrlectureseries/

Abstract: What happens when oil enters the habitat of a sensitive species. Join us to hear all about response considerations for snowy plovers.

Bio(s): Laird Henkel is a Senior Environmental Scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife Office of Spill Prevention and Response (OSPR). He has been with OSPR since 2007 and is currently the supervisor of OSPR's Marine Wildlife Veterinary Care & Research Center in Santa Cruz. He has acted as Wildlife Branch Director for numerous spill responses in California. Prior to joining OSPR, Laird worked on a variety of field projects with coastal birds, including monitoring of Western Snowy Plovers.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD (if available)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Risk Communication to Advance Equity: Research Findings, Best Practices, and Lessons Learned
Presenter(s): Renee Collini, Mississippi Alabama Sea Grant; Katy Hintzen, Hawaii Sea Grant; Brenna Sweetman, NOAA Office for Coastal Management; Karla Lopez, previous NOAA CESSRST intern
Date & Time: 17 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Risk Communication to Advance Equity: Research Findings, Best Practices, and Lessons Learned

Presenter(s): Renee Collini, Mississippi Alabama Sea Grant; Katy Hintzen, Hawaii Sea Grant; Brenna Sweetman, NOAA Office for Coastal Management; Karla Lopez, previous NOAA CESSRST intern

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office for Coastal Management, NOAA Sea Grant, NOAA National Weather Service

Seminar Contact(s): brenna.sweetman@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at https://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/noaaseminarseries2022/event/event_info.html

Abstract: Coastal flooding is affecting underserved and vulnerable communities at an alarming rate. Underserved communities are increasingly impacted by severe weather and flooding, resulting in NOAA and others to recognize the need to prioritize integrating equity into all stakeholder engagement and service delivery efforts. NOAA and Sea Grant programs partnered to better understand how to communicate risk with underserved communities to better prepare for sea level rise flooding. This project was two-fold. The first part was a literature review conducted by NOAA intern Karla Lopez on how to conduct effective long-term engagement with communities that are most vulnerable to sea level rise. The second part summarizes lessons learned from implementing these practices through community engagement activities conducted by Mississippi Alabama Sea Grant, Hawaii Sea Grant and North Carolina Sea Grant. This presentation will share an overview of the lessons learned from the literature review and on the ground engagement activities to help increase equitable access to information that will improve climate resilience.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Taking a Deeper Dive into Creating Effective Marine Education Materials
Presenter(s): Joanna Grunin, NOAA OAR Intern (Stony Brook University)
Date & Time: 17 November 2022
2:00 pm - 2:45 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Taking a Deeper Dive into Creating Effective Marine Education MaterialsNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Joanna Grunin, NOAA OAR Intern (Stony Brook University)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6154401313796348176

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: This presentation will explore educational toolkits created to teach middle schoolers about ocean acidification. As we see our climate change, we experience the effects differently by region. Providing educators with interactive, regionally-specific education materials can be beneficial to inspiring the next generation of ocean advocates.

Keywords: Education, ocean acidification, marine outreach

Bio(s): Joanna recently completed a communications internship with OAR and received a Masters in Marine Conservation and Policy from Stony Brook University. She is a passionate advocate for conservation, education, community organizing, and policy reform.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Doug Kluck, NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, Dennis Todey, USDA Midwest Climate Hub
Date & Time: 17 November 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook

Presenter(s): Doug Kluck, NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, Dennis Todey, USDA Midwest Climate Hub

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
November 2022 topics include continuing drought challenges and impacts both short and long term; major river system updates; wildfire potential outlooks/updates/impacts; recent and potential major climate/weather impacts; La Nia for the third fall/winter in a row what does it mean for this region; various conditions (soils, river, reservoirs, snow accumulations); and temperature/precipitation outlooks for the next month and season.

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7528179497868100876

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Reconstruction of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope in baleen whale earplugs
Presenter(s): Farzaneh Mansouri, PhD Postdoctoral Researcher, Baylor University
Date & Time: 17 November 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Reconstruction of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope in baleen whale earplugs

Presenter(s): Farzaneh Mansouri, PhD Postdoctoral Researcher Baylor University

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov
Location: Webinar


Remote Access:

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m62bee8403f564b780ee336ea913890c1

Meeting number (access code): 2763 830 3906
Meeting password: c63Kb7umFJ2

JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Global call-in numbers https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/globalcallin.php?MTID=m47f3c4812bd5a86fddec9d8af24ec6b8

JOIN FROM A VIDEO SYSTEM OR APPLICATION
Dial sip:27638303906@noaanmfs-meets.webex.com
You can also dial 207.182.190.20 and enter your meeting number.

Can't join the meeting?
https://collaborationhelp.cisco.com/article/WBX000029055
Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: TBD


NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Urban Heat Island Mapping Results Webinar
Presenter(s): Sarah Kapnick, Ph.D., NOAA chief scientist; Joey Williams, CAPA Strategies, LLC, manager; Abdoulaziz (Aziz) Abdoulaye Adily, Ph.D. student, University of Nebraska Medical Center; David Celebrezze, resilience and behavior change manager, Sustainable Columbus; Corrina Farho, AmeriCorps CivicSpark fellow, Gonzaga University's Center for Climate, Society, and the Environment; Karli Honebein, climate literacy program coordinator, Gonzaga University's Center for Climate, Society, and the Environment; Laura Sivels, climate engagement program manager, Montgomery County, Maryland
Date & Time: 17 November 2022
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NIHHIS-CAPA Urban Heat Island Mapping Results Webinar NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s):
  • Sarah Kapnick, Ph.D., NOAA chief scientist, moderator
  • Joey Williams, CAPA Strategies, LLC, manager
  • Abdoulaziz (Aziz) Abdoulaye Adily, Ph.D. student, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska
  • David Celebrezze, resilience and behavior change manager, Sustainable Columbus, Columbus, Ohio
  • Corrina Farho, AmeriCorps CivicSpark fellow, Gonzaga University's Center for Climate, Society, and the Environment, Spokane, Washington
  • Karli Honebein, climate literacy program coordinator, Gonzaga University's Center for Climate, Society, and the Environment, Spokane, Washington
  • Laura Sivels, climate engagement program manager, Montgomery County, Maryland


Sponsor(s): NOAA CPO and NIHHIS



Seminar Contact(s): Morgan Zabow (morgan.zabow@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/332054036076516365


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NIHHIS Youtube channel.

Abstract: The 2022 Urban Heat Island (UHI) domestic mapping campaign took place in fifteen communities across the US this summer, and the campaign cycle officially wrapped up in September. The heat map reports are being released to communities on a rolling basis, and community organizations, local governments, and citizen scientists are already planning ways that they can use their reports to inform decision makers and implement cooling solutions. To reflect on the 6th year of UHI mapping, NOAA's National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS) and CAPA Strategies will host a 90 minute webinar on November 17th at 1:00PM EST.

The webinar will start with an overview of the 2022 campaigns. Following the overview will be presentations from four of the campaigns. During these presentations, the campaigns will discuss their overall experience, how they engaged volunteers and local organizations, what they learned, and how they plan to use their mapping results. After the presentations, there will be a discussion and Q&A between the campaigns. The webinar is a great opportunity for communities interested in applying for the 2023 cohort to learn more.

Keywords: Urban heat islands, extreme heat, adaptation, resilience, citizen science

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NIHHIS Youtube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Conservation Genomics of North America's Most Imperiled Taxa
Presenter(s): Steven Hein, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA/OAR, Policy and Congressional Affairs Branch; Moderated by Becky Curtis, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA, Fishery Management Specialist for NMFS Office of Sustainable Fisheries
Date & Time: 17 November 2022
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Conservation Genomics of North America's Most Imperiled Taxa (2022 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Steven Hein, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA/OAR, Policy and Congressional Affairs Branch; Moderated by Becky Curtis, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA, Fishery Management Specialist for NMFS Office of Sustainable Fisheries.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Sea Grant; NOAA Central Library



Seminar Contact(s): NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Around 65% of unionid mussels are awarded enhanced protection at the local, state, and/or federal level. Genomic techniques can provide valuable information to guide robust conservation strategies for this highly imperiled group.Keywords: genomics, conservation, mussels

Bio(s): Steve received a PhD from Miami University in Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology and MSc in Biology from the University of Texas at Tyler. His work focuses on applying genetic, ecological, and biogeographical inferences to guide endangered species conservation.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: An assessment of marine, estuarine, and riverine habitat vulnerability to climate change in the Northeast U.S.
Presenter(s): Mike Johnson, NOAA/NMFS Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office
Date & Time: 17 November 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: An assessment of marine, estuarine, and riverine habitat vulnerability to climate change in the Northeast U.S.

Presenter(s): Mike Johnson, NOAA/NMFS Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov
Location: Webinar


Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Social Science in NOAA: Workforce Trends, Challenges, and Opportunities for Building a More Interdisciplinary Workforce
Presenter(s): Jeffrey Kast, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA, National Sea Grant College Program and Weather Program Office; Moderated by Becky Curtis, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA, Fishery Management Specialist for the Office of Sustainable Fisheries
Date & Time: 17 November 2022
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Social Science in NOAA: Workforce Trends, Challenges, and Opportunities for Building a More Interdisciplinary Workforce (2022 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Jeffrey Kast, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA, National Sea Grant College Program and Weather Program Office; Moderated by Becky Curtis, 2022 Knauss Fellow, NOAA, Fishery Management Specialist for the Office of Sustainable Fisheries.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Sea Grant; NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Increasing legislative and executive mandates that require research, methods, and skills from the social, behavioral, and economic (SBE) sciences are affecting agencies across the federal landscape. Within NOAA, the results are increased focus on evaluating societal outcomes and growing demand for economic valuation of the work, products, and tools conducted by and developed by the agency. Currently, SBE scientists make up less than 1% of NOAA's federal workforce. As a result of historical mandates and regulations it is no surprise that NOAA's SBE scientists are mainly located in NOAA Fisheries (70%) and, within the Line Office, are mainly employed as economists (80%). Given societal needs and recent mandates, does NOAA Fisheries foreshadow the future SBE workforce needs for other Line Offices within NOAA? If so, what would that look like and how could we get there? This talk will focus on the challenges and opportunities for building a world-class workforce and address questions such as why NOAA SBE scientists have higher annual turnover rates than physical science colleagues (5.6% vs. 4.8%) over the past 17 fiscal years even though recent survey data show that NOAA SBE scientists are generally satisfied with their work.Keywords: social science, workforce development, mixed methods

Bio(s): Jeffrey Kast received his Ph.D. in Environmental Science from The Ohio State University where his research focused on building a multi- and interdisciplinary understanding of challenges affecting water quality in Lake Erie. His dissertation research included developing methods of integrating social science data into physical watershed models to improve simulations and analyzing the influence of national and state agricultural and environmental policies in the mid-twentieth century on landscape changes across Ohio. Jeffrey also holds a Masters degree in Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering from Ohio State and a Bachelors degree in Agricultural and Biological Engineering from the University of Florida.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

16 November 2022

Title: Extending VIIRS Ocean Color Neural Network retrievals to High Chlorophyll-a Algal Bloom Conditions
Presenter(s): Dr. Alex Gilerson, CUNY
Date & Time: 16 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Extending VIIRS Ocean Color Neural Network retrievals to High Chlorophyll-a Algal Bloom Conditions through the Utilization of I1 VIIRS Imaging Band and VIIRS-OLCI Data Fusion

Presenter(s): Dr. Alex Gilerson, The City College of the City University of New York

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov
Location: Webinar

Abstract: State and federal environmental and health monitoring requires better information regarding the presence of harmful algal blooms (HABs) on their coasts. Satellites support monitoring if they can provide frequent coverage and can retrieve chlorophyll-a Chla over a wide range of concentrations. VIIRS OC3V algorithm often does not estimate Chla correctly for Chla > 10-15 mg/m3. The NIR-red band algorithm, which works well at high Chla is not applicable to VIIRS, which does not have a 709 nm band. A combination of VIIRS and OLCI data, which has a 709 nm band and currently used for HABs detection, should significantly increase the frequency of observations and reliability of detection. Results from the first year of the project on the development of the NN algorithm with I1 band and comparison with OLCI data are presented showing that inclusion into the algorithm data from the VIIRS imaging I1 band 600-680 nm expands the range of detected Chla to higher values typical to algal blooms in coastal areas like the Chesapeake Bay. The sources of uncertainties in Rrs retrieval from VIIRS and OLCI sensors are well identified; results are complemented by measurements from a new sensor head with increased number of bands recently installed on the LISCO AERONET-OC site and from a new Chesapeake Bay AERONET-OC site.

Bio(s): Prof. A. Gilerson received his PhD, Master and Bachelor degrees from the Technical University, Kazan, Russia. He started his work at the CCNY in 1997 at the Institute for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers (IUSL) with the focus on medical applications of optical coherence tomography. Since joining Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory of Electrical Engineering Department in 2003 he worked on multiple projects related to Remote Sensing of the coupled Ocean-Atmosphere environment, specifically on development of algorithms for the estimation of chlorophyll concentration and chlorophyll fluorescence, detection of algal blooms, validation of satellite sensors for ocean monitoring, development of instrumentation and systems for advanced characterization of the ocean waters and ocean surface. He developed (together of Dr. S. Ahmed) the Long Island Sound Coastal Observatory (LISCO) for the validation of the Ocean Color satellite sensors which is a part of NASA AERONET and AERONET-Ocean Color Networks; developed integrated system for the study of underwater polarized light fields; developed a hyperspectral polarimetric imaging system for ocean studies; led CCNY group in multiple ocean field campaigns. He is a member of the NOAA-NASA-Navy team for the calibration/validation of the Ocean Color satellites. His work has been supported by grants from NASA, NOAA and the Office of Naval Research. He is a part of Earth System Science and Environmental Engineering Program and a member of doctoral faculty of the Earth and Environmental Sciences Program at the Graduate Center of CUNY, member of NOAA CREST center.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php. For more information visit: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: Bering sea temperature variabilities and effects to consider
Presenter(s): Emily Hayden, M.S., Oregon State University College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences; Jens Nielsen, Ph.D., Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, & Ecosystem Studies/NOAA AFSC
Date & Time: 16 November 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Bering sea temperature variabilities and effects to consider

Presenter(s): Emily Hayden, M.S, Oregon State University, and Jens Nielsen, Ph.D., University of Washington CICOES/NOAA AFSC

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact): EcoFOCI Research Physical Scientist Emily Lemagie (emily.lemagie@noaa.gov), and EcoFOCI Zooplankton Ecologist Deana Crouser (deana.crouser@noaa.gov).

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: These presentations will provide an overview of ocean temperature and sea ice variability, paired with a discussion of its potential impacts on phytoplankton bloom timing and zooplankton diapause in the Bering Sea. Atmospheric variability is driving the majority of air-sea heat flux anomalies in the Bering Sea, which are contributing to recent elevated ocean temperatures and low sea ice concentrations. One potential impact is an offset between phytoplankton bloom timing and zooplankton coming out of diapause. After hearing about both of these topics, we will have time for a panel discussion with our speakers about variability in the Bering Sea.

Bio(s): Emily Hayden is a Graduate Research Fellow at Oregon State University in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, with a concentration in Physics of Oceans and Atmospheres. Her research focuses on the link between atmospheric variability and the ocean state, and the mechanisms that drive this coupling in the subpolar North Pacific. Jens Nielsen
is an aquatic ecologist focusing primarily on plankton ecology at NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center. His research aims to understand community and trophic dynamics in ecosystems in an effort to develop biological indicators of ecosystem changes along the US west coast from California to Alaska.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: CoExploration: Real-Time Multi-Modal AUV Mapping with Low-Throughput Acoustic Links
Presenter(s): Dr. Mike Jakuba, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Senior Engineer
Date & Time: 16 November 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: CoExploration: Real-Time Multi-Modal AUV Mapping with Low-Throughput Acoustic LinksNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Dr. Mike Jakuba, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Senior Engineer

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Liang Wu (liang.wu@noaa.gov), Chris Beaverson (chris.beaverson@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4139839826341832459
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.




Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: This talk will describe new "CoExploration" tools that provide AUV operators with significantly more real-time insight into on-board data than typical synchronous acoustic uplinks allow. CoEx aims to maximize the utility of the low-throughput acoustic links between operator and vehicle to leverage the strengths of both members of the team---access to full resolution data on the part of the AUV, and situational and logistical awareness, and scientific expertise and intent on the part of operators. The talk will present results from a recent expedition during which operators used CoEx tools to uplink multibeam, identify a target, redirect the vehicle to photograph it, and uplink confirmatory photos, all in real time during a single dive.

Keywords: CoExploration, AUV, mapping

Bio(s): Dr. Michael Jakuba is an engineer with extensive experience designing and deploying marine robotic systems. Dr. Jakuba received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from MIT in 2000, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering/Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering from the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in 2003 and 2007, respectively. He was a postdoctoral researcher at Johns Hopkins University and the Australian Centre for Field Robotics in Sydney Australia prior to returning to WHOI in 2011 where he now works as a Senior Engineer.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


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15 November 2022

Title: Alaska Fire Season 2022: Focus on Southwest Alaska and Impacts on Vegetation and Fuels
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP Climate Specialist; and J.J. Frost, ABR, Inc. Plant Biologist
Date & Time: 15 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Alaska Fire Season 2022: Focus on Southwest Alaska and Impacts on Vegetation and Fuels

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman (ACCAP Climate Specialist), and J.J. Frost (ABR, Inc. Plant Biologist)

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/fire-season-swalaska-2022/

Abstract: The 2022 fire season in Alaska was unprecedented. Southwest Alaska experienced record-breaking fires that impacted local communities and challenged management resources. This webinar will review the weather, climate, and ecological factors that contributed to the severe wildfire season, with an in-depth look at the Southwest region. Additionally, this webinar will cover vegetation types and potential changes in the context of intensifying fire in Southwestern Alaska.

Bio(s): Rick Thoman is the Climate Specialist at the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy. He has many years of experience producing reliable Alaska climate change information describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities, and the media.

J.J. Frost has a multidisciplinary research background focused on boreal forest and Arctic tundra ecosystems, with sixteen years of field experience in Alaska and western Siberia. His work focuses on vegetation classification and mapping, plant-landform-soil relationships, landscape change detection, long-term monitoring of vegetation and permafrost, and habitat-use relationships for breeding birds. He has substantial expertise in integrating field-based information with a variety of modern, and historical remote-sensing data sources to elucidate current ecosystem conditions and long-term change.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

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Title: Recent Atlantic multidecadal variability and its impacts are driven by external forcings
Presenter(s): Dr. Chengfei He; Postdoctoral Associate, NOAA/AOML and University of Miami/Rosenstiel School of Marine, Atmospheric, and Earth Science
Date & Time: 15 November 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Recent Atlantic multidecadal variability and its impacts are driven by external forcings

Presenter(s): Dr. Chengfei He; Postdoctoral Associate, NOAA/AOML and University of Miami/Rosenstiel

Sponsor(s): Matthieu Le Henaff, NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AMOL) and University of Miami / Rosenstiel School of Marine, Atmospheric, and Earth Science

Seminar Contact(s): Matthieu Le Henaff, matthieu.lehenaff@noaa.gov


Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://meet.goto.com/776954917

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (408) 650-3123

Access Code: 776-954-917

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Abstract: The Atlantic multidecadal variability (AMV) " a basin-scale sea surface temperature (SST) uctuation in the Atlantic " has dramatic influences on climate, understanding the causes of which has crucial social-ecological implications. However, the driver of AMV and its impacts remains a topic of debate because of limitations of current climate models. Here we identify a systematic SST bias in the CMIP6 models that leads to large-scale atmospheric circulation and rainfall bias in the simulation. After removing the bias, we find the simulated AMV and associated impacts are highly consistent with observations, albeit of relatively small magnitude. We show statistically and physically that AMV and related impacts since 1950 have been driven primarily by anthropogenic aerosols and natural forcings, while they are likely driven by internal dynamics in the early twentieth century. In the positive AMV, the forced tropical Atlantic SST gradient excites Gill-type response locally, including a low-level westerly that favors the Sahel rainfall and a high-level easterly that perturbs the vertical wind shear and hence North Atlantic Hurricane activity. This local response further propagates northward and downstream, forming a circum-global teleconnection pattern and affecting climate in other regions.

Bio(s): Chengfei He is a postdoc at RSMAS, University of Miami, working with Amy Clement. Prior to moving to Florida, he received his PhD from The Ohio State University in 2021, when he focused on water isotope and deglacial climate change since the Last Glacial Maximum. Now his interest is mostly in the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: The seminar will be recorded, and the recording will be available at: https://www.youtube.com/user/phodaoml . (the exact link will be available after the recording is posted)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: A look at the sensitivity of British weather to tides and recent developments in regional coupled modelling at the UK Met Office
Presenter(s): Alex Arnold and Sgolne Berthou, UK Met Office
Date & Time: 15 November 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A look at the sensitivity of British weather to tides and recent developments in regional coupled modelling at the UK Met Office

Presenter(s): Alex Arnold and Sgolne Berthou (UK Met Office)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar contact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US) +1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: TBA


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + El Niño-Southern Oscillation and the 2022-23 Winter Outlook
Presenter(s): Chris Fuhrmann, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Michelle L'Heureux, NWS Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 15 November 2022
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + El Nio-Southern Oscillation and the 2022-23 Winter Outlook

Presenter(s):
Climate Overview: Chris Fuhrmann | Southeast Regional Climate CenterWater Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur/Todd Hamill | NWS Southeast River Forecast CenterAgriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox | University of GeorgiaEl Nio-Southern Oscillation and the 2022-23 Winter Outlook: Michelle L'Heureux | NWS Climate Prediction Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.
The November 15 webinar will feature a special presentation on "El Nio-Southern Oscillation and the 2022-23 Winter Outlook."

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/9215585718468903438

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here: (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

14 November 2022

Title: Geostationary Satellites - Tools for a Meteorologist and You
Presenter(s): Kevin Fryar, NOAA/NESDIS Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites - GOES
Date & Time: 14 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Geostationary Satellites - Tools for a Meteorologist and You

Presenter(s): Kevin Fryar, NOAA/NESDIS Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES)

Sponsor(s): NOAA NED Talks 2022
Seminar Contact: rafael.deameller@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Registration link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ewjhfqq4f5uz/event/registration.htmlInformation: https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/events/kevin-fryar-geostationary-satellites-tools-meteorologist-and-you

Bio(s): Dreams do come true! It has been very exciting to see how remote sensing and data gathering applications within the satellite industry are becoming more and more advanced. I am so lucky to get to shape future tools to get weather satellite information to those who need it"whether you fly, hunt, hike, sail, or respond to a weather disaster.

I've held operational, staff, and management positions within the National Weather Service (NWS) and the Air Force over the last 20 years. What I've learned I put into practice as the Chief of Staff for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Laboratory Studies of Optical and Chemical properties of PM Emissions from African Biomass Fuels
Presenter(s): Solomon Bililign, North Carolina A&T State University
Date & Time: 14 November 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: DSRC GC402
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Laboratory Studies of Optical and Chemical properties of PM Emissions from African Biomass Fuels
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Solomon Bililign, North Carolina A&T State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.womack@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6307586372665323024

Abstract: Biomass burning (BB) is a major source of pollutants that impact local, regional, and global air quality, and public health. Work in our lab is focused on emissions from African biomass fuels - a hotspot source region of carbonaceous aerosols on a global scale. Recently we investigated the relationship between morphology (fractal dimensions) and modified combustion efficiency (MCE); determined fractal dimensions from TEM images; measured emission factors of pollutants from six different sub-Saharan African biomass fuels combusted under a wide range of burning conditions (MCE's). Our most recent work determined the influence of combustion condition and fuel type on the hygroscopicity parameter of BB aerosols measured using the enhancement in light extinction coefficient (f(RH)) using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC). Ongoing studies in our laboratory focus on investigating how the molecular-level composition of smoldering-dominated organic-rich solid African biomass burning aerosols change as a function of aging conditions (i.e., fresh versus dark/photochemical/cloud water aging) and how these aerosol optical properties (mass scattering, absorption, and extinction cross-sections, absorption/scattering ngstrm exponents, and the single scattering albedo) change because of any potential molecular-level chemical changes. We plan to analyze filter samples with a platform that consists of ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled in-line to a diode array detector and a high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer, equipped with an electrospray ionization source operated in both positive and negative ion modes. The simultaneous absorption and mass spectral optimized chromatographic analysis of solvent extracts is expected to reveal individual BrC constituents and their key chemical characteristics. The evaluation of the constituents' atmospheric relevance is based on analysis of filter samples collected in the lab and two distinct locations in Africa (Botswana) during the dry-winter fire season in 2022, followed by mass closure of the main chromophores. This study will add to the growing knowledge in African fuel sources and their varied impact on climate and air quality.

Bio(s): Dr. Solomon Bililign is a professor in the Physics Department at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (NCA&T). He received his BS and MS degrees in Physics from Addis Ababa University, and his PhD in Physics from the University of Utah. After completing his postdoctoral work in the Chemistry department of the University of Utah, he joined the faculty of NCAT in 1993. He received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring in 2010, as well as several other awards from NCA&T for excellence in teaching and research. He served as the director of the NOAA-funded Interdisciplinary Scientific Environmental Technology (ISET) Cooperative Science Center.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2022, contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

10 November 2022

Title: NOAA CoastWatch: Chlorophyll in the Chesapeake Bay, Communications Best Practices
Presenter(s): Timothy Wynne, NOAA and V Wegman, GST
Date & Time: 10 November 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title 1: Evaluating the efficacy of five chlorophyll algorithms in the Chesapeake Bay (USA) for operational monitoring and assessment

Presenter(s): Timothy Wynne, NCCOS HAB Forecasting Branch.

Title 2: NOAA CoastWatch Communication Best Practices

Presenter(s): V Wegman, GST
CoastWatch is enacting a new Communications Plan, with an associated document that lays out the Best Practices for CoastWatch affiliates.

Remote Access: Google Meet link: https://meet.google.com/uco-uboz-cmkOr dial: (US) +1 406-838-3189 PIN: 768 242 663#

Sponsor(s): NOAA CoastWatch (STAR)

Seminar Contact(s): Victoria.Wegman@noaa.gov
Slides, Recordings Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: NOAA/CVP Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS) Process Studies Webinar Series - Session 5
Presenter(s): Deepak Cherian - National Center for Atmospheric Research - NCAR and Daniel Whitt - NASA Ames Research Center
Date & Time: 10 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA/CVP Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS) Process Studies Webinar Series - Session 5

Presenter(s): Deepak Cherian - National Center for Atmospheric Research - NCAR; Daniel Whitt - NASA Ames Research Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Climate Variability and Predictability Program

Seminar Contact(s): jose.algarin@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/808724212884499215Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: N/A

Abstract: The NOAA Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) Program is hosting a webinar series on the Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS) Pre-Field Modeling Studies that will highlight the recent results from the CVP-funded projects. The goal of these modeling studies is to refine the current scientific understanding of the equatorial Pacific climate system, with a specific focus on two process studies identified in the TPOS 2020 First Report, Pacific Upwelling and Mixing Physics (PUMP) and Air"sea Interaction at the eastern edge of the Warm Pool. Their results will assist in the planning of future field campaigns.The fifth and last session will feature two presentations:Off-equatorial deep-cycle turbulence forced by Tropical Instability Waves, by Deepak Cherian (National Center for Atmospheric Research - NCAR)Simulating turbulent vertical heat transport from mesoscales to turbulent scales in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Cold Tongue, by Dr. Daniel Whitt (NASA Ames Research Center)

Bio(s): Dr. Deepak Cherian is a Physical Oceanographer at the National Center for Atmospheric Research - NCAR. Dr. Cherian is a physical oceanographer, whose recent research primarily focuses on ocean mixing, both using observations and models. Deepak also actively works to broaden access to scientific computational skills by contributing in many ways to the scientific Python and Pan geo communities.Dr. Daniel Whitt is a research scientist and interdisciplinary oceanographer in the Biospheric Science Branch of the Earth Science Division at NASA Ames Research Center. He uses observations, high-end computing, and theory to model and understand the ocean, including its physics, biogeochemistry, and ecology as well as its role in the changing Earth system.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Within a few days of the webinar, a link to the recording
will posted on the CVP Program website: cpo.noaa.gov/cvp/webinars.

Subscribe / Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Broad Community Development of the Unified Forecast System, Using the WAVEWATCH III® Wind Model as an Example
Presenter(s): Hendrik Tolman, NOAA / NWS / STI
Date & Time: 10 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Broad Community Development of the Unified Forecast System, Using the WAVEWATCH III Wind Model as an Example

Presenter(s): Hendrik Tolman, NOAA / NWS / STI

Sponsor(s): Office of Science and Technology Integration (OSTI) Modeling Division, National Weather Service of NOAA. If you would like to recommend a speaker and topic please email:
ufs.modeling@noaa.gov and provide information on speaker and topic along with email addresses of speakers.

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Mackell (stacy.mackell@noaa.gov) and Caroline Delgado (caroline.delgado@noaa.gov)Remote Acess: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2327840262424013581

Abstract: This is a repeat of a presentation I did at the Issac Newton Institute of the University of Cambridge on October 26. It will touch on the topics of multi-disciplinary community modeling, the use of AI and ML learning, and collaboration with the private sector for the UFS, using the history of the WAVEWATCH III wind wave model as an example.

Bio(s): Dr. Ir. Hendrik L. Tolman is the Senior Advisor for Advanced Modeling Systems of the Office of Science and Technology Integration (OSTI) of the National Weather Service (NWS). Before joining OSTI, he was at the Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) of the NWS for more that 20 years, as wave modeler (original development of WAVEWATCH III), Marine Modeling Branch Chief and Director. Dr. Tolman holds a Doctorate (Dr., PhD equivalent) and Engineering degree (Ir., Masters equivalent) from the Civil Engineering Department of Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. He is a naturalized US citizen of Dutch origin.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:All PowerPoints and recordings from past webinars can be accessed at the UFS webinar web page.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Changes Afoot After 2022: State Plane and the Death of the U.S. Survey Foot
Presenter(s): Michael Dennis, PhD, Geodesist, Observation and Analysis Division, NGS
Date & Time: 10 November 2022
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Changes Afoot After 2022: State Plane and the Death of the U.S. Survey Foot

Presenter(s): Michael Dennis, PhD, Geodesist, Observation and Analysis Division, NGS

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NOS National Geodetic Survey.

Seminar Contact(s): sonja.bowen@noaa.gov, NOAA National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1585003612125323787
Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Abstract:
Change is nearly upon us. Design of the State Plane Coordinate System of 2022 (SPCS2022) is almost done, and on December 31, 2022, the U.S. survey foot will be deprecated. This means that it will be deemed obsolete and should be used for historical and legacy applications only. It will be superseded by the international foot definition (i.e., 1 foot = 0.3048 meter exactly) for all applications, including SPCS2022. However, SPCS2022 will not be released until 2025, along with the rest of the modernized National Spatial Reference System. This webinar gives an overview on the status of SPCS2022 and on making an orderly transition to the international foot with minimum disruption.

Technical Content Rating: Intermediate - Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.


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Title: Applications of biomarkers in trophic ecology
Presenter(s): Suzanne Budge, PhD Professor Department of Process Engineering and Applied Science, Dalhousie University
Date & Time: 10 November 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Applications of biomarkers in trophic ecology

Presenter(s): Suzanne Budge, PhD, Professor Department of Process Engineering and Applied Science, Dalhousie University

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS.NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
JOIN WEBEX MEETING
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Meeting number (access code): 2763 830 3906
Meeting password: c63Kb7umFJ2

JOIN BY PHONE
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Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: Several naturally occurring chemicals can be used as specific indicators or biomarkers of their source. Biomarker-based approaches, utilizing both fatty acid signatures and the ratios of bulk stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes, have been employed to elucidate animal diets and trophic structure, with known caveats in their applications. In this talk, I will describe a qualitative application using these markers to investigate the foraging ecology of nearshore fish in the Gulf of Alaska, with an emphasis on the potential for competition within these species. To complement this, I will also present results from feeding experiments with captive fish that explored the application of stable carbon isotope ratios of individual fatty acids in evaluating diets of marine fish. This approach avoids several of the limitations associated with traditional biomarker techniques, and as such, may offer a more specific method for the evaluation of diets of marine fish.
NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

9 November 2022

Title: The U.S. South Atlantic Ecosystem Status Report: Development and Emerging Applications
Presenter(s): J. Kevin Craig, PhD Research Fishery Biologist National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Beaufort Lab
Date & Time: 9 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The U.S. South Atlantic Ecosystem Status Report: Development and Emerging ApplicationsNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): J. Kevin Craig, PhD Research Fishery Biologist National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Beaufort Lab

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4702291695240836368
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The U.S. South Atlantic is a transitional ecosystem along the Atlantic seaboard that is characterized by tropical conditions in the south (Florida) and temperate conditions in the north (North Carolina). The system supports important recreational and commercial fisheries and is experiencing some of the highest rates of population growth in the United States. Here we describe the development of the first Ecosystem Status Report (ESR) for the region, provide an overview of the status and trends of key ecosystem components, and describe some emerging applications of the report to support resource management in the region.

Keywords: Ecosystem Status Report, South Atlantic, Ecosystem Monitoring

Bio(s): Kevin Craig oversees the Atlantic and Caribbean Reef Fish branch at the Southeast Fisheries Science Center. His research interests focus on environmental effects on fish population and community dynamics in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic regions. Prior to his current position, he led stock assessments for several South Atlantic species. He earned undergraduate degrees from N.C. State University, an M.S. in Fisheries from the University of Washington and a PhD in Ecology from Duke University.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


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Title: An Introduction to the Plan Integration for Resilience Scorecard™ (PIRS™) for Heat
Presenter(s): Dr. Ladd Keith, Dr. Sara Meerow, Priya Zachariah, and Dr. Meredith Jennings
Date & Time: 9 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Ladd Keith, Dr. Sara Meerow, Priya Zachariah, and Dr. Meredith Jennings


Sponsor(s): NOAA CPO Extreme Heat Risk Initiative and the National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS)

Seminar Contact(s): Hunter Jones; hunter.jones@Noaa.govREGISTER WITH GOTOWEBINAR
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7424617620000029199

Abstract: This webinar will focus on the recently released American Planning Association report: Planning for Urban Heat Resilience, as well as the newly developed Plan Integration for Resilience Scorecard (PIRS) for Heat guidebook. Viewers will learn the basics of conducting the PIRS for Heat approach to consider how to integrate heat resilience activities across multiple municipal-scale plans. A case study on the PIRS for Heat results and their potential uses for Houston, TX will be provided.This webinar is part of the NOAA Extreme Heat Risk Initiative Webinar Series. Learn more about the series here: https://www.heat.gov/pages/heat-risk-initiative-research-resultsBIOGRAPHYLadd Keith, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the School of Landscape Architecture and Planning and a faculty research associate at the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy at the University of Arizona. An urban planner by training, he has over a decade of experience planning for climate change with diverse stakeholders in cities across the U.S. His research explores heat planning and governance with funding from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Department of Transportation. He served a full term on the City of Tucson's Planning Commission and chaired the development and adoption of the city's comprehensive plan.Dr. Sara Meerow is an associate professor in the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning at Arizona State University. She is an interdisciplinary scholar working at the intersection of urban geography and planning to tackle the challenge of making cities more resilient in the face of climate change and other social and environmental hazards, while at the same time more sustainable and just. Her current projects focus on conceptualizations of urban resilience, planning for urban resilience to flooding and extreme heat, and green infrastructure planning in a range of cities in the U.S. and internationally.
Priya Zachariah, AICP, is the Chief Resilience and Sustainability Officer (CRSO) for the City of Houston, overseeing the City's new Office of Resilience and Sustainability.Dr. Meredith Jennings received her Doctorate from the University of Miami from the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. Professional interests include building cross-disciplinary partnerships and programs that promote community resilience and lessen the impacts of climate change. As a 2017-2018 National Academy of Sciences' Gulf Research Program Science Policy Fellow, she led climate and health resilience building initiatives at Harris County Public Health. Since joining HARC in 2018, Dr. Jennings has provided project management, technical analysis, and stakeholder engagement to support projects such as the City of Houston Climate Action Plan (released April 2020), the 2020 Houston Harris Heat Mapping Project, the Harris County Precinct 2 Air Quality Assessment, and ongoing research to increase affordable, renewable energy resources in low-income communities.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: ABT Lightning Talks: Zooplankton, Fish Larvae and Saildrone Wave Measurements
Presenter(s): Deana Crouser, BS., Lynker Technologies in support of NOAA's ASFC; Alison Deary, Ph. D., NOAA AFSC; Ned Cokelet, Ph. D., NOAA PMEL
Date & Time: 9 November 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: ABT Lightning Talks: Zooplankton, Fish Larvae and Saildrone Wave Measurements

Presenter(s): Deana Crouser, B.S., NOAA AFSC; Alison Deary, Ph.D., NOAA AFSC; Ned Cokelet, Ph.D., NOAA PMEL

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): EcoFOCI Research Physical Scientist Emily Lemagie (emily.lemagie@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Zooplankton Ecologist Deana Crouser (deana.crouser@noaa.gov).

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: In this trial of a new 5-minute lightning talk format for the EcoFOCI seminar we will have the opportunity to hear from multiple speakers about recent projects, ecosystem indicators, measurement techniques, and more. This session will begin with an introduction to the ABT'' communication method. We will also hear about zooplankton as ecosystem indicators, identifying fish larvae, and collecting wave measurements from saildrones. We will end with an open discussion session and opportunity to ask questions of our speaker/panelists.

Bio(s): Deana Crouser is a Zooplankton Ecologist and a contractor with Lynker Technologies in support of NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center. Her research focuses on how environmental conditions affect zooplankton size and distribution. Alison Deary is a Fisheries Biologist at NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center. Her research focuses on early life history stages of fishes from the Northeast Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea, and the Arctic. Ned Cokelet, also known as the saildrone data guru, is a physical Oceanographer at NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory. Ned advises on saildrone instrumentation and the variables they measure among other things.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Decadal trends of global climate and air pollution: two-way interactions, joint impacts and synergistic mitigation
Presenter(s): Yangyang Xu, Texas A&M University
Date & Time: 9 November 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: Decadal trends of global climate and air pollution: two-way interactions, joint impacts and synergistic mitigation
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Yangyang Xu, Texas A&M University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): jan.kazil@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/320270570450079755

Abstract: Climate change and air pollution are arguably two most pressing environmental issues facing the world today. This talk give an overview of studies relating the two at the decadal to multi-decadal time scale. The first part focusing on interactions will review recent work of how global warming affects aerosol distribution (Banks et al., 2021; Fiore et al., 2022), and in turn, how aerosols affect mean and extreme precipitation (Xu et al., 2022) and circulation changes (Diao and Xu, 2022), which could consequently impact air pollution itself (Wang et al., 2021), completing an intrinsic feedback loop. The second part will address the joint occurrence of heat extremes and air pollution, including haze (Xu et al., 2020) and ozone (Xiao et al., 2022), concerning their broader impact on human health and crop yield. Some concluding thoughts is given on how to mitigate the near-term warming rates by achieving co-benefits of air quality improvement while avoiding the shock of aerosol unmasking (Dreyfus et al., 2022).

Bio(s): Dr. Yangyang Xu received his Ph.D. in Earth Sciences from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego in 2014. Dr. Xu joined the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at Texas A&M University as an Assistant Professor in 2016 and was promoted to Associate professor in 2022. Dr. Xu's research focuses on climate modeling with a specialization in climate change attribution, impact, adaptation, and mitigation. Dr. Xu is the recipient of the American Geophysical Union's 2019 Global and Environment Change Early Career Award for "outstanding contributions in research, educational, or societal impacts in the area of global environmental change".

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2022,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!

8 November 2022

Title: The use of apps to assist fishers in reducing unwanted catches
Presenter(s): Julia Calderwood, Marine Institute, Ireland
Date & Time: 8 November 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: The use of apps to assist fishers in reducing unwanted catches

Presenter(s): Julia Calderwood (Marine Institute, Ireland)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contact: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m161d8630abba4e363a98635052f62a1fOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 2762 418 8254

Accessibility: Seminars will be close captioned by Friends Interpreting Services, LLC.

Abstract: The introduction of the LandingObligation in Europe has highlighted the need for fishers to adopt moreselective fishing practices to avoid unwanted catches. Part of the solution maycome from gear technology, but the rest will need to come via knowing where andwhen unwanted catches might be expected. App technology has the potential toprovide industry with near-real time information on fish distributions to helpbetter target or avoid certain species. Work exploring the potential of thistechnology in Irish demersal fisheries will be presented.

Bio(s): Julia is a researcher working as part of theEcosystem Based Fisheries Management Team, based at the Marine Institute inGalway, Ireland. She originally joined the Marine Institute 7 years ago to workas part of the Horizon2020 funded DiscardLess project, examining the impacts ofthe Landing Obligation on European Fisheries. In 2020 she was awarded aStarting Investigator Researcher Grant from Science Foundation Ireland to startthe IFISH project, which aims to explore the development of information sharingnetworks in Irish Fisheries to aid in reducing unwanted catches.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2022-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Ocean/sea-ice floe interactions at the (sub-)mesoscales
Presenter(s): Mukund Gupta, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA
Date & Time: 8 November 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Ocean/sea-ice floe interactions at the (sub-)mesoscales

Presenter(s): Mukund Gupta (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar contact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US) +1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: Marginal ice zones are composed of discrete sea-ice floes, whose dynamics are not well captured by the continuum representation of sea ice in most climate models. This study makes use of an ocean Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model, coupled to cylindrical sea-ice floes, to investigate thermal and mechanical interactions between melt-induced submesoscale features and sea-ice floes, during summer conditions. We explore the sensitivity of sea-ice melt rates and upper-ocean turbulence properties to floe size, ice-ocean drag and surface winds. Under low wind conditions, upper ocean turbulence transports warm cyclonic filaments from the open ocean toward the center of the floes and enhance their basal melt. This heat transport is partially suppressed by trapping of ice within cold anticyclonic features. When winds are stronger, melt rates are enhanced by the decoupling of floes from the cold, melt-induced lens underneath sea ice. Distinct dynamical regimes emerge in which the influence of warm filaments on sea-ice melt is mitigated by the strength of ice-ocean coupling and eddy size relative to floe size. Simple scaling laws successfully capture floe melt rates under these limiting regimes, and may help parameterize these processes in coarse continuum-based sea-ice models.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

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Title: NWS Rapid Onset Drought Product: Overview, 2022 Case Studies, and Opportunity to Share Feedback on Proposed Improvements
Presenter(s): Jon Gottschalck, Brad Pugh, Adam Hartman, NWS Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 8 November 2022
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NWS Rapid Onset Drought Product

Remote Access: Overview, 2022 Case Studies, and Opportunity to Share Feedback on Proposed Improvements

Presenter(s): Jon Gottschalck, Brad Pugh, Adam Hartman, NWS Climate Prediction Center

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) and the National Weather Service (NWS) are pleased to present this national webinar on a new drought product from the NWS Climate Prediction Center. In May, the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) began issuing an experimental Rapid Onset Drought risk product within CPC's Day 8-14 (Week-2) U.S. Hazards Outlook. This product highlights areas where rapid drought development (sometimes known as flash drought) may occur in the coming 2-3 weeks as depicted by the U.S. Drought Monitor. This experimental variable uses initial conditions, such as antecedent dryness, and skillful temperature and precipitation outlooks during the next two weeks to communicate the risk of rapidly-developing drought. Rapid Onset Drought risk areas give end users, particularly farmers making decisions about planting and supplemental irrigation, an early warning of the potential for hot and dry conditions. This product supplements CPC's Monthly Drought Outlook and is an important step toward comprehensive flash drought monitoring and prediction.
This webinar will review the tools and indicators that CPC forecasters use to assess Rapid Onset Drought risk, how to interpret this new product, and case studies of Rapid Onset Drought during the summer of 2022. In addition, CPC will share their next steps for improving the product in response to the recent national solicitation of comments which includes efforts toward quantitative verification. Participants are encouraged to provide feedback on these proposed improvements during the webinar. In addition, operational meteorologists and end users are encouraged to share their questions and experience using this new product in drought monitoring and decision-making during this webinar.

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2242112443304455950

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here: (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

7 November 2022

Title: Sea Level Rise Here and Now
Presenter(s): William Sweet, NOAA NOS
Date & Time: 7 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Sea Level Rise Here and Now

Presenter(s): William Sweet, NOAA NOS

Sponsor(s): NOAA NEDTalks 2022Seminar Contact: rafael.deameller@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Registration link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/e87xqbj29oqx/event/registration.htmlInformation: https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/events/william-sweet-sea-level-rise-here-and-now

Bio(s): William Sweet is a NOAA Oceanographer spearheading efforts to track and predict changes in sea level and coastal flood risk to support sound decision making. He leads NOAA's annual high tide flood assessment, is the lead author for the U.S. Interagency Sea Level Rise Task Force's 2017 and 2022 reports, co-leads the U.S. Department of Defense's Coastal Assessment Regional Scenario Working Group and is a chapter author for the 4th and on-going 5th National Climate Assessments. William received his Masters and Ph.D. in oceanography from N.C. State University.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, November 2022: Applying Machine Learning to Improve Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Forecasts, and Bayesian Joint Probability (BJP) Calibration of Subseasonal Model Forecasts
Presenter(s): Judah Cohen, Atmospheric and Environmental Research, and Dan Collins, NOAA CPC
Date & Time: 7 November 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Applying Machine Learning to Improve Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Forecasts, and Bayesian Joint Probability (BJP) Calibration of Subseasonal Model Forecasts



Presenter(s): Dr. Judah Cohen, Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Lexington, MA; Dr. Dan Collins, NOAA CPC



Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Weather Program Office S2S Program and NOAA NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration Modeling Program Division

Seminar Contacts: Mark Olsen, mark.olsen@noaa.gov



Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/8426465125700931856



Abstract: This monthly webinar series was created to share ongoing work within NWS and OAR at the Weeks 3-4 and S2S timescales. We would like to foster a relaxed, informal dialogue among forecasters, modelers and researchers. This month, Dr. Judah Cohen will speak about "Applying Machine Learning to Improve Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Forecasts." Dr. Dan Collins will speak about "Bayesian Joint Probability (BJP) Calibration of Subseasonal Model Forecasts."



Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available on the Weeks 3-4/S2S Webinar Series website: https://vlab.noaa.gov/web/weeks-3-4-s2s-webinar-series



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: NOAA Assistant Administrators Look at the Year Ahead 2023
Presenter(s): Mr. Ken Graham, Director of NOAA's National Weather Service and Assistant Administrator for Weather Services at NOAA; RADM Nancy Hann, Director for Operations NOAA Office of Marine and Aviation Operations and Director of the NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps; Dr. Steve Thur, Assistant Administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research; Ms. Nicole LeBoeuf, Director of the National Ocean Service and the Assistant Administrator for Ocean Services and Coastal Zone Management; Dr. Steve Volz, Assistant Administrator for the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service; Ms Janet Coit, Assistant Administrator, NOAA Fisheries and NOAA's Acting Assistant Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere
Date & Time: 7 November 2022
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: NOAA Assistant Administrators Look at the Year Ahead 2023; Second Annual NELS Panel Discussion

Sponsor(s): Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) team

Abstract: This 90-min panel is an opportunity for the NOAA Assistant Administrators (AA) leadership to come together to share, to inform, and to engage with the NOAA staff and the Public on what is being planned for the year ahead in support of NOAA's mission. The NELS Team has put together panel framing questions for this year's event:
  • How does your LO FY23 roadmap support NOAA's mission?
  • How does your LO support NOAA's current priorities as outlined by Dr. Richard Spinrad (NOAA's Administrator)?
Panelists:
  • Mr. Ken Graham, Director of NOAA's National Weather Service and Assistant Administrator for Weather Services at NOAA
  • RADM Nancy Hann, Director for Operations NOAA Office of Marine and Aviation Operations and Director of the NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps
  • Dr. Steve Thur, Assistant Administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research
  • Ms. Nicole LeBoeuf, Director of the National Ocean Service and the Assistant Administrator for Ocean Services and Coastal Zone Management
  • Dr. Steve Volz, Assistant Administrator for the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service
  • Ms Janet Coit, Assistant Administrator, NOAA Fisheries and NOAA's Acting Assistant Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere
Moderator: Dr. Karen Hyun, NOAA Chief of Staff
WATCH NOW: https://youtu.be/uKH4ker9_hc

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4 November 2022

Title: How do weak, misaligned tropical cyclones evolve towards alignment? A multi-case study using observations and HAFS
Presenter(s): Dr. George 'Trey' Alvey, Assistant Scientist, CIMAS/RSMAS/University of Miami and Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/OAR/NOAA
Date & Time: 4 November 2022
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series, OAR - AOML - Happenings Calendar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: How do weak, misaligned tropical cyclones evolve towards alignment? A multi-case study using observations and HAFS

Presenter(s): Dr. George 'Trey' Alvey, Assistant Scientist, CIMAS/RSMAS/University of Miami and Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/OAR/NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

Seminar Contact(s): Shirley Murillo, shirley.murillo@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Join webinar at: https://meet.goto.com/364170237You can also dial in using your phone.
Dial: +1 (646) 749-3122
Access Code: 364-170-237

Meeting ID: 364-170-237

Abstract: Rapid intensification (RI) commonly begins as weak tropical cyclones (TCs) transition (sometimes abruptly) from a seemingly unfavorable misaligned vortex toward alignment, which poses immense challenges for numerical weather prediction and operational forecasting. Although there have already been many case studies that have improved understanding for processes like vortex alignment and precipitation symmetrization, the vortex-scale and environmental characteristics governing the differing pathways remain more unclear. This study focuses on multi-storm evaluations of weak TCs using observations like ground radar and the Hurricane Analysis and Forecast System (HAFS). High-impact cases from 2019"2021 are specifically highlighted including Dorian (2019), Isaias (2020), Sally (2020), Elsa (2021), Ida (2021), and Nicholas (2021). In cases that feature sustained alignment, the displaced low-level and mid-level circulations non-monotonically progress towards vortex tilt reduction with periods of reformation, precession, and advection. The persistence and intensity of deep convection (near the mid-level center) is a common important feature preceding and during alignment. A feedback loop is also identified wherein outflow boundaries associated with cold pools downtilt may initially provide indirect thermodynamic benefits (e.g., moisture pooling and convergence) to promote upstream convection maintenance, which further increases inflow strength, amplifies instability, and enhances moisture convergence to help convection persist.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be available in 2-3 days at website: https://www.aoml.noaa.gov/seminars/

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3 November 2022

Title: Shedding light on solar radiation variability at Earth's surface
Presenter(s): Jake Gristey, CU CIRES and NOAA CSL
Date & Time: 3 November 2022
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: DSRC GC-402
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: Shedding light on solar radiation variability at Earth's surface
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jake Gristey, CU CIRES and NOAA CSL

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): jan.kazil@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/

Abstract: Energy originating from the sun and reaching Earth's surface, known as the surface solar irradiance (SSI), ultimately drives virtually all Earth-atmosphere processes. The SSI is strongly modulated by clouds, including shallow cumulus clouds that are encountered frequently across the globe. The detailed 3D spatial structure of shallow cumulus clouds, their rapid evolution, and aerosol embedded within the cloud field, all lead to complex variability in SSI that has proven challenging to understand and predict. In this talk, I will show how this SSI variability is captured concisely by the bi-modal shape of the SSI probability density function (PDF), which is robustly observed but only reproduced in simulations with 3D radiative transfer. I will demonstrate that, despite common beliefs, 3D radiative effects do not disappear with space-time averaging. To address these issues, machine-learning algorithms are explored to construct a mapping between cloud and aerosol properties, derived from large eddy simulation, and the corresponding SSI PDF, derived from 3D radiative transfer. I will show the drastic improvements in prediction of SSI relative to traditional 1D radiative transfer, while bypassing the computational expense of 3D radiative transfer. I will also share an approach that quantifies the relative importance of each predictor, revealing the inordinately large importance of aerosol between clouds. The new findings have important implications for solar renewable energy assessment, highlight the significance of the absence of 3D radiative effects in weather and climate modeling, and provide a route forward for efficient parameterization of 3D radiative effects at the surface.

Bio(s): Dr. Jake Gristey is a Research Scientist at CIRES and NOAA CSL, and is also affiliated with the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado. He received his Master's degree in 2014 and PhD degree in 2018 from the Department of Meteorology at the University of Reading in the UK, including a year of study at the University of Oklahoma and a research placement at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Dr. Gristey splits his time between two research foci. First, he works as part of the NOAA Atmospheric Science for Renewable Energy program to advance understanding of solar energy variability below shallow cumulus clouds (the topic of this seminar). Second, he leads the development of irradiance retrieval algorithms for the upcoming Libera satellite mission, due to launch toward the end of the decade.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2022,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!
Title: Accounting for Environmental Effects in New England Groundfish Stock Assessments
Presenter(s): Alex Hansell, Research Fishery Biologist at Northeast Fisheries Science Center, NOAA
Date & Time: 3 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Accounting for Environmental Effects in New England Groundfish Stock Assessments (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s): Alex Hansell, Research Fishery Biologist at Northeast Fisheries Science Center, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Kristan Blackhart and Library Seminars

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.


Abstract: The Northeast U.S. shelf ecosystem is a complex and changing region that supports a wide array of living marine resources and resource-dependent human communities. Over the last 40 years, the waters of the northwest Atlantic have warmed at a rate over three times the global average, and recent decadal warming is among the fastest in the world. Due to the rapid pace of change in the region, there is a critical need to develop and apply scientific knowledge and tools that can help integrate climate change impacts into stock assessment. Here we describe a structured approach to operational integration of climate change in the context of a stock assessment process. We then describe the application of this approach to the American plaice stock assessment process and ongoing processes for other groundfish species.Keywords: Research Track Stock Assessment, climate change, stock dynamics


Bio(s): Alex Hansell is the lead assessment scientist for Georges Bank yellowtail flounder and Georges Bank winter flounder. His research interests include species distribution models, incorporating environmental effects into stock assessment and model validation.

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Title: Using biomarkers to fill information gaps in the ecology of Alaska’s fishes
Presenter(s): Vanessa von Biela, PhD; and Ashley Stanek, PhD; Research Fish Biologists, U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Science Center
Date & Time: 3 November 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Using biomarkers to fill information gaps in the ecology of Alaska's fishes

Presenter(s): Vanessa von Biela, PhD; and Ashley Stanek, PhD; Research Fish Biologists, U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

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Abstract: Natural biomarkers are central to understanding fishes and aquatic ecosystems in Alaska's remote places. In this seminar we will summarize two sets of recent investigations that use biomarkers. First, we use a combination of stable isotopes and radiocarbon to understand Arctic fish food webs including the use of terrestrial organic matter in estuarine lagoons and the age of organic matter from freshwater to marine feeding. Second, we focus on Pacific salmon in the subarctic where we are refining heat shock proteins and gene transcription tools to better identify heat stress in rivers and streams that are now warm (>18C).

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Vanessa von Biela is a Research Fish Biologist with the USGS Alaska Science Center in Anchorage, Alaska. She has been researching Alaska's aquatic ecosystems for more than 15 years with a portfolio spanning marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecology. Vanessa received her B.Sc. in Zoology from the University of California Santa Barbara, M.Sc. in Biological Sciences from University of Alaska Anchorage, and Ph.D. in Fisheries from University of Alaska Fairbanks. She's also a mother of three with an 8 year old son and boy-girl twins who are 5 years old.

Ashley Stanek is a Biologist with the Fish and Aquatic Ecology Group at the USGS Alaska Science Center in Anchorage, Alaska. Since she joined USGS in 2019, her research has primarily focused on fish food webs in the lagoons of the nearshore Alaskan Beaufort Sea. Prior to USGS, Ashley's research ranged from studying wolves in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, to seabirds in the Aleutian Islands, and bears in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. Ashley received her B.Sc. in Zoology from Humboldt State University and her M.Sc. in Biological Sciences from the University of Alaska Anchorage.

NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: A satellite perspective on the buoyancy driven ocean circulation
Presenter(s): Aqeel Piracha is a PhD student at the Institute of Marine Sciences ICM Barcelona, Spain
Date & Time: 3 November 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Please share with anyone (NOAA or not) who might be interested; thanks.

Title: A satellite perspective on the buoyancy driven ocean circulation

Presenter(s): Aqeel Piracha, PhD student at the Institute of Marine Sciences (ICM) Barcelona, Spain

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Varis.Ransi@noaa.gov, co-coordinator NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series

Remote Access: Register at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/aqeel/event/login.htmlYou may enter the webinar via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. If you enter via a browser, PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use the IE browser.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download it but you can test it here.
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3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register at link above.
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Ocean Circulation is intimately tied to the movement of unique bodies of water. These bodies of water are known as water masses and they each have distinct properties and histories which can be used to fingerprint them. Their characteristics are set by interactions with the atmosphere. Once set, these characteristics remain unchanged as the water mass sinks into the ocean interior. This means, with a knowledge of Ocean-Atmosphere interaction, we can trace these surface water masses to infer ocean circulation. Global ocean circulation can be summarized as a progressive change in surface water buoyancy. With equatorial heating creating buoyant water masses which progressively lose their buoyancy through cooling and other atmospheric processes until, at the poles, they ultimately sink to complete a global ocean circulation cell. This surface branch of the circulation is the most crucial as this is where they are created. Estimates of this surface arm traditionally require a direct knowledge of ocean-atmosphere interactions. However, the data describing these interactions are usually biased and prone to various uncertainties and errors. Can we infer knowledge of ocean circulation without this data. By Understanding processes forcing sea surface state changes, the use of these error-prone air-sea fluxes can be avoided allowing for a much more accurate picture of how the oceans are changing in a changing climate.

Bio(s): Aqeel Piracha is a PhD student at the Institute of Marine Sciences (ICM) Barcelona, Spain. Prior to starting his PhD, he was a trainee at the European Space Agency (ESA) where his specialization in the field of ocean circulation was born. He attained his bachelor degree from the University of Bangor in Wales, where his dissertation was on analyzing Deuterium/Hydrogen ratios of Planets, Comets and Meteorites to understand the origins of Earth's oceans. His master degree thesis was on understanding the stability of internal tides in coastal regions.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Within a few days of the webinar, a link to the recording,
usually a PDF of the slides, and sometimes a summary of the chat will be sent to all who registered.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to
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2 November 2022

Title: BOO! Does working across political boundaries scare you? Try collaborative science!
Presenter(s): Soupy Dalyander, Water Institute of the Gulf, sdalyander@thewaterinstitute.org; George Ramseur, Moffatt & Nichol, gramseur@moffattnichol.com; Aimee Good, San Francisco Bay NERR, aimee@sfsu.edu; Stuart Siegel, San Francisco Bay NERR, siegel@sfsu.edu; Doug George, NOAA Office for Coastal Management, douglas.george@noaa.gov; Caitlin Young, NOAA RESTORE Science Program, caitlin.young@noaa.gov
Date & Time: 2 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesDate & Time: 2 November 2022, 3 - 4 pm ET

Title: BOO! Does working across political boundaries scare you? Try collaborative science!

Presenter(s):
  • Soupy Dalyander, Senior Research Scientist, Water Institute of the Gulf
  • George Ramseur, Senior Coastal Scientist, Moffatt & Nichol
  • Aimee Good, Wetland Science & Coastal Training Program Coordinator, San Francisco Bay NERR
  • Stuart Siegel, Manager, San Francisco Bay NERR
  • Doug George, Science Collaborative Program Manager, NOAA Office for Coastal Management
  • Caitlin Young, Science Coordinator, NOAA RESTORE Science Program


Sponsor(s): This webinar is co-sponsored by the National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) Science Collaborative, and NOAA RESTORE Science ProgramSeminar Contacts: Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov), Caitlin Young (caitlin.young@noaa.gov), Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5250703910830951436Abstract
Ecosystems don't care about political boundaries, even if the natural resources within them are managed by multiple entities. Research projects that span political boundaries can often be sticky " decisions are made on long timelines, changes in policy and staff can derail implementation of projects and the tools they produce, and it can be difficult to effectively engage diverse stakeholders so that their perspectives inform the work. Enter: collaborative science. In situations with complex and competing interests, there is a higher likelihood that science will be applied to decision making when problems are tackled with a collaborative science framework. In this webinar, collaborative science project teams will discuss how to work across political boundaries and with different partners to develop shared tools, models, and action plans that will improve ecosystem management.Collaborative Science ConversationsThe NOAA RESTORE Science and NERRS Science Collaborative programs are back at it, teaming up to bring you the voices of project teams from the field through our Collaborative Science Conversations webinar series. These sessions dig into the unique value of collaborative science, what it feels like in practice, and tips and strategies for success.

Bio(s): Please visit here for more information about the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Connecting MJO and ENSO through Multiscale Air-Sea Coupling of Rain-Salinity-Wind-Current and Processes controlling precipitation and near-surface salinity in the tropical ocean using multi scale coupled modeling and analysis
Presenter(s): Shuyi Chen, University of Washington; and Carol Anne Clayson, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute - WHOI
Date & Time: 2 November 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA/CVP Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS) Process Studies Webinar Series " Session 4

Presenter(s): Shuyi Chen (University of Washington); and Carol Anne Clayson (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute - WHOI)Connecting MJO and ENSO through Multiscale Air-Sea Coupling of Rain-Salinity-Wind-Current (Shuyi Chen, (University of Washington) and Processes controlling precipitation and near-surface salinity in the tropical ocean using multi scale coupled modeling and analysis (Carol Anne Clayson, WHOI)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Climate Variability and Predictability Program

Seminar Contact(s): jose.algarin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/808724212884499215Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: N/A

Abstract: The NOAA Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) Program is hosting a webinar series on the Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS) Pre-Field Modeling Studies that will highlight the recent results from the CVP-funded projects. The goal of these modeling studies is to refine the current scientific understanding of the equatorial Pacific climate system, with a specific focus on two process studies identified in the TPOS2020 First Report, Pacific Upwelling and Mixing Physics (PUMP) and Air"sea Interaction at the eastern edge of the Warm Pool. Their results will assist in the planning of future field campaigns.The fourth of five sessions will feature two presentations:Connecting MJO and ENSO through Multiscale Air-Sea Coupling of Rain-Salinity-Wind-Current, by Shuyi Chen (University of Washington)Processes controlling precipitation and near-surface salinity in the tropical ocean using multi scale coupled modeling and analysis, by Dr. Carol Anne Clayson (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute - WHOI)

Bio(s): Dr. Shuyi Chen is a Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington. Her research focuses on understanding high-impact weather, such as hurricanes and the MJO, and improving their prediction. She studies air-sea interaction and precipitation in the tropics and coastal environments using observations and coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean models. Additionally, Dr. Chen has led national and international research programs in both field campaigns and coupled atmosphere-ocean modeling.Dr. Carol Anne Clayson is the Associate Director for Research Strategies and a Senior Scientist in the Department of Physical Oceanography at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). Her current areas of research include understanding the air-sea boundary layers and impacts on weather, climate, and energy sectors and the development of satellite and in situ sensors to observe these processes. She has served on numerous national and international science panels.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Within a few days of the webinar, a link to the recording
will posted on the CVP Program website: cpo.noaa.gov/cvp/webinars.

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Title: Ecosystem Applications of Downscaled Climate Projections for the California Current System
Presenter(s): Mercedes Pozo Buil, UC Santa Cruz / NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 2 November 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar and 110 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz, CA, USA
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Ecosystem Applications of Downscaled Climate Projections for the California Current System

Presenter(s): Mercedes (Mer) Pozo Buil, Assistant Project Scientist, University of California Santa Cruz

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology DivisionSeminar contact: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: https://swfsc.webex.com/swfsc/j.php?MTID=m3806c3115f500baad2d89356012682a6; Password (if needed): fedsem1nar! ; Join by phone by dialing +1-415-655-0002 US Toll, Access code: 2498 072 7370

Abstract: The California Current System (CCS) is a highly productive eastern boundary current system, in which coastal upwelling drives high biological productivity that supports a variety of marine ecosystem services along the U.S. West Coast. Skillful regional ocean projections spanning the range of potential climate futures are needed to inform living marine resource management under climate change. However, available projections of ecosystem-relevant variables remain biased by the inability of current earth system models to resolve upwelling dynamics. In this talk, I will present the first ensemble of downscaled projections of climate change in the CCS at high spatial resolution (10km) from 1980 to 2100 under a high future emission scenario. I will show projected future changes in a range of ecosystem variables including SST, chlorophyll, subsurface nutrients and oxygen, and sardine biomass. Finally, I will summarize how these high-resolution projections have been applied to study the impact of climate change on various ecosystem components in the California Current.

Bio(s): Dr. Mercedes (Mer) Pozo Buil is a physical oceanographer interested in ocean modelling, ocean and climate dynamics, and decadal climate variability and its impact on marine ecosystems. She is an Assistant Project Scientist at the University of California Santa Cruz in the Institute of Marine Sciences, working at the Environmental Research Division of the NOAA Southwest Fisheries Sciences Center in Monterey, California. Mer received two bachelor of science degrees in marine and environmental science, and a master's degree in physical oceanography from the University of Cadiz in Spain. She holds a doctoral degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; link to recording available upon request.

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1 November 2022

Title: Salmon shark: a misnomer? Exploring the diet and ecosystem impacts of an apex predator in the Northeast Pacific
Presenter(s): Alexandra McInturf, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 1 November 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Salmon shark: a misnomer? Exploring the diet and ecosystem impacts of an apex predator in the Northeast Pacific

Presenter(s): Alexandra McInturf (Oregon State University)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Ground fish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contact: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m161d8630abba4e363a98635052f62a1fOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 2762 418 8254

Accessibility: Seminars will be close captioned by Friends Interpreting Services, LLC.

Abstract: Though predationimpacts salmon stocks in the Eastern North Pacific, very little is known aboutsources of mortality for adult salmon while at sea. We will share the resultsof a project designed to address this knowledge gap by focusing on onepotential predator: the salmon shark (Lamnaditropis).Via a combination of methods, from stomach content analysis to speciesdistribution modeling, we are exploring the composition of salmon shark dietand assessing how frequently the movements of salmon sharks overlap withpotential salmon habitat. This information should improve our understanding ofa predator that may have a substantial effect on salmon recovery efforts.

Bio(s): Alexandra (Alex) McInturf, PhD, is a CICOES postdoctoralresearch fellow at Oregon State University's Big Fish Lab. She is broadlyinterested in studying how threatened fishes respond to environmental change.She obtained her PhD in Animal Behavior from UC Davis in 2021, where shestudied a variety of topics - sevengill shark movement in the San FranciscoBay, basking shark distribution in the California Current Ecosystem, and howtemperature affects predation of juvenile Chinook salmon in California'sCentral Valley. In the Big Fish Lab, she is exploring the foraging ecology anddistribution of salmon sharks in the Eastern North Pacific. She is also aNational Geographic Explorer, and in this role has studied the social lives ofbasking sharks in Ireland for the last 6 years. In addition to research, Alexis a science communicator and co-coordinator of the Irish Basking Shark Group,an education- and conservation-focused organization dedicated to basking sharksin Ireland.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2022-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

31 October 2022

Title: Estimating the forest carbon cycle under climate change
Presenter(s): Dr. Mukund Palat Rao, NOAA Climate & Global Change Fellow
Date & Time: 31 October 2022
12:00 pm - 12:45 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Estimating the forest carbon cycle under climate change

Presenter(s): Dr. Mukund Palat Rao, NOAA Climate & Global Change Fellow

Sponsor(s): NOAA Climate Program Office and The Cooperative Programs for the Advancement of Earth System Science (CPAESS)

Seminar Contacts: clara.deck@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3988376600968042508

Abstract: Forests act as a carbon sink by sequestering ~25% of human carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel burning, industry, and land-use. Forests acquire CO2 from the atmosphere through photosynthesis. They then accumulate some fraction of this carbon as biomass that can remain within an ecosystem over long timescales from years to centuries. In this talk, I will first discuss how increases in extreme heat events due to climate change may threaten the ability of the Eurasian boreal forests to continue to sequester carbon. Next, I will highlight the importance of measuring both photosynthesis (carbon uptake) and tree-growth (carbon accumulation) simultaneously to forecast the fate of forest carbon. For example, our definition of the growing season' in broadleaf deciduous oak forests is typically based on visual cues of leaf emergence in the spring and leaf senescence in the autumn. Oak forests are distributed widely across the northern hemisphere. Using a network of hourly point dendrometers, leaf level photosynthesis measurements, and remote sensing, we show that oak tree-growth and oak photosynthesis occurs asynchronously. Therefore, oak trees do not grow through the growing season. Consequently, estimates of photosynthesis may not provide us sufficient information to estimate the carbon sequestration capacity of forests.
This webinar is part of a series featuring NOAA Climate and Global Change (C&GC) Fellows in the NOAA Science Seminar Series. C&GC is supported by NOAA's Climate Program Office and managed by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR).

Bio(s): Mukund Palat Rao is an Ecoclimatologist who researches the interactions between climate change and natural and human ecosystems. His expertise includes dendrochronology, plant ecophysiology, remote sensing, and climate science. Mukund received his PhD in 2020 from Columbia University, USA. In his research, he has investigated droughts and flooding in the Brahmaputra and Indus Rivers in South Asia and the impact of dzud (cold winters that cause livestock mortality) on pastoral nomadic herding communities in Mongolia. As a NOAA Climate and Global Change (C&GC) fellow he is currently working on projects related to the forest carbon cycle, the vulnerability of boreal forests to increasing heat waves, and the use of dendrochronology to understand past environmental change and timber transport.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

27 October 2022

Title: Stable isotopes reveal the trophic ecology of marine predators from the South Atlantic to the North Pacific
Presenter(s): Genyffer Troina, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of British Columbia
Date & Time: 27 October 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Genyffer Troina, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of British Columbia


Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
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Abstract: The feeding habits and foraging areas of marine predators determine their ecological roles in ecosystems and the strength of interspecific trophic interactions (e.g., competition). Yet, such information is often challenging to obtain due to limited sampling opportunities, especially when it concerns populations inhabiting the high seas. Stable isotopes provide a useful tool to quantify animal feeding behaviour over time, as tissues have different integration times representing the average prey consumed in the past few weeks/months (e.g., skin, muscle) to a lifetime (e.g., fish otoliths, cetacean tooth or baleen). I apply this method to investigate the trophic ecology of various marine predators in both the western South Atlantic and eastern North Pacific oceans. In the Atlantic, a diversity of cetacean species occurs within the oceanic waters of the Brazilian continental shelf and slope. However, due to their offshore distribution, little is known about their feeding habits, foraging areas and trophic interactions. The analysis of bulk carbon ( 13 C) and nitrogen ( 15 N) stable isotopes, and 15 N of individual amino acids in skin samples of free-ranging cetaceans (Delphinidae and Physeteridae) offered important and unique insights into their trophic ecology. Additionally, samples of different components of the pelagic food webs (e.g., zooplankton, fish and squids) were used to characterize the isotopic patterns throughout the region, and the trophic pathways that sustain these cetacean species. In the North Pacific, the investigation of the salmon food webs in the high seas is shedding some light into these species' trophic interactions, competition with non-salmonid species, and the effect of oceanographic conditions on the main trophic pathways that sustain salmon in the high seas during the least studied period of their lifecycle. Predators play important roles in structuring ecosystems but are often at risk due to harvest or habitat loss. Stable isotopes provide a quantitative analysis of food web structure and the trophic ecology of predators to better understand how environmental changes will affect these pelagic ecosystems.

BIOGRAPHY

Genyffer Troina is a postdoc fellow at the Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, at the University of British Columbia. She obtained her undergraduate degree in Biological Sciences at the Federal University of Rio Grande, in southern Brazil, her master's in marine and Lacustrine Science and Management at Ghent University and the University of Brussels in Belgium, and her Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography in a joint programme between the University of Brussels and the Federal University of Rio Grande. Her research focuses on the feeding ecology and trophic interactions of marine predators, and the analysis of pelagic food webs using stable isotopes. Her work has focused on coastal and oceanic cetacean species in the South Atlantic, and more recently on the North Pacific salmon and their food webs.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Office of Coast Survey Bathymetric Data Licensing: IOCM Seminar
Presenter(s): Matt Wilson, Streamlining Team Lead, NOAA
Date & Time: 27 October 2022
1:00 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Office of Coast Survey Bathymetric Data Licensing
Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Matt Wilson, Streamlining Team Lead at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Office of Coast Survey.

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NOS Office of Coast Survey, Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping Program

Seminar Contact(s): amber.butler@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7431481870810396944

Accessibility: Please contact amber.butler@noaa.gov for accessibility requests by October 20th.

Abstract: The NOAA Office of Coast Survey (OCS) has a new policy to assign an open data license onto the bathymetric data they collect. The license selected (Creative Commons Zero 1.0 Universal) serves to formally dedicate OCS data into the public domain. This license assignment legally removes copyright, making the OCS bathymetry as free, open, and accessible as possible, to spur and encourage exploration and innovation throughout the industry. This result is central to the NOAA Data Strategy and is a model for other NOAA offices to follow.Additionally, the policy requires licensing for bathymetric data contributions from the ocean mapping community. This safeguards the interests of both the providers and the end users, while it also streamlines our data handling " because the data licenses are machine-readable, the data ingest, distribution, and downstream applications can be more automated and scalable. New OCS products, and the National Bathymetric Source, the OCS database for the best-available bathymetry, are built to maintain data licenses, and realize the full benefit of using them.

Bio(s): Matt Wilson holds an MS in Ocean Mapping from the University of New Hampshire Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping & Joint Hydrographic Center and an MBA from Pennsylvania State University. Previously, he worked as Sales and Marketing Manager for QPS, Inc., and he began his career serving as a U.S. Naval Officer. With NOAA, he is focused on the faster and more efficient throughput of hydrographic data towards products and services.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Email iwgocm.staff@noaa.gov for summary materials, contact information, and access to the recording.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Climate at a Glance tool
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Karin Gleason, NOAA/NESDIS National Centers for Environmental Information
Date & Time: 27 October 2022
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Climate at a Glance tool

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Karin Gleason, NOAA/NESDIS National Centers for Environmental Information


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s): Ellen Mecray

Remote Access: Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract: The webinar will feature a recap of October conditions and Karin Gleason will brief on the wildly popular NCEI Climate at a Glance tool.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

25 October 2022

Title: Identifying stage-specific drivers of Pacific hake recruitment
Presenter(s): Cathleen Vestfals, NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 25 October 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Identifying stage-specific drivers of Pacific hake recruitment

Presenter(s): Cathleen Vestfals, NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Ground fish Seminar Series Seminar Contact: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m161d8630abba4e363a98635052f62a1fOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 2762 418 8254

Accessibility: Seminars will be close captioned by Friends Interpreting Services, LLC.

Abstract: Pacific hake recruitment is highly variable, but the mechanisms underlying this variability are poorly understood. This presentation focuses on research that investigates the oceanographic and biological variables that likely influence their recruitment and also highlights information shared at a workshop with industry that is helping to refine our understanding of hake by identifying new factors contributing to their distribution, spawning behavior, growth, and recruitment.

Bio(s): Dr. Cathleen Vestfals attended the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, B.C., where she received her B.Sc. in Biology, with a specialization in Marine Biology. After working as a North Pacific Groundfish Observer in Alaska for several years, Cathleen obtained her Masters Degree in Marine Resource Management from Oregon State University working with Drs. David Sampson, Lorenzo Ciannelli, and Waldo Wakefield to characterize canary rockfish habitat off the Washington and Oregon coasts. She obtained her Ph.D. in Oceanography in 2015 from OSU, working with Drs. Lorenzo Ciannelli and Janet Duffy-Anderson to examine the effects of environmental variability on slope-spawning flatfish in the eastern Bering Sea. For her post-doctoral research with Drs. Franz Mueter and Ben Laurel, Cathleen developed individual-based models for Arctic cod and saffron cod in an effort to identify their spawning locations and to help understand how climate variability affects the growth and dispersal of their early life stages. She has also used these models to examine larval overlap with simulated oil spills to assess potential injury. As an NRC post-doc, Cathleen worked with Dr. Kristin Marshall at the NWFSC to identify recruitment drivers of Pacific hake.Cathleen is interested in research that examines how environmental variables influence the distribution and abundance of marine fishes, with the ultimate goal of informing fisheries and ecosystem models and improving management strategies.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2022-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Putting Recent Climate and Weather Events in Historical Context
Presenter(s): Chip Konrad, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia
Date & Time: 25 October 2022
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Putting Recent Climate and Weather Events in Historical Context

Presenter(s):
Climate Overview: Chip Konrad | Southeast Regional Climate CenterWater Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur/Todd Hamill | NWS Southeast River Forecast CenterAgriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox | University of GeorgiaPutting Recent Climate and Weather Events in Historical Context: Chip Konrad | Southeast Regional Climate Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.
The October 25 webinar will feature a special presentation on "Putting Recent Climate and Weather Events in Historical Context."

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/9215585718468903438

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here: (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Implementation of ocean biogeochemical modeling and ocean color data assimilation in the NWS Unified Forecast System
Presenter(s): Dr. Xiao Liu, NOAA
Date & Time: 25 October 2022
7:30 am - 8:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Implementation of ocean biogeochemical modeling and ocean color data assimilation in the Unified Forecast System in support of NCEP's weather, subseasonal-to-seasonal, and ecological predictions

Presenter(s): Xiao Liu, NOAA National Weather Service NCEP/EMC

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.goto.com/818183349 Or dial: United States: +1 (571) 317-3129 Access Code: 818-183-349


Abstract: Ocean biogeochemical processes provide important geophysical feedback to the ocean and weather systems through ocean biophysical and air-sea interactions. In recent years, multi-platform satellite observations provide nearly global coverage of surface ocean color with repeat daily cycles, enabling the assimilation of near real-time ocean color products (e.g. Chl-a, POC, Kd) in ocean forecast systems. Here we present the implementation of a simple ocean biogeochemical model (BLING) and daily assimilation of MODIS and VIIRS ocean color products in the Unified Forecast System - a pre-operational, fully coupled Earth modeling system. We evaluate preliminary ocean analysis results with regard to 1) the impact of biogeochemical data assimilation on simulated ocean physical variables and air-sea fluxes, and 2) the impact of both physical and biogeochemical data assimilation on simulated ocean biogeochemical variables, with a particular focus on prediction skills at timescales of weeks to months. This work is funded through the JPSS/PGRR Program and is in support of the application of sub-seasonal to seasonal predictions at NOAA/NWS/NCEP.

Bio(s): Dr. Xiao Liu is a marine ecologist by training and works at the National Weather Services National Center for Environmental Prediction, Environmental Modelling Center in College Park, MD. She uses remote sensing and autonomous in situ observations to model the ocean physical and biological interactions.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php. For more information visit: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

24 October 2022

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Joe Boomgard-Zagrodnik, Washington State University; Jon Gottschalk, NOAA Climate Prediction Center; Meghan Collins, Ben Hatchett, Desert Research Institute; Keith Jennings, Lynker
Date & Time: 24 October 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar

Presenter(s):

Climate Recap & Current Conditions
Joe Boomgard-Zagrodnik | Washington State University

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Jon Gottschalk | NOAA Climate Prediction Center

Mountain Rain or Snow: Citizen Scientists Help Advance Precipitation Phase Research
Meghan Collins & Ben Hatchett | Desert Research Institute
Keith Jennings | Lynker

Monitoring the Daily Evolution and Extent of Snow Drought
Ben Hatchett | Desert Research Institute

Seminar Contact(s): Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
According to the October 4, 2022 U.S. Drought Monitor, 65.2% of the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) is in drought. A very wet spring and early summer greatly improved conditions compared to March, but now we're going in the wrong direction again as drought expands and intensifies. This webinar will provide more information on the current conditions and outlooks, as well as additional presentations on "Mountain Rain or Snow: Citizen Scientists Help Advance Precipitation Phase Research" and "Monitoring the Daily Evolution and Extent of Snow Drought."

These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8867791495373650959

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Genesis of the Gulf Stream subseasonal variability in the Florida Straits
Presenter(s): Dr. Kandaga Pujiana, Assistant Scientist, NOAA's Atlantic Oceanic Meteorological Laboratory AMOL, Physical Oceanography Division, and the University of Miami/CIMAS
Date & Time: 24 October 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Genesis of the Gulf Stream subseasonal variability in the Florida Straits

Presenter(s): Dr. Kandaga Pujiana, Assistant Scientist, NOAA/AOML, Physical Oceanography Division, and the University of Miami/CIMAS.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Atlantic Oceanic Meteorological Laboratory (AMOL).


Seminar Contact(s): Matthieu Le Henaff, matthieu.lehenaff@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://meet.goto.com/234592901

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (312) 757-3121

Access Code: 234-592-901

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Abstract: Subseasonal variability (20 - 100 days) accounts for over a third of the Florida Current volume transport's total variance, yet physical processes controlling the variability remain not fully understood. In this seminar, I will demonstrate that coastal-trapped waves are the primary driver for the subseasonal variation of the Florida Current transport observed from 2001 to 2019. The role of local winds and open ocean signals is of secondary importance. The along-shore wind component of the anomalous North Atlantic subtropical anticyclone generates the subseasonal coastal-trapped waves off the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight coast. The subseasonal waves propagate from Cape May to Apalachicola, behaving as Kelvin waves in the Florida Straits and as continental shelf waves along the rest of the waveguide. They affect the Florida Current transport by up to 2.6 Sv, on average. As the waves propagate into the Gulf of Mexico, their energy substantially dissipates. The wave amplitude at Port Canaveral of up to 15 cm is three times higher than at Apalachicola. I will also discuss concurrent subseasonal changes of the meridional overturning circulation in the North Atlantic.

Bio(s): K. Pujiana received his Ph.D. in 2012 at Columbia University (Ocean & Climate Physics Division). He did his postdoctoral at Oregon State University (Ocean Mixing Group) and then at NOAA-PMEL (Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array Division). He is an Assistant Scientist at CIMAS and AOML (Physical Oceanography Division).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: The seminar will be recorded, and the recording will be available at: https://www.youtube.com/user/phodaoml . (the exact link will be available after the recording is posted).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

21 October 2022

Title: October 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy
Date & Time: 21 October 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: October 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office, and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov); Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://alaska.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwkfumhrjgsHNXmVo6pOxmhaualOheTUIkW

Abstract: We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, discuss forecast tools, and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for November 2022. Join the gathering online to learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Bio(s): Rick Thoman is an expert in Alaska climate and weather. He produces reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities and media.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

20 October 2022

Title: What Have We Learned? The Last Year of Deep-Sea Explorations of Papahānaumokuākea
Presenter(s): Allison Funds, Chief Operating Officer, Ocean Exploration Trust, Hkokahalelani Pihana, Executive Director N Waa Mau Marine Stewardship Program, and Daniel Wagner, Chief Scientist, Ocean Exploration Trust
Date & Time: 20 October 2022
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: What Have We Learned? The Last Year of Deep-Sea Explorations of Papahnaumokukea

Presenter(s): Allison Funds, Chief Operating Officer, Ocean Exploration Trust, Hkokahalelani Pihana, Executive Director N Waa Mau Marine Stewardship Program, and Daniel Wagner, Chief Scientist, Ocean Exploration Trust

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8149638883596161806

Abstract: In 2022, the Ocean Exploration Trust and partners conducted three telepresence-enabled expeditions aboard E/V Nautilus to explore never-before-surveyed areas within the Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument. Throughout the planning and execution of these missions, the team worked closely with NOAA, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and educators to co-develop culturally-relevant science, outreach and education products, particularly those targeting communities in Hawaii and across the Pacific. This webinar will provide an overview of the partnership between the Ocean Exploration Trust and key Monument stakeholders, as well as summarize scientific discoveries of the recent deep-sea explorations of Papahnaumokukea.

This presentation is part of the Third Thursday By the Bay Presentation Series at Mokuppapa Discovery Center, which is the visitor center for Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument in Hilo, Hawaii. This lecture series is also supported by the National Marine San

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Laura Edwards, South Dakota State Climatologist; Brad Rippey, USDA Meteorologist
Date & Time: 20 October 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook

Presenter(s): Laura Edwards | South Dakota State Climatologist; Brad Rippey | USDA Meteorologist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

October 2022 topics include growing drought challenges, longer term implications if it were to linger through fall/winter, and drought impacts in the short term; wildfire potential outlooks/updates/impacts; and recent and potential climate/weather impacts including, but not limited to, freeze/frost timing and impacts so far, potential La Nia for the third fall/winter in a row and what does it mean for this region, various crop conditions (yield, production), and temperature/precipitation outlooks for the next month and season.

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7528179497868100876

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: What do giants eat? Using stable isotopes to reveal the trophic ecology of a kelp forest predator, the giant sea bass
Presenter(s): Kayla Blincow, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, VI-EPSCOR and Center for Marine and Environmental Studies, University of the Virgin Islands
Date & Time: 20 October 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: What do giants eat? Using stable isotopes to reveal the trophic ecology of a kelp forest predator, the giant sea bass

Presenter(s): Kayla Blincow, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, VI-EPSCOR and Center for Marine and Environmental Studies, University of the Virgin Islands

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
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Meeting number (access code): 2763 830 3906

Meeting password: c63Kb7umFJ2

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Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

ABSTRACT

Giant Sea Bass (Stereolepis gigas) in southern California are beginning to recover following severe population declines due to overharvest. This recovery has not only allowed scientists the opportunity to learn more about the species, but also has implications for the trophic dynamics of rocky reef and kelp forest environments throughout their range. Stable isotopes can be used to gain information on consumer diets, trophic interactions, and food web dynamics. In this talk, we will cover how a combination of stable isotope and gut content analyses helped uncover new insights into the trophic ecology of one of southern California's most iconic predators.

BIOGRAPHY

Kayla Blincow is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of the Virgin Islands. She completed her PhD at Scripps Institution of Oceanography with Dr. Brice Semmens focusing broadly on employing quantitative tools to address fisheries ecology questions. Her dissertation work was varied, ranging from a global analysis of seafood trade to species-specific investigations of the recovery of Giant Sea Bass in southern California. She is currently applying her quantitative ecology expertise to acoustic telemetry projects on St. Thomas and St. John in the US Virgin Islands as part of the NSF VI-EPSCOR program. In addition to her research pursuits, Dr. Blincow is an avid R user with a penchant for convincing the next generation of marine scientists of the importance of statistics and coding.
NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Stranded at Sea: International Seafarers Shipping 90% of Global Trade and Lessons from the Supply Chain Crisis
Presenter(s): Liang Wu, 2022 Knauss Marine Policy and Science Communication Fellow, NOAA Ocean Exploration, Science & Technology and Outreach & Education Divisions; moderated by Elliott Matthews
Date & Time: 20 October 2022
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Stranded at Sea: International Seafarers Shipping 90% of Global Trade and Lessons from the Supply Chain Crisis (2022 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Liang Wu, 2022 Knauss Marine Policy and Science Communication Fellow, NOAA Ocean Exploration, Science & Technology and Outreach & Education Divisions; moderated by Elliott Matthews

Sponsor(s): Sea Grant; NOAA Central Library



Seminar Contact(s): NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: During the pandemic-induced supply chain crisis, societies are not only affected by a backlog of cargo but also a backlog of seafarers stranded at sea. In this talk, Liang will shed light on the predicament of 1.89 million seafarers working at the core of cross-oceanic shipping

Keywords: supply chain, seafarers, maritime transportation

Bio(s): Liang Wu is a doctoral candidate in anthropology who studies the lives of multinational seafarers working on container ships, their lived experiences and meanings of contemporary seamanship that are integral to the transportation of 90% of everyday goods and products.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


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19 October 2022

Title: Celebrating 50 Years of Ocean Conservation and Stewardship
Presenter(s): Claire Fackler, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and Chloe McKenna, NOAA affiliate with the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation
Date & Time: 19 October 2022
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Celebrating 50 Years of Ocean Conservation and Stewardship

Presenter(s): Claire Fackler, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and Chloe McKenna, NOAA affiliate with the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/9097951171562470927

Abstract: 50 years ago, the U.S. ushered in a new era of ocean conservation by creating the National Marine Sanctuary System. This network of spectacular underwater parks protect the ocean and Great Lakes and aim to inspire ocean and climate literacy and conservation. Discover what our national marine sanctuaries and marine national monuments have to offer, and how these educational materials can bring the ocean and Great Lakes into your classroom, home, facility, or wherever you learn best. You'll also learn more about our new USPS forever stamps, Reyn Spooner Aloha shirt collab, Sherman's Lagoon comic, NOAA Ocean Guardian Youth Ambassador Program, and exciting new educational materials that our team has worked on all year to celebrate our 50th anniversary.

In partnership with the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, we invite you to help us Save Spectacular as we celebrate, discover, explore, and enjoy the unique wonders of the National Marine Sanctuary System. Together we can ensure these special places are sustained as destinations for adventure, solace, and reflection for the next 50 years and beyond.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: NOAA/CVP Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS) Process Studies
Presenter(s): Kelvin Richards, University of Hawai'i at Manoa; Aneesh Subramanian, University of Colorado - Boulder
Date & Time: 19 October 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA/CVP Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS) Process Studies Webinar Series " Session 3

Presenter(s): Kelvin Richards (University of Hawai'i at Manoa); and Aneesh Subramanian (University of Colorado - Boulder)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Climate Variability and Predictability Program

Seminar Contact(s): jose.algarin@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/808724212884499215
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: N/A

Abstract: The NOAA Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) Program is hosting a webinar series on the Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS) Pre-Field Modeling Studies that will highlight the recent results from the CVP-funded projects. The goal of these modeling studies is to refine the current scientific understanding of the equatorial Pacific climate system, with a specific focus on two process studies identified in the TPOS 2020 First Report, Pacific Upwelling and Mixing Physics (PUMP) and Air"sea Interaction at the eastern edge of the Warm Pool. Their results will assist in the planning of future field campaigns.The third of five sessions will feature two presentations:Capturing small vertical scale features in observations and models, and their impact, by Dr. Kelvin Richards (University of Hawai'i at Manoa)Improved understanding of forecast biases and errors in the Tropics using observing system experiments, by Dr. Aneesh Subramanian (University of Colorado - Boulder)

Bio(s): Dr. Kelvin Richards has been a Professor at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa for the past 20 years. Using a combination of observations, theory and numerical experimentation he studies a range of processes that impact the ocean state, ocean-atmosphere interactions and the marine ecosystem. Dr. Aneesh Subramanian's research interests are mainly in climate processes, global and regional weather and climate prediction and coupled ocean-atmosphere data assimilation. Dr. Subramanian received his Ph. D. from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and went on to become a Postdoctoral Research Scientist and Lecturer in the Physics Department at the University of Oxford. He was then a scientist at the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes before starting his position as an Assistant Professor at the University of Colorado -Boulder in 2019.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Within a few days of the webinar, a link to the recording,
usually a PDF of the slides, and sometimes a summary of the chat will be sent to all who registered.

Subscribe / Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Fingerprinting Reactive Nitrogen Sources and Chemistry
Presenter(s): Meredith Hastings, Brown University
Date & Time: 19 October 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Fingerprinting Reactive Nitrogen Sources and Chemistry
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Meredith Hastings, Brown University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.womack@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3998011621783722765

Abstract: Reactive nitrogen species (including nitrogen oxides, ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, and organic nitrates) serve major roles in controlling the composition of our atmosphere, and have a direct impact on ecosystem health and water quality. My research group is focused on using the nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopic composition of reactive nitrogen species to investigate variations in sources, oxidation chemistry, atmospheric transport, and deposition. This seminar will discuss recent method developments, approaches to laboratory versus field experiments and applications from wildfires to agricultural to urban emissions.

Bio(s): Meredith Hastings is a Professor in the Department of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences at Brown University. She earned her PhD in Geosciences at Princeton University, and completed her postdoctoral work at the University of Washington and the Joint Institute for Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean. She has a joint appointment with and currently serves as Deputy Director of the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society. She also leads a range of outreach and education activities in support of promoting professional development for early career researchers (via the Earth Science Women's Network, which she co-founded) to tackling harassment in the geosciences (as a co-PI on the ADVANCEGeo project).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2022,contingent on speaker approval.

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Title: Metagenomic discovery of microbial and host genetic features of the marine polychaete Sirsoe methanicola colonizing a methane hydrate in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Dr. Jean Lim, Postdoctoral Scholar, College of Marine Science, University of South Florida
Date & Time: 19 October 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Metagenomic discovery of microbial and host genetic features of the marine polychaete Sirsoe methanicola colonizing a methane hydrate in the Gulf of Mexico

Part of the NOAA Omics Seminar Series



Presenter(s): Dr. Jean Lim, Postdoctoral Scholar, College of Marine Science, University of South Florida



Sponsor(s): NOAA Omics Working Group



Seminar Contact(s): Katharine Egan, NOAA OAR 'Omics Coordinator, noaa.omics@noaa.gov



Remote Access: Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5066271830102597131



Abstract: The methane ice worm Sirsoe methanicola is the only macrofaunal species observed to colonize methane hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico. Our recently published metagenomic analysis of the worms' gut contents and worm fragments predicted diverse metabolic capabilities related to microbial cycling of sulfur, carbon, and nitrogen compounds, as well as microbial synthesis of amino acids and B vitamins. The ice worm microbial community was dominated by uncultured Sulfurospirillum, a taxon previously considered free-living rather than host-associated. From the metagenomic data, we also assembled the 18S rRNA gene, 28S rRNA gene, and a complete 17,403 bp mitochondrial genome of S. methanicola. Assembled marker gene sequences were near-identical to previously published S. methanicola sequences, and the mitogenome represents the first complete mitogenome of the family Hesionidae. Other functional genes related to S. methanicola were also annotated in the metagenomes. Our study highlights the utility of metagenomics in elucidating both microbial and host genetic features in this poorly understood deep-sea marine polychaete.



Bio(s): Dr. Jean Lim was previously a postdoctoral associate at the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS), University of Miami. She is an expert in bioinformatics and high-performance computing and has collaborated with NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) on various omics projects. Her research focuses on host-microbe symbiosis and microbial ecology.



Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of this presentation will be made available on the NOAA Omics website. View past omics seminar recordings here: https://sciencecouncil.noaa.gov/NOAA-Science-Technology-Focus-Areas/NOAA-Omics



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18 October 2022

Title: Climate, salmon, and fishing communities: Collaborative, solutions-oriented science for Alaska
Presenter(s): Erik Schoen, University of Alaska
Date & Time: 18 October 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Climate, salmon, and fishing communities: Collaborative, solutions-oriented science for Alaska
Presenter(s): Erik Schoen, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/climate-salmon-and-fishing/

Abstract: As Alaska's salmon respond to a rapidly changing environment, our fishing communities are experiencing record highs, disastrous lows, and uncertainty about what the future will bring. Climatic conditions affect salmon throughout their life cycle, from freshwater to the ocean and back. Climate can also influence salmon indirectly via their predators, prey, or pathogens, and through landscape changes like wildfire and melting glaciers. However, scientists are still working to understand which effects are most critical and how we can apply this knowledge to conserve salmon and sustain fishing communities. In this webinar, I will contend that we can better understand and adapt to these changes through collaborations between climate scientists, fisheries biologists, and local communities. I will share insights from student-led fieldwork on local rivers, research melding climate and population models, and conversations among Indigenous knowledge holders, agency scientists, and academics. Finally, I will suggest pathways forward that incorporate traditional knowledge, novel technologies, collaboration, and co-production into the research process.

Bio(s): Erik is a fisheries biologist who studies the effects of environmental change on fish populations and aquatic food webs. His research uses field, lab, experimental, and quantitative approaches to tackle problems with implications for natural resource management, conservation, and habitat restoration. Much of his recent research focuses on how Alaskan salmon are responding to a changing environment.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

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Title: Stags of the sea? On the evolution and function of cranial weapons in sculpins
Presenter(s): Thaddaeus Buser, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Groundfish Assessment Program, GAP
Date & Time: 18 October 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Stags of the sea? On the evolution and function of cranial weapons in sculpins

Presenter(s): Thaddaeus Buser, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Groundfish Assessment Program (GAP)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Ground fish Seminar Series Seminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m161d8630abba4e363a98635052f62a1fOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 2762 418 8254

Accessibility: Seminars will be close captioned by Friends Interpreting Services, LLC.

Abstract: Many North Pacific fishes are armed with scutes, spines, and barbs. It is generally accepted that these structures defend their bearers against predation, but outside of a few species, the function and evolutionary history of fish weapons remains mysterious. I used a variety of techniques, including CT scans and 3D motion capture to describe the morphology and use of preopercular spines in sculpins and compare the evolutionary drivers of the weaponization of sculpin skulls with better-understood terrestrial models, such as the evolution of antlers in stag deer.

Bio(s): Thaddaeus Buser received his Bachelor's degree in Aquatic and Fisheries Science from the University of Washington, his master's degree in Fisheries from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, and his PhD in Fisheries from Oregon State University. His research interests center around the biology, ecology, and evolution of North Pacific fishes and invertebrates, with a particular enthusiasm for sculpins and their relatives. Before joining the Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Thaddaeus was a post-doc research associate at Rice University, where he studied the diversity and evolution of fish skulls.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2022-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-series

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Title: Simulating Linear Kinematic Features in Viscous-Plastic Sea Ice Models
Presenter(s): Carolin Mehlmann, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg , Germany
Date & Time: 18 October 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Simulating linear kinematic features in viscous-plastic sea ice models

Presenter(s): Carolin Mehlmann (Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg , Germany)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar contact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US) +1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: TBD


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

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Title: The Historic Cemetery Landscape of North Carolina’s coast
Presenter(s): Melissa Timo, Historic Cemetery Specialist, NC Office of State Archaeology
Date & Time: 18 October 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Submerged NC: As you are now, so once was I - The Historic Cemetery Landscape of the North Carolina Coast

Presenter(s): Melissa Timo, Historic Cemetery Specialist for the NC Office of State Archaeology

Sponsor(s): NOAA, ONMS, Monitor National Marine Sanctuaryand the NC Office of State Archaeology

Seminar Contact(s): Shannon.Ricles@noaa.gov

Registration: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8219689863981154319

Abstract: North Carolina's coast has some of the oldest historic cemeteries in the state. From death's heads to grave houses to Gullah Geechee influences, this region has a bevy of unique and special funerary traditions visitors can explore. Unfortunately, these landscapes face their own challenges, too.Join Melissa Timo, Historic Cemetery Specialist for the NC Office of State Archaeology (NC OSA), as she discusses cemetery traditions along the North Carolina coast from the 18th through early 20th centuries. Also, learn how the NC Office of State Archaeology is documenting and preserving these cemeteries in the face of adverse effects from climate change, sea level rise, and development.

Bio(s): Melissa joined the NC Office of State Archaeology (NC OSA) in April 2019, as a Historic Cemetery Specialist. She obtained her BS. in anthropology and archaeology from Mercyhurst University in Erie, Pennsylvania, and received her MA in historical archaeology, with an emphasis in public archaeology from the University of West Florida in Pensacola, Florida.

Before coming to NC OSA, Melissa worked in the private sector, for the Exploring Joara Foundation in Morganton, North Carolina, the Florida Public Archaeology Network, the National Park Service, local historical societies, university archaeology labs and field schools, and the Sagamore Institute of the Adirondacks at Vanderbilt's Great Camp Sagamore. She has a passion for connecting people to their local history, historic cemeteries, and archaeological resources.

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; once captioned it will be hosted on the archived webpage: https://monitor.noaa.gov/gallery/webinar-archive.html.Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar weeklyemail:
Send an emailto OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

17 October 2022

Title: Applications of Combined Polar and Geostationary High-resolution Sounding Observations
Presenter(s): Dr. William Smith Sr., Senior Scientist, SSEC at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
Date & Time: 17 October 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Applications of Combined Polar and Geostationary High-resolution Sounding Observations

Presenter(s): Dr William Smith Sr., Senior Scientist, SSEC at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Sponsor(s): NOAA JPSS Program

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Meeting ID
meet.google.com/uij-brdj-tas

Phone Numbers
(US)+1 304-853-3623
PIN: 711 161 368#

Abstract: High-resolution hyperspectral satellite sounding is becoming an operational reality during the next decade. China has already launched two GIIRS instruments successfully into geostationary orbit (i.e.,2016 and 2021) and Europe will launch the MTG IRS instrument in 2023. The US is planning to launch a hyperspectral sounder on its next generation geostationary satellite soon during the next decade. Also, fleets of small low inclination satellites are being considered to obtain high-resolution sounding measurements on a global scale to compliment forthcoming regional scale high-resolution geostationary satellite measurements. To prepare for the use of these data, high horizontal and temporal resolution multispectral data from current geostationary satellite imager instruments (i.e., the GOES-ABI and MSG-SEVIRI))have been fused with high vertical resolution polar-orbiting satellite (CrIS and IASI), and cloud penetrating Microwave (ATMS and AMSU), data to produce all-sky condition high spatial (2-km) and temporal (30-minute) resolution soundings, which simulate those to be obtained from future satellite sounding systems. The LEO/GEO fusion derived high-resolution soundings are assimilated into regional numerical forecast models to investigate their impact on Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) accuracy. It is shown that hourly continuous assimilation of these data enables improved diagnosis of the 3-dimensional wind vector field that, when used to initialize a forecast cycle, improves weather forecasts (i.e., specify precipitation and the location and genesis time of severe convective storms). The high-resolution sounder observations, and their use to initialize regional weather forecasts, have been conducted on a24/7 basis to gather statistically significant forecast improvement results that can be expected future high-resolution sounding systems. More than two years of continuous operation of the high-resolution satellite sounding data assimilation/forecast system has provided validation statistics demonstrating improvements in NWP, in particular precipitation and severe convective weather forecasts over the North American region. The operational utility of the high-resolution soundings, and forecasts generated with them, have also been recently demonstrated during the 2022 Hazardous Weather Testbed experiment. Several examples of the improvement of forecasts of hazardous weather, including tornado and extreme precipitation/flash-flood events are presented to illustrate the potential life-saving impact of high-resolution satellite data.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov
with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA
Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome
your suggestions and ideas!

13 October 2022

Title: An Implementation Plan for Response and Prevention of Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease
Presenter(s): Caroline McLaughlin, National Coral Disease Coordinator, Florida Sea Grant
Date & Time: 13 October 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series


Title: An Implementation Plan for Response and Prevention of Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease

Presenter(s): Caroline McLaughlin, National Coral Disease Coordinator, Florida Sea Grant

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program

Seminar Contact(s): Caroline Donovan, caroline.donovan@noaa.gov

Remote Access: To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/ . Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio. Closed captioning provided.

Abstract: As of August 2022, SCTLD has affected corals along the entirety of Florida's 360-mile long reef system and has been reported in 22 Caribbean countries and territories, including the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. As of September 2022, the appearance of a SCTLD-like disease was documented at Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary in the Gulf of Mexico. The NOAA Strategy for Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease (SCTLD): An Implementation Plan for Response and Prevention aims to:
  • Build on goals and agency priorities identified in the NOAA Strategy for SCTLD Response and Prevention;
  • Outline a detailed, five-year course of action for SCTLD response and prevention;
  • Match agency capacity with SCTLD response needs and complement and enhance the efforts of our Partners; and,
  • Highlight key actions necessary to understand and address this new threat to coral reefs over the long-term.
Recognizing that SCTLD will likely be present on U.S. coral reefs for the foreseeable future, the implementation plan also outlines key actions necessary to address this new threat over the long-term. While it is unlikely that SCTLD will be fully eradicated as a result of this implementation plan, the plan would provide major gains in terms of reducing the likelihood of further transmission; preparing vulnerable areas in the event the disease reaches them; saving priority corals in regions whose corals are being heavily impacted; and, contributing to future restoration of highly susceptible species whose populations have been devastated in many areas.

Bio(s): Caroline McLaughlin serves as the National Coral Disease Coordinator with Florida Sea Grant in partnership with NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program. Caroline has more than a decade of experience in the conservation sector, an academic background in environmental science and policy, and significant experience working to enhance the resilience of coral reefs. Most recently, she worked with the National Parks Conservation Association as the Associate Director of the Sun Coast Region, covering Florida, Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands, and Louisiana, where she worked in a leadership role to advance policies to protect marine and coastal ecosystems in and around national parks.Caroline holds a B.A. in Ecosystem Science and Policy and Geography from the University of Miami, and a dual M.A. in Natural Resources, Sustainable Development, and International Affairs from American University in Washington, D.C. and the United Nations' University for Peace in Costa Rica. An avid traveler and lover of the outdoors, Caroline has a passion for the oceans (especially sharks!) and spending time with her golden retriever, Lionpaw Lani.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:A recording of the presentation will be sent out via email after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: NOAA CoastWatch: Climate Change Impacts on the Ocean: Compound Extreme Events Along the U.S. West Coast and Global Ocean Memory
Presenter(s): Hui Shi, NOAA Central Pacific OceanWatch
Date & Time: 13 October 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Climate Change Impacts on the Ocean: Compound Extreme Events Along the U.S. West Coast and Global Ocean Memory

Presenter(s): Hui(Daisy) Shi, NOAA Central Pacific OceanWatch

Abstract: From 2013 to 2016, a severe marine heatwave occurred in the Northeast Pacific while an exceptional multi-year drought prevailed along the U.S. West Coast. The co-occurrence of these extreme events has caused significant economical-ecological impacts on the coastal marine and terrestrial systems. Using the projections from the latest earth system models, we explored the future changes of these compound extremes. During the study, we found not only extreme events, but global ocean memory (defined as the temporal autocorrelation in surface temperature anomalies) is also changing under climate change.

Remote Access: Video call link: https://meet.google.com/uco-uboz-cmk
Or dial: (US) +1 406-838-3189
PIN: 768 242 663#

Sponsor(s): NOAA CoastWatch (STAR)

Seminar Contact(s): Victoria.Wegman@noaa.gov
Slides, Recordings Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php

Title: Enhancing Forecast Value with Artificial Intelligence
Presenter(s): Sue Ellen Haupt, National Center for Atmospheric Research, NCAR
Date & Time: 13 October 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Enhancing Forecast Value with Artificial Intelligence

Presenter(s): Sue Ellen Haupt, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

Sponsor(s): Office of Science and Technology Integration (OSTI) Modeling Division, National Weather Service of NOAA. If you would like to recommend a speaker and topic please email:
ufs.modeling@noaa.gov and provide information on speaker and topic along with email addresses of speakers.

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Mackell (stacy.mackell@noaa.gov) and Caroline Delgado (caroline.delgado@noaa.gov)Remote Acess: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2327840262424013581

Abstract: This talk will review how AI/ML has been advancing our capabilities to model the weather and climate. Modern forecast systems benefit from having AI blended with physics approaches to optimize forecast accuracy, speed, and applicability. First, we'll discuss ML postprocessing, which allows us to merge model output with historical observations to improve real-time forecasts. This widely applied method has been a boon to forecast improvement for a variety of applications. We'll review NCAR's Dynamic Integrated Forecast System (DICast) as an example of a successful post processing system. We'll describe how we blend that and other AI methods with numerical models for renewable energy applications among others. Secondly, ML replacements and emulations of model physical parameterizations has the potential to not only greatly speed computations, but when built with observational data, to also provide more accurate solutions. Work on multiple parameterizations have shown major potential to advance modeling capabilities, including one for surface layer parameterizations that has proven to provide advances beyond standard methods, even at sites where it was not trained. Finally, using AI/ML to actually produce model output is beginning to show real potential. One example is using deep learning to provide high-resolution features conditioned on a coarser simulation. After being trained on high-resolution model output, this approach can provide plausible high-resolution images even on regions where it was not originally trained. These applications suggest a potential for future fully learned AI/ML modeling capability. These types of advances are in the midst of revolutionizing how we model the atmosphere.

Bio(s): Dr. Sue Ellen Haupt is a Senior Scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Deputy Director of its Research Applications Laboratory (RAL). She is also a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS), where she currently serves as Commissioner of the Commission on the Weather, Water, and Climate Enterprise, as well as Contributing and Founding Director of the World Energy and Meteorology Council (WEMC). Dr. Haupt is an expert in boundary layer meteorology, large-scale atmospheric dynamics, applications of artificial intelligence in the environmental sciences, renewable energy, dynamical systems, numerical methods, and computational fluid dynamics. Her specialty is in applying novel numerical techniques to problems in the environmental sciences in both basic and applied research.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:All PowerPoints and recordings from past webinars can be accessed at the UFS webinar web page.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: River Herring and Blue Catfish Research Conducted by AFS Potomac Chapter Travel Award Recipients
Presenter(s): Seth Gibbons, Clemson University (East Carolina University at time of travel grant), PhD student; and Vaskar Nepal, Western Illinois University, Assistant Professor of Biology
Date & Time: 13 October 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: River Herring and Blue Catfish Research Conducted by AFS Potomac Chapter Travel Award RecipientsNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Seth Gibbons, Clemson University (East Carolina University at time of travel grant), PhD student; and Vaskar Nepal, Western Illinois University, Assistant Professor of Biology

*The speakers will be introduced by AFS Potomac Chapter President Julie Difilippi Simpson

Sponsor(s): NOAA Fisheries and AFS Potomac Chapter

Seminar Contacts: NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3156822554089037582



Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the
NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.



Abstract: The Potomac Chapter of the American Fisheries Society (AFS) funds an annual award, named for former Potomac Chapter President (and NMFS leader) Richard Schaefer, for a promising graduate student to attend and make a presentation at the AFS annual meeting. Two recent awardees, Seth Gibbons and Vaskar Nepal, will describe their research on river herring environmental DNA, and salinity and thermal tolerance of blue catfish, respectively. These presentations should be of interest to anyone interested in the Potomac River watershed, invasive species, eDNA, and AFS work in the local Washington, DC area.

Keywords: river herring, blue catfish, eDNA

Bio(s): Seth Gibbons is a third-year PhD student at Clemson University, in the Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Department. He received a BS in Wildlife Biology (with a minor in History) from Lees-McRae College and an MS in Biology (with a concentration in Environmental and Organismic Biology) from East Carolina University. His prior research has focused on using environmental DNA to assist management decisions for freshwater and anadromous fish.
Dr. Vaskar Nepal completed his PhD at Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 2020, where he was subsequently a post-doctoral researcher for two years. His research interest is in ecophysiology and life-history of fishes.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Sequential sampling for chemical analysis and how it can fill data gaps about life history and habitat use: Case studies on sea turtle bones and marine mammal teeth
Presenter(s): Calandra Turner Tomaszewicz, PhD, Research Biologist NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Marine Mammal and Turtle Division
Date & Time: 13 October 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Sequential sampling for chemical analysis and how it can fill data gaps about life history and habitat use: Case studies on sea turtle bones and marine mammal teeth

Presenter(s): Calandra Turner Tomaszewicz, PhD, Research Biologist NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Marine Mammal and Turtle Division

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS.NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

Join via webinar: Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 2763 830 3906; Meeting password: c63Kb7umFJ2Join by phone: +1-415-527-5035 US Toll Global call-in numbers https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/globalcallin.php?MTID=m3142650430de6a3cadba4efb1ef4af96 Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: Understanding multi-year habitat use and age-specific movement patterns is a primary goal in ongoing efforts to recover protected marine species globally. Specifically, the need to estimate residency, survivorship, and growth rates in different habitats, is critical for accurate population assessments and conservation planning. Yet for many of these long-lived and migratory animals, progress on estimating these multi-year movement and demographic parameters can be difficult " largely due to the inability to follow and monitor these animals underwater throughout their entire life cycle. Despite these challenges, advances are being made through the synergistic application of multiple different techniques, and gradually the understanding of multi-year movement and age and growth for several threatened and endangered marine species is improving.

Here we share the approach of one of these useful combination of methods, skeleto+iso, in which the sequential sampling of accretionary tissues is helping to recreate multi-year movements of animals to inform the recovery and management efforts of specific populations. Case studies will share about the application of this efficient method on different sea turtle populations and marine mammal species. The sampling of different tissues for various chemical markers can be extremely useful in assessing diet, habitat, health and reproductive status " one commonly applied analyses is stable nitrogen (15N) and carbon (13C) isotope analysis of either bulk tissue, or compound specific amino acids. The tissues commonly used include skin (for snapshot insights), or accretionary tissues such as humerus bones or teeth (for multi-year records). Skeletochronology combines histology techniques and image analysis to quantify growth layers, analogous to tree rings, and these annual growth layers contain individual histories in sequential layers. When the skeleto+iso are combined, the results (age, age-at-maturity, size, annual growth, ontogenetic shifts, habitat, diet, etc.) are indexed to multiple years of an individual animal's life. This process can also be linked with other analyses including hormones, genetics, trace elements, captures/photo ID, satellite tracking and more, all to disclose more detailed information on population demographics, ecology and movement of protected species.

BIOGRAPHY

Cali Turner Tomaszewicz is a Research Biologist at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center, in the Marine Mammal and Turtle Division. As part of the Marine Turtle Ecology and Assessment Program, she conducts population ecology and demographic research on marine sea turtles and marine mammals. At the Southwest Fisheries Science Center, she's worked in close partnership with the Marine Turtle Ecology and Assessment Program (MTEAP) since 2008, and combines field and lab work to answer key questions about the life history, habitat use patterns (migrations and foraging), and population ecology for protected marine species - largely focusing on sea turtles in the Pacific. Her primary research techniques include: skeletochronology, biogeochemical analysis, and mark-recapture. At the SWFSC, she designs and conducts collaborative lab- and field-based research, and manages the Marine Turtle Demography Lab.

She received her undergraduate degree at Claremont McKenna College in 2001, majoring in Environment, Economics & Politics. In 2009 she received a Masters degree at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, and in 2016 completed her Ph.D. at the University of California San Diego in Biology. Her graduate and postgraduate research has focused on multiple sea turtle species (greens, loggerheads, hawksbills, and flatbacks), Northern fur seals, humpback and blue whales, and she is also currently helping advise additional graduate student projects focused on California sea lions and killer whales.
NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Data to Decisions: Climate Products and Services to Support Gulf of Mexico Decision Makers
Presenter(s): Sharon Mesick, Regional Climate Services Director, Southern Region, NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information; Victor Murphy, Climate and COOP Services Program Manager, Operational Services Division, NOAA National Weather Service Southern Region
Date & Time: 13 October 2022
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Data to Decisions: Climate Products and Services to Support Gulf of Mexico Decision Makers
NOAA Gulf of Mexico Forum Webinar Series


Presenter(s): Sharon Mesick, Regional Climate Services Director, Southern Region, NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information; Victor Murphy, Climate and Continuity of Operations (COOP) Services Program Manager, Operational Services Division, NOAA National Weather Service Southern Region

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaboration Team, a part of NOAA's Regional Collaboration Network

Seminar Contact(s): Kristen Laursen, Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov , NOAA Fisheries and Regional Collaboration Network

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8822582882227444750
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For your awareness, this webinar will be recorded and shared.

Abstract: NOAA's Southern Regional Climate Services provide data, information products, and services to support climate-scale decision making across the 10-state and Caribbean region. This forum will highlight some recent information product releases, and seeks to gather information from Gulf constituents about the types of products and services that are needed to help advance your mission in the Gulf of Mexico.

Bio(s): Sharon Mesick is the Regional Climate Services Director for the Southern Region. She is responsible for connecting regional constituents with NOAA data, products and services to meet their mission needs. She has been with NOAA for almost 20 years, most of this time with the NOAA Coastal Data Development program focused on Gulf of Mexico issues.
Victor Murphy is the Climate and Continuity of Operations (COOP) Services Program Manager for the National Weather Service Southern Region, based at the Weather Service Headquarters office in Ft. Worth Texas. He is responsible for product dissemination, decision support services, and upper air and marine observations for the Region, including the Gulf of Mexico.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Please contact Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov for the recording and/or PDF.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

12 October 2022

Title: NCCOS National Competitive Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Programs FY 2023 Funding Opportunity for Prevention Control and Mitigation of Harmful Algal Bloom (PCMHAB) and Monitoring and Event Response for Harmful Algal Blooms (MERHAB) programs
Presenter(s): Marc Suddleson, Maggie Broadwater, Brittany King, Felix Martinez, Quay Dortch
Date & Time: 12 October 2022
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Please share with anyone (NOAA or not) who might be interested; thanks.

Title: NCCOS National Competitive Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Programs FY 2023 Funding Opportunity for Prevention Control and Mitigation of Harmful Algal Bloom (PCMHAB) and Monitoring and Event Response for Harmful Algal Blooms (MERHAB) programs

Presenter(s): Marc Suddleson, Maggie Broadwater, Brittany King, all of National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) Competitive Research Program (CRP)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Varis.Ransi@noaa.gov, co-coordinator NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series

Remote Access: Register here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/habfunding2023/event/registration.htmlYou may enter the webinar via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. If you enter via a browser, PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use the IE browser.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download it but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download info is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register at link above.
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) is pleased to announce a Fiscal Year 2023 Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) soliciting proposals for the Prevention Control and Mitigation of Harmful Algal Bloom (PCMHAB)and Monitoring and Event Response for Harmful Algal Blooms (MERHAB) national competitive research programs. Targeted PCMHAB proposals will advance new methods for HAB toxin measurement in seafood to prevent human illnesses. MERHAB targeted and regional proposals will build and sustain capacity for monitoring and observing of HABs and associated toxins. NCCOS is making approximately $2.8 million dollars available for selected multi-year project spending availability of FY2023 Federal appropriations. The deadline for required letters of intent is November 08, 2022. The deadline for full applications is January 31, 2023. The full NOFO is available online at: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=343841

Bio(s): Marc Suddleson is a competitive research program manager with the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Silver Spring Maryland, USA. Marc has overseen the creation and management of national research programs, including the Monitoring and Event Response for HABs (MERHAB) research program for over 20 years building effective partnerships between federal labs, universities, state and tribal agencies and industry to develop and implement harmful algae monitoring, alert, prediction and response systems. Marc is a member of the U.S. National HAB Committee and of the International Society for the Study of Harmful Algae.Dr. Maggie Broadwater is a program manager in the Competitive Research Program at NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). She previously worked as a research scientist in the NCCOS Marine Forensics and Marine Biotoxins Programs in Charleston, SC. Dr. Broadwater holds a B.S. in Biochemistry from the College of Charleston, M.S. in Biomedical Sciences, and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the Medical University of South Carolina.Dr. Brittany King is environmental justice specialist in the Competitive Research Program at NOAA's National Center for Coastal Ocean Science. Dr. King holds a B.S. in Marine and Environmental Science from Hampton University, MESM in Environmental Science and Management from the Bren School at UC Santa Barbara, and a Ph.D. in Fisheries Science from Oregon State University.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:Within a few days of the webinar, a link to the recording, usually a PDF of the slides, and sometimes a summary of the chat will be sent to all who registered.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Improving Beach Management in South Carolina by Defining Piping Plover Foraging Habitats
Presenter(s): Andrew Tweel, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, tweela@dnr.sc.gov
Date & Time: 12 October 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesDate & Time: 12 October 2022, 2 - 3 pm ET

Title: Improving Beach Management in South Carolina by Defining Piping Plover Foraging Habitats

Presenter(s):
  • Andrew Tweel, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources


Sponsor(s): This webinar is sponsored by the NERRS Science CollaborativeSeminar Contacts: Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6342610215153718796 Abstract
Shorebird populations are declining globally in the face of sea level rise, increasing coastal development, and shoreline modifications. The piping plover and red knot have exhibited population declines in recent years, particularly in the intertidal habitats of South Carolina. Recent research has established linkages between benthic prey abundance and foraging activity along South Carolina beaches; however, most of these projects focused on determining impacts from shoreline modification, rather than quantifying habitat characteristics. Identifying characteristics associated with optimal foraging habitat can help inform state and federal permitting and habitat management activities in areas these shorebirds inhabit. A project team at the ACE Basin Reserve worked with the SC Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to develop a habitat assessment tool for the piping plover and red knot. In this webinar, project lead Andrew Tweel will share methods and outcomes of the project, including a refined list of preferred prey species for piping plovers and a preliminary list for red knots. Tweel will discuss what prey species are important, what makes certain areas foraging hotspots for the piping plover and red knot, and how this information can inform management decisions within South Carolina and across the U.S.

Bio(s): Please visit here for more information about the webinar.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

11 October 2022

Title: U.S. Southwest Drought Briefing
Presenter(s): Jon Meyer, Simon Wang, Utah Climate Center at Utah State University
Date & Time: 11 October 2022
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Southwest Drought Briefing

Presenter(s):
Current Climate Conditions and OutlookJon Meyer | Utah Climate Center at Utah State UniversityUsing Twitter Data to Monitor and Predict DroughtSimon Wang | Utah Climate Center at Utah State University

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USDA Southwest Climate Hub

Seminar Contact(s): Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov), NOAA/OAR Climate Program Office

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4639505183515134222

Abstract: The Southwest is in long-term drought even as the monsoon continues into fall. This webinar will look at current and forecast drought conditions for Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, and Utah.


Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6200831490394183180

Recordings: You can find them here: (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Observing Alaskan Lake and River Ice through Fresh Eyes: Focus on Freeze-up
Presenter(s): Chris Arp, Water and Environmental Research Center UAF
Date & Time: 11 October 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Observing Alaskan Lake and River Ice through Fresh Eyes: Focus on Freeze-up

Presenter(s): Chris Arp, Water and Environmental Research Center, UAF

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/fresh-eyes-focus-on-freeze-up/

Abstract: Seeing ice first form on lakes and rivers signals the start of winter for many Alaskans. Despite longer and warmer falls in recent years, trends in freeze-up timing are often inconclusive. Part of this challenge may be defining whether freeze-up occurs as a single-day event or a progressive process with widely varied timing depending on the waterbody and season of interest. Defining freeze-up in terms that matter to how people use waters for travel, recreation, and subsistence is likely just as important. As part of a new freshwater ice observation program, Fresh Eyes on Ice, we are looking for citizen observations and insights into freeze-up and the entire ice cycle. We'll discuss new efforts being made to improve ice observation in Alaska and ways that you can help.

Bio(s): Chris Arp is a Research Professor at the Water and Environmental Research Center at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. His Research interests include Landscape and watershed-scale functions of lakes and wetlands and patterns and process of river systems. He is also interested in Community-based monitoring, citizen science, and science education.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Phylogenetic imputation of reproductive, behavioral, and morphometric traits, and their use in joint species distribution models to understand community assembly
Presenter(s): James Thorson, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center AFSC, Habitat and Ecological Process Research Program, HEPR
Date & Time: 11 October 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Phylogenetic imputation of reproductive, behavioral, and morphometric traits, and their use in joint species distribution models to understand community assembly

Presenter(s): James Thorson (NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC), Habitat and Ecological Process Research Program (HEPR)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Ground fish Seminar Series Seminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m161d8630abba4e363a98635052f62a1fOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 2762 418 8254

Accessibility: Seminars will be close captioned by Friends Interpreting Services, LLC.

Abstract: We estimate evolutionary mechanisms governing fish life-history, and review phylogenetic structural equation models. We then use trait estimates to identify associations between traits and habitat utilization for groundfishes in the Gulf of Alaska.

Bio(s): James Thorson leads the Habitat and Ecological Processes Research Program at AFSC, which involves envisioning future research and partnerships regarding Essential Fish Habitat and Loss of Sea Ice. He hopes to encourage further synthesis of direct and impacts of fishing on population status and productivity. He also collaborates with researchers in all AFSC divisions to integrate monitoring, process research, and modelling efforts to respond to ongoing changes in climate and resulting habitat.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2022-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Using unsupervised machine learning to characterize upper ocean temperature structures in the European Arctic
Presenter(s): Erin Thomas, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM
Date & Time: 11 October 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Using unsupervised machine learning to characterize upper ocean temperature structures in the European Arctic

Presenter(s): Erin Thomas (Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar contact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US) +1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: In-situ observations of subsurface ocean temperatures are often inconsistently distributed in time and space. This creates challenges for ocean model evaluation or understanding large-scale ocean characteristics. This seminar will present an unsupervised neural networking technique that we use to characterize ocean temperatures in the European Arctic and provide information on the accuracy of modeled vertical ocean temperature profiles. Self-organizing maps (SOM) is an unsupervised machine learning technique that we apply to approximately twenty thousand Argo and CTD temperature profiles from 2012 to 2020 in the European Arctic to categorize the observed vertical ocean temperature structures in the top 150 m. The observed temperature structures are then used to validate the spatial and temporal variability of modeled vertical temperature structures in the TOPAZ4 model. This analysis gives us new insights about the model's capabilities to reproduce specific vertical structures of the top-most ocean layer.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

6 October 2022

Title: Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS) Process Studies Webinar Series – Session 2
Presenter(s): Dongxiao Zhang University of Washington/CICOES and NOAA/PMEL; Jieshun Zhu NOAA/NCEP/Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 6 October 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS) Process Studies Webinar Series " Session 2

Presenter(s): Dongxiao Zhang (University of Washington/CICOES and NOAA/PMEL); and Jieshun Zhu (NOAA/NCEP/Climate Prediction Center)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Climate Variability and Predictability Program

Seminar Contact(s): Jose Algarin jose.algarin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/808724212884499215Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Abstract: The NOAA Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) Program is hosting a webinar series on the Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS) Pre-Field Modeling Studies that will highlight the recent results from the CVP-funded projects. The goal of these modeling studies is to refine the current scientific understanding of the equatorial Pacific climate system, with a specific focus on two process studies identified in the TPOS2020 First Report, Pacific Upwelling and Mixing Physics (PUMP) and Air"sea Interaction at the eastern edge of the Warm Pool. Their results will assist in the planning of future field campaigns.
This first of five sessions will feature two presentations:Saildrone USV pilot studies for the Tropical Pacific Observing System, by Dr. Dongxiao Zhang (University of Washington/CICOES and NOAA/PMEL)An OSSE study on roles of TAO/TRITON and Argo in tropical Pacific observing system, by Dr. Jieshun Zhu (NOAA/NCEP/Climate Prediction Center)

Bio(s): Dr. Dongxiao Zhang is a Principal Research Scientist of the Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies (CICOES) at University of Washington and NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL). He studies ocean circulation and its impacts on climate variability, and the multiscale air-sea interactions with observations from moored buoys and Uncrewed Surface Vehicles (USV). He has led and co-led a number of USV saildrone observations, including the Tropical Pacific Observing System and the Atlantic hurricane missions.Dr. Jieshun Zhu is a meteorologist at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. His research interests include climate prediction and modeling, and air-sea interactions at various time scales. He also works on ocean data assimilation and some TPOS-related observing system experiments.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Within a few days of the webinar, a link t o the recording,
usually a PDF of the slides, and sometimes a summary of the chat will be sent to all who registered.

Subscribe / Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: NOAA’s Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research, and Technology: Linking Exploration to Conservation
Presenter(s): Dr. Joshua D. Voss, Associate Research Professor and Executive Director of CIOERT
Date & Time: 6 October 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA's Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research, and Technology: Linking Exploration to ConservationNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Dr. Joshua D. Voss, Associate Research Professor and Executive Director of CIOERT; Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Joanne Flanders (joanne.flanders@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: This seminar will combine stories, science, stunning visuals to highlight the major accomplishments of NOAA's Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research, and Technology (CIOERT). Led by Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in partnership with the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration (and Research), University of North Carolina Wilmington, University of Miami, and SRI International, CIOERT's vision has been to transform the way we explore our oceans through novel approaches and technology. We have served NOAA strategic priorities in three theme areas: exploration of continental shelf edge frontiers, research on vulnerable coral and sponge ecosystems, and development of advanced underwater technologies. Since 2010 CIOERT has conducted more than 40 research cruises focused on deep and mesophotic coral reef exploration and characterization, resulting in the discovery of new species, expanded and revised habitat maps, newly identified coral reef resources, and improved understanding of ecological connectivity among coral reef ecosystems. These studies have provided critical data and recommendations to enhance marine ecosystem management, including the establishment of 2 new MPAs and expansion of 5 existing MPAs. CIOERT has successfully developed new technologies for ocean research and exploration including custom ROV sampling equipment, noninvasive technology to measure coral metabolism, an integrated state-of-the-art mesopelagic system, and the first ever invertebrate cultured cell line. CIOERT researchers have discovered novel marine compounds with demonstrated activity against MRSA, tuberculosis, and triple negative breast cancer. More than 125 graduate and undergraduate students have participated in CIOERT research and training programs. Finally, CIOERT researchers have contributed to 23 telepresence-enabled exploration missions engaging thousands of shoreside scientists, graduate and undergraduate students, high school classes, and members of the interested public.

Keywords: technology, ocean research, exploration

Bio(s): Dr. Joshua Voss is an Associate Research Professor at Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Chair of the Harbor Branch Faculty Assembly, and Executive Director of NOAA's Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research, and Technology. His primary areas of interest include shallow and mesophotic coral reef ecology, coral health and disease, molecular ecology, and marine conservation and management. Through Harbor Branch's Robertson Coral Reef Program and CIOERT he works to discover, characterize, and protect coral reefs ecosystems. Voss is a certified technical rebreather diver and scuba instructor who has completed over 1500 scientific dives and led more than 40 scientific expeditions primarily in the wider Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. Voss teaches undergraduate courses in the Harbor Branch Semester by the Sea Program and the Florida Institute of Oceanography's marine field studies program, graduate courses in FAU's Department of Biology, and molecular workshops for high school students. Voss has served on various committees including the South Atlantic Fisheries Management Council Coral Advisory Panel, Southeast Florida Coral Reef Initiative Team and as co-lead of their Technical Advisory Committee, the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Technical Advisory Committee, the South Florida Marine Research Hub, and FAU's Diving and Boating Safety Committee. After growing in central Florida, Voss attended Elon University in North Carolina and completed a B.S. in Biology along with minors in Philosophy and Chemistry. He earned his Ph.D. in Biological Sciences at Florida International University in Miami, and was a member of the Marine Science faculty at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg before joining FAU Harbor Branch.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Using amino acid stable isotopes from pinniped museum specimens to trace a century of environmental change through northeast Pacific food webs
Presenter(s): Megan Feddern, PhD; Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 6 October 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Using amino acid stable isotopes from pinniped museum specimens to trace a century of environmental change through northeast Pacific food webs

Presenter(s): Megan Feddern, PhD; Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS.NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Join via webinar (updated 10/05/2022 4:00 pm)

Webex

Meeting number: 2762 241 3566
Meeting password: c63Kb7umFJ2

Join via phone

1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll FreeCan't join the meeting? Contact support.
Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: Physical environments are changing globally due to anthropogenic impacts which have the potential to alter ecological interactions. To understand how ecological interactions are changing, long-term datasets are necessary to document ecological baselines from the past that are comparable to current ecological conditions. Compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of amino acids can be used as a useful chemical tracer for retrospective analyses which can elucidate changes in biogeochemistry and trophic interactions that influence food webs. Here, we apply CSIA to museum skull specimens from two species of pinnipeds in the northeast Pacific, harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus), to evaluate ecological responses to physical conditions in the northeast Pacific. Altogether, this work shows CSIA is a useful tracer for elucidating long-term physical forcing mechanisms on food webs and changes in food web structure through time as indicated by top predator trophic position.



Bio(s): Megan is a climate ecologist, data scientist, and graphic designer. Currently she is a postdoctoral researcher at University of Alaska Fairbanks in the Cunningham Lab working on climate drivers of Chinook salmon population dynamics in the Arctic/Yukon/Kuskokwim region. Previously, Megan was a Ph.D candidate in the Holtgrieve Ecosystem Ecology Lab where she earned her degree in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences with a certificate in Data Science through the UW eScience Institute. Her dissertation research used compound specific stable isotope analysis of amino acids to understand changes in primary productivity and foraging ecology of pinnipeds in the northeast Pacific using museum skull specimens. She also investigated the impacts of salmon derived nutrients on riparian soil nitrogen cycling. Megan was a NMFS-Sea Grant Population Dynamics and Ecosystem Fellow and Washington Sea Grant Fellow.
NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Occurence of Vibrios, Mnemiopsis leidyi and their associated bacterial communities found in The Maryland Coastal Bays
Presenter(s): Dr. Detbra Rosales, NSF-CREST postdoctoral fellow with the University of Maryland Eastern shore and NOAA Cooperative Oxford Laboratory
Date & Time: 6 October 2022
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Please share with anyone (NOAA or not) who might be interested; thanks.

Title: Occurrence of Vibrios, Mnemiopsis leidyi and their associated bacterial communities found in The Maryland Coastal Bays

Presenter(s): Dr. Detbra Rosales, postdoctoral fellow with the University of Maryland Eastern shore and NOAA Cooperative Oxford Laboratory.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series


Seminar Contact(s): Varis.Ransi@noaa.gov, co-coordinator NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series

Remote Access: Register here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/detbrarosales/event/registration.htmlYou may enter the webinar via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. If you enter via a browser, PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use the IE browser.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download it but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download info is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register at link above.
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Ctenophores play an important role in marine ecosystem and can affect the structure of the planktonic food web. They can release a large amount of nutrients and organic matter, which can stimulate bacterial growth and alter bacterial composition. The interaction between bacteria and Ctenophores is poorly understood, especially the interaction between Ctenophores and Vibrios. This presentation will focus on the distribution and abundance of the Ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi and association with Vibrios in the Maryland Coastal Bays (MCBs). Along with deciphering the microbial communities associated to M. leidyi. Understanding the relationship between Vibrios and M. leidyi may be useful in the development of a vibrio predictive model for the MCBs.

Bio(s): Dr. Detbra Rosales is a NSF-CREST postdoctoral fellow with the University of Maryland Eastern shore and NOAA cooperative oxford lab. She received her B.S (environmental science) from SUNY Binghamton in 2010 and M.A in (biology) from CUNY Brooklyn college in 2012. She completed her Ph.D. (Marine Estuarine Environmental Science) in 2020 from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. Her research focuses on the ecology of Vibrios and harmful algal species.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:Within a few days of the webinar, a link to the recording, usually a PDF of the slides, and sometimes a summary of the chat will be sent to all who registered.

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5 October 2022

Title: Ku a Lanakila Nā Mahi Iʻa: the Fish Farmers Stand Victorious
Presenter(s): Brenda Asuncion, Hui Mlama Loko I'a Coordinator, KUA Hawaii; Randie Hovatter, Communications Specialist, NOAA Office of Aquaculture
Date & Time: 5 October 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Ku a Lanakila N Mahi Ia: the Fish Farmers Stand Victorious

Presenter(s): Brenda Asuncion, Hui Mlama Loko I'a Coordinator, KUA Hawaii

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of Aquaculture

Seminar Contact(s): Randie Hovatter (randie.hovatter@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Register at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?RGID=r94aa858828c1176fb1dadf602aae1153

Abstract:
This installment of the NOAA Science Seminar Series is presented by the NOAA Office of Aquaculture (OAQ). The webinar will consist of a 30-40 minute presentation, followed by moderated Q&A for the remainder of the hour. It will be recorded.This project uses oral history documentation to uplift the innovation and pioneering spirit of the elder generation of Hawaii aquaculturists. Hawaii-based nonprofit Kuaina Ulu Auamo (KUA) aims to document the lived experiences of growing seafood as a means to ensure we continue to hold restorative aquaculture as a crucial part of our food systems into the future. We also hope to increase awareness of aquaculture achievements in Hawaii, including successes in modern aquaculture as well as the resilience of loko ia as the oldest form of mariculture and aquaculture innovation in the islands. The project also increases community capacity to do oral history documentation by providing resources for training and technical support for audio recording and transcription. We will share about the pilot phase of the project in which nine participants were interviewed on three different islands.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to oneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Sitka Landslide Risk Dashboard & Geohazards in Southeast Alaska
Presenter(s): Annette Patton, Sitka Sound Science Center, and Jacyn Schmidt, Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska
Date & Time: 5 October 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Sitka Landslide Risk Dashboard & Geohazards in Southeast Alaska

Presenter(s): Annette Patton (Sitka Sound Science Center); and Jacyn Schmidt (Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska)

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office, and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) and Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/vaws-landslide-risk-dashboard/

Abstract: Rain-induced landslides pose risk to lives and infrastructure across Southeast Alaska. After the fatal landslide in Sitka in August, 2015, the community convened experts to consider strategies to mitigate landslide risk. Over the last five years, the Sitka Sound Science Center has partnered with an inter-disciplinary, inter-agency team of local and technical experts to develop and disseminate a landslide risk dashboard. The dashboard uses NWS rainfall data to estimate current and forecasted landslide probability and is now available to the public at sitkalandslide.org. We are now beginning a project to expand monitoring for landslides and other natural hazards in six rural communities in Southeast Alaska.

Bio(s): Annette Patton is the Lead Geoscientist at the Sitka Sound Science Center. One of her main topics of research is understanding landslide initiation, including the geology, geomorphology, and weather patterns that make a hillslope more susceptible to landslides and debris flows. Her PhD research focused on evaluating the impacts of climate change on landslide occurrence in Denali National Park. Recently, Annette's work includes research to develop and implement the landslide forecasting system in Sitka and other communities in Southeast Alaska.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Past and Recent Developments in Microphysical Modeling
Presenter(s): Greg Thompson, JCSDA Observations Project Scientist
Date & Time: 5 October 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Brad Ferrier Lecture - Past and Recent Developments in Microphysical Modeling

Presenter(s): Greg Thompson, JCSDA Observations Project Scientist

Sponsor(s): NWS/NCEP/EMC Brad Ferrier Lecture

Seminar Contact(s): Jeff McQueen, jeff.mcqueen@noaa.gov, EMC Seminar committee

Remote Access: Google Meeting link - meet.google.com/geu-yinb-mwkJoin by phone - (US) +1 404-857-2887 PIN: 781 552 646#

Abstract: Brad Ferrier was a pioneer in developing a two-moment bulk microphysical parameterization for numerical weather prediction, and much of his seminal 1994 paper has been coded into numerous schemes of the past 25 years. Unfortunately, computational resources always forced simplifications of his complex scheme to adapt into the NCEP operational environment. In his own words, this was the infamous "Physics Wheel of Pain." Nevertheless, Brad found ways to incorporate major concepts from his higher-moment scheme into NCEP's Eta and NMM (NAM) models for operations. Today's computers are now permitting his earlier vision to take shape. For example, the Thompson and Eidhammer (2014) aerosol-aware scheme has been run operationally in the RAP/HRRR/RRFS models while the predecessor Thompson et al (2008) scheme is likely to be used in the GFSv17. The most recent developments in these schemes will be shown including: 1) aerosol/cloud/precipitation interactions, 2) highlights from the ICICLE (2019) winter field campaign, and 3) what happens when you perturb the most uncertain parts within a microphysics scheme to produce new outcomes. Finally, the talk will conclude with ideas for future improvements to model clouds and precipitation.

Bio(s): Dr. Greg Thompson has joined the JCSDA to bring to bear his cloud physics knowledge to improve satellite data assimilation for improvement of numerical weather prediction models. He is internationally recognized for his research on numerical weather modeling, particularly the parameterization of cloud physics and precipitation processes. He developed a bulk microphysical parameterization that compares favorably against other two-moment bulk and more sophisticated spectral microphysics schemes. The latest version of the now aerosol-aware Thompson-Eidhammer microphysics scheme is operationally used in the Rapid Refresh (RAP) and High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) models run at the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). Dr. Thompson has greatly contributed towards the development of automated aircraft and ground icing forecast applications using model output and explicit prediction of supercooled liquid water together with various surface, radar, and multispectral satellite data to create icing hazard guidance products that are now routinely generated by NCEP to serve the aviation industry.Subscribe / Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!!
Title: Shifts in Pacific salmon community alter continental-scale subsidy biotransport
Presenter(s): Jess Brandt, University of Connecticut
Date & Time: 5 October 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar & 110 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Shifts in Pacific salmon community alter continental-scale subsidy biotransport

Presenter(s): Jess Brandt, Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology DivisionSeminar contact: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://swfsc.webex.com/swfsc/j.php?MTID=m3806c3115f500baad2d89356012682a6; Password (if needed): fedsem1nar! ; Join by phone by dialing +1-415-655-0002 US Toll, Access code: 2498 072 7370

Abstract: The annual migration of approximately 123 million Pacific salmon to spawning grounds in North American watersheds connects marine with freshwater food webs as a pathway of both nutrient and contaminant subsidy biotransport. Despite the shared pathways by which nutrients and contaminants are accumulated in the marine environment, transported during migration, and released to recipient systems, these two subsidy categories have been traditionally studied separately by ecologists and ecotoxicologists. Here, we combine species-specific nutrient and contaminant concentrations with 40 years of annual Pacific salmon escapement estimates for North America to yield the first spatiotemporally comprehensive assessment of continental-scale biotransport. With this dataset we aim to 1) quantify the magnitudes of continental-scale marine-to-freshwater subsidy fluxes by migrating salmon, 2) assess how shifts in the Pacific salmon community have altered subsidy fluxes over time and space, and 3) address how individual species disproportionately deliver either brighter side or darker side subsidy profiles corresponding with their ecology and life history traits. Our results focus on the suite of nutrient and persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic contaminant subsidies that are commonly associated with Pacific salmon: nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), mercury (Hg), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), and polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs).

Bio(s): Dr. Jess Brandt is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment & Center for Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of Connecticut. Her research program considers how recipient ecological systems mediate contaminant distribution and how contaminant legacies constrain fish conservation efforts, with focuses on selenium, mercury, and most recently, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in aquatic food webs. Jess holds a PhD (Duke University, 2018) and MHS (Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2012) in Environmental Health, and a BA in Public Health from Johns Hopkins University (2011).

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; link to recording available upon request.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Sources and human health impacts of air pollution constrained using remote sensing data and air quality modeling
Presenter(s): Daven Henze, University of Colorado, Boulder
Date & Time: 5 October 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Sources and human health impacts of air pollution constrained using remote sensing data and air quality modeling
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Daven Henze, University of Colorado, Boulder

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.womack@noaa.gov

Remote Access: DSRC GC402 and online at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7453153243993932813

Abstract: In this talk I will present recent work from my group and collaborators that touches on the topics of improving our understanding of sources of air pollutants, and relating specific sources to their impacts on human health through long-term exposure at the urban to national scales. The projects focus on the health impacts of PM2.5, O3 and NO2, and a common theme throughout the projects is the use of remote sensing data to constrain both the inputs to the air quality simulations as well as our estimates of exposure. In particular, I'll present work using NH3 remote sensing from the CrIS instrument to better understand sources of ammonia in the US and Europe. I'll also present results on source apportionment modeling using adjoint sensitivity analysis of air pollution health impacts in G20 countries globally, across different countries in Europe, and in source regions around 14 US cities.

Bio(s): Daven Henze is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder. He received his bachelor's degrees in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at the University of Washington, and his PhD in Chemical Engineering from CalTech in 2007. He did his postdoctoral work at Columbia University before joining the faculty at CU Boulder in 2009. He currently serves as the S. P. Chip and Lori Johnson Faculty Fellow and as the Mechanical Engineering department's Associate Chair, and the Chair of the Graduate Program.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2022,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!
Title: Using Remotely Sensed Sea Surface Salinity and Colored Detrital Matter to Characterize Freshened Surface Layers in the Kara and Laptev Seas during the Ice-Free Season
Presenter(s): Marta Umbert, Ph.D., Institut de Cincies del Mar, Barcelona, Spain
Date & Time: 5 October 2022
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Please share with anyone (NOAA or not) who might be interested; thanks.

Title: Using Remotely Sensed Sea Surface Salinity and Colored Detrital Matter to Characterize Freshened Surface Layers in the Kara and Laptev Seas during the Ice-Free Season

Presenter(s): Marta Umbert, Ph.D., Department of Physical and Technological Oceanography, Institut de Cincies del Mar, CSIC, 08003 Barcelona, Spain

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Varis.Ransi@noaa.gov, co-coordinator NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series

Remote Access: Register here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/martaumbert/event/registration.htmlYou may enter the webinar via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. If you enter via a browser, PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use the IE browser.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download it but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download info is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register at link above.
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: The overall volume of freshwater entering the Arctic Ocean has been growing as glaciers melt and river runoff increases. Since 1980, a 20% increase in river runoff has been observed in the Arctic system. As the discharges of the Ob, Yenisei, and Lena rivers are an important source of freshwater in the Kara and Laptev Seas, an increase in river discharge might have a significant impact on the upper ocean circulation. The fresh river water mixes with ocean water and forms a large freshened surface layer (FSL), which carries high loads of dissolved organic matter and suspended matter into the Arctic Ocean. Optically active material (e.g., phytoplankton and detrital matter) are spread out into plumes, which are evident in satellite data. Russian river signatures in the Kara and Laptev Seas are also evident in recent SMOS Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) Arctic products. In this study, we compare the new Arctic+ SSS products, produced at the Barcelona Expert Center, with the Ocean Color absorption coefficient of colored detrital matter (CDM) in the Kara and Laptev Seas for the period 2011"2019. The SSS and CDM are found to be strongly negatively correlated in the regions of freshwater influence, with regression coefficients between '0.72 and '0.91 in the studied period. Exploiting this linear correlation, we estimate the SSS back to 1998 using two techniques: one assuming that the relationship between the CDM and SSS varies regionally in the river-influenced areas, and another assuming that it does not. We use the 22-year time-series of reconstructed SSS to estimate the interannual variability of the extension of the FSL in the Kara and Laptev Seas as well as their freshwater content. For the Kara and Laptev Seas, we use 32 and 28 psu as reference salinities, and 26 and 24 psu isohalines as FSL boundaries, respectively. The average FSL extension in the Kara Sea is 2089"2611 km2, with a typical freshwater content of 11.84"14.02 km3. The Laptev Sea has a slightly higher mean FSL extension of 2320"2686 km2 and a freshwater content of 10.15"12.44 km3. The yearly mean freshwater content and extension of the FSL, computed from SMOS SSS and Optical data, is (as expected) found to co-vary with in situ measurements of river discharge from the Arctic Great Rivers Observatory database, demonstrating the potential of SMOS SSS to better monitor the river discharge changes in Eurasia and to understand the Arctic freshwater system during the ice-free season.

Bio(s): Dr. Marta Umbert is a postdoctoral Marie Curie researcher at the Institute of Marine Sciences in Barcelona. Her actual goals are the 3D estimation of ocean currents and the study of fresh water in the Arctic Ocean. To this end, she uses quasi-geostrophic approaches and data fusion tools, combining remote sensing products, reanalysis, and in-situ data. Dr. Umbert specialises in using remote sensing variables like ocean salinity in combination with other remote sensing variables (ocean colour, temperature, and altimetry) in order to provide better remote sensing products that allow her to study the oceanographic processes governing the Arctic Ocean.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:Within a few days of the webinar, a link to the recording, usually a PDF of the slides, and sometimes a summary of the chat will be sent to all who registered.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

4 October 2022

Title: Evaporation links the Hydrologic Cycle and Global Heat Transport
Presenter(s): Dr. Robert Fajber, NOAA Climate & Global Change Fellow, Class 29
Date & Time: 4 October 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Evaporation links the Hydrologic Cycle and Global Heat Transport

Presenter(s): Dr. Robert Fajber, NOAA Climate & Global Change Fellow, Class 29

Sponsor(s): NOAA Climate Program Office and The Cooperative Programs for the Advancement of Earth System Science (CPAESS)

Seminar Contacts: clara.deck@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/306532172926387211

Abstract: While the total heat transport of the coupled climate system is constrained by the top of atmosphere radiation, the partitioning of the flux into atmospheric and oceanic components is constrained by the surface energy fluxes. In the atmosphere the dominant balance is between evaporation adding energy and a near uniform net radiative flux removing energy, so that the total energy transport is largely determined by the evaporation. Over the oceans the neat heat flux is largely a balance between shortwave heating and evaporative cooling. Since evaporation has equal but opposite effects of the ocean and atmospheric heat transport it plays a critical role in coupling together the atmospheric and oceanic heat transports.In this talk I will explore the link between Evaporation and Heat Transport using a variety of model experiments and observational analysis. First it will be demonstrated how evaporation drives both the moist and dry components of atmospheric heat transport by decomposing the heat transport into physically based components which relate the heat transport to different diabatic processes. Second I will show results from a coupled ocean atmospheric model using perturbed evaporation, which changes the partitioning between the atmospheric and oceanic heat transport. Lastly I will discuss the biases and spread in cmip model heat transport relative to observations, and our hypotheses as to the cause.

This webinar is part of a series featuring NOAA Climate and Global Change (C&GC) Fellows in the NOAA Science Seminar Series. C&GC is supported by NOAA's Climate Program Office and managed by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR).

Bio(s): Robert Fajber received his PhD from the University of Toronto in 2020 in Physics and Atmospheric Science. After he became a NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoc, hosted by Kyle Armour and Aaron Donohoe at the University of Washington, Atmospheric Sciences. He works on understanding the interdependence of Atmospheric Dynamics and Physics in the global circulation.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Weakly Nonlinear Ekman Pumping in the Sri Lanka Dome
Presenter(s): Kerstin Cullen, Naval Research Laboratory
Date & Time: 4 October 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Weakly Nonlinear Ekman Pumping in the Sri Lanka Dome

Presenter(s): Kerstin Cullen (Naval Research Laboratory)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar contact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US) +1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: The Sri Lanka Dome is a cyclonic, upwelling feature in the Southwest Monsoon Current system in the southern Bay of Bengal. Wind stress curl (generated by the wind shadow from the Island of Sri Lanka) does not explain this system's sea level height dynamics or the distribution of cool sea surface temperatures (SST). Previous work has attributed the spatial SST pattern to lateral advection. We explore whether low latitude weakly nonlinear 'vorticity' Ekman pumping could be an explanation for both cooling and observed changes in sea level height in the southwest Bay of Bengal. Weakly nonlinear upwelling, calculated from ERA5 and AVISO geostrophic currents, co-locates with changes in sea level height (and presumably isopycnals). While the SST signal is sensitive to several factors, including the net surface flux, regional upwelling explains changes in AVISO sea level height if the nonlinear terms are included in both the Sri Lanka Dome and the region of the Southwest Monsoon Current.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: The World Data System (WDS); an Interdisciplinary body of the International Science Council
Presenter(s): Meredith Goins, executive director of the World Data System - International Program Office
Date & Time: 4 October 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The World Data System (WDS): An Interdisciplinary body of the International Science Council

Presenter(s): Meredith Goins, executive director of the World Data System (WDS) " International Program Office (IPO); mgoins2@vols.utk.edu

Sponsor(s): NOAA NESDIS National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)

Seminar Contact(s): Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5576014216210403595
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract: The World Data System (WDS) is an Interdisciplinary Body of the International Science Council (ISC; formerly ICSU) working to provide universal, equitable access to data around the world. As of 01 Dec 2020, the World Data System has 128 Member Organizations in worldwide geographic locations. It is hosted at Hosted by the University of Tennessee Oak Ridge Innovation Institute. NOAA NESDIS NCEI hosts four WDS services/centers. NOAA NESDIS NCEI hosts and operates World Data Centers and Services for Geophysics, Meteorology, Oceanography, and Paleoclimatology in accordance with WDS principles. Each center and service acquires, catalogs, and archives a discipline specific collection of datasets, and develops products and applications designed to meet the information needs of resource managers, policy makers, researchers, educators, and the general public around the world.

Bio(s): Meredith P. Goins joined the World Data System (WDS) as Executive Director of the International Program Office in 2021. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (PI, Dr. Suzie Allard) and housed at the University of Tennessee Oak Ridge Innovation Institute (UTORII) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the WDS is an Affiliated body of the International Science Council.
WDS's mission is to enhance the capabilities, impact, and sustainability of our member data repositories and data services by:
  • creating trusted communities of scientific data repositories
  • strengthening the scientific enterprise throughout the entire lifecycle of data and all related components creating first-class data that feeds first-class research output
  • advocating for accessible data and transparent and reproducible science.
With over two decades of experience in science and medical information centers, Goins is currently working towards her Ph.D. in Communications and Information Science at the University of Tennessee, focusing on peer reviewers and their perceptions of the review process for data repositories. She previously earned her M.S. in Information Science from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and her B.A. in Public Relations from East Carolina University.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to oneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Reproductive plasticity in California rockfishes in response to variable environmental conditions
Presenter(s): Sabrina Beyer, University of California Santa Cruz, SWFSC Affiliate
Date & Time: 4 October 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Reproductive plasticity in California rockfishes in response to variable environmental conditions

Presenter(s): Sabrina Beyer (University of California Santa Cruz, SWFSC Affiliate)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Ground fish Seminar Series Seminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m161d8630abba4e363a98635052f62a1f Or by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035, Access code: 2762 418 8254

Accessibility: Seminars will be close captioned by Friends Interpreting Services, LLC.

Abstract: Rockfishes (Sebastes spp.)of the California Current Ecosystem are live-bearers and exhibit variation in the frequency of reproduction and fecundity. We analyzed a 20+ year time series of fecundity data in central California and manipulated temperature and food in the lab to show how reproductive output correlates with body condition and is influenced by the environment. Our results improve estimates of population reproductive potential, important for management.

Bio(s): Sabrina Beyer is a NMFS/ Sea Grant Population and Ecosystem Dynamics Fellow, and Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Sabrina has been affiliated with the NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Fisheries Ecology Division since 2009. She uses quantitative empirical and theoretical methods to study how spatiotemporal variation in ocean conditions influences the reproduction of marine fishes. Her work aims to improve biological information for West Coast groundfish stock assessments and to improve life history theory related to the causes and consequences of variation in fish reproductive traits.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2022-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

3 October 2022

Title: Strongly Coupled Data Assimilation with a Linear Inverse Model, and Ensemble Predictability of Week 3/4 Precipitation and Temperature over the United States via Cluster Analysis of the Large-Scale Circulation
Presenter(s): Greg Hakim, University of Washington; and David Straus, George Mason University
Date & Time: 3 October 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Strongly Coupled Data Assimilation with a Linear Inverse Model, and Ensemble Predictability of Week 3/4 Precipitation and Temperature over the United States via Cluster Analysis of the Large-Scale Circulation

Presenter(s): Dr. Greg Hakim, University of Washington; Dr. David Straus, George Mason University

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Weather Program Office S2S Program; and NOAA NWS Office of Science and Technology, Integration Modeling Program Division

Seminar Contact(s): Mark Olsen, mark.olsen@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/8426465125700931856

Abstract: This monthly webinar series was created to share ongoing work within NWS and OAR at the Weeks 3-4 and subseasonal-to-seasonal (S2S) timescales. We would like to foster a relaxed, informal dialogue among forecasters, modelers and researchers. This month, Dr. Greg Hakim will speak about "Strongly Coupled Data Assimilation with a Linear Inverse Model." Dr. David Straus will speak about "Ensemble Predictability of Week 3/4 Precipitation and Temperature over the United States via Cluster Analysis of the Large-Scale Circulation."

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available on the Weeks 3-4/S2S Webinar Series website: https://vlab.noaa.gov/web/weeks-3-4-s2s-webinar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

29 September 2022

Title: The use of contaminant tracers in answering broad ecological questions
Presenter(s): Ann McLeod, PhD; Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Canterbury
Date & Time: 29 September 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The use of contaminant tracers in answering broad ecological questions

Presenter(s): Ann McLeod, PhD; Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Canterbury

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NMFS.NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/nwfsc-monster-seminar-jam

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting Meeting number (access code): 2763 830 3906; Meeting password: c63Kb7umFJ2JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll Global call-in numbers https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/globalcallin.php?MTID=m3142650430de6a3cadba4efb1ef4af96 Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): I completed my Master's degree in Environmental Science at the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research at the University of Windsor under the supervision of Drs Doug Haffner and Ken Drouillard. My Master's work involved ecotoxicology and modeling the movement of contaminants through food webs. I continued on doing some post-Master's work pursuing the idea that contaminants can be used as contaminant tracers for answering broad ecological question " much of that work I will present today. From there I went to Memorial University and completed a PhD in ecology using data, computational approaches, and theory to look at food webs across space under the supervision of Dr. Shawn Leroux. And I am currently an NSERC supported post doctoral fellow in the Tonkin lab at the university of Canterbury where I largely think about community ecology and the interactions between species in both time and space using a mathematical lens.


Seminar

Recordings: Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.
NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: U.S. East coast climate change scenario planning
Presenter(s): Sean Lucey, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 29 September 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. East coast climate change scenario planning

Presenter(s): Sean Lucey, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Future Direction for Hurricane Research
Presenter(s): Dr. Frank Marks, Director, NOAA's Atlantic Oceanic Meteorological Laboratory, Hurricane Research Division
Date & Time: 29 September 2022
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: OAR - AOML - Happenings Calendar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Future Direction for Hurricane Research

Presenter(s): Dr. Frank Marks, Director, NOAA/AOML/HRD


Sponsor(s): NOAA's Atlantic Oceanic Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), Hurricane Research Division


Seminar Contact(s): Shirley Murillo, shirley.murillo@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.goto.com/281091565United States: +1 (872) 240-3212
Access Code: 281-091-565

Abstract: In response to the 2017 Weather Research and Forecasting Innovation Act NOAA developed a plan detailing the specific research, development, and technology transfer activities to address the Act's three main objectives: 1) improving the prediction of intensity and track of TCs; 2) improving the forecast and communication of surges from TCs; and 3) incorporating risk communication research to create more effective watch and warning products. The plan outlined the key research strategies to improve tropical cyclone (TC) forecast guidance. However, the current forecast products, metrics, and verification fall short of those needed to meet the goals outlined in the plan. Future TC research objectives must expand beyond model development activities to address impacts from hurricanes (e.g., wind, surge, inland flooding, severe weather) and incorporate risk communication research to create more effective TC products. Currently, the uncertainty in TC hazard guidance is expressed based on past performance, not on current forecast uncertainty. Model improvements must also be in sync with data assimilation (DA) improvements to produce reliable analyses to better characterize the uncertainty in storm structure needed to address the risk for all hazards. More research is needed to improve probabilistic hazard guidance by utilizing model machine learning to consider uncertainty of track, intensity, and structure for each storm. Finally, there is a need to support social and behavioral science research to improve the communication of risk and uncertainty for emergency managers and the public through more effective TC products. Future research opportunities should utilize the FACETs framework to transform TC hazard guidance blending social and behavioral science with physical science research and development.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: The seminar will be recorded, and the recording will be available at: https://www.youtube.com/c/noaaaoml. (the exact link will be available after the recording is posted).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: ArcPro Satellite Annotation workshop
Presenter(s): Dr. Hannah Cubaynes, ArcPro Satellite Annotation workshop, British Antarctic Survey
Date & Time: 29 September 2022
10:30 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series


Title: ArcPRO Satellite Annotation workshop

Presenter(s): Dr. Hannah Cubaynes, British Antarctic Survey

Sponsor(s): Christin Khan (NEFSC) and Dr. Kim Goetz (AFSC) -- Geospatial Artificial Intelligence for Animals (GAIA) collaboration

Seminar Contact(s): christin.khan@noaa.gov

Remote Access: ArcPro Satellite Annotation workshop
Wednesday, September 28 11:30am " 1:00pm
Google Meet joining info
Video call link: https://meet.google.com/bke-ozcq-emg
Or dial: (US) +1 415-841-2536 PIN: 621 937 712#
More phone numbers: https://tel.meet/bke-ozcq-emg?pin=1011942275743

Abstract: A workshop to learn how to annotate wildlife in very high-resolution (VHR) satellite imagery, and to create a database of annotations, which will facilitate collaboration across research groups towards the development of an operational system for cetacean detection in VHR satellite imagery. We will provide a general outline of the steps required to annotate wildlife in satellite images, alongside detailed protocol for ESRI ArcGIS Pro 2.5. We use cetaceans as a case study to explain the steps, which are transferable to other wildlife of similar size (4-30 m long). We also provide guidance on ways to differentiate species of cetaceans in VHR satellite image, as well as assessing the certainty of the detection. Attendees should have ArcPro installed and be familiar with the program.

Bio(s): Hannah Cubaynes is a research associate at the British Antarctic Survey. Her research interests are to develop the use of very high-resolution satellite imagery to monitor marine mammals in remote regions, and make this method applicable at a global oceanic scale by improving the efficiency of image analysis through crowdsourcing and automated systems. She is particularly focusing on whales and walrus.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Seasonal Bird Migration Patterns
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Andrew Farnsworth, Cornell University Department of Ornithology
Date & Time: 29 September 2022
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Seasonal Bird Migration Patterns

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Andrew Farnsworth, Cornell University Department of Ornithology


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s): Ellen Mecray

Remote Access: Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract: The webinar will feature a recap of September conditions and Andrew Farnsworth will brief on seasonal bird migration patterns in the eastern US.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

28 September 2022

Title: Beyond total biomass: Progress towards detecting phytoplankton communities from space
Presenter(s): Dr. Ali Chase, University of Washington
Date & Time: 28 September 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Beyond total biomass: Progress towards detecting phytoplankton communities from space

Presenter(s): Ali Chase, University of Washington Applied Physics Laboratory

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Abstract: The ability to detect phytoplankton groups from remote sensing data is of interest to a broad range of groups and end users. Due to the complexity of phytoplankton populations in marine waters, as well as the other particles and dissolved substances that impact the properties of the water when observed remotely, the task is non-trivial. However, recent technology and instrumentation developments allow us to analyze and combine large datasets that can improve development of algorithms to detect phytoplankton groups. This talk presents a large dataset of in situ plankton cell imagery data, and how it is analyzed and subsequently used to map diatom carbon from satellite remote sensing data.

Bio(s): Ali is an optical oceanographer based at the Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington, in the Air-Sea Interaction &amp; Remote Sensing department. Her research interests center on combining information from in situ optical measurements and plankton cell imagery to detect different phytoplankton types present in the water, and subsequently extend these methods to remote sensing observations to understand and explain changes in phytoplankton communities through time and space and the consequences for marine ecosystems. Ali earned her B.A. from Bowdoin College in Maine, and her M.S. and PhD from the University of Maine in the Boss/Karp-Boss lab before moving to the University of Washington in 2020.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php. For more information visit: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: North Carolina’s Shellfish Aquaculture Industry: Climate Resilience and Engagement Best Practices
Presenter(s): Sarah Spiegler, Coastal Resilience Specialist, North Carolina Sea Grant; Jacob Boyd, Habitat and Enhancement Section Chief, NC Division of Marine Fisheries; Eric Herbst, Coastal Aquaculture Specialist, North Carolina Sea Grant; Randie Hovatter, Communications Specialist, NOAA Office of Aquaculture
Date & Time: 28 September 2022
2:45 pm - 3:45 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Carolina's Shellfish Aquaculture Industry: Climate Resilience and Engagement Best Practices

Presenter(s): Sarah Spiegler, Coastal Resilience Specialist, North Carolina Sea Grant; Jacob Boyd, Habitat and Enhancement Section Chief, NC Division of Marine Fisheries; Eric Herbst, Coastal Aquaculture Specialist, North Carolina Sea Grant

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of Aquaculture

Seminar Contact(s): Randie Hovatter (randie.hovatter@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Register at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?RGID=rd015225c7150fc000e77e7fe322fcd8c

Abstract:
This installment of the NOAA Science Seminar Series is presented by the NOAA Office of Aquaculture (OAQ). The webinar will consist of a 30-40 minute presentation, followed by moderated Q&A for the remainder of the hour.
Current climate and coastal resilience efforts at the federal, state, and local levels work to address and communicate the impacts from climate change. These impacts include the increase in frequency and intensity of storms, degraded water quality, variable salinity and dissolved oxygen, and increased inundation, which directly and indirectly affect the shellfish aquaculture industry in North Carolina. Climate change also directly impacts management of the shellfish aquaculture industry and long-term planning. Building resilience is an iterative process that requires planning, responding to an event, recovering, and adapting. An important component to developing a resilient NC shellfish aquaculture industry will be to incorporate these iterative processes and climate change and resilience extension best practices for communication and engagement.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to oneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: ArcMap Satellite Annotation workshop
Presenter(s): Dr. Hannah Cubaynes, ArcMap Satellite Annotation workshop, British Antarctic Survey
Date & Time: 28 September 2022
10:30 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:


NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: ArcMap Satellite Annotation workshop

Presenter(s): Dr. Hannah Cubaynes, British Antarctic Survey

Sponsor(s): Christin Khan (NEFSC) and Dr. Kim Goetz (AFSC) -- Geospatial Artificial Intelligence for Animals (GAIA) collaboration

Seminar Contact(s): christin.khan@noaa.gov

Remote Access: ArcMap Satellite Annotation workshop
Wednesday, September 28 11:30am " 1:00pm
Google Meet joining info
Video call link: https://meet.google.com/bke-ozcq-emg
Or dial: (US) +1 415-841-2536 PIN: 621 937 712#
More phone numbers: https://tel.meet/bke-ozcq-emg?pin=1011942275743

Abstract: A workshop to learn how to annotate wildlife in very high-resolution (VHR) satellite imagery, and to create a database of annotations, which will facilitate collaboration across research groups towards the development of an operational system for cetacean detection in VHR satellite imagery. We will provide a general outline of the steps required to annotate wildlife in satellite images, alongside detailed protocol for ESRI ArcMap 10.8. We use cetaceans as a case study to explain the steps, which are transferable to other wildlife of similar size (4-30 m long). We also provide guidance on ways to differentiate species of cetaceans in VHR satellite image, as well as assessing the certainty of the detection. Attendees should have ArcMap installed and be familiar with the program.

Bio(s): Hannah Cubaynes is a research associate at the British Antarctic Survey. Her research interests are to develop the use of very high-resolution satellite imagery to monitor marine mammals in remote regions, and make this method applicable at a global oceanic scale by improving the efficiency of image analysis through crowdsourcing and automated systems. She is particularly focusing on whales and walrus.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

27 September 2022

Title: Coastal Flooding in the Face of Climate Change: Understanding Constituent Needs
Presenter(s): Brenna Sweetman, NOAA Office for Coastal Management; and Cayla Dean, NOAA Center for Operational and Oceanographic Products and Services
Date & Time: 27 September 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Coastal Flooding in the Face of Climate Change: Understanding Constituent Needs

Presenter(s): Brenna Sweetman, NOAA Office for Coastal Management; and Cayla Dean, NOAA Center for Operational and Oceanographic Products and Services

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office for Coastal Management, and NOAA Center for Operational and Oceanographic Products and Services

Seminar Contact(s): brenna.sweetman@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/277143326095330831

Abstract: The need to develop user-friendly coastal flood information to support decision makers in the face of climate change is a high priority across NOAA. To better understand what users need, two offices, the Office for Coastal Management and the Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, joined forces to host five virtual workshops. Using social science methods in line with NOAA's Service Delivery Framework, the workshops targeted the following communities: planning; transportation and navigation; real estate and insurance; health and human services; and natural resource use and floodplain management. During the course of these stakeholder workshops, NOAA obtained information to understand how NOAA can better meet the needs and address gaps to serve our coastal regions and inform effective climate resilience strategies. This presentation will provide an overview of the information collected from these engagement activities to better understand stakeholder needs. Following the presentation, we will have the opportunity for discussion on best practices and learning opportunities for those who currently, or are interested, in engaging coastal decision makers.

Bio(s): Brenna is a Social Scientist with NOAA's Office for Coastal Management based at the National Water Center in Tuscaloosa, AL. Her work focuses on integrating social science to support sound decision-making to address coastal and water challenges.

Cayla is an Outreach Specialist with NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services based at the National Water Center in Tuscaloosa, AL. She acts as a liaison between the National Water Center and the National Ocean Service modeling groups to help further the science behind predicting total water levels for the nation.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to oneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Gray's Reef NMS - An Ocean Oasis off the Georgia Coast
Presenter(s): Ben Prueitt, Outreach and Social Media Coordinator, Gray's Reef NMS
Date & Time: 27 September 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary - An Ocean Oasis off the Georgia Coast

Presenter(s): Ben Prueitt, Outreach and Social Media Coordinator for Gray's Reef NMS

Sponsor(s): NOAA, ONMS, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary and the NC Office of State Archaeology

Seminar Contact(s): Shannon.Ricles@noaa.gov

Registration: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3474281247643492875

Abstract: Just 19 miles off the Georgia coast lies a stretch of live-bottom reef that teems with marine life, including the calving grounds of the endangered North Atlantic right whale. This hard or rocky seafloor supports high numbers of large invertebrates, such as sponges, corals, and sea squirts. The rocky ledges can rise up to six feet, but lie 60 to 70 feet below the surface of the ocean. With their nooks and crannies, caves, and bumps, these complex ledges offer habitat for invertebrates to thrive, which in turn provides food for the many fishes that also shelter in the reef.Join Ben Prueitt, Outreach and Social Media Coordinator, to learn more about the reef and how its beauty invites scuba divers and anglers alike to explore its wonders. Dive into the reef's unique diversity and learn how ongoing research studies the sanctuary as it transforms from winter to summer and back again.Be the first to learn how you can soon visit the sanctuary without ever getting your feet wet! In October 2022, Gray's Reef Ocean Discovery Center will open inviting residents and visitors to the area to come explore. No boat is required, and the center will be open to the public free of charge.

Bio(s): Ben Prueitt joined the Gray's Reef team in 2019 as the Outreach and Social Media Coordinator. His experience in communicating science began with marine education programs for teens in his home waters around Tampa Bay, Florida. Previously, Ben developed media products for the New York-Pennsylvania Professional Baseball League, and worked with the Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission's Corals Program to monitor long-term changes on reefs in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and Dry Tortugas National Park. Most recently, Ben managed the communications and marketing for an oil spill research consortium at the University of South Florida (USF) College of Marine Science. Ben holds a B.S. in Environmental Science & Policy from USF St. Petersburg and volunteers his time as a team member with the taste of science' organization where he helps plan public speaking events for local scientists.

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; once captioned it will be hosted on the archived webpage: https://monitor.noaa.gov/gallery/webinar-archive.html.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: On the Jacobian approximation in sea ice models with viscous-plastic rheology
Presenter(s): Max Yaremchuk, Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, MS
Date & Time: 27 September 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: On the Jacobian approximation in sea ice models with viscous-plastic rheology

Presenter(s): Max Yaremchuk (Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, MS)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar contact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US) +1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: Viscous-plastic rheology is widely used in the sea ice modeling community at increasingly high resolutions. Due to the high degree of non-linearity of the rheological constraints, accurate approximation of the Jacobian is required to improve the efficiency of the implicit solvers of the sea ice momentum equation in pack ice. We consider the analytical Jacobian of the ice momentum equation and assess its approximation errors in the Jacobian-free Newton"Krylov (JFNK) method and in the family of more traditional schemes which neglect the dependence of viscosity coefficients on the deformation tensor. It is shown that this dependence provides a substantial contribution to the Jacobian, especially in the regions enriched by linear kinematic features like ridges and elongated polynyas. Numerical experiments indicate that performance of the Newton solvers is also sensitive to errors associated with inexact computation of the search direction, that may be caused, in particular, by numerical approximations of the Jacobian which violate its dissipative property. Based on
this analysis, an improved selective damping strategy for the Newtonian solver of the momentum equation is proposed. A series of numerical experiments conducted in simulated pack ice environment demonstrate faster convergence of the updated solver with analytical Jacobian as compared to the one based on the selectively damped JFNK method with inexact GMRES solver in the inner loop.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Modernizing How You Access Water Data
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia; Emily Read, Randi Butler, Nicole Felts, U.S. Geological Survey,
Date & Time: 27 September 2022
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Modernizing How You Access Water Data

Presenter(s):
Chip Konrad, Southeast Regional Climate Center (Climate Overview)

Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center (Water Resources Overview )

Pam Knox, University of Georgia (Agriculture Impact Update)Emily Read, Randi Butler, Nicole Felts, U.S. Geological Survey (Modernizing How You Access Water Data)

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

The September 27 webinar will feature a special presentation on "Modernizing How You Access Water Data." This presentation will include two modernized water data delivery products: Next Generation Monitoring Location Pages and WaterAlert.

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/9215585718468903438

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here: (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

26 September 2022

Title: California-Nevada Drought & Climate Update and Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): John Abatzoglou, CNAP, UC Merced; Michael Bernardo, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Shrad Shukla, CNAP, UC Santa Barbara
Date & Time: 26 September 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: California-Nevada Drought & Climate Update and Outlook Webinar


Presenter(s):

John Abatzoglou | CNAP, UC Merced: Drought and Climate Update and Outlook

Noe Santos | U.S. Bureau of Reclamation: Status of the Colorado River Basin

Shrad Shukla | CNAP, UC Santa Barbara: Improving Drought Outlooks With Subseasonal Forecasts

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS); California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP); Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC)

POC: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Abstract: According to the September 6 U.S. Drought Monitor, 99.9% of CA/NV is in drought, with 45.1% in Extreme (D3) or Exceptional (D4) Drought. Even in a state known for extreme events, last week was one for the books. Record-shattering heat, an explosion of wildfires, and Tropical Storm Kay. But all eyes will soon be on the fall and winter outlooks with the hope for a better snow year even as La Nia is favored to continue through winter 2022-23.

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) March 2022 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia).

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4476439910238000397

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

22 September 2022

Title: NOAA/CVP Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS) Process Studies Webinar Series - Session 1
Presenter(s): Anna-Lena Depenmeier, National Center for Atmospheric Research - NCAR; Ariane Verdy, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Date & Time: 22 September 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA/CVP Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS) Process Studies Webinar Series - Session 1

Presenter(s): Anna-Lena Depenmeier (National Center for Atmospheric Research - NCAR); Ariane Verdy (Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Climate Variability and Predictability Program

Seminar Contact(s): Jose Algarin, jose.algarin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/808724212884499215
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: N/A

Abstract: The NOAA Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) Program is hosting a webinar series on the Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS) Pre-Field Modeling Studies that will highlight the recent results from the CVP-funded projects. The goal of these modeling studies is to refine the current scientific understanding of the equatorial Pacific climate system, with a specific focus on two process studies identified in the TPOS 2020 First Report, Pacific Upwelling and Mixing Physics (PUMP) and Air"sea Interaction at the eastern edge of the Warm Pool. Their results will assist in the planning of future field campaigns.This first of five sessions will feature two presentations:The variability of diabatic upwelling in the eastern equatorial Pacific, by Dr. Anna-Lena Deppenmeier (UCAR)Equatorial mixing in a high-resolution state estimate of the tropical Pacific Ocean, by Dr. Ariane Verdy (Scripps Institute of Oceanography)

Bio(s): Dr. Anna-Lena Deppenmeier is a Project Scientist at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). Her research focuses on the interaction between the ocean and the atmosphere, and the effect of small scale processes such as mixing on large scale properties, and vice versa. Dr. Ariane Verdy is an Applications Programmer at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Her research interests include the dynamics of marine ecosystems, ocean circulation and biogeochemistry, and mathematical ecology.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Within a few days of the webinar, a link to the recording,
usually a PDF of the slides, and sometimes a summary of the chat will be sent to all who registered.

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Title: Rapid Transitions in Precipitation Extremes
Presenter(s): Dr. Trent Ford, University of Illinois-Prairie Research Institute, Dr. Liang Chen, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Date & Time: 22 September 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Midwest DEWS Research

Remote Access: Rapid Transitions in Precipitation Extremes

Presenter(s):
Dr. Trent Ford | University of Illinois-Prairie Research Institute
Dr. Liang Chen | University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5246808340822776589

Seminar Contacts: Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Please join us for the next Midwest DEWS Research Webinar, which will highlight results from a NIDIS-funded research study that analyzed the rapid transitions in precipitation extremes in the MidwestThe Midwest region regularly experiences precipitation extremes, both flood and drought. However, these extremes and their corresponding impacts are typically studied and communicated independently, without consideration of the compound impacts due to a rapid transition from one extreme to the other.This goal of this research study, led by Dr. Trent Ford at the University of Illinois and Dr. Liang Chen at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, was to improve our understanding of rapid transitions between precipitation extremes in the Midwest, their causes, and the future risk they pose to the region. This webinar will include a presentation of the results, with a Q & A session following the presentation.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

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Title: Interannual variability of sea level and heat content in the South Indian Ocean
Presenter(s): Dr. Denis Volkov, Oceanographer, NOAA's Atlantic Oceanic Meteorological Laboratory AMOL and University of Miami/CIMAS
Date & Time: 22 September 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series, OAR - AOML - Happenings Calendar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Interannual variability of sea level and heat content in the South Indian Ocean

Presenter(s): Dr. Denis Volkov, Oceanographer, NOAA/AOML/University of Miami/CIMAS.


Sponsor(s): NOAA's Atlantic Oceanic Meteorological Laboratory (AOML),Physical Oceanography Division, and University of Miami/CIMAS

Seminar Contact(s): Matthieu Le Henaff; matthieu.lehenaff@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://meet.goto.com/721848381

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United States: +1 (224) 501-3412
Access Code: 721-848-381

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Dial in or type: 67.217.95.2 or inroomlink.goto.com
Meeting ID: 721 848 381
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Abstract: The subtropical southern Indian Ocean (SIO) has been characterized as one of the major heat accumulators among the oceanic basins due to its remarkable warming during the past two decades. The interannual-to-decadal variability of heat content and sea level in the SIO is strongly influenced by its connection with the Pacific and large-scale climatic forcing in the Indo-Pacific region. The main conduit of warm water from the Pacific to the SIO is the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), which is an important component of the global meridional overturning circulation. Temperature anomalies originated in the Pacific enter the SIO via the ITF, spread along the west Australian coast, and then radiate westward as Rossby waves and mesoscale eddies, thus contributing to the transfer of heat toward the SIO interior. In addition, local wind forcing, through Ekman pumping over the open ocean and coastal upwelling, also generates Rossby waves and/or modifies those emanated from the eastern boundary. In this seminar, I will discuss the relative contributions of remote (of Pacific origin) forcing and local wind forcing to the observed variability of heat content and sea level in the SIO during the altimeter era (from 1993 to present). Particular attention will be paid to the mechanisms and fate of the unprecedented cooling during the strong 2014"2016 El Nio and the quick recovery of heat content during the weak 2017"2018 La Nia. It is interesting that the response of sea level (and presumably heat content) averaged over the SIO subtropical gyre to the strongest on record 1997"1998 El Nio was much weaker than that to the recent 2014"2016 El Nio. The reasons for this difference will also be discussed.

Bio(s): D. Volkov graduated from St. Petersburg State University in Russia and did his Ph.D. at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. He continued his career as a postdoctoral researcher first at C.L.S. Space Oceanography Division in France and then at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. Since 2013, he has been a scientist at CIMAS and AOML.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording will be made available shortly after the webinar at: https://www.youtube.com/user/phodaoml

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Might Retaining In Situ Pressure During Sampling Change Our View of Deep Ocean Life?
Presenter(s): Douglas Bartlett, Professor of Marine Microbiology, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California
Date & Time: 22 September 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Might Retaining In Situ Pressure During Sampling Change Our View of Deep Ocean Life?NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Douglas Bartlett, Professor of Marine Microbiology, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Liang Wu (liang.wu@noaa.gov), Chris Beaverson (chris.beaverson@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7883405337534633227



Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Piezophilic (pressure loving) microbes exist in the deep sea which are adapted for pressures greater than 15,000 pounds per square inch (109 megapascals) and which lose cell integrity when decompressed. This prompts the question how much of deep-sea microbial life is unknown due to cell lysis during recovery? During the course of our NOAA OER investigation we developed a pressure-retaining seawater sampling system and associated full ocean depth lander. The use of this device in collecting cells, performing activity analyses and obtaining genome sequence information in two different deep-sea environments will be described.

Keywords: piezophiles, deep-sea, microbes

Bio(s): Dr. Bartlett is a marine microbiologist who has worked in deep-sea science for ~35 years. A major focus has been the characterization of genes and processes important for sensing and adapting to high pressure. His group has also isolated novel hadal extremophiles, and examined the diversity and activity of microbes at hadal depths in seawater, sediments and from animals, including across ocean trenches extending to 10,900 meters. Some insights have been derived from whole genome and single-cell genome studies.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

21 September 2022

Title: Climate Change, Whales, and Kids: how science and education can protect species and fight climate change
Presenter(s): Sara Hutto, Conservation and Climate Program Coordinator, Greater Farallones Association
Date & Time: 21 September 2022
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Climate Change, Whales, and Kids: how science and education can protect species and fight climate change

Presenter(s): Sara Hutto, Conservation and Climate Program Coordinator, Greater Farallones Association

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8746142632523177742

Abstract: Globally, whales and other megafauna play an important role in the carbon cycle and in reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide. In this webinar, the Climate Program Coordinator for Greater Farallones and Cordell Bank national marine sanctuaries will discuss the latest science on "whale carbon," and the critical efforts underway to rebuild whale stocks by reducing impacts, such as lethal collisions with ships. Recent engagement with school children on the subject made a big splash, resulting in a renewed commitment from the largest container shipping line to continue to go slow for whales, demonstrating the important role that community engagement plays in ocean protection.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Using metabarcoding to understand microbial communities on aquacultured sugar kelp - identifying the good and the bad players
Presenter(s): Dr. Yuan Liu, Molecular Biologist, Contractor with AIS, Inc. in support of NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 21 September 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Using metabarcoding to understand microbial communities on aquacultured sugar kelp - identifying the good and the bad players

Part of the NOAA Omics Seminar Series



Presenter(s): Dr. Yuan Liu, Molecular Biologist, Contractor with AIS, Inc. in support of NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center



Sponsor(s): NOAA Omics Working Group



Seminar Contact(s): Katharine Egan, NOAA OAR 'Omics Coordinator, noaa.omics@noaa.gov



Remote Access: Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9073792700853665803



Abstract: Sugar kelp cultivation at the southern end of its range on the east coast of North America is being pursued commercially for human consumption, which demands a high-quality product. Blade quality can be compromised by attached organisms " epibionts. Biweekly examination of epibionts on sugar kelp was conducted April"May 2018, on a kelp farm in eastern Long Island Sound, CT, USA. Culturable Vibrio spp. were not present on kelp blades until May and were limited to only old sections. No Vibrio colonies were human pathogens V. parahaemolyticus or V. vulnificus, based upon ToxR-specific multiplex PCR assays. Neither epibenthic cyanobacteria Lyngbya spp. nor the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima, microbes of concern because of toxigenicity, were detected on kelp by microscopy or metabarcoding of partial rRNA genes. Summarizing most-common sequence reads, Gammaproteobacteria was the most abundant bacterial group on kelp blades (49%) and Alphaproteobacteria were the most abundant in seawater (39%). Bacillariophyta were the most abundant eukaryotes on kelp blades (36%) and Dinoflagellata were the most abundant eukaryotes in seawater (43%). Molecular operational taxonomic unit matrices were used for non-metric multidimensional scaling; the most prominent structure for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities was the separation between blade and seawater samples. Indicator Species Analysis identified Gammaproteobacteria (55%) and Bacillariophyta (56%) to be the most important blade indicator prokaryotes and eukaryotes, respectively. A closer examination of indicator species temporal patterns and their ecophysiology suggested that Aquimarina, Parcubacteria, and Peronosporomycetes are potential pathogens to sugar kelp. Ciliates may be the most important grazers that keep epiphytes (Bacillariophyta, Rhodophyta, and Phaeophyta) and Peronosporomycetes on kelp in check.



Bio(s): Dr. Yuan Liu is a marine molecular biologist. She earned her PhD in microbial oceanography from Stony Brook University, where she used a DNA fingerprinting technique to study planktonic microbial communities associated with a harmful brown tide species. Working in the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) Milford laboratory, Yuan strives to apply environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding to a variety of fisheries-related projects that examine all kingdoms of life. Currently, her focus is to contribute to the NOAA Omics Strategic Initiative by identifying best practices for eDNA surveys that could be added to the agency's fisheries survey toolbox.



Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of this presentation will be made available on the NOAA Omics website. View past omics seminar recordings here: https://sciencecouncil.noaa.gov/NOAA-Science-Technology-Focus-Areas/NOAA-Omics



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

20 September 2022

Title: The Coastal Ice-Ocean Prediction Systems for the East and West Coasts of Canada – key components of Canada’s Oceans Protection Plan
Presenter(s): Jean-Philippe Paquin, Environnement et Changement Climatique Canada
Date & Time: 20 September 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Coastal Ice-Ocean Prediction Systems for the East and West Coasts of Canada " key components of Canada's Oceans Protection Plan

Presenter(s): Jean-Philippe Paquin (Environnement et Changement Climatique Canada)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar contact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US) +1 414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: TBD


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

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19 September 2022

Title: Expanding VIIRS Aerosol and Fire Products Utilization through Training and Outreach to End Users Featuring Python Tutorials
Presenter(s): Amy K. Huff, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist, IMSG at NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research, STAR
Date & Time: 19 September 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Expanding VIIRS Aerosol and Fire Products Utilization through Training and Outreach to End Users Featuring Python Tutorials

Presenter(s): Amy K. Huff, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist, IMSG at NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR)

Sponsor(s): NOAA JPSS Program

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:Meeting ID: meet.google.com/qei-kzjo-woh

Phone Number: (US)+1 530-425-6764
PIN: 624 532 736#

Abstract: NOAA's JPSS satellites provide global observations in near real-time that can be used to monitor, assess, and forecast fires and atmospheric aerosols. The JPSS satellite data are distributed asnetCDF4 (.nc) files, however, and the process of accessing the files and processing the data correctly can be challenging, especially for new users. To facilitate wider use of JPSSVIIRS aerosol and fire products, NOAA's Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) is providing training and outreach to the user community featuring Python tutorials. The Python tutorials cover a range of topics including downloading satellite data files from the JPSS archive on Amazon Web Services (AWS), opening and understanding the contents of netCDF4 data files, processing satellite data using quality/confidence flags, and visualizing satellite data on maps to make professional quality figures. To reach abroad swath of the user community, 1-2-hour trainings are conducted at scientific conferences, such as AMS Short Courses; multi-day in-depth sessions are organized for smaller specialized groups by request. Python scripts are available for download from the new STAR Atmospheric Composition Training website (https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/atmospheric-composition-training/),along with detailed annotation of the Python code. An overview of the STAR training and outreach program will be presented, including examples of how the Python tutorials are increasing the use of JPSS VIIRS aerosol and fire products for atmospheric research and operations



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

16 September 2022

Title: September 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy
Date & Time: 16 September 2022
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: September 2022 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov), Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/september-2022-climate-outlook/

Abstract: Join us for the 100th NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing!! We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, discuss forecast tools, and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for October 2022. Learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Bio(s): Rick Thoman is an expert in Alaska climate and weather. He produces reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities, and media.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

15 September 2022

Title: Utilizing a Biocultural Lens to Build Pilina (relationships) to the Kai Lipo (deep sea ecosystems)
Presenter(s): Hkokahalelani Pihana, Kainalu Steward, and J. Hauoli Lorenzo-Elarco
Date & Time: 15 September 2022
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Utilizing a Biocultural Lens to Build Pilina (relationships) to the Kai Lipo (deep sea ecosystems)

Presenter(s): Hkokahalelani Pihana, M.S, Tropical Conservation Biology & Environmental Science University of Hawaii at Hilo, Executive Director N Waa Mau Marine Stewardship Program

Kainalu Steward, M.S, Tropical Conservation Biology & Environmental Science University of Hawaii at Hilo, Ph.D. student, Arizona State University

J. Hauoli Lorenzo-Elarco, Kumu Ao lelo Hawaii (Instructor of Hawaiian Language) at Honolulu Community College, Ph.D. student, Ka Haka Ula o Keeliklani, University of Hawaii at Hilo

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4072865272081793803

Abstract: Increasing indigenous participation in STEAM, ocean sciences, and maritime careers is critical for building equitable and inclusive biocultural ocean science. Join Hk Pihana, Kainalu Steward and Hauoli Lorenzo-Elarco of the Papahnaumokukea Native Hawaiian Cultural Working Group as they share their experiences developing a partnership with the Ocean Exploration Trust (OET) during deep ocean mapping and exploration within Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument and Johnston Atoll. From 2021-2022, Knaka iwi (Native Hawaiians) participated as Science & Engineering Interns, Science Communication Fellows, and Cultural Liaisons on OET's Exploration Vessel Nautilus. This partnership has led to the creation of Hawaiian names for each expedition, promotional videos in lelo Hawaii (Hawaiian language) for live ship-to-shore interactions with kula kaiapuni (Hawaiian immersion schools), and a current effort to create culturally-grounded ocean science curriculum in lelo Hawaii. Come learn more about efforts to transform ocean science through a biocultural lens.

This presentation is part of the Third Thursday by The Bay webinar series at Mokuppapa Discovery Center, which is the visitor center for Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument in Hilo, Hawaii. This lecture series is also supported by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation through a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Oil Spill Fate and Transport
Presenter(s): Kevin Kirsch, NOAA, OR&R
Date & Time: 15 September 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Oil Spill Fate and Transport

Presenter(s): Dr. Amy MacFadyen

Sponsor(s): Office of Response and Restoration: You Don't Know What You Don't Know: NOAA OR&R 101 Series (https://response.restoration.noaa.gov/oil-and-chemical-spills/oil-spills/orr-lecture-series-you-dont-know-what-you-dont-know )

Seminar Contact(s): kimberly.albins@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://noaaorr.adobeconnect.com/orrlectureseries/

Abstract: This lecture is one of our key lectures in our popular Science of Oil Spills class. When oil is spilled on the water surface, typically its density is less than that of water (fresh or saltwater) and it spreads quickly under the influence of gravity to form a thin slick. This slick is acted upon by weathering processes (chemical, biological, and physical transformations) and transport processes due to winds and currents. Both weathering and transport are critical to consider when predicting the trajectory of oil spills. Learn how these various processes impact the oil that is spilled and how scientist use this information to understand where oil may go in the environment.

Bio(s): Dr. Amy MacFadyen is a physical oceanographer at the Emergency Response Division of the Office of Response and Restoration (NOAA). The Emergency Response Division (ERD) provides scientific support for oil and chemical spill response -- a key part of which is trajectory forecasting to predict the movement of spills. During the unprecedented Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, ERD provided daily trajectories to the incident command which were utilized for planning, allocation of resources, and direction of response assets. Before moving to ERD, Amy was at the University of Washington, first as a graduate student then as a postdoctoral researcher. Her research examined transport of Harmful Algal Blooms from offshore initiation sites to the Washington coast.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD (if available)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Darren Clabo, South Dakota State Fire Meteorologist
Date & Time: 15 September 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook

Presenter(s): Darren Clabo | South Dakota State Fire Meteorologist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

September 2022 topics include continued risk for drought impacts into the fall and the end of the growing season, fall wildfire potential updates/impacts, and continuing heat issues; and recent and potential climate/weather impacts including, but not limited to, La Nia for the third fall/winter in a row, crop conditions, temperature/precipitation outlooks for the next month and (fall) season, impacts to various sectors across the region, and potential for freeze/frost in the upcoming month or so.

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7528179497868100876

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: What is the Knauss FORCE?
Presenter(s): Eleanor Pierel, 2022 Knauss Climate Policy Fellow to the NOAA Senior Advisor for Climate; Rebecca Atkins, 2022 Knauss Marine Policy Fellow to the Senior Advisor for Coastal Inundation in NOS
Date & Time: 15 September 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: What is the Knauss FORCE? (2022 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Eleanor Pierel, 2022 Knauss Climate Policy Fellow to the NOAA Senior Advisor for Climate; Rebecca Atkins, 2022 Knauss Marine Policy Fellow to the Senior Advisor for Coastal Inundation in NOS

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Abstract: Fellows for Organized Resilient Coastal Efforts (FORCE) is the Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship committee dedicated to coastal resilience work across federal agencies. The 2022 class includes fellows from NOAA, NSF, EPA, FEMA, and both legislative branches. In this Lunch & Learn session, you will hear from FORCE members about committee accomplishments and goals, the breadth of coastal work that their fellowship placements encompass, and the intersection of coastal resilience with their research and academic experiences.
Keywords: Knauss, coastal resilience, inter-agency

Bio(s): Dr. Eleanor Pierel is a 2022 Knauss Fellow serving as the Climate Policy Fellow and Special Assistant to NOAA's Senior Advisor for Climate. She recently completed her PhD in Geography at the University of South Carolina where she studied small business and community resilience to complex hazards. Her research was supported by the NOAA Carolinas RISA program (CISA) in collaboration with NIST's Applied Economics Office and scholarships from the South Carolina Sea Grant and Space Grant programs. Eleanor also holds a Master's Degree in Geography with a focus in remote sensing from the University of South Carolina and a Bachelor's Degree in Environmental Studies, Sustainability, and GIS from George Washington University.Rebecca Atkins is a 2022 Knauss Fellow working with Mark Osler, NOAA's Senior Advisor for Coastal Inundation and Resilience, within the National Ocean Service (NOS). She is also working towards her Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of Georgia's Odum School of Ecology. Rebecca holds a bachelor's degree in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation and a minor in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences from the University of Florida.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Protecting “Pristine” Places from Pollution: Applying New Water Quality Assessment Techniques in the National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa
Presenter(s): Dave Whitall, NOAA/NOS NCCOS, Stressor Detection and Impacts Division, Monitoring and Assessment Branch
Date & Time: 15 September 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Protecting Pristine Places from Pollution: Applying New Water Quality Assessment Techniques in the National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa

Presenter(s): Dave Whitall, NOAA/NOS NCCOS, Stressor Detection and Impacts Division, Monitoring and Assessment Branch

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): david.moe.nelson@noaa.gov , co-coordinator NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series

Remote Access: Register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/whitall_sep15_2022_protecting_american_samoa/event/registration.html
You may enter the webinar via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. If you enter via a browser, PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge browsers and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use the IE browser.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download it but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download info is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register at link above.
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Resource managers have significant concerns about the potential inputs of contaminants from an unlined, solid waste landfill into Fagatele Bay, an embayment within the National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa. NCCOS researchers, in collaboration with the Sanctuary, NOAA Coral Program staff and academic partners used a variety of methods to assess the water quality status of the Bay, including new in situ sampling technology. This study assessed concentration of pollutants (e.g. PCBs, PAHs, personal care products, pesticides, metals, nutrients) in the system as well as their potential impacts (toxicity and mutagenicity). Methods utilized included: active in situ water samplers for organic chemistry analysis, metals analysis of sediment samples, bacterial (Colitag) and nutrient analyses of bottom water discrete samples, sea urchin embryo development toxicity assays using SPE-concentrated site water, application of the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test) for mutagenic activity of SPE-concentrated site water, and analysis of foraminifera populations as an indicator of stress. Although a variety of pollutants were detected in the Bay, they were all at relatively low concentrations that are unlikely to cause adverse ecosystem effects. Overall, these methods suggest that while some pollutants are reaching the Bay, the water quality of the system is relatively good. Resource managers can use these data as a baseline to ensure that water quality does not degrade over time, and to be aware of specific pollutant groups (e.g. pharmaceuticals) that might be of emerging concern.

Bio(s): Dr. Dave Whitall is a Coastal Ecologist with the Monitoring and Assessment Branch, of the Stress Detection and Impacts Division in the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Dave received a BS in environmental science from Penn State University and his PhD in environmental chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He joined NCCOS in 2003 and has published on a variety of environmental pollution topics, ranging from eutrophication to hypoxia to toxic pollution, in ecosystems ranging from polar lakes to temperate estuaries to coral reefs, including work in all seven U.S. coral reef jurisdictions.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Within a few days of the webinar, a link to the recording,
usually a PDF of the slides, and sometimes a summary of the chat will be sent to all who registered.

Subscribe / Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

14 September 2022

Title: Everyone has a story, what's your leadership story?
Presenter(s): Paul M. Scholz, Deputy Assistant Administrator for NOAA's National Ocean Service NOS
Date & Time: 14 September 2022
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Everyone has a story, what's your leadership story?
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series. These webinars are open to the public, in or outside of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Presenter(s): Paul M. Scholz, Deputy Assistant Administrator for NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS).

Remote Access: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/edezuj4ndslo/event/registration.html
(limited to 1000 online seats on a first come first served basis)

Sponsor(s): This event is hosted by the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series with sponsorship from the NOAA Science Council. The NOAA-wide NELS provides examples of NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. The NELS are presented as part of the NOAA Science Seminar Series For NELS questions, contact nels@noaa.gov.

Abstract: As we look ahead into the next century, leaders will be those who empower others. " Bill Gates.As we nurture the future generation of leaders, I want to share my personal story and emphasize that there are many paths for achieving career success and writing your own leadership story. From serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in Ecuador, to my role today as the NOS Deputy Assistant Administrator, I have had the opportunity to grow and develop as an environmental advocate and lifelong learner.

Woven throughout my leadership narrative are the tenets of adaptability, public service, mentorship, and a strong organizational culture. These beliefs have helped me get to where I am today.

I hope that sharing my experiences may encourage others to ask themselves, What is the next chapter of your story?

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided at the NELS web page.

Bio(s): https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/about/nosaa-deputy-bio.html

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:Recording available a few days after the webinar at the NELS webpage. Notice: This seminar will be recorded for later viewing. By joining you automatically consent to such recording. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.
To nominate a NELS speaker, please use this form and/or contact the NELS Team at nels@noaa.gov.The NELS Team is Hernan Garcia, Sandra Claar, Katie Rowley, and Robert.Levy@noaa.gov.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: A perspective on moving forward with Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Jon Hare, Science and Research Director of the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 14 September 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A perspective on moving forward with Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management (EBM/EBFM)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Jon Hare, Science and Research Director of the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4702291695240836368
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The NOAA Fisheries mission explicitly includes Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management - We provide vital services for the nation, all backed by sound science and an ecosystem-based approach to management. Yet many express that we have not made significant progress in implementing an ecosystem-based approach. I will explore this issue and consider the role that scientific culture plays in how we frame the problem and how we frame solutions. My conclusion is that to implement ecosystem-based management, we need to take one-step at a time - together.

Keywords: Ecosystems, science-to-management, collaboration

Bio(s): Jon Hare is the Science and Research Director of the NOAA"S Northeast Fisheries Science Center. He oversees science activities related to the NOAA Fisheries mission in the Northeast region including fisheries, aquaculture, protected species, habitat, and ecosystem science. Prior to becoming Director in 2016, Jon spent more than 20 years as a researcher focusing on understanding the interactions between ocean ecosystems and fisheries populations with a goal of contributing to sustainable fisheries and species conservation.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

13 September 2022

Title: U.S. Southwest Drought Briefing
Presenter(s): Peter Goble, Colorado Climate Center; Christine Rumsey, USGS Utah Water Science Center
Date & Time: 13 September 2022
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Southwest Drought Briefing

Presenter(s):

Climate Conditions and Outlook: Peter Goble, Colorado Climate Center
Great Salt Lake Hydro Mapper: Christine Rumsey, USGS Utah Water Science Center

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USDA Southwest Climate Hub

Seminar Contact(s): Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov), NOAA/OAR Climate Program Office

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4639505183515134222

Abstract: The Southwest is in continuing drought. Recent summer rains have improved, but not removed drought from the region. This webinar will look at current and forecast drought conditions for Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, and Utah. Despite a wet summer, the Great Salt Lake has hit a historic, all-time low water level; this webinar will also look at the recently released Great Salt Lake hydromapper tool developed by USGS and State of Utah.


Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7838262689030055182

Recordings: You can find them here: (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Community Climate Studies - Observing, Modeling, and Mitigating Urban Heat for Equitable Resilience
Presenter(s): Dr. Ben Zaichik, Professor, Johns Hopkins University; Dr. Elizabeth Doran, Research Assistant Professor, University of Vermont; Dr. John Mejia, Desert Research Institute; Dr. Dev Niyogi, University of Texas at Austin
Date & Time: 13 September 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Community Climate Studies - Observing, Modeling, and Mitigating Urban Heat for Equitable Resilience

Presenter(s): Dr. Ben Zaichik, Professor, Johns Hopkins University; Dr. Elizabeth Doran, Research Assistant Professor, University of Vermont; Dr. John Mejia, Desert Research Institute; Dr. Dev Niyogi, University of Texas at Austin

Sponsor(s): NOAA Climate Program Office and National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS)

Seminar Contacts: hunter.jones@noaa.gov, morgan.zabow@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1015720470796558862

Abstract: The burden of heat in urban areas is not shared equally among all residents, often with the most disadvantaged bearing the highest risk and suffering the greatest impacts. The drivers of these inequities are many, including social factors, historical housing policies, urban planning and design choices, and urban-scale climate dynamics effected by urban form. This webinar will focus on 4 projects taking place across the country aiming to work with communities to understand the impacts of extreme heat, to observe and model the drivers of those impacts, and to ultimately help local decision makers make informed decisions about how to mitigate heat risk now and for the future. These projects were funded by the National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS) Extreme Heat Risk Initiative in FY21 and will continue through FY22. A fifth project funded in this competition, focused on urban planning for extreme heat, has been completed and will be the subject of a future webinar session.Presentations
  • Baltimore, MD: Seeing Heat Risk Through an Equity Lens: Putting High Resolution Temperature Data to Work for Urban Environmental Justice
  • Vermont: Exposure-based Extreme Heat Vulnerability Mapping to Inform Adaptation and Mitigation of Extreme Heat Exposure Risk in Small Cities and Rural Settlements
  • Houston, TX: Improved Simulations of Surface Temperature in Cities Near Large Water Bodies with Implications for Heat Indices and Urban Heat Mitigation Scenarios
  • Austin, TX: Urban Climate Science for Decision-Making & Evaluation of Heat-Health Interventions for Austin, Texas


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

12 September 2022

Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales: A diagnostic toolbox: assessing the representation of stratosphere-troposphere coupling in the Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFSv12), and Captured QBO-MJO connection in a subseasonal prediction system
Presenter(s): Dillon Elsbury, CIRES, Laura Ciasto, NOAA CPC, and Kai Huang, George Mason University
Date & Time: 12 September 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A diagnostic toolbox: assessing the representation of stratosphere-troposphere coupling in the Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFSv12), and Captured QBO-MJO Connection in a Subseasonal Prediction System

Presenter(s): Dr. Dillon Elsbury, CIRES and Dr. Laura Ciasto, NOAA CPC; Kai Huang, George Mason University

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Weather Program Office S2S Program and NOAA NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration Modeling Program Division

Seminar Contact(s): Mark Olsen, mark.olsen@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/8426465125700931856

Abstract: This monthly webinar series was created to share ongoing work within NWS and OAR at the Weeks 3-4 and S2S timescales. We would like to foster a relaxed, informal dialogue among forecasters, modelers and researchers. This month, Drs. Dillon Elsbury and Laura Ciasto will speak about "A diagnostic toolbox: assessing the representation of stratosphere-troposphere coupling in the Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFSv12)." Kai Huang will speak about "Captured QBO-MJO Connection in a Subseasonal Prediction System."

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available on the Weeks 3-4/S2S Webinar Series website: https://vlab.noaa.gov/web/weeks-3-4-s2s-webinar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

9 September 2022

Title: Three Minute Thesis Webinar on Drought
Presenter(s): Molly Woloszyn, Regional Drought Information Coordinator, National Integrated Drought Information System NIDIS, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences CIRES, University of Colorado - Boulder; Veva Deheza, Executive Director, NIDIS; Crystal Stiles, Tribal Engagement Coordinator, NIDIS, CIRES; Adam Hartman, Meteorologist, NOAA Climate Prediction Center; Christa Peters-Lidard, Director Acting, NASA Sciences and Exploration Directorate; Hailan Wang, Meteorologist, NOAA Climate Prediction Center; Jason Otkin, Associate Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Evan Sawyer, Drought Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries - California Central Valley Office; Andy Hoell, Meteorologist, NOAA Physical Sciences Laboratory.
Date & Time: 9 September 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Three Minute Thesis Webinar on Drought

Presenter(s): Molly Woloszyn, Regional Drought Information Coordinator, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), University of Colorado - Boulder; Veva Deheza, Executive Director, NIDIS; Crystal Stiles, Tribal Engagement Coordinator, NIDIS, CIRES; Adam Hartman, Meteorologist, NOAA Climate Prediction Center; Christa Peters-Lidard, Director (Acting), NASA Sciences and Exploration Directorate; Hailan Wang, Meteorologist, NOAA Climate Prediction Center; Jason Otkin, Associate Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Evan Sawyer, Drought Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries - California Central Valley Office; Andy Hoell, Meteorologist, NOAA Physical Sciences Laboratory.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Regional Collaboration Network

Seminar Contact(s): Keli Pirtle, keli.pirtle@noaa.gov and Bethany Perry, bethany.perry@noaa.gov ,

Remote Access: Please register -- https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3627432221699579663 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract: The NOAA Regional Collaboration Network invites you to join us for a special webinar designed to share experiences and information about NOAA's role related to drought. From learning about the National Integrated Drought Information System, understanding flash drought, or how drought relates to salmon recovery - you will have the chance to hear straight from the experts on a wide array of drought-related topics! In addition, presenters will address questions from the audience.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be made available shortly after the seminar at: https://www.noaa.gov/regions/central-region-thesis-webinar-recordings

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

8 September 2022

Title: Addressing Tropical Variability and Convective Gray-Zone Representation in NOAA’s Unified Forecast System
Presenter(s): Lisa Bengtsson, NOAA ESRL PSL
Date & Time: 8 September 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Addressing Tropical Variability and Convective Gray-Zone Representation in NOAA's Unified Forecast System

Presenter(s): Lisa Bengtsson, NOAA ESRL PSL

Sponsor(s): Office of Science and Technology Integration (OSTI) Modeling Division, National Weather Service of NOAA. If you would like to recommend a speaker and topic please email:
ufs.modeling@noaa.gov and provide information on speaker and topic along with email addresses of speakers.

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Mackell (stacy.mackell@noaa.gov) and Caroline Delgado (caroline.delgado@noaa.gov)Remote Acess: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2327840262424013581

Abstract: The weather in the tropics is important for the Earth's atmospheric circulation pattern, therefore, correctly modeling the seasonal and year-to-year variations in this region is crucial for improving predictions of weather and climate across the world. Weather and climate variability in the tropics is primarily driven by equatorial waves interacting with smaller scale atmospheric convection. These convectively coupled' equatorial waves are important for global weather prediction because a better description of the weather in the tropics will lead to a better description of the weather in other places, such as the United States. Convectively coupled equatorial waves have been a major modeling challenge from weather to climate scales because the onset and propagation of these waves depends on processes that are only partially accounted for in global weather prediction systems. In this talk I will present recent research that highlights some key aspects needed in the NOAA GFS description of atmospheric convection to improve the interaction between small scale physics and large scale waves. These aspects include improvements in moisture-convection coupling, stochasticity and sub-grid (and cross-grid) convective organization feedbacks. I will also address aspects related to representing cumulus convection in the so-called convective grey zone regime, and discuss scale adaptive representation of cumulus convection needed to prepare the GFS for higher global resolution.

Bio(s): Dr. Lisa Bengtsson is a research scientist at the NOAA ESRL Physical Science Laboratory (PSL). She joined CIRES/NOAA in 2017, after working as a research scientist at the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) since 2006. Her research interests include parameterization of cumulus convection and model uncertainty . She currently co-leads the NOAA UFSR2O physics development team. Dr. Bengtsson earned her MSc and PhD degrees at Stockholm University in Sweden, and her BSc degree in atmospheric sciences from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, in the USA.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:All PowerPoints and recordings from past webinars can be accessed at the UFS webinar web page.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Newly launched Heat.gov has tools for communities facing extreme heat
Presenter(s): Morgan Zabow, NOAA Climate Program Office, Climate and Health Communications and Outreach Coordinator
Date & Time: 8 September 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Newly launched Heat.gov has tools for communities facing extreme heat

Presenter(s): Morgan Zabow, NOAA Climate Program Office, Climate and Health Communications and Outreach Coordinator

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Seminar Contact(s): library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8285781513893264397

Abstract: On July 26th, Biden Administration through the interagency National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS) launched Heat.gov, a new website to provide the public and decision-makers with clear, timely and science-based information to understand and reduce the health risks of extreme heat. In this presentation, Morgan Zabow will give an overview of the website, which includes current and projected heat information, heat tools across the federal government, information on our urban heat island mapping program, resources and guides on planning and preparing for heat, and more.

Keywords: Extreme heat, tools, resources

Bio(s): Morgan Zabow is the Climate and Health Communications and Outreach Coordinator with NOAA's Climate Program Office, and works on the National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS). As part of the NIHHIS team, she co-leads an interagency heat communications team, is the lead of content creation for the newly launched heat.gov, and helps to manage the citizen science Urban Heat Island mapping campaigns. Morgan has a Masters of Public Health in Environmental Health from Emory University, and a Bachelors of Science from the University of Georgia.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: GNSS Orbit Determination
Presenter(s): Dr. Josh Jones, Continuously Operating Reference Station Branch, NGS
Date & Time: 8 September 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: GNSS Orbit Determination

Presenter(s): Dr. Josh Jones, Geodetic Orbiteer, Continuously Operating Reference Station Branch, NGS

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NOS National Geodetic Survey.

Seminar Contact(s): sonja.bowen@noaa.gov, NOAA National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/603062761289614606
Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Abstract:
Satellite orbit dynamics is a critical part to the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) infrastructure. In the age of space-based observations, it is an important concept to understand when discussing measurements taken with the Global Positioning System (GPS). Without the understanding of satellites and their produced data; GPS and other navigation systems would not work. This talk will introduce the basics of GPS and satellites while focusing on:
  • How NGS determines where satellites are in orbit and how they move.

  • Why understanding satellite orbits is important to the Global Positioning System.

  • What NGS does with created satellite data products referred to as ephemeris.

Technical Content Rating: Beginner- No prior knowledge of this topic is necessary.


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7 September 2022

Title: Summer Urban Heat Projects in Philadelphia and Charleston
Presenter(s): Ivana Gonzalez, Nueva Esperanza Inc.; Christina Gareis, Nueva Esperanza Inc.; Nikki Pearl, Drexel University; Richard Johnson, Drexel University; Janice Barnes, Climate Adaptation Partners
Date & Time: 7 September 2022
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual (see description)
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Summer Urban Heat Projects in Philadelphia and Charleston / Green Infrastructure, Climate, and Cities CCRUN Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ivana Gonzalez, Nueva Esperanza Inc; Christina Gareis, Nueva Esperanza Inc; Nikki Pearl, Drexel University; Richard Johnson, Drexel University; Janice Barnes, Climate Adaptation Partners

Sponsor(s): The Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar Contact(s): Genie Bey, genie.bey@noaa.gov; Nikki Pearl, np868@drexel.edu

Remote Access: Virtual meeting is hosted on Zoom. You must register in advance at https://drexel.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_dJzPK4hITqSkmG-w2oTADA

Abstract: CCRUN hosts a monthly series featuring researchers and practitioners from around the urban northeast region and country all of whom have new ideas on how to promote resilient, livable, and sustainable cities. The talks focus on urban solutions to global problems associated with increasing temperature and sea level rise, precipitation variability and greenhouse gas emissions. We are interested in spurring dialogue on the implications of such changes on the complex infrastructure of intensely developed landscapes, and on the health, well-being, and vulnerability of the people who live in them.Join us as we discuss projects addressing summer urban heat throughout Philadelphia, PA and Charleston, SC.

Bio(s):Ivana Gonzalez is a lifelong North Philadelphia resident with a passion for social and environmental justice advocacy. As the Community Outreach Coordinator at Nueva Esperanza Inc., Ivana is the point person for youth internship programming, environmental and social justice initiatives, as well as community education initiatives. In her role, Ivana works closely with partner organizations like PHS, TreePhilly, and Drexel University to combat the decades of disinvestment in the Hunting Park, Juniata, and Feltonville communities. As one of the city's worst urban heat islands, Hunting Park needs investment in trees and other cooling structures and initiatives, like the Planter Bench Project, to stay healthy during increasingly hot summers.

Christina Gareis, MS, MPH is dedicated to the advancement of individual and community health and well-being. As the Community Public Health Coordinator on Nueva Esperanza Inc.'s Housing and Economic Development team, Christina conducts community-based participatory research, outreach, and education. She focuses on disparate health-related topics such as the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on low-income and minority communities, the links between environment and health, and other topics. Additionally, Christina supports Esperanza's Neighborhood heat mitigation projects such as leading the tree canopy strategy in Hunting Park, developing block-level greening mapping, and conducting air quality analysis in partnership with Drexel University.

Nikki Pearl, MSW is the new Lab Manager for the Sustainable Water Resource Engineering (SWRE) Lab at Drexel University. In her role, she coordinates community-driven outreach initiatives to address climate resiliency and focuses on the equitable implementation of green infrastructure and other climate solutions. Prior to joining Drexel University, Nikki worked for the Columbia, Missouri's Office of Sustainability, where she helped spearhead a Neighborhood Climate Ambassadors Program in frontline communities throughout the City.

Richard Johnson is the Director of Community Science at The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University where he delivers projects that develop accessible, applicable, community-centered solutions to environmental challenges. He has spent his career working on environmental education and community development, including as a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Dominican Republic and Manager of the Climate & Urban Systems Partnership. At the Academy, he helps lead the Philly Urban Heat Network and spearheads the Academy's Philadelphia Urban Heat and Air Quality Mapping Campaign.

Dr. Janice Barnes, Founder of Climate Adaptation Partners (CAP), works with public and private clients to identify their risks and vulnerabilities and to meet their resilience goals. In partnership with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, City of Charleston, The Citadel James B. Near Center for Climate Studies, University of South Carolina, Medical University of South Carolina, and Charleston Housing Authority, CAP is facilitating the Charleston Heat Health Research Program (CHHRP). Following the 2021 HeatWatch campaign, this program aims to collect data during the 2022 heat season that will improve awareness of existing heat-health risks and to use these data to inform design performance criteria for planned investments in site and building designs and associated material selections.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: The presentation will be recorded and archived on https://www.ccrun.org/resources/seminars/ and https://www.youtube.com/c/CCRUNRISA/videos. Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Environmental Flows in California
Presenter(s): Sarah Yarnell, University of California, Davis
Date & Time: 7 September 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Environmental Flows in California

Presenter(s): Sarah Yarnell, Associate Professional Researcher, Center for Watershed Sciences, University of California, Davis

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology DivisionSeminar contact: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: https://swfsc.webex.com/swfsc/j.php?MTID=m07961348a4316a4d4a63f0f678a72da5; Password (if needed): 5sNxHn33mN5; Join by phone by dialing +1-415-655-0002 US Toll, Access code: 2498 072 7370

Abstract: Across California's diverse landscape, water managers have the challenging task of allocating an often scarce resource among cities, farms, and the environment. While determining how much water people need is often possible, determining environmental flows - the streamflows required to sustain freshwater and estuarine ecosystems and the human livelihoods that depend on these ecosystems - is more difficult. Further complicating matters, multiple state and local agencies share responsibility for determining the flows needed to protect freshwater ecosystems, and yet the vast majority of streams and rivers in California do not have instream flow requirements. Among those that do, instream flows have not often resulted in effective protection for aquatic species. As a result, a group of scientists from academia, agencies, research organizations, and non-governmental organizations has focused on developing technical tools and products, including the California Environmental Flows Framework (CEFF), necessary to inform environmental flow management across the state. This talk provides an overview of the state of science on environmental flows, the California Environmental Flows Framework, and opportunities and challenges in California for applying environmental flows.

Bio(s): Dr. Sarah Yarnell is an Associate Professional Researcher at the Center for Watershed Sciences, University of California, Davis. Her research focuses on integrating the traditional fields of hydrology, ecology, and geomorphology in the river environment, with the goal of applying understanding of river ecosystem processes to managed systems throughout California. She works closely with government resource agencies and the private sector to assess the impacts of environmental flows and habitat restoration on aquatic biota and provide recommendations for management that improve the functioning of river ecosystems.

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; link to recording available upon request.

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Title: How do weak, misaligned tropical cyclones evolve towards alignment? A multi-case study using observations and HAFS
Presenter(s): George 'Trey' Alvey, PhD, Assistant Scientist, CIMAS/RSMAS University of Miami and Hurricane Research Division/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory
Date & Time: 7 September 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: OAR - AOML - Happenings Calendar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: How do weak, misaligned tropical cyclones evolve towards alignment? A multi-case study using observations and HAFS
AOML Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): George 'Trey' Alvey, PhD, Assistant Scientist, CIMAS/RSMAS University of Miami and Hurricane Research Division/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

Sponsor(s): Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/OAR

Seminar Contact(s): Shirley Murillo (Shirley.Murillo@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/544877053

Abstract: Rapid intensification (RI) commonly begins as weak tropical cyclones (TCs) transition (sometimes abruptly) from a seemingly unfavorable misaligned vortex toward alignment, which poses immense challenges for numerical weather prediction and operational forecasting. Although there have already been many case studies that have improved understanding for processes like vortex alignment and precipitation symmetrization, the vortex-scale and environmental characteristics governing the differing pathways remain more unclear. This study focuses on multi-storm evaluations of weak TCs using observations like ground radar and the Hurricane Analysis and Forecast System (HAFS). High-impact cases from 2019"2021 are specifically highlighted including Dorian (2019), Isaias (2020), Sally (2020), Elsa (2021), Ida (2021), and Nicholas (2021). In cases that feature sustained alignment, the displaced low-level and mid-level circulations non-monotonically progress towards vortex tilt reduction with periods of reformation, precession, and advection. The persistence and intensity of deep convection (near the mid-level center) is a common important feature preceding and during alignment. A feedback loop is also identified wherein outflow boundaries associated with cold pools downtilt may initially provide indirect thermodynamic benefits (e.g., moisture pooling and convergence) to promote upstream convection maintenance, which further increases inflow strength, amplifies instability, and enhances moisture convergence to help convection persist.

Keywords: Tropical cyclones, rapid intensification, HAFS

Bio(s): George 'Trey' Alvey, PhD is an Assistant Scientist with CIMAS/RSMAS University of Miami and Hurricane Research Division/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML).

Recordings: Recording will be shared after the event on the AOML YouTube channel.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Transforming underwater sampling and manipulation with soft robotics
Presenter(s): Stephen Licht, Associate Professor and Brennan Phillips, Assistant Professor, URI Ocean Engineering
Date & Time: 7 September 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Transforming underwater sampling and manipulation with soft roboticsNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Stephen Licht (Associate Professor) and Brennan Phillips (Assistant Professor, University of Rhode Island Ocean Engineering).

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and NOAA Central Library.

Seminar Contacts: Liang Wu (liang.wu@noaa.gov), Chris Beaverson (chris.beaverson@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/36436040524931854

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Soft robotic actuators and manipulator systems are an emerging technology uniquely suited for use underwater, where they can operate in neutral buoyancy. Soft robotic drive systems also draw significantly less power and produce less acoustic noise than conventional hydraulic systems, making them suitable for use on smaller deployment platforms such as inspection-class ROVs. This presentation will review progress in underwater soft robotic systems, and present applications of emerging technologies in shallow and deep-sea environments.

Keywords: Soft robotics, manipulation, sampling

Bio(s): Stephen Licht's research group at the University of Rhode Island develops and deploys technologies for underwater, surface, and aerial platforms used in marine applications. His current work focuses on mechanical systems and control algorithms to enhance the capabilities of systems with low logistics footprints. Dr. Licht received a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Yale University, and a PhD in Mechanical and Oceanographic Engineering from the MIT/WHOI Joint Program. Prior to joining URI in 2013, Dr. Licht was a Principal Research Scientist with iRobot Corporation.

Brennan Phillips specializes in the development and application of novel instrumentation for oceanographic research. His current research topics include low-light imaging of deep-sea biology and bioluminescence, soft robotic manipulators, hydraulic systems, distributed sensing, and low-cost, lightweight methods for ocean exploration. Dr. Phillips received his BS in Ocean Engineering from URI, an MS in Oceanography from the University of Connecticut, and a PhD in Oceanography from URI/GSO.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

6 September 2022

Title: NOAA Weather Program Office (WPO) FY23 Funding Opportunity
Presenter(s): John Ten Hoeve, WPO Deputy Director, WPO; Matthew Mahalik, WPO Research Transitions and Funding Opportunity Lead; Tamara Battle, WPO Policy and Partnerships Manager
Date & Time: 6 September 2022
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Weather Program Office (WPO) FY23 Funding OpportunityNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): John Ten Hoeve, WPO Deputy Director, WPO; Matthew Mahalik, WPO Research Transitions and Funding Opportunity Lead; Tamara Battle, WPO Policy and Partnerships Manager (moderator)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Weather Program Office (WPO)

Seminar Contacts: NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: NOAA's Weather Program Office (WPO) Fiscal Year 2023 (FY23) funding opportunity is accepting proposals through November 17, 2022, as part of four grant competitions valued in total at approximately $13.5 million per year. The opportunity is geared toward researchers in academia, industry, cooperative institutes, and other non-Federal institutions, while also encouraging collaborations between NOAA and external researchers. In FY23, proposals are being accepted for the following competitions: Innovations for Community Modeling, Observations, Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBES), and Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment in the United States (VORTEX-USA; inclusive of VORTEX-Southeast). This webinar will provide insight into the funding opportunity, including tips on how to craft a competitive proposal.

Keywords: weather, research, funding

Bio(s): John Ten Hoeve, PhD is the Deputy Director of the NOAA Weather Program Office (WPO), and is the lead author for WPO's 2022-2026 Strategic Plan. Prior to WPO, John served as the Deputy Director of the Office of Organizational Excellence at NOAA's National Weather Service, and led the development of the National Weather Service's 2019-2022 Strategic Plan. John holds a B.S. in Meteorology from Penn State University, and a M.S. and PhD from Stanford University in Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Matt Mahalik is the Research Transitions Lead for the Weather Program Office (WPO) in OAR. Matt works to coordinate the planning and execution of the transition of science from OAR to other NOAA Line Offices and beyond, while also coordinating WPO's annual Federal Funding Opportunity and Annual Operating Plan. His background is in severe weather research and development, particularly in weather radar and observations. Matt holds a B.S. in Meteorology from Penn State University, and a M.S. in Atmospheric Science from Texas Tech University.

Tamara Battle is the Policy and Partnerships Manager for the Weather Program Office (WPO), and is the lead for coordinating and overseeing various aspects of the Weather Research and Forecasting Innovation Act of 2017 (the Weather Act) and other weather policy topics for WPO and OAR. Tamara holds a B.S. in Environmental Science from Medgar Evers College, CUNY, M.A. in Geology from The City College of New York, CUNY, and M.S. in Atmospheric Sciences from Howard University, and is a doctoral candidate at Morgan State University in Environmental Engineering.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

1 September 2022

Title: Using Tools from Stock Assessment to Explore Management Strategies that Achieve Ecosystem Goals in the California Current
Presenter(s): Kiva Oken, Stock Assessment Scientist, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 1 September 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Using Tools from Stock Assessment to Explore Management Strategies that Achieve Ecosystem Goals in the California Current (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s): Kiva Oken, Stock Assessment Scientist, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Kristan Blackhart and Library Seminars

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.


Abstract: Many of the models and statistical tools used in stock assessment are also more broadly relevant in the service of ecosystem-based fisheries management. In this talk, I will present several examples from the California Current of how we can use population modeling to explore different management strategies given direct trophic interactions between populations, interactions induced by fishing behavior, and interactions between populations and their environment. We can use lessons learned from these case studies to highlight opportunities and challenges for ecosystem-based fisheries management moving forward.Keywords: ecosystem-based fisheries management, population modeling, California current


Bio(s): Kiva Oken is a stock assessment scientist at the NWFSC in Seattle and holds a PhD in quantitative ecology and resource management from the University of Washington. Previously, she was an assistant professor at UC Davis. Her research uses quantitative tools to understand ecological and socio-ecological processes that are relevant for the sustainable use and conservation of fisheries.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

31 August 2022

Title: The role of natural and anthropogenic marine aerosols in cloud-chemistry-climate feedbacks: the Benguela upwelling system and Marine Cloud Brightening
Presenter(s): Hannah Horowitz, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Date & Time: 31 August 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: The role of natural and anthropogenic marine aerosols in cloud-chemistry-climate feedbacks: the Benguela upwelling system and Marine Cloud Brightening
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Hannah Horowitz, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.womack@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1739234305833204748

Abstract: Marine aerosols like sea salt aerosols and sulfate, derived from plankton emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), influence climate by directly scattering radiation and serving as cloud condensation nuclei. Clouds also play a critical role in the chemistry of DMS and the recycling of reactive halogens, of which sea salt aerosols are the largest source in the troposphere. Reactive halogens play a key role in the atmosphere's oxidative potential and the chemistry of mercury, ozone, methane, and other aerosol species including sulfate via DMS and nitrates, leading to additional feedbacks on pollution and climate. Here I will present recent work in our group from two projects. First, we simulate the impacts of intentional sea salt aerosol emissions for Marine Cloud Brightening climate intervention on pollutants and greenhouse gases. Second, we simulate the impacts of marine-derived aerosols over the Benguela upwelling system off the coast of Southern Africa, a critical region for Earth's climate and for aerosol-cloud interactions in particular. Here, most previous research has centered on the impact of biomass burning aerosols during its peak season (August " October), while the role of DMS and sea salt aerosol emissions during the rest of the year remain underexplored. We develop and apply the GEOS-Chem 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to investigate this system, including in the context of our rapidly evolving understanding of DMS chemistry.

Bio(s): Hannah Horowitz is an assistant professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at the University of Illinois " Urbana Champaign, with an affiliate appointment in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences. She received her BA and PhD from Harvard University in Earth and Planetary Sciences, as well as a MS in Environmental Science and Engineering. She was an NSF Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Washington's Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, and then joined the faculty at UIUC in 2020. Her research focuses on the interactions between human activity, atmospheric chemistry, climate, and pollution, through developing and applying global models.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2022,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!
Title: The International Terrestrial Reference Frame: More Than Three Decades of Research and Development
Presenter(s): Dr. Zuheir Altamimi, Research Director at Institut National de l'Information Gographique et Forestire (IGN), and Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP), France
Date & Time: 31 August 2022
9:00 am - 10:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The International Terrestrial Reference Frame: More Than Three Decades of Research and Development

Presenter(s): Dr. Zuheir Altamimi, Research Director at the Institut National de l'Information Gographique et Forestire (IGN), and Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP), France

Sponsor(s): National Geodetic Survey


Seminar Contact(s): Carla Kirby - Carla.Kirby@noaa.gov

Remote Access: http://meet.google.com/nnu-dksi-eadPhone Numbers (US)+1 904-580-8598
PIN: 376 207 249#

Abstract: The presentation introduces the concept of reference systems and frames, but also possible reference frame representations for a deformable Earth. It also details the ITRF genesis, its development over the years, current achievement and scientific results. A particular focus will be given to the newly released ITRF2020, showing its innovations, main results and the usage of its kinematic model pertaining to the precise modeling of nonlinear station motions. Throughout the presentation, we highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the geodetic infrastructures, as well as systematic errors of the four geodetic techniques contributing to the ITRF construction: DORIS, GNSS, SLR, and VLBI. The presentation ends by briefly introducing the objectives of the United Nations Global Geospatial Information Management (UN-GGIM) initiative on the Global Geodetic Reference Frame for Sustainable development, and its responses to help improving the global geodetic infrastructure.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Contact Carla Kirby for presentation slides after the talk.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

30 August 2022

Title: The Value of Satellite-Enabled Reductions of Exposure to Poor Air Quality: A literature review
Presenter(s): Jessica Chen, NOAA-NWS, NERTO Intern & NOAA EPP/MSI CESSRST Scholar
Date & Time: 30 August 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Value of Satellite-Enabled Reductions of Exposure to Poor Air Quality: A literature review

Presenter(s): Jessica Chen, NOAA-NWS, NERTO Intern & NOAA EPP/MSI CESSRST Scholar

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Seminar Contact(s): Valerie Were (valerie.l.were@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3188835933514790411

Abstract: Plans for the GeoXO satellite system, which will replace the current GOES-R satellites in the early 2030s, include an atmospheric composition instrument, a hyperspectral infrared sounder, and a higher resolution imager that will be used together to provide greatly enhanced observations of atmospheric gasses and suspended small particles that impair air quality. As with any federal investment, the cost must be more than offset by benefits. However, measurement of the health-related impacts of reducing exposure to poor air quality is a highly specialized field of economics. The goal is to synthesize existing research that can be used by NOAA and other researchers to identify and address gaps in our understanding of the economic benefits of reducing public exposure to poor air quality.

Keywords: Atmospheric Science, Economics, Environmental and Public Health

Bio(s): Jessica Chen is a Graduate NOAA EPP/MSI Scholar completing her NERTO with NWS. Jessica has a Masters Degree in Sustainability in the Urban Environment and an undergraduate background in Economics.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Atlantic Hurricane Season Update
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University, and Matthew Rosencrans, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 30 August 2022
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Atlantic Hurricane Season Update

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University, and
Matthew Rosencrans, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s): Ellen Mecray

Remote Access: Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract: The webinar will feature a recap of August conditions and Matthew Rosencrans will brief on the updates to the Atlantic Hurricane Season.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

25 August 2022

Title: Seasonal forecasts of ocean physics and biogeochemistry in the Northeast U.S. with regional MOM6
Presenter(s): Andrew Ross, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory
Date & Time: 25 August 2022
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Seasonal forecasts of ocean physics and biogeochemistry in the Northeast U.S. with regional MOM6

Presenter(s): Andrew Ross, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

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24 August 2022

Title: Assessing the Dynamics of Equatorial Indian Ocean Driven by Indian Ocean Dipole with Satellite Ocean Color Observations
Presenter(s): Dr. Wei Shi, NOAA/NESDIS
Date & Time: 24 August 2022
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Assessing the Dynamics of Equatorial Indian Ocean Driven by Indian Ocean Dipole with Satellite Ocean Color Observations

Presenter(s): Wei Shi and Menghua Wang, NOAA/NESDSID/STAR/SOCD Ocean Color Team

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.goto.com/MerrieNeely/noccg-seminar---wei-shi-noaa You can also dial in: United States: +1 (571) 317-3116 Canada: +1 (647) 497-9373

Access Code: 348-758-805


Abstract: This presentation summarizes results from two recent studies in the Equatorial Indian Ocean. With the VIIRS-SNPP observations, we identified, characterized, and quantified the biological Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) for the first time with the 2019 positive IOD event. The 2019 positive IOD event led to anomalous biological activity in both the east IOD zone and west IOD zone. The biological IOD was attributed to the different nutrient dynamics in the east and west Equatorial Indian Ocean. In addition, we developed biological dipole mode indices (BDMIs) based on the dipolar observations of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) anomalies in the east and west IOD zones during the IOD event. The two BDMIs, which are based on Chl-a difference and relative
difference, not only represent the dipolar biological activities in the Equatorial Indian Ocean, but also reflect the thermocline dynamics in the east IOD and west IOD zones. The BDMIs and traditional SST-based dipole mode index (DMI) can both effectively detect IOD signal for the major IOD events. They are complementary for characterizing the IOD events, and the combination of these indices provides a better understanding of the atmosphere and ocean processes for both surface and subsurface.

Speaker Bio

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php. For more information visit: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

23 August 2022

Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Climate, Heat and the Southeast
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia; Morgan Zabow, NOAA's National Integrated Heat Health Information System
Date & Time: 23 August 2022
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Climate, Heat and the Southeast

Presenter(s):
Chip Konrad, Southeast Regional Climate Center (Climate Overview)

Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center (Water Resources Overview )

Pam Knox, University of Georgia (Agriculture Impact Update)

Morgan Zabow, NOAA's National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS) (Climate, Heat and the Southeast)

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

The August 23 webinar will feature a special presentation on "Climate, Heat and the Southeast."

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/9215585718468903438

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here: (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

22 August 2022

Title: U.S. Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Larry O'Neill, Oregon Climate Service, Brent Bower, NWS Weather Forecast Office - Seattle
Date & Time: 22 August 2022
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description: