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Past Seminars

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

19 February 2020

Title: Exploring Instrument Hosting Potentials from Emerging Internet Platforms
Presenter(s): Likun Wang, Riverside Technology, inc
Date & Time: 19 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars
This seminar was previously scheduled on January 29, 2020.
Presenter:
Likun Wang, Riverside Technology, inc
Co-Authors: LingLiu, Katherine Lukens, Kayo Ide, Kevin Garrett, Sid Boukabara
Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series
Remote access:
WebEx:
Event Number:     904 040 583   
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=mfb1864553ba631a7369c610e5bbd40c0
Audio:
       
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 904 040 583

Slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2020/20200219_Wang.pdf
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2020/20200219_Wang.pptx

Abstract:

The NOAA global observing system (GOS) contains a large variety of observing platforms, including geostationary and polar-orbiting satellites, radiosonde,aircraft, surface stations, ships, buoys, etc. Despite the comprehensiveness of the observing system, many critical gaps exist in spatial/temporal coverage,spectral coverage, and resolution. To address these gaps, the NOAA/NESDIS Technology Maturation Program funded one of projects to explore use of emerging internet platforms (such as Loon high altitude balloons and SpaceX StarLink Satellites) for hosting remote sensing instruments. This talk summarizes feasibility assessment on potentials payload hosting opportunities that can benefit NOAA GOS system, which mainly focuses on Loon platforms and also extends to recent SpaceX StarLink constellations.  

First, the Loon platform characteristics and flight dynamics are comprehensively surveyed to explore the capability and limitation for Loon as a hosting platform.  Second, by comparing GOES-16 Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) with collocated Loon infrared thermometer measurements,we demonstrate that the Loon platform can served as a validation platform for future NOAA satellite sensors. Third, through simulation studies, observational geometry (e.g., footprint size, swath width, pointing accuracy) and weighting functions are studied for the scenarios that the Loon platform can host passive microwave instruments. More importantly, we demonstrate that balloon-based GPS radio occultation (RO) measurements can be complementary to current satellite based GPSRO systems. Efforts have been devoted to develop the capability of simulating the GPSRO slant path and bending angle from the balloon platform at~20 km, utilizing current constellation of Global Navigation Satellite Systems.Based on the calculations, the sampling characteristics and spatial and temporal coverage as well as the advantages and disadvantages are discussed.Based on this, the Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) is designed to assess possible impacts on Global Forecasting System (GFS) forecasting capabilities by adding balloon-based GPSRO observations. The impacts are demonstrated and compared to those from space-based GPSRO observations. Finally,SpaceX StarLink constellation are simulated and potential hosting opportunities are discussed.
Presenter:
Dr. Likun Wang is now working in NOAA/NESDIS/STAR as a contract scientist employed by Riverside Technology, inc for Research Technology Maturation for the Exploitation of Emerging Technologies (RTMEE) Contract, including near space payload hosting platform assessment, Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology demonstration, and geostationary sounder proxy data  simulations. With more than 15 years of progressive working experiences of NOAA's satellite sensors, Dr. Likun Wang has been responsible for the pre- and post-launch calibration testing data analysis, inter-calibration for post-launch instrument monitoring and assessment, ground processing software development, configuration and calibration parameter refining, and new algorithm design and integration. He currently serves the chair of World Meteorological Organization (WMO) sponsored Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System (GSICS) infrared sensor working group. Likun Wang received his B.S. degree in atmospheric sciences and the M.S. degree in meteorology from Peking University, Beijing, China, in 1996 and 1999, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in atmospheric sciences from University of Alaska Fairbanks, in 2004.
POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. 
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Title: Assimilating Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), Past, Present and Future
Presenter(s): Dr Jim Jung
Date & Time: 19 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar
Presenter(s):
 Dr Jim Jung  
Seminar Title: Assimilating Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), Past, Present and Future
877-401-9225
pc: 53339716
Webex:
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m74c6bc7ffaf4a73e070da492774175a3
Meeting password: Jpss2020!
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.   https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/  
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Title: Sustainable Use & Stewardship of Ocean & Coastal Resources
Presenter(s): Melissa Karp, Research Associate, NOAA NMFS Office of Science and Technology, National Stock Assessment Program; Gary Wikfors, Supervisory Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/Milford Laboratory Director; Richard Stumpf, Oceanographer, NOAA NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science; and Alexander Gilerson, Professor, City College of New York, Department of Electrical Engineering
Date & Time: 19 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA SIlver Spring staff, SSMC4 Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Science Report Seminar Series #2: Sustainable Use and Stewardship of Ocean and Coastal Resources
The second of four seminars in the NOAA Science Report Seminar Series. There will be four speakers for each seminar.
Presentation Titles and Speakers for Feb 19:

Forecasting fisheries in a changing climate, by Melissa Karp, Research Associate, Contractor in support of NOAA/NMFS/Office of Science and Technology/National Stock Assessment Program, Silver Spring, MD

Establishing a scientific foundation for blue mussel offshore aquaculture in the southern New England, by Gary Wikfors, Supervisory Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/Milford Laboratory Director and Chief, Aquaculture Sustainability Branch, Ecosystems and Aquaculture Division, Milford, CT

New tools to monitor harmful algal blooms, by Richard Stumpf, Oceanographer, NOAA NOS/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Silver Spring, MD

New tools to monitor harmful algal blooms, by Alexander Gilerson, Professor, City College of New York, Department of Electrical Engineering, New York City, NY


Sponsor(s):
The NOAA Research and Development Enterprise Committee, Gina DigiantonioEmma Kelley, Laura Newcomb, and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator, Tracy Gill
Remote access:
 
Please register for the seminar at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nsrs2/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. 
If you have not used Adobe Connect, you should test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: 

https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm  
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using aMac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived andmade accessible in the near future. Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset. Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
NOAA research and development seeks to better understand the biogeochemical and human processes that impact our ocean,coasts, and Great Lakes and to inform their conservation, restoration, and sustainable use. This seminar will include lightning talks on managing shifting fish distributions and changing productivity, assessing opportunities for domestic mussel production, and developing new monitoring capabilities for detecting and tracking harmful algal blooms.

About the
Presenter(s):
Melissa Karp received her M.S. in marine science from the College of William and Mary's School of Marine Science, at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 2016 and her B.S. in Biology and Environmental Science from Tufts University in 2013. Currently, Melissa is a contractor with ECS Tech working on behalf of NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology. Her work focuses on supporting efforts to advance stock assessment methodology in the U.S., particularly related to the incorporation of ecosystem and climate information in the assessment process.

Gary Wikfor's terminal degree is in Phycology, the study of algae, but he always has worked at the intersection of phytoplankton and the bivalve mollusks -- such as oysters, clams, scallops, and mussels --that derive their nutrition from phytoplankton. As Chief of the Aquaculture Sustainability Branch, Gary has a hands-on role in several current team initiatives: 1) Nutrient bioextraction using shellfish aquaculture, 2)Probiotic bacteria for use in shellfish hatcheries, and 3) Shellfish cellular immune response to environmental variation.

Dr. Rick Stumpf received a B.A. degree in the Environmental Sciences from the University of Virginia, and M.S. and Ph.D.degrees in Marine Studies from the University of Delaware. Dr. Stumpf develops methods to use satellite data and modeling to understand coastal eutrophication, habitat change, and algal bloom monitoring and forecasting. Heleads NOAA's efforts to translate forecasts of harmful algal blooms from research to operations.

Dr. Gilerson received his B.S., M.S. and PhD degrees in Engineering from the Technical University, Kazan, Russia. From 2003 he works at the City College of the City University of New York, Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory as a Senior Scientist and then as a Professor. His current research interests include development of advanced algorithms for the retrieval of properties of ocean particulates, detection and monitoring of algal blooms,hyperspectral polarimetric imaging of the ocean body and validation of the Ocean Color satellite sensors.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. 

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Title: Sea Grant Spotlight: Sea Grant/PMEL Tsunami and Coastal Resilience Liaison
Presenter(s): Carrie Garrison-Laney, Sea Grant Liaison
Date & Time: 19 February 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only,
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series
Sponsor(s):
National Sea Grant and the NOAA Central Library
POC:
Elizabeth Rohring (elizabeth.rohring@noaa.gov)
Register for this webinar only presentation: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8106871159811925762   
Key Takeaways:- The U.S. can apply "lessons learned" from the Japanese experience to improve coastal resilience. - U.S. coastal communities need more education to understand the magnitude of a tsunami and how to survive one.- Plans for community response in the aftermath of a tsunami should be made in advance of the next tsunami event.  
 
Presenter(s):
 Dr. Carrie Garrison-Laney, a Tsunami Hazards Specialist at Washington Sea Grant at the University of Washington and a liaison to the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory's NOAA Center for Tsunami Research in Seattle.  

Abstract:
 Dr. Carrie Garrison-Laney will talk about her recent trip to areas of Japan destroyed by the Tohoku earthquake tsunami in 2011, and the ongoing recovery and reconstruction. Insights gained from this major disaster can reduce future disaster losses (which is the meaning of the Japanese word "bosai"). These lessons in resilience can be applied to coastal areas of the U.S. through continued education, planning, and preparation for a tsunami disaster, and are critical to Washington Sea Grant's coastal resilience efforts. 
 
Bio:
 Dr. Carrie Garrison-Laney is tsunami hazards specialist at Washington Sea Grant at the University of Washington and a liaison to the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory's NOAA Center for Tsunami Research in Seattle. Carrie's work includes research on tsunami geology and tsunami modeling. She also works collaboratively with the Washington Department of Natural Resources, and the Washington Emergency Management Division creating outreach materials and giving outreach trainings and talks.  
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. 
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Title: Temperature-related mortality under climate change scenarios in health regions of Canada
Presenter(s): Éric Lavigne , Ph.D, Health Canada,  Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Date & Time: 19 February 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar
Presenter(s):
 Éric Lavigne , Ph.D, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada  

Sponsor(s):
 NOAA National Weather Service 
Seminar POC for questions: Michelle.Hawkins@noaa.gov, 301-427-9374
Remote access only: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4126064022681636364  

Abstract:
 Climate change is an important global health threat of the 21st century. According to the fifth report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), greenhouse gases emitted from anthropogenic emissions were established as the leading sources for the warming of the planet. In Canada, land temperature has already raised by 1.7°C since 1948 and is expected to increase on average by about 5.44 °C in major cities towards the end of the century. This webinar aims to present findings from an health impact projection study using the daily mortality counts of non-accidental, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality for 111 health regions across Canada. During the seminar, it will be shown that Canada will experience an increase in mortality under higher greenhouse gas emission scenarios during the 21st century. In particular, climate change may potentially result in an increase in heat-related excess mortality that is not balanced by a decrease in cold-related deaths which will result in an overall positive net increase in mortality for Canada. Climate change would result in a net increase in cardiovascular and, to a larger extent, respiratory mortality towards the end of the 21st century under a higher emission scenario.    
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, contact Michelle.Hawkins@noaa.gov for recordings.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Passive Acoustic Monitoring in California’s National Marine Sanctuaries
Presenter(s): Samara Haver, Ph.D candidate at Oregon State University; Angela R. Szesciorka and Vanessa ZoBell, Ph.D. candidates at Scripps Institution of Oceanography - all are Dr. Nancy Foster Scholars
Date & Time: 19 February 2020
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s):
 Samara Haver, Ph.D candidate at Oregon State University; Angela R. Szesciorka and Vanessa ZoBell, Ph.D. candidates at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (all are Dr. Nancy Foster Scholars)
Sponsor(s):
 NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries 
Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429 
Remote access:
 Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5058057356418521613  

Abstract:
 Acoustic signals travel quickly and efficiently over long distances in the aquatic environment; thus, sound has become the principal sensory modality used by many marine animal species. This is particularly true for acoustically oriented marine mammals that rely on sound to communicate, perceive their environment, detect and avoid predators, forage for food, and navigate. Passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) is used to measure, monitor, and determine the sources of sound in underwater environments, enabling scientists to eavesdrop on the acoustic behavior of marine animals (e.g., whale song, fish chorusing, snapping shrimp), natural abiotic sounds (e.g., wind, earthquakes), and human generated sounds (e.g., cargo vessels). By utilizing PAM tools in national marine sanctuaries, researchers are able to collect data to answer questions about these valuable marine habitats and provide important condition information to managers and policymakers. In this webinar, three Ph.D. candidates that are NOAA Dr. Nancy Foster Scholars will discuss current PAM research efforts taking place in some of California's national marine sanctuaries.  
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: 
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html 
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html 
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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20 February 2020

Title: Clear as a Whistle: Documenting dolphin Occurrence with Passive Acoustic Ocean Gliders
Presenter(s): Dr. Tammy Silva, Postdoctoral Fellow, NOAA's Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary & School for Marine Science & Technology, University of Massachusetts
Date & Time: 20 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
Clear as a Whistle: Documenting dolphin Occurrence with Passive Acoustic Ocean Gliders
Presenter(s):
Dr. Tammy Silva, Postdoctoral Fellow, NOAA's Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary & School for Marine Science & Technology, University of Massachusetts
Sponsor(s):
 
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov. You may email a request for the PDF and/or mp4 recording; they may be available.
Remote access:
 
Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/silva/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:  
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. 
This webinar will be recorded and likely available by request from Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
 
Basic information about marine mammal habitat use patterns is essential for informing ecosystem-based management and mitigating humanimpacts. However, collecting shipboard or aerial survey data on the occurrence and distribution of highly mobile, cryptic animals with large home ranges, like oceanic dolphin species, is challenging. We addressed this challenge by using autonomous ocean gliders equipped with passive acoustic recorders to document dolphin occurrence in and around Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, a highly productive, urbanized area in the southwestern Gulf of Maine that lacks data on dolphin habitat use. Our results showed a frequent, consistent presence of dolphin species and possible annual site fidelity, suggesting that dolphins could play an important role in the southwestern Gulf of Maine ecosystem and highlighting the advantages of passive acoustic ocean gliders in collecting baseline habitat use data.
Bio:
Tammy is a Postdoctoral Fellow working with Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary and the School for Marine Science and Technology at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. She leads the sanctuary's forage fish research project focused on how sand lance drive ecology of sand habitats and her current research focuses on quantifying predator-prey spatial relationships. Her doctoral work focused on integrating passive acoustic monitoring with opportunistic sightings data to document toothed whale habitat use in the southwestern Gulf of Maine. Tammy earned her PhD and MS from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and a BS in Biology from Stonehill College.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title:
New
Misinformation in and about science
Presenter(s): Jevin West, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of Washington
Date & Time: 20 February 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or NOAA NWFSC- Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Jevin West, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, University of Washington
Sponsor(s):
 NOAA's NWFSC Monster seminars 
NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website
To contact Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov 
 
JOIN IN PERSON
Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Auditorium
2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Maps and directions
JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join Webex
Meeting number: 900 441 597
Meeting password: D3KQpmv8
JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 900 441 597
ABSTRACTScience is the greatest of human inventions. It has solved and continues to solve many of societies most pressing questions in human health, planetary wellness and economic viability. But one of Science's new challenges is the well being of Science itself and ways in which scientists communicate within this social system. The reproducibility crisis, misaligned motivations, literature overload, publication bias, p-hacking, retraction loss, gender inequity, complicity of university presses, and out-of-date publishing models are just a few of the maladies of Science and its modes of communication. These maladies are further exacerbated with intentional disinformation campaigns and by the speed in which misinformation travels on social media. Turning the microscope on Science, with the goal of improving its health, will be the focus of this talk.
BIOJevin West is an Associate Professor in the Information School at the University of Washington. He is the co-founder of the DataLab and the Director of the new Center for an Informed Public at UW. He holds an Adjunct Faculty position in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. He is also a Data Science Fellow at the eScience Institute and Affiliate Faculty for the Center for Statistics & Social Sciences. His research and teaching focus on misinformation in and about science. He develops methods for mining the scientific literature in order to study the origins of disciplines, the social and economic biases that drive these disciplines, and the impact the current publication system has on the health of science. He co-developed a course, Calling BS, that teaches students how to combat misinformation wrapped in data, figures, and statistics. The course is now being taught at universities around the globe. More information can be found at jevinwest.org.    
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. 
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Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Trent Ford, Illinois State Climatologist 
Date & Time: 20 February 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s):
 
Trent Ford, Illinois State Climatologist  
Sponsor(s):
 National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service
POCs: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
 
The focus area for this webinar is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. 
Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.
Register: https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/north-central-us-monthly-climate-and-drought-summary-and-outlook-5  
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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21 February 2020

Title:
New
February 2020 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 21 February 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminars
Presenter(s):
 Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)
Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team
POC:
Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) 
Remote access:
  http://accap.adobeconnect.com/feb2020/event/registration.html

Abstract:
 
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather. 
Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)
Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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24 February 2020

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Meghan Dalton, Climate Impacts Research Consortium; Britt Parker, National Integrated Drought Information System, John Abatzoglou, University of Idaho,  Tim Cook, WA State Emergency Management Division,  Adrienne Marshall, Department of Forest, Rangeland and Fire Sciences at the University of Idaho
Date & Time: 24 February 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s):
Meghan Dalton, Climate Impacts Research Consortium; Britt Parker, National Integrated Drought Information System, John Abatzoglou, University of Idaho, Tim Cook, WA State Emergency Management Division, Adrienne Marshall, Department of Forest, Rangeland and Fire Sciences at the University of Idaho
Sponsor(s):
 National Integrated Drought Information System, Climate Impacts Research Consortium, USDA Northwest Climate Hub, National Weather Service
POC:
 Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
  These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. 
Registration: https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/pnw-dews-drought-climate-outlook  
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)
Seminar POC for questions: Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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25 February 2020

Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar
Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District
Date & Time: 25 February 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s):
 Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District
Sponsor(s):
 National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center
POC:
 Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
 
The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar is part of a monthly (twice a month during drought status) webinar series designed to provide stakeholders, water-resource managers, and other interested parties in the ACF region with timely information on current drought status, seasonal forecasts and outlooks, streamflow​ conditions and forecasts, groundwater conditions, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir conditions.
Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6936832458494548749  
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)
Seminar POC for questions: Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Engaging Communities in Role-Playing Simulations to Advance Climate Planning
Presenter(s): Dr. Christine Feurt, Wells NERR
Date & Time: 25 February 2020
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only ,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Resilience Dialogues: Strategies for Conflict Management in Collaborative Science
Presenter(s):
 Dr. Christine Feurt, Wells NERR
Sponsor(s):
 NERRS Science Collaborative   
Webinar: Please register through GoToWebinar (https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5790467341395463681).
Seminar POCs for questions:
dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

Abstract:
 
Resiliencedialogues are conversations that occur among people with diverse perspectiveswho have agreed to work together to increase community and ecological resilience.Planning and facilitating resilience dialogues requires skills incollaboration, stakeholder engagement, and conflict management. 

TheResilience Dialogues project looked across a decade of collaborative scienceprojects to distill key lessons learned and best practices used to buildresilience. This webinar shares successful collaborative techniques that workedto engage the diverse expertise of stakeholders, develop a shared languagearound commonly held values and craft solutions-based science that respectedlocal knowledge and the concerns of vulnerable communities. Results of theproject have been used to develop training and resources for facilitators ofcollaborative processes and to guide the transfer of collaborative scienceprojects to new audiences.


Bio:
Dr. Christine Feurt is the director of theCoastal Training Program at the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve inMaine. Dr. Feurt integrates natural and social science into stakeholderprocesses using the Collaborative Learning approach in order to sustainecosystem services and build resilient coastal communities.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weeklyemail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminarsrequest@list.woc.noaa.gov with the work 'subscribe'in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA ScienceSeminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/   
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26 February 2020

Title:
New
Subseasonal Prediction: An Emerging Capability of US Weather Enterprise
Presenter(s): Dr. Jan Dutton, Prescient Weather
Date & Time: 26 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s):
 Dr. Jan Dutton, Prescient Weather, CEO  
POC:
Tiffany House (tiffany.house@noaa.gov)
Join us on the webinar by registering here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2407408601720113933  

Abstract:
 Prescient Weather successfully completed a Phase II NOAA SBIR in 2018 focusing on subseasonal prediction of impact variables of importance to the energy industry. The research created an operational multi-model subseasonal forecast methodology that was then used to predict impact variables three to five weeks in advance. The presentation will discuss the science behind the product, the product implementation, and the success enjoyed since the SBIR.
Key Takeaways: 
  •  Subseasonal and seasonal forecasts are improving

  • A growing number of customers are buying subseasonal forecasts

  • The World Climate Service uses sophisticated capabilities to provide market-leading subseasonal and season forecasts developed with the support of the SBIR program.


About the Speaker: Dr. Jan F. Dutton is a 19-year veteran of the Weather Information Services industry. He holds a PhD in Meteorology and MBA from The Pennsylvania State University and he has served as product manager, sales manager, business development manager, and general manager at well-known companies in the industry. In his role as CEO of Prescient Weather, Dr. Dutton focuses primarily on marketing and sales in an effort to widely distribute the fantastic S2S science-to-product activities of the company.  
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/  
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27 February 2020

Title: Could Oyster Reef Restoration Benefit Seafood Harvesters and RegionalEconomies? An Ecological-Economic Modeling Approach
Presenter(s): Dr. Scott Knoche, Director, Morgan State University, Patuxent Environmental & Aquatic Research Laboratory - PEARL, and Dr. Tom Ihde, Research Assistant Professor, Morgan State University - PEARL
Date & Time: 27 February 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Rom 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
Could Oyster Reef Restoration Benefit Seafood Harvesters and Regional Economies? An Ecological-Economic Modeling Approach    
Presenter(s):
Dr. Scott Knoche, Director, Morgan State University, Patuxent Environmental & Aquatic Research Laboratory (PEARL), and Dr. Tom Ihde, Research Assistant Professor, Morgan State Univ., PEARL
Sponsor(s):
 
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov. You may email a request for the PDF and/or mp4 recording; they may be available.
Remote access:
 
Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pearl/event/registration.html 
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:  
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. 
This webinar will be recorded and likely available by request from Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
 
In this study we explore commercial fishing related regional economic impacts resulting from different oyster management strategies associated with oyster reef restoration in Maryland's Choptank River system. First, an ecological model is used to simulate the young restored reefs currently protected from oyster harvest through designated sanctuaries. Next, the model is used to simulate the effects of different oyster management strategies on commercial fisheries harvests in the region for the following three scenarios: 1) immature protected reef, 2) mature protected reef, and 3) open oyster harvest on formerly protected reefs. Species-specific commercial harvest estimates are translated into dockside revenues by applying historic per-unit prices to biomass harvested. A regional economic impact model is then used to convert dockside revenues to economic measures such as sales, value-added, income, and employment. Ecological model results will be presented and potential regional economic impacts discussed. 
About the
Presenter(s):
Dr. Scott Knoche is the Director of the Morgan State University Patuxent Environmental and Aquatic Research Laboratory (PEARL). As the Director of PEARL, Dr. Knoche leads a diverse staff with expertise in environmental education, shellfish aquaculture and genetics, fisheries biology, and ecological modelling. Dr. Knoche also maintains an active research program in his area of expertise -  environmental and natural resource economics. Much of this research focuses on estimating the economic benefits of outdoor recreation and environmental restoration.  
Dr. Tom Ihde is a fisheries biologist specializing in crustacean fisheries and ecosystem modeling. He integrates ecological, physical and chemical forcing, and fisheries population dynamics principles, in the context of spatial and temporal change, to provide policymakers with the quantitative information they need to make well-informed natural resource decisions. His work has largely focused on the dynamics and management of the Chesapeake Bay.    
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: Warm-water anomalies in the mesophotic depth range of the Southern California Bight with implications for gorgonian octocorals
Presenter(s): Elizabeth Gugliotti, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 27 February 2020
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 14817 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Elizabeth Gugliotti - NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Deep Coral Ecology Lab

Sponsor: NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program

Point of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/996129351582802189.

For audio: Participants can use their computer speakers or call 631-992-3221 followed by passcode 402-471-061.


Abstract:
In recent years, ‘marine heatwave' events have affected multiple ecosystems along the California coast, including kelp beds, sea stars, and pelagic ecosystems. The effect of heatwaves on cold-adapted, deep-water corals is unknown. Mortalities of gorgonian octocorals were observed along the California coast below 20 m. These mortalities were hypothesized to be a result of warm-water anomalies. This study deployed temperature loggers in 2016 at 20, 50, 100, and 200 m in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary (CINMS) to characterize warm-water anomalies in the mesophotic depth range. The in situ temperature variability observed during the 2015-2016 ENSO event informed a laboratory study to determine the upper thermal limit of the common gorgonian octocoral Adelogorgia phyllosclera, using a series of temperature assays. Warm-water anomalies in the CINMS were frequently observed at 50 and 100 m, with most of these anomalies occurring during strong ENSO months. The laboratory temperature assays suggested that the upper thermal limit of A. phyllosclera was 20 °C, which was exceeded occasionally during the 2015-2016 ENSO event at depths that A. phyllosclera is known to occur. This study indicates that gorgonian octocorals at mesophotic depths are frequently exposed to warm-water anomalies that last 1.5-3.8 hours on average and that these anomalies are near the upper thermal limits of A. phyllosclera. These results provide evidence that warm-water anomalies during the 2015-2016 ENSO event could have contributed to the gorgonian mortalities observed in 2016, either directly or indirectly. Further monitoring is needed to understand the threat of ocean warming to gorgonian octocorals living at mesophotic depths.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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Title: Crumbling reefs: a natural ocean acidification laboratory in the Northeast Pacific
Presenter(s): Leslie Wickes, Thrive Blue LLC
Date & Time: 27 February 2020
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 14817 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Leslie Wickes - Thrive Blue LLC, Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association

Sponsor: NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program

Point of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/996129351582802189.

For audio: Participants can use their computer speakers or call 631-992-3221 followed by passcode 402-471-061.


Abstract:
Ocean acidification (OA) over the next century will leave most known cold-water coral (CWC) reefs exposed to seawater that is undersaturated with aragonite and corrosive to their dead skeletons. Laboratory experiments and reports of Lophelia pertusa below the aragonite saturation horizon (ASH) have led to the assumption that CWC ecosystems may persist under future acidification conditions. This assumption does not consider the effects of OA to the larger reef framework or dead skeleton that comprises the bulk of the three-dimensional structure. The shallow ASH of the Northeast Pacific creates a natural laboratory for investigating the effects of OA on CWC in future ocean conditions. The current study utilized ROV surveys (n=707 2003-2015) to document the distribution of L. pertusa, in the Southern California Bight. Though widely distributed (n=171) at 313-66 m depth, the majority of sites had only sparse live patches. Aragonite saturations at L. pertusa sites were between 0.68-1.86. L. pertusa sites that had substantial cohesive reef framework, consisting of live and dead coral, were limited to shallow sites (169-66 m, n=14). The highest frequency and abundance of L. pertusa was found in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, where surveys targeted collections and characterization of reef framework above and below the ASH. Sites that experience persistent undersaturation (> 170 m) had an absence of dead-reef framework and lacked structural complexity. The absence of complexity in undersaturated conditions indicates a loss of structural integrity that we attribute to dissolution of dead reef-framework. This study set the stage for a cross-disciplinary collaborative investigation of the coral that employed in situ, structural and mechanical analyses to provide an explanation for the loss of reef complexity. The rapid shoaling of the ASH in this region provides an unprecedented opportunity to assess the ecosystem-scale effects of OA on CWC reefs.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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4 March 2020

Title: A Robust & Effective Research & Development Enterprise
Presenter(s): John Forsythe, Sr Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere; Bryan Costa, Marine Ecologist, NOAA's NOS National Centers for Ocean Coastal Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division; Josh London, Wildlife Biologist, NOAA NMFS, AFSC National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Polar Ecosystems Program, Seattle, WA; Maria Kavanaugh, Assistant Professor, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences; and Joaquin Trinanes, Associate Professor, University of Santiago de Compostela; NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory
Date & Time: 4 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or for NOAA SIlver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
NOAA Science Report Seminar Series #3: A Robust and Effective Research and Development Enterprise

The third of four seminars in the NOAA Science Report Seminar Series.
There will be four or five speakers for each seminar; see description of third seminar below.
Presentation Titles and Speakers for March 4:

Blended Satellite Water Vapor Products for Forecasters, by John Forsythe, Senior Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO

Leveraging partnerships and unmanned systems to map coastal elevations and nearshore depths, by Bryan Costa, Marine Ecologist, NOAA NOS/National Centers for Ocean Coastal Science/Biogeography Branch, Marine Spatial Ecology Division,Santa Barbara, CA

Using drone technology to obtain critical new estimates of harbor seals in the Pribilof Islands, by Josh London, Wildlife Biologist, NOAA NMFS, AFSC National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Polar Ecosystems Program, Seattle, WA

Marine Biodiversity Observing Network (MBON) Seascape Products on CoastWatch,by Maria Kavanaugh and Joaquin Trinanes, Maria" Assistant Professor, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences,Corvallis, OR. And Joaquin - Associate Professor, University of Santiago de Compostela; NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)


Sponsor(s):
The NOAA Research and Development Enterprise Committee, Gina DigiantonioEmma Kelley, Laura Newcomb, and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator, Tracy Gill
Remote access:
 
Please register for the seminar at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nsrs3/event/registration.html 
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe Connect, you should test your abilityto use Adobe Connect at the following link: 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm  
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using aMac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived andmade accessible in the near future. Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset. Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
Abstract
NOAA advances a robust and effective research and development enterprise. This seminar will include lightning talks about predicting high-impact weather events using water vapor information; using drones to map coastal elevations and nearshore depths, as well as to estimate harbor seal populations; and, the Marine Biodiversity Observing Network.

About the
Presenter(s):
 
John Forsythe received his B.S from the University of Maryland (1987) and M.S. from Colorado State University (1993). He is an expert in satellite remote sensing with specialty in microwave remote sensing,and serves as a PI on several NOAA JPSS, GOES-R and Hydrometeorology Testbed projects to improve and deliver new blended products to forecasters.

Bryan Costa graduated from Middlebury College (03.5') with a joint degree in Biology and Environmental Studies and from the University of Maryland, College Park (09') with an MPS in Geospatial Sciences.His research interests include novel applications of state-of-the-art remote sensing and commercially available geospatial technologies. He currently is co-located with the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary in Santa Barbara, CA.

Josh London received a B.S. in wildlife sciences from the University of Washington College of Forest Resources and a Ph.D. from the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. Josh is currently a wildlife biologist with the Polar Ecosystems Program, and his research focus is population assessment and ecology of harbor seals.

Maria Kavanaugh received her B.S. in Zoology, M.S. in Marine Ecology with Statistics and Oceanography minors, and Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography with a Statistics minor from Oregon State University. She is an assistant professor at Oregon State University and her research specialties are seascape ecology, remote sensing, and global change.

Joaquin Trinanes received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from the University of Santiago de Compostela in 1993 and 1998 respectively. He is an Associate Professor at the University of Santiago de Compostela and works as Op. Manager of the CoastWatch Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico node at NOAA/AOML, in Miami. His research interests are focused on remote sensing, oceanography, and scalable data management and analysis.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. 

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Title: Empowering Young Water Scientists with the EarthEcho Water Challenge!
Presenter(s): Sean Russell, Associate Director of Youth Engagement and Partnerships for EarthEcho International
Date & Time: 4 March 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s):
 Sean Russell, Associate Director of Youth Engagement and Partnerships for EarthEcho International   
Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries   
Seminar POC for questions: hannah.macdonald@noaa.gov (989)-657-1362 
 
Webinar information
TBD

Abstract:
 
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. 
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5 March 2020

Title: Implementing the Evidence Act in the Department of Commerce
Presenter(s): Christine Heflin, DOC
Date & Time: 5 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 E W Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s):
Christine Heflin, Director of the Office of Performance Excellence, US Department of Commerce
Remote? Join us online: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6545751565682317315  

Abstract:
This training session discuss the Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking Act of 2018 (Evidence Act). This introductory course goes into detail about the Evidence Act-- what it is and what the requirements are.
Take Away: Key points include: overview of the Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking Act of 2018 ("Evidence Act"); implementation approach; key requirements of the Evidence Act; and evidence examples and methodologies.
Bio:
Chris Heflin is the Director of Performance Excellence in the US Department of Commerce. Ms. Heflin is a performance management practitioner with over thirty years of leadership in government innovation and improvement. Ms. Heflin received a B.A. in Political Science from McDaniel College and a Master's in Public Administration from the University of Maryland.  
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. 
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Title: Linking the ‘what’ and the ‘where’ – how habitat type and location can affect estuarine fishes
Presenter(s): Dr. Ryan J. Woodland, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, Solomons, MD, USA
Date & Time: 5 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room 8150,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
Linking the ‘what' and the ‘where' " how habitat type andlocation can affect estuarine fishes  
Presenter(s):
Dr. Ryan J. Woodland, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science ChesapeakeBiological Laboratory, Solomons, MD, USA
Co-Authors
- Dr. Fiona Y. Warry, Dep't of Environment, Land, Water & Planning, Arthur RylahInstitute, Heidelberg, Victoria, AU
- Dr. Yafei Zhu, Water Studies Centre, School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton,Victoria, AU
- Dr. Ralph Mac, Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, AustralianCapital Territory, AU
- Dr. Paul Reich, Dep't of Environment, Land, Water & Planning, Arthur Rylah Institute, Heidelberg, Victoria, AU
- Dr. Gregory P. Jenkins, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University,Queenscliff, Victoria, AU; & 
  School of Biosciences, The Universityof Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, AU
- Dr. Perran L. M. Cook, WaterStudies Centre, School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, AU
Sponsor(s):
 
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov. You may email a request for the PDF and/or mp4 recording; they may be available.
Remote access:
 
Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/woodland/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:  
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. 
This webinar will be recorded and likely available by request from Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
 
Estuaries are among the most productive ecosystems per unit area, but this productivity is unevenly distributed across a complex mosaic of habitats. Identifying the qualities of different habitats that influence the composition and productivity of biotic communities is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of these ecosystems. We combined field surveys, hydrological modelling and stable isotope analysis to understand the roles of habitat, hydrological connectivity, salinity and temperature in determining assemblage composition, species abundance and trophic ecology of an estuarine fish community. Hydrodynamics, vegetation matrices of macroalgae and seagrass and the presence of epiphytes on vegetation explained spatial patterns in taxonomic biodiversity, multivariate assemblage structure and the occurrence of juvenile black bream Acanthopagrus butcheri, a species that possesses ecological traits common to many demersal estuarine fish species. Juvenile bream abundance was related to vegetation composition (particularly epiphyte presence), supporting the hypothesis that juvenile habitats that provided resources or conditions that extended beyond just structure conferred more ecological advantages. This was further evidenced by stable isotope-based estimates of basal resource contributions of epiphytes. Our findings suggest that hydrodynamic connectivity with riverine water masses acts as a coarse determinant for estuarine fish communities at large spatial scales. At smaller scales, habitat-level associations influence local abundances and the identity and importance of specific trophic resources. Coupling hydrodynamic modelling with natural biomarkers provides a powerful approach for assessing the spatial context of habitat use that can help resource managers prioritize monitoring and habitat preservation efforts for coastal fish communities in a changing global environment.
Bio:
Ryan Woodland is an Assistant Professor at the ChesapeakeBiological Laboratory, part of the University of Maryland Center forEnvironmental Science, located in Solomons, MD. His research focuses on therole of natural and human-derived processes in shaping the structure andfunction of biological communities in coastal ecosystems. He received his BScfrom the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, and his MS and PhD from the Universityof Maryland College Park. Prior to his current position, he held postdoctoral researchpositions at the Université du Québec Trois-Rivières in Québec, Canada, andat Monash University in Victoria, Australia.  
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: Puget Sound river nitrogen: Partitioning trends through time and watershed sources
Presenter(s): Hollie Putnam, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, University of Rhode Island, Department of Biological Sciences
Date & Time: 5 March 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or NOAA NWFSC- Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Hollie Putnam, Ph.D.Assistant Professor,University of Rhode Island,Department of Biological Sciences
Sponsor(s):
 
NOAA's NWFSC Monster seminars https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/index.cfm    
Webinar information
Connect to Webex
Meeting number: 900 441 597
Meeting password: D3KQpmv8
Join by phone+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 900 441 597  

Abstract:
 
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. 
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Title: A coral of a different color: Genetic insights to the diversity and distribution of gorgonian octocorals in the US Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Peter Etnoyer, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 5 March 2020
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 13514 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Peter Etnoyer - NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Deep Coral Ecology Lab

Sponsor: NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program

Point of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4201985300294108429.

For audio: Participants can use their computer speakers or call 415-930-5321 followed by passcode 775-994-993.


Abstract:
Genetic analyses can provide critical information to assist restoration activities in the wake of environmental assaults, like the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoMx). The damage assessment for the DWH spill showed that several species of gorgonian octocorals on rocky reefs in the mesophotic zone (50-150 m) had significantly more injury post-spill compared to pre-spill conditions, but genetic diversity was unknown at the time. To meet the goals of restoration activities, this study set out to evaluate the mtDNA mutS and CO1+ igr gene regions of two injured taxa, from across the GoMx. DNA sequences were cross-referenced with museum specimens using BLAST. Results from the mtDNA mutS gene in samples of Swiftia exserta (n = 278) revealed three haplotypes in S. exserta, but no significant differences among phenotypic color morphs. Only one haplotype was found among presumptive Hypnogorgia pendula (n = 314). Homology searches for both species revealed inconsistencies with online data bases as presumptive Hypnogorgia samples exhibited high homology with Muricea pendula. Similarly, the S. exserta sequences failed to match other S. exserta sequences in GenBank, but they matched museum specimens. Phylogenetic analyses conducted using a subsample of octocoral mutS sequences in Genbank in conjunction with our data, revealed evidence of extreme divergence within the Swiftia. This is problematic as S. exserta is the type species for this genus. Our results indicate that the genera Hypnogorgia, Muricea, and Swiftia will require additional taxonomic analyses and possibly a systematic revision. To build upon these findings, sclerite morphology will be closely examined using scanning electron microscopy, and the nuclear marker 28S will be used to verify these findings. Other genera of gorgonian octocorals were injured by the spill (Thesea, Placogorgia, Paramuricea), and these may also benefit from inclusion into a larger molecular analysis.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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Title: Comparative observations of flow intensity around Hawaiian deep-sea corals
Presenter(s): Frank Parrish, NOAA Fisheries Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 5 March 2020
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 13514 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: Frank Parrish - NOAA Fisheries Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center 

Sponsor: NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program

Point of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4201985300294108429.

For audio: Participants can use their computer speakers or call 415-930-5321 followed by passcode 775-994-993.


Abstract:
Fifteen instruments placed close to deep sea corals on the slopes of 3 islands in Hawaii showed the mean current flow rates differed significantly by site and taxa. Measurements for some of the 19 coral taxa observed were limited to one island site while others were measured at all sites. Patches of coralids were measured at separate sites with the “red” Hemicorallium laauense found at areas with the lowest flow (0.5-4.9 cm/s) and the “pink” Pleurocorallium secundum seen at a higher level flow sites (12.6-18.4 cm/s) with little overlap between. A patch of Narella gigas and N. muzikae were observed only at the site with the highest flow (18.4-21.7 cm/s). Measurements of bamboo coral (Acanella dispar) and the parasitic zooanthid, gold coral (Kulamanamana haumeaae) that colonizes bamboo, were made at all three sites with flow ranging from (2.8-18.9 cm/s). The number and maximum size of gold coral colonies were negatively correlated with increasing flow, but this was not seen for the bamboo colonies. Although preliminary, these observations provide some insight as to how flow regimes form coral patches and influence diversity in deep-sea coral communities.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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10 March 2020

Title: What It Takes to Build a Weather-Ready Nation
Presenter(s): Louis Uccellini, PhD, NOAA Assistant Administrator for Weather Services, and Director of the National Weather Service
Date & Time: 10 March 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: VIa webinar or in NOAA Science Center, 1301 E W Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Seminars are available to the Public via webinar, and NOAA staff can attend in person or via webinar.   
Title: What It Takes to Build a Weather-Ready Nation 
 
Presenter(s):
  Louis Uccellini, PhD, NOAA's Assistant Administrator for Weather Services, and Director of the National Weather Service
Sponsor(s):
 2020 NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series: To provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council.  See seminars here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries  
Seminar POCs for questions: For questions about the seminars:  Hernan.Garcia@noaa.govTracy.Gill@noaa.govSandra.Claar@noaa.gov , katie.rowley@noaa.gov
Remote access:
 Register for webinar at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/uccellini/event/registration.html 
Seminars are available to the Public via webinar, and NOAA staff can attend in person or via webinar 
 
After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBD
About the speaker: Dr. Louis W. Uccellini is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Assistant Administrator for Weather Services, and Director of the National Weather Service. In this role, he is responsible for the day-to-day civilian weather operations for the United States, its territories, adjacent waters, and ocean areas. Prior to this position, he served as the Director of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) for 14 years. He was responsible for directing and planning the science, technology, and operations related to NCEP's nine centers: Central Operations, Environmental Modeling Center, Ocean Prediction Center, Hydrometeorological Prediction Center, Climate Prediction Center, all in Camp Springs, MD; the National Hurricane Center in Miami, FL; Storm Prediction Center in Norman, OK; Space Weather Prediction Center in Boulder, CO; and the Aviation Weather Center in Kansas City, MO. With his leadership, the 13 year effort to plan, develop and build the new NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (the NCWCP Building) at the University of Maryland M Squared Research Center was completed; as was the implementation of a Seamless Suite of Models from the S2S to Mesoscale modeling systems based on the principle of multi model ensembles. Dr. Uccellini was the Director of the National Weather Service's Office of Meteorology from 1994 to 1999, Chief of the National Weather Service's Meteorological Operations Division from 1989 to 1994, and section head for the Mesoscale Analysis and Modeling Section at the Goddard Space Flight Center's Laboratory for Atmospheres from 1978 to 1989. Dr. Uccellini received his Ph.D. (1977), Master (1972) and Bachelor of Science (1971) degrees in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has published more than 70+ peer-reviewed articles and chapters in books on subjects including analysis of severe weather outbreaks, snowstorms, gravity waves, jet streaks, cyclones, and the use of satellite data in analysis and modeling applications and more recently the basis for the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, the WMO based Grand Challenge for Seamless Prediction and the Restructuring of the NWS to Build a Weather Ready Nation. He is the co-author of a widely acclaimed two-volume American Meteorological Society (AMS) monograph Northeast Snowstorms, published in 2004, and authored chapters in the 1990 AMS publication Extratropical Cyclones, the 1999 AMS publication The Life Cycles of Extratropical Cyclones, and the 2008 AMS publication Synoptic Dynamic Meteorology and Weather Analysis and Forecasting. Dr. Uccellini is the Permanent US Representative at the World Meteorological Organization, and has served on many national and international research and field experiment programs. He has received many awards in recognition of his research and operational achievements including the Maryland Academy of Sciences Distinguished Young Scientist Award (1981), the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement (1985), the AMS's prestigious Clarence Leroy Meisinger Award (1985), the Cleveland Abbe Award (2016), and the National Weather Association's Research Achievement Awards for Significant Contributions to Operational Meteorology (1996). He was elected as President of the AMS in 2012- 2013 and served as Co-Chief Editor of Weather and Forecasting from 1988-1992. In 2001 he received the U.S. Presidential Meritorious Executive Rank Award and in 2006 he received the U.S. Presidential Distinguished Rank Award. https://www.weather.gov/organization/uccellini_louis
Are our seminars recorded? Yes. When available these will be posted here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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12 March 2020

Title: Simulating Acidification (and linked processes) along the North American West Coast
Presenter(s): James McWilliams, PhD, Louis B. Slichter Professor of Earth Sciences in the Dept of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Institute of Geophysical and Planetary Sciences at UCLA
Date & Time: 12 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) and for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: 
Simulating Acidification (and linked processes) along the North American West Coast
Presenter(s):
 
James McWilliams, PhD, Louis B. Slichter Professor of Earth Sciences in the Dept of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Institute of Geophysical and Planetary Sciences at UCLA.  
Co-authors: Daniele Bianchi, Pierre Damien, Curtis Deutsch, Evan Howard, Faycal Kessouri, and Lionel Renault
Sponsor(s):
 
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
Remote access:
 
Please register at: 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/mcwilliams/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
 
Recently a new generation of realistic, coupled atmosphere-circulation-biogeochemistry-ecosystem simulations has been developed and deployed by our team for the California Current System. Its
centerpiece is a multi-decadal hindcast with fine mesoscale grid resolution, with nested subdomains and time periods for focus on particular places and processes (e.g., urban eutrophication in Southern California), as well as regional impact assessments for the future. This webinar will address motivations, methodology, and a sampling of key results. This project and its continuing extensions have meaningful implications for management of climate change at a
regional level.
Bio:
James C. McWilliams received his college degrees in Applied Mathematics: a B.S. (with honors) in 1968 from Caltech, and a M.S. in 1969 and Ph.D. in 1971 from Harvard. After holding a research
fellowship in geophysical fluid dynamics at Harvard (1971-74), he jointly established the Oceanography Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), where he became a senior scientist in 1980. In 1994 he became the Louis B. Slichter Professor of Earth Sciences in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Institute of Geophysical and Planetary Sciences at UCLA. He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a member of the
U.S. National Academy of Sciences.
His primary areas of scientific research are the fluid dynamics of Earth's oceans and atmosphere, both their theory and computational modeling. Particular subjects include the maintenance of the general circulations; climate dynamics; mesoscale and submesoscale eddies; boundary layer turbulence; biogeochemical and ecosystem modeling; and coastal and nearshore waves and currents. He is a co-creator of the Regional Oceanic Modeling System, a widely used circulation code for highly turbulent currents.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. 
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Title: Gravity at NGS: Why We Need it and How We Measure It
Presenter(s): Derek van Westrum, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 March 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Gravity at NGS: Why We Need it and How We Measure It
Presenter(s):
Derek van Westrum,  National Geodetic Survey 
Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.
POC:
Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey
Remote access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3747906789496130571

Abstract:
NGS will switch to a vertical datum based on geopotential in just a few years. With that in mind, this webinar will describe “geopotential,” how it relates to gravity, and how NGS collects gravity data. Learn about relative vs. absolute gravity, terrestrial vs. airborne gravity, gravity vs. gravity gradient, and more. 
Beginner Technical Content Rating: No prior knowledge of the topic is necessary.
Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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18 March 2020

Title: A Sample of Research Accomplishments, including Social Science
Presenter(s): Jennifer Henderson, Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science CIRES and NOAA's Global Systems Division; David DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist, Associate College Professor, CoCoRaHS State Coordinator, Director of the NM Climate Center, New Mexico State University; Kara Salazar, Assistant Program Leader and Extension Specialist for Sustainable Communities, Illinois- Indiana Sea Grant,Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources; and Alan Haynie, Economist, NOAA NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 18 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below), or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Science Report Seminar Series #4: A Sample of Research Accomplishments, including Social Science

The fourth of four seminars in the NOAA Science Report Seminar Series. There will be four speakers for each seminar; see description of the final seminar below.
Presentation Titles and Speakers for March 18:

Improving forecaster and partner interpretation of uncertainty and confidence in risk information, by Jennifer Henderson, Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES) and Global Systems Division at NOAA, Boulder, Colorado

Science clears the air in dust storm response, by David DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist, Associate College Professor, CoCoRaHS State Coordinator, Director of the NM Climate Center, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico

Engaging communities with online action planning tools: TippingPoint Planner for improving water quality across the Great Lakes, by KaraSalazark, Assistant Program Leader and Extension Specialist for Sustainable Communities, Illinois- Indiana Sea Grant, Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, West Lafayette, IN

Using big data to understand data-poor fisheries, by Alan Haynie, Economist, NOAA NMFS/Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA


Sponsor(s):
The NOAA Research and Development Enterprise Committee, Gina DigiantonioEmma Kelley, Laura Newcomb, and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator, Tracy Gill
Remote access:
 
Please register for the seminar at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nsrs4/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe Connect, you should test your abilityto use Adobe Connect at the following link: 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm  
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using aMac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived andmade accessible in the near future. Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset. Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
Abstract
This seminar will include lightning talks highlighting some of NOAA's 2019 research accomplishments. Speakers will talk about improving forecaster and partner interpretation of uncertainty and confidence in risk information, dust storm warnings saving lives and reducing the economic impacts of these events, engaging communities with online action planning tools, and using big data to understand data-poor fisheries.

About the
Presenter(s):

Dr. Jennifer Henderson received herM.F.A. at Goucher College and Ph.D. at Virginia Tech University. Dr. Henderson works with stakeholders in the weather and climate communities to co-produce knowledge about improved communication of risk and uncertainty in predictive information contexts.

Dr. David DuBois received his B.A. in Physics at Rutgers University, M.S. in Physics at New Mexico State University, and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science at the University of Nevada, Reno.As the State Climatologist for New Mexico, Dr. DuBois focuses on climate literacy through providing climate information to the public, speaking engagement, interviews, school demonstrations, networking, and tours. Through his faculty appointment at New Mexico University, he maintains an active research program in air quality and applied climatology.

Dr. Kara Salazar has a B.S. andM.P.A. from Indiana University's School of Public and Environmental Affairs anda M.S. from the Indiana University School of Education. Additionally, she is pursuing a Ph.D. part-time in Natural Resources Social Science at Purdue University.Kara Salazar is Assistant Program Leader and Extension Specialist for Sustainable Communities, affiliated with Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, Purdue University Extension and Department of Forestry and Natural Resources. Working with multidisciplinary teams, she develops programs and resources to support planning and sustainable development strategies in communities across Indiana and Great Lakes states.

Dr. Alan Haynie was an undergraduate in Economics and International Relations at Stanford University and was a NMFS/Sea Grant Marine Resource Economics Graduate Fellow at the University of Washington, from where he received his PhD. Alan is currently an economist at the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, and his research includes the spatial analysis of fisheries under changing climate, biological,and market conditions and with the implementation of catch shares and other management changes.

Subscribeto the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe'in the subject or body. And visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Serieswebsite for more information. 

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Title: Validation of the Polarimetric Radio Occultation and Heavy Precipitation (ROHP) data and Potential Application to Weather Modeling
Presenter(s): F. Joseph (Joe) Turk and Chi O. AoJet Propulsion Laboratory, California Instituteof Technology, Pasadena, CA
Date & Time: 18 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter:

F. Joseph (Joe) Turk and Chi O. Ao, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 


Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series
Remote access:
WebEx:
Event Number:     902 629 658   
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=me9f3b586d540b847e7aa28c848f6b3e2
Audio:
       
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 902 629 658


Abstract:

As stated  in the recent Decadal Survey for Earth Observations from Space, the climate and weather forecast predictive capability for precipitation intensity is limited by gaps in the understanding of basic cloud-convective processes.  This process lacks several observational constraints, one being the difficulty in obtaining the thermodynamic profile (i.e., vertically resolved pressure,temperature, and water vapor structure) in close proximity to convective clouds.  The objective of the Radio Occultations and Heavy Precipitation (ROHP) experiment, orbiting onboard the Spanish PAZ satellite since May 2018, is to demonstrate the simultaneous capability to detect heavy precipitation along the same RO ray paths used to estimate the thermodynamic profile. While conventional RO does not directly provide this capability, PRO enhances standard RO by receiving the GNSS signals in two orthogonal polarizations (“H” and “V”). Owing to hydrometeor asymmetry, the H- and V-polarized radio signals propagating through heavy precipitation will experience differential phase delays,measurable via the ROHP polarimetric antenna.


In this presentation we will discuss the on-orbit calibration and validation of the ROHP data, and present potential applications for these data in weather modeling. The ROHP calibration is performed with an extensive dataset of one year of observations, co-located with independent information from Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) precipitation products and ionospheric activity.  The validation demonstrates how the calibrated products can be used as a proxy for heavy precipitation.  The PRO signals also exhibit positive differential phase signatures well above the freezing level, indicating possible sensitivity to frozen hydrometeors and the cloud vertical structure.  This knowledge of the presence of precipitation associated with the RO observation is useful for the evaluation and diagnosis of NWP forecast models.  The use of PRO in data assimilation methods will require an observation operator that can simulate all contributions to the differential phase delay along realistic RO propagation paths, taking into account the cloud structure.
Presenter(s):

F.J.(Joe) Turk is a radar scientist at JPL, where he has been since 2009.  From 1995-2009, he was a member of the meteorological applications group at the Naval Research Laboratory, Marine Meteorology Division, in Monterey, CA. He received his Ph.D. degree from Colorado State University, and his M.S. and B.S. degrees from Michigan Technological University, all in electrical engineering.  His work experience has covered polarimetric weather radar, satellite passive microwave and radar observations and applications, microwave radiative transfer, polarimetric RO, and airborne radar and wind lidar observations. He is a member of NASA's Precipitation Measurement Missions science team.

Chi O.Ao is a research technologist at JPL with over 15 years of experience in GNSS radio occultation (RO) receiver tracking and inversion techniques, simulation methods, data analysis, and climate applications.  He leads the RO processing and applications team from multiple missions including CHAMP and COSMIC at JPL.  He is currently the GNSS-RO Scientist of the Jason-CS/Sentinel-6mission, the Principal Investigator of the NASA Earth Science U.S. Participating Program for the ROHP-PAZ experiment, and a member of the Decadal Survey Incubation Study Team for the Planetary Boundary Layer.


POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
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19 March 2020

Title: Observational Needs for Marine Ecosystem Modeling and Forecasting: From Coastal Systems to the Global Ocean
Presenter(s): Dr. Antonietta Capotondi, University of Colorado/CIRES and NOAA/ESRL Physical Sciences Division
Date & Time: 19 March 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
Observational Needs for Marine Ecosystem Modeling and Forecasting: From Coastal Systems to the Global Ocean
Presenter(s):

Dr. Antonietta Capotondi , University of Colorado/CIRES and NOAA/ESRL Physical Sciences Division
Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator Tracy Gill.
Remote access:

Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/capatondi/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. If you have not used Adobe connect, you should can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov


Abstract:

Coastal regions hostrich marine ecosystems and are centers of important economic activities,including fishing, shipping, and recreation. Due to the socioeconomic and ecological importance of these areas, predicting relevant indicators of the ecosystem state on sub-seasonal to interannual timescales is becoming increasingly important. Depending on the application, forecasts may be sought for physical, chemical and biological quantities. While these quantities are known to be influenced by large-scale modes of climate variability, which provide important sources of predictability, prediction capabilities are limited by insufficient observations needed for understanding the physical and biological processes involved, as well as for initialization and verification of the prediction systems. In this presentation, I will use examples from U.S.coastal applications developed in the context of the NOAA-CPO-MAPP Marine Prediction Task Force, to identify key observational requirements for facilitating improved understanding and sustaining operational ecosystem forecasting.


Bio:

TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title: Characterizing Potential Distributions of Deep-Sea Corals and Sponges Offshore the US West Coast through Spatial Predictive Modeling
Presenter(s): Matt Poti, NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 19 March 2020
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 13514 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Matt Poti - NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Biogeography Branch

Sponsor: NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program

Point of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8814729048907734029.

For audio: Participants can use their computer speakers or call 415-655-0052 followed by passcode 998-178-755.


Abstract:
Multiple agencies manage marine resources in the Northeast Pacific Ocean offshore the US West Coast. Information about the spatial distribution of sensitive biota, such as deep-sea corals and sponges (DSCS), is critical for making environmentally sound decisions related to offshore activities such as commercial fishing and energy development. Spatial predictive modeling is a cost-effective tool for identifying potential habitat in broad areas where data are sparse. For the area offshore the US West Coast, models of predicted suitable habitat were generated at 200 m resolution for ~50 DSCS taxa. DSCS occurrences were extracted from the NOAA National Deep-Sea Corals and Sponges Database. This included a large number of records from recent high-resolution visual surveys. For each taxon, a statistical model was used to relate occurrence locations to information describing the environmental conditions at these locations, including measures of seafloor topography, surficial sediment character, and oceanography. Models were fit using maximum entropy (Maxent) methods, a common approach for modeling presence-only data. Unlike in previous studies that have modeled distributions of deep-sea biota using Maxent, models were fit as regularized generalized linear models following the recent interpretation of Maxent as a point process. Two steps were taken to reduce the effects of spatial sampling bias on model predictions. First, background location data were selected from the broader set of occurrence data for all taxa. Second, occurrence data were assigned to cross-validation folds for model fitting and testing using spatial blocking. In addition, a stepwise model selection procedure was used to choose an optimal set of environmental predictors for which model performance and complexity were balanced. Model outputs include maps of the predicted distribution of suitable habitat, spatially explicit depictions of prediction uncertainty, and measures of model performance.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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26 March 2020

Title: Ocean Guardian Schools: Learn how to get involved
Presenter(s): Naomi Pollack, Ocean Guardian School Program Coordinator
Date & Time: 26 March 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s):
Naomi Pollack, Ocean Guardian School Program Coordinator
Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429
Remote access:
Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1035761246304441357

Abstract:
What do 134 schools with over 61,000 students from around the country have in common? They have all made a commitment to protect the health of their local watersheds, one ocean and special ocean areas like national marine sanctuaries. ​Since 2009, NOAA's Ocean Guardian School program (https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/ocean_guardian/) has supported K-12 schools to conduct hands-on watershed/ocean stewardship projects on campuses and in local communities. Please join Naomi Pollack for a program overview and learn how your school can participate and become recognized by NOAA as an Ocean Guardian School.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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1 April 2020

Title:
New
Introduction to Machine Learning Applications for Numerical Weather Prediction Systems
Presenter(s): Vladimir Krasnopolsky, NWS/NCEP/EMC
Date & Time: 1 April 2020
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar
Presenter:

Vladimir Krasnopolsky, NWS/NCEP/EMC


Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series: Special Seminar Series on AI
Remote access:
WebEx:
Event Number:     905 519 423   
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=mc7f89d898d256f1b2fed2795e488a264
Audio:
       
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 905 519 423

Abstract:
 This introductory talk provides basic information about mostly used machine learning (ML) techniques and some ML applications developed to enhance different components of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) systems. Basic groups of ML applications that have been already developed for NWP systems are overviewed.Major challenges that NWP currently faces are discussed. It is shown that many of these problems can be resolved or alleviated using ML techniques. ML applications developed for NWP model initialization/data assimilation, model improvements, and model output post processing are discussed. Several examples of such application (ML satellite retrieval algorithm, ML fast parameterizations of subgrid processes, and ML nonlinear ensembles) are introduced to illustrate the capabilities of ML techniques.  Advantages and limitations of ML techniques are discussed.
Bio:
  Dr.Vladimir M. Krasnopolsky got his M.S. in Theoretical and Computational Physics and Ph. D. in Theoretical Nuclear Physics from the Moscow State University (Russia).  He worked in the field of theoretical nuclear physics at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (Moscow State University) before coming to the US in 1989. Since 1990 he has been working in the field of numerical weather and climate prediction and AI applications. Vladimir works on applications of remote sensing and satellite data in meteorology, oceanography, and numerical weather and climate prediction.  Dr.Krasnopolsky also works with various machine learning techniques.  He developed multiple neural network applications for numerical weather and climate prediction.  Dr. Krasnopolsky published two books, two book chapters, over 70 papers in refereed scientific journals.  He is a member (formerly Chair) of the Committee on “Computational and Artificial Intelligence Applications in Environmental Science” of American Meteorological Society, a member of the IEEE/Computational Intelligence Society Task Force “Computational intelligence in earth and environmental sciences”, and a member of the International Neural Network Society Working Group “Computational intelligence in earth and environmental sciences”. In 2018 Vladimir was awarded AMS Distinguished Scientific Committee award for “Contributions to advancing the application of artificial neural networks to earth science problems and in particular emulations of complex multidimensional mappings.”
POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
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2 April 2020

Title: What is the status of fish stocks around the world and the role of fisheries management?
Presenter(s): Ray Hilborn, Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 2 April 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 10153, SSMC4 - Medium Conference Room - 8348
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title:
What is the status of fish stocks around the world and the role of fisheries management?  
Presenter(s):
Ray Hilborn, Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington  
Sponsor(s):
 
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) science seminar coordinator Tracy Gill.   
Remote access:
 
Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/hilborn/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
 
Using data from scientific stock assessments of trends in abundance and fishing mortality for stocks representing roughly half of global catch, we show that on average that stocks are increasing and fishing pressure declining. Merging these data with surveys of fisheries management systems we show that where stocks are intensively managed abundance is higher and fishing pressure lower than where there is little fisheries management. We conclude that the solution to sustaining global fisheries is to assess abundance, set regulations to adjust fishing pressure, and enforce those regulations. We do not have abundance data from half of the world's fisheries, but surveys on management systems and expert opinion on stock abundance for those fisheries suggest the stocks are in poor shape.  


Bio:
Ray Hilborn is a Professor in the School of  Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, specializing in natural resource management and conservation. He authored several books including “Ocean Recovery: a sustainable future for global fisheries? (with Ulrike Hilborn) in 2019, “Overfishing: what everyone needs to know” (with Ulrike Hilborn) in 2012, “Quantitative fisheries stock assessment” with Carl Walters in 1992, and “The Ecological Detective: confronting models with data” with Marc Mangel, in 1997 and has published over 300 peer reviewed articles. He has received the Volvo Environmental Prize, the American Fisheries Societies Award of Excellence, The Ecological Society of America's Sustainability Science Award, and the International Fisheries Science Prize. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Washington State Academy of Sciences, and the American Fisheries Society.  

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. 
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Title: Combining eDNA and traditional surveys to study biodiversity in seamount communities
Presenter(s): Meredith Everett, NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 2 April 2020
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 13514 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Meredith Everett - NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor: NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program

Point of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6172660881479604236.

For audio: Participants can use their computer speakers or call 631-992-3221 followed by passcode 493-034-810.


Abstract:
Seamounts are important habitats in the deep-ocean and are increasingly the focus of national and international conservation efforts. Their structure and local community composition vary depending on location, form, and local oceanic conditions. As with other deep-sea habitats, seamounts can be challenging environments for exploration and surveys. Corals and sponges can be difficult to identify visually, and motile organisms may avoid detection. Sampling is often limited and it is impossible to sample every individual in large, diverse communities. Environmental DNA (eDNA) studies provide a unique way to begin to address whole community diversity on seamounts, capturing a snapshot of a local community and allowing detection of numerous taxa from a single water sample. During the 2018 E/V Nautilus season, 36 eDNA samples were collected at five seamount communities off British Columbia, and 25 eDNA samples were collected from nine seamounts in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. These sampling efforts targeted areas of dense coral and sponge communities, which were highly variable among locations. Representative samples of coral and sponge individuals, as well as high resolution video and still images were collected over the course of the same dives. Combining high throughput amplicon sequencing of the eDNA samples, including markers developed for octocorals, black corals, sponges, and fish, with traditional video and DNA barcode analysis, we have explored whole community diversity around these seamounts. This provides critical baseline information of the structure of these communities for future management of these protected areas.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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Title: Revelations from mitogenome studies of western Gulf of Mexico octocorals
Presenter(s): Erin Easton, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
Date & Time: 2 April 2020
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Erin Easton - University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

Sponsor: NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program

Point of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6172660881479604236.

For audio: Participants can use their computer speakers or call 631-992-3221 followed by passcode 493-034-810.


Abstract:
The continental shelf of the western Gulf of Mexico is a wide, muddy shelf punctuated by a few protruding reefs at mesophotic depths (30-150 m). These reefs provide essential habitat for abundant and diverse marine communities. Most of our knowledge of the octocorals on these reefs is obtained from video surveys and samples collected at the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary but few detailed morphological analyses and genetic studies have been conducted on the collected samples. Because octocorals can be difficult to assign to species from images and the intraspecific and interspecific morphological variations are not well understood for many octocoral taxa, their diversity may be under or overestimated at these reefs. In addition, traditional barcoding regions for octocorals often reveal few to no genetic differences within species or closely related species. To identify new potential barcode regions and to determine whether genetic analysis of the collected octocorals reveal different diversity patterns, we obtained mitogenomes for octocoral morphospecies. Dozens of new primers were designed and at least three potential barcode regions were identified. Preliminary mitogenome data reveal field identifications are often inaccurate, some morphospecies consist of multiple distinct lineages, some morphospecies are genetically distinct from species reported from the region, and target mitogenome regions that may better resolve interspecific differences than the standard barcoding regions used for octocoral studies.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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9 April 2020

Title: OPUS-Projects for real-time kinematic (RTK) Vectors and the GVX Format
Presenter(s): Dan Gillins, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 April 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: OPUS-Projects for RTK Vectors and the GVX Format
Presenter(s):
Dan Gillins,  National Geodetic Survey 
Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.
POC:
Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey
Remote access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1512599650227593739

Abstract:
NGS is developing OPUS-Projects so that GNSS vectors, including from real-time kinematic (RTK) surveys, can be uploaded to a survey network for least squares adjustment and submittal to NGS for publication. This has required developing a standardized GNSS vector exchange format known as GVX (see https://geodesy.noaa.gov/data/formats/GVX/index.shtml).
Advanced Technical Content Rating: Advanced knowledge of the topic is helpful.
Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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14 April 2020

Title: The Opportunity Imperative
Presenter(s): Craig McLean, NOAA's Assistant Administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and NOAA Acting Chief Scientist
Date & Time: 14 April 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ Silver Spring, MD, SSMC4, Room 1W611, or via webinar (see below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Seminars are available to the Public via webinar, and NOAA staff can attend in person or via webinar.   
Title: The Opportunity Imperative
Presenter(s):
 Craig McLean, NOAA Assistant Administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and NOAA Acting Chief Scientist.
Sponsor(s):
 2020 NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series: To provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council.  See seminars here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries 
 
Seminar POCs for questions: For questions about the seminars:  Hernan.Garcia@noaa.govTracy.Gill@noaa.govSandra.Claar@noaa.gov , Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov
Remote access:
 Register for webinar at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/mclean/event/registration.html
After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBD
About the speaker:  Craig McLean is the Assistant Administrator for NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research. He is responsible for NOAA's research enterprise including a network of research laboratories and the execution of NOAA programs including the Climate Program, Weather Research, National Sea Grant, and Ocean Exploration, to name a few. Among a number of formal international engagements in science and technology, Mr. McLean serves as the U.S. Representative to the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC), and as the U.S. Representative for the U.S.-European Union-Canada Galway Statement on Atlantic Ocean Cooperation. Mr. McLean has previously served throughout NOAA, in the National Marine Fisheries Service, National Ocean Service, NOAA's General Counsel, and was the founding Director of NOAA's Ocean Exploration program. He served in uniform for nearly 25 years in NOAA's Commissioned Corps, retiring at the rank of Captain. Mr. McLean is a Fellow of the Explorers Club and of the Marine Technology Society, and a past-president and former chairman of the Sea-Space Symposium. https://www.noaa.gov/our-people/leadership/craig-mclean
Are our seminars recorded? Yes. When available these will be posted here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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16 April 2020

Title: Quantifying the overlap of trawl fisheries with deep-sea corals and sponges in the Aleutians Islands, Alaska
Presenter(s): John Olson - NOAA Fisheries Alaska Regional Office
Date & Time: 16 April 2020
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in HQ SSMC3 13514 conf room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series 

Speaker: John Olson - NOAA Fisheries Alaska Regional Office

Sponsor: NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program

Point of Contact: heather.coleman@noaa.gov (301-427-8650)

Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6600028956568341772.

For audio: Participants can use their computer speakers or call 415-655-0060 followed by passcode 654-149-455.


Abstract:
Deep-sea coral and sponge communities in the Aleutian Islands are important habitat features for many life stages of commercially important fish targets, including Atka mackerel, Pacific cod, and rockfish. The effects of commercial fishing activities on deep-sea corals and sponges has been difficult to quantify due to a lack of spatially-explicit fishery data, bottom contact by different gear types, undetermined location of corals and sponges, and the susceptibility and recovery dynamics these structure-forming invertebrates (SFI). To address these challenges, a fishing effects model was developed in the North Pacific to integrate spatially explicit VMS data with target-specific gear configurations for over 40,000 bottom trawls since 2003. Fishery observer coverage for Aleutian Island trawl fisheries is nearly 100 percent and records catch species composition. Species distribution models provide presence data for coral, sponge, Primnoidae, and Stylasteridae. A simple spatial overlap analysis of the trawl footprint indicates trawl fisheries are extremely aggregated and spatially distinct for three main targets " mackerel, cod, and rockfish. Across the Aleutian Islands, trawl fisheries affect less than 10% of areas of the highest probability of presence for SFIs. Patterns in spatial variation exist longitudinally, from about 5% in the eastern, 10% in the central, and 20% in the western Aleutians. This footprint analysis depicts maximum overlap, as it does not account for bottom contact, estimated at between 20 and 100% for AI fisheries, or susceptibility or recovery of SFIs. However, this analysis does provide valuable information for fishery managers evaluating impacts on SFIs.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

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23 April 2020

Title: Gardening Corals for Reef Restoration
Presenter(s): Katie Lohr, Conservation Science Fellow for the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries through the Sea Grant John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Program
Date & Time: 23 April 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Gardening Corals for Reef Restoration
Presenter(s):
Katie Lohr, Conservation Science Fellow for the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries through the Sea Grant John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Program
Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429
Remote access:
Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4679716503903139852

Abstract:
As coral reefs decline globally, interest in using coral gardening techniques for reef restoration is increasing. This webinar presentation will review well-established and cutting-edge techniques for propagating and restoring corals, as well as experimental work focused on identifying corals that can survive future ocean conditions.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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12 May 2020

Title: Creating OneNOAA
Presenter(s): Louisa Koch, NOAA's Director of Education
Date & Time: 12 May 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, Central Library, SSMC3, 2nd floor
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Seminars are available to the Public via webinar, and NOAA staff can attend in person or via webinar.   
Title: Creating OneNOAA
Presenter(s):
 Louisa Koch, NOAA's Director of Education    
Sponsor(s):
 2020 NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series: To provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council.  See seminars here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries  
Seminar POCs for questions: For questions about the seminars: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.govTracy.Gill@noaa.govSandra.Claar@noaa.gov , Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov
Remote access:
 Register for webinar at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/koch/event/registration.html 
After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.  
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
 Explore NOAA's representation and opportunities to better integrate, leverage and increase NOAA resources.  
About the speaker: Louisa Koch, NOAA's Director of Education, educates and inspires the public and future workforce about the Earth System working with NOAA's amazing array of people, partners, places and information. Ms. Koch served as NOAA's acting Deputy Under Secretary and Deputy Assistant Administrator for Research. Before joining NOAA, Ms. Koch worked for Office of Management and Budget, the Department of Defense and the Joint Economic Committee, U.S. Congress. Ms. Koch earned a Master's in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Bachelor's in Physics from Middlebury College. She lives in Maryland with her husband and two daughters. https://www.noaa.gov/education/our-people/louisa-koch 
 
Are our seminars recorded? Yes. When available these will be posted here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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9 June 2020

Title: Evolving Challenges in Fisheries Science (and How We Are Tackling Them)
Presenter(s): Francisco -Cisco- Werner PhD, Director of Scientific Programs & Chief Science Advisor of NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service
Date & Time: 9 June 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ Silver Spring, MD, SSMC4, Room 1W611
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Evolving Challenges in Fisheries Science (and How We Are Tackling Them)
Presenter(s):
Francisco (Cisco) Werner PhD, Director of Scientific Programs & Chief Science Advisor of NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service
Sponsor(s):
 2020 NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series: To provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council.  See seminars here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries  
Seminar POCs for questions: For questions about the seminars:  Hernan.Garcia@noaa.govTracy.Gill@noaa.govSandra.Claar@noaa.gov , Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov
Remote access:
 Register for webinar at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/werner/event/registration.html
Seminars are available to the Public via webinar, and NOAA staff can attend in person or via webinar 
 
After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
  NOAA Fisheries is responsible for the stewardship of the nation's ocean resources and their habitat. Our mission is to ensure productive and sustainable fisheries, safe sources of seafood, the recovery and conservation of protected resources, and healthy ecosystems, all backed by sound science and an ecosystem-based approach to management. In the past 5 years, our science and advice to management have required that we consider " among others " remarkable changes in our environment and expansions in the multi-sectoral uses of coastal regions. At the same time, we have benefited from rapid advances in scientific and technological capabilities, such as molecular (‘omics) methods, artificial intelligence, unmanned systems, and computational capabilities. As such, it is fair to say that we are at a pivot point in the science needed to address upcoming challenges. A discussion of next steps in our science will be presented.
About the speaker: Dr. Francisco (Cisco) Werner is the Director of Scientific Programs and Chief Science Advisor for NOAA Fisheries, a role he took on in June 2017. In this capacity, he leads NOAA Fisheries' efforts to provide the science needed to support sustainable fisheries and ecosystems and to continue our nation's progress in ending overfishing, rebuilding fish populations, saving critical species, and preserving vital habitats. As director, Cisco supervises the planning, development, and management of a multidisciplinary scientific enterprise of basic and applied research. He oversees NOAA's six regional Fisheries Science Centers, including 24 labs and field stations, and the Office of Science and Technology. Cisco previously served as the Science and Research Director for NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center from 2011 to 2016. Prior to joining NOAA Fisheries, he was the Director of the Institute of Marine and Coastal Studies at Rutgers University. Cisco's research has focused on the development and implementation of numerical models of ocean circulation and ocean forecasting systems. He has also published extensively on the effects of physical forcing on marine ecosystems and the impact on the structure, function, and abundance of ecologically and commercially important species in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. He served as Chair of the GLOBEC (Global Ecosystem Dynamics) Program, and is presently the U.S. delegate to PICES (the North Pacific Marine Science Organization). Cisco earned his BSc in Mathematics, and his MSc and PhD in Oceanography, all from the University of Washington.  https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/contact/cisco-werner-phd
Are our seminars recorded? Yes. When available these will be posted here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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14 July 2020

Title: Collecting and providing an operational, integrated digital understanding of our earth environment to meet NOAA and the world’s needs
Presenter(s): Stephen Volz PhD, NOAA's Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services
Date & Time: 14 July 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ Silver Spring, MD, SSMC4, Room 1W611, or via webinar, see below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Collecting and providing an operational, integrated digital understanding of our earth environment to meet NOAA and the world's needs
Presenter(s):
Stephen Volz PhD, NOAA's Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services 
Sponsor(s):
 2020 NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series: To provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council.  See seminars here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries  
Seminar POCs for questions: For questions about the seminars:  Hernan.Garcia@noaa.govTracy.Gill@noaa.govSandra.Claar@noaa.gov , katie.rowley@noaa.gov 
Remote access:
 Register for webinar at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/volz/event/registration.html 
Seminars are available to the Public via webinar, and NOAA staff can attend in person or via webinar 
 
After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBD
Bio:
Dr. Volz has 26 years of professional experience in aerospace. He is a leader in the international Earth observation community, serving as the NOAA Principal to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). In this capacity he leads efforts to coordinate global satellite based observations among international space agency partners to further the development of a Global Earth Observation System of Systems. He serves as the Co-Chair of the NOAA Observing Systems Council and is also a member of the NOAA Executive Council. Dr. Volz previously served as the Associate Director for Flight Programs in the Earth Science Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate where he managed all of NASA's Earth Science flight missions and associated activities. Prior to serving as the Flight Program Director, Dr. Volz was the Earth Science program executive for a series of Earth Science missions, including EO-3 GIFTS, CloudSat, CALIPSO, and ICESat, and he led the Senior Review for the Earth Science operating missions. Dr. Volz worked in industry at Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation from 1997"2002, where he was the Project Manager for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility superfluid helium cryostat and other flight projects. From 1986"1997 Dr. Volz worked for NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center as an instrument manager, an I&T Manager, a systems engineer, and a cryogenic systems engineer on missions and instruments including the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), among others. Dr. Volz is a member of several professional societies, including the American Physical Society (M'82), the American Astronomical Society (M'87), the American Geophysical Union (M'02), and the American Meteorological Society (M'08). He is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), an active member of and participant in the Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS), and a member of the GRSS Administration Committee (AdCom) for the period of 2013"2017. Dr. Volz has a doctorate in Experimental Condensed Matter Physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (1986), a master's in Physics from Illinois (1981), and a bachelor's in Physics from the University of Virginia (1980). He has more than 20 publications in peer reviewed journals. https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/sites/default/files/asset/document/stephen_volz_bio.pdf
Are our seminars recorded? Yes. When available these will be posted here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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16 July 2020

Title: Invasion and restoration at Palmyra Atoll: benthic dynamics associated with the invasive corallimorph, Rhodactis howesii
Presenter(s): Amanda Carter, OAR
Date & Time: 16 July 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s):
Amanda Carter, Congressional Affairs Fellow for NOAA Research  
Sponsor(s):
Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library.
POC:
Knauss Fellow Hollis Jones (hollis.jones@noaa.gov
Remote access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Knauss Fellows Seminar Series: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7762577768086995714 Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
 Few studies have documented the spatial and temporal dynamics of highly invasive species in coral reef benthic communities. In this presentation, we will discuss how we quantified the ecological dynamics of invasion by a corallimorph, Rhodactis howesii, at Palmyra Atoll in the central Pacific. We examined the spatial and temporal dynamics of this invasion, and its impact on the benthic community, using a combination of permanent photoquadrats and large-scale photomosaic imagery. Additionally, clearing plots were established and coral fragments were transplanted to provide the basis for a long-term restoration experiment on a reef undergoing invasion.  
About the speaker: Amanda has a Masters and Ph.D. from Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, CA. Her graduate research focused on global and local stressors on coral reefs, and their impacts on the spatial, chemical, and microbial ecology of the benthic community. She was fortunate enough to spend the last 8 years working at Palmyra Atoll, one of her favorite places to dive.  
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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8 September 2020

Title: Empowered to Lead: Inspiring the Next Generation of Leaders
Presenter(s): Albert 'Benjie' Spencer, Chief Engineer, Director, Engineering Standards, NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 8 September 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ Silver Spring, MD, SSMC4, Room 1W611 or via webinar - see below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Empowered to Lead: Inspiring the Next Generation of Leaders
Presenter(s):
Albert (Benjie) Spencer, Chief Engineer, Director, Engineering Standards, NOAA's National Weather Service
Sponsor(s):
 2020 NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series: To provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council.  See seminars here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries 
 
Seminar POCs for questions: For questions about the seminars:  Hernan.Garcia@noaa.govTracy.Gill@noaa.govSandra.Claar@noaa.gov, Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov
Remote access:
 Register for webinar at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/spencer/event/registration.html 
After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.  
Seminars are available to the Public via webinar, and NOAA staff can attend in person or via webinar. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: 
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBD
About the speaker: TBD
Are our seminars recorded? Yes. When available these will be posted here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

 

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Developer - Lori K. Brown


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