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Past Seminars

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

  • The OneNOAA Science Seminar Series began in 2004 and is a voluntary effort by over 40 NOAA seminar coordinators to produce and distribute a list of NOAA-hosted, publicly accessible science seminars. Last year we shared listings for over 500 seminars with over 7700 subscribers.
  • For general seminar series questions, contact Hernan Garcia, Tracy Gill, or Lori Brown. For questions specific to a particular seminar, email the contact listed in the seminar description.
  • During the COVID-19 Pandemic: All NOAA seminars will be presented via webinar only.
  • To subscribe/unsubscribe: Send an email with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov.
  • Here are the Seminar submission guidelines
  • Here is the Google calendar of seminar listings
  • All seminar are listed in Eastern Time

9 March 2021

Title: Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Spring Flood Outlook
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center;Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia
Date & Time: 9 March 2021
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Climate Overview
Sandra Rayne | Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview
Jeff Dobur/Todd Hamill | NWS Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update
Pam Knox | University of Georgia

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact: Meredith Muth, NIDIS, (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/6735992372888130064

Abstract:

Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems. The March 9 webinar will also feature the spring flood outlook.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Targeted High Resolution Water Clarity Mapping for Hydrographic Survey Planning In Alaska
Presenter(s): David Flanagan, TCarta, Marine Remote Sensing Program Coordinator; Ben Page, TCarta, Remote Sensing Analyst & PI
Date & Time: 9 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Targeted High Resolution Water Clarity Mapping for Hydrographic Survey Planning In Alaska

Presenter(s):
David Flanagan, TCarta, Marine Remote Sensing Program Coordinator; Ben Page, TCarta, Remote Sensing Analyst

POC: Tiffany House tiffany.house@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8300898687165463821

Join us for our next NOAA Innovators Seminar on March 9th at 12PM ET!

Keywords: Water Quality, Remote Sensing, and Alaska

Abstract:
TCarta has developed a hydrospatial analysis tool to map water clarity using harmonized surface reflectances from Sentinel-2 and high-resolution PlanetScope imagery to aid in hydrographic survey planning. Monitoring surface water quality phenology will help forecast clear water conditions for airborne and marine-based hydrographic surveys and support optimal satellite imagery collection.

Bio(s):
David Flanagan leads the marine remote sensing program at TCarta in research and development and commercial production efforts. He joined TCarta 2 ½ years ago after completing his MS in Environmental Studies at the College of Charleston.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title:
New
Ten Ocean Prophecies
Presenter(s): Jason Link, PhD, Senior Scientist for Ecosystems, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service
Date & Time: 9 March 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Ten Ocean Prophecies
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series. These webinars are open to anyone, in or outside of NOAA.

Presenter(s):
Jason Link, PhD, Senior Scientist for Ecosystems, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service

Remote Access:
Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/jasonlink/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Environmental Leadership seminar series. The NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series was created to provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council. For questions about the seminars, contact:
Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov, or
Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Society has always needed, reluctantly tolerated, and ultimately had a place for those who remind them of inconvenient facts, point out that the status quo isn't quite working or will soon stop working, challenge the inertia that is resistant to obviously needed change, and predict likely future conditions to drive home the prior three considerations. Today we mostly call those individuals “scientists” and they are still very much needed. Yet the perils multiply when scientists themselves become so entrenched within their various systems, bureaucracies and operations that they too become resistant to such “prophetic” nudges. By gently highlighting some predictions extended to their probable impacts, as well as how we can mitigate them, I seek to combat this danger to us as a scientific community.

In case you may have missed it, an observation very relevant to NOAA is that the world's oceans are experiencing unprecedented pressures and challenges, from climate change to excessive resource use to fundamental shifts in major marine ecosystem processes to a host of other perturbations, often beyond anything we have ever observed before. The implications of these impacts for ocean-dependent economies, human well-being, the ocean ecosystem itself, and frankly the entire planet, are not trivial. Here I want to call attention to some of these issues with example forecasts of major marine ecosystem changes, that if left unaddressed will become problematic at ever-increasing scales.

Coupling those two observations - i.e., the need for a “prophetic” message and the challenges facing marine ecosystems - here I issue a challenge to us as a marine science organization, a call to action of sorts. I present this call to action by briefly noting 10 ocean prophecies. You'll have to listen in to hear what those “prophecies” or predictions entail. But to tease how might they inform us and how we might address the issues they raise, some common threads among these “prophecies” include the need to: better communicate maintainable urgency; stop arguing amongst ourselves over trivial, 4th significant-digits decimal point false precision minutia; be even more organizationally flexible, less siloed, less program-oriented, and more outcome focused; incorporate the science of decision-making under uncertainty in all our decision-making protocols; recognize and leverage the value of tradeoffs; and focus on assertively presenting actionable solutions. Though there is always a warning in a “prophetic” message, there is also always hope; it is the latter upon which I will accentuate.

Bio(s):
Jason Link is Senior Scientist for Ecosystem-based Management for the National Marine Fisheries Service, at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole. Dr. Link earned his B.S. in Biology with a minor in Chemistry from Central Michigan University. He then received his Ph.D. from Michigan Technological University. He began his career with NOAA NMFS at the Pascagoula Lab before moving to the Woods Hole Lab.Accessibility: This webinar will have closed captioning.To access the video and PDF of the presentation after the seminar, visit:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries and look under tab for Past Presentations.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title:
New
What does drought look like in the Aleutian islands & Southwest Alaska
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 9 March 2021
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Drought Webinar Series (https://uaf-accap.org/research-activities/alaska-drought-webinar-series/)

Register: https://alaska.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZEucuquqzsrHtxE0cMaT0qPf4OC3ZSqlbzK

Presenter(s):
TBD

Abstract:
Join a listening session to share your story, experiences or data and hear from others in the region. These two-hour listening sessions will start with four, short presentations from people who live and work in the region with time for questions. Then small group discussions to hear from participants on what they have or are experiencing in terms of unusual dryness in the region and how they have prepared for future drought.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

10 March 2021

Title:
New
Saildrone - Ocean Mapping and Exploration at Scale
Presenter(s): Captain Brian Connon, US Navy, Retired, Vice President, Ocean Mapping at Saildrone, Inc.
Date & Time: 10 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Saildrone - Ocean Mapping and Exploration at Scale

Presenter(s):
Captain Brian Connon, US Navy (Retired), Vice President, Ocean Mapping at Saildrone, Inc.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Webinar Series and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Seminar coordinators are Amber.Butler@noaa.gov, Executive Secretariat for the Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping team in the National Ocean Service, and the Executive Secretariat for the Interagency Working Group on Ocean and Coastal Mapping which consists of 13 federal agencies." and Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov, NOS science seminar coordinator.

Remote Access:
Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/saildrone/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Accessibility:
This webinar will have closed captioning.

Abstract:
Saildrone, Inc. has launched a 72 foot (22 m) version of its uncrewed surface vehicles, known as saildrones. Powered by wind and solar energy, saildrones are capable of extreme-duration missions of up to 12 months in the open ocean. This latest and largest version, the first in the Surveyor class of USVs, is called the Saildrone Surveyor, and carries sonar equipment capable of seafloor mapping down to 7,000 m. This seminar will give a brief overview of Saildrone and then focus on how Surveyor can offer a cost-effective, modern solution for national and international ocean mapping and exploration requirements.

Bio(s):
Captain Brian Connon, US Navy (Ret) became Vice President, Ocean Mapping at Saildrone, Inc. in December 2020 after serving as Director of the University of Southern Mississippi's Hydrographic Science Research Center. A 28-year veteran of the US Navy, he directed the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency's Maritime Safety Office, served as Superintendent of the US Naval Observatory, Deputy Oceanographer/Navigator of the Navy, Deputy Hydrographer of the Navy, and Commanding Officer of the Navy's Fleet Survey Team. A certified hydrographer, he holds a BS in Geography from the University of South Carolina, an MS in Oceanography and Meteorology from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA, and an MS in Hydrography from the University of Southern Mississippi. He is a Chartered Marine Scientist (Hydrography) and Fellow of the Institute for Marine Engineering, Science and Technology. He also serves as Editor for the International Hydrographic Review and is a Trustee of The Hydrographic Society of America.Slides and Recording: The recording (and possibly a PDF of the slides) will be available after the webinar. Questions? Contact Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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Title: NOAA Science Report Seminar: Sustainable Use and Stewardship of Ocean and Coastal Resources
Presenter(s): Multiple presenters
Date & Time: 10 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

NOAA Science Report Seminar: Four projects presented about sustainable use and stewardship of ocean and coastal resources.

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3687206059398171659 (when you register for one webinar, you are signing up for the entire NOAA Science Report Seminar series)



Sponsor(s):

NOAA Research and Development Enterprise Committee. Points of contact: Isha Renta (isha.renta@noaa.gov) & NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)



Abstract:
Forecasting hazardous algal blooms, estimating bluefin tuna from genetic techniques, supporting Alaska coastal resource management, and testing oyster restoration strategies - these are just a few of NOAA's scientific accomplishments that are highlighted in the 2020 NOAA Science Report. The NOAA Science Report celebrates NOAA's R&D by showcasing science highlights, bibliometrics, NOAA's scientific workforce, and more. This seminar features four projects from the 2020 NOAA Science Report (to be released soon) related to sustainable use and the stewardship of our oceans and coastal resources.

Keywords: NOAA Science Report, Ocean, Coastal, Marine

Forecasting Hazardous Algal Blooms: Modeling and Molecular Tools

Presenter(s):
Mark Rowe, Research Physical Scientist, NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI; Steve Kibler, Oceanographer, NOAA's Beaufort LaboratoryBeaufort, NC

Bio(s)
Mark Rowe works on developing models to understand and predict changes in the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the Great Lakes. His recent work has focused on development of linked hydrodynamic and biological models to simulate harmful algal blooms and hypoxia in Lake Erie, and impacts of invasive quagga mussels on primary production, nutrient cycles, and the lower food web of Lake Michigan. He has contributed to forecast models that provide timely and actionable information to public water systems, anglers, recreational users of Lake Erie. Dr. Rowe received MS and PhD degrees from Michigan Technological University where he conducted research on measurement and modeling of atmospheric deposition of persistent organic pollutants to Lake Superior.

Steve Kibler has a B.S. in marine biology from Long Island University and an M.S. in biological oceanography from Old Dominion University. He has been working on harmful algal bloom-related projects at NOAA's Beaufort Laboratory since 2000. His current work is focused on trophic transfer of toxins during Alexandrium blooms in Alaska.

Genomic Abundance Estimation for Western Atlantic Bluefin Tuna Using Close-Kin Mark Recapture



Presenter(s):
Matthew Lauretta, Research Fishery Biologist, National Marine Fisheries Service, Miami, FL



Bio(s):

Matthew Lauretta is a Research Fishery Biologist at the NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center. He received his Bachelor's degree in Environmental Chemistry at Northern Arizona University, and his Doctorate in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences at the University of Florida. His current research focuses on population assessment and stock forecasting of Atlantic tunas and billfish. Aside from fish, his hobbies include board games, biking, hiking, disc-golf, and native plant gardening.

Kachemak Bay Ecological Assessment: Supporting Alaska Coastal Resource Management

Presenter(s):
Kris Holderied, Director, NOAA Kasitsna Bay Laboratory, Seldovia, AK



Bio(s):

Director of the NOAA Kasitsna Bay Laboratory since 2005, Kris Holderied oversees research and facility operations at the lab, conducts research on coastal ecosystem change and supports marine science education activities. Her research interests in oceanography, estuaries and nearshore habitats are focused on better understanding how changing ocean conditions affect Alaska coastal resources and communities, especially those associated with climate change, harmful algal blooms and ocean acidification. Holderied previously worked as a physical oceanographer with NOAA/NOS/NCCOS in Silver Spring, Md., developing satellite-based products for benthic habitat mapping, harmful algal bloom detection and coastal climate change impacts. Before that, she worked on environmental compliance projects for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Norfolk, VA and served as an active duty oceanography officer in the U.S. Navy. She has a BS degree in oceanography from the U.S. Naval Academy and a MS degree in physical oceanography from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program.

Testing Alternative Oyster Restoration Strategies

Presenter(s):
Jason Spires, Research Ecologist, NOAA Cooperative Oxford Laboratory, Marine Spatial Ecology DivisionNational Centers for Coastal Ocean Science NOAA National Ocean Service Oxford, MD



Bio(s):
Jason Spires is a Research Ecologist with NOAA's Cooperative Oxford Laboratory on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. He received his B.S. from the University of Maryland in Geography and GIS in 2005, M.S. in Fisheries Science from the University of Maryland in 2015, and currently is a part-time Ph.D. student at the University of Maryland-Horn Point Laboratory. Jason's work focuses on developing tools and techniques for marking and recapturing calcium carbonate based organisms, primarily oysters. Currently, Jason is collaborating with the NOAA Restoration Center and other federal and state agencies to investigate lower cost, oyster restoration methods. In addition, Jason is also a NOAA scientific diver and actively serves as a graduate student mentor in the NOAA Educational Partnership Program.



Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php



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Title: Managing Harmful Algal Blooms in Tribal Waters, a Three-part Series
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 10 March 2021
1:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Managing Harmful Algal Blooms in Tribal Waters - a Three-part Seminar Series on the impacts of marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their toxins.
These three free seminars are on March 10, 16, & 18, 2021 at 1:00-3:30 pm ET or
10:00 am -12:30 pm PT.

Presenter(s):
TBD

Sponsor(s):
US EPA, in collaboration with the NOAA and the Sitka Tribe of Alaska, is hosting this three-part webinar series.Seminar Contact: EPACyanoHABs@epa.gov; NOAA contact is Steve.Morton@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here (free).

Abstract:
In this this three-part webinar series on the impacts of marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their toxins, attendees will have the opportunity to:
  • Listen to and talk with Tribes from across the country about their experiences addressing the impacts of HABs and their toxins in fresh and marine waters.

  • Learn about strategies to build tribal capacity for effectively collecting baseline data on HABs.

  • Ask national experts about data collection, funding, outreach, and other HABs management needs.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. For more, visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website.
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Title: Snow Crab in a Rapidly Changing Ocean: historical context, recent insights and future perspectives
Presenter(s): Erin Fedewa, erin.fedewa@noaa.gov, Fisheries Biologist at the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center | Kodiak, AK
Date & Time: 10 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - PMEL - EcoFOCI Virtual Seminar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Snow Crab in a Rapidly Changing Ocean: historical context, recent insights and future perspectives / EcoFOCI Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Erin Fedewa, Fisheries Biologist at the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center | Kodiak, AK

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact: Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Abstract:
Record high Bering Sea water temperatures in 2018 and 2019 were accompanied by dramatic shifts in snow crab population structure, highlighting the importance of ongoing and future research efforts to better understand snow crab responses to continued warming.

Bio(s):


Accessibility:

Slides:
Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker.

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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Title: NOAA’s Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program: 10 Years and Counting
Presenter(s): Dr. Stephanie Oakes, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 10 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Stephanie Oakes , NOAA Fisheries, Integrated Ecosystem Assessment program manager

Sponsor(s):
NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4462794963967362828 Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) approach engages scientists, stakeholders, and managers to consider all ecosystem components, including humans, in the decision-making process. This helps managers balance trade-offs and contemplate ways to achieve their goals. 2020 marked the 10-year anniversary of NOAA's adoption of the IEA framework. We will discuss the origins of the IEAs approach, and how the approach builds relationships between people and provides the ecosystem science necessary to balance the needs of nature and society.

Keywords: integrated, ecosystems, assessments

Bio(s):
Dr. Oakes is a Fishery Biologist with the Marine Ecosystems Division at the NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology in Silver Spring MD (USA). Her research background focused on the study of Antarctic marine ecosystems and food webs. She is now the program manager for the NOAA IEA program, supports initiatives related to ecosystem based management and ecosystem based fisheries management, and implements NOAA and NOAA Fisheries policies related to scientific integrity.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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11 March 2021

Title: Persistent Contaminants and Herpesvirus Infection are Positively Correlated with Cancer in Wild California Sea Lions
Presenter(s): Dr. Frances Gulland, University of California, Davis; Dr. Alissa Deming, Pacific Marine Mammal Center, California; Prof. Ailsa Hall, University of St Andrews, Scotland; Dr. Irvin Schultz, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 11 March 2021
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Frances Gulland, University of California, Davis; Dr. Alissa Deming, Pacific Marine Mammal Center, California; Prof. Ailsa Hall, University of St Andrews, Scotland; Dr. Irvin Schultz, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5102268728787699984

Abstract:
The prevalence of cancer in wild California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) is one of the highest in mammals, with 18"23% of adult animals examined post-mortem over the past 40 years having urogenital carcinoma. Multiple factors have been identified in association with this carcinoma: sea lion genetics, infections and organochlorine pollutants. Two recent publications this year (Links to Gulland and Deming papers) demonstrate that genital herpesvirus infection plays an integral role in carcinogenesis and the importance of persistent organochlorines combined with OtHV1 infection in cancer occurrence in wild sea lions. These sea lion studies provide evidence that herpesvirus infection (OtHV1) is critical to the likelihood of carcinoma occurrence, however the higher the animals' blubber contaminant concentrations, the higher the odds of cancer.Key Takeaways: -Demonstrating unequivocal adverse health effects of persistent contaminants on marine mammals is challenging due to the impossibility of conducting controlled exposure studies, while observational studies on wild animals are challenged with confounding factors causing adverse health effects, life history traits, and the need for ethical and non-invasive monitoring.-These studies are significant because they establish a strong causality between contaminant exposure, viral infection and cancer in sea lions. Such synergism between pollutants and virus in causing cancer has been suggested previously in humans but not in wildlife.-These studies demonstrate the value of long-term collaborative epidemiological studies on stranded animals that control for multiple factors and use large sample sizes.Publications: Two recent publications this year (Gulland et al. and Deming et al.) demonstrate that genital herpesvirus infection plays an integral role in carcinogenesis and the importance of persistent organochlorines combined with OtHV1 infection in cancer occurrence in wild sea lions.

Bio(s):
Dr. Frances Gulland is a veterinarian and Research Associate at the University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine. She received her veterinary degree and PhD in Zoology from the University of Cambridge, U.K., in 1984 and 1991 respectively. She then worked at The Marine Mammal Center in California for 25 years providing veterinary care to stranded marine mammals. She has chaired the U.S. Working Group on Marine Mammal Unusual Mortality Events, the Southern Sea Otter Recovery Implementation Team, and currently serves as Commissioner on the U.S. Marine Mammal Commission.Dr. Alissa Deming is the Director of Clinical Medicine at the Pacific Marine Mammal Center. She received her Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine and PhD in Comparative, Diagnostic and Population Medicine from the University of Florida. Her PhD research focused on the role a herpesvirus infection plays in a common cancer seen in wild California sea lions. She has strong background in marine mammal veterinary medicine, having worked as a clinical veterinarian at The Marine Mammal Center, Dauphin Island Sea Lab, SeaWorld San Diego, and the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program. Her principal research interest is to investigate disease patterns in marine mammal populations to better understand the impacts of human and environmental influences on ecosystem health.
Prof. Ailsa Hall is currently Emeritus Professor at the University of St Andrews, Sea Mammal Research Unit. She recently retired as Director of the Unit after 30 years of research focused on factors affecting the survival of marine mammals. With a background in Epidemiology and a PhD in Occupational Medicine she first studied the effects of the phocine distemper virus on UK seal populations in the early 1990s. Since then she has been involved in a wide range of marine mammal epidemiological, toxicological and physiological studies with collaborators from all over the world.Dr. Schultz is program manager of the environmental chemistry group (ECP) at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The ECP studies chemical and biologic agents impacting marine mammals and other marine organisms. Dr. Schultz previously served as a senior scientist at the PNNL"Marine Sciences Lab from 1996-2017, developing research programs on salmonid toxciogenomics, endocrine disruption, marine algal toxins, bioaccumulation of nanomaterials and human exposure monitoring in coastal populations. His areas of expertise includes analytical chemistry, in vitro/in vivo extrapolations, toxicokinetics and biological modeling.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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Title:
New
“Talk to me, Goose” Using Dataset DOIs: Part 2 of our Digital Object Identifier Series
Presenter(s): Don Collins, Oceanographer, NESDIS
Date & Time: 11 March 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Welcome to our next installment of the Publishing @ NOAA Series!

Presenter(s):
Don Collins, Oceanographer, NESDIS
Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5906362472614441487This is the second in a two-part series focusing on digital object identifiers, or DOIs. In Part 2 of the series, NCEI oceanographer and archivist Don Collins will discuss data DOIs: what are they, how does NCEI manage DOIs for archived data, and what are similarities/differences between publication and data DOIs. In Part 1, NOAA Central Library librarian Jenn Fagan-Fry discussed what digital object identifiers (DOIs) are, how publication DOIs are used in academic publishing, who is responsible for creating and maintaining them, and more. Watch Part 1 here: I feel the need...the need for Publication DOIs

Bio(s):
Don Collins has more than 30 years of experience working at NOAA data centers, starting at the National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) which merged with the other NOAA data centers in 2015 to become the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Don is the current lead for the NOAA Data IDs Working Group and NCEI Data Citation team. He leads a team of science data managers that work on acquiring, ingesting, and archiving data at NCEI and is the current product owner for the OneStop project Collection Manager tools team. One of his current activities is working with the NOAA Data Strategy team to identify and provide guidance about using appropriate licenses for environmental data archived at NCEI.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php
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Title:
New
Fishing for answers in the age of genomics
Presenter(s): Devon Pearse, PhD, NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center/University of California, Santa Cruz
Date & Time: 11 March 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Fishing for answers in the age of genomics

Presenter(s):
Devon Pearse, PhD, NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center/University of California, Santa Cruz

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website
POC: Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 905 389 231
Meeting password: hqM8wrE5kb3

JOIN BY PHONE
1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free, Access code: 905 389 231Can't join the meeting? Contact support.

ABSTRACTResearch on the evolutionary genomic characteristics of natural populations has made spectacular progress in the past few years, largely due to the advances in sequencing technology and analysis. However, it is far from clear how our understanding of adaptive genomic variation can or should inform wildlife conservation practice. Before this occurs, consideration must be given to the biological realities of dynamic natural habitats and the implications of using specific genomic targets to set conservation priorities. In this talk I will present examples of genomic variants associated with specific phenotypes in salmonids and other taxa to demonstrate the complex ways in which genomic variation and the environment interact to affect phenotypic variation and individual fitness and to highlight the key issues and limitations for the incorporation of adaptive genomic variation in conservation practice.

BIOGRAPHYDr. Devon Pearse is a Research Geneticist in the Fisheries Ecology Division of the NOAA/NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center, and adjunct professor at the University of California in Santa Cruz, CA. He works as part of a cooperative group of scientists focused on using genetic data to understand the evolutionary processes that affect individuals and populations. This work provides basic insights and informs science policy. Devon's career has spanned a remarkable transition in the field of genetics; he earned his PhD in Genetics from the University of Georgia in Athens, GA where he dabbled in allozymes and used just three microsatellite loci to conduct parentage analysis in freshwater turtles, while projects he is involved in today use whole genome re-sequencing data, providing incredible resolution to identify adaptive genomic variation.

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Title: Working in the Modernized National Spatial Reference System
Presenter(s): Dru Smith, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 11 March 2021
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Working in the Modernized National Spatial Reference System

Presenter(s):
Dru Smith, National Geodetic Survey (NGS)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. POC: Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4481024867393675532

Abstract:

In 2020 NGS updated all three of its "Blueprint" documents, outlining the modernized NSRS. This webinar will go through the 2020 update to "Blueprint for the modernized NSRS, Part 3: Working in the modernized NSRS.

Technical Content Rating: Intermediate - Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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Title: Interactive data visualizations for coral conservation and management in FL and the US Virgin Islands: a collaboration between NOAA and the National Park Service
Presenter(s): Shay Viehman, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science; Christine Buckel, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science; Mike Bollinger, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 11 March 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Interactive data visualizations for coral conservation and management in FL and the US Virgin Islands: a collaboration between NOAA and the National Park Service

Presenter(s):

Shay Viehman, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Christine Buckel, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean ScienceMike Bollinger, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

Sponsor(s):

Coral Collaboration Webinar Series - NOAA Coral Reef Conservation ProgramSeminar Contact:
Robin Garcia, robin.garcia@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Adobe Connect information:
1. To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/
2. Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio.

Abstract:
Coral reefs are increasingly threatened by coral mortality caused by disease and bleaching. US coral reef jurisdictions include many different large-scale long-term coral monitoring efforts, including NOAA's National Coral Reef Monitoring Program, the National Park Service's Inventory and Monitoring Program's coral monitoring, state and territorial monitoring, and stressor-specific monitoring. However, it can be challenging for managers to wade through multiple different datastreams to answer questions about the current status of resources. NOAA and the National Park Service have collaborated to create a web-based Coral Conservation and Management Dashboard that utilizes a combination of maps and charts to help users visualize and query coral data from multiple monitoring programs in National Park areas in Florida and the US Virgin Islands. We will provide an overview of this effort and demonstrate how this application addresses coral management questions. Data are included to visualize coral cover and density, coral bleaching, disease, and photomosaics. In addition, this dashboard also connects directly to existing dashboards of coral disease in FL and the USVI. National Park Service scientists can also add data/observations and images of coral disease in real time. This dashboard will facilitate accessibility of coral data for NPS scientists and managers.

Bio(s):

Shay Viehman is a research ecologist with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science.Christine Buckel is an ecologist with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science.Mike Bollinger is an underwater technical systems research assistant with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
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Title: Dive into a Changing Ecosystem: From Lush Kelp Forests to Urchin Barren
Presenter(s): Kate Vylet, underwater photographer, scientific diver, and divemaster anchored in Monterey Bay, California, Josh Smith, Ph.D. Candidate and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California Santa Cruz, and Karen Grimmer, Resource Protection Coordinator with NOAA's Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 11 March 2021
9:00 pm - 10:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kate Vylet, underwater photographer, scientific diver, and divemaster anchored in Monterey Bay, California, Josh Smith, Ph.D. Candidate and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California Santa Cruz, and Karen Grimmer, Resource Protection Coordinator with NOAA's Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1182517471088080143

Abstract:
Tucked along California's coast is a vibrant underwater forest of towering kelp and diverse wildlife. In the last six years, unprecedented outbreaks of purple sea urchins have decimated kelp forests within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, lending several questions: What caused the urchin outbreak? How have sea otters responded? Will intervention and urchin culling enhance kelp recovery? Through underwater photography and observations by Kate Vylet, and a scientific discussion by Josh Smith and Karen Grimmer, this talk will outline how science, art, and community observation intersect to inform the path forward.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded?
Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html
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15 March 2021

Title: Calibration, Validation, and Assimilation of ATMS observations
Presenter(s): Isaac Moradi, University of Maryland
Date & Time: 15 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Seminar Contact: Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s):
Isaac Moradi, University of Maryland


Abstract:
Microwave satellite observations are one of the largest datasets assimilated into Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. However, these observations are subject to errors and uncertainties that need to be corrected before being used for retrieving geophysical variables or assimilated into the NWP models. This talk summarizes the research supporting ATMS Cal/Val activities including validation of radiative transfer models in the microwave region and also using artificial intelligence models for cross-calibration of ATMS and CrIS observations. Additionally, the potential of microwave observations in improving the weather forecasts is limited by the accuracy of all-sky radiative transfer calculations. We introduce a novel Bayesian Monte Carlo technique to improve the assimilation of microwave observations over the rainbands of tropical cyclones. The BMCI technique eliminates the need for a forward model in the data assimilation system. The technique includes three steps, (i) generating a comprehensive dataset using in-situ cloud measurements and atmospheric profiles, (ii) generating synthetic ATMS observations from the training dataset, and (iii) using real observations to estimate the geophysical variables over the rainbands of tropical cyclones. The retrieved profiles of temperature, relative humidity, and cloud water content as well as surface information such as SST were then assimilated into the model. The results show that assimilating the BMCI retrievals can influence the dynamical features of the cyclone, including a stronger warm core, a symmetric eye, and vertically aligned wind columns.
Remote Access
866-240-1897
(access code): 131 938 8542
Individual Attendee ID will be given after sign-in to WEBEX

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m5ede89bc99bcb9fed0fd8cb229f97099

Meeting number (access code): 131 938 8542

Meeting password: Jpss2021!

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php
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16 March 2021

Title: Managing Harmful Algal Blooms in Tribal Waters, a Three-part Series
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 16 March 2021
1:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Managing Harmful Algal Blooms in Tribal Waters: a Three-part Seminar Series on the impacts of marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their toxins. These three free seminars are on March 10, 16, & 18, 2021 at 1:00-3:30 pm ET or 10:00 am -12:30 pm PT.

Presenter(s):
TBD

Sponsor(s):
US EPA, in collaboration with the NOAA and the Sitka Tribe of Alaska, is hosting this three-part webinar series.Seminar Contact: EPACyanoHABs@epa.gov; NOAA contact is Steve.Morton@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here (free).

Abstract:
In this this three-part webinar series on the impacts of marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their toxins, attendees will have the opportunity to:
  • Listen to and talk with Tribes from across the country about their experiences addressing the impacts of HABs and their toxins in fresh and marine waters.
  • Learn about strategies to build tribal capacity for effectively collecting baseline data on HABs.
  • Ask national experts about data collection, funding, outreach, and other HABs management needs.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. For more, visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website.
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Title:
New
Oases for Marine Life - Shipwrecks in 3D
Presenter(s): Dr. Avery Paxton, Research Associate, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 16 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Oases for Marine Life - Shipwrecks in 3D

Presenter(s):
Dr. Avery Paxton, Research Associate, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Monitor National Marine Sanctuary

Seminar contact: Shannon.Ricles@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2161387385632133901

Abstract:
Join Dr. Avery Paxton to explore how North Carolina shipwrecks form homes for a diversity of marine life. Learn how for the past decade, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary and National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Beaufort Lab have led an effort off the coast of North Carolina to document shipwrecks from the Civil War to the Battle of the Atlantic that brought World War II to our shores. This research honors the sacrifices of all who worked, fought, and died in defense of freedom, as well as recognizing the role these nationally significant shipwrecks play in the region's health as habitat for marine ecosystems.This presentation will highlight the role that shipwrecks play as oases for marine life and showcase advanced technologies, including echosounder surveys to create 3D visualizations of shipwrecks and the surrounding marine life. Along with collecting data to interpret this underwater battlefield, the project also demonstrates the significance of these shipwrecks as both ecological and historical wonders. This project is an example of NOAA offices collaborating to use their best assets to document the incredible maritime history and marine life off North Carolina's shores.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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Title:
New
What does drought look like in Interior Alaska
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 16 March 2021
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Drought Webinar Series (https://uaf-accap.org/research-activities/alaska-drought-webinar-series/)

Register: https://alaska.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZErde2vrDMoH90sGCTcrtflqDcwxh67-jJ_

Presenter(s):
TBD

Abstract:
JJoin a listening session to share your story, experiences or data and hear from others in the region. These two-hour listening sessions will start with four, short presentations from people who live and work in the region with time for questions. Then small group discussions to hear from participants on what they have or are experiencing in terms of unusual dryness in the region and how they have prepared for future drought.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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17 March 2021

Title: Resched to 3/31: Earth’s Ice Imbalance
Presenter(s): Tom Slater, PhD, Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling, University of Leeds
Date & Time: 17 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Earth's ice imbalance

Presenter(s):
Tom Slater, PhD, Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling, University of Leeds

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/tomslater/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
We combine satellite observations and numerical models to show that Earth lost 28 trillion tonnes of ice between 1994 and 2017. Arctic sea ice (7.6 trillion tonnes),Antarctic ice shelves (6.5 trillion tonnes), mountain glaciers (6.1 trillion tonnes), the Greenland ice sheet (3.8 trillion tonnes), the Antarctic ice sheet(2.5 trillion tonnes), and Southern Ocean sea ice (0.9 trillion tonnes) haveall decreased in mass. Just over half (58 %) of the ice loss was from the northern hemisphere, and the remainder (42 %) was from the southern hemisphere. The rate of ice loss has risen by 57 % since the 1990s - from 0.8 to 1.2 trillion tonnes per year - owing to increased losses from mountain glaciers, Antarctica,Greenland, and from Antarctic ice shelves. During the same period, the loss of grounded ice from the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets and mountain glaciers raised the global sea level by 34.6 ± 3.1 mm. The majority of all ice losses were driven by atmospheric melting (68 % from Arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers ice shelf calving and ice sheet surface mass balance), with the remaining losses (32 % from ice sheet discharge and ice shelf thinning) being driven by oceanic melting. Altogether, these elements of the cryosphere have taken up 3.2% of the global energy imbalance.

Bio(s):
Thomas Slater studied for an undergraduate and masters degree in Physics at the University of Leeds between 2010 and 2015. After that he moved departments within the University to the School of Earth and Environment, where he started a PhD in Remote Sensing supervised by Andy Shepherd and Mal McMillan at the Centre for Polar Observation. After completing his PhD in 2019, he stayed on at the Centre as a postdoctoral research fellow, and has been working there since as land icealtimetry expert.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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Title: A Dive into Chukchi Sea Nutrient Cycling: new insights and new technology
Presenter(s): Calvin Mordy, calvin.mordy@noaa.gov, and Bonnie Chang bonnie.chang@noaa.gov, Nutrient Chemists at the University of Washington Cooperative Institute for Climates, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies (CICOES) | Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 17 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - PMEL - EcoFOCI Virtual Seminar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
A Dive into Chukchi Sea Nutrient Cycling: new insights and new technology / EcoFOCI Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Calvin Mordy & Bonnie Chang, Nutrient Chemists at the University of Washington Cooperative Institute for Climates, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies (CICOES) | Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact: Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Abstract:
Utilizing nitrate and its natural abundance stable isotope composition to infer nutrient cycling in the Chukchi Sea.

Bio(s):
Bonnie joined CICOES in the fall of 2013, first as a postdoctoral research associate, and now as a research scientist, working with John Bullister (NOAA-PMEL) and Rolf Sonnerup (CICOES). She is interested in understanding how microbes in the ocean use nitrogen, an essential element for life. Her current research projects look at how nitrogen enters the ocean (nitrogen fixation), is cycled (nitrous oxide production and consumption), and leaves the ocean (denitrification and anammox). Calvin is an oceanographer working with physical oceanographers and fisheries scientists to better understand how Alaskan marine ecosystems respond to changes in the environment. He is also a lead PI for the Innovative Technology for Arctic Exploration program which develops and deploys innovative platforms and sensors in the arctic such as the Saildrone, Oculus Coastal Glider and ALAMO floats. Calvin is also part of the the GO-SHIP CLIVAR hydrographic program to build the premier deep-water global nutrient data set.

Accessibility:

Slides:
Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker.

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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Title: Ecological Drought: Impacts on Coastal Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Kirsten Lackstrom, Research Associate, Carolinas Integrated Sciences & Assessments - a NOAA RISA, Beth Middleton, Research Ecologist, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, USGS , Michael Osland, Research Ecologist, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, USGS
Date & Time: 17 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kirsten Lackstrom, Research Associate, Carolinas Integrated Sciences & Assessments (a NOAA RISA)
Beth Middleton, Research Ecologist, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, USGS
Michael Osland, Research Ecologist, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, USGS

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USGS

Seminar Contacts: Elizabeth Weight (elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2255096561498743823

Abstract:

This webinar will share recent research on drought impacts to coastal ecosystems and services.

This webinar is the fourth in a four-part series that seeks to raise awareness of ecological drought, share actions that strengthen ecosystem resilience and mitigate the impacts of droughts, and discuss research and management needs for future drought planning and preparedness. The series is co-hosted by NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System and the USGS National Climate Adaptation Science Center, with expert speakers from the research community, tribal nations, and government agencies.

Information on the additional sessions is listed below:
Ecological Drought: An Introduction, February 3, 2021, 11:30 am " 12:30 pm ET
Ecological Drought: Planning for Resilience, February 17, 2021, 1" 2 pm ET
Ecological Drought: Drought, Wildfire, and Recovery, March 3, 2021, 4 " 5 pm ET

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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18 March 2021

Title:
New
Knauss Fellows 2021 - Elle Wibisono & Sean Mullin
Presenter(s): Sean Mullin, Environment and Energy Fellow, Office of Rep. John Garamendi; Elle Wibisono, U.S. Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee; Oceans, Fisheries, Climate Change, and Manufacturing Subcommittee
Date & Time: 18 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Knauss Fellows 2021 features presentations from two Knauss Fellows, Elle Wibisono & Sean Mullin.

Seminar Contact: Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3545885829485263117 Knauss Fellows present on the third Thursday of every month. Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

12:00 - 12:30 PM

Title:
Characteristics and potential management of the Indonesian deep-slope demeral fishery

Presenter(s):
Elle Wibisono, U.S. Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee; Oceans, Fisheries, Climate Change, and Manufacturing Subcommittee (majority)

Abstract:
Indonesia is the second-largest global snapper exporter. However, the fishery is data-poor and unmanaged. Together with The Nature Conservancy, we deployed a collaborative data collection system where fishers take photographs of their entire catch on a measuring board. Using the catch data, we conducted preliminary fishery stock assessments and identified juvenile hotspots where Marine Protected Areas might benefit this fishery.

Bio(s):
Elle Wibisono grew up in Indonesia and received her Bachelor's degree from Wellesley College. After graduating, she worked for The Nature Conservancy Indonesia on the sustainable management of the snapper-grouper fishery. She received her Ph.D. also on the snapper-grouper fishery from the University of Rhode Island. She also makes fish comics online.

12:30 - 1:00 PM

Title:
Correlating the microbial and megafaunal communities with biogeochemistry at a cold methane seep in the Costa Rica Pacific Margin

Presenter(s):
Sean Mullin, Environment and Energy Fellow, Office of Rep. John Garamendi (D-CA-03)

Abstract:
Marine methane seeps are globally distributed, highly dynamic hotspots for chemosynthetic communities and geochemical activity on the seafloor. We describe the porewater geochemistry, microbial diversity, and megafauna distribution of 324 carbonate and sediment core samples retrieved from Mound 12, a seep west of Costa Rica. We demonstrate that the sediment microbial community that forms the basis of the chemosynthetic food web is more narrowly distributed than megafaunal populations, but that carbonates may host active methanotrophs even when removed from active seep areas, with implications for the impacts of seabed mining and hydrocarbon extraction.

Bio(s):
Sean Mullin received his Bachelor's degree in Microbiology from UC Berkeley and his Ph.D. in Geobiology from Caltech with Victoria Orphan. His research focused on the microbial ecology of the deep places of the world, from the continental deep biosphere to the deep oceans.

Accessibility: If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.
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Title: Deep-Sea Exploration From Home: how students, scientists, and people anywhere can become ocean explorers
Presenter(s): Nicole Raineault, Chief Scientist, Ocean Exploration Trust
Date & Time: 18 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Deep-Sea Exploration From Home: how students, scientists, and learners anywhere can become ocean explorers

Presenter(s):
Nicole Raineault, Chief Scientist, Ocean Exploration Trust

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/oceanexploration/event/registration.htmlAfter registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar at
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Accessibility:
This webinar will have closed captioning.Slides and Recording: The slides and the recording will most likely be available after the webinar; contact Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov if interested.

Abstract:
Access to theocean used to be limited to seafarers, willing and able, to board a ship and goto sea. Today however, telepresence, the ability to transport a person anywhereto another location, can connect people globally to the deep-sea without everleaving home. Ocean Exploration Trust explores the world's ocean using the E/V Nautilus and invites everyone toparticipate in exploration in real-time. Scientists can join our Scientist Ashore network to work with sailing team members tobuild expeditions, lend their expertise to dives, and access data and samples.Teachers can utilize the resources on our website to teach STEM principles.Members of the public can make discoveries alongside professionals as theywatch and engage with the team over our NautilusLive website. This talk will provide anintroduction to the technologies that help make anyone an explorer, an overviewof the 2021 expedition season, and information on how to become a member of ourCorps of Exploration.

Bio(s):
Nicole Raineault is the Chief Scientist and Vice President of Exploration and Science Operations with the Ocean Exploration Trust, the non-profit organization that owns and operates the ocean exploration vessel (E/V) Nautilus. She received her PhD from the University of Delaware in geological sciences, earned a Master of Science in Oceanography from Rutgers University and a Bachelor of Science in Marine Science from the University of Maine. In the last decade, Nicole has lead or been involved in over 40 expeditions at sea.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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Title: Managing Harmful Algal Blooms in Tribal Waters, a Three-part Series
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 18 March 2021
1:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Managing Harmful Algal Blooms in Tribal Waters: a Three-part Seminar Series on the impacts of marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their toxins. These three free seminars are on March 10, 16, & 18, 2021 at 1:00-3:30 pm ET or
10:00 am -12:30 pm PT.

Presenter(s):
TBD

Sponsor(s):
US EPA, in collaboration with the NOAA and the Sitka Tribe of Alaska, is hosting this three-part webinar series.Seminar Contact: EPACyanoHABs@epa.gov; NOAA contact is Steve.Morton@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here (free).

Abstract:
In this this three-part webinar series on the impacts of marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their toxins, attendees will have the opportunity to:
  • Listen to and talk with Tribes from across the country about their experiences addressing the impacts of HABs and their toxins in fresh and marine waters.
  • Learn about strategies to build tribal capacity for effectively collecting baseline data on HABs.
  • Ask national experts about data collection, funding, outreach, and other HABs management needs.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. For more, visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website.
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Title:
New
North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Pat Guinan, Missouri State Climatologist
Date & Time: 18 March 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Pat Guinan, Missouri State Climatologist

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7528179497868100876

Abstract:

The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña.

March 2021 topics include the aftermath impacts and warm rebound of the February cold snap, La Niña (Advisory) Update, the continuing high water levels in the Great Lakes, recent and potential climate/weather impacts (e.g., river and lake ice, drought persistence and potential future issues, mountain snow pack, wildfire potential), and the latest precipitation, temperature, and drought outlooks. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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22 March 2021

Title:
New
CA/NV at a Crossroads: Drought & Climate Update and Outlook
Presenter(s): Dan McEvoy, Western Regional Climate Center/DRI/CNAP, Nathan Patrick, NOAA NWS California-Nevada River Forecast Center, Lauren Parker, USDA California Climate Hub
Gary McCuin, UNR Eureka County Nevada Extension Educator, University of California Cooperative Extension
Date & Time: 22 March 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):


Drought & Climate Update
Dan McEvoy | Western Regional Climate Center/DRI/CNAP

Drought & Climate Outlook
Nathan Patrick | NOAA NWS California-Nevada River Forecast Center

California & Nevada Rangeland Conditions
Lauren Parker | USDA California Climate Hub
Gary McCuin | UNR Eureka County Nevada Extension Educator
University of California Cooperative Extension

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), NWS California-Nevada River Forecast Center, Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Desert Research Institute, USDA California Climate Hub, University of Nevada, Reno, University of California Cooperative Extension

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/936633684602498832

POC: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Abstract:

According to the March 2 U.S. Drought Monitor, 90.9% of CA and 100% of NV are in drought. The winter wet season is almost over and there's little chance for snowpack to reach normal levels. Worse, this is the second year in a row with below-normal snowpack. This webinar will discuss current conditions and outlook as well as an overview of California and Nevada rangeland conditions.

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) March 2021 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Niño and La Niña).

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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23 March 2021

Title: 2020 Fire Weather Review: The current role of NOAA, and the National Weather Service, including the Incident Meteorologist program
Presenter(s): Kari Fleegel NOAA-NWS-Aberdeen, SD; Patrick Gilchrist NOAA/NWS/Glasgow, MT WCM
Date & Time: 23 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kari Fleegel NOAA-NWS-Aberdeen, SD; Patrick Gilchrist NOAA/NWS/Glasgow, MT WCM

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library

Seminar contact: library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5284539169525239310

Abstract:
National Weather Service Incident Meteorologists Kari Fleegel and Patrick Gilchrist give a recap of the historic 2020 fire weather year. They explain how different NOAA programs come together to support large wildfires, the role of the Incident Meteorology program, and their experiences at wildfires.

Keywords: Wildfire, Fire, Incident Meteorologist

Bio(s):
Kari Fleegel is a Meteorologist with NOAA's National Weather Service in Aberdeen, South Dakota. She entered the Incident Meteorologist program in 2002 and has since been on over 20 deployments to wildfires, oil spills, as well as large national events across the country. They have both had the opportunity to assist the Australian Bureau of Meteorology with onsite support during a couple of their larger fire seasons.

Patrick Gilchrist is a Warning Coordination Meteorologist for the National Weather Service Office in Glasgow, MT. He has served as an Incident Meteorologist since 2006, supporting 25 large wildfires in the western U.S.. They have both had the opportunity to assist the Australian Bureau of Meteorology with onsite support during a couple of their larger fire seasons.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/seminars

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Drought and Water Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District
Date & Time: 23 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

Seminar Contact: Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/3055521234554770701

Abstract:

The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar is part of a monthly (twice a month during drought status) webinar series designed to provide stakeholders, water-resource managers, and other interested parties in the ACF region with timely information on current drought status, seasonal forecasts and outlooks, streamflow​ conditions and forecasts, groundwater conditions, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir conditions.

Recordings:
Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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Title:
New
What does drought look like in Northwest Alaska
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 23 March 2021
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Drought Webinar Series (https://uaf-accap.org/research-activities/alaska-drought-webinar-series/)

Register: https://alaska.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMvdu2grzovGdTi7n_IFKC1IrP1qQZ3Giy-

Presenter(s):
TBD

Abstract:
Join a listening session to share your story, experiences or data and hear from others in the region. These two-hour listening sessions will start with four, short presentations from people who live and work in the region with time for questions. Then small group discussions to hear from participants on what they have or are experiencing in terms of unusual dryness in the region and how they have prepared for future drought.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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24 March 2021

Title: Upper Ocean Carbon Cycle Dynamics: a look at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) and Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Station (BATS)
Presenter(s): Mariela Brooks, mariela.brooks@noaa.gov, Research Chemist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center | Juneau, AK
Date & Time: 24 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - PMEL - EcoFOCI Virtual Seminar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Upper Ocean Carbon Cycle Dynamics: a look at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) and Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Station (BATS) / EcoFOCI Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mariela Brooks, Research Chemist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center | Juneau, AK

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact: Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Abstract:
Examining changes, over three decades, using stable isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon of surface seawater at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) and Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Station (BATS).

Bio(s):
Mariela Brooks works in the Recruitment, Energetics and Coastal Assessment (RECA) program focusing on stable isotope analysis and examining biogeochemical drivers of marine fisheries and trophic ecology, as well as exploring new analysis techniques and method development. Prior to joining AFSC, Mariela's doctoral research focused on open-ocean time-series measurements from the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) and Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Station (BATS) using inorganic carbon chemistry and stable carbon isotopes to better understand upper ocean carbon cycle dynamics. She received a B.S. in Physics from Portland State University, and studied marine chemistry at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD where she received both her M.S. in Earth Sciences and Ph.D. in Oceanography. Throughout her career, she has worked on research that includes exploring atmospheric chemistry in the Pacific Northwest, methyl halides in the Florida Everglades, and open-ocean time-series measurements of inorganic carbon chemistry and stable carbon isotopes.

Accessibility:

Slides:
Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker.

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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Title: Cephalopods of Hawai`i
Presenter(s): Heather Ylitalo-Ward, PhD, Aquatic Biologist, State of Hawai'i, Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Aquatic Resources
Date & Time: 24 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Heather Ylitalo-Ward, PhD, Aquatic Biologist, State of Hawai'i, Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Aquatic Resources

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7301602044853909005

Abstract:
Join Heather Ylitalo-Ward, PhD, in her talk about cephalopods and why they are important in Hawai'i and beyond. Having studied octopus sexual selection in graduate school, Dr. Ylitalo-Ward now works for the State of Hawai'i Dept. of Land and Natural Resources Division of Aquatic Resources monitoring coral reef ecosystem health and populations. For this talk, she will discuss her experience working with these fascinating creatures and why she continues to be enamored with them to this day.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Modeling global ocean biogeochemistry in support of field and satellite missions
Presenter(s): Cecile Rousseaux, NASA
Date & Time: 24 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

NOCCG Seminar cross-listed with OneNOAA and STAR Seminars

Title:
Modeling global ocean biogeochemistry in support of field and satellite missions

Presenter(s):
Dr. Cecile Rousseaux, NASA-Goddard

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact: Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/803588261

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (312) 757-3121
Access Code: 803-588-261


Abstract:
Oceans play an important role in the Earth's carbon cycle. Within the oceans, the intensity of carbon fixation and export is strongly dependent on the concentration and composition of various water constituents including phytoplankton. Yet, the ocean color satellites have so far been largely used to derive the total phytoplankton concentration regardless of its composition. Different phytoplankton groups have however disparate impacts on ocean ecology, nutrient cycling, and the carbon cycle.Therefore, total chlorophyll as currently measured by ocean color is no longer sufficient to describe the full complexity of the ocean carbon cycle. As a direct result of this gap in knowledge, satellite and field sampling missions, such as the NASA Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) satellite mission and the EXport Processes in the Ocean from Remote Sensing (EXPORTS) field campaign, have been developed to improve our understanding of these processes and how likely they are to respond to climate variability and change. Earth System Models on the other hand have become more complex and now include a variety of mechanisms and variables that are not always measured directly from satellites or in the field. The use of models combined with data assimilation allows for the integration of existing satellite data and provide global continuous data in the oceans, land and in the atmosphere. Here we show how the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) has been used in various projects to prepare for field and satellite missions and improve our understanding of how to best use these satellite and field campaign data, and the potential limitations of the field sampling design and/or satellite mission.Speaker Biography: https://science.gsfc.nasa.gov/sed/bio/cecile.s.rousseaux

Slides:
When available after the seminar they can be found here: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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25 March 2021

Title: Seasonal Prediction of Bottom Temperature on the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf
Presenter(s): Zhuomin Chen, Post-Doctoral Research Associate, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute
Date & Time: 25 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Seasonal Prediction of Bottom Temperature on the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf

Presenter(s):
Zhuomin Chen, Post-Doctoral Research Associate, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register via Google meet at: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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Title: Navigating USAJobs Announcements: A Hiring Manager's Perspective
Presenter(s): Amanda McCarty, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Fishery Monitoring and Research Division Chief
Date & Time: 25 March 2021
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Amanda McCarty, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Fishery Monitoring and Research Division Chief

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Pride ERG; NOAA Central Library

Seminar contact: library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4516851354721928973

Abstract:
Applying for federal positions can be confusing and cumbersome, which can keep great candidates from getting Federal positions. This webinar provides a hiring manager's perspective on how to successfully interpret an announcement in the USAJobs system. You will learn how to search for job vacancy announcements and compare your experience against the requirements of the announcement. We will talk through different types of job postings as examples. You will walk away with a better understanding of how to interpret an announcement and craft your resume/CV in response.

Keywords: hiring, USAJobs, resumes

Bio(s):
Amanda serves as the Fishery Monitoring and Research Division Chief at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center. She oversees the Division's full portfolio, which includes fisheries observing and monitoring programs, cooperative research, and collaborative agreements with academia and research organizations to conduct scientific research in support of sustainable fishery management. She has been lucky to hire over 2 dozen Federal employees in the past 5 years.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/seminars

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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30 March 2021

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: Spring Flood Outlook
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, Rob Shedd NOAA/NWS/Mid-Atlantic River Forecast Center, Jason Elliott and Ron Horwood NOAA/NWS/Northeast River Forecast Center
Date & Time: 30 March 2021
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Spring Flood Outlook

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center,
Rob Shedd, NOAA/NWS/Mid-Atlantic River Forecast Center, and
Jason Elliott/Ron Horwood, NOAA/NWS/Northeast River Forecast Center.


Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:

Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:

The webinar will feature a recap of March conditions and a discussion with the NWS/River Forecast Centers on the spring flood outlook.

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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31 March 2021

Title:
New
Earth’s ice imbalance (resche'd from 3/17/21)
Presenter(s): Tom Slater, PhD, Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling, University of Leeds
Date & Time: 31 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Earth's ice imbalance - Rescheduled from 3/17/21

Presenter(s):
Tom Slater, PhD, Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling, University of Leeds

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/tomslater/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
We combine satellite observations and numerical models to show that Earth lost 28 trillion tonnes of ice between 1994 and 2017. Arctic sea ice (7.6 trillion tonnes),Antarctic ice shelves (6.5 trillion tonnes), mountain glaciers (6.1 trillion tonnes), the Greenland ice sheet (3.8 trillion tonnes), the Antarctic ice sheet(2.5 trillion tonnes), and Southern Ocean sea ice (0.9 trillion tonnes) haveall decreased in mass. Just over half (58 %) of the ice loss was from the northern hemisphere, and the remainder (42 %) was from the southern hemisphere. The rate of ice loss has risen by 57 % since the 1990s - from 0.8 to 1.2 trillion tonnes per year - owing to increased losses from mountain glaciers, Antarctica,Greenland, and from Antarctic ice shelves. During the same period, the loss of grounded ice from the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets and mountain glaciers raised the global sea level by 34.6 ± 3.1 mm. The majority of all ice losses were driven by atmospheric melting (68 % from Arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers ice shelf calving and ice sheet surface mass balance), with the remaining losses (32 % from ice sheet discharge and ice shelf thinning) being driven by oceanic melting. Altogether, these elements of the cryosphere have taken up 3.2% of the global energy imbalance.

Bio(s):
Thomas Slater studied for an undergraduate and masters degree in Physics at the University of Leeds between 2010 and 2015. After that he moved departments within the University to the School of Earth and Environment, where he started a PhD in Remote Sensing supervised by Andy Shepherd and Mal McMillan at the Centre for Polar Observation. After completing his PhD in 2019, he stayed on at the Centre as a postdoctoral research fellow, and has been working there since as land icealtimetry expert.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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Title:
New
Understanding the Role Coastal Marshes Play in Protecting Communities from Storm Surge and Flooding
Presenter(s): Y. Peter Sheng, University of Florida, pete.pp@gmail.com; Sarah Fernald, Hudson River NERR, sarah.fernald@dec.ny.gov
Date & Time: 31 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series



Title:
Understanding the Role Coastal Marshes Play in Protecting Communities from Storm Surge and Flooding



Presenter(s):
Peter Sheng, Professor Emeritus and Adjunct Professor, University of Florida; Sarah Fernald, Research Coordinator, Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve



Sponsor(s):
This seminar is sponsored by the NERRS Science Collaborative

Seminar Contact: Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)



Remote Access:
Please register through GoToWebinar (https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2085776169882712590)



Abstract:
As coastal communities strive to safeguard themselves from increasing storm risks, they are looking for ways to maximize the protective powers of their natural features such as coastal wetlands. This project closely examined one marsh complex that lies adjacent to Piermont Village along the Hudson River Estuary in New York. Village residents wanted to better understand how Piermont Marsh would buffer their village from storm-induced flooding and waves, and whether a proposed plan to restore native cattails within a small area of the Phragmites-dominated marsh would lessen its buffering capacity.

In this webinar, two members of the project team will explain how the team used state of the art modeling methods to simulate marsh vegetation and storm impacts produced by a series of past and future storm scenarios. By looking back at Superstorm Sandy in 2012 and projecting how much worse the damage could have been without the marsh, the research team was able to put a dollar value on Piermont Marsh's buffering services. They will share key takeaways from the research and explain how the findings are informing planning for the marsh and shoreline infrastructure.



Bio(s):
Please visit here for biographical information about our speakers.

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Title: Ocean, Ice and Atmosphere in the Changing Arctic: Science and technology development in the Office of Naval Research Arctic Program
Presenter(s): Craig M. Lee, craig@apl.washington.edu, Senior Principal Oceanographer at the University of Washington Applied Physics Lab| Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 31 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - PMEL - EcoFOCI Virtual Seminar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Ocean, Ice and Atmosphere in the Changing Arctic: Science and technology development in the Office of Naval Research Arctic Program / EcoFOCI Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Craig M. Lee, Senior Principal Oceanographer at the University of Washington Applied Physics Lab| Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s):
This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact: Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Abstract:
An overview of recent science results and technological developments stemming from a sequence of ONR-supported research efforts focused on changes in atmosphere-ice-ocean dynamics in the Beaufort Sea.

Bio(s):
Dr. Lee is a physical oceanographer specializing in observations and instrument development. His primary interests include: (1) upper ocean dynamics, especially mesoscale and submesocale fronts and eddies, (2) interactions between biology, biogeochemistry and ocean physics and (3) high-latitude oceanography.

Accessibility:

Slides:
Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker.

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

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1 April 2021

Title: Strategies for Successful Research to Application Projects: A Case Study of the National Sea Grant College Program
Presenter(s): Hollis Jones, Graduate Student, University of California Davis
Date & Time: 1 April 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Strategies for Successful Research to Application Projects: A Case Study of the National Sea Grant College Program

Presenter(s):
Hollis Jones, Graduate Student, University of California Davis. At time of publication, a Louisiana Sea Grant Knauss fellow with the National Sea Grant Office.Co-Authors: Rebecca Briggs, Alison Krepp, Elizabeth Rohring, both with the National Sea Grant College Program, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, NOAA.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/hollisjones/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
As coastal landscapes change, management professionals are working hard to transition research results into actions that support scientifically informed decisions impacting coastal communities. This type of research faces many challenges due to competing priorities, but boundary spanning organizations can help mediate these conflicts by forming transdisciplinary collaborations. The National Sea Grant College Program (Sea Grant), a NOAA-based agency, is a networked organization of 34 university-based state programs that uses a three pronged approach of research, extension, andeducation to move academic research into the hands of stakeholders and decisionmakers. The objective of this study is to better understand strategies for successful research to application (R2A) projects that address complex environmental problems occurring in a socio-economic context. Specifically, this work examines R2A projects from the Sea Grant network to better understand the drivers for project development and common deliverables produced through the R2A process. We identify five common facilitating factors that enabled ‘successful' R2A across all projects: platforms for partnerships, iterative communication, transparent planning, clear examples of R2A, and graduate student involvement. By providing examples of successful frameworks, we hope to encourage more organizations to engage in the R2A process. And here is a link to the publication.

Bio(s):
Hollis Jones is a PhD student at the University of California Davis where her research focuses on improving the resilience of coastal ecosystems and communities. Prior to joining the UC Davis community she was a 2019 Knauss Marine Policy Fellow with the National Sea Grant Office where she worked to understand the challenges facing research-to-application transitions. She also holds a MS from Louisiana State University where she studied the impacts of combined stressors on eastern oysters in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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7 April 2021

Title: Environmental-Health Warning Systems, the Case of Cold for Quebec
Presenter(s): Fateh Chebana, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique
Date & Time: 7 April 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Environmental-Health Warning Systems, the Case of Cold for Quebec

Presenter(s):
Fateh Chebana, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National Weather Service, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Seminar Contact: michelle.hawkins@noaa.gov, kimberly.mcmahon@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/866620085105683983
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
For several years, the effects of climate and the environment on human health have been increasingly observed in several geographic regions through certain health outcomes (mortality, hospitalization). In a prevention perspective, warning systems are implemented by the public health authorities to intervene during episodes of extreme environmental events. In Quebec, the SUPREME system (Surveillance and Prevention of the Impacts of Extreme Meteorological Events on Public Health System) has been used for a decade. SUPREMME is a source of information that affords regional and departmental interveners in the public health network access, at a single site through a secure portal, to health and meteorological information concerning the health impacts of extreme weather events.

On the other hand, “health” alerts are only about heat and all-cause mortality, as well as with basic statistical approaches in general. It is therefore important to adapt to the specific health impacts that may be linked to other extremes such as extreme cold or air pollution, using appropriate methodologies (statistics and machine learning). In this talk, we focus on cold-mortality/hospitalisation system in Quebec and we briefly present a number of methodological developments and perspectives.

Bio(s):
Fateh Chebana is a professor at Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) and he has a PhD in Statistics from University of Paris. His main research focuses on statistical hydrology as well as environmental health with statistical approaches. In particular, he is interested in hydrological risk assessment with advanced approaches and more complex situations, as well as in developing environmental health-warning systems based on recent machine learning techniques.

Recordings: A recording of this presentation will be available on the National Weather Service YouTube channel. Please check https://www.youtube.com/user/usweathergov for updates.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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8 April 2021

Title: Modernized NSRS Use Cases
Presenter(s): Nicole Kinsman, Galen Scott, Boris Kanazir, Kevin Jordan, & Jeff Jalbrzikowski, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 8 April 2021
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Working in the Modernized National Spatial Reference System

Presenter(s):
Nicole Kinsman, Galen Scott, Boris Kanazir, Kevin Jordan, & Jeff Jalbrzikowski,
National Geodetic Survey (NGS)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. POC: Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3740164037304876814

Abstract:
NGS has developed four applied-use cases to provide users a glimpse of what it will be like to work in the modernized NSRS. Thought experiments framed around:
  • Flood Mapping,
  • Passive Control for a Multi-year Corridor Project,
  • Transitioning Data to the Modernized NSRS, and
  • Airport and Other Infrastructure Monitoring
showcase how features of the modernized NSRS can be leveraged in both familiar and new workflows. These use cases are intended to facilitate stakeholder feedback about necessary products or training and to serve as a starting point for those interested in pursuing detailed, data-driven case studies in the future.Technical Content Rating: Intermediate - Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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21 April 2021

Title: Whale Sharks of Hawai’i
Presenter(s): Travis Marcoux, Chief Technical Scientist, Hawaii Uncharted Research Collective
Date & Time: 21 April 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Travis Marcoux, Chief Technical Scientist, Hawaii Uncharted Research Collective

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7045541180675108875

Abstract:
Whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) are known to be the largest fish in the world with some individuals measuring 20 meters (60 feet) long and weighing around 40 tons. Despite their tremendous size, they are gentle giants, using their nearly 1.5 m-wide (5-foot) mouths to filter plankton out of large volumes of water as they swim. Very little is known about whale sharks in Hawai‘i. The researchers at Hawai‘i Uncharted Research Collective started this non-profit organization for this very reason.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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29 April 2021

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: NE Fisheries Climate Modeling project
Presenter(s): NOAA/NMFS/Northeast Fisheries Science Center)
Date & Time: 29 April 2021
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Northeast Fisheries Climate Modeling project

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center,
Lisa Kerr, Gulf of Maine Research Institute, and
Vince Saba, NOAA/NMFS/Northeast Fisheries Science Center.


Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:

Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:

The webinar will feature a recap of April conditions and a discussion on the Northeast Climate Integrated Modeling project (NCLIM).

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

(Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, Lisa Kerr (Gulf of Maine Research Institute), and Vince Saba
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Title: Integrating responses to environmental drivers of system change within ecosystem-based fishery management procedures.
Presenter(s): Gavin Fay, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth - SMAST
Date & Time: 29 April 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Integrating responses to environmental drivers of system change within ecosystem-based fishery management procedures.

Presenter(s):
Gavin Fay, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth - SMAST

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register via Google meet at: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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27 May 2021

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: New NOAA Climate Normals
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and Mike Palecki, NOAA/NESDIS/National Centers for Environmental Information
Date & Time: 27 May 2021
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/New NOAA Climate Normals

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center,
Mike Palecki, NOAA/NESDIS/National Centers for Environmental Information.


Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:

Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:

The webinar will feature a recap of May conditions and a discussion about the new NOAA Climate Normals.

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Circulation changes at the Tail of the Grand Banks cause predictable environmental change on the Northeast US and Canadian Shelf.
Presenter(s): Jaime Palter, Associate Professor, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography
Date & Time: 27 May 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Circulation changes at the Tail of the Grand Banks cause predictable environmental change on the Northeast US and Canadian Shelf.

Presenter(s):
Jaime Palter, Associate Professor, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register via Google meet at: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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24 June 2021

Title: Temperature-linked assessments for winter flounder and Gulf of Maine cod.
Presenter(s): Brian Stock and Tim Miller, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 24 June 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Temperature-linked assessments for winter flounder and Gulf of Maine cod.

Presenter(s):
Brian Stock and Tim Miller, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register via Google meet at: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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29 July 2021

Title: Understanding and forecasting species range dynamics in the oceans.
Presenter(s): Alexa Fredston, Rutgers University
Date & Time: 29 July 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Understanding and forecasting species range dynamics in the oceans.

Presenter(s):
Alexa Fredston, Rutgers University

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register via Google meet at: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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26 August 2021

Title: Regional drivers of interannual and spatial variability of OA variables on the NE shelf.
Presenter(s): Samantha Siedlecki and Kelly McGarry, University of Connecticut
Date & Time: 26 August 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Regional drivers of interannual and spatial variability of OA variables on the NE shelf.

Presenter(s):
Samantha Siedlecki and Kelly McGarry, University of Connecticut

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register via Google meet at: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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30 September 2021

Title: Ocean acidification effects on Eastern oysters, surfclams, and Atlantic sea scallops: Commonalities and differences?
Presenter(s): Shannon Meseck, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 30 September 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Ocean acidification effects on Eastern oysters, surfclams, and Atlantic sea scallops: Commonalities and differences?

Presenter(s):
Shannon Meseck, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register via Google meet at: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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28 October 2021

Title: Evaluating the performance of Northeast Groundfish Fisheries Management in a Changing Ocean.
Presenter(s): Mackenzie Mazur and Lisa Kerr, Gulf of Maine Research Institute
Date & Time: 28 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Evaluating the performance of Northeast Groundfish Fisheries Management in a Changing Ocean.

Presenter(s):
Mackenzie Mazur and Lisa Kerr, Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register via Google meet at: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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18 November 2021

Title: Biological consequences of a changing climate on the pre-recruit life stages of NE US finfish: Effects of CO2 and thermal environments.
Presenter(s): Chris Chambers, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 18 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Biological consequences of a changing climate on the pre-recruit life stages of NE US finfish: Effects of CO2 and thermal environments.

Presenter(s):
Chris Chambers, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register via Google meet at: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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16 December 2021

Title: Shifting species and climate adaptation pathways for Northeast U. S. fishing communities.
Presenter(s): Andrew Allyn and Kathy Mills, Gulf of Maine Research Institute
Date & Time: 16 December 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Shifting species and climate adaptation pathways for Northeast U. S. fishing communities.

Presenter(s):
Andrew Allyn and Kathy Mills, Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Sponsor(s):
U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register via Google meet at: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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