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Past Seminars

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

During the COVID-19 Pandemic:
Until further notice, all OneNOAA seminars will be presented via remote access only. This will be true even if the seminar was originally listed with a physical location. If you have questions about attending a specific seminar, please reach out to the Seminar Contact listed in the seminar's calendar entry.

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

• Seminar submission guidelines

17 August 2020

Title: NOAA’s 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop Opening Plenary
Presenter(s): Adrienne Simonson, NOAA/OCIO; Craig McLean, AA NOAA/OAR
Date & Time: 17 August 2020
3:00 pm - 4:45 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
NOAA's 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop Opening Plenary

Presenter(s):
Adrienne Simonson and Craig McLean.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA 2020 Environmental Data Management (EDM) Workshop sponsored by the NOAA Environmental Data Management Committee. Seminar Contact: edmw.planning.team@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3052069864643756814 After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.Accessibility: Video recordings with captions and transcripts of the presentation will be available on the workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) after the presentation.

Abstract:
Please join us for the opening plenary session of NOAA's 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop. Adrienne Simonson, NOAA's Environmental Data Management Committee acting chair will give opening remarks to kick-off the week-long workshop. The keynote speaker will be Craig McLean, NOAA's Assistant Administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and Chief Scientist. Mr. McLean will speak about how effective data governance supports scientific integrity across NOAA. For more information please visit the workshop website here: https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/

Bio(s):
Adrienne Simonson serves as the acting chair for NOAA's Environmental Data Management Committee, acting director of the NOAA Big Data Program, and Big Data Program business director. Craig McLean serves as the Assistant Administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and is now serving as the Acting Chief Scientist. Mr. McLean has previously served in NOAA as Acting Deputy Assistant Administrator of the National Ocean Service, was the founding Director of OAR's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research and served in uniform for nearly 25 years in NOAA's Commissioned Corps, attaining the rank of Captain.

Slides:
Slides will be available on the EDM Workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) the day after the presentation and will be available to noaa.gov email addresses.Recordings: Recording of the presentation will be available on the EDM Workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) several weeks after the workshop and will be available to noaa.gov email addresses.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

18 August 2020

Title:
New
Real time passive acoustic detection of endangered North Atlantic Right Whales using autonomous underwater technology
Presenter(s): Sofie Van Parijs, Passive Acoustic Research Program Lead, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Resource Assessment and Evaluation Division, Protected Species Branch
Date & Time: 18 August 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
This seminar will be recorded and available after the webinar.

Title:
Real time passive acoustic detection of endangered North Atlantic Right Whales using autonomous underwater technology

Presenter(s):
Sofie Van Parijs, Passive Acoustic Research Program Lead, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Resource Assessment and Evaluation Division, Protected Species Branch

Co-Authors:
- Genevieve Davis, Research Biologist, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center,
Assessment and Evaluation Division, Protected Species Branch

- Mark Baumgartner, Senior Scientist, Biology Dept., Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series. Coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/eubalaenaglacialis/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
Passive acoustic technology has developed at a fast rate over the past 15 years. The exponential growth in the capacity to use this approach to answer ecological and conservation questions, using the sounds produced by marine animals at sea, has radically changed how we can monitor and create mitigation strategies for a wide number of species. In particular, the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale and other baleen whale species are prone to ship strike and are impacted by loud underwater man made sounds from such things as vessel traffic, pile driving, seismic surveys and more. While visual sightings have long been used as the tool of choice for detecting whales, inclement weather, darkness and the fact that whales spend most of their time subsurface, restricts this technique. When combined with passive acoustic technology, which is impervious to weather and darkness, but requires that the animal is vocalising to be detected, these two approaches provide a much better and more accurate representation of a species presence in an area. In this presentation, I will talk about how we use passive acoustics for understanding marine animal presence and focus on the autonomous real time technology that we have developed to report the presence of North Atlantic right whales and other species back to shore in real time. This technology is becoming increasingly valuable for monitoring and mitigation by NMFS. Additionally, it is being increasingly adopted by industries, such as the wind energy industry, to help them improve their compliance during their construction events. Now that this technology is mature it offers many solutions for improving our protection of endangered species as well as other needs such as defining spawning aggregations of soniferous fish.

Bio(s):
Dr. Sofie Van Parijs leads the passive acoustic research program at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole. She has worked from the poles to the Tropics for over 20 years. Currently her focus is on using passive acoustics to understand changes in distribution and occupancy of marine mammals, defining fish spawning aggregations, studying effects of manmade noise and defining underwater soundscapes in protected areas. In order to do this, the team uses a wide range of passive acoustic recording technologies, including autonomous underwater gliders, which together with colleagues at WHOI, have adapted to provide real time information on endangered marine species.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title:
New
Ocean Dashboard: Examples of Affordable Ocean Monitoring Using Small, Satellite Reporting Smart Sensors
Presenter(s): Marco Flagg, Desert Star Systems LLC, CEO
Date & Time: 18 August 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov, and Tiffany House, tiffany.house@noaa.gov

Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6702188984701896976

Presenter(s):
Marco Flagg, Desert Star Systems LLC, CEO

Abstract:
Ocean Dashboard is Desert Star's vision for comprehensive near real-time ocean monitoring using small (generally less than 500g), long-endurance autonomous satellite reporting sensors that can be deployed in large enough numbers to significantly improve sampling density. This presentation provides examples including an Atlantic traversing tag originally monitoring a tiger shark that subsequently ‘discovered' methane seeps; new tags that can detect the time and location of fish spawning; and opportunities for autonomous acoustic monitoring including potentially tracking the ocean migration of endangered cetaceans beyond the reach of static monitors.

Key Takeaways:
1. Small, autonomous satellite reporting smart sensors offer extensive capabilities for physical and biological ocean observations.
2. Small size, ease of deployment and endurance supports high sampling densities that would otherwise be cost prohibitive.
3. The growing use of such sensors, can give us a near real-time window into fish and cetacean migration, human activities and physical processes alike, combining to form an ocean dashboard that improves our understanding.

Bio(s):
Recognizing the vicious cycle of high cost leading to limited availability of ocean sensors, Marco Flagg defined a strategy of modular design that produces efficiencies of scale across an ever-growing portfolio. Marco combines out-of-the-box engineering thought with a passion for ocean exploration that has led him to journeys of the deep ocean gaining a new understanding of the particular environment and the needs of researchers, and translating that knowledge into new products and concepts.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: NOAA’s 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop Day 2 Plenary
Presenter(s): Adrienne Simonson, NOAA/OCIO; RDML Gallaudet, Deputy NOAA Administrator
Date & Time: 18 August 2020
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
NOAA's 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop Day 2 Plenary

Presenter(s):
Adrienne Simonson, RDML Gallaudet and the Science & Technology focus area leads. This presentation will be delivered remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA 2020 Environmental Data Management (EDM) Workshop sponsored by the NOAA Environmental Data Management Committee. Seminar Contact: edmw.planning.team@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3545878128864036110 After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.Accessibility: Video recordings with captions and transcripts of the presentation will be available on the workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) after the presentation.

Abstract:
Please join us for the Tuesday plenary session of NOAA's 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop. Adrienne Simonson, NOAA's Environmental Data Management Committee acting chair will be chairing a session with RDML Gallaudet and the Science and Technology Focus Area leads. Joining RDML Gallaudet, during the panel presentation and discussion will be Charles Alexander (Unmanned Systems Strategy), Dr. Jamese Sims (AI Strategy), Dr. Kelly Goodwin (‘Omics Strategy), David Layton (Cloud Strategy), and Kim Valentine (Data Strategy). Please bring your questions! For more information please visit the workshop website here: https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/

Bio(s):
Adrienne Simonson serves as the acting chair for NOAA's Environmental Data Management Committee, acting director of the NOAA Big Data Program, and Big Data Program business director. RDML Gallaudet serves as NOAA's Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Deputy NOAA Administrator. From 2017-2019 he served as the Acting Undersecretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator. Before these assignments, he served for 32 years in the US Navy, completing his service in 2017 as the Oceanographer of the Navy.

Slides:
Slides will be available on the EDM Workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) the day after the presentation and will be available to noaa.gov email addresses.Recordings: Recording of the presentation will be available on the EDM Workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) several weeks after the workshop and will be available to noaa.gov email addresses.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Grass-Cast: A Tool to Plan for Grass Availability During a Drought
Presenter(s): Brian Fuchs, National Drought Mitigation Center, Dannele Peck, USDA Northern Plains Climate Hub
Date & Time: 18 August 2020
6:00 pm - 6:45 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Brian Fuchs, Monitoring Coordinator with the National Drought Mitigation Center
Dannele Peck, Director of the USDA Northern Plains Climate Hub

Sponsor(s):
USDA Climate Hubs, National Drought Mitigation Center, NOAA, National Ingegrated Drought Information System

Seminar contact: Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov)

Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2559522740520541966

Abstract:

Setting grazing plans and stocking rates can be especially challenging during a drought, such as the one currently afflicting much of the western United States. The Grassland Productivity Forecast tool, or Grass-Cast, can help provide insight into how the grass production through the summer will play out. The Grass-Cast tool covers the Great Plains region and has recently expanded to include Arizona and New Mexico, two states dealing with moderate to extreme drought. Please join us as Brian Fuchs, Monitoring Coordinator with the National Drought Mitigation Center, and Dannele Peck, Director of the USDA Northern Plains Climate Hub, talk about the current drought conditions and what the Grass-Cast forecast tells us about the rest of summer.Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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19 August 2020

Title: NOAA’s 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop Day 3 Plenary
Presenter(s): Amy McGovern, University of Oklahoma; Kandis Boyd, NOAA/OAR/WPO
Date & Time: 19 August 2020
1:15 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
NOAA's 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop Day 3 Plenary

Presenter(s):
Dr. Amy McGovern and Dr. Kandis Boyd. This presentation will be delivered remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA 2020 Environmental Data Management (EDM) Workshop sponsored by the NOAA Environmental Data Management Committee. Seminar Contact: edmw.planning.team@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9092481083412637454 After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.Accessibility: Video recordings with captions and transcripts of the presentation will be available on the workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) after the presentation.

Abstract:
Please join us for the Wednesday plenary session of NOAA's 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop. Dr. Amy McGovern, professor at the University of Oklahoma will be talking about expanding data science and artificial intelligence (AI) for NOAA. AI and data science methods have proven that they can be used for a wide variety of atmospheric and ocean prediction tasks yet there is a lack of training and understanding of how to apply these methods. In this talk, we explore two topics. First, how to train data science and AI researchers for NOAA. Second, how to manage and curate NOAA data such that transformative AI is possible. The session will close with a presentation from Dr. Kandis Boyd, acting director of the OAR Weather Program Office (WPO) about WPO initiatives and how data access and management lead to better research, which supports all of NOAA. For more information please visit the workshop website here: https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/

Bio(s):
Dr. Amy McGovern is a professor in the School of Computer Science at the University of Oklahoma and an adjunct professor in the School of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma. Dr. McGovern is an NSF CAREER award winner and her research focuses on developing novel spatiotemporal data mining method for real-world applications, particularly focusing on severe weather. Dr. Kandis Boyd, PMP, serves as the Deputy Director of the Weather Program Office (WPO), which is part of the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR). Prior to her current position, Kandis worked as a Physical Scientist/Subject Matter Expert in the DOC/Office of the Inspector General, where she managed a NOAA portfolio of satellite and systems acquisition programs. Kandis has a Bachelor's of Science degree in Meteorology from Iowa State University, a double Master's degree in Water Resources and Meteorology from Iowa State University, a Doctorate degree in Public Administration from Nova Southeastern University, and a Masters Certificate in Project Management from George Washington University.

Slides:
Slides will be available on the EDM Workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) the day after the presentation and will be available to noaa.gov email addresses.
Recordings: Recording of the presentation will be available on the EDM Workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) several weeks after the workshop and will be available to noaa.gov email addresses.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title:
New
 Increasing trend of global tropical cyclone-induced SST cooling since 1982 and its implications  
Presenter(s): Da Nguyen, Ph.D. NOAA/AOML- Physical Oceanographic Division
Date & Time: 19 August 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Increasing trend of global tropical cyclone-induced SST cooling since 1982 and itsimplications    

Presenter(s):
Da Nguyen Ph.D/ PhOD

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

Seminar Contact: Gregory Foltz: gregory.foltz@noaa.gov 

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/982208749
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122Access Code: 982-208-749 

Abstract:
Tropical cyclones (TC) provide an important source of mixing for the upper ocean, bringingcold, nutrient-rich water from the subsurface to the surface layer and causing sea surface temperature(SST) cooling. TC-induced mixing also pumps heat downward and warms the subsurface, potentiallycontributing to global warming-induced trends of the upper ocean. In this study, based on satelliteobservations, we show a significant increasing trend of global TC-induced SST cooling of 0.03 deg C perdecade since 1982. The increase has been driven by an increase in the intensity of category 1-5hurricanes and associated enhancement of TC-induced mixing. The corresponding increase in the TC induced ocean heat pump in the tropical Northern Hemisphere is estimated to be about 10% of the totalwarming trend of the upper 200 m. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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20 August 2020

Title: Funding Opportunity: Planning for Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Julien Lartigue, Director, NOAA RESTORE Science Program
Date & Time: 20 August 2020
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Funding Opportunity: Planning for Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico
Webinar 1 of 3 announcing RESTORE Science Program Funding Opportunity. Next two webinars are on Aug. 21 at 1pm ET, and Aug 25 at 4pm ET.

Presenter(s):
Julien Lartigue, Director, NOAA RESTORE Science Program

Sponsor(s):
NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Points of contact: Andrew.Lade@noaa.gov and for webinar questions, Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/restorescience/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, by visiting:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
The NOAA RESTORE Science Program invites you to join a webinar on our current funding opportunity which will support teams of managers, researchers, and other stakeholders to plan a research project that informs a specific management decision impacting natural resources in the Gulf of Mexico. This funding opportunity lays the foundation for the co-production of actionable science in two ways. One way is by focusing on the creation of partnerships between natural resource managers and researchers. The second way is by providing those partnerships with funding to jointly scope and design a research project that informs a future natural resource management decision. NOAA is making approximately $2.5 million available through this competition to fund approximately 20 projects for 12 months each. As these planning projects conclude, the Science Program plans to release a second competition for funding to execute and apply actionable science in the Gulf of Mexico. Each webinar is expected to last approximately 30 minutes, and will begin with a 12-minute overview of the funding competition followed by questions from participants. A recording of the webinar will be placed here on the Science Program's website by September 1. After the competition is publicly released on August 11, an overview of the competition along with frequently asked questions can be found on the Science Program's website.

Bio(s):
Julien Lartigue is the Director of NOAA RESTORE Science Program. Julien uses his experience working at academic institutions across the Gulf States and with federal and state agencies to connect the research and information needs of resource managers to the problem-solving capacity within the research community. As a long-time resident of the Gulf Coast, he is committed to the conservation and wise-management of the region's natural resources and the future of its coastal communities. Julien has a BA in Biology from Swarthmore College and holds a PhD in Marine Sciences from the University of South Alabama.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 4: AI/ML for Post-Processing and Data dissemination, Part 1
Presenter(s): Jacqueline Le Moigne - NASA, Eric Loken - OU CIMMS/OU, Tianle Yuan - NASA GSFC/UMBC JCET
Date & Time: 20 August 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 4: AI/ML for Post-Processing and Data dissemination, Part 1
Chairs: Greg Dusek (NOAA/NOS), Andre van der Westhuysen (IMSG at NWS/NCEP/EMC)

Presenter(s):
Artificial Intelligence for Advanced Earth Science Information Systems - Jacqueline Le Moigne (NASA)Using Random Forests to Create Probabilistic Next-Day Severe Weather Guidance from NWP Ensembles - Eric Loken (OU CIMMS/OU)Modeling Clouds From Sub-grid to Global Scales with Deep Generative Models - Tianle Yuan (NASA GSFC/UMBC JCET)Panel Discussion - Panelists: Science Committee Members

Sponsor(s):

AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php
Seminar Contact: Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1588368100231581711
Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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Title: NOAA’s 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop Day 4 Plenary
Presenter(s): Christopher Lynnes, NASA; Thomas Beach, Department of Commerce
Date & Time: 20 August 2020
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7460837713630281230
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
NOAA's 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop Day 4 Plenary

Presenter(s):
Dr. Christopher Lynnes and Thomas A. Beach. This presentation will be delivered remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA 2020 Environmental Data Management (EDM) Workshop sponsored by the NOAA Environmental Data Management Committee. Seminar Contact: edmw.planning.team@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7460837713630281230 After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.Accessibility: Video recordings with captions and transcripts of the presentation will be available on the workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) after the presentation.

Abstract:
Please join us for the Wednesday plenary session of NOAA's 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop. Dr. Christopher Lynnes will be kicking-off the Thursday plenary where he will share perspectives as the systems architect with NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System. The plenary will continue with Thomas Beach, the interim Chief Data Officer at the Department of Commerce. Mr. Beach provides strategic direction and guidance in the implementation of the Federal Data Strategy and Data Governance in addition to leading the Commerce Data Governance Board. This is an opportunity to gain deeper understanding and insights on the Office of the Chief Data Officer's (OCDO) vision on carrying out the Agency Specific Actions of the Federal Data Strategy and OCDO's perspective on data management with a particular focus to the NOAA mission and the environmental data management community. Also, in response to the tidal wave of data " how can we put data to work? Examples of how to put data to work from experience as the Chief Data Strategist at the United States Patent & Trademark Office will be presented. For more information please visit the workshop website here: https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/

Bio(s):
Dr. Christopher Lynnes is the Systems Architect for NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) where he is responsible for designing and enhancing the systems for providing one of the world's largest collections of Earth observing data.Mr. Beach as the interim Chief Data Officer (CDO) at the Department of Commerce, and chairs the Department's Commerce Data Governance Board and leads implementation of the Federal Data Strategy and represents the Department on the new Federal CDO Council. At the United State Patent & Trademark Office, Thomas served the Chief Data Strategist and founder of the Digital Service & Big Data initiative to unleash and unlock the value of patent and trademark data through data science, machine learning and applied artificial intelligence to ensure that patents and trademarks are of the highest quality. Thomas has served on the team creating the Federal Data Strategy as part of the Cross-Agency Priority (CAP) Goal: Leveraging Data as a Strategic Asset which is part of the President's Management Agenda.

Slides:
Slides will be available on the EDM Workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) the day after the presentation and will be available to noaa.gov email addresses.Recordings: Recording of the presentation will be available on the EDM Workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) several weeks after the workshop and will be available to noaa.gov email addresses.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Stu Foster, Kentucky Climate Center
Date & Time: 20 August 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Stu Forest, Kentucky Climate Center

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7528179497868100876

Abstract:

The focus area for this webinar is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña.

Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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Title: Testing Machine Learning Tool’s (CoralNet) Capacity to Classify Coral Bleaching
Presenter(s): Abigail Schulz, NOAA EPP/MSI Scholar from the University of Texas A&M Corpus Christi
Date & Time: 20 August 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Testing Machine Learning Tool's (CoralNet) Capacity to Classify Coral Bleaching

Presenter(s):

Abigail Schulz, NOAA EPP/MSI Scholar from the University of Texas A&M Corpus Christi

Sponsor(s):

Coral Collaboration Webinar Series - NOAA Coral Reef Conservation ProgramSeminar Contact:
Robin Garcia, robin.garcia@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
AdobeConnect information:
1. To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/
2. Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio.


Abstract:
Coral bleaching is a phenomena in which environmental stressors disturb the symbiotic relationship between corals and zooxanthellae, causing corals to lose their color and turn a stark white. Advancements in artificial intelligence, however, can be used to quantify bleaching events by monitoring the health state of reefs and the level of bleaching present. CoralNet is a collaborative, online image and data repository that enables users to upload and annotate benthic imagery, and has the capacity to utilize machine learning approaches to automate image classification. Here, we used CoralNet to compare the accuracy of two different automated classifiers in annotating imagery, one that identifies bleaching at the species level and one that only distinguishes between non-bleached coral and bleached coral. The classifiers were each trained on the same 5,458 images from the Hawaii coral bleaching events, and then given a set number of images for which their annotations were compared. Results have yet to be drawn from the testing phase between the two robots.


Bio(s):

Abigail Schulz is an undergraduate student at the University of Texas A&M Corpus Christi and a 2020 NOAA Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI) Scholar.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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Title:
New
Testing Machine Learning Tool’s (CoralNet) Capacity to Classify Coral Bleaching
Presenter(s): Abigail Schulz, NOAA EPP/MSI Scholar from the University of Texas A&M Corpus Christi
Date & Time: 20 August 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Testing Machine Learning Tool's (CoralNet) Capacity to Classify Coral Bleaching

Presenter(s):

Abigail Schulz, NOAA EPP/MSI Scholar from the University of Texas A&M Corpus Christi

Sponsor(s):

Coral Collaboration Webinar Series - NOAA Coral Reef Conservation ProgramSeminar Contact:
Robin Garcia, robin.garcia@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
AdobeConnect information:
1. To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/
2. Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio.


Abstract:
Coral bleaching is a phenomena in which environmental stressors disturb the symbiotic relationship between corals and zooxanthellae, causing corals to lose their color and turn a stark white. Advancements in artificial intelligence, however, can be used to quantify bleaching events by monitoring the health state of reefs and the level of bleaching present. CoralNet is a collaborative, online image and data repository that enables users to upload and annotate benthic imagery, and has the capacity to utilize machine learning approaches to automate image classification. Here, we used CoralNet to compare the accuracy of two different automated classifiers in annotating imagery, one that identifies bleaching at the species level and one that only distinguishes between non-bleached coral and bleached coral. The classifiers were each trained on the same 5,458 images from the Hawaii coral bleaching events, and then given a set number of images for which their annotations were compared. Results have yet to be drawn from the testing phase between the two robots.


Bio(s):

Abigail Schulz is an undergraduate student at the University of Texas A&M Corpus Christi and a 2020 NOAA Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI) Scholar.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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Title:
New
Unleashing the Innovator in Every Child
Presenter(s): Christian Wong, Hawaii Science and Technology Museum
Date & Time: 20 August 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Christian Wong, Hawaii Science and Technology Museum

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1404235087112334091

Abstract:
Join Hawaiʻi Science and Technology Museum (HSTM) Executive Director Christian Wong for his talk about community robotics, and mentoring the next generation of science and engineering leaders. In partnership with NOAAʻs Mokupāpapa Discovery Center in Hilo, Christian and HSTM developed the Kenyan K. Beals Community Robotics Center in support of student engineering and robotics projects and are currently preparing to launch a small satellite they helped develop to take measurements of the thermosphere. Christian will also talk about how HSTM is adjusting to providing STEM education during the pandemic, and the role innovation plays in education and developing a sustainable economy for Hawaiʻi Island.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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21 August 2020

Title: Funding Opportunity: Planning for Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Julien Lartigue, Director, NOAA RESTORE Science Program
Date & Time: 21 August 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Vai webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Funding Opportunity: Planning for Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico
Webinar 2 of 3 announcing RESTORE Science Program Funding Opportunity. Last webinars is on August 25 at 4pm ET.

Presenter(s):
Julien Lartigue, Director, NOAA RESTORE Science Program

Sponsor(s):
NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Points of contact: Andrew.Lade@noaa.gov and for webinar questions, Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/restorescience2/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, by visiting:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
The NOAA RESTORE Science Program invites you to join a webinar on our current funding opportunity which will support teams of managers, researchers, and other stakeholders to plan a research project that informs a specific management decision impacting natural resources in the Gulf of Mexico. This funding opportunity lays the foundation for the co-production of actionable science in two ways. One way is by focusing on the creation of partnerships between natural resource managers and researchers. The second way is by providing those partnerships with funding to jointly scope and design a research project that informs a future natural resource management decision. NOAA is making approximately $2.5 million available through this competition to fund approximately 20 projects for 12 months each. As these planning projects conclude, the Science Program plans to release a second competition for funding to execute and apply actionable science in the Gulf of Mexico. Each webinar is expected to last approximately 30 minutes, and will begin with a 12-minute overview of the funding competition followed by questions from participants. A recording of the webinar will be placed here on the Science Program's website by September 1. After the competition is publicly released on August 11, an overview of the competition along with frequently asked questions can be found on the Science Program's website.

Bio(s):
Julien Lartigue is the Director of NOAA RESTORE Science Program. Julien uses his experience working at academic institutions across the Gulf States and with federal and state agencies to connect the research and information needs of resource managers to the problem-solving capacity within the research community. As a long-time resident of the Gulf Coast, he is committed to the conservation and wise-management of the region's natural resources and the future of its coastal communities. Julien has a BA in Biology from Swarthmore College and holds a PhD in Marine Sciences from the University of South Alabama.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title:
New
Corals, shipwrecks, and dolphins, oh my! Diving into Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Hannah MacDonald, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Stephanie Gandulla, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, Lesslee Dort
Date & Time: 21 August 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: REMOTE
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Hannah MacDonald, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: hannah.macdonald@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Join Blue Star Diving operators Key Dives and Fury Watersport Adventures while they swap sea stories of their favorite moments beneath the waves of Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.During this live interaction, you will learn about the wonders that are protected within Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, how you can become an underwater explorer, and what you can do to help protect this special place. Hear from Florida Keys dive experts on their experiences inside the sanctuaries stunning reefs. Join us for this live interaction to learn more!Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6753431723786778895More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Live Interaction Series:
https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/live/watch.html
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7705142600218021390

Recordings:
Yes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwKFsJZmdxpHC9veUEL_gwk8b1BtS_lXP

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: NOAA’s 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop Closing Plenary
Presenter(s): Stephen Volz, NESDIS/AA; Robert Sears, OCIO/SDD/N-Wave; Dave Mauro, OCIO/SDD/N-Wave; David Fischman, NESDIS/NCEI
Date & Time: 21 August 2020
2:00 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3953347242513235214, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
NOAA's 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop Closing Plenary

Presenter(s):
Dr. Stephen Volz, Roberts Sears, Dave Mauro and David Fishcman. This presentation will be delivered remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA 2020 Environmental Data Management (EDM) Workshop sponsored by the NOAA Environmental Data Management Committee. Seminar Contact: edmw.planning.team@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3953347242513235214 After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.Accessibility: Video recordings with captions and transcripts of the presentation will be available on the workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) after the presentation.

Abstract:
The keynote speaker for the closing plenary of the 2020 NOAA Environmental Data Workshop will be Dr. Stephen Volz, NOAA's Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services. The closing plenary will continue with Rob Sears and Dave Mauro will talk about NOAA's enterprise network N-Wave. N-Wave is built on partnerships and relationships among NOAA and the Academic and State research network communities, connecting researchers to the data and resources needed to advance environmental science. David Fischman will close the session with a presentation titled “NOAA's 3rd Wave”. Fischman will talk about how NOAA can build a new way to connect all the data and metadata via APIs for machine to machine access which will lead to amazing findings. For more information please visit the workshop website here: https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/

Bio(s):
Dr. Stephen Volz serves as the NOAA's Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services. He is a leader in the international Earth observation community, serving as the NOAA Principal to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). In this capacity he leads efforts to coordinate global satellite based observations among international space agency partners to further the development of a Global Earth Observation System of Systems.Robert Sears is the director of N-Wave, NOAA's Enterprise Network program. N-Wave operates within the NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer to align and execute on NOAA's strategic plan for network transport and optimization. Dave Mauro is an N-Wave solutions architect focused on customer engagement and planning. Dave Fischman started his NOAA career as a survey technician, he then transitioned to NOAA Corps and served as the Operations Officer on the NOAA Ship Ka'imimoana. Dave now works for NESDIS/NCEI in Boulder, Colorado.

Slides:
Slides will be available on the EDM Workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) the day after the presentation and will be available to noaa.gov email addresses.Recordings: Recording of the presentation will be available on the EDM Workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) several weeks after the workshop and will be available to noaa.gov email addresses.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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Title: August 2020 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP
Date & Time: 21 August 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access:
http://accap.adobeconnect.com/nws_august2020/event/registration.html

Abstract:

The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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24 August 2020

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Nicolas Bond, Office of the Washington State Climatologist, Jeremy Wolf, NWS Spokane, Joseph Vaughn, Western Washington University, Dave Peterson, University of Washington
Date & Time: 24 August 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Climate Recap & Current Conditions: Nicholas Bond, Office of the Washington State Climatologist

Seasonal Conditions/Climate Outlook: Jeremy Wolf, NWS Spokane

AIRPACT: Air-Quality Forecasting for the Pacific Northwest: Joseph Vaughn, Washington State University

Changing wildfire, changing forests: the effects of climate change on fire regimes and vegetation in the Pacific Northwest: Dave Peterson | University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System, Climate Impacts Research Consortium, USDA Northwest Climate Hub, National Weather Service

Seminar Contact: Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7418695626972018445

Abstract:

According to the July 28, 2020 U.S. Drought Monitor, 35.9% of the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) is in drought, including areas of Extreme Drought (D3) in Oregon. Will the drought continue into fall? Find out the latest on conditions, climate outlook, effects of climate change on fire regimes and vegetation in the Pacific Northwest on the August 24 Webinar.

These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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25 August 2020

Title: Fish Predation on a Landscape Scale
Presenter(s): Cyril J. Michel, University of California, Santa Cruz/NOAA-NMFS; Mark J. Henderson - USGS/Humboldt State University; Christopher M. Loomis - Humboldt State University; Joseph M. Smith, NOAA-NMFS-NWFSC, Seattle; Nicholas J. Demetras, NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz; Ilysa S. Iglesias, NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz; Brendan M. Lehman, NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz, and David D. Huff, NOAA-NMFS NWFSC, Newport
Date & Time: 25 August 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Fish Predation on a Landscape Scale

Presenter(s):
Cyril J. Michel, University of California - Santa Cruz / NOAA-NMFS
Co-Authors:
Mark J. Henderson - USGS / Humboldt State University, Arcata
Christopher M. Loomis - Humboldt State University, Arcata
Joseph M. Smith - NOAA-NMFS-NWFSC, Seattle
Nicholas J. Demetras - NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz
Ilysa S. Iglesias - NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz
Brendan M. Lehman - NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz
David D. Huff - NOAA-NMFS NWFSC, Newport

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov. After the webinar, we will likely email the recording and PDF of slides to registrants if/when available.

Remote Access:
Please register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/fishpredation/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

Abstract:
California's Central Valley salmon populations are in decline, and it is believed that one of the major contributors to these declines is low survival during residence in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The mechanism of their mortality is unclear, but it is believed that a significant contributor is predation by the large populations of predators present there. However, it is currently not clear what proportion of juvenile salmonid mortality can be directly attributed to fish predation, largely because empirical data on predation has only been collected at limited spatial scales. In 2017, we quantified predation mortality rates, predator abundance, and relevant environmental covariates in 21 randomly selected study sites in the Delta, using a randomized selection protocol. Predation mortality rates were quantified using Predation Event Recorders (standardized predation monitoring devices), and predator densities were quantified using Dual-Identification Sonar cameras. This site selection protocol allowed for the inference of relationships between the environment and predation across a broader spatial scale than previous studies. Using these statistical relationships, we then developed the capability to produce high-resolution spatially and temporally-explicit predation risk estimates. We then put these predation risk estimates in the context of their impacts on migrating juvenile salmon, allowing us to assess the potential success of different potential survival-enhancing management actions.

Bio(s):
Cyril has spent his career to date passionately devoted to restoring salmon stocks in California's Central Valley. This work has led him through a natural progression, starting with his Master's Thesis work on investigating the outmigration survival dynamics of juvenile late-fall Chinook salmon, to present day, which consists of being the team leader for the salmon acoustic telemetry and salmon predation programs at University of California Santa Cruz, in affiliation with the National Marine Fisheries Service Southwest Fisheries Science Center. These two programs are both currently maturing and moving from the monitoring phase, in other words, assessing the spatial and temporal dynamics as well as environmental drivers of juvenile salmon survival and predation risk, to the experimental phase, with different studies testing ways to manipulate juvenile salmon survival and predation risk on a landscape scale. When Cyril isn't working tirelessly to restore salmon populations, he's secretly out (trying to) catch them on his boat and keep them for dinner.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar
Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District
Date & Time: 25 August 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

Seminar Contact: Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/3343275517350002704

Abstract:

The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar is part of a monthly (twice a month during drought status) webinar series designed to provide stakeholders, water-resource managers, and other interested parties in the ACF region with timely information on current drought status, seasonal forecasts and outlooks, streamflow​ conditions and forecasts, groundwater conditions, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir conditions.

Recordings:
Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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Title: Funding Opportunity: Planning for Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Julien Lartigue, Director, NOAA RESTORE Science Program
Date & Time: 25 August 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Funding Opportunity: Planning for Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico
Webinar 3 of 3 announcing RESTORE Science Program Funding Opportunity.

Presenter(s):
Julien Lartigue, Director, NOAA RESTORE Science Program

Sponsor(s):
NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Points of contact: Andrew.Lade@noaa.gov and for webinar questions, Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/restorescience3/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, by visiting:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
The NOAA RESTORE Science Program invites you to join a webinar on our current funding opportunity which will support teams of managers, researchers, and other stakeholders to plan a research project that informs a specific management decision impacting natural resources in the Gulf of Mexico. This funding opportunity lays the foundation for the co-production of actionable science in two ways. One way is by focusing on the creation of partnerships between natural resource managers and researchers. The second way is by providing those partnerships with funding to jointly scope and design a research project that informs a future natural resource management decision. NOAA is making approximately $2.5 million available through this competition to fund approximately 20 projects for 12 months each. As these planning projects conclude, the Science Program plans to release a second competition for funding to execute and apply actionable science in the Gulf of Mexico. Each webinar is expected to last approximately 30 minutes, and will begin with a 12-minute overview of the funding competition followed by questions from participants. A recording of the webinar will be placed here on the Science Program's website by September 1. After the competition is publicly released on August 11, an overview of the competition along with frequently asked questions can be found on the Science Program's website.

Bio(s):
Julien Lartigue is the Director of NOAA RESTORE Science Program. Julien uses his experience working at academic institutions across the Gulf States and with federal and state agencies to connect the research and information needs of resource managers to the problem-solving capacity within the research community. As a long-time resident of the Gulf Coast, he is committed to the conservation and wise-management of the region's natural resources and the future of its coastal communities. Julien has a BA in Biology from Swarthmore College and holds a PhD in Marine Sciences from the University of South Alabama.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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26 August 2020

Title:
New
A Voyage Across an Ancient Ocean: A Bicycle Journey Through the Northern Dominion of Oil
Presenter(s): David Goodrich, NOAA Retired
Date & Time: 26 August 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9132281205921950220

Presenter(s):
David Goodrich, author, NOAA (Retired)

Abstract:
As a climate scientist and former NOAA Corps officer, I embarked on a different kind of voyage in the summer of 2018, looking to go to places where climate change comes from, that is, where carbon is coming from the ground. I started in the oil sands of Alberta and rode 1100 miles solo through the boreal forest and prairie to the Bakken oil field of North Dakota. The ancient ocean of the title is the inland sea that laid down both oil deposits. The ride ended at Theodore Roosevelt National Park, where our original conservationist president spent his days as a cowboy. A volume with the above title was released this month from Pegasus Books.

Bio(s):
David Goodrich worked at NOAA's Climate Program Office in Silver Spring, retiring as director of Climate Observations. He also served as the Director of the UN Global Climate Observing System in Geneva, Switzerland. In addition to the bicycle trip from Alberta to North Dakota, he has ridden from Delaware to Oregon, down the Appalachians and across Montana, South Dakota, France and Spain. His earlier book was A Hole in the Wind: A Climate Scientist's Bicycle Journey Across the United States. He lives in Maryland.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: Benthic habitat mapping to meet the needs of the National Park Service: An example from Fire Island National Seashore Post-Hurricane Sandy
Presenter(s): Monique LaFrance Bartley, Marine Ecologist, National Park Service; Ocean and Coastal Resources Branch, Fort Collins, CO
Date & Time: 26 August 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Benthic habitat mapping to meet the needs of the National Park Service: An example from Fire Island National Seashore Post-Hurricane Sandy
Webinar No. 3 in NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Monique LaFrance Bartley, Marine Ecologist, National Park Service; Ocean and Coastal Resources Branch, Fort Collins, CO

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's IOCM Webinar Series and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series Webinar Coordinators/contacts are Amber.Butler@noaa.gov and Tracy.GIll@noaa.go

Remote Access:
Register at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/lafrance/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, by visiting: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer,so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
Hurricane Sandy made landfall along the Atlantic coast in October 2012, creating a new tidal inlet at Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS) in New York. The event provided a unique research opportunity and numerous efforts were undertaken to understand the ecological and management implications of the new inlet. One such effort was benthic habitat mapping along the bay side of FIIS within Great South Bay. This presentation will discuss the acoustic and ground-truthing data acquisition and analysis used to develop benthic habitat maps that depict statistically significant relationships between macrofaunal communities and their associated environment; how the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) played a key role in developing and assessing the habitat map units; and the influence of the new inlet on benthic habitats. This study provides further understanding of biotic-abiotic relationships within FIIS and serves as a comprehensive baseline dataset, since previous data are limited. More broadly, the study demonstrates the value of benthic habitat mapping and CMECS for guiding science-based management strategies and provides an example of mapping in extremely shallow waters (<3m) in turbid environments where optical methods are not possible.The presentation will also introduce a new NPS effort to develop maps for all 88 coastal and Great Lakes parks (e.g. topobathymetry, geomorphic features, benthic habitats). The initial phase of the project involves compiling and assessing existing data within parks (e.g. LiDAR, multibeam, backscatter, sidescan, aerial imagery, ground-truthing) to identify data gaps. In addition, we would like to coordinate and collaborate with other federal agencies to acquire data where needed, as well as contribute to national mapping efforts.

Bio(s):
Monique recently joined the National Park Service as a Marine Ecologist within the Ocean and Coastal Resources Branch. Her primarily role is managing benthic mapping and sediment and shoreline management projects that serve all 88 coastal and Great Lakes parks. In addition, she provides technical expertise at the request of parks, and is responsible for implementing and managing interagency collaborations. Prior to joining NPS, Monique spent twelve years at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography, where she was a Marine Research Specialist and earned her MS and PhD in Oceanography. Her research focused on shallow water benthic habitat mapping and its real-world value to resource management, application of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS), and GIS. Her work also involved interpreting and presenting scientific information to managers, regulators, and non-scientific audiences.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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27 August 2020

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: Hurricane Season Outlook 2
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center and Gerry Bell, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 27 August 2020
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: via GoToWebinar (registration required),
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Hurricane Season Outlook 2

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and
Gerry Bell, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center.


Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:

Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:

The webinar will feature a recap of August conditions and a discussion on the analytical indicators and an outlook for the North Atlantic Hurricane Season.

Bio(s):
TBD

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 5: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 1
Presenter(s): Alan Geer - ECMWF, Elizabeth Barnes - CSU, Matthew Dawkins - Kitware Inc., Likun Wang - RTi at NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 27 August 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 5: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 1
Chairs: Imme Ebert-Uphoff (CIRA), Ryan Lagerquist (NCAR)

Presenter(s):
Combining data assimilation and machine learning for weather forecasting - Alan Geer (ECMWF)Viewing Climate Signals through an AI Lens - Elizabeth Barnes (CSU)Video and Image Analytics for Marine Environments (VIAME), a Do-it-yourself AI Toolkit - Matthew Dawkins (Kitware Inc)Generating High Temporal and Spatial Microwave Hurricane Image Products Using Artificial intelligence and Machine Learning Technique - Likun Wang (RTi at NESDIS/STAR)Panel Discussion - Panelists: Science Committee Members

Sponsor(s):

AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php
Seminar Contact: Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/322372819824278543
Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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Title: New Mexico Weather Outlook Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Dave DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist
Date & Time: 27 August 2020
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers
Dave DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist

Sponsor(s):
NOAA, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USDA Southwest Climate Hub, New Mexico Climate Center, Quivira Coalition, Santa Ana Natural Resources

Seminar Contact: Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov)

Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7590421755382798093

Abstract:

These monthly webinar presentations will provide information on current and upcoming weather and climate conditions in New Mexico, with a highlight on conditions on Tribal lands. Agricultural producers and land managers are encouraged to attend. The webinars will take place on the 4th Thursday of the next 4 months (June 25, July 23, August 27, September 24).

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

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Title: Delayed Release of the Modernized National Spatial Reference System (NSRS)
Presenter(s): Dr. Dru Smith, NSRS Modernization Manager, NOAA's Office of National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 27 August 2020
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Delayed Release of the Modernized National Spatial Reference System (NSRS)

Presenter(s):
Dr. Dru Smith, NSRS Modernization Manager, NOAA's Office of National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. Point of contact is Steve Vogel.Registration link: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2512684640527236875

Abstract:
NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) is announcing a delay in the release of the modernized National Spatial Reference System (NSRS). NGS is currently conducting a comprehensive analysis of ongoing projects, programs, and resources required to complete NSRS modernization and will continue to provide regular updates on our progress.

Bio(s):
Dru Smith is currently NOAA's National Spatial Reference System modernization manager, and was previously the NOAA/NGS Chief Geodesist.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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1 September 2020

Title:
New
Building a shared context for science: Cross-group engagement at the science-policy interface
Presenter(s): Lindsey C. Williams, PhD, University of New Hampshire, Independent Consultant
Date & Time: 1 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Building a shared context for science: Cross-group engagement at the science-policy interface

Presenter(s):
Lindsey C. Williams, PhD, University of New Hampshire, Independent Consultant

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Coordinator is Tracy Gill.

Remote Access:
Register at
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/engagement/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
It is widely accepted that public policy decisions that account for scientific and technical advice are likely to improve outcomes for all. Even with more data and information available than ever before, it has become increasingly difficult to agree on baseline facts and develop mutually beneficial paths ahead. Drawing lessons from dispute resolution and negotiation theory along with the literature on public engagement and collaborative processes, this seminar uses research findings from two case studies (groundfish management and estuarine water quality management) to illustrate opportunities ahead. Based on participant observation and analysis of semi-structured interviews with researchers, managers, and the regulated community within each case, we consider the role of credibility, legitimacy,and salience in the use of science as well as the impact of engagement and collaboration opportunities. The findings from this research and other experiences shows that when done well, engagement activities can help to develop relationships, open lines of communication, expand individual and collective understanding of the issues at hand (not driven by just one group view), and create space for creative solutions. While decisions will ultimately still need to be made, processes that enable a more complete picture and an expansion of the ideas at the table are more likely to account for science and technical information and will ultimately be more resilient and adaptive in the face of change. These approaches can be hampered by several factors including poor process design, power imbalances, lack of resources, limited familiarity with negotiation, and lack of exposure to other perspectives or ways of thinking.Efforts to think differently about systems approaches, changes to research processes, new perspectives on stakeholder engagement, and multi partner collaborative efforts might help make the jump towards progress in social-ecological systems.

Bio(s):
Lindsey Williams is a social scientist and policy specialist with over 17 years of experience in research, teaching, and practice on ocean and coastal management issues, including 10 years in federal government service in several budget, policy, and communications roles. Her current work focuses on the science-policy interface, negotiation and consensus building, and collaborative processes particularly as they relate to coastal and environmental matters. She holds a PhD in Natural Resources and Environmental Studies from the University of New Hampshire, a Master of Marine Policy from the University of Delaware, and Bachelor of Arts in Biology from Colby College. Lindsey works as an independent consultant,advisor, and lecturer and is currently teaching several courses at the University of New Hampshire, serving on the Scientific and Statistical Committee for the New England Fishery Management Council, and is in her second term as an At-Large member of City Council in Dover, NH.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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2 September 2020

Title: Comparing losses of tidal forests and tidal marsh on the Oregon coast: A paradigm shift for estuary restoration and conservation
Presenter(s): Laura Brophy, Director,Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, OR
Date & Time: 2 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesRescheduled from 8/11/20:

Title:
Comparing losses of tidal forests and tidal marsh on the Oregon coast: A paradigm shift for estuary restoration and conservation

Presenter(s):
Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, OR

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at:https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/paradigmshift/event/registration.html After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
This groundbreaking study showed that prior to European settlement, over half of Oregon coast's tidal wetlands were forested "tidal swamps," but 95% of these tidal forests have been lost to diking, logging, development, and conversion to agricultural land uses. Today's remnants of these tidal forests contain deep, structurally-complex tidal channels that shelter young salmon on their way to the sea, providing rich food resources and protection from predators and high river flows. These tidal swamps, typically dominated by salt-tolerant Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), also store more carbon per hectare than almost any other ecosystem on earth. The near-eradication of these tidal forests has greatly impacted their provision of these and other valued wetland functions. Our study used accurate elevation-based estuary mapping methods to document the historical extent, current extent, and losses of these tidal forests on the Oregon coast, compared to emergent tidal marsh and tidal scrub-shrub wetlands. We found that historically, forested and scrub-shrub tidal wetlands (collectively called "tidal swamp") formed a majority (57.8%) of the coast's tidal wetland area, with forested wetlands strongly predominating (54.4%). Emergent tidal wetlands ("tidal marsh") occupied a smaller area (42.2%). Together, diking and vegetation conversion resulted in the loss of 95% of historical tidal forested wetlands and 96% of historical scrub-shrub tidal wetlands, compared to 59% of historical tidal marsh. One factor offset some of the losses of historical tidal marsh: the substantial gain (1770 ha) of new tidal marsh in former mudflats due to sediment accretion and low relative sea level rise (SLR). We did not find evidence of widespread erosion or drowning of tidal wetlands on the Oregon coast, suggesting that Oregon's tidal wetlands may be more resilient to SLR than some other coastal regions of the United States. The study represents a major step forward in understanding the history of the Oregon coast, and highlights the importance of protecting remaining tidal forested wetlands and restoring these habitats where appropriate. The presentation and project report include information on approaches and methods for tidal swamp restoration, and emphasize the need for further field monitoring and research to support these efforts.

Bio(s):
Laura Brophy is the Director of the Estuary Technical Group at the Institute for Applied Ecology in Corvallis,Oregon. For over 20 years, she has provided leadership in science-based decision support for estuary restoration and conservation in the Pacific Northwest andU.S. West Coast. Through her field research and her participation in collaborative groups that share the common goal of improving estuary restoration science and application, she has been central to the recent renaissance of estuary restoration planning in the West. In these collaborations, she has led the development of several heavily-used spatial mapping tools for estuary management and climate change adaptation planning.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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Title: The Future of Drought in Texas: What Do Researchers and Stakeholders Need to Know?
Presenter(s): John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas State Climatologist
Date & Time: 2 September 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas State Climatologist

Sponsor(s):
Texas State Climate Office, NOAA, NIDIS

Seminar contact: Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov)

Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2194997252451413262

Abstract:

Long‐range water planning is complicated by factors that are rapidly changing in the 21st century, including climate, population, and water use. Climate projections indicate the latter half of the 21st century may be even drier in some parts of the United States than even the most arid centuries of the last 1,000 years that included megadroughts.

In this webinar, Texas State Climatologist Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon will discuss these drought projections and related climate factors for Texas, and some barriers to the use of these projections by Texas agricultural producers, large surface water suppliers, small groundwater management districts, and regional water planning districts.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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3 September 2020

Title: Expanding Alabama’s Real-time Coastal Observing System for coastal management applications
Presenter(s): Brian Dzwonkowski, Associate Professor, University of South Alabama
Date & Time: 3 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Expanding Alabama's Real-time Coastal Observing System for coastal management applications
Seminar 8 of 13 in NOAA's RESTORE Science Program Seminar Series:
Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico


Presenter(s):
BrianDzwonkowski,Associate Professor, University of South Alabama

Sponsor(s):
NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Points of contact are Andrew.Lade@noaa.gov and Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov .

Remote Access:
Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/dzwonkowski/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
One of the many challenges in the management of coastal regions is their ever-changing environmental conditions. Being at the interface of terrestrial and marine regions, coastal and estuarine systems can experience dramatic variability in their physical and biogeochemical properties which have significant ramifications for water quality and the associated ecosystem. In order to support various Alabama stakeholders in their use and management of the coastal zone, Dauphin Island Sea Lab (DISL) developed a network of monitoring stations (Alabama's Real-time Coastal Observing System, ARCOS) beginning in 2003 that provide continuous real-time hydrographic and meteorological observations across coastal Alabama. To improve the quality of data as well as broaden the user community, DISL has been in the process of upgrading and expanding the network capacity. In 2017, supported by NOAA RESTORE program, DISL has been modernizing the station infrastructure and data delivery platform as well as expanding the measurement parameters and spatial extent of the network. This work has also involved actively engaging with our existing users as well as developing additional uses of the network to attract new users and interest groups that could benefit from this decision support tool. In particular, we will highlight a new understanding of regional hypoxia as well as guidance on the intensification potential for approaching hurricanes that has been provided by this network. This effort demonstrates the benefits that long-term monitoring of coastal and estuarine environments can provide to decision-making in coastal regions.

Bio(s):
Brian Dzwonkowski is an Associate Professor in the Department of Marine Sciences at the University of South Alabama where he has been a faculty member since 2014. His research interests lie in coastal physical oceanography (i.e. things related to the structure and flow of water such as currents, tides, stratification) as well as how physical processes impact biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem function. He spends much of his time trying to understand the dynamics of Mobile Bay and the Mississippi Bight and how physical insights can inform our understanding and management of this region.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: Using Film to Drive Social Change
Presenter(s): Tirrea Billings
Date & Time: 3 September 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tirrea Billings

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2160293366302456334

Abstract:
Five high school students undertook the adventure of a lifetime during Project Shiphunt: hunt for a shipwreck, investigate its identity, and document it in 3D for future generations. Accompanied by a team of scientists and historians from the NOAA, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and other partners, the students conducted a full-fledged research mission, as they searched the deep waters of northeastern Lake Huron. Join Tirrea Billings to learn more about this experience and how it helped shape her love for film and storytelling, her journey as an entrepreneur, and how she uses her gifts as an activist in digital spaces.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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8 September 2020

Title: Empowered to Lead: Inspiring the Next Generation of Leaders
Presenter(s): Albert 'Benjie' Spencer, Chief Engineer, Director, Engineering Standards, NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 8 September 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ Silver Spring, MD, SSMC4, Room 1W611 or via webinar - see below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Empowered to Lead - Inspiring the Next Generation of Leaders

Presenter(s):
Albert (Benjie) Spencer, Chief Engineer, Director, Engineering Standards, NOAA's National Weather Service

Sponsor(s):
2020 NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series: To provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council. See seminars here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

Seminar POCs for questions: For questions about the seminars: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov, Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/spencer/event/registration.html

After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address. Seminars are available to the Public via webinar, and NOAA staff can attend in person or via webinar. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
NOAA's mission is vital and empowering our future leaders is paramount, especially in these uncertain times. How do we embrace and prepare ourselves as a virtual leader? What are the questions that we need to ask as we evolve into a new normalcy in the midst of a pandemic? How do I ensure fairness and equality? How do I empower myself to be a leader and ensure NOAA's mission?

Bio(s):
Mr. Albert (Benjie) Spencer serves as the Chief Engineer, and Director of Engineering Standards Division, for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Weather Service within the Office of Planning and Programming for Service Delivery. Mr. Spencer is responsible for implementing policy, providing end-to-end system engineering oversight, assessing risks, and ensuring consistent engineering processes and standards are applied throughout the organization. Mr. Spencer has over 40 years of civil service with NOAA, with over 25 years of systems engineering and major acquisition experience, having served in various engineering positions for some of NOAA's major acquisitions of the NEXRAD (Next Generation Weather RADAR), NOAA Aircraft Acquisition for a Gulfstream G4 business class aircraft modified for meteorological and atmospheric measurements, AWIPS (Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System) and NPOESS (National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System), which are critical to providing timely climate and weather information to the public. Mr. Spencer was highlighted in the Spring 2015 issue of the magazine, Minority Engineer, sharing his story in helping NWS to build a Weather-Ready Nation, and the challenges to get minorities interested in science and engineering careers at NOAA. Mr. Spencer is also the recipient of the 2017 Black Engineer of the Year Award (BEYA) for Career Achievement in the Federal Government. Mr. Spencer served on the Reimbursable Projects Program Standing Review Board (SRB) and currently serves on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) SRB. He also serves on the Executive Advisory Board (EAB) for the Systems Engineering Research Center (SERC) and the External Advisory Board of the NOAA Cooperative Science Center for Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology (NCAS-M).Mr. Spencer obtained his Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering degree from Howard University in Washington, D.C. and received his Graduate Certificate in Systems Engineering and Architecting from Stevens Institute of Technology. Mr. Spencer is the recipient of The U.S. Department of Commerce Gold and Silver Medals, the highest two honor awards that can be granted by the Secretary of Commerce, and two Bronze Medal awards, NOAA's highest honor award. Mr. Spencer is a member of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE), American Meteorological Society (AMS) and the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). Mr. Spencer is also a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Mr. Spencer has been married for 36 years to his wife Margo, and he is a native of Washington, D.C., raised in Portsmouth, Va. Recordings: When available these will be posted here:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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22 September 2020

Title:
New
The Sediment-bound Contaminant Resilience and Response (SCoRR) Strategy – A framework for evaluating potential environmental contaminant exposures
Presenter(s): Daniel Jones, Geographer, US Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah
Date & Time: 22 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
The Sediment-bound Contaminant Resilience and Response (SCoRR) Strategy -
A framework for evaluating potential environmental contaminant exposures

Presenter(s):
Daniel Jones, Geographer, US Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah
Co-author: Timothy Reilly, USGS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; coordinators for this seminar include Mark.Osler@noaa.gov, Pamela.Braff@noaa.gov, and Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

Register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/scorr/event/registration.html.
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
In response to Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed the Sediment-bound Contaminant Resiliency and Response (SCoRR) strategy to define baseline and post-event sediment-bound environmental health (EH) stressors (https://toxics.usgs.gov/scorr). The strategy includes a tiered decision-support tool, field survey methods, and geospatial screening tools for rapid and systematic local to regional-scale assessments of potential contaminant exposures. Foundational data used in the strategy include potential contaminant sources to ecological and human health, stakeholder submitted assets (key habitats, study locations, etc.), and historic storm vulnerabilities. The strategy was designed to accommodate variable data types and quality and is easily adaptable. While initially developed to evaluate vulnerabilities associated with coastal storms and flooding, the strategy has since been applied to inland areas, varied sample media, and other disaster scenarios. Of note has been a recent application to oil and gas-related hazards in the Northeast Region, which included an extensive multi-state stakeholder data compilation effort.Assembled data provides extensive accounting of stakeholder assets (e.g., key habitat, study locations, recreation) and their associated vulnerabilities to potential contamination from oil and gas-related activities. Ongoing work will expand upon previous data compilation efforts to other geographies, disaster scenarios, and focused contaminant hazards, and will continue to develop EH vulnerability metrics for each new data compilation. Key to these efforts is the identification of new federal, state, and local stakeholder priorities nationwide to apply the strategy to, ultimately leading to nationally consistent datasets and EH vulnerability metrics.

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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7 October 2020

Title: Ecosystem Modeling for Fisheries Management in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): David Chagaris, Professor, IFAS Nature Coast Biological Station, University of Florida and Dr. Igal Berenshtein, Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 7 October 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Ecosystem Modeling for Fisheries Management in the Gulf of Mexico
Part of NOAA's RESTORE Science Program Seminar Series: Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico

Presenter(s):
Dr. David Chagaris, Assistant Professor, IFAS Nature Coast Biological Station, University of Florida, and Dr. Igal Berenshtein, Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami

Sponsor(s):
NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Points of contact are Andrew.Lade@noaa.govand for webinar questions, Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ecosystemmodeling/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm . Audio is over the computer,so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
The overall goal of this project is to integrate information on ecosystem stressors and predator-prey interactions into the assessment and management of fisheries in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). Two existing trophic-dynamic ecosystem models for the GoM were updated and expanded. The first is an ecosystem model of the West Florida Shelf (WFS), that focuses on reef fish species and red tides. The second model is a Gulf-wide (U.S. territorial waters) ecosystem model that focuses on federally managed species, the role of forage fish, and effects of bycatch. Both models utilize the Ecopath with Ecosim and Ecospace (EwE) modeling software package. In the WFS EwE model, a new feature was added to enable estimation of red tide mortality over space and time, while accounting for potential bloom avoidance and effects of food web impacts on recovery times. An important output from this model is a time series of red tide mortality that can be incorporated into reef fish stock assessments and can also inform projection scenarios used by managers to set annual catch limits. The Gulf-wide EwE model focuses on Gulf menhaden and generates time series of predation mortality for stock assessment and presents managers with the tradeoff between menhaden harvest and predator populations. Primary end users of these tools include stock assessment scientists, scientific advisory committees, and state and federal fisheries managers. Input from end users was obtained during an initial scoping workshop and we remained engaged with our end users by providing updates opportunistically during routine meetings. In the case of Gulf menhaden, our end user engagement efforts highlighted constraints and limitations in their management structure, impeding immediate uptake of the ecosystem information. Over the next year, we will finalize ecosystem model outputs to upcoming stock assessments and management actions for gag grouper, scamp, gray snapper, and Gulf menhaden as well as the recently initiated Gulf Fishery Ecosystem Plan.

Bio(s):
Dr. David Chagaris is a research assistant professor at the IFAS Nature Coast Biological Station, University of Florida. Dr. Chagaris is a quantitative fisheries scientist that analyzes datasets and develops population dynamic and ecosystem models that incorporate environmental drivers, food web dynamics, and habitat interactions in order to understand how fisheries resources and marine ecosystems respond to fishing and environmental change. Those models are then used to improve population assessments, screen policy options for unintended consequences, evaluate ecosystem effects of natural and anthropogenic perturbations, and develop new management reference points that account for ecosystem interactions and the uncertainty therein. Dr. Chagaris is also currently a member of the Gulf Council SSC, the Gulf Council Ecosystem Technical Committee, and the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Ecological Reference Points workgroup.Dr. Igal Berenshtein is a postdoctoral research associate at the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami, and the NOAA Fisheries Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Dr. Berenshtein is a quantitative marine ecologist working on the broad aspects of ecological and environmental questions by integrating analytical approaches, such as biophysical modeling, behavioral experiments, empirical studies and ecosystem modeling. Igal has completed his first Postdoc at the university of Miami working on Marine pollution and larval dispersal, and he is now in his second post-doc position at the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, working on ecosystem modeling in the Gulf of Mexico.

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8 October 2020

Title: Delayed Release of the Modernized NSRS
Presenter(s): Dr. Dru Smith, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 8 October 2020
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Delayed Release of the Modernized NSRS

Presenter(s):
Dr. Dru Smith, National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. POC: Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2512684640527236875

Abstract:

NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) is announcing a delay in the release of the modernized National Spatial Reference System (NSRS). NGS is currently conducting a comprehensive analysis of ongoing projects, programs, and resources required to complete NSRS modernization and will continue to provide regular updates on our progress.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge is helpful.

Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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22 October 2020

Title: Giant Seabass: Kings of the Kelp Forest
Presenter(s): Dr. Ryan Freedman, Research Ecologist, NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 22 October 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Ryan Freedman, Research Ecologist, NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7239334497593642766

Abstract:
Giant Seabass are a species of large fish that live in the cool waters off the coast of California. This fish is the top predator of the kelp forest ecosystem, but the population has been low because of overfishing. Thanks to government protections in California, Giant Seabass are beginning to return to Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and NOAA is working with other groups to study them. The fish is unique because scientists believe it uses sounds to communicate. NOAA is working to record these sounds in the wild and study how these fish move around Santa Barbara Island, a small offshore island in the sanctuary.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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