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NOAA Science Seminar Series
Past 2023 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

22 December 2023

Title: December NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 22 December 2023
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: December NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing


Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/dec-2024-climate-outlook/

Abstract: We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, discuss some forecasting tools, and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for January 2024 and the winter season. Join the gathering online to learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Bio(s): Rick Thoman is the Alaska Climate Specialist with ACCAP and has many years of experience producing reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities, and the media.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

21 December 2023

Title: Skillful Multiyear Prediction of Ocean Metabolic State in the North American Large Marine Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Zhuomin Chen, University of Connecticut
Date & Time: 21 December 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Skillful Multiyear Prediction of Ocean Metabolic State in the North American Large Marine Ecosystems

Presenter(s): Zhuomin Chen, University of Connecticut

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov Location: Webinar

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the One NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

19 December 2023

Title: Advancing STOFS 2D Global: NOAA’s Fast and High Fidelity Operational Storm and Tide Model
Presenter(s): Joannes Westerink, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN
Date & Time: 19 December 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Advancing STOFS 2D Global: NOAA's Fast and High Fidelity Operational Storm and Tide Model

Presenter(s): Joannes Westerink (University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar Contact(s): Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Abstract: TBD

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

18 December 2023

Title: U.S. Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) December Drought & Climate Outlook
Presenter(s): Janelle Christensen, USDA Northwest Climate Hub; Larry O'Neill, Oregon Climate Service; Andrea Bair NOAA NWS Western Region; Chris Konrad, USGS
Date & Time: 18 December 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Pacific Northwest DEWS December Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar

Presenter(s): Moderator: Janelle Christensen, USDA Northwest Climate Hub
Climate Recap & Current Conditions: Larry O'Neill, Oregon Climate Service
Seasonal Conditions/Climate Outlook: Andrea Bair NOAA NWS Western Region
Baseline Streamflow Forecasts: Chris Konrad, USGS

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System

Seminar Contact(s): Britt Parker britt.parker@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Abstract:
These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Will be available here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

14 December 2023

Title: Ecological and environmental predictors of juvenile coral density across the central and western Pacific
Presenter(s): Courtney Couch, NOAA NMFS
Date & Time: 14 December 2023
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Ecological and environmental predictors of juvenile coral density across the central and western Pacific

Presenter(s): Courtney Couch, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research/National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.donovan@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Abstract: The persistence of Pacific coral reefs is threatened by large-scale mortality. While reefs have demonstrated the ability to recover from these disturbances, recovery potential is highly variable; in part driven by the high spatial variability in the abundance of coral juveniles. However, our understanding of the patterns and predictors of juvenile coral density is hampered by the limited geographic scope of previous studies. Our objectives in this study were to: (1) explore the spatial and temporal patterns of juvenile colony density across the U.S. affiliated Pacific islands and atolls; and (2) identify the potential role of ecological and environmental factors which may influence coral juvenile abundance. Juvenile density was quantified as part of NOAA's National Coral Reef Monitoring Program between 2013 and 2019 using a stratified sampling design across 1,405 forereef sites on 34 islands and atolls. Regional mean juvenile density varied from 1.4 to 10.5 colonies m-2 with the highest densities observed in the northern Mariana Islands, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, and southern Mariana Islands. Juvenile density significantly increased between sampling periods in the Main Hawaiian Islands, Line Islands and northern Mariana Islands. With the unique scale and gradients across the U.S. Pacific, our study found that the high latitude regions have enhanced juvenile density compared to their lower latitude counterparts. Survey-weighted generalized linear modeling suggests density is dependent on stock-recruitment with an open adult population, availability of suitable habitat at the site-scale, timing and severity of heat stress, wave energy during heat stress, and proximity to human population. Given the vast spatial scale of this dataset, this study allows us to identify hot spots of recovery potential and study recovery dynamics across a large environmental gradient. It also has applications for reef managers and restoration practitioners to more effectively promote conditions that favor persistence of corals and make informed decisions about restoration site selection.

Bio(s): Courtney is a Supervisory Coral Reef Researcher for the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research in Honolulu, HI. She joined NOAA/CIMAR in 2017 after completing a PhD at Cornell University in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and a postdoc at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology. Courtney studies benthic communities across the U.S. Pacific to identify factors underpinning coral reef resilience and has co-lead a research program that utilizes Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry to assess coral reefs. She is currently co-leading a research program to guide practitioners more effectively implement coral restoration in the Pacific. NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: The Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical-Datum Target Area is 100% Complete! What's next?
Presenter(s): Jeff Johnson, NOAA National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 December 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical-Datum Target Area is 100% Complete! What's next?

Presenter(s): Jeff Johnson. NOAA National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NGS Webinar Series

Accessibility: Captions are available during the presentation.

Abstract: NGS's ~15 year old Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project has finally flown every data line at least one time. This data, purposed for gravimetric geoid modeling, can be improved on and NGS intends to keep flying certain regions to improve the dataset.This webinar will include an overview of why the GRAV-D project was started, what we've accomplished, and a bit on how NGS collects and processes airborne gravity data. Also included, is a look at near term plans for both airborne and terrestrial gravity data collection at NGS.

Bio(s): Jeff Johnson is the Gravity and Heights Branch Chief in the Spatial Reference Systems Division at NGS and he has been managing the Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) airborne gravity project since 2018. Jeff is predominantly involved in managing the GRAV-D budget, and working with a team of individuals within NGS, NOAA, other federal agencies, and government contractors to make sure high quality airborne gravity data is collected and available for geoid modelers. This involves not only developing a technical expertise for airborne gravity data collection, but also for contracting, Inter-agency agreements, and planning logistics.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recordings are usually available here 2023 Recorded Webinars, within 10 days of the webinar.
Title: Exploring Fisheries Policy Options to Control Invasive Catfish in Chesapeake Bay Using Ecopath with Ecosim
Presenter(s): Noah Tait, Graduate Student, LMRCSC II, NOAA Office of Education, Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions
Date & Time: 14 December 2023
11:30 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Exploring Fisheries Policy Options to Control Invasive Catfish in Chesapeake Bay Using Ecopath with Ecosim

Presenter(s): Noah Tait, LMRCSC II, NOAA Office of Education, Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI)

Sponsor(s): NOAAEPP/MSI Cooperative Science Centers

Seminar Contact(s): Audrey.Trotman@noaa.gov, oed.epp10@noaa.gov

Accessibility: Google Meet closed captioning available.

Abstract: Introduced to Chesapeake Bay tributaries to bolster recreational fishing, the blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) has become an invasive apex predator. Capable of exerting top-down forces on Bay trophic webs, they pose a threat to several fisheries-significant species, including the blue crab and fishes such as menhaden and shad. This project focuses on the use of a dynamic mass-balanced ecosystem modeling software, Ecopath with Ecosim (EwE), supplemented with NOAA Fisheries data, to simulate the effects that blue catfish have on the trophic systems of the Bay over time and the interactions between fisheries and ecosystems. EwE allows for the exploration of policy options such as catch quotas, and marine protected areas to optimize for fishery health and economic stability. By exploring policy options for economically incentivizing the capture of blue catfish by recreational and commercial fisheries, the primary objective of reducing the population to a sustainable level can be reasonably accomplished. If the invasive blue catfish population can be reliably controlled through EwE-informed management strategies, then blue crab populations will increase, at least in principle. By extension, preliminary data suggests that patterns relevant to the interaction between blue catfish and blue crabs will be applicable to future, more complex interactions involving menhaden and shad, as well as other key members of Chesapeake Bay food web.

Bio(s): Noah Tait is pursuing an M.S. in Biological Sciences with a concentration in Environmental Science at Hampton University under the mentorship of Dr. Tunde Adebola. Noah's thesis is titled, Developing a Coupled Human Socio-Ecological System for Chesapeake Bay Shellfish Fisheries. The goal of his research is to further develop a model of shellfish fisheries of the Chesapeake Bay, focusing on socio-ecological impacts on the bay and its fisheries. Such impacts can include those that are social, cultural, economic, or political in nature. The model will be developed as a C# plugin to an existing EwE model. Noah is a native of the Chesapeake Bay area, sparking his interest in the bay's ecosystems. Noah aims to apply his studies to a career in fisheries management, helping to develop sound practices and policies for sustainable management of estuarine natural resources. Noah completed his NERTO under the supervision of Howard Townsend, NOAA, National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Science Technology " Cooperative Oxford Lab.For more information access the webpage for the Cooperative Science Centers, https://www.noaa.gov/office-education/epp-msi/csc/20212022-awards and NERTO, www.noaa.gov/eppnerto/.
Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send ane-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: A Systematic Review of the Disease Ecology and Conservation & Management strategies of Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease
Presenter(s): Olivia Pares, Graduate Student, LMRCSC II, NOAA Office of Education, Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions
Date & Time: 14 December 2023
11:00 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A Systematic Review of the Disease Ecology and Conservation & Management strategies of Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease

Presenter(s): Olivia Pares, LMRCSC II, NOAA Office of Education, Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI)

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science Centers


Seminar Contact(s): Audrey.Trotman@noaa.gov, oed.epp10@noaa.gov

Accessibility: Google Meet closed captioning available.

Abstract: Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease (SCTLD) is a highly infectious disease that destroys the soft tissue of many stony coral species, causing a significant coral loss in every reef it infects in approximately three to six weeks. SCTLD first appeared in Miami, Florida, in 2014, and by 2019, SCTLD was reported in Mexico, Belize, and the Caribbean Islands. The pathogen(s) responsible for SCTLD have yet to be confirmed. Coral microbiome analysis using 16s rRNA sequencing has shown that SCTLD is associated with a shift in the microbial community. However, histology of coral tissue infected with SCTLD has demonstrated a breakdown of the host and endosymbiont symbiosis rather than bacteria associated with tissue death. Research using transmission electron microscopy on SCTLD infected and healthy coral hypothesize that SCTLD is a viral disease of endosymbionts leading to coral host death. Whether the putative pathogen(s) responsible for SCTLD is bacterial, viral, or due to environmental stress has eluded researchers. To better decipher the disease dynamics of corals, the complexities of the host, pathogen, and environment triad of ecological factors must be considered for disease management and research. To address this, we aim to synthesize the available knowledge in a comprehensive review of SCTLD peer-reviewed scientific literature, complemented with gray literature, and on-site collaborations with coral resource managers, researchers, and educators. This review will highlight knowledge gaps that facilitate the development of best management practices and research recommendations for SCTLD.

Bio(s): Olivia Pares is in her fourth year of graduate studies, she is investigating the life history and disease ecology of the blue crab (Callinectes spp.) in Puerto Rico, where the five species of Callinectes support an important, yet unstudied, artisanal fishery. She is also learning about management of blue crab in the Chesapeake Bay. Her thesis is titled, Life history and disease ecology of a key benthic-pelagic link in tropical and temperate American estuaries. Olivia aims to become a resource manager at NOAA or another state agency. Olivia completed her NERTO under the supervision of Helena Antoun of NOAA, National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Regional Office Protected Resources Division.

For more information access the webpage for the Cooperative Science Centers, https://www.noaa.gov/office-education/epp-msi/csc/20212022-awards and NERTO, www.noaa.gov/eppnerto/.

Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Exploring whether carbonate chemistry should be considered for site selection for Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica)
Presenter(s): Cloe Lemaire, Graduate Student, LMRCSC II, NOAA Office of Education, Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions
Date & Time: 14 December 2023
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Exploring whether carbonate chemistry should be considered for site selection for Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica)

Presenter(s): Cloe Lemaire, LMRCSC II, NOAA Office of Education, Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI)

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science Centers


Seminar Contact(s): Audrey.Trotman@noaa.gov, oed.epp10@noaa.gov

Accessibility: Google Meet closed captioning available.

Abstract: In the U.S. southeast, the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is a valuable fishery providing economic benefit. Additionally, oysters are often referred to as ecosystem engineers creating structured reefs and increasing coastal resilience. The focus of this study was quantifying temporal and spatial environmental variability for factors impactful to oyster growth and calcification (pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), and equilibrium pCO2) across two southeast salt marshes, Galveston Bay, Texas, and Wassaw Sound, Georgia. We hypothesize oysters grown in optimal conditions will be less energetically challenged, maximizing growth rate and delivery of ecosystem services. In Georgia, adult and juvenile oyster growth studies were conducted to draw connections between water quality and oyster growth. Daily pH variability was similar (~0.5 units/day) between all sites in Texas and Georgia, except for Prairie Preserve, which had the highest daily pH variability (p< 0.05), most likely due to limited hydraulic exchange with the larger bay. However, DIC concentrations and TA were higher in Texas than in Georgia, resulting in higher saturation indices across all sites in Galveston Bay. In Georgia, saturation indices were below nominal calcification threshold (<1) at most sites, however, oysters actively recruited and grew (Coffee Bluff = 0.4 0.1, yet number of newly recruited spat was highest at 98 4). Moreover, ontogenetic differences in growth suggest optimum growing conditions may not be the same at all life stages. The current study provides evidence for increased larval recruitment and early growth in the upper (low-salinity) estuary but increased adult growth and survival in the lower (high-salinity) estuary.

Bio(s): Cloe Lemaire is pursuing an M.S. degree in Marine Science at Savannah State University. Cloe's research goals include assessing the effects of natural variations and human-caused impacts on coastal ecosystems and organisms. Her thesis is focused on the effects of these changes on the value of fisheries, particularly the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica). She completed her NERTO under the supervision of Jennifer Doerr, Research Fishery Biologist, of the Habitat Branch, NOAA/SEFSC/Galveston Laboratory.

For more information access the webpage for the Cooperative Science Centers, https://www.noaa.gov/office-education/epp-msi/csc/20212022-awards and NERTO, www.noaa.gov/eppnerto/.

Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

13 December 2023

Title: Ecosystem Status Report for the Hawaiian Islands
Presenter(s): Jamison Gove, Ph.D., Research Oceanographer, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, PIFSC
Date & Time: 13 December 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Ecosystem Status Report for the Hawaiian Islands (EBM/EBFM)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Jamison Gove, Ph.D., Research Oceanographer, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC)

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The Hawaii Integrated Ecosystem Assessment recently released the first ever Ecosystem Status Report for Hawaii. The report expands the geographic scope of previous efforts and describes the status and trends of marine ecosystems across the 8 main Hawaiian Islands. The seminar will highlight key findings related to socio-cultural connections, climate and ocean ecosystem processes, and human impacts within the Hawaiian Islands and how this information supports ecosystem-based management in the Pacific Islands region.

Keywords: ecosystem, Hawaii, ecosystem-based management

Bio(s): Dr. Jamison Gove is a research oceanographer with the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center and leads the Hawaii Integrated Ecosystem Assessment.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Ocean Acidification in the National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa
Presenter(s): Val Brown, NOAA NMS American Samoa
Date & Time: 13 December 2023
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm ET
Location: GoTo Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Ocean Acidification in the National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa

Presenter(s): Val Brown, Research Coordinator at The National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Acidification Program SOARCE webinar series https://oceanacidification.noaa.gov/ocean-acidification-education-outreach/

Seminar Contact(s): natalie.lord@noaa.gov

Abstract: American Samoa is home to some of the most resilient coral reefs in the world. From the 500-year-old giant Porites corals in Ta'u, to the heat resistant super corals in Ofu, and the thriving coral communities in Fagatele Bay. The reefs protect the shorelines, provide food for families, and play an integral role in Samoan culture and heritage. The National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa is working with partners to better understand how ocean acidification may affect these resources and the communities that rely on them. Efforts include monitoring ocean acidification indicators, integration of ocean acidification into climate vulnerability and adaptation efforts, and education and outreach.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Webinar recording will be shared on the NOAA OAP YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCB7UrrT3gGJAHGnZzjQCvNQ

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

12 December 2023

Title: Overview of the Draft Aquatic National eDNA Strategy
Presenter(s): Dr. Kelly Goodwin, NOAA 'Omics Portfolio Lead & NOAA 'Omics Working Group Chair, NOAA Ocean Exploration
Date & Time: 12 December 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Overview of the Draft Aquatic National eDNA Strategy

Part of the NOAA Omics Seminar Series



Presenter(s): Dr. Kelly Goodwin, NOAA 'Omics Portfolio Lead & NOAA 'Omics Working Group Chair, NOAA Ocean Exploration



Sponsor(s): NOAA Omics



Seminar Contact(s): Nicole Miller, NOAA 'Omics Portfolio Specialist, noaa.omics@noaa.gov



Remote Access: Register Here



Abstract: The co-chairs of the eDNA Task Team under the Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology (SOST) Interagency Working Group on Biodiversity will provide a preview of the National Aquatic eDNA Strategy, which is slated to roll out in spring 2024.



Bio(s): Dr. Kelly Goodwin is a marine microbiologist who has led development, validation, application, and technology transfer of molecular biological tools to address NOAA missions, including improved assessment of ecosystem status. Within the NOAA Ocean Exploration Science and Technology Division, she is the portfolio lead for NOAA 'Omics and serves as the chair of the NOAA 'Omics Working Group. In these roles, Dr. Goodwin is responsible for providing agency-wide direction with regard to harmonizing integration of bioscience and biotechnology into NOAA research and operations. The goal is to accelerate mission outcomes across a range of national priorities, including employing biomolecular mapping of biodiversity to explore the ocean and to understand and mitigate impacts arising from ecosystem threats such as climate, pollution, disease, and invasive species.



Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of this presentation will be made available on the NOAA Omics website. View past omics seminar recordings here: https://sciencecouncil.noaa.gov/NOAA-Science-Technology-Focus-Areas/NOAA-Omics



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Fundamental and Ecological Thermal Physiology of California Chinook Salmon
Presenter(s): Ken Zillig, University of California, Davis
Date & Time: 12 December 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Fundamental and Ecological Thermal Physiology of California Chinook Salmon

Presenter(s): Ken Zillig, University of California, Davis

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Bianca.Prohaska@noaa.gov and Sarah.Friedman@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACE GAP)Location: Webinar


Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mcd207c7faa0b6e6449f165028ad4c156 Or by phone: 1(415) 527-5035 Access code: 2760 566 4931 Meeting password: gfish23

Accessibility: Webex closed captioning available.

Abstract: Salmon in California (and elsewhere) confront interacting abiotic and biotic factors as they spawn, rear, and migrate. We use the organismal physiology of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to explore how their response to environmental temperature, and consequently management actions, may be impacted by their ecological interactions. We find that thermal effects upon trophic interactions may be a driver of poor salmonid performance in warm-water conditions.

Bio(s): Dr. Ken Zillig completed his Ph.D in ecology under the guidance of Dr. Nann Fangue at the University of California Davis. His dissertation research focused the interpopulation variation in thermal physiology of juvenile Chinook salmon populations from across the west coast. He has continued his work on Chinook salmon with a post-doc studying the impact of food resources on the thermal performance of wild-rearing Chinook salmon. In addition, he has conducted metabolic research on disparate systems from the Antarctic to tropical Pacific islands.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at:https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2023-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-seriesSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Exploring Livestock Grazing for Coastal Habitat Management
Presenter(s): Robert Smith, Coastal Coordinator for Wildlife Mississippi; Brandon Waltman, NCRS Assistant State Soil Scientist; Dr. Rocky Lemus, forage research professor, Mississippi State University Extension; and Jim Currie, private landowner
Date & Time: 12 December 2023
10:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Exploring Livestock Grazing for Coastal Habitat Management Webinar

Presenter(s): Robert Smith, Coastal Coordinator for Wildlife Mississippi; Brandon Waltman, NCRS Assistant State Soil Scientist; Dr. Rocky Lemus, forage research professor, Mississippi State University Extension; and Jim Currie, private landowner

Sponsor(s): National Sea Grant Office

Seminar Contact(s): kelly.samek@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: https://msstateextension.zoom.us/my/ericsparksmsu

Abstract: Searching for a cost-effective, less intrusive habitat management solution? Discover how to transform livestock grazing from a ubiquitous agricultural practice into a powerful tool for vegetation management and landscape enhancement. In this webinar, you'll hear short presentations from Robert Smith, Coastal Coordinator for Wildlife Mississippi, Brandon Waltman, NCRS Assistant State Soil Scientist, Dr. Rocky Lemus, forage research professor, Mississippi State University Extension, and Jim Currie, private landowner followed by a Q&A session. Topics to be covered include what is conservation grazing, the power of herbivory, herbivory and soil health, wildland forage and its management, and a case study. For more information: https://exploringlivestockgrazingwebinar.eventbrite.com

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

11 December 2023

Title: Demonstration and evaluation of global VIIRS tandem winds from S-NPP and NOAA-20
Presenter(s): Dave Santek, CIMSS/SSEC, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI
Date & Time: 11 December 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Demonstration and evaluation of global VIIRS tandem winds from S-NPP and NOAA-20

Presenter(s): Dave Santek, CIMSS/SSEC, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI

Sponsor(s): NOAA JPSS Program

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access
Meeting ID
meet.google.com/cdi-gtqb-ahs
Phone Numbers (US)
+1 240-774-0054
PIN: 318 601 240#

Abstract:
The VIIRS polar winds product is currently operational for the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) and NOAA-20 satellites, providing wind speed, direction, and pressure of cloud-tracked features at high latitudes. With NOAA-20 in a similar orbit as S-NPP but delayed by 1/2 orbit in time, there is an opportunity to track clouds from the NOAA-20/S-NPP tandem. This will reduce the time interval between images, which will result in reduced latency in product availability, potentially higher quality winds, and global rather than only high-latitude coverage.

The outcome of the project will be presented in terms of product generation, comparisons to other wind products, and an initial model impact experiment. Also, the status of ongoing studies using a triplet of images from the current S-NPP, NOAA-20, and NOAA-21 formation will be discussed.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available upon Request


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7 December 2023

Title: Inadvertent introduction of bias into the stock assessment and review process
Presenter(s): Will Satterthwaite, Research Ecologist, NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center - Fisheries Ecology Division
Date & Time: 7 December 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Inadvertent introduction of bias into the stock assessment and review process (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s): Will Satterthwaite, Research Ecologist, NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center - Fisheries Ecology Division

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA's Central Library (NCL)Seminar Contacts: Abby Furnish (abigail.furnish@noaa.gov) and Library Seminars

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3945052553876565847

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.


Abstract: Science is struggling with a "reproducibility crisis" brought on by factors including p-hacking or selective reporting that may increase the rate of false positives or generate misleading effect size estimates from meta-analyses. This results when multiple modeling approaches or statistical tests may be brought to bear on the same problem, and there are pressures or rewards for finding significant results. I will provide examples of risks for similar processes operating in fisheries science, and describe simulations addressing the level of bias this may introduce into management advice.Keywords: p-hacking, reproducibility, bias


Bio(s): Will Satterthwaite is a research ecologist based in Santa Cruz. In his day job, he works on the ecology and life history of salmon and their interactions with the ecosystem. Since 2012, he has been a member of the Pacific Fishery Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee, developing familiarity with assessing groundfish and coastal pelagic species. Although this talk is partially informed by experiences on the SSC, he in no way speaks for the SSC or NMFS during this talk.

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Title: Pacific Northwest forested and scrub-shrub tidal wetlands: The once and future swamps
Presenter(s): Laura Brophy, Center for Applied Ecology, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 7 December 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Pacific Northwest forested and scrub-shrub tidal wetlands: The once and future swamps

Presenter(s): Laura Brophy, M.S., Center for Applied Ecology, Oregon State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam

Seminar Contacts: Vicky Krikelas, Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov
Location: WebinarJoin via Webex:https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m13be6e4e4f7af5fc75612760532574dbMeeting number: 2763 575 3111
Meeting password: axKJ28Jc7mPJoin via phone: 1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free; Can't join the meeting? Contact support.

Abstract: Forested and scrub-shrub tidal wetlands (collectively known as tidal swamps) of the US Pacific Northwest (PNW) are understudied, yet of great interest today due to their historical losses, high levels of ecosystem services, and current and future threats including climate change. The most prevalent and unique tidal swamp type in this region is dominated by brackish-tolerant Sitka spruce, with dry season salinities often ranging into the mesohaline. Our team has collaborated with others to create accurate, elevation-based maps of estuary extent and analyses of changes in vegetation and tidal connectivity, which in combination allow us to determine the historical and current distribution of tidal swamps and tidal marshes. Combining these studies with similar analyses by other regional experts has revealed that prior to Euro-American arrival, PNW tidal swamps made up over half of the total tidal wetland area in the region's estuaries. Since then, over 90% of these tidal swamps have been lost due to estuary modifications such as diking, fill and logging. These losses, along with the high levels of ecosystem services provided by PNW tidal swamps such as carbon sequestration and juvenile salmond foraging habitat, mean that forested tidal wetlands are now a high priority for restoration and conservation in the region. However, human alterations such as diking and drainage have led to major changes at historical locations of tidal swamps, particularly subsidence (elevation loss). As a result, tidal swamps often cannot be restored in their historical locations. To determine suitable restoration sites, our Pacific Northwest Blue Carbon Working Group is characterizing the physical environment of least-disturbed PNW tidal swamps, including key drivers such as elevation, groundwater level, and salinity. We are using the resulting data along with elevation-based estuary extent maps, LIDAR digital elevation models, spatial data on salinities, and maps of tidal connectivity to develop maps of potential tidal swamp restoration sites. The resulting maps will help coastal land managers, restoration practitioners, and other stakeholders plan effective conservation and restoration projects to help bring back the many valued functions of the PNW's unique forested and scrub-shrub tidal wetlands.

Bio(s): Laura Brophy directs the Estuary Technical Group at the Institute for Applied Ecology, a nonprofit in Corvallis, Oregon and serves as Courtesy Faculty for Oregon State University's College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences. She develops and delivers rigorous science to support estuary restoration and conservation by coastal communities. Over the past 20 years, Laura has led field studies in nearly all of Oregon's major estuaries, including effectiveness monitoring at the state's largest tidal wetland restoration projects. Building on these projects with collaborative teams across the U.S. Pacific Northwest and West Coast, she and her colleagues have made exciting discoveries about tidal wetland characteristics and functions, which have led to her central role in producing improved maps of estuary habitats and improved quantification of tidal wetland functions like carbon sequestration and fish habitat. Laura currently collaborates with many state, Tribal, regional and national entities to apply these new methods and insights, helping to improve estuarine resource management across the U.S. into the future.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Artificial Intelligence in Weather Modeling
Presenter(s): Dr. Anima Anandkumar, Bren Professor of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Division of Engineering and Applied Science, Caltech
Date & Time: 7 December 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Artificial Intelligence in Weather Modeling

Presenter(s): Dr. Anima Anandkumar, Artificial Intelligence in Weather Modeling, Division of Engineering and Applied Science, Caltech

Sponsor(s): The Office of System Architecture and Advanced Planning (OSAAP), and the NESDIS User Engagement Council.

Seminar Contact(s): Vanessa Escobar, (Vanessa.Escobar@noaa.gov)Location: WebinarRegistration link: (Registration required) https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1JcZmbp0AZc0W_6fUnBeozS68W4NsSVDNuwAWluXGWww/edit

Abstract: Dr. Anandkumar leads development of AI-based weather modeling that allows forecasting with higher resolution and faster predictions for extreme weather events. On September 10, several new AI-based models followed"and accurately predicted"Hurricane Lee's path through the Atlantic Ocean. These programs leverage activities and outputs from NOAA's new Center for Artificial Intelligence (NCAI) established in 2021 to improve NOAA capabilities. During this month's Speaker Series talk, Dr. Anandkumar will discuss her work with NVIDIA on storm prediction modeling using machine learning, which is faster, more scalable, and more affordable than traditionally used modeling systems. To learn more about how Dr. Anandkumar and Caltech are working towards the Pathfinder Initiative, please contact noaa.pathfinderinitiative@noaa.gov.

Bio(s): Dr. Anima Anandkumar (California Institute of Technology) has been a Bren Professor of Computing and Mathematical Sciences at CalTech since 2017 and is the senior director of machine learning research at NVIDIA. Her research in artificial intelligence (AI) brings pivotal solutions to climate, drone flight, engineering, and medicine advancement. She has been honored for her groundbreaking work with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Fellowship, Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, National Science Foundation (NSF) Career Award, and faculty fellowships from Microsoft, Google, Facebook, and Adobe. She is also a member of the World Economic Forum's Expert Network.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Restoration of Deep Gulf of Mexico Coral Communities: Gulf of Mexico Forum Webinar
Presenter(s): Sasha Francis, Gulf Restoration Education & Outreach Manager, Deepwater Horizon - DWH - Mesophotic & Deep Benthic Communities Restoration, National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, NOAA Affiliate
Date & Time: 7 December 2023
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Restoration of Deep Gulf of Mexico Coral Communities
NOAA Gulf of Mexico Forum Webinar Series


Presenter(s): Sasha Francis, Gulf Restoration Education & Outreach Manager, Deepwater Horizon (DWH) Mesophotic & Deep Benthic Communities Restoration, National Marine Sanctuary Foundation

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaboration Team, a part of NOAA's Regional Collaboration Network

Seminar Contact(s): Kristen Laursen, Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov , NOAA Fisheries and Regional Collaboration NetworkLocation: Webinar


Remote Access: Please Register at:https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5311921428427346517
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For your awareness, this webinar will be recorded and shared.


Abstract: For December, the Gulf of Mexico Forum webinar series will focus on mesophotic and deep benthic (mid-depths and deep-sea) communities in the Gulf of Mexico. In particular, our speaker, Sasha Francis, will focus on the ongoing efforts to restore these hard-to-reach habitats that were injured by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. This presentation will feature imagery and stories about fascinating deep-sea coral propagation techniques, exploration and sample collections a mile below the surface, connecting scientists at sea with the community, and more.


Bio(s): Sasha Francis is the Gulf Restoration Education and Outreach Manager with National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, working with NOAA and other partners on the restoration of Mesophotic and Deep Benthic Communities injured by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. She leads strategic efforts to share the restoration activities being conducted by four collaborative project teams, and increase awareness of the existence and importance of these communities, threats they face, and actions that can be taken to protect them. Sasha's previous roles include being a marine mammal behaviorist, zookeeper, and Texas watershed environmental educator.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Please contact Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov for the recording and/or PDF.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

6 December 2023

Title: Assessing Drought in a Changing Climate
Presenter(s): Meredith Muth, NIDIS; Maggie Hurwitz, NWS; Joel Lisonbee, NIDIS; Arin Peters, NWS Western Region Hydrology Program Manager; Andy Hoell, NOAA Physical Sciences Laboratory; Brian Brettschneider, NWS Anchorage Alaska; Maggie Hurwitz, NWS
Date & Time: 6 December 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Assessing Drought in a Changing Climate



Presenter(s):

Welcome: Meredith Muth, NIDIS; Maggie Hurwitz, NWS

State of the Science Overview: Joel Lisonbee, NIDIS

Monitoring and Communicating Drought in a Changing Climate: Arin Peters, NWS Western Region Hydrology Program Manager

Attribution and Uncertainty of Droughts: Andy Hoell, NOAA Physical Sciences Laboratory; Brian Brettschneider, NWS Anchorage Alaska

Q&A and Discussion: Maggie Hurwitz, NWS



Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System and National Weather Service



Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov) and Maggie Hurwitz (margaret.hurwitz@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar



Remote Access:

https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/806354775104750680



Abstract:

How will climate change affect how we assess drought? How can we assess if a drought was made worse because of a warming climate? This webinar, hosted by NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) and National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), will focus on challenges in assessing and communicating drought conditions in a changing climate. The presentations and feedback received during this webinar will help NWS to develop practical field office guidance for messaging drought in a changing climate, based on the best available science.



Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Will be available here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ



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Title: NOAA’s National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) Coping with Drought Informational Webinar: LOI Feedback & Application Requirements
Presenter(s): Britt Parker and Crystal Stiles, NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System
Date & Time: 6 December 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NIDIS Coping with Drought Informational

Remote Access: LOI Feedback & Application Requirements

Presenter(s): Britt Parker and Crystal Stiles, NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System

Seminar Contact(s): Britt Parker britt.parker@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Abstract: In September 2023, NIDIS announced approximately $2 million in funding for projects to support tribal drought resilience as part of President Biden's Investing in America agenda, under the Inflation Reduction Act.The Climate Program Office FY24 NIDIS Tribal Drought Resilience with Inflation Reduction Act Support competition will focus on addressing current and future drought risk on tribal lands across the Western U.S. to support decision-making and build tribal drought resilience in a changing climate. The competition lead will hold an informational webinar on Wednesday, December 6, 2023 at 2 p.m. ET. This webinar will provide general information about feedback provided on letters of intent, as well as full application requirements.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Will be available here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Causal analysis: Dynamic and phylogenetic structural equation models
Presenter(s): Jim Thorson, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 6 December 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar and 110 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz, CA
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Causal analysis: Dynamic and phylogenetic structural equation models

Presenter(s): Jim Thorson, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology DivisionSeminar contact: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov.

Abstract: Description, prediction, and explanation all depend upon causal understanding. In this talk, I demonstrate a simplified (linear) toolbox for causal analysis that builds upon structural equation models. To demonstrate, I first introduce phylogenetic structural equation models (PSEM). I show that these can be fitted to data from 30+ traits for all described fishes to classify fishes into Periodic, Equilibrium, or Opportunistic strategies. I also introduce a simplified R-package phylosem that can be used for customized application of PSEM. Finally, I use PSEM to predict natural mortality rate for rockfishes (Sebastes spp), and show that PSEM substantively improves predictions relative to conventional linear models when predicting natural mortality from size and growth parameters. Next, I introduce dynamic structural equation model (DSEM). This includes both simultaneous and lagged effects, and therefore unifies a wide range of time-series methods. I specifically highlight how DSEM can be used to synthesize physical and lower-trophic variables to explain recruitment for Alaska pollock. I also introduce how DSEM can be used to integrate ecosystem indicators for Integrated Ecosystem Assessments (IEAs), using the Bering Sea ecosystem as an example. I hope to convince you that structural equation models are useful to integrate causal understanding into statistical models.

Bio(s): Jim Thorson is a statistical ecologist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center. His pandemic hobby was reading global history books. He will soon be fostering two cats, and hopes to study their interactions with existing (resident) children.

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; link to recording available upon request.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: A Strategic Approach to Climate Modeling for Environmental Security
Presenter(s): Dr. Richard B. -Ricky- Rood, University of Michigan
Date & Time: 6 December 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: David Skaggs Research Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, USA - 2A305, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A Strategic Approach to Climate Modeling for Environmental SecurityNOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Richard B. (Ricky) Rood, University of Michigan

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): Audrey Gaudel, audrey.gaudel@noaa.gov

Abstract: Climate simulations show that our carbon dioxide and methane emissions, primarily, have caused Earth to warm and that we must intervene and, essentially, eliminate the emissions to manage the warming and its consequences. Such a credible vision of our future is historically unique. Though the challenges are daunting, the simulations motivate us to take informed steps to influence the magnitude of the change that we will realize and manage the consequences.
New modeling strategies and modeling capacity are essential tools to take benefit of the knowledge provided by our future-climate projections. As the climate is and will be non-stationarity, the models will be providing information along a trajectory that is novel; they will provide information about trends and extremes. Questions of design, engineering, and management, which have for decades relied on historical environmental observations, will rest on trajectories described, first, by simulations. New questions of large-scale environmental intervention will emerge. Current climate modeling capacity rests in institutions, most of which are focused on research. Community-wide, effective protocols anchor organizations such as the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP), which provide simulation design criteria and facilitate integrated evaluations, descriptions of uncertainty, and interpretation of simulations. It supports a culture of model intercomparison projects that evaluate model performance using the body of climate observations. Models that have participated in CMIP have been evaluated and applied to a wide range of applications, some of which they were not originally designed.It is argued here that in order to meet the challenges of a warming climate with its multitude of correlated consequences, new modeling strategies are needed. These strategies rely on models being designed for purpose and their guidance interpreted in context with observations, theory, and experiment to support science-based decision making. This talk highlights some of the lessons learned from our efforts to apply current models to adaptation and proffers potential design criteria for needed model capacity.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2023, contingent on speaker approval.

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5 December 2023

Title: The Fifth National Climate Assessment (NCA5): Alaska Chapter Overview
Presenter(s): Henry Huntington, NCA5 Alaska chapter lead, and several co-authors
Date & Time: 5 December 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Fifth National Climate Assessment (NCA5): Alaska Chapter Overview


Presenter(s): Henry Huntington, NCA5 Alaska chapter lead, and several co-authors

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office, and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The Alaska chapter of the Fifth National Climate Assessment examines how climate change affects various aspects of our society. From health and livelihoods through our built environment and our security, the changing climate has far-reaching effects. The chapter also examines the many ways that Alaska communities and others are adapting to a changing environment.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

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Title: Intermountain West Drought Briefing
Presenter(s): Gretel Follingstad, NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System NIDI, University of Colorado Boulder / Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences CIRES; Curtis Riganti, National Drought Mitigation Center; Emilie Elias, USDA Southwest Climate Hub
Date & Time: 5 December 2023
2:00 pm - 2:45 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Intermountain West Drought Briefing

Presenter(s):
Introduction and Snow Drought Update " Gretel Follingstad, NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), University of Colorado Boulder / Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES)Drought Conditions Update " Curtis Riganti, National Drought Mitigation CenterSpecial Presentation: The Fifth U.S. National Climate Assessment and the NCA Interactive Atlas Explorer " Emilie Elias, USDA Southwest Climate Hub

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System

Seminar Contact(s):
Gretel Follingstad gretel.follingstad@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Abstract: This webinar will provide an update on current drought conditions and snow drought in the Intermountain West (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming), followed by a special presentation on the Fifth U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA5) and the NCA Interactive Atlas Explorer. The NCA Interactive Atlas Explorer provides digital access to downscaled climate projections used in NCA5, which allows users to explore projected changes to local climate conditions.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Will be available here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ

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Title: Evolutionary status of antifreeze glycoprotein genotype and function may inform on environmental preference of Pacific cod and Walleye Pollock
Presenter(s): Chi-Hing Christina Cheng, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Date & Time: 5 December 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Evolutionary status of antifreeze glycoprotein genotype and function may inform on environmental preference of Pacific cod and Walleye Pollock

Presenter(s): Chi-Hing Christina Cheng, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Ground fish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Bianca.Prohaska@noaa.gov and Sarah.Friedman@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACE GAP)Location: Webinar


Accessibility: Webex closed captioning available.


Abstract: Freezing water temperatures and floating ice crystals in the marine cryosphere are a deadly combination for hypoosmotic teleost fishes. This has compelled the evolution of a diversity of life-saving antifreeze proteins in different fish lineages. Antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) evolved in the most recent common ancestor of the gadidae family, enabling a number of species to exploit icy, freezing Arctic and sub-Arctic environments. The status of the AFGP trait in the commercially important Alaska Pacific cod and the walleye pollock is previously unknown. We characterized the phenotype, i.e. AFGP activity in these two species collected from the East Bering Sea, to evaluate the level of antifreeze protection against freezing. We also characterized the AFGP genotype to evaluate the functionality of the encoding genes. Results thus far suggest icy, freezing conditions of the high Arctic are uninhabitable for these two gadids.

Bio(s): Chris Cheng is a Professor in the Department of Evolution,Ecology and Behavior at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees fromthe Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology at the same university.Her research contributes to the understanding of cold adaptation andspecialization of polar fishes as well as their biodiversity, using integrativeapproaches, from field studies, environmental DNA, protein biochemistry,molecular physiology, phylogenetics, to genome biology. Her work experience in the polar regionsincludes nearly four decades in Antarctica (McMurdo and Palmer Stations)starting with in 1984, ship expeditions to the Atlantic Arctic, and recentcollaboration with NOAA scientists in the Alaskan Arctic. Her research alsoinvolved working in the sub-Antarctic regions of Chile and New Zealand ontemperate relatives of Antarctic fishes. In 2012, she was elected AAAS Fellowfor advancing the field of molecular evolution of new functional genes throughher work on the mechanisms of antifreeze protein gene evolution. She served as a member on the NSF OPPAdvisory Committee in 2012-2014, and on the 2015 NAS/NRC study "AStrategic Vision for Antarctic and Southern Ocean Research, and currently onthe NAS Polar Research Board from 2022-2025.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at:https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2023-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-seriesSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Effects of vertical mixing on the Lake Michigan food web: an application of a linked end-to-end Earth System Model Framework
Presenter(s): Hongyan Zhang, Eureka Aquatic Res. LLC, David Cannon, University of Michigan
Date & Time: 5 December 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Effects of vertical mixing on the Lake Michigan food web: an application of a linked end-to-end Earth System Model Framework

Presenter(s): Hongyan Zhang (Eureka Aquatic Res. LLC), David Cannon (U. Michigan)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

SeminarContact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Abstract: Physical processes may affect ecosystem structure and function through the accumulation, transport and dispersal of organic and inorganic materials, nutrients, and organisms; they structure physical habitat, and can influence predator-prey interactions and trophic production. In the Laurentian Great Lakes, horizontal currents generally dominate, but little is known about the effects of vertical mixing on lake food webs. We developed a linked earth system model and used it to explore how vertical mixing affects the productivity of Lake Michigan (LM), the world's fifth largest lake, whose food web and fisheries have been adversely affected by invasive Dreissena mussels. We hypothesized that higher vertical mixing would result in higher food web biomass by making phosphorus more available to the lower food web, and that filtration by invasive mussels would counter the effects of mixing and decrease food web biomass. Using linked climate, hydrodynamics and ecosystem models, we projected the response of LM's food web to scenarios of different levels of vertical mixing, with and without invasive mussels. Biomass of most functional food web groups increased with increases in vertical mixing, with greatest increases in phytoplankton and zooplankton. Increased biomass was due to the replenishment of nutrients into the euphotic zone, which enhanced growth and biomass of lower trophic levels through bottom-up effects. However, filtration by invasive mussels reduced the positive effects of mixing for most species. Future applications of the linked earth system framework will explore effects of climate warming and nutrient reduction on fisheries production to inform fisheries managers.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

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4 December 2023

Title: How Environmental Justice Law & Policy Has Been Shaping Great Lakes Protection & Restoration
Presenter(s): Oday Salim, Environmental Law and Sustainability Clinic Director, University of Michigan Law School
Date & Time: 4 December 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: How Environmental Justice Law & Policy Has Been Shaping Great Lakes Protection & Restoration

Presenter(s): Oday Salim, Environmental Law & Sustainability Clinic Director at the University of Michigan Law School

Sponsor(s): Great Lakes Seminar Series: The Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR) and NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (NOAA GLERL)
Seminar Contacts: Margaret Throckmorton, throckmj@umich.edu Location: Webinar


Remote Access: Register at: https://umich.us11.list-manage.com/track/click?u=69536ba6c5d787d86fa6ad710&id=a9e1cba302&e=fab337377e

Abstract: There is an all too common misconception that environmental justice law is vague and toothless. In fact, environmental justice law is nearly ubiquitous and has been significantly altering environmental decision-making norms. This talk will address the ways that environmental justice law has already shaped and may in the future shape Great Lakes environmental protection and restoration. Specifically, the talk will define environmental justice law, summarize its history, and go through Great Lakes case studies that illustrate how this legal framework alters decision-making regarding pollution control, natural resources management, and energy regulation.

Bio(s): Oday Salim directs the Environmental Law & Sustainability Clinic at the University of Michigan Law School, where he also co-directs the Environmental Law & Policy Program and teaches the Environmental Justice seminar. In addition, he is an attorney for the National Wildlife Federation in its Great Lakes Regional Center and the chair of the American Bar Association's Environmental Justice Committee. Professor Salim has taught courses on environmental justice, energy regulation, and mineral law. As an attorney, his most recent work has addressed water affordability, oil pipelines, Clean Water Act permitting, stormwater management, and the public trust doctrine.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at: https://ciglr.seas.umich.edu/event/120423-oday-salim/Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

30 November 2023

Title: Assessment of marine, estuarine, and riverine habitat vulnerability to climate change
Presenter(s): Michael Johnson, MS, Regional climate & resilience coordinator, Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office
Date & Time: 30 November 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Assessment of marine, estuarine, and riverine habitat vulnerability to climate change

Presenter(s): Michael Johnson, MS, Regional climate & resilience coordinator, Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office

Sponsor(s): NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam

Seminar Contacts: Vicky Krikelas, Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov
Location: Webinar

Join via Webex:

https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m13be6e4e4f7af5fc75612760532574db

Meeting number: 2763 575 3111
Meeting password: axKJ28Jc7mP

Join via phone: 1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free; Can't join the meeting? Contact support.



Abstract: Vulnerability assessments have become an important tool in climate change science. As the Northeast U.S. Shelf and other regions continues to experience rapid change, it will be important to understand the relative vulnerability of its species, habitats, and communities to that change. We developed the Habitat Climate Vulnerability Assessment (HCVA), which considers climate impacts on the habitats of fish and protected species in the Northeast U.S. region. The objective of the study was to provide regional managers and scientists with a practical tool to efficiently assess the relative vulnerability of habitats to climate change. The HCVA considers two components, exposure and the sensitivity (including adaptability), to determine vulnerability of marine, estuarine, and riverine habitats to climate change from Cape Hatteras, NC to the Maine-Canada border. The framework incorporated key environmental drivers of change and the sensitivity of habitats to those changes, and used expert elicitation, which relies on expert knowledge, to score the sensitivity and exposure of each habitat. Some of the goals of the study were to contribute to an understanding of the long-term effects of climate change to fish habitats, identification of particularly vulnerable habitats, and inform decisions regarding EFH designations and consultations, and fishery management.

BIO

Mike has worked for the National Marine Fisheries Service for 24 years, with the majority of that time spent in the Habitat and Ecosystem Services Division (HESD) in the Greater Atlantic Region. He has a MS degree in biology with a focus on ichthyology and marine ecology. In addition to decades of experience conducting Essential Fish Habitat consultations in the northeast region, Mike is the climate coordinator for the HESD and Greater Atlantic Region Fisheries Office. He has served on numerous climate coordination groups nationally and regionally, developed guidance for integrating climate science into the HESD program, and was a lead author on a climate vulnerability assessment for coastal habitats in the northeast region. His interest in climate change extends to his personal life, where he is the chair of the climate resiliency committee in the Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts. Mike enjoys road and gravel bike riding in New England and beyond.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Estuaries past, present and future: Using elevations and historical maps to characterize estuarine habitats across 30 National Estuarine Research Reserves
Presenter(s): Kerstin Wasson, Elkhorn Slough NERR, kerstin.wasson@gmail.com; Charlie Endris, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, charles.endris@sjsu.edu; Andrea Woolfolk, Elkhorn Slough NERR, amwoolfolk@gmail.com; Suzanne Shull, Padilla Bay NERR, sshull@padillabay.gov
Date & Time: 30 November 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Estuaries past, present and future: Using elevations and historical maps to characterize estuarine habitats across 30 National Estuarine Research Reserves

Presenter(s):
  • Kerstin Wasson, Research Coordinator, Elkhorn Slough NERR
  • Charlie Endris, GIS Specialist, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories
  • Andrea Woolfolk, Stewardship Coordinator, Elkhorn Slough NERR
  • Suzanne Shull, GIS Specialist, Padilla Bay NERR


Sponsor(s): This webinar is sponsored by the NERRS Science CollaborativeSeminar Contacts: Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu) Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://umich.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_33F-LjrSQpW6qE_1062QiAAbstract
Estuaries are coastal gems. To protect and restore them, we need a clear understanding of exactly where they are, where they were, and where they could be in the future. A team led by the National Estuarine Research Reserves (NERRs) recently completed an ambitious effort to map estuarine habitat in and around the 30 NERRs. They used a powerful combination of NOAA resources for elevation and tidal datums to map the reach of tides, historical topographic sheets generated by NOAA's predecessor agency to map past habitat distributions, and compared this to mapping from USFWS's National Wetland Inventory (NWI). Elevation-based mapping revealed that estuary extent is greater than currently mapped in NWI. At more than two-thirds of the Reserves, the team detected tidal forests missed by NWI. Comparison of historical maps to NWI revealed dramatically greater loss of tidal wetland extent on the Pacific coast than in other regions. The results of this investigation suggest that multiple mapping methods complement each other and should be integrated to provide a more accurate understanding of estuaries"past, present and future.

Bio(s): Please visit here for more information about the webinar.Subscribe to the One NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Bay scallop resilience multigenerational ocean acidification experiments
Presenter(s): Shannon Meseck, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 30 November 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Bay scallop resilience multigenerational ocean acidification experiments

Presenter(s): Shannon Meseck, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

28 November 2023

Title: Snow crab in a rapidly changing Bering Sea: Historical context, recent insights and future perspectives
Presenter(s): Erin Fedewa, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Shellfish Assessment Program
Date & Time: 28 November 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Snow crab in a rapidly changing Bering Sea: Historical context, recent insights and future perspectives

Presenter(s): Erin Fedewa, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC), Shellfish Assessment Program (SAP)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Bianca.Prohaska@noaa.gov and Sarah.Friedman@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACE GAP)Location: Webinar


Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mcd207c7faa0b6e6449f165028ad4c156 Or by phone: 1(415) 527-5035 Access code: 2760 566 4931 Meeting password: gfish23

Accessibility: Webex closed captioning available.

Abstract: The 2021 collapse of Bering Sea snow crab coincided with record-high juvenile recruitment, extreme temperatures, and historic low sea ice. Declines in juvenile snow crab body condition have previously been associated with warmer temperatures in the Bering Sea, and energetic condition is likely an important determinant of survival. Here, we investigate spatiotemporal variation in body condition of juvenile snow crab collected during (2019) and after (2021 " 2023) the Bering Sea snow crab stock collapse. Our results provide empirical evidence that immature snow crab in eastern Bering Sea nursery grounds were in reduced energetic condition in 2019 relative to post-collapse years.

Bio(s): Erin Fedewa is a Research Fishery Biologist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Shellfish Assessment Program in Kodiak, Alaska. She received her M.S. from Oregon State University, and afterwards, was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to conduct research in Trinidad and Tobago. As a member of the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council's Crab Plan Team, Erin's interests lie in conducting applied research to support effective management decisions for Bering Sea crab stocks. Her diverse research portfolio includes snow crab energetics, trophic dynamics and thermal stress, crab-ecosystem linkages, Bitter Crab Disease dynamics, and fishery gear interactions. She also leads the Ecosystem and Socioeconomic Profiles for Bering Sea crab stocks in support of ecosystem-based fisheries management

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2023-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-seriesSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Evidence of Langmuir mixing effects in the upper ocean layer during tropical cyclones using observations and a coupled wave-ocean model
Presenter(s): Xiaohui Zhou, Princeton University
Date & Time: 28 November 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Evidence of Langmuir mixing effects in the upper ocean layer during tropical cyclones using observations and a coupled wave-ocean model

Presenter(s): Xiaohui Zhou, Princeton University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar Contact(s): Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US)+1414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: Mixing of the ocean beneath tropical cyclones (TC) cools the surface temperature there by modifying the storm intensity. Modeling studies predict that surface wave forcing through Langmuir turbulence (LT) increases the mixing and cooling and decreases near-surface vertical velocity shear. However, there are very few quantitative observational validations of these model predictions, and the validation efforts are often limited by uncertainties in the drag coefficient (Cd ). We combine EM-APEX and Lagrangian float measurements of temperature, salinity, velocity and vertical turbulent kinetic energy (VKE) from five TCs with a coupled ocean-wave model (Modular Ocean Model 6 -WAVEWATCH III) forced by the drag coefficient C d directly constrained for these storms. On the right-hand of the storms in the northern hemisphere, where wind and waves are nearly aligned, the measured VKE is consistent with predictions of models including LT and 2-3 times higher than predictions without LT. Similarly, vertical shear in the upper 20m is small, consistent with predictions of LT models and inconsistent with the large shears predicted by models without LT. On the left-hand of the storms, where wind and waves are misaligned, the observed VKE and cooling are reduced compared to those on the right-hand, consistent with the measured decrease in Cd . These results confirm the importance of surface waves for ocean cooling and thus TC intensity, through both Cd and LT effects. However, the model predictions, even with the LT parameterization, underestimate the upper ocean cooling and mixed layer deepening by 20-30%, suggesting possible deficiency of the existing LT parameterization.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

27 November 2023

Title: Flood Information at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology: Current Status and Future Direction
Presenter(s): Robert Pipunic, Team Leader, Observations and Assimilation Science and Innovation Group, Australian Bureau of Meteorology
Date & Time: 27 November 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: FloodInformation at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology: Current Status and FutureDirection

Presenter(s):
Robert Pipunic, Team Leader Observations and Assimilation Science andInnovation Group, Australian Bureau of Meteorology

Sponsor(s): NOAA JPSS Program

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access:
Meeting ID
meet.google.com/brw-fzzg-pwe
Phone Numbers (US)
+1 415-851-0882
PIN: 375 668 322#

Abstract:
The Bureau of Meteorology in Australia has a range of responsibilities beyond forecasting weather and managing meteorological observations. Among other things, they include issuing warnings for conditions that could pose a threat to life and infrastructure like fire and floods. The Bureau's well established flood forecasting and warning service is underpinned by expertise in flood modelling and extensive data feeds such as from catchment gauge networks, NWP rainfall forecasts along with near-real-time radar for refinement. There is a desire to complement the established flood forecast and warning service with spatially explicit information on flood water extents during and soon after flood events. This is being pursued with plans to leverage Bureau's directly received near-real-time data feeds from NOAA's polar orbiting satellites in conjunction with geostationary Himawari data, in collaboration with experts at University of Wisconsin SSEC and George Mason University in the U.S. The aim is to provide value with flood information that's consistent across the whole Australian continent, particularly for catchments with sparse or no gauge monitoring. This talk will cover the current Bureau of Meteorology flood service and use some recent examples to highlight the value that satellite products can add.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available upon Request


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

21 November 2023

Title: Wildfire 2023 in the North: A Tale of Two Extremes
Presenter(s): Piyush Jain, Natural Resources Canada; and Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 21 November 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The 2023 wildfire season in the North: A Tale of Two Extremes


Presenter(s):

Presenter(s): Piyush Jain (Natural Resources Canada) and Rick Thoman (Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy)

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/wildfire-2023/

Abstract: In 2023 Canada experienced the worst wildfire season on record, including record high area burned, numerous community evacuations in the Northwest Territories and beyond, and poor air quality from smoke in both Canada and the Eastern seaboard. Farther west in Alaska, 2023 saw a near complete absence of wildfire until late July, only to be followed by a late season surge. This presentation will review and contrast the Alaskan and Canadian fire seasons and discuss what lessons we can learn from the tale of two extremes.

Bio(s): Piyush Jain is a Research Scientist with the Canadian Forest Service. His main areas of study include the meteorological drivers of wildfire ignition and spread, developing improved models for fire weather forecasting, and examining the implications of a changing climate on current and future wildfire regimes.

Rick Thoman is the Alaska Climate Specialist with the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy and has many years of experience producing reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities, and the media.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: The role of apex predators, habitat, and seascape complexity on nearshore fish assemblages in Southeast, Alaska
Presenter(s): Lia Domke, NOAA Alaska Regional Office Habitat Conservation Division, Alaska Sea Grant State Fellow
Date & Time: 21 November 2023
3:00 pm - 3:45 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The role of apex predators, habitat, and seascape complexity on nearshore fish assemblages in Southeast, AlaskaNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Lia Domke, NOAA Alaska Regional Office Habitat Conservation Division, Alaska Sea Grant State Fellow

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7457118092104018527


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Nearshore marine ecosystems contain dynamic and complex submerged vegetated habitats that offer shelter and prey for juvenile, migratory, and residential species, including organisms important for commercial, subsistence, and recreational uses. Various abiotic and biotic forces influence the efficacy of the nursery role, shelter, and source of prey of the nearshore. In this dissertation, we examined the influence of submerged vegetation type, the presence of apex predators, and seascape patterns on nearshore fish communities in Southeast Alaska.

Keywords: nearshore fish assemblages, indirect effects, seascape complexity

Bio(s): Lia Domke is a 2023 Alaska Sea Grant State Fellow with the NOAA Alaska Regional Office Habitat Conservation Division supporting advancing our understanding of essential fish habitat in the nearshore. Lia is completing her PhD at the University of Alaska Fairbanks College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences in December 2023 on nearshore fish communities and their associated habitats.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Decomposition of estuarine circulation and residual stratification under land-fast sea ice
Presenter(s): Hans Burchard, Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Germany
Date & Time: 21 November 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Decomposition of estuarine circulation and residual stratification under land-fast sea ice

Presenter(s): Hans Burchard (Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Germany)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar Contact(s): Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US)+1414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: For Arctic estuaries which are characterized by land-fast sea-ice cover during the winter season, processes generating estuarine circulation and residual stratification have not yet been investigated, although some of the largest estuaries in the world belong to this class. Land-fast sea ice provides a no-slip surface boundary condition in addition to the bottom boundary, such that frictional effects are expected to be increased. For this study of estuarine circulation and residual stratification under land-fast sea ice, first a simple linear analytical model is used. To include tidally varying scenarios, a water-column model is applied with a second-moment turbulence closure to juxtapose free-surface and ice-covered estuaries. Well-mixed and strongly stratified tidally periodic scenarios are analyzed by means of a decomposition of estuarine circulation into contributions from gravitational circulation, eddy viscosity - shear covariance (ESCO), surface stress and river run-off. A new method is developed to also decompose tidal residual salinity anomaly profiles. Estuarine circulation intensity and tidally residual potential energy anomaly are studied for a parameter space spanned by the Simpson number and the Unsteadiness number. These are the major results of this study that will support future scenario studies in Arctic estuaries under conditions of accelerated warming:(i) Residual surface drag under ice opposes estuarine circulation;
(ii) Residual differential advection under ice destabilizes the near-surface flow;
(iii) Reversal of ESCO during strong stratification does not occur under land-fast sea ice;
(iv) Tidal pumping (s-ESCO) contributes dominantly to residual stratification also with sea-ice cover.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

17 November 2023

Title: November NOAA NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 17 November 2023
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series


Title: November NOAA NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing


Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/nov-climate-outlook/

Abstract: We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, discuss some forecasting tools, and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for December 2023 and the winter season. Join the gathering online to learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Bio(s): Rick Thoman is the Alaska Climate Specialist with ACCAP and has many years of experience producing reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities, and the media.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

16 November 2023

Title: Coral Connections - From Diving Deep and Long Lab Days to Meetings, Management, and Policy
Presenter(s): Dr. Alexis -Lexie- Sturm, 2023 Knauss Fellow, NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program
Date & Time: 16 November 2023
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Coral Connections - From Diving Deep and Long Lab Days to Meetings, Management, and Policy (2023 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Dr. Alexis (Lexie) Sturm, 2023 Knauss Fellow, NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3789867482289424475

Abstract: Lexie combined field-based approaches including ROV, scuba, and technical diving with lab-based molecular techniques to expand our knowledge of shallow and deep Caribbean coral populations. After finishing her dissertation, she took her passion for coral reefs and scientific background and applied it to her Knauss fellowship with NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program.
Keywords: coral reefs, population genetics, marine management

Bio(s): Lexie is from the D.C. area but moved to Florida for college and graduate school. Her dissertation focused on coral genetic connectivity. She graduated with her PhD in December 2022. She has worked across multiple NOAA offices including National Marine Sanctuaries, Protected Resources, and now as a Knauss Fellow in the Coral Reef Conservation Program.

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Characterizing the sustainability of wastewater and resource recovery infrastructure for an informal settlement in Kampala, Uganda
Presenter(s): Dr. Hannah Lohman, 2023 Knauss Fellow, NOAA Climate Program Office, Climate Adaptation Partnerships Program
Date & Time: 16 November 2023
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Characterizing the sustainability of wastewater and resource recovery infrastructure for an informal settlement in Kampala, Uganda (2023 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Dr. Hannah Lohman, 2023 Knauss Fellow, NOAA Climate Program Office, Climate Adaptation Partnerships Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3789867482289424475

Abstract: In resource-limited settings, conventional wastewater systems often fail to meet their goals - with system failures stemming from a mismatch among community needs, constraints, and deployed technologies. Hannah will illustrate the use of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to compare the existing wastewater system and two proposed alternative systems for Bwaise, an informal settlement in Kampala, Uganda. She will demonstrate the use of the MCDA framework to evaluate infrastructure alternatives tailored to individual contexts to increase transparency in technology evaluations and context-specific decision-making, which can be applied to projects outside of wastewater sector.
Keywords: decision-making, infrastructure, sustainability

Bio(s): Hannah is a 2023 Knauss Fellow working with the NOAA Climate Program Office Climate Adaptation Partnerships (CAP) Program (formerly RISA). As the Climate Adaptation Science Policy Fellow, she works to support the coordination of regionally focused community research priorities on impacts and adaptation science across the CAP network and with relevant partners. Hannah recently earned her PhD in environmental engineering in 2023 from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, where her research focused on developing decision-making tools to evaluate the tradeoffs of water, wastewater, and resource recovery infrastructure alternatives in resource-limited communities.

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

15 November 2023

Title: Atmospheric Chemistry of Volatile Methyl Siloxanes – Kinetics, Oxidation Mechanism, and Aerosol Formation from Experimental and Theoretical Investigations
Presenter(s): Dr. Ellie Browne, University of Colorado, Boulder and Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences
Date & Time: 15 November 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: David Skaggs Research Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, USA; Room 2A305
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Atmospheric Chemistry of Volatile Methyl Siloxanes " Kinetics, Oxidation Mechanism, and Aerosol Formation from Experimental and Theoretical InvestigationsNOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Ellie Browne, University of Colorado, Boulder and Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): Gregory Schill, gregory.schill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2432051985869245276

Abstract: Volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) are solely anthropogenic chemicals that have come under recent scrutiny for their environmental persistence and tendency to bioaccumulate. Millions of tons of these chemicals are produced every year. These high-production chemicals have recently come under increased scrutiny due to potential negative environmental impacts. However, constraining the impacts of these chemicals is challenging because the atmospheric degradation of these chemicals is poorly understood despite the fact that >90% of the environmental loading of VMS is in the atmosphere. In this talk, I will discuss our recent work investigating the kinetics and mechanisms of VMS oxidation using laboratory experiments and electronic structure calculations. We find the oxidation by chlorine atom may contribute to VMS oxidation in urban environments and that the presence of the silicon heteroatom allows for atypical reactions that challenge our understanding of atmospheric oxidation mechanisms. I will conclude with a brief overview of recent experiments investigating the aerosol formation from VMS molecules. Air Resources Laboratory. He received his PhD in Environmental Sciences at Peking University in China. His current research includes aircraft and mobile measurements of greenhouse gases and air pollutants to study emissions and chemistry related to air quality and climate. He has participated in many field studies, including the Air Pollution in Maryland project, the Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases in Maryland project, and more recently the AEROMMA field campaign.

Bio(s): Ellie is an Assistant Professor in the Chemistry department at the University of Colorado Boulder and a fellow of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences. Prior, she received her Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of California Berkeley and was a NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellow at MIT. Recently she has received the American Society for Mass Spectrometry Research Award in 2019, a CU Boulder Provost Faculty Achievement Award in 2022, and was named an ACS Environmental Au Rising Star in 2022. Her current research focuses on understanding aerosol particle formation and growth in order to improve the understanding of planetary radiative budgets of the modern Earth as well as the early Earth and other planetary bodies. Research themes include the chemistry of silicon, sulfur, and nitrogen heteroatoms and the development of new analytical instrumentation and methods.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2023, contingent on speaker approval.

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Title: Characterizing Microplastic Hotspots From Apalachicola Watershed To Apalachicola Bay
Presenter(s): DeMarcus Turner, NOAA CCME-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, Florida A&M University
Date & Time: 15 November 2023
10:00 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Characterizing Microplastic Hotspots from Apalachicola Watershed to Apalachicola Bay

Presenter(s): DeMarcus Turner, NOAA CCME-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, Florida A&M University

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science CentersSeminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/nuv-aktk-kzj

Phone Number
(US)+1 205-832-1407
PIN: 470 146 591#

Abstract: Microplastic (MP) pollution is an issue that has recently gained the attention of environmental scientists and researchers around the globe. MPs have been an underlying issue since the creation of plastic in the 19th century, but the awareness of MP's vast distribution in environments and organisms wasn't discovered until recently. MPs are identified by their physical structure, size, and chemical properties. This research project characterizes emissions of MP hotspots within the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River system in Florida. The validation of the model is done by observing the presence, absence, and density of MPs in the Apalachicola River's water and sediments. Twelve sites along the Apalachicola River between its origin at Lake Seminole formed by the Jim Woodruff Dam at the border of Florida and Georgia and Apalachicola Bay were sampled. The sediment and water samples were processed through sieving, density separation, and vacuum filtration. Each processed sample was analyzed to gather information on sediment grain size, MP identification, and density. The data show the abundance, concentration, and the types of MPs in the Apalachicola River's water and sediment. The results support the hypothesis that dams like the Jim Woodruff Dam serve as potential MP sinks. There is also evidence that MPs are present in the surface water and sediment of every site sampled. The majority of the MPs collected were black fibers or strains that were less than 500m and were found in the sediments.

Bio(s): DeMarcus Turner is an inquisitive graduate scholar that seeks to enhance his comprehensive knowledge of ecological systems while networking with organizations, professionals, and leaders that share the same mission to conserve, protect, and maintain the natural environment. He was born and raised in Norfolk, Virginia, and received his Bachelor of science degree in biology from Norfolk State University. In addition to graduating Cum Laude he interned at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute's biology department, and in Washington State University's Plant Pathology department. While at Norfolk State he served as former chairman of the Beta Kappa Chi Scientific Honor society and was a member of the Society of Wetland Scientists.
His most recent accomplishments include graduating from Florida A&M University's School of the Environment with his Master of Science degree in Environmental Science. Demarcus was supported at FAMU as a NOAA Center for Coastal and Marine Ecosystems graduate scholar and interned with two different NOAA line offices. He was also inducted into the Alpha Kappa Mu honor society for his exceptional academic success and gained membership into Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics & Native Americans in Science and the American Geophysical Union.
Mr. Turner's current accomplishments include his admittance into a PhD program at the University of South Carolina in the Arnold School of Public Health where he will receive his doctorate in environmental health sciences. To fund his research, he has been awarded fellowship from the National GEM consortium where he is sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He also accepted a Research assistant position and fellowship from the Arnold School of Public Health. After receiving his PhD DeMarcus intends or applying for positions in NOAA to pursue a career path as a scientist, researcher, government official, and community leader.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

14 November 2023

Title: Unpacking the 2023/2024 El Niño Season for the Pacific Islands
Presenter(s): Brandon Bukunt, NOAA NWS Regional Climate Science and Services Meteorologist; Dr. Ryan Rykaczewski, NOAA PIFSC Supervisory Research Marine Scientist
Date & Time: 14 November 2023
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:


NOAA Science Seminar Series

Tittle: Unpacking the 2023/2024 El Nio Season for the Pacific Islands

Presenter(s): Brandon Bukunt: NOAA NWS Regional Climate Science and Services Meteorologist and
Dr. Ryan Rykaczewski: NOAA PIFSC Supervisory Research Marine Scientist

Sponsor(s): NOAA National MPA Center and OCTO

Seminar Contact(s): brandon.bukunt@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2328704489893665366

Abstract: An examination of the ongoing El Nio for the US Affiliated Pacific Islands and Hawaii. Come learn about this year's El Nio from both an atmospheric and fisheries perspective.

Bio(s):
Brandon Bukunt is a meteorologist at NOAA Pacific Region Headquarters (PRH). Prior to joining PRH, Brandon was a forecaster with the National Weather Service Guam from 2018 to September 2023. His responsibilities at NWS Guam included managing the climate program alongside issuance of drought statements, tropical cyclone advisories, and routine weather/marine forecasts. He holds a BS and MS in Atmospheric Science from the University of Hawaii at Mnoa.Ryan Rykaczewski is a fisheries oceanographer working at the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center in Honolulu. Ryan earned his PhD from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography where his work focused on the ecology of zooplankton, sardines, and anchovies of the Eastern Pacific. Since then, Ryan has been working to improve his understanding of the impacts of climate processes on ocean conditions, with an emphasis on the North Pacific. In his current position, he is seeking to better incorporate understanding of ocean and climate observations into the management of fisheries of the Central Pacific. Ryan spends his free time sitting on the beach and playing in the sand with his two little kids.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be shared after the webinar with all who register, or a link where they can be found, or a contact for the recording.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: Engaging the Next Generation of Marine Scientists with Storytelling and Culturally Relevant Media
Presenter(s): Dr. Tammy Silva, Research Marine Ecologist at Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary; and Ben Gilbarg, Director of STEAM the Streets
Date & Time: 14 November 2023
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Engaging the Next Generation of Marine Scientists with Storytelling and Culturally Relevant Media

Presenter(s): Dr. Tammy Silva, Research Marine Ecologist at Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary and Ben Gilbarg, Director of STEAM the Streets

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NOS Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7845810845202481493

Abstract: How can we help build a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive Marine Science workforce? How can we help youth see it so they can be it? Reaching youth in culturally relevant, creative ways that they can relate to, is essential for accomplishing this.
STEAM the Streets specializes in producing unique content that promotes career paths in STEM and the Arts (STEAM), and through their experience as educators and youth developers, have a proven recipe for keeping youth engaged.NOAA's Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary Marine Ecologist, Tammy Silva, partnered up with STEAM the Streets to create videos and a learning module to reach, engage, and educate youth about the triumphs and challenges of a career in Marine Ecology. The learning module and videos are included in the free STEAM the Streets mobile app, and the content can be utilized outside of the app to educate students in a classroom setting. In this webinar, educators will hear about the career module content, learn about the app, and receive access to the free materials so that they can implement the app or the lesson with their classes.Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: Atlantic Hurricanes and Climate Change
Presenter(s): Tom Knutson, Senior Scientist, NOAA/OAR/GFDL
Date & Time: 14 November 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Atlantic Hurricanes and Climate ChangeNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Tom Knutson, Senior Scientist, NOAA/OAR/GFDL

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/191648610034053213


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: It is surprisingly difficult to confidently detect a greenhouse warming signal in past Atlantic hurricane activity--in contrast to the case for global mean temperature. I will discuss why this is the case, including a discussion of strong multidecadal variability and the possible role of aerosol forcing in the basin. I will review what recent studies say about the possible future of Atlantic hurricanes as the climate continues to warm. The projections from these studies include stronger hurricanes with higher rainfall rates and greater inundation risk due to sea level rise, but with a possible decrease in hurricane numbers.

Keywords: Hurricanes, climate change, climate variability

Bio(s): Tom Knutson is a Senior Scientist at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. He is a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society and the American Geophysical Union, and former Chair of the World Meteorological Organization's Expert Team on Tropical Cyclones and Climate Change.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Where We Are and Where We're Going with the Cooperative Rockfish Survey in the Gulf of Alaska
Presenter(s): Madison Hall, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Groundfish Assessment Program
Date & Time: 14 November 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Where We Are and Where We're Going with the Cooperative Rockfish Survey in the Gulf of Alaska

Presenter(s): Madison Hall, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC), Groundfish Assessment Program (GAP)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Ground fish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Bianca.Prohaska@noaa.gov and Sarah.Friedman@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACE GAP)Location: Webinar


Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mcd207c7faa0b6e6449f165028ad4c156 Or by phone: 1(415) 527-5035 Access code: 2760 566 4931 Meeting password: gfish23

Accessibility: Webex closed captioning available.

Abstract: AFSC scientists, together with academic and fishing industry partners, have completed a third summer of data collection in our Gulf of Alaska cooperative rockfish survey. This project, the Science - Industry Rockfish Research Collaboration in Alaska (SIRRCA), aims to improve rockfish assessment models by increased sampling in the rocky habitats that many rockfish species prefer. These habitats are successfully fished by our industry partners but are deemed untrawlable to the NMFS survey vessels and gear, promoting collaborative sampling. Come learn more about what SIRRCA has accomplished thus far and where we are headed with this ambitious government " industry cooperative research.

Bio(s): Madison is currently a member of the Bering Sea research group at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle. She obtained a Bachelor's of Science in Biology from the Georgia Institute of Technology, a Master's of Science in Zoology from Rhodes University in South Africa, and a PhD in Conservation Biology from the University of Central Florida. None of this work was conducted on fish or fisheries, but it did involve intensive spatiotemporal statistical modeling of the seascape, harrowing fieldwork, and working in large groups of diverse stakeholders. This lead to a postdoc in the Fisheries, Aquatic Science, and Technology lab at Alaska Pacific University, and eventually to her joining AFSC as a research biologist. Over the past few years she has lead the design and execution of a cooperative survey in the Alaskan rockfish fishery entitled the Science-Industry Rockfish Research Collaboration in Alaska (or SIRRCA). Today she will be discussing what the project has accomplished thus far and where they plan to go from here.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at:https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2023-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-seriesSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

13 November 2023

Title: Responses of the Antarctic Ocean to the Climate Change focusing on the Ross Sea and Amundsen Sea
Presenter(s): Seung-Tae Yoon, Assistant Professor; School of Earth System Sciences, Kyungpook National University
Date & Time: 13 November 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar and in person: NCWCP 3555
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Responses of the Antarctic Ocean to the Climate Change focusing on the Ross Sea and Amundsen Sea

Presenter(s): Seung-Tae Yoon (Assistant Professor; School of Earth System Sciences, Kyungpook National University)

Sponsor(s): STAR Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Ludo Brucker (Ludovic.Brucker@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
Dr. Yoon's presentation

Abstract: The Antarctica is one of the most vulnerable region to the influences of climate change. Especially, the Antarctic ice shelves have been melting extensively with the rapid grounding line retreat over the past decades, contributing to global sea level rise. To evaluate the Antarctic region change and assess its impact on the future sea level, we have conducted field observations in the Ross Sea and east Amundsen Sea using various observation methods in cooperation with LIONESS (Land-Ice/Ocean Network Exploration with Semiautonomous Systems) led by KOPRI (Korea Polar Research Institute). In this presentation, I will show the recent hydrographic variability of Terra Nova Bay, Ross Sea where the densest water mass in the world is formed, and introduce the recent findings around the West Antarctic ice shelves having experienced extensive ice mass loss over the past decades. In addition, I will also introduce a new Antarctic research project (2023-2031) Korea Network for Observation and prediction of ice sheet and sea level changes in a Warming world (K-NOW)' which I am participating in as a Co-PI.
Keywords: Antarctica, warming, climate change, ice shelves

Bio(s): TBD


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9 November 2023

Title: Ecological Variability as an Indicator of Shoreline Restoration Success: A Decade of Community Science Monitoring Across Puget Sound
Presenter(s): Simone Des Roches, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Date & Time: 9 November 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Ecological Variability as an Indicator of Shoreline Restoration Success: A Decade of Community Science Monitoring Across Puget Sound

Presenter(s): Simone Des Roches, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Sponsor(s): NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam

Seminar Contacts: Vicky Krikelas, Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov
Location: Webinar

Join via Webex:

https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m13be6e4e4f7af5fc75612760532574db

Meeting number: 2763 575 3111
Meeting password: axKJ28Jc7mP

Join via phone: 1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free. Can't join the meeting? Contact support.

Abstract: Humans have drastically modified marine nearshore ecosystems through shoreline armoring. This armor " seawalls, bulkheads, and riprap " reduces the abundance and changes the composition of key ecological attributes of beaches including wrack, logs, and invertebrates. Monitoring in Puget Sound shows that restoration, including armor removal, can reverse these negative effects. Less is known, however, about changes in variability of these ecological responses as a result of armor construction and removal. Ecological temporal and spatial variation can themselves be indicators of restoration effectiveness and could be a consequence of how restoration is performed. Impacts of individual restoration activities, such as the amount of armor removed and specific supplemental actions taken (planting, log addition, sediment nourishment) can be difficult to measure because they are not performed randomly nor independently across sites. Together with community scientists, we found that beach wrack, logs, and supratidal invertebrates not only increased following restoration, but also often had higher variance, much like adjacent natural (never armored) beaches. Differences among sample sites, more so than across sample years, explained most of this variation. Site variability may be due to geomorphological differences, which drive natural ecological processes across spatially disparate beaches. Variability in restored beaches could also result from the length of armor removed and different restoration actions taken. For example, we found that the addition of logs post armor removal had positive impacts on the proportion of gravel sediments, the amount of wrack, log recruitment, and riparian vegetation cover. Because shoreline armoring is a pervasive human activity, public perception of natural variability is key to the social context of restoration success. Participation in data collection through community science endeavors is one way to encourage an appreciation for this variability within and across landscapes. We implore that shoreline monitoring efforts should evaluate and communicate ecosystem variability as a key indicator of restoration success.

Bio(s): Simone began her research career at the University of British Columbia studying how intraspecific variation within threespine stickleback fish affect their lake ecosystems. During her PhD she studied the evolutionary ecology of, and natural selection on, lizards in White Sands, NM. After moving to California, Simone did her first postdoc at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where she explored sticklebacks' rapid evolutionary responses to climate change in California estuaries across a latitudinal gradient. She made it back to her favorite bioregion for two more postdocs at the University of Washington: the first as part of an international collaborative network studying urban evolutionary ecology; and the second with the Wetland Ecosystem Team in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, developing and analyzing data from the shoreline monitoring database " a community science-based repository for standardized protocols and data on effects of shoreline restoration in Puget Sound. Simone joined the WDFW habitat program as a research scientist half a year ago and is examining relationships between fish " particularly salmonids, and their habitats. She is broadly interested in exploring how habitat modification and restoration affect the intraspecific variation and evolutionary trajectories in salmonids and other fishes. Simone lives in Edmonds with her husband, one-year-old, and senior menagerie of a keeshond, two rabbits, and a crested gecko. She is passionate about art and science and loves watercolor, knitting, natural dyeing, and pigment-making.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

8 November 2023

Title: NOAA’s Ecosystem-Based Management Resource: The National Marine Ecosystem Status Website
Presenter(s): Willem Klajbor, Senior Research Associate, University of Miami CIMAS/AOML
Date & Time: 8 November 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA's Ecosystem-Based Management (EBM) Resource: The National Marine Ecosystem Status Website (EBM/EBFM)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Willem Klajbor, Senior Research Associate, University of Miami CIMAS/AOML

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2193136901026367578
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The agency's National Marine Ecosystem Status website provides a starting point for educators, outreach specialists, and the interested public to explore the status of eight major U.S. marine and Great Lakes ecosystems as well as the nation at -a -glance. For the first time in one location, it provides easy access to NOAA's wide range of important coastal, marine and Great Lakes ecosystem data in an EBM context. In this presentation, Will will walk through new features of the website, including new indicators and resources available for the first time on the site, and explain how NOAA Programs and interested partners can get involved.

Keywords: Ecosystem, Indicator, Data

Bio(s): Will Klajbor is a Senior Research Associate at the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Science at AOML coordinating the NOAA Ecosystem Indicators Working Group and the NOAA National Marine Ecosystem Status website. Will also helps to coordinate NOAA's Offshore Wind Energy efforts in the Gulf of Mexico, working between the Southeast Fisheries Science Center, the Southeast Regional Office, and the Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program. Prior to the CIMAS, Will was a 2021 Knauss Fellow with ONMS, NCEI and AOML. Will has a Masters in Marine Resource Management with a minor in Risk Quantification in Marine Systems from Oregon State University and Bachelor's Degrees in Marine and Coastal Management and Economics from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Detecting and Interpreting Virus Diversity and Dynamics in Marine Holobionts
Presenter(s): Alex J. Veglia, Assistant Professor, Department of Biology - University of Puerto Rico Mayagez
Date & Time: 8 November 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Detecting and Interpreting Virus Diversity and Dynamics in Marine HolobiontsPart of the NOAA Omics Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Alex J. Veglia, Assistant Professor, Department of Biology - University of Puerto Rico Mayagez

Sponsor(s): NOAA Omics Working Group

Seminar Contact(s): Nicole Miller, NOAA 'Omics Specialist, noaa.omics@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3247774164475234398

Abstract: Marine holobionts are comprised of an animal host and symbiotic microorganisms, which may include protists (e.g., dinoflagellates, apicomplexans), fungi, bacteria, archaea, and viruses. The community composition of these symbionts and the interactions occurring between them can significantly impact emergent animal phenotypes, such as stress or disease resilience. Viruses exhibit a multifaceted interaction spectrum within animal holobionts, having potentially positive, negative, or neutral functional contributions to host biology. Despite the persistent methodological challenges in investigating viruses and their impact on marine holobionts, the application of diverse 'omics techniques has proven essential in advancing our understanding of viruses within these complex systems. In this seminar, we will explore the application of high-throughput 'omics approaches to study viruses within coral reef organisms. First, we will illustrate the use of endogenous virus elements in host genomes to better understand the ecology of an enigmatic Symbiodiniaceae-infecting RNA virus (dinoRNAV') associated with cnidarian tissues. Next, we will introduce 'vAMPirus' (github.com/Aveglia/vAMPirus), a new bioinformatic tool for analyzing viral amplicon sequence data and showcase its utility in investigating environmental reservoirs of dinoRNAV on a Pacific coral reef. Finally, we will provide an overview of metatranscriptomics and its role in elucidating the contribution of viruses to stony coral tissue loss disease. Overall, this seminar will encompass diverse 'omics approaches for studying viruses in marine holobionts, offering valuable insights for future investigations.

Bio(s): Dr. Alex J. Veglia is an environmental virologist who earned his master's degree at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayagez in the Department of Marine Science, where his research focused on isolating and identifying cyanobacteria-infecting viruses inhabiting coral reef invertebrate tissues. He then furthered his coral reef virology research during his Ph.D. at Rice University, developing virus-focused bioinformatics tools and investigating viral roles in coral reef health and ecosystem functioning. Now, as the leader of the Virus Diversity and Bioinformatics (ViDaB) Lab at UPRM's Department of Biology, his research group is dedicated to deciphering virus genetic and ecological diversity within diverse marine metazoan holobionts.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of this presentation will be made available on the NOAA Omics website. View past omics seminar recordings here: https://sciencecouncil.noaa.gov/NOAA-Science-Technology-Focus-Areas/NOAA-Omics

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Projected Increase in Extremely Active Atlantic Hurricane Season
Presenter(s): Dr. Hosmay Lopez, PhOD
Date & Time: 8 November 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, OAR - AOML - Happenings Calendar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series


Title: Projected Increase in Extremely Active Atlantic Hurricane Season

Presenter(s): Dr. Hosmay Lopez (PhOD)

Sponsor(s): NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratories (AOML)

Seminar Contact(s): Rayne Sabatello; rayne.sabatello@noaa.gov

Location: Online only: online

Remote Access: Please join meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.

https://meet.google.com/ywp-zzfy-nco

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (334) 518-1155 Access Code:912 529 495#



Abstract: Future changes to the year-to-year swings between active and inactive North Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC) seasons have received little attention, yet may have great societal implications in areas prone to hurricane landfalls. This work investigates past and future changes in North Atlantic TC activity, focusing on interannual variability and evaluating the contributions from anthropogenic forcing. We show that interannual variability of Atlantic TC activity has already increased, evidenced by a significant increase in the occurrence of both extremely active and inactive TC seasons since the 1980s. Consistent with the observed trend, TC-resolving general circulation models project a 58 - 64% increase in the variance of North Atlantic TC activity, measured by accumulated cyclone energy, by the middle of the 21st Century. Further analysis indicates that these changes are the result of increased variability in vertical wind shear and atmospheric stability, in response to enhanced Pacific-to-Atlantic interbasin sea surface temperature variations. Therefore, we conclude that robust anthropogenic-forced intensification in the variability of Atlantic TC activity has already emerged from natural variability and will continue to intensify in the future, with important implications for emergency planning and societal preparedness.

Bio(s): Dr. Lopez is an oceanographer at the NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. He is currently engaged in several research projects, which aim at studying the ocean atmosphere interaction, climate variability and change, and the occurrence of extreme weather events. One of Dr. Lopez recent studies involves assessing the role of anthropogenic (i.e., climate change) forcing on seasonal variations in Atlantic hurricane activity. He has a BS in Meteorology and Mathematics from Florida State University and a Ph.D. in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography from the University of Miami.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Ocean Protector, An Online Ocean Acidification Game
Presenter(s): Alex Zimmerman, Indiana University
Date & Time: 8 November 2023
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm ET
Location: GoTo Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Ocean Protector, An Online Ocean Acidification Game

Presenter(s): Alex Zimmerman, Visiting Researcher at Indiana University and Developer at Outreach Games

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Acidification Program SOARCE webinar series https://oceanacidification.noaa.gov/ocean-acidification-education-outreach/

Seminar Contact(s): natalie.lord@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8479100956163832413

Abstract: Ocean Protector is a new online game-based learning program to teach middle school students about the impacts of ocean acidification (OA) and positive actions to help. Thanks to funding from the NOAA OAP Education mini-grant, the game was developed collaboratively with educators to deliver a digital program that is engaging, easy to use, and integrates NOAA data into a framework that aligns with Next Generation Science Standards. Students begin the game by learning about OA and selecting a character role, such as marine park manager, fishing boat captain, or ocean tour guide. Students then evaluate and select decisions for how to reduce OA impacts on their character and marine life. After each decision the game updates dynamically and students analyze how their actions influenced OA impacts using data and their learned knowledge. Ultimately, this decision-driven process helps foster student-centered learning and ocean literacy, including with students from inland communities. Ocean Protector and associated lesson-plans are released freely online at https://www.outreachgames.org/OceanProtector/game_program/index.html. The presentation will detail the design structure, game details/usability, and educator resources along with lessons learned from the entire development process.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Webinar recording will be shared on the NOAA OAP YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCB7UrrT3gGJAHGnZzjQCvNQ

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: The Impacts of African Americans/Blacks in Aquatic Sciences, and the Contributions of the NOAA Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center (LMRCSC) to a Diverse Scientific Workforce
Presenter(s): Paulinus Chigbu, PhD - Center Director, NOAA LMRCSC, University of Maryland - Eastern Shore
Date & Time: 8 November 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Impacts of African Americans/Blacks in Aquatic Sciences, and the Contributions of the NOAA Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center (LMRCSC) to a Diverse Scientific WorkforceNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Paulinus Chigbu, PhD - Center Director, NOAA LMRCSC, University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Sponsor(s): NOAA Education and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8704901061463436894
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Traditionally underrepresented and historically excluded communities are part of and have a deep history with nature and the environment, as well as having a wealth of traditional ecological knowledge, but are underrepresented in the geosciences workforce, including at NOAA. Since the 1960s, the number of African Americans/Blacks in formal aquatic sciences programs has increased, albeit very slowly. This presentation will share highlights of the institutions and programs, such as the NOAA Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center (LMRCSC), that have successfully increased the education and graduation of African Americans/Blacks in aquatic sciences. Information on the contributions of African Americans/Blacks to the advancement of aquatic sciences will also be shared. These advancements are part of the long-standing history that African Americans/Blacks have with the natural environment. The critical role of mentoring and training the next generation of students at the LMRCSC in support of an inclusive and diverse aquatic sciences workforce will be demonstrated.

Keywords: aquatic sciences, nation's workforce

Bio(s): Dr. Paulinus Chigbu is Director of the NOAA Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center (LMRCSC), and Associate Dean for Research, Development and Graduate Education at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES). Over the past 25 years, he has led major research and educational programs funded by NOAA and NSF. Under his leadership, the NOAA LMRCSC has grown to become a national center of excellence for the development of a diverse body of professionals in marine and sheries sciences.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

7 November 2023

Title: Cod confidential: Using satellite tag and VMS data to decipher behavioral reactions of Pacific cod to trawl vessels
Presenter(s): Sean Rohan, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Groundfish Assessment Program
Date & Time: 7 November 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Cod confidential: Using satellite tag and VMS data to decipher behavioral reactions of Pacific cod to trawl vessels

Presenter(s): Sean Rohan, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC), Groundfish Assessment Program (GAP)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Bianca.Prohaska@noaa.gov and Sarah.Friedman@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACE GAP)Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mcd207c7faa0b6e6449f165028ad4c156 Or by phone: 1(415) 527-5035 Access code: 2760 566 4931 Meeting password: gfish23

Accessibility: Webex closed captioning available.

Abstract: Electronic archival tags are essential tools for studying the movement and behavior of highly mobile free-swimming fishes. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate how Pop-up Satellite Archival Tag data can be combined with GPS data from the Vessel Monitoring System to characterize behavioral reactions of Pacific cod to commercial bottom trawl vessels and gear. Surprisingly, we found that some Pacific cod have a much longer swimming endurance at typical commercial bottom trawl towing speeds than previously thought, which may have implications for the catchability of Pacific cod in fisheries-independent bottom trawl surveys.

Bio(s): Dr. Sean Rohan is a research fisheries biologist in the Bering Sea Bottom Trawl Survey Group at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2023-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-seriesSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

6 November 2023

Title: Calibrated probabilistic sub-seasonal rainfall forecasting of the 2022 Pakistan Rainfall, and A Polar Low Genesis Potential Index and Its Application to Subseasonal Prediction
Presenter(s): Bohar Singh, IRI, Columbia Climate School, Columbia University; and Zhuo Wang, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Date & Time: 6 November 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Calibrated probabilistic sub-seasonal rainfall forecasting of the 2022 Pakistan Rainfall, and A Polar Low Genesis Potential Index and Its Application to Subseasonal Prediction

Presenter(s): Dr. Bohar Singh, IRI, Columbia Climate School, Columbia University, New York; Dr. Zhuo Wang, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Weather Program Office S2S Program, and NOAA NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration Modeling Program DivisionSeminar Contacts: DK Kang, dk.kang@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/7367713502366487643

Abstract: This monthly webinar series was created to share ongoing work within NWS and OAR at the Weeks 3-4 and S2S timescales. We would like to foster a relaxed, informal dialogue among forecasters, modelers and researchers. This month, Dr. Bohar Singh will speak about "Calibrated probabilistic sub-seasonal rainfall forecasting of the 2022 Pakistan Rainfall." Dr. Zhuo Wang will speak about "A Polar Low Genesis Potential Index and Its Application to Subseasonal Prediction"

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available on the Weeks 3-4/S2S Webinar Series website: https://vlab.noaa.gov/web/weeks-3-4-s2s-webinar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

2 November 2023

Title: Coordinating Northwestern Michigan College's Historic Multibeam Submission to the NCEI Bathymetry Archive
Presenter(s): Cathleen Yung, GIS Coordinator, NOAA NOS OCS IOCM, Asheville, NC
Date & Time: 2 November 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Coordinating Northwestern Michigan College's Historic Multibeam Submission to the NCEI Bathymetry Archive

Presenter(s): Cathleen Yung, GIS Coordinator, NOAA NOS OCS IOCM, Asheville, NC

Sponsor(s): IOCM Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Cathleen Yung, cathleen.yung@noaa.gov; Amber Butler amber.butler@noaa.gov, iwgocm.staff@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8244683977477786715

Abstract: In September 2022, Cathleen Yung (Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping/IOCM GIS Coordinator) and Jessica Nation (NCEI Bathymetry Data Manager) began working with directors from Northwestern Michigan College (NMC) to implement mapping coordination and data stewardship practices into NMC's Marine Technology Capstone curriculum. The result of this project was a milestone achievement: NMC contributed the first multibeam bathymetry survey from the Great Lakes to NCEI's Archive. By working directly with Cathleen, the students and instructors utilized the Great Lakes Spatial Priorities Study to identify an area of interest with high mapping priority. Jessica presented NCEI's data submission guidelines to the students and helped them prepare their data for archive after the survey was complete. The survey, NMC2023, is now publicly accessible online through the Bathymetric Data Viewer. The data from this student-led survey directly supports local interests while also furthering the goals of the regional Lakebed 2030 mapping initiative.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: SAGE: The Sensor for Aqueous Gases in the Environment
Presenter(s): Dr. Anna Michel, Associate Scientist in the Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Chief Scientist for the National Deep Submergence Facility
Date & Time: 2 November 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: SAGE: The Sensor for Aqueous Gases in the Environment

Presenter(s): Dr. Anna Michel, Associate Scientist in the Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering at the Woods Hole Oceanographic; Chief Scientist for the National Deep Submergence Facility

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library SeminarsLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2426368609803588956

Abstract: SAGE: The Sensor for Aqueous Gases in the Environment is a new technology developed in the Chemical Sensors Laboratory at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for measuring dissolved gases in environmental applications. Here we present the development of SAGE, which uses a hollow core fiber along with infrared spectroscopy for dissolved methane sensing. Two versions of SAGE, a 2000 m rated deep ocean methane sensor and a field-portable methane sensor for coastal environments will be shared. Results from field tests at hydrothermal vents using AUV Sentry and ROV Jason, at methane seeps, and in a coastal salt marsh will be presented.
Keywords: In situ sensing, methane, exploration

Bio(s): Anna Michel is an Associate Scientist in the Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. She also serves as the Chief Scientist for the National Deep Submergence Facility. Her research focuses on the development of new in situ sensors and sensing platforms for advancing our understanding of ocean chemistry in locations ranging from deep-sea hydrothermal vents to the coastal Arctic. Michel's lab is also developing technologies for measuring microplastics.

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

1 November 2023

Title: Climate change effects on cold-water coral reefs and their associated communities
Presenter(s): Ryan Gasbarro, NOAA SWFSC
Date & Time: 1 November 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Climate change effects on cold-water coral reefs and their associated communities

Presenter(s): Ryan Gasbarro, Postdoctoral researcher, NOAA SWFSC Environmental Research Division

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology DivisionSeminar contact: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m5de8b1fe08b663314db3a6a3b2f367fd; Password (if needed): fedsem1nar! ; Join by phone: 415-527-5035 (US only, not a toll-free number), Access code/meeting number: 2762 421 0654

Abstract: The distribution of marine biodiversity faces dramatic spatial reorganization from climate change. However, much of the theory and empirical work on distributional changes comes from shallow-water ecosystems, while the deep seafloor (> 200 m) receives comparably little attention despite mounting evidence of the accrual of climatic changes within this largest habitable area of the planet. Cold-water coral (CWC) reefs are persistent features of continental margins (~200 " 4000 m) around the globe, important biodiversity and biogeochemical cycling hotspots, and sentinels of marine climate change. Thus, work constraining and predicting climate effects on their distributions is sorely needed. Here, I present a number of case studies predicting the effects of climate change on the distributions of CWC reef habitats and their associated fauna, using both modelling approaches and empirical data collected on multiple oceanographic cruises to the CWC reefs of the southeast USA (SEUS) margin in 2018-2019. I begin by presenting global habitat suitability models (HSMs) built using publicly available oceanographic and biogeographic products to predict the occurrence of reef-forming CWC species and the reef habitat they form, testing for taxonomic and regional differences in their ecological niches. I then use an ensemble of global climate model outputs to project the distributions of these same taxa to 2100 in a range of climate scenarios, and test for differences in distribution changes across species and bioregions. Then, I use higher-resolution ocean model products and data from multiple oceanographic cruises to the SEUS to build HSMs for this region; this data collation revealed the largest known, essentially continuous CWC reef province on the planet and suggests key climate refugia occurring in newly discovered reef sites that are notably outside of protected areas designed to prevent bottom-contact fishing overlap with CWC reefs. Then, I use video imagery and in situ collections of intact seafloor communities to test how the abundance, taxonomic and functional diversity, and community structure of invertebrate and fish communities in hard-substratum ecosystems along the SEUS margin " including CWC reefs and submarine canyons " change along biocomplexity (e.g. the percentage of live coral cover), bathymetric, and oceanographic gradients. These studies expand upon baseline descriptions of reef habitats and coral-associated fauna in the SEUS, testing for mechanisms driving observed ecological patterns across large environmental gradients. Together, this volume of work improves our understanding of the drivers of seafloor Vulnerable Marine Ecosystem occurrence and biodiversity and augmenting conservation efforts for these critical components of the global ocean.

Bio(s): Ryan Gasbarro received his Ph.D. from Temple University and an M.Sc. the University of Victoria. He is currently a postdoc with the NOAA SWFSC's Environmental Research Division (ERD) with research interests in the application of species distribution models and other quantitative tools to understand the drivers of marine biodiversity and the potential effects of climate change. His current work explores the oceanographic and climatic drivers of juvenile groundfish biodiversity in the California Current.

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; link to recording available upon request.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

31 October 2023

Title: Integrative macroevolution: A research program developed using deep-sea fishes
Presenter(s): Liz Miller, University of Oklahoma and Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Date & Time: 31 October 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Integrative macroevolution: A research program developed using deep-sea fishes

Presenter(s): Liz Miller, University of Oklahoma and Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Bianca.Prohaska@noaa.gov and Sarah.Friedman@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACE GAP)Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mcd207c7faa0b6e6449f165028ad4c156 Or by phone: 1(415) 527-5035 Access code: 2760 566 4931 Meeting password: gfish23

Accessibility: Webex closed captioning available.

Abstract: Global biodiversity patterns, such as species richness distributions, are ultimately formed through speciation, extinction, dispersal and habitat transitions. However, the reasons why these processes might vary in space and time are complex and require insights from other disciplines. Here I describe a research approach, "integrative macroevolution", which I define as bringing in data and approaches from many fields to more fully explain biodiversity patterns. My postdoctoral work on deep-sea fish macroevolution served as a testing ground for a more integrative approach to studying macroevolution. First, I will discuss temporal patterns of deep-sea colonization and diversification across the fish Tree of Life, and why deep-sea colonization might be limited. Second, I will demonstrate how anglerfishes exemplify evolutionary outcomes after colonization of the deep sea.

Bio(s): Dr. Elizabeth Miller is currently a postdoc affiliated with the University of Oklahoma and based in San Diego. She previously was a postdoc at the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. The goal of her research is to explain global patterns of biodiversity from an evolutionary perspective.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2023-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-seriesSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

27 October 2023

Title: Challenges & opportunities in using heat mortality & emergency department information for estimating health burden
Presenter(s): Ambarish Vaidyanathan, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Date & Time: 27 October 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA-ECCC Extreme Temperature

Remote Access: Challenges & opportunities in using heat mortality & emergency department information for estimating health burden

Presenter(s): Ambarish Vaidyanathan, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention

Sponsor(s): NOAA National Weather Service / Analyze, Forecast, and Support Office

Seminar Contact(s): Kimberly McMahon, kimberly.mcmahon@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Please register for NOAA-ECCC Extreme Temperature

Remote Access: Challenges & opportunities in using heat mortality & emergency department information on Oct 27, 2023 2:00 PM EDT at:https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5809060112429292635 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract: Heat continues to be the leading weather-related killer with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimating an average of 1,220 heat-related deaths occurred in the United States annually (2019 "2021) based on information reported in death certificates. However, the true mortality burden is higher because heat exposure is a contributing factor to deaths resulting from many causes. NOAA's global analysis shows that the 10 warmest years on record have all occurred since 2005, and 7 of the 10 have occurred just since 2014. Not only are heat waves occurring more frequently, but are also more intense and longer-lasting with less cooling overnight, leading to more strain on the human body.

This webinar will focus on the convergence of heat and health, specifically exploring the challenges and opportunities around the analysis of heat mortality and emergency department information.

Bio(s): Rish Vaidyanathan is a senior health scientist with the Climate and Health Program at the National Center for Environmental Health, CDC. Rish's training and work experience covers a wide range of substantive areas, including epidemiology, exposure assessment, and data science. In addition, he has several years of experience planning, coordinating, and implementing strategies to facilitate the conduct of environmental health surveillance and translational research projects. Specifically, he has been able to establish mutually beneficial collaborations with various academic institutions, state and local health departments, and federal agencies on efforts to identify and characterize populations most at risk to extreme heat and other climate-sensitive exposures.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of this webinar will be available at https://www.weather.gov/safety/heat-outreach.

Subscribe / Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word subscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

26 October 2023

Title: The Stream Evolution Triangle: new perspectives on the interactions between biological and physical processes that restore streams
Presenter(s): Janine Castro, Ph.D., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office
Date & Time: 26 October 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Stream Evolution Triangle: new perspectives on the interactions between biological and physical processes that restore streams

Presenter(s): Janine Castro, Ph.D., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office

Sponsor(s): NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam

Seminar Contacts: Vicky Krikelas, Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov
Location: WebinarJoin via Webex:https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m13be6e4e4f7af5fc75612760532574dbMeeting number: 2763 575 3111
Meeting password: axKJ28Jc7mPJoin via phone: 1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll FreeCan't join the meeting? Contact support.

Abstract: This talk will provide an overview of the underpinning science for the Stream Evolution Triangle (SET) "including updates and emerging perspectives on stream evolution. Having introduced the SET, evidence from completed projects will be used as case studies for its application in innovative stream restoration. The SET derives from the Stream Evolution Model (SEM), which was itself an updated version of earlier Channel Evolution Models (CEMs). The SEM represents an advance over the CEMs in that it considers the impacts of disturbance and recovery on habitat and ecosystem benefits, but it does not explicitly account for the influence of biological processes on morphological adjustments in the fluvial system. Omission of biological influences on stream morphology can be traced back to Lane's balance which, since the 1950s, has been used in various forms to explain a stream's tendency to aggrade or incise in terms of only physical processes. The SET combines geology, hydrology, and biology in the form of a ternary diagram similar to those used in many other fields of natural science. The triangle treats geology, hydrology and biology as co-determinants of stream morphology and drivers of morphological evolution, while recognizing that, in a given watercourse, form and adjustment may be dominated by any of these three controlling factors, depending upon the landscape setting, catchment context, and biome.

Bio(s): Janine Castro is the Project Leader for the US Fish and Wildlife Service Fisheries Office in Vancouver, Washington. She has worked as a Geomorphologist for the Fish and Wildlife Service for 22 years and spent the preceding 10 years working for the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Janine is one of the five founding members of River Restoration Northwest, is the Technical Director for Portland State University's River Restoration Professional Certificate Program, and is a member of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program's Expert Regional Technical Group, which reviews ecosystem restoration actions in the floodplain of the lower Columbia River and estuary.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Development of Working Waterfront Case Studies Layering Climate Inundation and Economic Data
Presenter(s): Dijani Laplace, NOAA CCME-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, Texas A&M University " Corpus Christi
Date & Time: 26 October 2023
1:00 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Development of Working Waterfront Case Studies Layering Climate Inundation and Economic Data

Presenter(s): Dijani Laplace, NOAA CCME-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, Texas A&M University " Corpus Christi

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science CentersSeminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/cfv-pwsj-kfm

Phone Numbers
(US)+1 520-800-2187
PIN: 741 524 478#

Abstract: Coastal communities are experiencing increased inundation occurrences due to sea level rise, hurricane flooding and high tide events. Identification of businesses and jobs most vulnerable to inundation is an important part of coastal municipal planning, especially for areas with working waterfronts. Unfortunately, many smaller coastal communities do not have the expertise and funding to conduct the analyses needed to obtain this information, and often require technical assistance. As such, this research project examined the U.S. coast to identify cities that were at risk to coastal inundation hazards using a variety of national datasets: FEMA National Risk Index, NOAA Sea Level Rise Viewer, NOAA Coastal Flood Exposure Mapper, NOAA C-CAP Land Cover and the Hazard Economics Rural Capacity Index Map. Four case study areas were identified after preliminary overlay of inundation hazards with businesses in the marine economy using 2021 ESRI Business Analyst data and further discussions with regional partners: Chelsea, MA; Cape May, NJ; Crisfield, MD and Murrells Inlet, SC. Four inundation hazard layers (high tide flooding, sea level rise 1-4ft, category 1 storm surge, FEMA Special Flood Hazard Areas) were overlaid with business locations in each case study area, and maps of flooding extent for each hazard and their impact on the marine economy were produced. Percentage of businesses inundated, potential total number of employees impacted, and potential sales volume lost for the marine and non- marine economy were calculated. Site specific information for each case study was also included for general context of the local economy. These case studies illustrate the potential efficacy of creating city-specific business inundation profiles for municipal planners using ESRI Business Analyst, and an initial framework for a methodology to identify smaller coastal communities in need of this form of technical assistance.

Bio(s): Dijani Laplace is a NOAA CCME- II Graduate Scholar currently pursuing his master's degree at Texas A&M University " Corpus Christi. Dijani is a part of the Community Resilience Group at the Harte Research Institute of Gulf of Mexico Studies, and his research is focused on understanding how resident perceptions of ecosystems in the U.S. Virgin Islands impact ecosystem management and resilience. Dijani received his B.S. in Biology from the University of the Virgin Islands in 2020. Dijani's research interests are focused on ecosystems, ecosystem services, and geospatial analysis. However, he has recently leaned into social science as part of his research. Most recently, Dijani completed his NERTO, in which he developed inundation profiles for businesses in certain cities as case studies using various inundation hazards, at the NOAA Office for Coastal Management in Charleston under the guidance of Dr. Kate Quigley and the economics team.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Evaluating dynamic harvest allocation strategies for shifting stocks
Presenter(s): Chris Dumas, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Date & Time: 26 October 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Evaluating dynamic harvest allocation strategies for shifting stocks

Presenter(s): Chris Dumas, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

24 October 2023

Title: Linking Observations and Models to Understand and Project Climate Change
Presenter(s): Ryan Kramer, OAR/GFDL, Physical Scientist
Date & Time: 24 October 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Linking Observations and Models to Understand and Project Climate Change

Presenter(s): Ryan Kramer, OAR/GFDL, Physical Scientist

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4364139106593868887

Abstract: Although both invaluable tools, climate models and observations traditionally have a different and arguably less intertwined relationship compared to their weather counterparts. This picture is changing, however, as a need for actionable climate projections meets an unprecedented multi-decade record of climate observations. Using Earth's energy budget - the fundamental driver of climate change - to set the scene, we'll discuss the growing value of long-term climate observations for informing our understanding of climate change and our ability to project it.
Keywords: Climate models, satellite observations, Earth's Energy Imbalance

Bio(s): Ryan Kramer is a scientist at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab, using climate models and observations to study Earth's changing energy budget. He will also soon serve as an OAR Liaison on Climate Modeling and Climate Observations, working to build new collaborations between these two NOAA communities.

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: 1. Design of a Low SWaP Dual-Band Radiometer for UAS Remote Sensing Applications 2. Inter-comparison and Validation of Remote Sensing Satellite based Soil Moisture
Presenter(s): 1. Maria Novoa Garcia, NOAA CESSRST-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, University of Puerto Rico Mayagez Campus; 2. Stephanie Marquez, NOAA CESSRST-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, University of Texas El Paso, UTEP
Date & Time: 24 October 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Titles: (2 seminars)

Seminar 1. Design of a Low SWaP Dual-Band Radiometer for UAS Remote Sensing Applications

Seminar 2. Inter-comparison and Validation of Remote Sensing Satellite based Soil Moisture

Presenter(s):

1. Maria Novoa Garcia, NOAA CESSRST-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, University of Puerto Rico Mayagez Campus

2. Stephanie Marquez, NOAA CESSRST-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, University of Texas El Paso (UTEP)

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science CentersSeminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/spo-vxqc-nmb

Phone Numbers
(US)+1 218-301-1341
PIN: 813 137 776#

Abstracts:

1. Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) is crucial in oceanographic, coastal, atmospheric, and other applications. Knowing this variable well allows the scientific community to understand and monitor the behavior of both the ocean and the atmosphere. This way, the government and other stakeholders can make better decisions to protect life and property based on analysis and conclusions by NOAA scientists. During my NOAA Experiential Research and Training Opportunities (NERTO), our research focused on studying further which variables significantly impact the measurement of sea surface salinity from passive microwave radiometers. These variables are the Sea Surface Temperature, Earth Incidence Angle, Wind Speed, and Direction. We concentrated on the sensitivity of the retrieved SSS to each variable mentioned by calculating the brightness temperature (TB). The calculations are from the study of Meissner et al. and the theses of Wah and Mera. A function was designed on MATLAB and showed that brightness temperature is more sensitive to Sea Surface Temperature and Wind Speed. The highest error in SSS is 1.0183 PSU, meaning that this parameter impacts most the brightness temperature and the retrieved sea surface salinity. I will also discuss furthers steps of this research which will implement this function in the analysis of retrieving SSS for the new novel airborne sensor.

2. This study explores the potential of using a random forest, gradient boosting and support vector machine model to predict soil moisture levels by incorporating both meteorological and biogeophysical data. The study utilized meteorological data such as temperature, albedo, and precipitation, and biogeophysical data including soil type, land cover, slope, elevation, and normalized differenced vegetation index (NDVI) from remotes ensing sources. Additionally, in-situ soil moisture measurements from a Campbell Scientific Hydrosense II-12 sensor were incorporated as input parameters to train and test the model. The dataset was collected from a soil moisture sensor network installed in Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico during the summer of 2022. The results indicate that the gradient boosting model accurately predicts soil moisture levels, with an NSE score of 0.62,demonstrating the importance of combining remote sensing data with ground-based observations. This study showcases the potential of machine learning algorithms, particularly random forest models, to accurately predict future soil moisture levels, which could enhance the accuracy of satellite data and weather predictions.

Bio(s): 1. My name is Mara Celeste Novoa-Garca and I am a NOAA EPP/MSI Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Technologies scholar. I completed a bachelor's degree as part of CESSRST-I Cohort 4 in computer engineering. Currently, I'm pursuing a master's in science in Electrical Engineering at the University of Puerto Rico Mayagez Campus and was a CESSRST-I Cohort 5 fellow, now CESSRST-II Cohort 1. My research focuses on the design and implementation of a compact dual-band radiometer installed in an unmanned aircraft system for remote sensing applications. This low size and weight instrument is a cost-effective alternative for Sea Surface Salinity retrievals and mitigates space-borne instruments limitations. Since Sea Surface Salinity is an essential climate variable, this research contributes to NOAA's mission to understand and predict changes in climate, weather, and coasts.

2. My name is Stephanie Marquez and I was a University of Texas El Paso (UTEP) Masters student and a NOAA EPP/MSI Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing (CESSRST) Scholar, in Cohort 5 for CESSRST-I, and then in CESSRST-II Cohort 1. I am currently pursuing a PhD in Geological Sciences at UTEP as part of CESSRST-II Cohort 2. My central research focuses on using machine learning to predict soil moisture in the Chihuahuan Desert using remote sensing data and field data. This research helps NOAA meet its mission to understand and improve soil moisture modeling.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Marine Heat Waves in the Southeast
Presenter(s): Chris Fuhrmann, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill, National Weather Service Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia; David Zierden, Florida State University; Chris Kelble, Ian Enochs, NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory
Date & Time: 24 October 2023
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Marine Heat Waves in the Southeast

Presenter(s):

Climate Overview: Chris Fuhrmann | Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill | NOAA/National Weather Service Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox | University of Georgia and David Zierden | Florida State University

Marine Heat Waves and Impacts in the Southeast: Chris Kelble and Ian Enochs | NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth (meredith.f.muth@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/6846806667689526028

Abstract:
The Southeast Climate monthly webinar series is held on the 4th Tuesday of each month at 10:00 am ET. This series is hosted by the Southeast Regional Climate Center (SERCC), the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), and the NOAA National Weather Service. These webinars provide the region with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods, and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as agriculture production, water resources, wildfires and ecosystems.

The October 24 webinar will feature a special presentation on "Marine Heat Waves and Impacts in the Southeast".

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

23 October 2023

Title: Adapting Agile Philosophies and Tools for a Research Environment
Presenter(s): Nikki Wayant, USACE, ERDC
Date & Time: 23 October 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Adapting Agile Philosophies and Tools for a Research Environment

Presenter(s): Nicole Wayant, USACE, ERDC

Sponsor(s): NOAA CoastWatch

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://meet.goto.com/728424789or by phone: Access Code: 728-424-789, United States: +1 (646) 749-3129
Canada: +1 (647) 497-9391

Abstract: There exist a myriad of project management methodologies, but none is focused solely on scientific research. Research projects are unique compared to other types of projects, including software development and manufacturing; research projects inherently have unplanned risk. These risks provide a challenge to managing resources, developing schedules, and providing team ownership while still achieving project goals. Agile, a popular framework for the management of software development, can be modified to work for scientific research projects and help mitigate these risks.

Bio(s): Nicole Wayant is a research project manager at the Engineer Research and Development Center's Geospatial Research Laboratory. Nicole has a background in mathematics and geography, specializing in the spatio-temporal study of vector-borne diseases. She has lead a variety of research projects ranging from the study of vector-borne diseases and civilian annoyance to military blast noise to the creation of automatic tools for the development of foundational geospatial data. When Nicole is not working she enjoys hiking, reading, playing her cello, and spending time with her family.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: slides can be found at this link: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php. For more information visit: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: Developing High-Resolution Records of Storminess from the Southern Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Reyce Bogardus and Vladimir Alexeev, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Date & Time: 23 October 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Developing High-Resolution Records of Storminess from the Southern Bering Sea


Presenter(s): Reyce Bogardus and Vladimir Alexeev (University of Alaska, Fairbanks)

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/storminess-bering-sea/

Abstract: In the Bering Sea, rapid climate change may be causing more intense storms, flooding and erosion. As a modern example, Typhoon Merbok made landfall in Western Alaska in September 2022, necessitating disaster declarations at the state and federal level to facilitate repairs in 40 western Alaskan communities. Little is known about how the frequency of intense storms may vary in the region on multidecadal to centennial timescales, given that storminess composites in the Bering Sea region only extend back approximately 40 years. To better understand how storm scenarios will play out in the future, a collaborative team of researchers is reconstructing the prehistoric record of extreme events from ancient sediment samples to improve our understanding of how storm intensity and frequency has changed through time. During this webinar, we will discuss findings from samples collected along the Aleutian Islands chain on the R/V Sikuliaq during the summer of 2022.

Bio(s): Reyce Bogardus is a PhD student and coastal geomorphologist from the Geophysical Institute Arctic Coastal Geoscience Laboratory who studies storm-driven shoreline change and flooding in Alaska. Reyce's research centers on reconstructing storm history and sea level changes along the Aleutian Chain.

Vladimir Alexeev is research faculty at the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He uses a hierarchy of models and observational data to study large-scale dynamics of climate. His research focuses include climate dynamics, atmospheric large-scale circulation, and permafrost.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Larry O'Neill, Oregon Climate Service; Jon Gottschalck, NOAA Climate Prediction Center; Moji Sadegh, Boise State University; Katherine Hegewisch, UC-Merced
Date & Time: 23 October 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar

Presenter(s):
Climate Recap & Current Conditions: Larry O'Neill | Oregon Climate ServiceSeasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook: Jon Gottschalck | NOAA Climate Prediction CenterFire Program Analysis Fire-Occurrence Database Attributes: Physical, Social, and Biological Attributes for Improved Understanding and Prediction of Wildfires: Moji Sadegh | Boise State UniversitySubseasonal Forecasts in the Climate Toolbox: Katherine Hegewisch | UC-Merced

Seminar Contact(s): Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2379278719153494874

Abstract: According to the October 5, 2023 U.S. Drought Monitor, 49% of the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) is in drought. Drought coverage has increased from 20% since June 6, but short-term outlooks lean wet. This webinar will provide more information on the current regional conditions and outlooks. Additionally, the webinar will feature a presentation on "Subseasonal Forecasts in the Climate Toolbox."These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, and impacts to affected industries such as agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

20 October 2023

Title: October NOAA NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 20 October 2023
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: October NOAA NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing


Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/oct-climate-outlook/

Abstract: We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, discuss some forecasting tools, and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for November 2023 and the winter season. Join the gathering online to learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Bio(s): Rick Thoman is the Alaska Climate Specialist with ACCAP and has many years of experience producing reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities, and the media.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

19 October 2023

Title: Impact Photography: Bridging science, policy and industry through images and education
Presenter(s): Christian Clauwers
Date & Time: 19 October 2023
8:00 pm - 9:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Impact Photography: Bridging science, policy and industry through images and education

Presenter(s): Christian Clauwers, Belgian photographer, explorer, public speaker, and author

Sponsor(s): NOAA Inouye Regional Center (IRC) Seminar series

Seminar contact: Kate Taylor, kate.taylor@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar and in-person at the IRC Auditorium (pending base access)

Remote Access: meet.google.com/tdm-bwnz-uiy

Abstract: Join us for an extraordinary seminar from Christian Clauwers, a Belgian photographer,
explorer, public speaker, and author. Christian has witnessed climate change on the frontline for over a decade and has documented its impact on our unique and fragile ecosystems. His journeys as an adventurer and explorer have taken him to over 114 countries across all 7 continents. He sailed the five oceans and explored their islands, including some of the most remote on the planet, witnessed by few. Christian believes in the power of images to show what is at stake and the consequences of the human footprint. He collaborates with the Belgian, French, Italian, Swedish, and Norwegian governments on multiple projects, all in the context of documenting climate impact and raising awareness through photography.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, reach out to seminar contact for a recording 24 hours after it concludes.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Laura Edwards, South Dakota State Climatologist; Brad Rippey, USDA Office of the Chief Economist
Date & Time: 19 October 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook

Presenter(s): Laura Edwards, South Dakota State Climatologist; Brad Rippey, USDA Office of the Chief Economist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/98150532442280278

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.
October 2023 topics include continued heat; mostly increases in drought coverage and impacts both short and long term; major river system updates and longer term concerns (Mississippi/Ohio/Missouri); recent major climate/weather events and their impacts; various conditions (precipitation, temperatures, soil moisture, streamflow, reservoirs, smoke); seasonal growing concerns; temperature/precipitation/drought outlooks for the next few weeks, months and seasons; and continued coverage of the evolving El Nio and what it may mean.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Historic trophic decline in New England's coastal marine ecosystem
Presenter(s): Dr. Madison Willert, 2023 Knauss Fellow, NOAA, National Sea Grant Office
Date & Time: 19 October 2023
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Historic trophic decline in New England's coastal marine ecosystem (2023 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Dr. Madison Willert, 2023 Knauss Fellow, NOAA, National Sea Grant Office

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8564210852243283285

Abstract: The northwestern Atlantic has a history of heavy fishing, and over the past century has also experienced destructive bottom fishing and harmful mobile fishing gear. We used museum specimens and modern samples to analyze nitrogen stable isotopes in tissues of two common demersal fishes pre-1950 (1850 to 1950) compared to 2021 to assess changes in trophic positions of coastal New England consumers over this time period. We found that these species declined in trophic positions as the result of heavy fishing activities.
Keywords: trophic, fishing, food webs

Bio(s): Dr. Madison Willert is a 2023 Knauss Marine Policy Fellow working jointly with the National Sea Grant Office and NOAA's Marine Debris Program. Madison's work supports the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and the Inflation Reduction Act activities across both offices to enhance coordination and communication between the teams concerning marine debris-related projects. Madison completed her PhD in 2022 at the Georgia Institute of Technology's School of Biological Sciences, where she used stable isotope analysis to investigate the long-term effects of overfishing on marine food webs.

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Mimicking natural systems: changes in behavior as a result of dynamic exposure to naproxen
Presenter(s): Dr. Alexandra Neal, 2023 Knauss Fellow, National Sea Grant Office & Weather Program
Date & Time: 19 October 2023
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Mimicking natural systems: changes in behavior as a result of dynamic exposure to naproxen (2023 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Dr. Alexandra Neal, 2023 Knauss Fellow, National Sea Grant Office & Weather Program Office

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8564210852243283285

Abstract: Toxicity of chemical pollutants is typically measured with LC50/EC50 tests, where organisms undergo a static exposure to a toxicant. This method of measuring toxicity does not account for the effects of turbulent mixing that occurs in flowing systems, which can alter chemical distribution in the water column and consequently alters chemical exposure in magnitude, duration, and frequency. We created flow-through streams and continuously exposed crayfish to sublethal concentrations of naproxen sodium, a common NSAID medication. We found that dynamic (flowing) exposure to naproxen significantly decreased fight intensity and duration in crayfish compared to non-exposed crayfish and crayfish who underwent a static exposure as well.
Keywords: ecotoxicology, dynamic exposure, pharmaceuticals

Bio(s): Alexandra is a 2023 Knauss fellow with a joint appointment to the National Sea Grant Office and the Weather Program Office in NOAA. As the Social Science Policy and Planning Liaison, she works to increase capacity, advance coordination, and support priority efforts for integrating social science at NOAA. Alexandra recently earned her PhD in Biology in 2022 from Bowling Green State University in Ohio, where both her masters and doctoral research focused on the effects of pharmaceutical pollution and the components of dynamic chemical exposure.

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

18 October 2023

Title: Unique ways to connect kids and teens to the ocean and engage them as science communicators
Presenter(s): Nora Nickum, Seattle Aquarium; Patricia Newman, award-winning author; Esteban Camacho Steffensen, international muralist; and Alicia Keefe, NOAA Fisheries Outreach & Education Coordinator
Date & Time: 18 October 2023
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Unique ways to connect kids and teens to the ocean and engage them as science communicators

Presenter(s):
  • Nora Nickum, Senior Ocean Policy Manager at the Seattle Aquarium and author of Superpod: Saving the Endangered Orcas of the Pacific Northwest
  • Patricia Newman, award-winning author of Planet Ocean: Why We All Need a Healthy Ocean, Plastic, Ahoy! Investigating the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, Sea Otter Heroes: The Predators That Saved an Ecosystem , and A River's Gifts: The Mighty Elwha River Reborn
  • Esteban Camacho Steffensen, international muralist with major works created throughout the Pacific Northwest, Costa Rica, China, and Spain
  • Alicia Keefe, NOAA Fisheries Outreach & Education Coordinator


Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3240651524415370845

Abstract: How do we connect kids and teens to the ocean and empower them to act? Story"in all its forms. Humans are hard-wired to spin tales to create emotional connections that help us better understand the world. Join nonfiction storytellers Nora Nickum and Patricia Newman, artist Esteban Camacho Steffensen, and educator Alicia Keefe, who each have ways of translating their passion for ocean conservation and complicated ocean science into forms that entice kids and teens to ask questions, dig deeper, and engage with their communities. Together we will discover new ways to visualize concepts like climate change, ocean acidification, pollution, habitat loss, food web disruption, and underwater noise using an interdisciplinary approach that includes science, art, writing, and speaking.Patricia and Nora will share examples from their written work as well as their live presentations with children and educators. NOAA Fisheries Outreach & Education Coordinator Alicia Keefe will highlight NOAA's interdisciplinary Southern Resident curriculum, other NOAA educational resources, and how NOAA works with artists to advance conservation. Esteban Camacho will share images of his murals and talk about the process of creating them while working with children and youth in a variety of educational settings. His environmental murals tell stories about the crisis while also inspiring the public with the beauty of the natural world that we are striving to protect. His style also explores symbiotic relationships and the humane role we can play in the web of life. His slideshow will break down the process of creating large scale murals and encourage others to undertake their own climate mural projects!Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: Building Capacity for Reserves to be Motus Wildlife Tracking Leaders
Presenter(s): Jessica Kinsella, ACE Basin NERR, KinsellaJ@dnr.sc.gov
Date & Time: 18 October 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Building Capacity for Reserves to be Motus Wildlife Tracking Leaders

Presenter(s): Jessica Kinsella, Stewardship Coordinator, ACE Basin NERR

Sponsor(s): This webinar is sponsored by the NERRS Science CollaborativeSeminar Contacts: Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3275595106750311258Abstract
The Motus Wildlife Tracking System is an open-source, international network of community hosted radio-telemetry receivers and wildlife researchers designed to investigate a wide variety of wildlife movement questions. Volunteer partners host and operate receiving stations across the world that autonomously listen for flying migratory animals equipped with transmitters called nanotags. Researchers rely on the receivers for movement data for a diversity of tagged wildlife, including birds, bats, and insects. Despite widespread interest in wildlife tracking and research within and beyond the Reserve system, this technology has only been used sporadically at a few reserve sites to date.In 2018, the ACE Basin NERR received private funding to implement a Motus receiver station at partner State Park, which sparked interest from potential collaborators. Since 2020, a multi-reserve project led by the ACE Basin Reserve has held a series of workshops to provide guidance and assistance on siting, construction, installation, and interpretation of Motus sites at participating reserves. In this webinar, project lead Jessica Kinsella will share how this effort has created new partnerships and positioned the Reserve as a regional leader for the Motus initiative, while enabling partners to increase their contribution to coastal bird research and engage their end users in coastal bird conservation and management.

Bio(s): Please visit here for more information about the webinar.Subscribe to the One NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: NOAA Satellite Snowfall Rate Product for Nowcasting
Presenter(s): Dr. Huan Meng, NOAA/NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research, STAR
Date & Time: 18 October 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: VAWS: NOAA Satellite Snowfall Rate Product for Nowcasting


Presenter(s): Dr. Huan Meng, NOAA/NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR)

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/vaws-sfr-alaska/

Abstract: The NOAA/NESDIS operational snowfall rate (SFR) product is derived from a constellation of polar-orbiting satellites. Recent advancements have substantially improved the SFR product through the integration of machine learning techniques. This observation-based product is generated locally at GINA, University of Alaska Fairbanks using direct broadcast satellite data received at GINA, resulting in low latency and making it well-suited for nowcasting applications.

Bio(s): Dr. Huan Meng is a physical scientist at NOAA/NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR). Her research area is in satellite remote sensing of precipitation and precipitation-related products. She has been working with a team of scientists from the Cooperative Institute for Satellite Earth System Studies (CISESS) at University of Maryland to develop satellite-based data products including snowfall rate.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

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Title: Measurements of Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gases in the Mid-Atlantic Region
Presenter(s): Dr. Xinrong Ren, NOAA Air Resources Laboratory
Date & Time: 18 October 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Measurements of Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gases in the Mid-Atlantic Region NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Xinrong Ren, NOAA Air Resources Laboratory

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): audrey.gaudel@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/748790942726998613

Abstract: Measurements of air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHGs) are crucial for understanding and mitigating the environmental and health impacts associated with air pollution and climate change. For the past ten years, NOAA Air Resources lab and University of Maryland have been collaborating to measure greenhouse gases (CO2, and CH4) along with a suite of air pollutants related to photochemical smog (O3, NOx, CO, and VOCs) and particulate matter (black carbon and aerosol optical properties) from a research aircraft and more recently from a mobile lab in the Mid-Atlantic region. These measurements complement surface air quality and greenhouse gas monitoring networks and provide input to a variety of models used to determine emissions. Some findings include (1) ozone in DC-Baltimore had a nonlinear response to NOx reductions but got over the hump and started to be sensitive to NOx; (2) ozone production in New York City has been sensitive to VOCs and is reaching the turning point to be sensitive to NOx; (3) methane emission inventories for DC-Baltimore are a factor of 2-3 lower than the observations; (4) CH4 emission rate of 1.1% of total production in the SW Marcellus in 2015/2016; (5) mobile measurements of GHGs and air pollutants are useful to survey point sources and address environmental justice issues; (6) Measurements from a near-road site have shed light on the efficiency of combustion and pollution control as well as the temperature and speed dependence of mobile emissions. Scientific information from these field measurements has been provided to policymakers like Maryland Department of Environment to establish cost-effective policies to reduce emissions to improve air quality and mitigate climate change.

Bio(s): Dr. Xinrong Ren is a Physical Scientist at NOAA Air Resources Laboratory. He received his PhD in Environmental Sciences at Peking University in China. His current research includes aircraft and mobile measurements of greenhouse gases and air pollutants to study emissions and chemistry related to air quality and climate. He has participated in many field studies, including the Air Pollution in Maryland project, the Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases in Maryland project, and more recently the AEROMMA field campaign.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2023, contingent on speaker approval.

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Title: Exploring the deep-sea coral communities of the Central Pacific with Genome Skimming and Environmental DNA
Presenter(s): Dr. Meredith V. Everett, Research Biologist, NOAA-NWFSC/DSCRTP; and Dr. Steve Auscavitch, Postdoctoral Associate, Boston University
Date & Time: 18 October 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Exploring the deep-sea coral communities of the Central Pacific with Genome Skimming and Environmental DNAPart of the NOAA Omics Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Meredith V. Everett, Research Biologist, NOAA-NWFSC/DSCRTP & Dr. Steve Auscavitch, Postdoctoral Associate, Boston University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Omics Working Group

Seminar Contact(s): Nicole Miller, NOAA 'Omics Specialist, noaa.omics@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7248264758612642649

Abstract: Environmental DNA-based (eDNA) approaches can be powerful tools for deep ocean biological characterization and offer substantial insights to baseline biodiversity metrics of the deep-sea benthos in unexplored or data-deficient areas. However, the lack of reliable species-specific genetic reference libraries can make interpretation of eDNA profiles challenging. Our work seeks to compose and apply the first Central Pacific voucher library explicitly targeting the regions Octocorallia. Recent efforts to explore and characterize the seafloor benthos across the central Pacific Ocean have yielded substantial numbers of octocoral collections, as well as an increasing number targeted eDNA samples from seawater collected by remotely operated vehicles. Using octocoral samples from a range of sources including field collections by the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer, E/V Nautilus, and R/V Falkor, as well as historical museum vouchers, we employed a combination of mitochondrial genetic markers (MutS, COI) and genome skimming methods to generate Central Pacific oriented reference library. In this first iteration, molecular operational taxonomic units were identified from 304 total voucher collections from deep-water octocorals in central Pacific waters. While the construction of this reference library is oriented toward refining eDNA characterization tools and identification of useful taxon-specific markers, these data also have the potential to expand the breadth and depth of understanding of octocoral phylogenomics. We have applied this reference library in metabarcoding of eDNA samples collected in the region, and are using these data to better characterize patterns of octocoral community biodiversity within each region, and examine patterns of biodiversity in relationship to habitat variables. Additionally, we are comparing community structure among regions to better understand patterns of connectivity or dispersal barriers to species distribution within the region. These data will help to contextualize the general biodiversity of the region, and provide valuable insight into the hidden communities likely associated with the species observed with deepwater ROVs.

Bio(s): Dr. Meredith Everett is a Research Biologist in the Conservation Biology Division at NOAA's NWFSC and on a temporary detail as Lead Scientist with NOAA's Deep-sea Coral Research and Technology Program. Meredith's genetic work has focused on the applications of Omics tools to better understanding deep-sea coral communities within the US EEZ, with a particular focus on application and development of eDNA technologies. Meredith has had the opportunity to apply these tools to habitats across the Central and Northeast Pacific, within the Gulf of Mexcio, and across the Arctic. Meredith received her B.S. in Biological Oceanography from the University of Washington, and her Ph.D. in Marine Biology from the University of Miami. Dr. Steve Auscavitch is a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Biology at Boston University. His research broadly seeks to understand evolutionary and ecological patterns and processes structuring deep-sea biodiversity, particularly on seamounts environments. His work focuses on identifying and filling knowledge gaps from poorly understood deep-sea environments using collections-based approaches, including museum specimens and those collected through exploratory remotely operated vehicle dives. His current projects in the Rotjan lab seek to identify and describe patterns of deep-sea coral biodiversity using next-generation DNA sequencing approaches to build genetic reference libraries for the equatorial central Pacific and surrounding waters. Steve is also an active member of the E/V Nautilus Corp of Exploration where he has contributed as science lead and science data manager on many cruises since 2014. He received his BS in Marine Science from the University of Connecticut at Avery Point, his MS in Marine Biology at the University of Maine, and PhD in Biology from Temple University. You can learn more about his work on social media (Twitter @SteveAuscavitch) and via his personal website.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of this presentation will be made available on the NOAA Omics website. View past omics seminar recordings here: https://sciencecouncil.noaa.gov/NOAA-Science-Technology-Focus-Areas/NOAA-Omics

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17 October 2023

Title: Weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Abyssal Limb in the North Atlantic
Presenter(s): Dr. Tiago Bilo, CIMAS/PhOD
Date & Time: 17 October 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, OAR - AOML - Happenings Calendar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series


Title: Weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Abyssal Limb in the North Atlantic

Presenter(s): Dr. Tiago Bilo (CIMAS/PhOD)

Sponsor(s): NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratories (AOML)

Seminar Contact(s): Matthieu Henaff; matthieu.lehenaff@noaa.gov

Location: Hybrid; NOAA AOML first floor conference room and online

Remote Access: Please join meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.

http://meet.google.com/ywp-zzfy-nco

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (405) 355- 2257 Access Code: 533-392-182#



Abstract: The abyssal limb of the Global Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) redistributes heat and carbon as it carries Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) from the Southern Ocean towards the northern hemisphere. Using mooring observations and hydrographic data from multiple sources in the North Atlantic, we show that northward flowing AABW is constrained below 4500 m with a mean volume transport of 2.400.25 Sv at 16N. During 2000-2020, the AABW northward transport weakened by approximately 0.350.13 Sv, corresponding to a 125% decrease. This weakening of the Atlantic MOC's abyssal cell likely results from the circulation adjustment to the reduction of AABW formation rates since the 1960s and is associated with abyssal warming observed throughout the Atlantic Ocean. We estimate that the warming of the AABW layer in the subtropical North Atlantic is, on average, 1 mC/year in the last two decades due to the downward heaving of abyssal isopycnals, resulting in a contribution to the increase of the abyssal heat content and, hence, sea-level rise in the region. This warming trend is approximately half of the AABW warming trend observed in the South Atlantic and parts of the Southern Ocean, indicating a dilution of the signal as the AABW crosses the Equator.

Bio(s): Tiago Bilo received his Ph.D. in 2020 from RSMAS, University of Miami. After a two-year Postdoc period at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, he joined CIMAS/AOML in October/2022 as an Assistant Scientist funded by the NOAA DeepT project, where he is studying the variability of water properties of the abyssal ocean.



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Title: High-Frequency Radar Data Comparisons with a NWPS Model and NDBC Buoys During the 2022 Mother’s Day Nor’easter Event on New Jersey’s Coastline
Presenter(s): Christopher Olson, NOAA Experiential Research and Training Opportunities NERTO Intern
Date & Time: 17 October 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: High-Frequency Radar Data Comparisons with a NWPS Model and NDBC Buoys During the 2022 Mother's Day Nor'easter Event on New Jersey's Coastline

Presenter(s): Christopher Olson, NOAA Experiential Research and Training Opportunities NERTO Intern

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NWS/NCEP/EMC
Seminar Contacts: avichal.mehra@noaa.gov, bin.liu@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Google Meet joining infoVideo call link: https://meet.google.com/iio-jsoo-oeu
Or dial: (US) +1 609-831-2267 PIN: 809 678 351#
More phone numbers: https://tel.meet/iio-jsoo-oeu?pin=2683255346285

Abstract: High-frequency radar (HFR) wave measurements are evaluated against numerical simulations and buoy observations in the New Jersey coastline during a storm event on May 7-8, 2022 (known as the Mother's Day nor-eastern event). Wave measurements are obtained from three CODAR SeaSone HFR stations installed along the New Jersey coast at Seaside Park, Brant Beach, and Brigantine NJ, and buoy observations provided by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC). Wave characteristics during this storm event are simulated using Nearshore Wave Prediction Systems (NWPS). HFR performance is evaluated based on the error analysis of wave height, wave period, and wave direction derived from observations and model output. Two types of wave data are used: single average value data and range data. For single average value data, the error analysis indicates that NWPS data have best agreement with buoy observations and HFR in one case of wave direction. Errors in wave period and wave direction are notably high suggesting possible inadequacies in appropriate choice of error analysis and techniques. Analysis of range data shows lower RMSE between 12 and 27 kilometers in wave height, suggesting an optimal operational range for HFR.

Bio(s): Christopher Olson is a NOAA Educational Partnership Program (EPP) " Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Center for Coastal & Marine Ecosystems " 2 (CCME-II) graduate scholar from Florida A&M University pursuing a Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering. He is an Experiential Research and Training Opportunities (NERTO) Intern at NOAA's Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) in College Park, Maryland.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides will be available after the seminar upon request.

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Title: Uncertainties and sensitivities in ocean mixed layer models and SST prediction
Presenter(s): Leah Johnson, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington
Date & Time: 17 October 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Uncertainties and sensitivities in ocean mixed layer models and SST prediction

Presenter(s): Leah Johnson (Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

SeminarContact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US)+1414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: This talk will cover two topics related to how we evaluate ocean surface boundary layer parameterizations. The first part presents a finite-time ensemble vector (EV) method to better manage the design and numerical principles of parameterization evaluation. The finite-time EV framework focuses on what constitutes the local behavior of the mixed layer dynamical system and isolates the forcing and ocean state conditions where turbulence parameterizations most disagree. Observations collected during the 2018 monsoon onset in the Bay of Bengal provide a case study to evaluate models under realistic and variable forcing conditions. The case study results highlight two regimes where models disagree 1) during wind-driven deepening of the mixed layer and 2) under strong diurnal forcing. The second part of the talk explores how boundary layer turbulence is modified in the presence of submesoscale flows. It will be shown that frontal circulations act to suppress the vertical buoyancy flux by surface forced turbulence and suggests OSBL parameterizations over mix buoyancy in the presence of lateral flows.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

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Title: Even low rates of cannibalism bias population estimates of Pacific hake
Presenter(s): Sophia Wasserman, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Groundfish Assessment Program
Date & Time: 17 October 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Even low rates of cannibalism bias population estimates of Pacific hake

Presenter(s): Sophia Wasserman, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC), Groundfish Assessment Program (GAP)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Ground fish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Bianca.Prohaska@noaa.gov and Sarah.Friedman@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACE GAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mcd207c7faa0b6e6449f165028ad4c156 Or by phone: 1(415) 527-5035 Access code: 2760 566 4931 Meeting password: gfish23

Accessibility: Webex closed captioning available.

Abstract: By incorporating trophic interactions and temperature-dependent bioenergetics, multi-species models such as CEATTLE (Climate-Enhanced Age-based Model with Temperature-specific Trophic Linkages and Energetics) are a step towards ecosystem-based assessment and management for species such as Pacific hake (Merluccius productus) in the California Current Ecosystem. Hake are generalist predators, and previous studies have determined that their diet consists of approximately 30% cannibalism. We used CEATTLE to include cannibalism in a model of hake population dynamics and re-examined hake diet data from 1980 onwards to determine the cannibalism proportions. Cannibalism rates were highly variable, ranging between 0 and 80% of stomach contents by weight. The estimated spawning stock biomass, total biomass, and recruitment increased by 16%, 31%, and 197% relative to the single-species model when cannibalism was included in the CEATTLE model, due to the increased mortality, primarily for age-1 hake.

Bio(s): Sophia is a new member of the GAP Bering Sea team and was previously a postdoc in the Punt Lab at UW, working on two projects. The first was a mixed-species management strategy evaluation of groundfish in the Bering with colleagues at the AFSC and the other, which she's talking about today, was applying the CEATTLE model to cannibalism in Pacific hake with the NWFSC. She received her PhD from the University of Galway in Ireland.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information and seminar recordings can be found at:https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2023-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-seriesSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

16 October 2023

Title: The Integral Role the Vegetation Health Index (VHI) has at the USDA’s World Agricultural Outlook Board for Yield Forecasts and Assessment
Presenter(s): Eric Luebehusen, Meteorologist, USDA " OCE " World Agricultural Outlook Board, Covering: Europe, Northern Africa, Former Soviet Union, Middle East, & Central Asia
Date & Time: 16 October 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Integral Role the Vegetation Health Index (VHI) has at the USDA'sWorld Agricultural Outlook Board for Yield Forecasts and Assessment

Presenter(s):
Eric Luebehusen, Meteorologist, USDA " OCE "World Agricultural Outlook Board, Covering: Europe, Northern Africa, FormerSoviet Union, Middle East, & Central Asia

Sponsor(s): NOAA JPSS Program

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access:

Meeting ID
meet.google.com/fns-izmb-nbh
Phone Numbers
(US)
+1 424-257-5946
PIN: 823 722 603#

Abstract:
The USDA's World Agricultural Outlook Board (WAOB) is the focal point within the USDA for providing weather intelligence in support of the World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimate (WASDE), a market-sensitive report released every month detailing crop production forecasts for the U.S. and globe. A small group of meteorologists within the WAOB use a wide array of in-situ and remote-sensing data to provide real-time crop impact assessments and yield forecasts to senior-level staff at USDA. One of the key components of the endeavor has been " and continues to be " the Vegetation Health Index.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available upon Request


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12 October 2023

Title: Coral Management Fellows in the Pacific Coral Reef Jurisdictions
Presenter(s): Lara Noren, Coral Management Fellow
Date & Time: 12 October 2023
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Coral Management Fellows in the Pacific Coral Reef Jurisdictions

Presenter(s): Lara Noren, Tilali Scanlan, Elly Perez, and Camille Quichocho

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.donovan@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access:
Adobe Connect
1. To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/ 2. Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio.

Abstract: Each Coral Management Fellow will present on what they have been working on during their fellowship in their respective jurisdictions.
Lara Noren, Hawaii

Bio(s): Lara is currently a Susan L. Williams National Coral Reef Management fellow assisting the State of Hawaii Division of Aquatic Resources to implement multiple conservation finance initiatives. Prior to her fellowship, Lara graduated with a B.S. in Marine Biology from the University of North Carolina - Wilmington and has a professional background in environmental education, natural resource management, and citizen science program implementation.

Tilali Scanlan, American Samoa

Bio(s): Tilali Scanlan is the National Coral Reef Management Fellow in American Samoa. She has a bachelor's degree in marine science from the University of the South Pacific in Fiji with a concentration in coral reef ecology. Tilali has a strong field skillset with experience in Tutuila, the Manu'a islands, and Rose Atoll, and is one of the few local coral biologists to complete the full coral identification training by Dr. Douglas Fenner. She is currently working with Dr. Fenner to deliver coral identification courses to coral reef scientists and practitioners around the island.

Camille Quichocho, Guam

Bio(s): Camille Quichocho is the National Coral Reef Management Fellow for Guam. She graduated from University of Guam with a B.S. in Agriculture & Natural Resource Science and minor in Biology in 2019. Camille currently leads the restoration planning teams for Guam's coral reef restoration action plan.

Elly Perez, CNMINOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Stream habitat change and climate change in the arctic
Presenter(s): Ken Tape, PhD, Professor, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 12 October 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Stream habitat change and climate change in the arctic

Presenter(s): Ken Tape, PhD, Professor, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam

Seminar Contacts: Vicky Krikelas, Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov
SEMINARS ARE VIRTUAL ONLY

Remote Access:

Join via Webex: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m13be6e4e4f7af5fc75612760532574db
Meeting number: 2763 575 3111
Meeting password: axKJ28Jc7mP

Join via phone
1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free
Can't join the meeting? Contact support.

Abstract: TBD
BIO TBD

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11 October 2023

Title: Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Glacial Meltwater on the Antarctic Peninsula Shelf
Presenter(s): Jack Pan, NASA, Jet Propulsion Lab
Date & Time: 11 October 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Glacial Meltwater on the Antarctic Peninsula Shelf

Presenter(s): Jack Pan, NASA Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.goto.com/537213725Or by phone Access Code: 537-213-725 United States: +1 (646) 749-3129
Canada: +1 (647) 497-9391
Location: WebinarAbstract
Glacial meltwater is an important environmental variable for ecosystem dynamics along the biologically productive Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) shelf. This region is experiencing rapid change, including increasing glacial meltwater discharge associated with the melting of land ice. To better understand the WAP environment and aid ecosystem forecasting, additional methods are needed for monitoring and quantifying glacial meltwater for this remote, sparsely sampled location. Prior studies showed that sea surface glacial meltwater (SSGM) has unique optical characteristics which may allow remote sensing detection via ocean color data. In this study, we develop a first-generation model for quantifying SSGM that can be applied to both spaceborne (MODIS-Aqua) and airborne (PRISM) ocean color platforms. In addition, the model was prepared and verified with one of the more comprehensive in-situ stable oxygen isotope datasets compiled for the WAP region. The SSGM model appears robust and provides accurate predictions of the fractional contribution of glacial meltwater to seawater when compared with in-situ data (r = 0.82, median absolute percent difference = 6.38%, median bias = '0.04), thus offering an additional novel method for quantifying and studying glacial meltwater in the WAP region.

Bio(s):
Jack Pan is a Postdoctoral Fellow at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Jack received his Ph.D. from Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO, UCSD). Prior to SIO, he worked as a consultant and team lead at JPL and led the development of satellite remote sensing projects on coastal ocean monitoring. Jack has also participated in several polar research expeditions to Antarctica and is a recipient of the Antarctica Service Medal for his instrumentation work and sampling in extreme environments. Jack is also an avid traveler and photographer.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: slides can be found at this link: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

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Title: Enhancing Linkages Between Ecosystem Research, Stock Assessment, and Management: Presentations by CINAR Fellows in Quantitative Fisheries and Ecosystem Science
Presenter(s): Gavin Fay, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth; Genevive Nesslage, Associate Research Professor, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Chesapeake Biological Laboratory; Joshua Stoll, Assistant Professor, University of Maine; John Wiedenmann, Assistant Professor, Rutgers University
Date & Time: 11 October 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Enhancing Linkages Between Ecosystem Research, Stock Assessment, and Management: Presentations by CINAR Fellows in Quantitative Fisheries and Ecosystem Science (EBM/EBFM)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s):
  • Gavin Fay, Associate Professor, Department of Fisheries Oceanography, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth's School for Marine Science and Technology (SMAST)
  • Genevive (Genny) Nesslage, Associate Research Professor, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
  • Joshua Stoll, Assistant Professor of Marine Policy, School of Marine Sciences, University of Maine
  • John Wiedenmann, Assistant Professor, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, Rutgers University


Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2193136901026367578
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The goal of the Cooperative Institute of the North Atlantic Region (CINAR) fellowship program in Quantitative Fisheries and Ecosystem Science is to engage early-career scientists in research that supports the training and education of the next generation of stock assessment scientists, ecosystem scientists, and economists, and that improves the assessment and management of vital living marine resources in the Northeast U.S. This program supported two-year fellowships for four early career faculty from CINAR partner institutions who partnered with a scientist at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center to further strengthen links among research, assessments, and management. Join us for this seminar as our four CINAR fellows present an overview of their research and educational activities and its impact.

Keywords: stock assessment, ecosystem research, social sciences

Bio(s): Dr. Gavin Fay is an Associate Professor in the Department of Fisheries Oceanography at University of Massachusetts Dartmouth's School for Marine Science and Technology (SMAST). Gavin's work focuses on using statistical and mathematical models for better ecosystem-based decision making for fisheries and our oceans. He is also interested in how open data science tools can empower communication of scientific results for application to management and policy.

Genevive (Genny) Nesslage is an Associate Research Professor at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. Her research focuses on stock assessment as well as fish, wildlife, and invasive species population dynamics.

Joshua Stoll is an Assistant Professor of Marine Policy in the School of Marine Sciences at the University of Maine. He is an applied social scientist who uses qualitative and quantitative methods to study questions about ocean governance, coastal community resilience, and seafood systems.

John Wiedenmann is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources at Rutgers University. His research focuses on the population dynamics of marine fish, stock assessment, and fisheries management, with a particular focus on the Mid-Atlantic and New England regions.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Coastal Acidification in the Classroom Webinar
Presenter(s): Kirstin Wakefield (MARACOOS), Anna Caputo (Chesapeake Bay NERRS) and Sarah Nuss, Chesapeake Bay NERRS
Date & Time: 11 October 2023
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm ET
Location: GoTo Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Coastal Acidification in the Classroom

Presenter(s): Kirstin Wakefield (MARACOOS), Anna Caputo (Chesapeake Bay NERRS) and Sarah Nuss (Chesapeake Bay NERRS)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Acidification Program SOARCE webinar series https://oceanacidification.noaa.gov/ocean-acidification-education-outreach/

Seminar Contact(s): natalie.lord@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3941533015916563290

Abstract: Coastal Acidification is the changing of pH in coastal waters caused by excess CO2 and local factors such as nutrient runoff, upwelling, and hypoxia. Coastal acidification can occur uniquely in each coastal area depending on the individual stressors there. The Mid-Atlantic Coastal Acidification Network (MACAN) sought to create a teaching tool on coastal acidification specific to the Mid-Atlantic region. Educators from NJ, DE, and VA collaborated to collate and modify existing resources, as well as create new resources, to build a module for 6-12 teachers. The module includes lesson plans adapted from organizations like NOAA, Sea Grant, and Project Learning Tree that will help students build an understanding of the issues by learning about estuarine chemistry and the effects of acidifying waters on marine habitats and biota. Join educators from the Chesapeake Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve in Virginia (CBNERR-VA) and MACAN to learn about the coastal acidification module and available resources.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Webinar recording will be shared on the NOAA OAP YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCB7UrrT3gGJAHGnZzjQCvNQ

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

10 October 2023

Title: Revealing the Ocean Deep: Next-Generation Sensing Technologies for Marine and Planetary Science
Presenter(s): Dr. Ved Chirayath, Director of the Aircraft Center for Earth Studies, ACES at University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine, Atmospheric, and Earth Science, RSMAES
Date & Time: 10 October 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Revealing the Ocean Deep: Next-Generation Sensing Technologies for Marine and Planetary ScienceNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Dr. Ved Chirayath, Director of the Aircraft Center for Earth Studies (ACES) at University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine, Atmospheric, and Earth Science (RSMAES)

Sponsor(s): Office of Research, Transition, and Application and the NOAA Central Library



Seminar Contact(s): NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2616830411040087132


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: We have mapped more of the surface of the Moon and Mars than our own ocean floor"but that is changing. Professor Ved Chirayath will present three remote sensing technologies he invented during his time at NASA. These technologies will help us better understand Earth's marine environments while furthering the search for life on other planets.

Keywords: Remote sensing, ocean observation, citizen science

Bio(s): Dr. Ved Chirayath is the Vetlesen Professor of Earth Sciences, Mechanical, and Aerospace Engineering and Director of the Aircraft Center for Earth Studies (ACES) at University of Miami's Rosenstiel School. He is the founder and former director of the Laboratory for Advanced Sensing at NASA Silicon Valley and a National Geographic Explorer.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Electronic tagging Atlantic halibut in the Gulf of Maine
Presenter(s): Bill DeVoe, Maine Department of Marine Resources
Date & Time: 10 October 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Electronic tagging Atlantic halibut in the Gulf of Maine

Presenter(s): Bill DeVoe, Maine Department of Marine Resources

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Ground fish Seminar Series Seminar Contacts: Bianca.Prohaska@noaa.gov and Sarah.Friedman@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACE GAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mcd207c7faa0b6e6449f165028ad4c156 Or by phone: 1(415) 527-5035 Access code: 2760 566 4931 Meeting password: gfish23

Accessibility: Webex closed captioning available.

Abstract: Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) is a commercially important species in New England and Atlantic Canada, yet remain a data-poor species with many questions regarding their reproductive biology and migratory habits. This seminar discusses research completed by the Maine Department of Marine Resources since 2016 to better understand halibut migration, life history, and spawning behavior using a variety of electronic tagging techniques. Data from this project have revealed the first evidence of spawning activity in US-tagged fish and long-range migration patterns throughout the Gulf of Maine and Atlantic Canada.

Bio(s): Bill has worked as a Marine Resource Scientist with the Maine Department of Marine Resources (DMR) Boothbay Harbor Lab since 2016. In addition to being the state's Atlantic halibut biologist, he is DMR's GIS coordinator and works as a technology coordinator on many other hardware and software projects. Bill has a BA in Biology from Hartwick College and has previously worked as a groundfish observer, timber frame carpenter and field assistant on projects around the world.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: More information andseminar recordings can be found at: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/alaska/outreach-and-education/2023-alaska-fisheries-science-center-groundfish-seminar-seriesSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: NEDTalk - Solar Eclipse, Unlocking Space Weather at the Sun
Presenter(s): Dr. Elsayed Talaat, Director of the Office of Space Weather Observations at NOAA NESDIS
Date & Time: 10 October 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Solar Eclipse, Unlocking Space Weather at the SunNOAA Environmental Data Talks (NEDTalks)

Presenter(s): Dr. Elsayed Talaat, Director of the Office of Space Weather Observations at NOAA NESDIS

Sponsor(s): NESDIS Communications / NESDIS HQ



Seminar Contact(s): Rafael.deAmeller@noaa.gov


Abstract: The term space weather generally describes changes that take place on the sun and near-Earth environment, particularly when the sun is especially active. In this talk he will discuss how NOAA is making us a Space Weather Ready Nation that is ready, responsive and resilient to space weather events.

See https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/events/solar-eclipse-unlocking-space-weather-the-sun

Bio(s): https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/events/solar-eclipse-unlocking-space-weather-the-sun

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: The Synergy of Data From Profiling Floats, Machine Learning and Numerical Modeling: Case of the Black Sea Euphotic Zone
Presenter(s): Emil Stanev, Institute of Coastal Systems, Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon, Geesthacht, Germany
Date & Time: 10 October 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Synergy of Data From Profiling Floats, Machine Learning and Numerical Modeling: Case of the Black Sea Euphotic Zone

Presenter(s): Emil Stanev (Institute of Coastal Systems, Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon, Geesthacht, Germany)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar Contact(s): Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US)+1414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: Data from profiling floats in the Black Sea revealed complex temporal and spatial relationships between physical variables and oxygen, chlorophyll and the backscattering coefficient at 700 nm, as well as some limits in understanding the details of biogeochemistry dynamics. To account for different interdependences between physical and biogeochemical properties, a feedforward backpropagation neural network (NN) was used. This NN learns from data recorded by profiling floats and predicts biogeochemical states using physical measurements only. The performance was very high, particularly for oxygen, but it decreased when the NN was applied to older data because the interrelationships between the physical and biogeochemical properties have changed recently. The biogeochemical states reconstructed by the NN using physical data produced by a coupled physical"biogeochemical operational model were better than the biogeochemical outputs of the same coupled model. Therefore, the use of data from profiling floats, physical properties from numerical models and NNs appears to be a powerful approach for reconstructing the 4D dynamics of the euphotic zone. Basin-wide patterns and temporal variabilities in oxygen, backscattering coefficient and chlorophyll were also analyzed. Of particular interest is the reconstruction of short-lived biogeochemical features, particularly in coastal anticyclone areas, which are difficult to observe with available floats at the basin scale.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

6 October 2023

Title: An overview of the NOAA NCCOS Fiscal Year 2024 Effects of Sea Level Rise (ESLR) Funding Opportunity for Potential Applicants
Presenter(s): Trevor Meckley, NOAA NCCOS Competitive Research Program, Silver Spring MD
Date & Time: 6 October 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: An overview of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) Fiscal Year 2024 Effects of Sea Level Rise (ESLR) Funding Opportunity for Potential Applicants

Presenter(s): Trevor Meckley, Program Manager, NOAA NCCOS Effects of Sea Level Rise (ESLR) Competitive Research Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Moe Nelson, david.moe.nelson@noaa.gov ; Trevor Meckley, trevor.meckley@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nos_science_seminar_sep_25_2023/event/registration.html

Note: The seminar is on Friday October 6, even though the registration link includes "sep_25".

Accessibility: TBD

Abstract: NOAA's National Centers for Coastal and Ocean Science Competitive Research Program (NCCOS/CRP) is pleased to announce a Fiscal Year 2024 Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) for the Effects of Sea Level Rise (ESLR) Program.The NOAA Competitive Research Program invites potential applicants to join a webinar on the FY24 Effects of Sea Level Rise (ESLR) federal funding opportunity. The opportunity has two focal areas; General Coastal Resilience and Alaska Regional Coastal Resilience, which will be described in detail during the webinar. The funding opportunity is soliciting proposals to evaluate and quantify the ability of nature based solutions (NBS) to mitigate the effects of sea level rise (SLR) and inundation (storm surge, nuisance flooding, and/or wave actions). This FFO will support research to inform adaptation planning and coastal management decisions in response to SLR and coastal inundation, through advancement of models of physical and biological processes capable of evaluating vulnerability and resilience under multiple sea level rise, inundation, and management scenarios, including evaluation of nature based solutions. NCCOS/CRP envisions funding two to four projects in the General Coastal Resilience focal area, and at least one project in the Alaska Regional Coastal Resilience focus area. NOAA expects to award approximately $4 million through this competition and anticipates supporting projects at the level of$200,000 to $400,000 per year for the General Coastal Resilience focal area and$200,000 to $500,000 per year for the Alaska Regional Coastal Resilience focal area, pending availability of appropriations.The webinar will discuss the ESLR program and the funding opportunity due dates and requirements. There will be an opportunity to ask clarifying questions at the end of the webinar. More information on the funding opportunity, and a recording of this webinar after the event, can be found on the ESLR Program's website. When formally announced, a link to the full funding opportunity description can be found here. A letter of intent is required. Please see the full NOFO in Grants.Gov for additional details and instructions.

Bio(s): Dr. Trevor Meckley manages the Effects of Sea Level Rise Competitive Research Program at NOAA's National Center for Coastal Ocean Science. Dr. Meckley holds a Ph.D. and M.S. from Michigan State University, and a B.S. from Millersville University.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:

A video recording of the presentation is available for viewing at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pscauk50hmi7/

A pdf of the slides is available upon request.

Additional information on this (and other) funding opportunities from NCCOS is available at: https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/about/funding-opportunities/ .

Subscribe / Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

5 October 2023

Title: Accounting for increased uncertainty in setting precautionary harvest limits from past assessments
Presenter(s): Chantel R. Wetzel, Ph.D., Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA
Date & Time: 5 October 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Accounting for increased uncertainty in setting precautionary harvest limits from past assessments (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s): Chantel R. Wetzel, Ph.D., Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA's Central Library (NCL)Seminar Contacts: Abby Furnish (abigail.furnish@noaa.gov) and Library Seminars

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3020883342544513627

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.


Abstract: Estimates of current population status, derived from stock assessments and often expressed as spawning output, are uncertain. Additionally, the uncertainty around spawning output projections should be expected to increase further out in time from the year in which the assessment was conducted. This work details an approach to quantify increasing uncertainty within and among existing assessments of U.S. West Coast groundfish and how the results of this analysis have been applied when setting future acceptable biological catches.Keywords: harvest control rules, scientific uncertainty, assessment


Bio(s): Chantel Wetzel is an assessment scientist at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA. In addition to conducting stock assessments, Chantel is involved in a variety of research that includes translating assessment uncertainty into appropriate management actions, developing robust assessment approaches across a range of data limitations, and developing tools for visualizing data and assessment results.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: NOAA NCCOS FY 2024 Funding Opportunity for the Ecology & Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (ECOHAB) Program
Presenter(s): Maggie Broadwater, NOAA/NOS NCCOS Competitive Research Program, Charleston SC
Date & Time: 5 October 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) FY 2024 Funding Opportunity for the Ecology & Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (ECOHAB) Program

Presenter(s): Maggie Broadwater, NOAA/NOS NCCOS Competitive Research Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Moe Nelson, david.moe.nelson@noaa.gov ; Maggie Broadwater, maggie.broadwater@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nccos_fy_24_ecohab_funding_opportunity/event/registration.html

Accessibility: TBD

Abstract: NOAA's National Centers for Coastal and Ocean Science Competitive Research Program (NCCOS/CRP) is pleased to announce a Fiscal Year2024 Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) for the Ecology & Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (ECOHAB) Program. The ECOHAB program was authorized under the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act (HABHRCA) in 1998 as an applied competitive research program designed to increase the understanding of the fundamental processes underlying the causes and impacts of HABs. Such understanding is required to develop appropriate HAB management and response strategies. While considerable progress has been made toward understanding and predicting HAB events and their impacts, the complexity of HABs has become more apparent and new HAB problems have emerged. Thus, research into the causes and impacts of HABs and toxins is still essential and will require a multi-disciplinary, holistic approach to advance our current understanding. NCCOS/CRP is soliciting proposals for targeted and regional FY2024 ECOHAB projects that aim to enhance predictive and/or applied science capabilities for HAB events. A letter of intent is required. The deadline for letters of intent is October 18, 2023; and full applications are due by 11:59PM ET on January 31, 2024. Please see the full NOFO in Grants.Gov for additional details and instructions, and visit the NCCOS Funding Opportunities page for more information including a recording and FAQ from this webinar.

Bio(s): Maggie Broadwater is a physical scientist and program manager with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) Competitive Research Program (CRP). As the manager of NOAA's Ecology & Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (ECOHAB) program, she works across NOAA and with other agencies and partner institutions to advance understanding, detection, prediction, control, mitigation, and response to harmful algal blooms (HABs). Maggie previously worked as a research scientist in NOAA's Marine Forensics and Marine Biotoxins programs, and holds a B.S. in Biochemistry, M.S. in Biomedical Sciences, and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry. She lives in Charleston, SC, USA.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
Additional information on this (and other) funding opportunities from NCCOS is available at: https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/about/funding-opportunities/
Open the tab for "New Funding Announcements", with links for these items:
PDF of the slides
Video recording of the presentation, with Closed Captioning
FAQs

A video recording of the presentation is also archived in Adobe Connect at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p23r1jtjlhvc/

Additional information on the NCCOS Ecology & Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (ECOHAB) program is available at:
https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/science-areas/habs/ecohab/

Subscribe / Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Modernizing Essential Fish Habitat using ensemble species distribution models, movement analysis, and data integration
Presenter(s): Margaret Siple, Ph.D. and Jim Thorson, Ph.D. , NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 5 October 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Modernizing Essential Fish Habitat using ensemble species distribution models, movement analysis, and data integration

Presenter(s): Margaret Siple, Ph.D. and Jim Thorson, Ph.D. , NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam

Seminar Contacts: Vicky Krikelas, Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

Join via Webex: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m13be6e4e4f7af5fc75612760532574db
Meeting number: 2763 575 3111
Meeting password: axKJ28Jc7mP

Join via phone
1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free
Can't join the meeting? Contact support.

Abstract: Habitat is a central concept for all ecological research, and provides the mechanistic connection between individual-level behaviors, environmental and climate changes, and population-level demographics. The Magnuson-Stevens Act mandates that fisheries management councils designate Essential Fish habitat (EFH) and revisit those designations every five years. The Alaska Fisheries Science Center and Regional Office have a multi-decadal partnership regarding EFH research, including funds for analytical, laboratory, and field research. In this talk, we quickly outline this partnership and then discuss recent and future research to support designating Alaska EFH. We start by summarizing an ensemble species distribution model (SDM) used to identify species densities for over 200 groundfish species and life-stages. This ensemble mitigates consistent differences in EFH area identified using individual models, and was recently adopted by the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council to designate EFH. We then discuss future EFH research using archival tags and stomach-content data. The archival-tag research applies a mechanistic diffusion-taxis movement model to archival tag data for Pacific cod, and estimates habitat preferences (and resulting habitat utilization) using a Hidden Markov model. The stomach-content research applies a thinned and marked point process, fitted as a Generalized Additive Model involving the multivariate Tweedie distribution. We specifically estimate a spatially varying catchability ratio between stomach contents and industry cooperative surveys for juvenile snow crab, and the resulting abundance index is correlated with stock-assessment estimates of crab recruitment. We share some current and future directions for using multiple data streams to inform SDMs and identifying prey habitat. Throughout, we emphasize that habitat research provides an avenue to combine field, laboratory, and analytical research, and provides opportunity for creative, cross-program research.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Contact Vicky Krikelas, Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Marine Mammal Stranding and Impacts from Extreme Weather and Climate - Gulf of Mexico Forum Webinar
Presenter(s): Erin Fougeres, Marine Mammal Stranding Program Administrator, NOAA Fisheries Southeast Regional Office; Blair Mase, Southeast Region Marine Mammal Stranding Coordinator, Southeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 5 October 2023
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Marine Mammal Stranding and Impacts from Extreme Weather and Climate
NOAA Gulf of Mexico Forum Webinar Series


Presenter(s): Erin Fougeres, Marine Mammal Stranding Program Administrator, NOAA Fisheries Southeast Regional Office; Blair Mase, Southeast Region Marine Mammal Stranding Coordinator, Southeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaboration Team, a part of NOAA's Regional Collaboration Network

Seminar Contact(s): Kristen Laursen, Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov , NOAA Fisheries and Regional Collaboration NetworkLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Please Register at:https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/805634594014505310

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For your awareness, this webinar will be recorded and shared.

Abstract: For October, the Gulf of Mexico Forum webinar series takes a closer look at marine mammal stranding and how it connects with weather and climate. Erin Fougeres will present on the "Marine Mammal Stranding Network in the Gulf of Mexico and impacts of climate extremes - the freshwater Unusual Mortality Event of 2019." Blair Mase will present on "Extreme weather impacts on marine mammal response" with a focus on out-of-habitat rescues after hurricanes.

Bio(s): Dr. Erin Fougeres is a marine mammal biologist and the NOAA Fisheries Marine Mammal Stranding Program Administrator for the southeast U.S. She earned her undergraduate degree from the University of California Santa Cruz and her Master's and Ph.D. in Marine Biology from the University of North Carolina Wilmington, where she worked in the Marine Mammal Stranding Program for more than 10 years. Erin's research expertise is in physiological ecology with an emphasis on bottlenose dolphin thermoregulation and morphology. As the Stranding Program Administrator for NOAA since 2008, she oversees a Network of volunteer organizations responding to marine mammal strandings from North Carolina through Texas, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. She helps to coordinate the response to and oversee the investigation of marine mammal strandings, including mass strandings and Unusual Mortality Events.

Blair Mase has served in the position of NOAA's Southeast Region Marine Mammal Stranding Coordinator since the onset of the program in 1993. She is based out of the NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center's Miami Lab. She has extensive experience in the responses of marine mammal stranding events, out of habitat rescues, disentanglement as well unusual mortality events and investigations. She works closely with Erin Fougeres at the Southeast Regional Office.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Please contact Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov for the recording and/or PDF.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

4 October 2023

Title: A dual-wavelength photothermal aerosol absorption monitor: design, calibration, performance and measurements of coated soot
Presenter(s): Dr. Gria Monik, University of Nova Gorica
Date & Time: 4 October 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: A dual-wavelength photothermal aerosol absorption monitor: design, calibration, performance and measurements of coated soot
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Gria Monik, University of Nova Gorica

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.womack@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5569556792983462240

Abstract: The direct measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficient is preferable over indirect methods. A photothermal interferometer probes the change of the refractive index caused by light absorption in the sample " the detection is linear and can be traced to first principles. Measurement at two wavelengths allows the determination of its wavelength dependence and the ngstrm exponent (AAE). The photothermal aerosol absorption monitor (PTAAM) uses a folded Mach-Zender interferometer. Two pump lasers at 532 and 1064 nm are modulated at different frequencies and focused in the sample chamber using an axicon (patent granted) for simultaneous measurement. The interferometer signal is detected by photodiodes and lock-in amplifiers at the two respective frequencies. The green channel is calibrated traceably to primary standards using ~1 mol/mol NO2. The calibration is transferred to the IR using aerosolized nigrosin. The uncertainties for absorption coefficients at 532 and 1064 nm and AAE were 4%, 6% and 9%, respectively. We calibrated filter photometers in green and IR. A winter ambient campaign has shown similar multiple scattering parameter values for ambient aerosols and laboratory experiments. We have also determined the absorption enhancement by coatings of BC with non-absorbing secondary organic matter (SOM).

Bio(s): Dr. Gria Monik is a professor at the University of Nova Gorica in Slovenia. He received his PhD in physics from the University of Ljubljana. He serves as the Head of the Center for Atmospheric Research and the Dean of the School of Environmental Sciences at the University of Nova Gorica. His research interests include measurement techniques of black carbon aerosol and other carbonaceous light absorbing aerosol. He has served as a member of the United Nations ECE expert group on black carbon.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2023,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!

3 October 2023

Title: NEDTalk - Space Weather Effects on Technology
Presenter(s): Shawn Dahl, NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center
Date & Time: 3 October 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Space Weather Effects on TechnologyNOAA Environmental Data Talks (NEDTalks)

Presenter(s): Shawn Dahl, NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center

Sponsor(s): NESDIS Communications / NESDIS HQ

Seminar Contacts: Rafael.deAmeller@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://events-na13.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/2358677976/en/events/event/shared/2442521456/event_registration.html?sco-id=10367383631

Abstract: This talk will highlight the Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), space weather activity, forecasting, and potential impacts. Space weather has become a concern for our society due to its ability to disrupt or degrade certain types of communications and technologies. Solar Cycle 25 is progressing, with solar maximum predicted to be around 2025. This presentation's intent is to inform participants about SWPC operations, space weather storms, and primary concerns with regards to possible impacts " such as for aviation, the power grid, space operations, and aurora.

See https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/events/space-weather-effects-technology

Bio(s): https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/events/space-weather-effects-technology

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Regional-to-Local Scale Numerical Modeling of Wave Transformation around the Monterey Peninsula, Central California
Presenter(s): Cesar Acevedo Ramirez, University of North Carolina, Wilmington
Date & Time: 3 October 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Modeling wave energy dissipation by bottom friction on rocky shores at the Monterey Peninsula, Central California

Presenter(s): Cesar Acevedo Ramirez (University of North Carolina, Wilmington)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar Contact(s): Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US)+1414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: As part of the ROcky shores eXperiments and Simulations (ROXSI) program, we present a SWAN numerical study of wave transformation across the rocky shores of the Monterey Peninsula, CA. Rocky shores are quasi-random undulations consisting of rock mounds, platforms and channels that are characterized by rough, multi-scale bathymetric variations. These rough environments have previously shown to dissipate more wave energy through bottom friction compared to sandy beaches. In SWAN, bottom friction dissipation is a function of the near-bed root-mean-square velocity and a wave friction factor that is inversely related to the ratio of the wave excursion distance and a bottom roughness scale through several possible formulations. The objective here is to assess the performance of different formulations on wave energy transformation by bottom friction and explore if simulated wave directional parameters are also affected. Model performance is defined as agreement in wave energy flux divergence and directional parameters with observations collected over 1 month from ~20 instruments including bottom-mounted ADCPS and surface wave buoys in 35 to 5 m water depth. We find that the empirical formulation that best agrees with observations is one that was previously applied in a coral reef environment (Rogers et al., 2016). Crucially, this formulation allows an increased range of wave friction factor values and thus increased dissipation by bottom friction. A 2-m resolution bathymetry product is also used to estimate a spatially-variable bottom roughness scale, which further improves frequency-averaged model results. Limitations and options to improve the chosen set-up are discussed.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

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28 September 2023

Title: Implementing the Habitat Assessment and Restoration Planning (HARP) Model in the Columbia basin
Presenter(s): Tim Beechie, Ph.D and Lisa Crozier, Ph.D., NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 28 September 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Implementing the Habitat Assessment and Restoration Planning (HARP) Model in the Columbia basin

Presenter(s): Tim Beechie, Ph.D and Lisa Crozier, Ph.D., NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam

Seminar Contacts: Vicky Krikelas, Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

SEMINARS ARE VIRTUAL ONLY

Join via Webex:

Meeting number: 2763 575 3111
Meeting password: axKJ28Jc7mP

Join via phone
1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free

Can't join the meeting? Contact support.
Abstracts: The Northwest Fisheries Science Center has initiated development of a comprehensive salmon life-cycle model for the Columbia River basin, comprised of three sub-models that simulate salmon life stages in tributaries (the Habitat Assessment and Restoration Planning Model, or HARP Model), smolt downstream migration and adult upstream migration in the mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers, and salmon survival in the estuary and ocean. The purpose of the comprehensive model is to quantify and compare the potential benefits of management actions in any of the three environments. The HARP model's specific purpose is to evaluate which tributary habitat restoration scenarios produce the largest increases in salmon abundance and promote resilience to climate change. The model is a sequence of three analyses that (1) process geospatial landscape and habitat data to produce datasets of historical and current habitat conditions in each basin, (2) translate the habitat data into habitat restoration and climate-change scenarios (sets of Beverton-Holt input parameters for the life-cycle models), and (3) use the salmon life-cycle models to estimate spawner abundance under each habitat/climate scenario. Model outputs indicate which types of restoration actions are likely to produce the largest increases in spawner abundance. The mainstem model will quantify effects of mainstem habitat changes and management actions on smolt survival and arrival timing at the estuary, and the estuary/ocean models will quantify effects of estuary and ocean management actions, such as predator controls, estuary habitat restoration, or climate change effects in the marine environment.

BIO

Tim Beechie has worked at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center since 1999, and is currently the leader of the Ecosystem Processes Research Team in the Watershed Program. His research focuses on geomorphology and riparian vegetation as key drivers of riverine ecosystems. Tim holds a Bachelor's degree in geology, a Master's degree in fisheries, and a Ph.D. in forest hydrology, all from the University of Washington in Seattle. Tim has researched landscape and human influences on fish populations for more than three decades, beginning with studies of fish populations in West African lakes in the mid-1980s. His current research interests include influences of valley and river channel morphology on salmon habitats and populations, using land use and restoration scenarios to estimate salmon population responses and evaluate restoration alternatives, and adapting river restoration plans and project designs for climate change.

Lisa Crozier received a Bachelor's degree from Harvard College and a Ph.D. from the University of Washington, Department of Zoology. She then completed a Post-doctoral Fellowship at the University of Chicago before joining NWFSC in 2004. She concentrated on the effects of climate change on butterfly ecophysiology and range shifts, before addressing these same issues in Pacific salmon. Lisa's primary research goal since coming to NWFSC is to quantify the effects of climate change on population viability of Pacific salmon, considering both ecological and evolutionary responses. To do this, she has been working on describing the sensitivity of juvenile freshwater growth, survival and migration timing of Snake River Chinook salmon, primarily, to environmental conditions, and projecting the impacts of climate change on population viability. She is currently extending this project to include impacts on adult migration timing and pre-spawn survival in various Columbia River salmonids.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Desert Dust and the Atmospheric Microbiome: Microorganisms Transport in the Eastern Mediterranean
Presenter(s): Yinon Rudich, Weizmann Institute of Science
Date & Time: 28 September 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: David Skaggs Research Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, USA, DSRC - 2A305 - Conference Room
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: Desert Dust and the Atmospheric Microbiome: Microorganisms Transport in the Eastern Mediterranean
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Yinon Rudich, Weizmann Institute of Science

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.womack@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3307537018209573465

Abstract: The atmospheric microbiome can affect various biogeochemical and atmospheric processes. The dynamics governing the atmospheric transport of airborne bacterial communities still need to be better understood. This seminar will describe our investigations concerning bacteria carried by mineral dust plumes over the eastern Mediterranean. Specifically, we will describe the bacterial community composition, the transport of pathogenic strains, and the intriguing mechanism of ice formation by ice-nucleating bacteria . Finally, we'll describe new AI-driven methodologies to study and forecast dust event transport.

Bio(s): Dr. Yinon Rudich is a Professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the Weizmann Institute of Science. He received his PhD in Chemical Physics from the Weizmann Institute, and joined the NOAA Aeronomy Lab as an NRC postdoctoral fellow in 1994. He joined the faculty of the Weizmann Institute in 1997 and now serves as the Dean of the Faculty of Chemistry. He is a fellow of the American Geological Union and the Royal Society of Chemistry. His research interests include bioaerosols, ice nucleation, and aerosol optical properties.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2023,contingent on speaker approval.

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Title: Surface vs Bottom Marine Heatwaves in the Northeast U.S.
Presenter(s): Vincent Saba, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 28 September 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Surface vs Bottom Marine Heatwaves in the Northeast U.S.

Presenter(s): Vincent Saba, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

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27 September 2023

Title: An Overview of the 2023 Alaska Spring Breakup Season: Highlighting Remote Sensing Tools Used by the NWS Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center
Presenter(s): Bob Busey, National Weather Service Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center
Date & Time: 27 September 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: An Overview of the 2023 Alaska Spring Breakup Season: Highlighting Remote Sensing Tools Used by the NWS Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center


Presenter(s): Bob Busey, National Weather Service Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contact(s): Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/spring-breakup-2023/

Abstract: The spring break up of 2023 was among the worst of the last thirty years for flooding across the state. The cool April slowed the melting and weakening of the river ice across many of the major rivers in the state. This resulted in a series of ice jams as the break up front moved down the Kuskokwim and Yukon towards the Bering Sea. This talk will be a bit of a summary of the spring as well as a walkthrough of some of the remote sensing products the River Forecast Center uses during the breakup season.

Bio(s): Bob Busey has been a hydrologist at the Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center in Anchorage since the fall of 2022. Previously, he was at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, International Arctic Research Center.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Exploring Ocean Twilight Zone Biodiversity with eDNA
Presenter(s): Dr. Annette Govindarajan, Research Specialist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Date & Time: 27 September 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Exploring Ocean Twilight Zone Biodiversity with eDNAPart of the NOAA Omics Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Annette Govindarajan, Research Specialist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Sponsor(s): NOAA Omics

Seminar Contact(s): Nicole Miller, NOAA 'Omics Portfolio Specialist, noaa.omics@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5561402814773832283

Abstract: The ocean's mesopelagic zone (or ocean twilight zone) harbors a vast biomass that is critically important to the global carbon cycle. However, the diversity of this biomass is understudied due to the OTZ's immense size and the logistical challenges of sampling the environment. There are knowledge gaps related to the composition, distributions, and ecological interactions of mesopelagic biomass. More information is especially needed on the phenomenon of diel vertical migration (DVM), where typically animals travel to surface waters to feed at night and return to mesopelagic depths for the day, expediting the downward movement of carbon in the process. Environmental DNA (eDNA) analyses have great potential to provide information on OTZ biodiversity and address hypotheses related DVM, species distributions, and ecological interactions. However, animal eDNA signals in the deep ocean are dilute and patchily distributed, creating challenges for using eDNA in the OTZ. I will discuss recent advances in eDNA approaches to studying OTZ animal diversity, including considerations for sampling, analysis, reference databases, and interpretation of results. I will also discuss autonomous sampling strategies, including the importance of large volume sampling and the integration of samplers with diverse oceanographic platforms, including Mesobot, a robot designed to sense and track midwater animals and particles, and Deep-See, a towed broadband acoustics and imaging instrument. I will describe our recent deployments with these platforms, and present results on mesopelagic animal diversity and DVM.

Bio(s): Annette Govindarajan is a molecular ecologist in the Biology Department at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Her research focuses on understanding the biodiversity, ecology, and evolution of marine animals, especially in the midwater realm. Towards these ends, she develops and applies environmental DNA approaches, including sampling technology and strategies, geared towards the deep ocean. Dr. Govindarajan has a BS in Biology from the University of Connecticut, and MS in Oceanography from the University of Connecticut, and a PhD in Biological Oceanography from the MIT - WHOI Joint Program, and completed her postdoc at WHOI.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of this presentation will be made available on the NOAA Omics website. View past omics seminar recordings here: https://sciencecouncil.noaa.gov/NOAA-Science-Technology-Focus-Areas/NOAA-Omics

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Diet Variation and Trophic Impact of Weakfish (Cynoscion regalis) within Multiple Marine Habitats of the Eastern U.S.
Presenter(s): Angel Reyes Delgado, NOAA EPP/MSI LMRCSC II Master's Fellow, University of Maryland - Eastern Shore
Date & Time: 27 September 2023
10:00 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Diet Variation and Trophic Impact of Weakfish (Cynoscion regalis) within Multiple Marine Habitats of the Eastern U.S.

Presenter(s): Angel Reyes Delgado, NOAA EPP/MSI LMRCSC II Master's Fellow, University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science Centers

Seminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/poa-upop-cju
Phone Number
(US)+1 585-491-8916
PIN: 636 574 745#

Abstracts: Weakfish (Cynoscion regalis) is a species that is not federally managed, but feed on species that are of federal and ecological interest. Our objectives were to examine the trophic ecology of weakfish in Chesapeake Bay, and the coastal and offshore waters of the Eastern United States. For these areas, we determined the most dominant prey of weakfish; identified how much diet variation was explained by the factors: area, size class, and year; and quantified how much prey biomass was removed by weakfish, 2007-2019. In general, diet composition was mostly dominated by Engraulidae, Mysidacea, Doryteuthis sp., Brevoortia tyrannus, and Teleostei (bony fishes) and significantly varied by area and size class. The total amount of variance explained by the three factors was 40 % with year not being a significant factor in explaining weakfish diet variation. Weakfish prey biomass removal occurs primarily in coastal waters (annual mean: approximately 240,000 tonnes, max: approximately 690,000 tonnes). Highly opportunistic, weakfish cannibalism also plays an essential part of their diet. These results have implications for fisheries management of weakfish, the natural mortality of their prey, and competition with federally-managed fishes when considering ecological interactions in regulatory approaches.

Bio(s): Angel Reyes Delgado is a 2nd year graduate student from Puerto Rico completing his master's degree in marine, Estuarine and Environmental Science at University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES). His thesis project is focused on analyzing and comparing juvenile weakfish stomach content, stable isotope analysis and fatty acid profiles between the Maryland Coastal Bays and as a means of assessing nursery habitat quality and contribute to current efforts of restoring weakfish struggling populations. He is co-advised by Paulinus Chigbu (UMES) and Ryan Woodland (University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

26 September 2023

Title: Northern Climate Reports: Ecological Futures in Stories, Charts, and Data
Presenter(s): Nancy Fresco, Craig Stephenson, Mike DeLue, Carolyn Rosner, University of Alaska, Scenarios Network for Alaska + Arctic Planning
Date & Time: 26 September 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Northern Climate Reports: Ecological Futures in Stories, Charts, and Data


Presenter(s): Nancy Fresco, Craig Stephenson, Mike DeLue, Carolyn Rosner (University of Alaska, Scenarios Network for Alaska + Arctic Planning)

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/northern-climate-reports/

Abstract: A changing climate is altering northern landscapes and there is a need for communities to be able to understand what they may expect in the future. During this webinar, we will unveil the interactive Northern Climate Reports tool created by UAF's Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning (SNAP) team. We will review how the tool uses climate data to construct a variety of possible futures for a warming North.

Bio(s): Nancy Fresco is an Assistant Research Professor with a background in biology, landscape ecology, and forestry, and has been SNAP's Network Coordinator since the group's start in 2007.

Craig Stephenson is a geospatial data analyst for SNAP. He develops web applications and web service APIs, processes geospatial datasets into value-added products, and administers Linux servers.

Mike DeLue is SNAP's science communicator. He communicates SNAP'S work using skills in public presentation, audio + video editing, and mapping.

Carolyn Rosner creates websites, logos, and other graphics. She also serves as a writer, art director, and content manager for SNAP's websites and web tools

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: CPO Societal Challenges: A Deep Dive in Water Quality and Climate Mitigation
Presenter(s): Brenda Rashleigh, NOAA Climate Program Office (Interagency Rotation Program), Senior Program Analyst for Water and Coasts; Neeharika Naik-Dhungel, Policy Analyst, NOAA Climate Program Office
Date & Time: 26 September 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: CPO Societal Challenges: A Deep Dive in Water Quality and Climate MitigationNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Brenda Rashleigh, NOAA Climate Program Office (Interagency Rotation Program), Senior Program Analyst for Water and Coasts; Neeharika Naik-Dhungel, Policy Analyst, NOAA Climate Program Office

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6443029721073827679


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: This presentation will discuss opportunities for advancing the understanding of water quality and climate mitigation in a changing climate through the lens of societal challenges identified by NOAA's Climate Program Office.

Keywords: Water Quality, Climate Mitigation, CPO

Bio(s): Brenda Rashleigh has been working with the NOAA Climate Program Office) for six months through the President's Management Council interagency rotation program as a Senior Policy Analyst for Water and Coasts. Her home agency is EPA's Office of Research and Development, where she serves as the Assistant Center Director for Water in the Center for Public Health and Environmental Assessment.

Neeharika Naik-Dhungel has been working with the NOAA Climate Program Office) for six months through the President's Management Council interagency rotation program as a Policy Analyst for Climate Mitigation. Her home agency is EPA's Office of Air and Radiation, where she serves as a Program Manager in the Green Power Partnership Program.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


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Title: NEDTalk - Seasons of the Sun in an Age of Discovery
Presenter(s): Mark Miesch, research scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado and NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center
Date & Time: 26 September 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Seasons of the Sun in an Age of DiscoveryNOAA Environmental Data Talks (NEDTalks)

Presenter(s): Mark Miesch, research scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado and NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC)

Sponsor(s): NESDIS Communications / NESDIS HQ

Seminar Contacts: Rafael.deAmeller@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://events-na13.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/2358677976/en/events/event/shared/2442521456/event_registration.html?sco-id=10367384637

Abstract: We all live next to a variable star. The Sun changes from day to day, from week to week, from year to year, even from decade to decade. These changes often take the form of colossal solar storms that are powered by magnetic energy and that pose increasing hazards to our technological society. However, there is striking regularity in the apparent chaos of space weather"the frequency and severity of solar storms rises and falls approximately every 11 years. This is known as the Solar Cycle and it has been occurring for at least 10,000 years, and likely much longer. In this presentation we explore how humanity has come to learn about the Solar Cycle and its earthly impacts through careful observation and inference that has spanned over 2000 years. And we anticipate what remaining mysteries, spectacles, and hazards await us as we approach yet another solar maximum.

See https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/events/seasons-of-the-sun-age-of-discovery

Bio(s): https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/events/seasons-of-the-sun-age-of-discovery

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Tailoring data assimilation for discontinuous Galerkin models
Presenter(s): Ivo Pasmans, University of Reading, UK
Date & Time: 26 September 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Tailoring data assimilation for discontinuous Galerkin models

Presenter(s): Ivo Pasmans (University of Reading, UK)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar Contact(s): Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
PhoneNumbers (US)+1414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: In recent years discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods have received increased interest from the geophysical community. In these methods the solution in each grid cell is approximated as a linear combination of basis functions. Ensemble data assimilation (EnDA) aims to approximate the true model state by combining model output with observations using error statistics estimated from an ensemble of model runs. EnDA in geophysical models faces several well-documented issues. In this work we have tested whether it is possible to exploit the DG structure to address three of them. These tests are carried out using a stochastically generated ensemble of synthetic model states. The issues are 1) finite ensemble covariances contain sampling errors that depend on the scales in the solution. It is found that Legendre basis polynomials form a set of wavelets that can be used to remove sampling errors using scale-dependent localisation. 2) Current EnDA requires averaging of dense (satellite) observations and cannot use the information contained in the observations to the fullest. By evaluation of the basis functions, the observation operator can be made to resolve the solution at a sub grid level for higher-order DG schemes. This increases the observation density that the EnDA can effectively digest. 3) Due to its ability to assimilate denser observation sets EnDA is capable of also reducing errors in the 1st-derivative. This is important as these gradients force several physical processes.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

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Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Climate-Driven Changes in Prescribed Fire in the Southeastern U.S.
Presenter(s): Chris Fuhrmann, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill, National Weather Service Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia; David Zierden, Florida State University; Megan Johnson, U.S. Forest Service
Date & Time: 26 September 2023
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Climate-Driven Changes in Prescribed Fire in the Southeastern U.S.

Presenter(s):

Climate Overview: Chris Fuhrmann | Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill | NOAA/National Weather Service Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox | University of Georgia and David Zierden | Florida State University
Climate-Driven Changes in Prescribed Fire in the Southeastern US: Megan Johnson | U.S. Forest Service

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth (meredith.f.muth@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/6846806667689526028

Abstract:
The Southeast Climate monthly webinar series is held on the 4th Tuesday of each month at 10:00 am ET. This series is hosted by the Southeast Regional Climate Center (SERCC), the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), and the NOAA National Weather Service. These webinars provide the region with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods, and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as agriculture production, water resources, wildfires and ecosystems.

The September 26 webinar will feature a special presentation on "Climate-Driven Changes in Prescribed Fire in the Southeastern US"

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ

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25 September 2023

Title: California-Nevada Drought & Climate Update and Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS/CIRES; Daniel McEvoy, Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute, National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center, Andrew Hoell, NOAA Physical Science Laboratory
Date & Time: 25 September 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: CA/NV Drought & Climate Update and Outlook Webinar

Presenter(s): Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS/CIRES; Julie Kalansky, CNAP, CW3E, Scripps Institution of Oceanography; Stephanie McAfee | Nevada State Climatologist, UNR

Introduction
Amanda Sheffield | NOAA/NIDIS/CIRES
Drought and Climate Update and OutlookDaniel McEvoy | Western Regional Climate Center, DRIEl Nio/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) UpdateTBD | National Weather Service Climate Prediction CenterEl Nio Intensity Matters for Western U.S. PrecipitationAndrew Hoell | NOAA Physical Science Laboratory

Seminar Contact(s): Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2766734526950828381

Abstract: We're in for an El Nio winter"and likely a strong one. The El Nio Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is expected to continue through December to February 2024, according to the National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center. El Nio typically brings wet winter weather to California and Nevada, but what areas is this El Nio cycle expected to favor? Tune in to this month's Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar for a discussion on the expected impacts of the ENSO along with a regular drought and climate update.

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) May 2023 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia).

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

22 September 2023

Title: September NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 22 September 2023
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: September NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing


Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/sept-2023-climate-outlook/

Abstract: We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, discuss some forecasting tools, and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for October 2023 and the early winter season. Join the gathering online to learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Bio(s): Rick Thoman is the Alaska Climate Specialist with ACCAP and has many years of experience producing reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities, and the media.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

21 September 2023

Title: Design of a Low SWaP Dual-Band Radiometer for UAS Remote Sensing Applications
Presenter(s): Maria Novoa Garcia, NOAA CESSRST-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, University of Puerto Rico Mayagez Campus
Date & Time: 21 September 2023
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Design of a Low SWaP Dual-Band Radiometer for UAS Remote Sensing Applications

Presenter(s): Maria Novoa Garcia, NOAA CESSRST-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, University of Puerto Rico Mayagez Campus

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science CentersSeminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/vcc-bsbe-yim

Phone Number
(US)+1 646-854-8831
PIN: 831 013 607#


Abstract: Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) is crucial in oceanographic, coastal, atmospheric, and other applications. Knowing this variable well allows the scientific community to understand and monitor the behavior of both the ocean and the atmosphere. This way, the government and other stakeholders can make better decisions to protect life and property based on analysis and conclusions by NOAA scientists. During my NOAA Experiential Research and Training Opportunities (NERTO), our research focused on studying further which variables significantly impact the measurement of sea surface salinity from passive microwave radiometers. These variables are the Sea Surface Temperature, Earth Incidence Angle, Wind Speed, and Direction. We concentrated on the sensitivity of the retrieved SSS to each variable mentioned by calculating the brightness temperature (TB). The calculations are from the study of Meissner et al. and the theses of Wah and Mera. A function was designed on MATLAB and showed that brightness temperature is more sensitive to Sea Surface Temperature and Wind Speed. The highest error in SSS is 1.0183 PSU, meaning that this parameter impacts most the brightness temperature and the retrieved sea surface salinity. I will also discuss furthers steps of this research which will implement this function in the analysis of retrieving SSS for the new novel airborne sensor.

Bio(s): My name is Mara Celeste Novoa-Garca and I am a NOAA EPP/MSI Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Technologies scholar. I completed a bachelor's degree as part of CESSRST-I Cohort 4 in computer engineering. Currently, I'm pursuing a master's in science in Electrical Engineering at the University of Puerto Rico Mayagez Campus and was a CESSRST-I Cohort 5 fellow, now CESSRST-II Cohort 1. My research focuses on the design and implementation of a compact dual-band radiometer installed in an unmanned aircraft system for remote sensing applications. This low size and weight instrument is a cost-effective alternative for Sea Surface Salinity retrievals and mitigates space-borne instruments limitations. Since Sea Surface Salinity is an essential climate variable, this research contributes to NOAA's mission to understand and predict changes in climate, weather, and coasts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Developing Offshore Wind in US Waters Part 2: Offshore Wind Development and the Structure and Function of Marine Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Jon Hare, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 21 September 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Developing Offshore Wind in US Waters Part 2: Offshore Wind Development and the Structure and Function of Marine Ecosystems

Presenter(s): Jon Hare, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA National MPA Center and OCTO

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4385375072691370583

Abstract:
The pace, scale, and magnitude of offshore wind development in the US and around the globe is increasing rapidly. Countries are committing to this new ocean use to decarbonize their energy systems and as a goal for economic growth. The scale of this development has moved from small turbines in shallow waters of the North Sea to new technologies that allow for large-scale industrialization in marine ecosystems. This webinar will explore the potential interactions of this growing industry with the structure and function of marine ecosystems and what science is still needed to better understand these interactions.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/archive.html)

Seminar Contact(s): Zac Cannizzo, zac.cannizzo@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: Linking gas, particulate, and toxic endpoints to air emissions in the Community Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Multiphase Mechanism (CRACMM)
Presenter(s): Havala Pye, U.S. EPA
Date & Time: 21 September 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: David Skaggs Research Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, USA
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: Linking gas, particulate, and toxic endpoints to air emissions in the Community Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Multiphase Mechanism (CRACMM)
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Havala Pye, EPA

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.womack@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/640088823785876317

Abstract: Chemical mechanisms are at the core of chemical transport models used to understand drivers of air quality and predict concentrations of pollutants in present day and future conditions. Mechanisms are traditionally focused on prediction of the criteria pollutant, ozone, and mass is often duplicated for purposes of predicting other endpoints such as the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) component of fine particle mass. In this work, Dr. Pye will present the recently developed Community Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Multiphase Mechanism (CRACMM) to show that coupling gas-phase radical chemistry and SOA formation can have benefits for representing the full range of atmospheric reactive organic carbon (ROC). These benefits include expanded coverage of ROC emissions, improved conservation of mass, and new SOA precursors not included in earlier generation mechanisms. This talk will also highlight recent applications of CRACMM in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system to understand ambient conditions such as those during the Fire Influence on Regional to Global Environments and Air Quality (FIREX-AQ) field campaign.

Bio(s): Dr. Havala O. T. Pye is a research scientist in the Office of Research and Development at the US Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Pye's work focuses on fine particles and other airborne pollutants that can impact human health and climate change. Specifically, she develops emission estimation methods and representations of fine particles and organic species in the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system allowing for improved quantification of air pollution impacts in regulatory analysis. She is the lead scientist for development of the Community Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Multiphase Mechanism (CRACMM). More information about Dr. Pye and her work.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2023,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: 2023 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Lightning Talks - Field Experience
Presenter(s): Colette Fletcher-Hoppe, Offshore Wind Technologies Specialist, DOE, Wind Energy Technology Office; Claire Huang, 2023 Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA National Centers For Coastal Ocean Science; De'Marcus Robinson, 2023 Sea Grant Knauss Fellow Council for Environmental Quality; Hannah Staley, 2023 Knauss Marine Policy Fellow, Office of Marine and Aviation Operations, National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration; Sarah Tucker, 2023 Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Global Ocean Monitoring & Observing Program, NOAA
Date & Time: 21 September 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: 2023 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Lightning Talks - Field Experience (2023 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Colette Fletcher-Hoppe, Offshore Wind Technologies Specialist, DOE, Wind Energy Technology Office; Claire Huang, 2023 Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA National Centers For Coastal Ocean Science; De'Marcus Robinson, 2023 Sea Grant Knauss Fellow Council for Environmental Quality; Hannah Staley, 2023 Knauss Marine Policy Fellow, Office of Marine and Aviation Operations, National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration; Sarah Tucker, 2023 Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Global Ocean Monitoring & Observing Program, NOAA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8876167589060972117

Abstract: Join us for five Knauss lightning talks about their field experience! 2023 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows will share their experience engaging with science and stakeholders on the ground. This webinar will be moderated by Kalina Grabb, 2023 Knauss International Policy Fellow for the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program.
Keywords: Knauss fellows, Sea Grant, field experience

Bio(s): Colette is a 2023 Knauss Fellow and a PhD candidate in Biology at the University of Southern CA in Los Angeles. As Offshore Wind Technologies Specialist, her Knauss Fellowship focuses on integrating the electrical grid with renewable resources and offshore wind operations and maintenance. Her PhD research focuses on the structure and function of marine microbial communities, i.e. bacteria, viruses, and single celled plants and animals that make up the bottom of the marine food web.Claire is a Sea Grant Knauss Fellow and a Policy and Communications Specialist with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. She holds a Masters of Environmental Management from Duke University and a B.A. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Columbia University. Her research in conservation and fisheries science spans everything from river herring habitat restoration and fish passage, to bottlenose dolphin population genetics. Previously, Claire worked in environmental law and international marine conservation NGOs; she is passionate about advancing environmental protection and climate justice by leveraging science, policy, and legal advocacy tools in partnership with communities.De'Marcus Robinson is a Knauss Fellow from the California Sea Grant program, who is currently working in the White House Council on Environmental Quality. He is also a PhD Candidate at UCLA in the Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Department.
Hannah holds a Masters of Environmental Science and Masters of Public Affairs from Indiana University and a Bachelors in Marine Science from Coastal Carolina University. She is currently a Sea Grant Knauss Fellow through the Indiana-Illinois Sea Grant. As a Legislative Affairs Specialist with NOAA's Office of Marine and Aviation Operations, her Knauss Fellowship involves reviewing and analyzing new bills, attending various briefings, providing insight on marine and aircraft operations to Congressional members and staff, assisting with internal reports, and staffing OMAO leadership.Sarah is an Arctic Research and Communications Knauss Fellow through the University of Hawaii Sea Grant Program. She is working in NOAA's Global Ocean Monitoring and Observing Program. She holds a BA in Biological Sciences from Smith College and a PhD in Marine Biology from the University of Hawaii at Mnoa

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

19 September 2023

Title: Teamwork Makes the Dream Work: How Visitors Help Sanctuaries Monitor Climate Change
Presenter(s): Dr. Tammy Silva, Research Marine Ecologist, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary; Brenda S. Altmeier, Maritime Heritage Coordinator, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary; and Dr. Zachary Cannizzo, Climate Coordinator, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, National Marine Protected Areas Center
Date & Time: 19 September 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Teamwork Makes the Dream Work: How Visitors Help Sanctuaries Monitor Climate Change

Presenter(s): Dr. Tammy Silva, Research Marine Ecologist, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary; Brenda S. Altmeier, Maritime Heritage Coordinator, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary; and Dr. Zachary Cannizzo, Climate Coordinator, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, National Marine Protected Areas Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NOS Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6189900149950348895

Abstract: From severe storms to ocean warming to sea level rise, climate change poses a clear and present threat to treasured places, critical biodiversity, and cultural resources across the national marine sanctuary system. Sanctuaries need to monitor climate change's impact within their sites and on natural resources, so they can identify and respond to these impacts. Everyone who visits and uses sanctuaries can play an invaluable role in ensuring their continued prosperity by helping to monitor for climate change impacts. Join us to learn more about the importance of climate change monitoring in sanctuaries, and how all kinds of visitors - from divers, to teachers, to fishers - are helping to monitor and educate about climate change impacts in Stellwagen Bank and Florida Keys national marine sanctuaries. Solving the climate crisis is going to take all of us working together, how can you support climate monitoring at your local sanctuary?

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here: (https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: September U.S. Southwest Drought Briefing
Presenter(s): Erin Saffell, Arizona State Climate Office, Shana Tighi, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Date & Time: 19 September 2023
3:00 pm - 3:35 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: August U.S. Southwest Drought Briefing

Presenter(s):
Current Climate Conditions and Outlook: Erin Saffell | Arizona State Climate Office

Current Conditions and Projected Operations in the Lower Colorado River Basin: Shana Tighi | Bureau of Reclamation

Seminar Contact(s): Gretel Follingstad (gretel.follingstad@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/9043638602756149334

Abstract: Short-term drought in the Southwest has improved greatly in the last year, but a lackluster summer monsoon and extreme heat has the region drying out again. However, the next couple weeks look relatively wet. This webinar will look at current and forecasted drought conditions for Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, and Utah. Following the conditions update, Shana Tighi with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation will provide an update on current conditions and projected operations in the Lower Colorado River Basin.

Recordings: Webinar summaries and recordings will be posted on Drought.gov: https://www.drought.gov/webinars?page=1&dews=Intermountain%20West

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: Uncharted: How Scientists Navigate Their Own Health, Research, and Experiences of Bias
Presenter(s): Skylar Bayer, Marine Habitat Resource Specialist, NMFS Alaska Regional Office, Habitat Conservation Division
Date & Time: 19 September 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Uncharted: How Scientists Navigate Their Own Health, Research, and Experiences of BiasNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Skylar Bayer, Marine Habitat Resource Specialist, NMFS Alaska Regional Office, Habitat Conservation Division

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4218949694568349781


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Uncharted is a collection of stories from scientists with disabilities and/or chronic conditions. Skylar will present on why she and Gabi chose to share stories, how they created the book, some excerpts and then suggestions for how to read the book in groups or classrooms.

Keywords: storytelling, disabilities, scientists

Bio(s): Skylar Bayer is a marine ecologist and science communicator. Currently a marine habitat resource specialist in the NOAA Fisheries Alaska Regional Office, she is the co-editor of the recently published, "Uncharted: How Scientists Navigate Their Own Health, Research, and Experiences of Bias."

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: 1. NERTO 2022: NOAA OLIA & HSST Experience 2. An Observational and HYSPLIT Modeling Study on the Impacts of Recent Canadian Wildfire Smoke on Air Quality across the United States
Presenter(s): 1. Lauren Taylor, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and PhD student, Howard University; 2. Lauryn Smith, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, Howard University
Date & Time: 19 September 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Titles: 1. NERTO 2022: NOAA OLIA & HSST Experience

2. An Observational and HYSPLIT Modeling Study on the Impacts of Recent Canadian Wildfire Smoke on Air Quality across the United States

Presenter(s): 1. Lauren Taylor, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and PhD student, Howard University

2. Lauryn Smith, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, Howard University

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science CentersSeminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/pym-hdib-wtq

Phone Number
(US)+1 260-302-1681
PIN: 878 684 712#

Abstracts: 1. Lauren Taylor participated in a NERTO with the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee's Environment Subcommittee between April 2022 and August 2022. As a result of this unique opportunity, she gained valuable insight into environmental governance and actively engaged in the legislative process. The experience involved diverse tasks such as conducting legislative research, attending committee hearings, and drafting briefing materials. By working closely with committee staff and participating in environmental policy initiatives, she gained first-hand experience with the legislative process. This included analyzing proposed bills, compiling data, and preparing briefings to inform committee members on critical environmental matters. Additionally, the internship provided opportunities for collaboration with environmental justice and sustainability experts, stakeholders, and other fellows. Engaging in discussions on climate change, alternative energy sources, and environmental protection fostered a broader perspective on the intricate challenges and trade-offs involved in developing effective policies. As a result of the NERTO, an understanding of the complex interplay between government, policy, and environmental issues was developed.

2. During the first week of June 2023, the northeast U.S. experienced a historical smoke event that blanketed most of the region due to fires originating in Quebec, Canada. At this time, northeast U.S. residents were exposed to a significant increase in PM2.5 and ozone concentrations. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was executed to simulate the transport of smoke emissions and quantify the long-range smoke dispersion through back trajectory from Howard University's Beltsville campus. For this particular study, the research requires a thorough analysis of several trajectories, from campus, on the Canadian wildfire smoke between the dates of June 5th, 2023, to June 9th, 2023. Canadian wildfires have recently become a recurring environmental hazard in Canada that has significant impacts on the United States. Wildfires have become a more persistent problem we see globally, and being exacerbated by climate change, results in prolonged fire seasons that only intensify as time goes on. The Canadian wildfires have yielded vast amounts of smoke that has blanketed much of the United States, negatively affecting the air quality. In addition to reduced air quality, observations include visibility impairment (yellow skies in New York City) and health risks that temporarily put a halt to everyday human activities (i.e., Yankees game cancellation). The fine particulate matter (PM2.5) present in the smoke can penetrate deep into the respiratory system leading to illnesses such as asthma. Wildfire smoke can also contain harmful pollutants like volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) that produce ozone (O3) through a photochemical reaction. Observational data shows a significant increase in PM2.5 and O3 concentrations during this historical event. The findings from this study yield a need for adequate wildfire management and control everywhere, as it cannot always be accurately estimated how and exactly where wildfire smoke will be transported.

Bio(s): 1. Lauren L. Taylor is a NCAS-M II Cohort I fellow earning a PhD in the Department of Sociology, with a concentration in atmospheric science and public policy at Howard University. She is interested in the NOAA Science and Technology focus area Data in support of the NCAS-M II research theme: Interdisciplinary scientific research for building resilient communities against weather extremes. Her research falls under the NCAS-M II research Integrated Social Science and Physical Sciences for Public Safety and Emergency Management Applications. Ms. Taylor's NOAA mission-aligned recent research experience involved completing a NERTO titled: NOAA OLIA & HSST Experience. Her NOAA mentor was Ms. Erin Schnettler at NOAA Office of Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs in Washington, D.C.

2. Lauryn Smith is a NCAS-M II Cohort 1 fellow earning a MS in the Graduate Atmospheric Science Program at Howard University. She is interested in the NOAA Science and Technology focus area Data in support of the NCAS-M II research theme: Innovative observations for advancing the analysis and prediction of weather, climate, and atmospheric chemistry. Her research falls under the NCAS-M II research pathway: Process-level Understanding and Enhanced Data Assimilation/Analysis Modeling Capacities. Ms. Lauryn Smith's NOAA mission-aligned recent research experience involved completing a NERTO titled: An Observational and HYSPLIT Modeling Study on the Impacts of Recent Canadian Wildfire Smoke on Air Quality across the United States. Her NOAA mentors were Dr. LaToya Myles and Dr. Mark Cohen at NOAA Air Resources Laboratory in College Park, Maryland.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: NEDTalks - Magnetosphere Weather & Particle Radiation
Presenter(s): Dr. Dimitrios Vassiliadis, NOAA NESDIS
Date & Time: 19 September 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Magnetosphere Weather & Particle RadiationNOAA Environmental Data Talks (NEDTalks)

Presenter(s): Dr. Dimitrios Vassiliadis, NOAA NESDIS

Sponsor(s): NESDIS Communications / NESDIS HQ

Seminar Contacts: Rafael.deAmeller@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://events-na13.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/2358677976/en/events/event/shared/2442521456/event_registration.html?sco-id=10256197018

Abstract: This talk will discuss the radiation environment in Earth's magnetosphere which impacts humans in space and satellite electronics. Solar energetic particles coming from solar flares as well as other cosmic rays from distant stars and other parts of the galaxy are important elements of this environment. A second major source is the Earth's radiation belts, whose energetic electrons and other particles can damage spacecraft components. The most energetic particles, typically from solar sources, have health effects on astronauts in the Space Station, space tourists, and airline crews on polar routes.

NOAA continuously monitors radiation levels and other space weather conditions. The agency issues watches, warnings, and alerts based on environmental measurements and numerical weather prediction models. New missions and instruments, such as the GOES-U satellite, to be launched in 2024, and the SWFO-L1 spacecraft in 2025, will be important in providing continuous streams of solar imagery and particle measurements relevant to forecasting these space weather effects.

See https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/events/magnetosphere-weather-particle-radiation

Bio(s): https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/events/magnetosphere-weather-particle-radiation

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: The effect of natural coral reef roughness on hydrodynamics and implications for reef restoration design
Presenter(s): Benjamin Norris, University of California, Santa Cruz
Date & Time: 19 September 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The effect of natural coral reef roughness on hydrodynamics and implications for reef restoration design

Presenter(s): Benjamin Norris (University of California, Santa Cruz)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

SeminarContact: Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US)+1414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: Coral reefs are effective natural barriers that protect adjacent coastal communities from hazards such as erosion and storm-induced flooding. However, the degradation of coral reefs compromises their efficacy to protect against these hazards while also reducing their other important ecosystem services, making degraded reefs a target for restoration. To improve restoration techniques, we present two scenarios, the first representing a pre-restoration state and the second a post-restoration state, to develop a detailed understanding of hydrodynamics given different seabed roughness. Results indicate that increasing seabed roughness through coral restoration could have a significant effect on wave energy dissipation, and hence coastal protection.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

18 September 2023

Title: The Benefits and Dangers of Pelagic Sargassum to Global Economies
Presenter(s): US)+1 929-336-0357
PIN: 334 356 565#

Abstract: The seminar will feature two presentations on the topic of monitoring Sargassum using satellite sensors. The first presentation will show how detecting Sargassum with Sentinel-2 is useful because of its spatial and spectralresolution, but Landsat is of paramount importance because this series of satellites allows analyses that are more than 30 years old. Landsat is used to calculate the Floating Algae Index and to obtain training fields using different thresholds and then apply deep learning methods that are capable of detecting only Sargassum. The second presentation will provide an overview of how satellite sensors are used within NOAA to monitor and track Sargassum. It will address the existing challenges and show how citizen science efforts can contribute to improving the risk assessment associated with Sargassum inundation events


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available upon Request


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!{Vctor Manuel Jimnez Escudero, M.Sc., Academic of the Institute of Geography, National Autonomous University of Mexico; and Dr. Joaquin Trinanes, Operations Manager for the NOAA/CoastWatch Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico Node and Associate Professor at the University Santiago de Compostela
Date & Time: 18 September 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Benefits and Dangers of Pelagic Sargassum to Global Economies

Presenter(s):
Vctor Manuel Jimnez Escudero, M.Sci., Academic of the Institute of Geography, National Autonomous University of Mexico
Dr. Joaquin Trinanes, Operations Manager for the NOAA/CoastWatch Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico Node and Associate Professor at the University Santiago de Compostela.

Sponsor(s): NOAA JPSS Program

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access:

Meeting ID

meet.google.com/nbv-zhwy-svi
Phone Numbers

14 September 2023

Title: NOAA CoastWatch: GEOAquaWatch, Swordfish Distribution with SeaScapes
Presenter(s): Merrie Beth Neely, GST; Jamon Jordan, OSU
Date & Time: 14 September 2023
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title 1: Intro to GEOAquaWatch

Presenter 1: Merrie Beth Neely, GST

Abstract 1: An overview of the Group on Earth Observation's global water quality Initiative, it's relevance to NOAA missions and capacity development, and the opportunities it provides for voluntary participation by NOAA scientists.

Title 2: Modeling Swordfish Distribution with SeaScapes

Presenter 2: Jamon Jordan, Oregon State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA CoastWatch (STAR)

Seminar Contact(s): Victoria.Wegman@noaa.gov
Slides, Recordings Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: Places Forgotten by History: The Archaeological Potential of Submerged Landscapes
Presenter(s): Amanda M. Evans, PhD, RPA, Maritime Services Practice Leader, Gray & Pape, Inc.
Date & Time: 14 September 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Places Forgotten by History: The Archaeological Potential of Submerged LandscapesNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Amanda M. Evans, PhD, RPA, Maritime Services Practice Leader, Gray & Pape, Inc.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and NOAA Central LibrarySeminar Contacts: library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/9172114337768497503

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Changing sea-levels have drastically changed the shape and amount of land available for habitation throughout human history. Using modern marine technologies, portions of these formerly exposed landscapes can be identified on or buried below the modern seafloor, and data gathered to illustrate what life would have been like in these areas. This talk will present the results of recent exploration along the northwestern Gulf of Mexico to map and illustrate these landscapes. In addition to discussing technologies, this talk will address how ocean exploration can further our understanding of settlement patterns and past human behavior.Keywords: landscapes, geophysics, archaeology

Bio(s): Dr. Evans is an underwater archaeologist with over 20 years of experience who has worked across the Southeast, Great Lakes, and Gulf and Atlantic coast regions of the United States, and the Caribbean and Mediterranean. She earned a Doctorate from Louisiana State University, and a Master's from Florida State University. Dr. Evans's specialties include submerged paleolandscapes and marine geophysics; physical site formation processes; and historic preservation and best practices regarding underwater cultural heritage.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: NOAA Coast Survey: Mapping US Waters for Navigation and More
Presenter(s): Rear Admiral Benjamin K. Evan, Office of Coast Survey Director and U.S. National Hydrographer
Date & Time: 14 September 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Coast Survey: Mapping US Waters for Navigation and More
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series. These webinars are open to the public, in or outside of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Presenter(s): Rear Admiral Benjamin K. Evan, Office of Coast Survey Director and U.S. National Hydrographer

Remote Access: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/er221jcu1klq/event/event_info.html

Sponsor(s): This event is part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series with sponsorship from the NOAA Science Council. The NOAA-wide NELS provides examples of NOAA's science and leadership by those who lead it and make it happen. The NELS are presented as part of the NOAA Science Seminar Series For NELS questions, please contact nels@noaa.gov.

Abstract: The NOAA Office of Coast Survey has been the nation's nautical chart maker since 1807, responsible for mapping US waters and producing nautical charts and other navigation products and services to support safe navigation and efficient marine transportation. However, as the resolution, coverage, and accessibility of Coast Survey's mapping data has increased, demand for this foundational geospatial information to support a wider range of NOAA missions has grown. During this seminar, RDML Evans will trace Coast Survey's ongoing evolution from an organization built primarily around production of paper nautical charts to one focused on data to support a broad range of applications - all while developing and distributing the next generation of navigation products and services necessary to allow mariners to Navigate with Confidence now and in the future.

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided at the NELS web page.

Bio(s): Rear Admiral Benjamin K. Evans was appointed the Director of NOAA's Office of Coast Survey in December 2021. He is responsible for overseeing mapping and charting of all U.S. coastal waters, as well as representing the U.S. in international hydrographic activities. RDML Evans's career includes nearly ten years of sea duty, including command of NOAA Ships Rainier and Ferdinand R. Hassler. Immediately prior to his appointment as Director of Coast Survey, RDML Evans served as acting chief of staff of the NOAA National Ocean Service. RDML Evans past experience also includes assignments as Chief of the Coast Survey's Pacific Hydrographic Branch and Data Acquisition and Control Branch, and service on the staff of the NOAA Administrator. RDML Evans is a native of New York State, where he grew up sailing on Lake Ontario. His academic background is in physics and ocean engineering, with graduate research focused on acoustics and navigation systems for autonomous underwater vehicles.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:Recording available a few days after the webinar at the NELS webpage. This session to be recorded. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent, please do not join the live session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Evaluating Diver-Operated Stereo-Video as a Benthic Surveying Tool in Temperate Rocky Reefs
Presenter(s): Travis Leggett, MS Student, California State University, Monterey Bay, Marine Science, NOAA EPP/MSI Center for Coastal and Marine Ecosystems, NOAA EPP/MSI Graduate Fellowship Program based at the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 14 September 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Evaluating Diver-Operated Stereo-Video as a Benthic Surveying Tool in Temperate Rocky Reefs.

Presenter(s): Travis Leggett, MS Student, California State University, Monterey Bay, Marine Science, NOAA EPP/MSI Center for Coastal and Marine Ecosystems, NOAA EPP/MSI Graduate Fellowship Program based at the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of Education (OED), Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI)

Seminar Contact(s): Natasha White; NOAA/OED/EPP/MSI, natasha.white@noaa.gov Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8973386407317320789

Abstract: Stereo Diver-Operated Video (stereo-DOV) has seen limited application as a benthic surveying tool in the temperate waters of California. Elsewhere, it has proven efficient for surveying coral reef structures and contributes to a permanent archive that can be revisited over time. In California, the increasing scale of disturbances and kelp forest habitat loss has intensified the demands on contemporary subtidal monitoring efforts. Given the resource-intensive nature of underwater SCUBA observational surveys, this poses challenges. To address this, we compared well-established SCUBA-based monitoring approaches to estimates from stereo-DOV in habitat characteristics, invertebrate community structure, and algae densities. We employed linear mixed-effects models to test the influence of diver visual surveys and two stereo_DOV perspectives (45 and 90) incorporating repeated measures as a random effect. Results indicate that diver visual surveys and both of the tested stereo-DOV perspectives estimate similar species richness and species diversity (Shannon-Wiener) in urchin barrens(p < 0.05). Conversely, diver surveys in kelp habitats estimated greater species richness and diversity (p < 0.05). Stereo-DOV showed lower detection efficacy in dense algae beds than in diver surveys (p < 0.05). Most habitat characteristics differed between survey types, except for substrate classification (p < 0.05). While stereo-DOV was quicker for data collection, data extraction required 3-5 times as much time. Our findings suggest that stereo-DOV may be most effective in urchin barrens and other habitats with lower diversity and fewer visual obstructions or where time at depth is a limiting factor.

Bio(s): Travis began his relationship with NOAA as a graduate student at California State University, Monterey Bay (CSUMB), supported by the NOAA Center for Coastal and Marine Ecosystems (CCME). He was selected as an EPP/MSI Graduate Fellow in 2022 and is currently a master's candidate in marine science at California State University, Monterey Bay, and Moss Landing Marine Laboratories where Dr. James Lindholm serves as his academic advisor. With the support of the EPP/MSI Fellowship, Travis completed his 1-year residency under the mentorship of Dr. Steve Lonhart at the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. During his fellowship his research focused on the use of stereo-imagery to explore the role of habitat contiguity in influencing the distribution patterns of urchin and kelp populations. Travis hopes his research will help scientists and activists better understand the scale and implications of large-scale marine disturbances, such as the 2014-2015 Pacific Warm Water Blob.Are your webinars recorded?: Yes, a link to the recorded webinar will be provided to all registrants after the event.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

13 September 2023

Title: The Two Sides of Alaska: Nature's Beauty and Plastic Pollution
Presenter(s): Ashok Deshpande, NOAA Fisheries, NEFSC, Sandy Hook, NJ
Date & Time: 13 September 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Two Sides of Alaska: Nature's Beauty and Plastic Pollution

Presenter(s): Ashok Deshpande, NOAA Fisheries, NEFSC, Sandy Hook, New Jersey

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Moe Nelson, david.moe.nelson@noaa.gov ; Ashok Deshpande , ashok.deshpande@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/e6t93m0ggc93/event/registration.html

Accessibility: TBD

Abstract:
Plastics and their breakdown components are accumulating at alarming rates in global ecosystems, including the Gulf of Alaska. Obtaining knowledge of the chemical composition of plastics is important because different chemical components influence the way plastics interact with the environment and biota. We employed pyrolysis GC-MS for the chemical characterization of 115 plastic debris samples of different physical and optical properties non-randomly collected from shorelines in the northern Gulf of Alaska. A two-tier approach of peak fingerprinting and mass spectral data of marker peaks provided higher confidence in the data. The analyses did not appear to be compromised by the physical properties, optical properties, or weathering conditions of the debris. Polyethylene and polypropylene, the low-density floating plastics possibly of oceanic origins, were some of the most frequently detected polymers in the Katmai National Park and Preserve and Kenai Fjords National Park. Interestingly, a more diverse composition of polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyethylene terephthalate, and polyvinyl chloride was detected in Western Prince William Sound shorelines, possibly of oceanic as well as terrestrial origins. Additional benefits of the pyrolysis GC-MS method included the detection of copolymers and plastic additives in the same analytical runs.

Bio(s): Ashok Deshpande has been working as a Research Chemist at the NOAA Sandy Hook Laboratory since 1990. Prior to the NOAA career, he worked as a Research Assistant Professor at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, and a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and at the Ohio State University. His research is focused on the applications of tracer chemicals in the assessment of diet composition, habitat use, migration, trophic ecology, contamination, and condition of the fisheries resource species.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
The webinar was recorded, and can be viewed by following this link, then click "Play Recording":
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pt1mrufppyyl/
A pdf of the slides is available upon request.

Subscribe / Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Ecosystem Based Management in Theory and Practice
Presenter(s): Dr. Anna Rindorf, Professor in Ecosystem Based Marine Management at the National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Danish Technical University
Date & Time: 13 September 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Ecosystem Based Management in Theory and Practice (EBM/EBFM)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Dr. Anna Rindorf, Professor in Ecosystem Based Marine Management at the National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Danish Technical University

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2193136901026367578
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Ecosystem based management advice and implementation is in its nature more complex than traditional single issue management advice and implementation. Traditional single issue management addressed e.g. the sustainability of bycatch of a particular species or of the harvest of a specific fish stock. Ecosystem based management addresses these issues simultaneously, possibly together with a variety of other considerations.

Keywords: Ecosystem based advice, European fisheries management, Policy impact

Bio(s): Dr. Anna Rindorf is a professor in Ecosystem Based Marine Management at the National Institute of Aquatic Resources at the Danish Technical University. With a background in fish and fisheries modelling and a bachelor in business administration, her research combines modelling of ecological processes and collaboration with stakeholders at the interface between natural, social and economic science to solve pressing management questions. Currently, Dr. Rindorf is the coordinator of the SEAwise project (SEAwiseproject.org) which aims to operationalize Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management in Europe.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Mycoremediation of Louisiana Sweet Crude oil with Pleurotus ostreatus
Presenter(s): Summer Crescent, MS Student, Florida A&M University, Molecular Biology, NOAA EPP/MSI Center Coastal and Marine Ecosystems, NOAA EPP/MSI Graduate Fellowship Program based at NOAA Hollings Marine Lab
Date & Time: 13 September 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Mycoremediation of Louisiana Sweet Crude oil with Pleurotus ostreatus

Presenter(s): Summer Star Crescent, MS Student, Florida A&M University, Biology, NOAA EPP/MSI Center for Coastal and Marine Ecosystems, NOAA EPP/MSI Graduate Fellowship Program based at NOAA Hollings Marine Lab

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of Education (OED), Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI)

Seminar Contact(s): Natasha White; NOAA/OED/EPP/MSI, natasha.white@noaa.gov Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5686059945413434460

Abstract: Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) is a white rot fungus known to biodegrade recalcitrant molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in petroleum crude oil, which can be toxic and lethal to organisms in the environment. Restoration efforts for oil spills in estuarine environments impose complex problems due to the sensitivity of the environmental resources at risk, leading to response and restoration methods that have limitations that can induce harm to ecosystems. This study focuses on the ability of P. ostreatus mycelium to alter the saturate, aromatic, resin, and asphaltene (SARA) fractions constituting fresh and weathered Louisiana Sweet Crude (LSC) crude oil with the addition of nitrogen and phosphorus amendments. This work examined in vitro mycelium growth response with influence of nitrogen and phosphorus amendments based on this species' C:N:P ratio. We used image analysis in FIJI to track mycelium growth rates in response to LSC and nutrients, and then applied SARA analysis to the oil extractions. The practical application of this fungi as a remediation tool has been investigated in the potential trophic transfer of toxic PAHs to Illyanassa obsolete (eastern mud snail) from P. ostreatus post oil degradation. Oil spills in estuarine ecosystems can negatively impact the blue economy and human health. With added knowledge about the efficiency of oyster mushrooms to remediate spilled LSC, they may be used in the future as an effective remediation tool.

Bio(s): Summer Crescent is a biology master's student at the NOAA Center for Coastal and Marine Ecosystems at Florida A&M University. Summer will conduct her fellowship research in NOAA's National Ocean Service at the Hollings Marine Lab with mentorship of Ed Wirth, Ph.D and her academic advisor at Florida A&M University.Are your webinars recorded?: Yes, a link to the recorded webinar will be provided to all registrants after the event.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Aerosols and Climate Risk
Presenter(s): Geeta Persad, University of Texas, Austin
Date & Time: 13 September 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online and David Skaggs Research Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, USA
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: Aerosols and Climate Risk
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Geeta Persad, University of Texas, Austin

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): jan.kazil@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6950361977452730197

Abstract: Anthropogenic aerosol emissions are expected to change rapidly over the coming decades, driving strong, spatially complex trends in temperature, hydroclimate, and extreme events both near and far from emission sources. Under-resourced, highly populated regions often bear the brunt of aerosols' climate and air quality effects, amplifying risk through heightened exposure and vulnerability. However, many policy-facing evaluations of near-term climate risk, including those in the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment report, underrepresent aerosols' complex and regionally diverse climate effects. In this talk, I lay out the ways in which current climate risk assessment processes neglect aerosol signals and argue that this constitutes a major missing element in society's ability to prepare for future climate change. I highlight examples from recent research demonstrating aerosols' influence on the spatial pattern of heatwave exposure, their importance for improving regional climate models, and their unique impacts on crop yields. Finally, I outline a pathway towards progress and call for greater interaction between the aerosol research, impact modeling, scenario development, and risk assessment communities.

Bio(s): Dr. Geeta G. Persad is an Assistant Professor of Climate Science in the Jackson School of Geosciences at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research centers on application of numerical global climate modeling to understand the behavior of the physical climate system and its societal impacts, with a focus on the role of atmospheric aerosol pollution in regional and global climate change. Her group's work spans fundamental and policy-relevant climate analysis and has been funded by NSF, DOE, NOAA, Environmental Defense Fund, The Water Foundation, and DiCaprio Foundation. She holds a BS in Geophysics from Stanford University and a PhD in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences from Princeton University, where she was a NSF Graduate Research Fellow and a Ford Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy Fellow. Prior to UT Austin, she led the Western Water and Climate Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists and held research positions at the Carnegie Institution for Science and NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2023,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!

12 September 2023

Title: Modeled coastal-ocean pathways of land-sourced contaminants in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence
Presenter(s): Melissa Moulton, NOAA National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO
Date & Time: 12 September 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Modeled coastal-ocean pathways of land-sourced contaminants in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence

Presenter(s): Melissa Moulton, NOAA National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar Contact(s): Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US) +1414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: Extreme precipitation during Hurricane Florence, which made landfall in North Carolina in September, 2018, led to breaches of upstream and inland industrial and agricultural sites including hog waste lagoons, coal ash pits, and wastewater treatment facilities. In the weeks following the storm, freshwater discharge carried pollutants, sediment, organic matter, and debris to the coastal ocean, contributing to beach closures, algae blooms, hypoxia, and other ecosystem impacts. Here, the ocean pathways of land-sourced contaminants following Hurricane Florence and a suite of future scenarios are investigated using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) with a river point source from a hydrologic model simulation (WRF-Hydro) of the Cape Fear River Basin, North Carolina's largest watershed. Maps of the onset and duration of hypothetical water quality hazards for a range of weather conditions may provide guidance to managers on the timing of swimming/shellfishing advisories and water quality sampling.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

7 September 2023

Title: The fall and rise (?) of the global model
Presenter(s): Johannes Muelmenstaedt, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Date & Time: 7 September 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: David Skaggs Research Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, USA
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: The fall and rise (?) of the global model
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Johannes Muelmenstaedt, Pacific Northwest National Lab

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): jan.kazil@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4820036208403978077

Abstract: Global climate models (GCMs) have had a rough decade. In recent community consensus assessments of aerosol forcing and climate sensitivity, little weight was given to global models. This is understandable considering the justified doubts in these models' ability to represent the relevant cloud processes, which occur at scales far smaller than the model resolution. But discounting GCMs is a waste of a line of evidence that could be put to better use as a crosscheck on the assumptions underlying the other lines of evidence (process modeling and observations).What would a world look like where global models contributed to physical understanding on an even footing with process modeling and observations? I will present an example from aerosol"cloud interactions. Cloud-top entrainment of warm, dry air into stratocumulus clouds increases as aerosol concentration increases. Climatically, this reduces cloud water enough under present-day (PD) compared to preindustrial (PI) aerosol conditions to cancel and probably overcome the effect of precipitation suppression by aerosol. The characteristic scales of cloud-top turbulence are O(1 m), so even large eddy simulations struggle to resolve entrainment; in global models, it will be impossible to resolve for the foreseeable future. Thus, a commonly held belief is that global models give an intrinsically biased answer for global aerosol forcing. To my great surprise, however, some global models are actually perfectly capable of reproducing the present-day satellite correlations that underpin our expectations of reduced cloud water. Nevertheless, their estimate of PD compared to PI is still one of cloud water increase due to anthropogenic aerosols. To conclude the presentation, I will try to get the different lines of evidence to engage in Hegelian dialectic to disentangle what this means for climate projections.

Bio(s): Johannes Muelmenstaedt's main research interest is the behavior of clouds in the multiscale climate system, one of the main uncertainties in our understanding of the climate system's response to human climate perturbations. In his current projects, Johannes aims to use observations of process variables, rather than state variables, to evaluate and eventually improve general-circulation and cloud-resolving global climate models. He is also interested in brute-forcing multiscale classical physics problems with quantum computers. Before moving to atmospheric science, Johannes received a PhD and MA in particle physics from the University of California, Berkeley, and a BS in physics from MIT.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2023,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Weather Program Office (WPO) FY2024 Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO)
Presenter(s): Jordan Dale, Testbeds, Air Quality & Fire Weather Program Manager, Weather Program Office; Lingyan Xin, Synoptic Program Manager, Weather Program Office; Tamara Battle, Moderator, and Policy & Partnerships Lead, Weather Program Office
Date & Time: 7 September 2023
1:00 pm - 1:45 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Weather Program Office (WPO) FY2024 Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO)NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Jordan Dale, Testbeds, Air Quality & Fire Weather Program Manager, Weather Program Office; Lingyan Xin, Synoptic Program Manager, Weather Program Office; Tamara Battle, Moderator, and Policy & Partnerships Lead, Weather Program Office.

Sponsor(s): OAR and NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4128634709934543197
Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars.


Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: WPO provides resources to the external community (outside of NOAA), primarily as competitive grants solicited through our annual Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO). This webinar will outline the available competitions for FY2024 and information on the proposal process and guidelines for submission.

Keywords: climate, fire weather, research

Bio(s): Jordan is the Testbeds and Air Quality Program Manager for the Weather Program Office (WPO). Previously, Jordan was a contractor supporting WPO's Observations and JTTI Programs. Prior to joining WPO, Jordan worked as a meteorologist at the National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Office just outside of Detroit, MI for two years and as a federal contractor in the Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office for three years where he supported the wind and water resource characterization portfolios. Jordan has a B.S. in Meteorology from Penn State University and M.S. in Atmospheric Science from NC State University.

Lingyan is the Synoptic Program Manager for the Fire Weather Competition at WPO. Prior to WPO, Lingyan spent 22 years at the NWS Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL), where she played a role in designing and developing hydrometeorological applications for the NWS AWIPS system. Her technical skills have been pivotal in the development of NOAA's Virtual Lab (VLab) and leading the successful transition of the Interactive Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System (IMS) from NESDIS to NWS. Lingyan holds a PhD in Atmospheric Science from the University of Alberta.

Tamara is the Policy and Partnerships Lead for WPO, assisting in coordinating and overseeing various aspects of the Weather Research and Forecasting Innovation Act of 2017, and other weather policy topics for WPO and OAR. Tamara has a B.S. in Environmental Science from Medgar Evers College, CUNY, M.A. in Geology from The City College of New York, CUNY, and M.S. in Atmospheric Sciences from Howard University. Currently, Tamara is a doctoral candidate at Morgan State University, where she is completing her studies in Environmental Engineering.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

6 September 2023

Title: NOAA NCCOS FY2024 Funding Opportunity for Social Cultural and Economic Assessment of Harmful Algal Blooms
Presenter(s): Brittany King, NOAA NCCOS Competitive Research Program, Silver Spring MD
Date & Time: 6 September 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA NCCOS FY2024 Funding Opportunity for Social Cultural and Economic Assessment of Harmful Algal Blooms

Presenter(s): Brittany King, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Competitive Research Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Moe Nelson, david.moe.nelson@noaa.gov ; Brittany King, brittany.king@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Register at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/e2426bd5cvn7/event/registration.html

Accessibility: TBD

Abstract:
NOAA's National Centers for Coastal and Ocean Science Competitive Research Program (NCCOS/CRP) is pleased to announce a Fiscal Year 2024 Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) for Social, Cultural, and Economic Assessment of Harmful Algal Blooms.
https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/about/funding-opportunities/
For this opportunity, NCCOS/CRP is soliciting proposals that assess the social, cultural and economic impacts of HAB events. Research funded through this opportunity may guide future research on the impacts of HAB events and inform the selection of management strategies. NOAA is making up to approximately $1.5 million available through this competition and anticipates supporting 3 to 5 projects, for up to three years, at the level of $300,000 to $400,000 per year per proposal pending availability of appropriations.

NCCOS/CRP envisions funding at least one project focused on social, cultural and/or subsistence impacts of HAB events and at least one project focused on economic impacts of HAB events.

A letter of intent is required. The deadline for letters of intent is October 13, 2023; and full applications are due by 11:59 PM ET on January 17, 2024. Please see the full NOFO in Grants.Gov for additional details and instructions.

Bio(s): Dr. Brittany King is a program manager and environmental justice specialist in the Competitive Research Program at NOAA's National Center for Coastal Ocean Science. Dr. King holds a Ph.D. in Fisheries Science from Oregon State University, a MESM in Environmental Science and Management, specializing in Coastal Marine Resource Management, from the Bren School at UC Santa Barbara and a B.S. in Marine and Environmental Science from Hampton University.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
The webinar was recorded, and can be viewed by following this link, then click "Play Recording":
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pjfrwbncnkf2/
A pdf of the slides will be available upon request.

Subscribe / Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: Climate impacts on spatiotemporal habitat usage of Mid-Atlantic fishes
Presenter(s): Adena Schonfeld, NOAA/NMFS SWFSC
Date & Time: 6 September 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar and 110 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz, CA
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Climate impacts on spatiotemporal habitat usage of Mid-Atlantic fishes

Presenter(s): Adena Schonfeld, Postdoctoral Researcher, NOAA/NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC)

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology DivisionSeminar contact: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m5de8b1fe08b663314db3a6a3b2f367fd; Password (if needed): fedsem1nar! ; Join by phone: 415-527-5035 (US only, not a toll-free number), Access code/meeting number: 2762 421 0654

Abstract: Climate change has altered marine environments, most notably by increasing water temperatures and reducing dissolved oxygen concentrations. These persistent changes have impacted the phenology and spatiotemporal habitat usage of mobile species, often through distributional shifts, which has been well-documented along the US East Coast. Adjacent estuaries, such as the Chesapeake Bay, provide valuable foraging, refuge, and spawning grounds for a diversity of seasonally resident species, but the climate-driven impacts on this estuarine community have not been fully quantified. To provide information in support of temporally and spatially dynamic management in a changing environment, a holistic approach was taken to evaluate a variety of assessed taxa at several spatial scales. Broad-scale, multispecies analyses revealed differences in patterns of relative habitat utilization of Chesapeake Bay and a more northern estuary over time, as well as in the temporal scale of associated environmental drivers. Modeled baseline habitat associations for several seasonal resident species in Chesapeake Bay indicated that continued physical impacts of climate change will likely exacerbate the decline in relative abundance. However, derived time series of habitat suitability suggested that dynamics outside of the physical conditions of Chesapeake Bay are likely driving the decreased usage of this estuary. Finally, the traditional mark-recapture modeling framework that includes catch-and-release fishing was extended to a subannual, multi-stock, spatially and temporally explicit version for a key anadromous finfish, striped bass. Model estimated instantaneous natural mortality increased over time within Chesapeake Bay, particularly for older fish, but has not changed appreciably outside of the estuary, supporting previous findings of increased disease-associated mortality with age, and a possible role of climate change-associated suboptimal environmental conditions. Collectively, the results demonstrate heterogeneous changes in spatiotemporal habitat use of several Mid-Atlantic species on various scales.

Bio(s): Adena Schonfeld received her PhD from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science and is currently a postdoc with the NOAA SWFSC's Environmental Research Division (ERD). Her research interests are in the application of quantitative techniques to fisheries ecology data to better understand patterns in abundance and population dynamics of important species. The focus of her current work is on fine-scale drivers of biodiversity in the California Current.

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; link to recording available upon request.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Importance of culture: How alternative oyster cultivation can be used to enhance equity among indigenous peoples within Terrebonne Parish, LA.
Presenter(s): Alyssa Outhwaite, NOAA CCME-II Graduate Scholar and PhD candidate, Texas A&M University " Corpus Christi
Date & Time: 6 September 2023
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Importance of culture: How alternative oyster cultivation can be used to enhance equity among indigenous peoples within Terrebonne Parish, LA.

Presenter(s): Alyssa Outhwaite, NOAA CCME-II Graduate Scholar and PhD candidate, Texas A&M University " Corpus Christi

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science CentersSeminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/mxh-segx-iyi

Phone Number
(US)+1 513-843-1078
PIN: 889 545 220#

Abstract: This project engaged the Pointe-au-Chien Indian Tribe (PACIT) of Terrebonne Parish, LA, to learn about the history of land use, exploitation and consider how alternative oyster culture (AOC) may be used to enhance environmental equity among their people. AOC is an environmentally friendly way of growing oysters that fits into the PACIT way of life. In particular, it is compatible to the PACIT lifestyle by reducing environmental harm, providing economic resilience and the potential opportunity to enhance shoreline protection. The PACIT culture places great importance on stewardship of the earth, however, their lands have suffered severe degradation through exploitation of resources, which have exacerbated land loss. Although the lands surrounding Terrebonne Parish are subject to the greatest subsidence rates in the U.S., the people of PACIT have persevered through creativity and adaptation. In this project, we present how they can use their strengths and their relationship with nature to continue to find balance in a changing world. We surveyed lands of cultural significance that are suitable areas for AOC and emphasized overlapping locations that would benefit from shoreline protection efforts. As the project results will be accessible to the PACIT, the findings can further community approaches to enhance coastal resilience.

Bio(s): Alyssa Outhwaite is a NOAA CCME-II Graduate Scholar and PhD candidate in Marine Biology at Texas A&M University " Corpus Christi. She is advised by Dr. Jennifer Pollack in the Coastal Conservation and Restoration Ecology Lab. She earned her B.S. in Ecology from Augusta University in Georgia and her M.S. in Biology from the University of Dayton in Ohio. Her previous work investigated the impact of salinity regime changes on estuarine biota, as well as material transport and deposition during oyster shell formation. Alyssa's current research addresses how habitat setting and changing environmental conditions can influence community structure and resource use across coastal habitats, including oyster reefs and wind-tidal flats. She also investigates how resource quality impacts use in bay ecosystems. These initiatives aim to find ways to balance habitat and resource preservation with communities' needs. Alyssa values applying research insight to improve the management of coastal assets, community engagement and environmental conservation.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: The Coming Surge in Spaceflight Emissions
Presenter(s): Marty Ross, The Aerospace Corporation
Date & Time: 6 September 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: David Skaggs Research Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, USA
Description:

NOAAScience Seminar Series

Title: The Coming Surge in Spaceflight Emissions
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Marty Ross, The Aerospace Corporation

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.womack@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7037792943070161245

Abstract: Emissions from the space industry are generally thought to be insignificant. After all, rocket CO2 emissions are small (0.02% of aviation) and growth has historically been slow. Climate and ozone assessment models have thus been able to account for large uncertainties in spaceflight emissions by only bounding global impacts. However, this approach is unlikely to be acceptable in the future because the space industry is in the midst of a paradigm shift to new and much larger rockets, accelerating launch rates, and increased use of destructive reentry to control the growing space debris problem. Spaceflight's stratospheric aerosol emissions, none of which are well understood, could reach 20 Gg per year as soon as 2050 and so become a factor in Earth's radiation budget. Increasing discussions to regulate (or purposefully create) stratospheric aerosols suggest that future launch and reentry emissions could become entangled with such efforts. Rocket launch emissions above 80 km (about 25% of the total) cause transient perturbations in thermosphere composition that could accumulate into global space weather impacts. In this talk, we discuss space industry technologies, expected growth in spaceflight emissions, and their future impacts on the atmosphere. We review the uncertain relationship between geoengineering experiments and spaceflight emissions and present a plan of models and measurements that would close the most critical knowledge gaps in order to provide policymakers with sufficient information to deal with the coming surge of launch and reentry emissions.

Bio(s): Dr. Martin Ross is a Senior Project Engineer with the Commercial Launch Projects at The Aerospace Corporation. He received his PhD in Planetary Physics from UCLA, and then joined The Aerospace Corporation in 1988 to study the environmental impacts of rocket plumes. He also serves as an adjunct professor at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, and is a member of the American Geological Union and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2023,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!

31 August 2023

Title: An exploration of the eMOLT program, its data archive, and future directions for making the most of environmental sensors on fishing vessels
Presenter(s): George Maynard, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 31 August 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: An exploration of the eMOLT program, its data archive, and future directions for making the most of environmental sensors on fishing vessels

Presenter(s): George Maynard, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

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Title: U.S. Eastern Region Climate Services: Atlantic Hurricane Season
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; and Matthew Rosencrans with the NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 31 August 2023
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: U.S. Eastern Region Climate Services

Remote Access: Atlantic Hurricane Season

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University; Matthew Rosencrans with the NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service / National Centers for Environmental Information / Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s): Ellen Mecray

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract: The webinar will feature a recap of August conditions and Matthew Rosencrans will offer an update on the Atlantic Hurricane Season.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

30 August 2023

Title: Super Climate Extremes
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 30 August 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Hybrid, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Super Climate Extremes

Presenter(s): Dr. James Overland, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Sponsor(s): NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Seminar Contact(s): Adi Hanein, adi.hanein@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.goto.com/696881101You can also dial in using your phone.United States: +1 (872) 240-3212Access Code: 696-881-101

Abstract: New environmental extremes are currently underway and are much greater than those in previous records. These are mostly regional, singular events that are caused by global change/local weather combinations and are larger than the impact of linear temperature increases projected using climate models. These new states cannot easily be assigned probabilities because they often have no historical analogs. Thus, the term super climate extremes is used.

Bio(s): Dr. Jim Overland is a research oceanographer leading PMEL's Arctic Climate Dynamics research group. Overland's professional interests are scientific support for decision makers on climate and ecosystems in the Arctic and sub-Arctic. He leads projects on: jet stream dynamics, Arctic changes and historical climate, climate and sea ice projections, and ecosystem impacts. Overland was the organizer for the NOAA Arctic Report Card annual summary, a recent Arctic Assessment for the international Arctic Council, and was a Lead author to the 5th IPCC Assessment Report. He has worked with NOAA biologists on endangered species and fisheries management. Having traveled to the Arctic as a student in the late 1960s, he has since seen the Arctic change to a different place with loss of sea ice, temperature rise, and global impacts. He has 47 years with NOAA.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Contact the seminar host for slides and recordings. We hope to have a recording posted on NOAA PMEL YouTube channel at a later date. Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!{Jim Overland, NOAA PMEL}
Title: Addressing health impacts and inequities from air pollution and climate change: New insights leveraging novel satellite and modeling datasets
Presenter(s): Susan Anenberg, George Washington University
Date & Time: 30 August 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Addressing health impacts and inequities from air pollution and climate change: New insights leveraging novel satellite and modeling datasets
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Susan Anenberg, George Washington University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): jan.kazil@noaa.govLoction: Webinar

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4608037171741948759

Abstract: Climate change and air pollution are linked in several ways, including that they both stem from anthropogenic fuel combustion, are leading risk factors for global public health, and contribute to health inequities. Novel geospatial data sources including satellites and models are enabling greater availability of information on exposure levels and risks for populations globally and within individual cities, including in places with limited ground monitoring. This talk will address how these novel geospatial datasets can be leveraged to address health impacts and inequities associated with air pollution and climate change at municipal, national, and international scales.

Bio(s): Dr. Susan Anenberg is a Professor and Chair of the Environmental and Occupational Health Department at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health. She is also the Director of the GW Climate and Health Institute. Dr. Anenberg's research focuses on the health implications of air pollution and climate change, from local to global scales. She currently serves on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board and Clean Air Act Advisory Committee, the World Health Organization's Global Air Pollution and Health Technical Advisory Group, and the National Academy of Science's Committee to Advise the U.S. Global Change Research Program. She also serves as President of the GeoHealth section of the American Geophysical Union. Previously, Dr. Anenberg was a Co-Founder and Partner at Environmental Health Analytics, LLC, the Deputy Managing Director for Recommendations at the U.S. Chemical Safety Board, an environmental scientist at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and a senior advisor for clean cookstove initiatives at the U.S. State Department.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2023,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.govwith the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAAScience Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome yoursuggestions and ideas!

29 August 2023

Title: Bering Science Publication
Presenter(s): Vanessa von Biela, USGS Alaska Science Center; Thomas Farrugia, Alaska Ocean Observing System; Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy; Leah Zacher, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 29 August 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Bering Science Publication


Presenter(s): Vanessa von Biela (USGS Alaska Science Center); Thomas Farrugia (Alaska Ocean Observing System); Rick Thoman (Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy); Leah Zacher (NOAA Fisheries)

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/bering-science-2023/

Abstract: Join us for an overview of the Bering Science publication, featuring speakers on salmon, crab, harmful algal blooms, and climate. The Bering Science publication is a collaboration between the Alaska Ocean Observing System and the International Arctic Research Center. The publication shares observations and research that is happening in and around the region. This year's report focused on five topics identified by our Community Advisory Panel " crab, harmful algal blooms, seabirds, climate and salmon.

The report can be viewed and downloaded at this website: https://uaf-iarc.org/bering-sea-changes/

Bio(s): Vanessa von Biela is a research fish biologist with USGS Alaska Science Center and will be presenting her research related to Yukon River salmon. She is interested in filling key information gaps about the structure, function, and drivers of aquatic ecosystems in the subarctic and Arctic to better inform management of public lands and resources.

Thomas Farrugia is the Alaska Harmful Algal Bloom (HABs) Coordinator with the Alaska Ocean Observing System and he works on awareness, monitoring, research, and response to HABs " a crucial issue impacting public health, food safety and security, and wildlife populations.

Rick Thoman is the Alaska Climate Specialist at the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP). He is an expert in Alaska climate and weather, and he produces reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities and media.

Leah Zacher is a research fisheries biologist with Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Shellfish Assessment Program in Kodiak, Alaska. She conducts research to support sustainable management of Alaskan crab species, with an emphasis on crab movement and distribution patterns.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: A data-assimilative model reanalysis of the U.S. Mid Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Maine: Configuration and comparison to observations and global ocean models
Presenter(s): Julia Levin, Rutgers University
Date & Time: 29 August 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A data-assimilative model reanalysis of the U.S. Mid Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Maine: Configuration and comparison to observations and global ocean models

Presenter(s): Julia Levin, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar Contact(s): Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US)+1414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: Model configuration used to produce a 15-year reanalysis (2007-2021) of circulation in the coastal ocean and adjacent deep sea of the northeast U.S. continental shelf is described. The analysis uses the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation (DA) of observations from a variety of in-situ platforms and satellites. A complementary analysis of the mean seasonal cycle of regional circulation, also computed using ROMS- 4D-Var but with climatological mean observations and forcing, is used to reduce biases in the boundary conditions and to provide a dynamically and kinematically constrained Mean Dynamic Topography to use in conjunction with the assimilation of satellite altimeter sea level anomaly observations. Comparisons to a non-assimilative version of the same ROMS model configuration show the added skill brought by assimilation of local observations. The improvement that downscaling with assimilation achieves over ocean state estimates from two global models is demonstrated by comparison to independent (unassimilated) observations.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Offshore Wind Extrapolation to Wind Turbine Heights Using AI/ML Random Forest Algorithm
Presenter(s): James Frech and Korak Saha
Date & Time: 29 August 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Offshore Wind Extrapolation to Wind Turbine Heights Using AI/ML Random Forest Algorithm

Presenter(s): James Frech and Korak Saha

Sponsor(s): NOAA's NCEI Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): fred.burnett@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access:
Google Meet joining info
Video call link: https://meet.google.com/bau-mcbz-ysx
Or dial: (US) +1 234-805-0127
PIN: 815 009 184#

Abstract: Offshore wind farms are a low cost, efficient technology for green energy. They deliver significant economic benefits through manufacturing and operation, and importantly can be deployed at scale. Offshore wind also offers a route to opening up access to renewable energy for a global population, majorly clustered around coastal locations. A few studies have shown that the offshore winds at the hub heights of wind turbines is on average 90% higher than over land (Archer and Jacobson 2005). America's fledgling offshore wind sector has been growing over the past few years and plans to account for ~22 GW of energy by 2030 and ~86 GW of energy by 2050 (https://www.energy.gov/eere/wind/wind-vision-1). While there are big plans for the future, offshore wind speed data around wind turbine hub heights are only available either through in situ observations viz. wind masts and lidars at selected locations, or forecasting-model based data from NREL's WIND toolkit. In situ data, which is a good source for validation of wind, are very sparse and costly to install en masse, whereas satellite-derived winds have vast coverage at high resolution. In this study, we show the potential of using machine learning techniques to accurately estimate offshore wind speed profiles from satellite-derived surface wind speeds compared to conventional methods. We use machine learning, in particular the random forest regressor, to estimate wind profiles from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Center for Environmental Information's (NCEI) Blended Seawinds version 2.0 (NBSv2.0) product (Saha and Zhang 2022), which contains satellite-derived 10m global neutral blended wind speed gridded data (0.25 degrees) with a resolution of up to 6 hours dating back to 1987. A single extrapolation model applicable to US coastal regions is developed, instead of an area specific one as attempted in previous studies (Optis 2021).The study makes use of hundreds of thousands of wind profiles from six publicly available lidar datasets over the Northeast US, California, and Hawaii regions to train and test a random forest model to extrapolate wind speed profiles up to 200m. The final model is implemented on the NBSv2.0 product, to create publicly available wind speed profiles over the US coasts, which are validated against the NREL's wind resource data for North America. An equally gridded map of wind profile in the wave boundary layer around the USA coastal waters will help develop a suite of wind energy resources (wind speed, wind speed frequency distribution, wind power density, effective wind speed occurrence, and rich level occurrence and their trends) and will help stakeholders in their decision making related to wind based renewable energy development.

Bio(s): James Frech is a member of NCEI's satellite oceanography team employed through the CISESS/ESSIC cooperative institute at the University of Maryland. He got his start at NOAA through the William M. Lapenta summer internship program in the summer of 2022. He is currently pursuing a master's degree in machine learning at the University of Maryland.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

28 August 2023

Title: Improving Local Drought Awareness and Messaging Using New NOAA NWS Drought Information Statements
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 28 August 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Improving Local Drought Awareness and Messaging Using New NOAA NWS Drought Information Statements

Presenter(s): TBD

Sponsor(s): NOAA National Weather Service, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)

Seminar Contacts: Margaret Hurwitz (margaret.hurwitz@noaa.gov) or Meredith Muth (Meredith.Muth@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/473881148063880281

Abstract:
NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) is developing a modernized Drought Information Statement (DGT), a product issued by NWS Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) that synthesizes local drought conditions, impacts, and outlooks. NWS is working toward experimental implementation of the modernized DGT, based on a pre-populated Google Slides template that incorporates graphics and enables collaboration between neighboring WFOs.

This webinar, co-hosted by NWS and NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), will review the DGT modernization effort, showcase the new DGT template and format, outline the expectations for DGT authors, and share examples of the modernized DGT that were developed during a recent beta test with selected WFOs.

Sharing local drought impacts and mitigation actions with stakeholders, particularly in the water resources and agriculture sectors, is an important component of the DGT. During this webinar, Dr. Kelly Helm Smith from the National Drought Mitigation Center will also review sources of drought impact information, including Condition Monitoring Observer Reports (CMOR) and the Drought Impact Reporter.

Agenda:
Overview of the new DGT template and instructions for WFO staff
Case studies from local offices
Q&A on the new DGT template
Accessing impact information: Overview of key national to local drought impact resources

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Joe Casola, NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information Western Region; Nick Bond, Office of the Washington State Climatologist/University of Washington; Larry O'Neill, Oregon Climate Service/Oregon State University; David Hoekema, Idaho Water Resources Department; Katherine Hegewisch, UC-Merced
Date & Time: 28 August 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar

Presenter(s):

Climate Recap & Current Conditions
Joe Casola | NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information Western Region

State Updates
Nick Bond | Office of the Washington State Climatologist/University of Washington
Larry O'Neill | Oregon Climate Service/Oregon State University
David Hoekema | Idaho Water Resources Department

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Joe Casola | NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information Western Region

Estimating Drought Recovery in the Climate Toolbox
Katherine Hegewisch | UC-Merced

Seminar Contact(s): Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4111935321691267166

Abstract:
According to the August 8, 2023 U.S. Drought Monitor, over 45% of the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) is in drought. Drought coverage has increased from 32% since the beginning of summer and short-term outlooks lean dry. This webinar will provide more information on the current regional conditions and outlooks as well as updates from state experts from Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. Additionally, the webinar will feature a presentation on "Estimating Drought Recovery in the Climate Toolbox."

These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

24 August 2023

Title: Towards Estimating Marine Ecosystem Impacts of Geoengineering
Presenter(s): Cheryl Harrison and Kelsey Roberts, Louisiana State University
Date & Time: 24 August 2023
8:00 pm - 9:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, and Inouye Regional Center (IRC) Auditorium, Honolulu HI, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Towards Estimating Marine Ecosystem Impacts of Geoengineering

Presenter(s): Cheryl Harrison and Kelsey Roberts, Louisiana State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Pacific Islands Inouye Regional Center (IRC) Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: kate.taylor@noaa.govLocation: Webinar and in-person (IRC Auditorium)

Remote Access:
Google Meet Link: https://meet.google.com/tdm-bwnz-uiy
Phone Number: (661) 527-2839, PIN: 251 826 738#

Abstract: Geoengineering is broadly defined as deliberate large-scale manipulation of the environment to counteract anthropogenic global warming. This practice is rapidly receiving attention as a possible way to maintain global temperature targets, as all future climate projections exceed the 1.5 warming threshold. Examples of proposed geoengineering techniques include stratospheric aerosol injection, marine cloud brightening, and marine carbon dioxide removal. This research explores how changes in ocean temperature, biogeochemistry, and primary production under geoengineering scenarios could impact marine ecosystems, including coral reefs, marine heatwaves, and spatiotemporal fish biomass distribution.

Bio(s): Cheryl Harrison is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences at Louisiana State University. Her lab focuses on using ocean modeling to understand biophysical interactions from the meso-to global scale, with emphasis on transport, biogeochemical and ecological impacts, including higher trophic levels and fisheries. Kelsey Roberts is a postdoctoral associate in Cheryl Harrison's lab. Cheryl Harrison and Kelsey Roberts, Louisiana State University

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting by contacting the Seminar Contact listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: A temporal analysis of microbes in the Salish Sea using 16S rRNA
Presenter(s): David Garca Prieto, NOAA LMRCSC-II Graduate Scholar and PhD student, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
Date & Time: 24 August 2023
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A temporal analysis of microbes in the Salish Sea using 16S rRNA

Presenter(s): David Garca Prieto, NOAA LMRCSC-II Graduate Scholar and PhD student, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science CentersSeminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/han-zbzi-hqa

Phone Number
(US)+1 540-680-4473
PIN: 103 945 031#

Abstract: Marine microbes, which include single-celled Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya (i.e. diatoms, foraminifera), play critical roles in global nutrient and carbon cycling and can be considered bottom-up controls of the marine food web. Human induced change is directly affecting the coastal ocean through the increase of carbon dioxide in ocean waters, leading to ocean acidification, as well as excess nutrient runoff from fertilizers/waste resulting in algal blooms and hypoxic zones associated with large die offs. The Salish Sea (Puget Sound, WA) is commercially relevant and hosts many species susceptible to these changes, like oysters and other shellfish. It is important for us to monitor microbial communities through time and space in order to get a better understanding of the normal seasonal dynamics of these populations, to better be able to detect and predict the effects of large scale physical and chemical environmental changes caused by climate change. This project focused on a temporal (Spring/Summer) analysis of the microbial community of the Salish Sea at three stations. It included a five-day research cruise where summer samples were obtained. Samples underwent: DNA extraction, PCR amplification, 16S rRNA gene sequencing with a Nanopore sequencer, and bioinformatic analysis as part of a longer-term monitoring program that will test the hypotheses that changes in microbial and zooplankton community composition are due to changes in pH, eutrophication, and increased hypoxia, controlling for normal seasonal change. Key findings of this smaller work were: 1) the microbial community shifted between Spring and Summer partially due to changes in stratification, 2) potential HAB (Harmful Algal Bloom) species of algae were identified in many of our samples and at station P28, Pseudo-nitzschia sp., a potential domoic acid producing diatom, represented almost half the summer surface community near Golden Gardens, a popular Seattle beach, 3) oxygen, salinity, density, and temperature all significantly affected the microbial composition at our sites, and 4) Nanopore sequencing is a valuable tool with a rapid turnaround that can be used to quickly assess risk for recreation and shellfish farming in coastal waters. Along the same five-day research cruise, I collected an additional 15 samples for metagenomic sequencing. These samples were collected along three different stations at five depths starting the surface going down to the near bottom of the water column. We then placed the metagenomic reads from these samples on a COI phylogenetic tree of zooplankton to assess the zooplankton community of these stations, with the goal of statistically linking the microbes to the zooplankton of the system, this time through metagenomic reads.

Bio(s): David is a second year PhD student in the MEES graduate program at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science-Horn Point Laboratory (UMCES-HPL) and LMRSCS II fellow. He is working in Dr. Clara Fuchsman's lab studying marine zooplankton, bacteria and viruses in metagenomics. Specifically, his research focuses on the cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus, and its viruses, their taxonomic identification through phylogenetic tree placement methods, and continues to work on finding linkages between zooplankton, bacteria and viruses. David earned his BS in Oceanography at the University of Washington - Seattle Campus.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Seminar postponed: BOEM Environmental Studies Program 50 years of Science for Decisions
Presenter(s): Dr. Rodney Cluck, Chief, Division of Environmental Sciences, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management - BOEM
Date & Time: 24 August 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

SEMINAR IS POSTPONED TBD

Title: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) Environmental Studies Program 50 years of Science for Decisions

Presenter(s): Dr. Rodney E. Cluck, Chief, Division of Environmental Sciences, Environmental Studies Program, Office of Environmental Programs, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI Science SeminarsSeminar Contacts: Hernan Garcia (NOAA NCEI; Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov)Location: Webinar

Remote Access: TBD

Abstract: Since its inception in 1973, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management's (BOEM) Environmental Studies Program (ESP) has provided valuable information to predict, assess, and manage impacts from offshore energy and marine mineral exploration, development, and production activities on human, marine, and coastal environments. The vision of BOEM's ESP is to realize ocean stewardship through science. This approach is essential to BOEM's mission of managing development of U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) energy and mineral resources in an environmentally and economically responsible way. The ESP also seeks to align the program with the broader stewardship role the Department of the Interior (DOI) plays in managing the Nation's public lands"the federal government and ocean users working cooperatively with mutual respect to achieve shared natural resource management goals. https://www.boem.gov/environment/environmental-studies-program-celebrates-golden-anniversary

Bio(s): Rodney Cluck holds a Ph.D. in environmental sociology from Mississippi State University and a Masters Degree in Rural Sociology from the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. Dr. Cluck is the Chief of the Division of Environmental Sciences where he leads the Environmental Studies Program (ESP), the scientific backbone that informs policy decisions regarding leasing and development of ocean energy.Subscribe/unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

23 August 2023

Title: Climate and anthropogenic controls of seaweed expansions in the East China Sea and Yellow Sea
Presenter(s): Lin Qi, NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group
Date & Time: 23 August 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Climate and anthropogenic controls of seaweed expansions in the East China Sea and Yellow Sea

Presenter(s): Dr. Lin Qi, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/SOCD Ocean Color Science Team

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov Location: Webinar

Abstract: Seaweed macroalgae blooms have been reported around the world in the last two decades, yet the exact reasons are often unclear. We attempt to solve this puzzle for the East China Sea and Yellow Sea using long-term observations and laboratory-based seaweed physiology measurements. We show not only how seaweeds have expanded in the past four decades, but also how a warming ocean (due to climate variability) and nutrient enrichment (due mainly to human activities) controlled such expansions. Among 63 large marine ecosystems (LMEs) in the world, the East China Sea (where seaweeds expanded) is one of the three LMEs that experienced super-fast warming. Given the IPCC-projected seawater temperature rise of 1.6 o C by 2050, will these seaweeds continue to expand?Speaker

Bio(s): Lin Qi received her PhD degree in remote sensing and GIS in 2015 from the Chinese Academy of Sciences. She worked as a post-doctorate scholar between 2015 and 2018 at the University of Massachusetts Boston (USA) and Xiamen University (China). Between 2019 and 2021 she was associate professor in marine science at the Sun Yat-sen University (China). She is currently a research scientist working in the Ocean Color Team at NOAA STAR. Her main research interests are optical characterization, remote sensing, and understanding of floating algae and other floating matters in global oceans and lakes. These include Ulva, Sargassum, Noctiluca, Trichodesmium, Microcystis, other dinoflagellates and diatoms, as well as brine shrimp cysts, sea snots, and marine litter.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: slides can be found at this link: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php. For more information visit: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: What explains the population of daytime, optically-thin clouds below one km in the marine trade wind region?
Presenter(s): Paquita Zuidema, University of Miami
Date & Time: 23 August 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: What explains the population of daytime, optically-thin clouds below one km in the marine trade wind region?
NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Paquita Zuidema, University of Miami

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory.

Seminar Contact(s): jan.kazil@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/919228437111554654

Abstract: The cloud fraction of shallow non-precipitating cumulus residing at the lifting condensation level (LCL) increases in the afternoon, most evident in airborne lidar observations from EUREC4A. This cannot be easily explained by afternoon increases in the ocean sea surface temperature. Observations from the German aircraft HALO platform and from the R/V Ronald H. Brown are used to search for an explanation. Three hypotheses are investigated: 1) afternoon increases of the ocean sea surface temperature help support buoyancy fluxes that lift air parcels to saturation, as seen in tropical regions under low wind speeds; 2) shortwave absorption of the sub-cloud layer helps deepen the sub-cloud layer, so that its mixed-layer height can reach the LCL; 3) clouds form where the sub-cloud layer is already moist, and shortwave absorption further stratifies the lower one km during the afternoon, so that the clouds only remain while forced from above. Analysis to date suggests #3 is the closest to the correct explanation. If so, then the next question is to identify why the daytime cloud layer is more or less moist in some places, and how this relates to moisture redistribution from shallow circulations, or, moisture transport occurring at larger scales. We do not yet have all the answers to the questions we are raising, so expect the presentation to foster more discussion as opposed to a summary of firm findings.

Bio(s): Dr. Paquita Zuidema is a Professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. She received her BS from the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana, and her PhD from the University of Colorado in Boulder. Dr. Zuidema then joined NOAA as a National Research Council postdoctoral fellow, and later as a CIRES scientist in the then Environmental Technology Laboratory, now the Physical Sciences Laboratory. Dr. Zuidema's research focuses on the relationship of warm, shallow clouds to the large-scale environment, with an emphasis on the connection to radiation. She is now the chair of the Atmospheric Sciences Department at the University of Miami.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2023,contingent on speaker approval.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

22 August 2023

Title: August U.S. Southwest Drought Briefing
Presenter(s): Erin Saffell, Arizona State Climate Office and Shana Tighi, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Date & Time: 22 August 2023
3:00 pm - 3:35 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: August U.S. Southwest Drought Briefing

Presenter(s):
Current Climate Conditions and Outlook: Erin Saffell | Arizona State Climate Office

Current Conditions and Projected Operations in the Lower Colorado River Basin: Shana Tighi | Bureau of Reclamation

Seminar Contact(s): Gretel Follingstad (gretel.follingstad@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/9043638602756149334

Abstract: Short-term drought in the Southwest has improved greatly in the last year, but a lackluster summer monsoon and extreme heat has the region drying out again. However, the next couple weeks look relatively wet. This webinar will look at current and forecasted drought conditions for Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, and Utah. Following the conditions update, Shana Tighi with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation will provide an update on current conditions and projected operations in the Lower Colorado River Basin.

Recordings: Webinar summaries and recordings will be posted on Drought.gov: https://www.drought.gov/webinars?page=1&dews=Intermountain%20West

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: Wildfire and Invasive Plants in Alaska’s Boreal Forest
Presenter(s): Katie Spellman, Christa Mulder, and Taylor Seitz; University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 22 August 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Wildfire and Invasive Plants in Alaska's Boreal Forest


Presenter(s): Katie Spellman, Christa Mulder, and Taylor Seitz (University of Alaska Fairbanks)

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/wildfire-invasive-plants/

Abstract: A warmer climate, increased human disturbance and transport, increased propagule pressure from growing non-native plant populations, and increased areas disturbed by wildfire have created a perfect storm of conditions for the spread of non-native plant species into Alaska's boreal forest. Previous studies have primarily concentrated on short-term relationship (less than 5 years) between wildfires and non-native species, leaving a significant gap in our understanding of long-term implications. This presentation will highlight the current status of in non-native plant invasions in burned areas of Alaska's boreal forest region and ongoing research efforts studying long-term trends. We will also provide an overview of what factors influence the vulnerability of boreal forests to non-native plant invasions along with how non-native plants are reaching affected habitat.

Bio(s): Katie Villano Spellman is a Research Assistant Professor with the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Katie specializes in plant ecology, non-native plant invasion, global change biology, and social-ecological systems. She teaches courses on invasive plants, climate change, ecological resilience, and interdisciplinary research methods. Committed to science education, Katie actively engages in community projects where she fosters public participation in scientific research. Her work aims to promote environmental awareness and influence education and outreach program design for better outcomes.

Christa Mulder is a plant ecologist and professor of ecology with the Institute of Arctic Biology and Department of Biology and Wildlife at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Christa works at the intersection of population, community, and ecosystem ecology. Her research involves direct and indirect interactions between several species, and between those species and their physical environment. Through field and greenhouse experiments and citizen science projects, she engages with the public and collaborates with non-scientists fostering environmental awareness and inclusive science initiatives.

Taylor Seitz is an ecologist with the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Taylor currently focuses her research on the relationship between non-native plant invasions and wildfires in Alaska's boreal forest region. She has previously worked as a microbial ecologist studying soil microbes in Fairbanks, AK and science communicator in Washington, DC.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

Title: 1. Remote sensing of anthropogenic debris in stream channels 2. Arctic Feedbacks on Trace Gas Compositions
Presenter(s): 1. Elena Aguilar, NOAA CESSRST-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, San Diego State University; 2. Francia Tenorio, NOAA CESSRST-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, San Diego State University
Date & Time: 22 August 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Titles: 1. "Remote sensing of anthropogenic debris in stream channels"

2. "Arctic Feedbacks on Trace Gas Compositions"

Presenter(s): 1. Elena Aguilar, NOAA CESSRST-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, San Diego State University

2. Francia Tenorio, NOAA CESSRST-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, San Diego State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science Centers

Seminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/ead-ypxo-gvb

Phone Number
(US)+1 470-241-4689
PIN: 445 547 848#

Abstracts: 1. Inadequate management of anthropogenic waste is a challenge for coastal waters in the US-Mexico border region. Managing waste requires detecting and monitoring locations where uncontrolled disposal and debris accumulation occurs at high rates. Watershed-scale remote sensing can aid the understanding of the distribution, pools, and fluxes of plastic materials in pluvial systems. The Los Laureles Canyon watershed (LLCW), located in Tijuana, Mexico, is a large source of plastic pollution for the Tijuana River Estuary in Imperial Beach, California. Through a combination of field, laboratory, and remote sensing methods, we identified surficial plastic materials and waste hotspots in LLCW and 6 visually assessed the utility of spectral mixture models and WorldView-3 (WV3) shortwave infrared (SWIR) broadband imagery for plastic mapping. Field trash surveys conducted in LLCW reveal channel reaches have large scale waste patches (4-10m) as a result of dumping. Laboratory reflectance spectroscopy was used to characterize the diversity of plastic reflectance and assess spectral signatures to inform multispectral image analysis. Samples processed to date show plastics have consistent absorptions at about 1210 nm, 1410 nm, 1660-1730nm, and 2100-2300nm wavelengths, depending on the polymer type. When convolved to the spectral response function of the WV3 sensor, mean plastic reflectance retains prominent features between 1660-1730 nm and above 2200 nm wavelengths, similar to an image endmember observed through principal components analysis of LLCW imagery. A spectral mixture model uses the matched filtering algorithm and selected image endmember to map built-environment plastic infrastructure and waste hotspots in areas explored during field visits.

2. Polar ecosystems are warming faster than any other region on Earth (IPCC 2022), posing many implications for tundra landscapes. The accelerated warming in the Arctic influences the rate and movement of nutrients in the soil and water, plant growth, microbial decomposition, and thawing of the permafrost processes that occur across the landscape. This can release greenhouse gases (GHG) into the atmosphere. Since permafrost regions hold over half of all the estimated organic carbon stored in Earth's soils and 40-60 Pg of nitrogen, it is essential to understand changes across the Arctic landscape and how this influences climate dynamics locally and globally. Thermokarst formations, which typically occur during the thawing of the permafrost, may be sources of emissions in tundra landscapes and a reflection of rapid climate change. Microtopographic features, particularly bare soils, may be a hotspot for GHGs. The webinar will present a mapping effort of such features via remote sensing techniques in a tundra ecosystem near Utqiavik, Alaska, emphasizing the monitoring GHGs from such features.

Bio(s): 1. My name is Elena Aguilar, and I am a NOAA EPP/MSI Earth System Science and Remote Sensing Scholar in Center for Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Technologies II (CESSRST-II), pursuing M.S. degree in Geography at San Diego State University with a concentration in Watershed Science. I was a Cohort 5 Master's Student in CESSRST I during my NERTO. My central research focuses on mapping plastics, from waste hotspots to building infrastructure, in an urban watershed on the coastal US-Mexico border using reflectance spectroscopy and WorldView-3 SWIR data. This research helps NOAA meet its mission of protecting and managing coastal resources and ecosystems by understanding the dynamics of urban land cover and can also inform work performed in its Marine Debris Program.

2. My name is Francia Tenorio, and I am a NOAA EPP/MSI Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Scholar, Cohort 1 of CESSRST-II. I started my Master's as a CESSRST-I fellow in Cohort 5, continuing into CESSRST-II in Cohort 1. The main focus of my research revolves around monitoring the impacts of climate change in the Arctic " specifically in Utqiavik, Alaska " by measuring greenhouse gases using field techniques and remote sensing to quantify landscape change on permafrost soils. I am passionate about preserving ecosystems, climate adaptation, and working across disciplines for positive change. This research aligns with NOAA's mission to understand and predict changes in climate, weather, and coasts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Numerical modeling of swash and beach groundwater dynamics
Presenter(s): Marie-Pierre Delisle, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole MA
Date & Time: 22 August 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Numerical modeling of swash and beach groundwater dynamics

Presenter(s): Marie-Pierre Delisle, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole MA

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coastal Ocean Modeling Seminars: https://coastaloceanmodels.noaa.gov/seminar/

Seminar Contact(s): Alexander.Kurapov@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: Connect with Google Meet meet.google.com/kti-ktaw-nes,
Phone Numbers (US)+1414-856-5982 PIN: 248 179#

Abstract: Coastal flooding is a growing socioeconomic and humanitarian hazard. Sea level rise will raise beach groundwater levels, potentially inundating low-lying areas from groundwater exposure while simultaneously propagating swash impacts onto higher beach and backshore elevations. Generally, coastal flood modeling efforts characterize only surface flows, neglecting swash zone processes such as infiltration and porous media flow. Swash zone processes are multi-phase, shallow, and transient, presenting numerous modeling and observational challenges. A novel numerical model, SedOlaFlow, was developed by integrating the free-surface resolving Reynolds-averaged Eulerian two-phase sediment transport model, SedWaveFoam, with the surface wave solver, olaFlow, in the OpenFOAM framework. This tightly-coupled, surface-subsurface model enables the direct investigation of interactions between swash surface and subsurface flows. The bi-directional swash-beach groundwater relationship plays a significant role in wave runup extent and timing and has significant implications for coastal vulnerability.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Future Water Availability and Streamflow Characteristics in the Southeast
Presenter(s): Chris Fuhrmann, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill, National Weather Service Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia; David Zierden, Florida State University; Jacob LaFontaine, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center
Date & Time: 22 August 2023
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Flash Drought in the Southeast

Presenter(s):

Climate Overview: Chris Fuhrmann | Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill | NOAA/National Weather Service Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox | University of Georgia and David Zierden | Florida State University
Future Water Availability and Streamflow Characteristics in the Southeastern U.S.: Jacob LaFontaine | USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth (meredith.f.muth@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/6846806667689526028

Abstract:
The Southeast Climate monthly webinar series is held on the 4th Tuesday of each month at 10:00 am ET. This series is hosted by the Southeast Regional Climate Center (SERCC), the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), and the NOAA National Weather Service. These webinars provide the region with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods, and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as agriculture production, water resources, wildfires and ecosystems.

The August 22 webinar will feature a special presentation on "Future water availability and streamflow characteristics in the Southeastern U.S.

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: Exploring the Value of Great Lakes Blue Carbon
Presenter(s): Karen Yoshida Weldon, Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research
Date & Time: 22 August 2023
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Exploring the Value of Great Lakes Blue Carbon NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Karen Yoshida Weldon, Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research

Sponsor(s): National Ocean Service and NOAA Central LibrarySeminar Contacts: library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5384778365709096537

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: Policymakers, coastal managers and private enterprises are increasingly turning their attention to nature-based climate solutions such as blue carbon. However, research on freshwater blue carbon is still in its infancy, and little work has examined this ecosystem service in the Great Lakes basin. This summer, initial research exploring how Great Lakes coastal wetlands contribute to the economy through carbon storage and sequestration was conducted at the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR). This webinar discusses some of the challenges with defining, measuring, and valuing this key ecosystem service.Keywords: blue carbon, Great Lakes, ecosystem services valuation

Bio(s): Karen Yoshida Weldon is a Great Lakes Summer Fellow at the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research. Karen graduated from the University of Michigan in April with an M.S. in Environment and Sustainability and an M.A. in International and Regional Studies.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

21 August 2023

Title: VIIRS Studies of Natural Gas Flaring
Presenter(s): Chris Elvidge, Earth Observation Group, Payne Institute for Public Policy, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401
Date & Time: 21 August 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: VIIRS Studies of Natural Gas Flaring

Presenter(s): Chris Elvidge, Earth Observation Group, Payne Institute for Public
Policy, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401

Sponsor(s): NOAA JPSS Program

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access:
Meeting ID
meet.google.com/wmc-watp-oas
Phone Numbers
(US)
+1 607-444-2199
PIN: 618 281 248#

Abstract:
Natural gas flaring is a widely used practice to dispose of methane and other combustibles at sites that lack infrastructure to move the gas to markets or use onsite. Flares burn in the range of 1400 to 2000 K, about twice as hot as biomass burning. EOG identifies flares within VIIRS nightfire (VNF) based on their temperature and persistence. The VIIRS shortwave infrared band data collected at night are particularly valuable for detecting and analyzing flares since the peak in radiant emissions from flares falls near the M10 bandpass. When flares are detected in multiple spectral bands VNF calculates temperature, source area and radiant heat using physical laws. Each year EOG finds about 10,000 flares in production areas (upstream) and about 1000 at refineries and other industrial sites (downstream). EOG estimates flared gas volumes for individual flares based on a calibration using radiant heat as input. From there
EOG estimates annual flared gas volumes for individual countries through time. Global flared gas volumes have remained largely steady since 2012 " near 140 billion cubic meters per year.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available upon Request


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

18 August 2023

Title: August NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 18 August 2023
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: August NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing


Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy

Sponsor(s): NOAA/OAR/Climate Program Office and the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar Contacts: Alison Hayden (abhayden@alaska.edu) & Genie Bey (genie.bey@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/august-2023-climate-briefing/

Abstract: We will review recent and current climate conditions around Alaska, discuss some forecasting tools, and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for September 2023 and the fall season. Join the gathering online to learn what's happened and what may be in store with Alaska's seasonal climate.

Bio(s): Rick Thoman is the Alaska Climate Specialist with ACCAP and has many years of experience producing reliable Alaska climate change information and graphics describing Alaska's changing environment. His work spans the bridge between climate modeling, Alaska communities, and the media.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

17 August 2023

Title: Oil Chemistry and Properties for Spill Response
Presenter(s): Dalina Thrift-Viveros, Office of Response & Restoration, Emergency Response Division
Date & Time: 17 August 2023
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Oil Chemistry and Properties - You Don't Know What You Don't Know Lecture Series

Presenter(s): Dalina Thrift-Viveros - Office of Response & Restoration, Emergency Response Division

Sponsor(s): Office of Response & Restoration - You Don't Know What You Don't Know Lecture Series

Seminar Contact(s): youdontknowwhatyoudontknow@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: noaaorr.adobeconnect.com/orrlectureseries/

Accessibility: Closed Captioning provided

Abstract: The YDKWYDK lecture series brings speakers from the world of oil and hazmat response to talk about their work or research. This month's episode is the second of a three part OR&R 101 series, where we bring in speakers from NOAA's own Office of Response & Restoration. In this episode we will hear from Dalina Thrift-Viveros of the Emergency Response Division, where she will speak about oil chemistry and properties, and how they impact the behavior of oil in the environment.

Bio(s): Dalina Thrift-Viveros serves as the Chemistry Team Lead for NOAA's Emergency Response Division (ERD), coordinating chemistry hazard assessment support for the US Coast Guard in the event of an oil or chemical spill. She has been working with ERD since 2011, and also serves as a chemistry subject matter expert on a variety of ERD-produced response software projects including ALOHA, CAMEO Chemicals, ADIOS, and CAFE. Originally from Long Beach, California, Dalina graduated from Caltech in 2007 with a bachelor's degree in chemistry, and then moved to Seattle for graduate school at the University of Washington, where she earned a master's degree in inorganic chemistry in 2010. After graduate school, Dalina taught introductory chemistry for two years at South Seattle Community College.

Recordings: This presentation will be recorded and shared with listeners prior to next month's presentation. If you are not on the email list, please reach out to us via the contact email above for access to the recordings.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Peter Boulay, Minnesota State Climate Office
Date & Time: 17 August 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook

Presenter(s): Peter Boulay, Minnesota State Climate Office

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/98150532442280278

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

August 2023 topics include increases/decreases in drought coverage and impacts both short and long term; major river system updates and longer term concerns (Mississippi); recent major climate/weather events and their impacts, various conditions (precipitation, temperatures, soil moisture, streamflow, reservoirs); seasonal growing concerns, temperature, precipitation, and drought outlooks for the next few weeks, months and seasons; and continued coverage of the evolving El Nio and what it may mean.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: 2023 Knauss Legislative Fellows
Presenter(s): Jeffrey Beauvais, Knauss Legislative Fellow, Rep. Garamendi (D-CA 8); and Zoe Wong, Knauss Legislative Fellow, Senator Whitehouse (RI)
Date & Time: 17 August 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: 1. Perspectives from the Hill: House of Representatives2. Aquaculture in the Senate: A Knauss Fellows Path from sustainability research to legislation2023 Knauss Fellows' Lunch & Learn Series

Presenter(s): Jeffrey Beauvais, Knauss Legislative Fellow, Rep. Garamendi (D-CA 8); and Zoe Wong, Knauss Legislative Fellow, Senator Whitehouse (RI)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)Seminar Contacts: Library Seminars

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/920650106285962080

Abstract: Join us for two presentations from 2023 Knauss Legislative Fellows! Introductions by Kaitlyn Theberge, 2023 Knauss Seafood Resources Fellow.
Keywords: Knauss, legislative fellows, Congress

Bio(s): Jeff is a Knauss Legislative Fellow working in the office of Congressman John Garamnedi, who represents parts of Contra Costa and Solano counties in the northeast most part of the San Francisco Bay Area. Jeff has a PhD from the University of Georgia in Integrative Conservation and Ecology, where he studied the environmental justice dimensions of marsh access, real estate development, and tourism along the South Carolina coast.Zoe is a Knauss Legislative Fellow working in the office of Senator Whitehouse of Rhode Island. Zoe earned her Masters degree in coastal environmental management from Duke University and previously worked as an environmental educator in Hawaii and a marine mammal research assistant in Maine.

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Student Experiences Three-Minute Thesis Special Edition: Gulf of Mexico Forum Webinar
Presenter(s): Carolyn Emerson, National Weather Service Student Volunteer Internship Program - Tampa Bay Area, FL; Anna Walker, National Weather Service Student Volunteer Internship Program - Tampa Bay Area, FL; Will Lyons, Florida Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of Education; Natalie Lord, New Hampshire Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA Ocean Acidification Program; Danielle Recco - William M. Lapenta Intern with the National Centers for Environmental Information; Abel Aragon - NOAA Pathways Program, Physical Science Student Trainee, National Centers for Environmental Information and NOAA Uncrewed Systems; Amadeus Hill - Department of State's Virtual Student Federal Service Internship Program, NOAA Disaster Preparedness Program; Matt Sheffield - Sea Grant Law Center Summer Legal Research Associate; Alyssa Outhwaite - NOAA Experiential Research and Training Opportunities Graduate Intern; Jennifer Clifton - Explorer-in-Training Program, NOAA Ocean Exploration
Date & Time: 17 August 2023
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Student Experiences Three-Minute Thesis Special Edition
NOAA Gulf of Mexico Forum Webinar Series


Presenter(s): Carolyn Emerson, National Weather Service Student Volunteer Internship Program - Tampa Bay Area, FL; Anna Walker, National Weather Service Student Volunteer Internship Program - Tampa Bay Area, FL; Will Lyons, Florida Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of Education; Natalie Lord, New Hampshire Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA Ocean Acidification Program; Danielle Recco - William M. Lapenta Intern with the National Centers for Environmental Information; Abel Aragon - NOAA Pathways Program, Physical Science Student Trainee, National Centers for Environmental Information and NOAA Uncrewed Systems; Amadeus Hill - Department of State's Virtual Student Federal Service Internship Program, NOAA Disaster Preparedness Program; Matt Sheffield - Sea Grant Law Center Summer Legal Research Associate; Alyssa Outhwaite - NOAA Experiential Research and Training Opportunities Graduate Intern; Jennifer Clifton - Explorer-in-Training Program, NOAA Ocean Exploration

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaboration Team, a part of NOAA's Regional Collaboration Network

Seminar Contact(s): Kristen Laursen, Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov , NOAA Fisheries and Regional Collaboration NetworkLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Please Register at:https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4677597775208121433

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For your awareness, this webinar will be recorded and shared.

Abstract: The NOAA Gulf of Mexico Forum Webinar Series is thrilled to feature Students, Interns, and Fellows sharing their experiences with NOAA and NOAA-related programs! Each will present a three-minute thesis-style talk about their experiences, project, or research.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Please contact Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov for the recording and/or PDF.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

16 August 2023

Title: Diversity and Biopharmaceutical Assessments of Deep-Sea, Mineral-Rich Biomes off Southern California
Presenter(s): Lisa Levin, Distinguished Professor Emerita at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego; and Paul Jensen, Professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego
Date & Time: 16 August 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Diversity and Biopharmaceutical Assessments of Deep-Sea, Mineral-Rich Biomes off Southern CaliforniaNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Lisa Levin, Distinguished Professor Emerita, Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego; Paul Jensen, Professor, Center for Marion Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and NOAA Central LibrarySeminar Contacts: library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4163542004561163608

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: The Southern California Borderland (SCB) hosts deepwater mineral deposits that are in high demand. These deposits provide habitat for diverse, poorly characterized invertebrate and microbial communities. With rising demand for deepwater mineral resources, there is a need to acquire baseline biodiversity measurements to establish tradeoffs associated with their exploitation. We will discuss efforts to assess the potential of benthic marine communities associated with mineral-rich, deep-sea sites in the SCB. Our analyses demonstrate unique patterns of biodiversity and provide linkages between biodiversity and biopharmaceutical potential.Keywords: deep-sea, biodiversity, mineral deposits

Bio(s): Lisa A. Levin is a Distinguished Professor Emerita of Biological Oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego. Her current research interests include biodiversity of continental margin ecosystems and the effects of climate change and human impacts on the deep ocean. She works to bring deep-sea science to policy through her work with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative, and the Deep Ocean Observing Strategy.Paul Jensen is a Professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego. His research interests lie at the interface of marine microbiology and natural products chemistry. His lab addresses fundamental questions such as what marine microbes produce natural products, where they live, why they make them, and how to exploit them for useful purposes including drug discovery.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

15 August 2023

Title: 1. Examining the role three fishery-independent programs play in the fisheries management of reef community species in the northern Gulf of Mexico 2. Tornado Outbreak 2021: Social Influences within Emergency Management
Presenter(s): 1. Jacob Gonzalez's, NOAA CCME-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley; 2. Doreen Young, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, Howard University
Date & Time: 15 August 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Google Meet
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Titles: 1. "Examining the role three fishery-independent programs play in the fisheries management of reef community species in the northern Gulf of Mexico"

2. "Tornado Outbreak 2021: Social Influences within Emergency Management"

Presenter(s): 1. Jacob Gonzalez, NOAA CCME-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

2. Doreen Young, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, Howard University

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science CentersSeminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/nmj-mjdy-evz

Phone Number
(US)+1 267-820-8554
PIN: 634 837 010#

Abstracts: 1. The Southeast Fisheries Science Center at the Pascagoula Mississippi branch is responsible for conducting surveys aimed at measuring the abundance of fish species within the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and Atlantic Ocean of the United States of America. Research surveys conducted include summer and fall ground fish, plankton, reef fish, and long line surveys. Each survey targets various fishes within different ecosystems to better assess the health of the GOM and Atlantic Ocean. For this research, data from three different surveys (Reef Fish, Plankton, and Groundfish) were provided for Balistes capriscus from 1986 to 2021. The Reef Fish survey deploys video recorders to assess the seafloor habitat and quantify the fish species that appear within the feed, the Plankton survey captures smaller species closer to the surface using Neuston nets, and Groundfish survey utilize trawls to capture fish species at the ocean floor. These data were used to create maps within the GOM to visualize the distribution and occurrence of b. capriscus, providing a better understanding of overall species distribution, a needed metric for resource (i.e., fisheries) management. Groundfish data demonstrated higher frequencies of sites containing b. capriscus in the fall vs summer. 85.9% of all sites documented in the Reef Fish survey did not have b. capriscus present. The Fall Plankton survey also contained a low number of sites that had b. capiscus present with those that did appearing mainly between the 50 m and 1000 m isobaths. A reason for the lack of sightings could be due to the preferred habitat of b. capriscus.

2. Emergency management plays a vital role in protecting human life and property. Several levels of support and assistance are available before, during, and after a national threat or natural disaster. Disaster management prioritizes recovery and preparedness for individuals and communities. According to the FEMA Emergency Management Institution, emergency managers are committed to preventing and responding to disasters, ensuring that they update their recovery efforts to meet the needs of the public and government. Previous literature argues that emergency management is vital in critical decision-making, especially during severe threats and uncertainty. Muntz and Hoekstra (2015) argue that decision-making and action are, in fact, a topic in social science literature, despite a concrete model or theory that highlights the process. They conducted twenty-five in-depth interviews, a focus group, and a newspaper analysis in New Jersey and New York to help answer how emergency managers and politicians made decisions during Superstorm Sandy (2012). Their literature reveals a scientific model of emergency management decision-making under uncertainty using a known theory of public response to hazards and a model of situational awareness as foundations. Building on Montz & Hoekstra (2015) literature, this research contributes to social science literature on severe weather events and emergency response. The research argues that funding, actions of nearby municipalities, social media, interpersonal relationships, intrapersonal relationships, and family should be included in a grounded scientific model of emergency management decision-making. The subsequent research questions are: Q1) To what degree do emergency managers utilize informal relationships during severe weather events? Q2) What factors do emergency managers prioritize during uncertain times?

Bio(s): 1. Jacob Adam Gonzalez received hisB.S. in Marine Biology from the University of Texas Rio GrandeValley (UTRGV). During his time as an undergraduate student, heparticipated in field research assisting in the lab of Dr. CarlosCintra Buenrostro as a volunteer, primarily helping graduate studentsin field and lab endeavors. During Jacob's time there, he found aninterest in habitat restoration and species diversity fostering Jacob'scuriosity and interests for marine resources. He is now a NOAA Center for Coastaland Marine Ecosystems-II Graduate Scholar at UTRGV, pursuing a M.S. degreein Ocean, Coastal and Earth Sciences. For his graduate research, Jacob isstudying population shifts in Engraulidae (i.e., anchovies) inrelation to increasing temperatures along the Texas coast. He is also seeking acareer in fisheries management and reef ecosystems.

2. Doreen Young is a NCAS-M II Cohort 1 fellow earning a master's degree in the Department of Sociology at Howard University. She is interested in the NOAA Science and Technology focus area Citizen Science in support of the NCAS-M II research theme: Interdisciplinary scientific research for building resilient communities against weather extremes. Her research falls under the NCAS-M II research pathway: Interdisciplinary integrated social and physical sciences for public safety and emergency management applications. Ms. Young's recent NOAA mission-aligned research experience involved completing a NERTO titled: Tornado Outbreak 2021: Social Influences within Emergency Management. Her NOAA mentor was Dr. Kim Klockow McClain at NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) in Norman, Oklahoma.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: 1. The Economic Impact of Large Wildfires in California 2. Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Characteristics from In-Situ
Presenter(s): 1. David Dongo, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and PhD candidate, Howard University; 2. Christopher Chuck' Baker, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and PhD student, University of Maryland, College Park.
Date & Time: 15 August 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Titles: 1. "The Economic Impact of Large Wildfires in California"

2. "Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Characteristics from In-Situ"

Presenter(s): 1. David Dongo, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and PhD candidate, Howard University

2. Christopher Chuck' Baker, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and PhD student, University of Maryland, College Park

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science CentersSeminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/hti-cirz-uts

Phone Number
(US)+1 774-419-5300
PIN: 142 506 774#

Abstracts: 1. This research analyses the economic impact of large wildfires across fifty-eight counties in the state of California, during the period 2009/2019. We use three labor market outcomes including, real GDP (inflation-adjusted), employment levels and wages and salaries of local workers, from county-level demographic data from the US Census Bureau, Bureau of Labor Statistics, California Department of Insurance and wildfire statistics from the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. Using a fixed- effects regression model, our first pooled OLS log-linear equation with county fixed effects uses real GDP as the key independent variable, and the results indicated that the number of acres burned, dollar damages, and number of fire outbreaks were negative and significant at 1 percent level. We further find that more fire breaks and the number of acres burned bolstered employment levels at 1 percent significance levels. Lastly, we find that more acres burned, number of fire outbreaks, and dollar damages negatively impacted wages and salaries of workers at 1 percent level of significance. These results validate our hypothesis that there is an association between the number of acres burned, number of fire outbreaks, dollar damages, and labor market outcomes in the State of California.

2. This project explores the application of an algorithmic technique for accurate and
continuous estimations of planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from wind radar profiler wind signal backscatter data. These profilers provide high time resolution, vertically stacked measurements of wind speed and wind direction from the surface to approximately 4 km above ground level (AGL). Virtual temperature is derived from a radio acoustic sounding system (RASS) positioned in proximity to the profiler, gathering data from the lowermost layer of the Earth's atmosphere up to around 1,500 meters above ground level (AGL). The algorithm successfully predicted the height of boundary layers when data retrieval was high. It also had promising results when data retrieval was low using elimination of outliers and homogeneity adjustment techniques. Accurate prediction of the PBL will allow for better analysis of local air quality variations and model forecasting ability.

Bio(s): 1. David Dongo is a NCAS-M II Cohort I fellow earning a PhD in Economics at Howard University in the fall of 2023. He is interested in modeling the effect of extreme weather events on households. His research on the economic impact of large wildfires on local economies uses social science models to establish the nexus between extreme weather and local economies. His research aligns with the NCAS-M II theme of interdisciplinary scientific research for building resilient communities against weather extremes. His research falls under the NCAS-M II research pathway: Process-level understanding and enhanced data assimilation/analysis and modeling capacities. His research builds on his NERTO work completed in July 2021 under the mentorship of Dr. Rajendra Poudel, Lead Economist in NOAA, and Dr. Haydar Kurban, Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Howard University.

2. Chuck Baker is a NCAS-M II Cohort 1 fellow earning a PhD in the Department of
Atmospheric Science at University of Maryland, College Park. He is interested in the
NOAA Science and Technology focus area Data in support of the NCAS-M II research theme: Interdisciplinary scientific research for building resilient communities against weather extremes. His research falls under the NCAS-M II research pathway: Improved quantification of forecast skills for weather, water, air-pollution, and climate events. Mr. Baker's NOAA mission-aligned recent research experience involved completing a NERTO titled: Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Characteristics from In-Situ Measurements. His NOAA Mentor was Dr. Xinrong Ren at NOAA OAR/Air Resources Laboratory (ARL), Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Division in College Park, Maryland.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

11 August 2023

Title: NOAA One Health: Three Minute Thesis Webinar on Air Quality
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 11 August 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA One Health Pre-Summit Webinar --Three Minute Thesis Webinar on Air Quality
NOAA One Health Pre-Summit Webinar Series

Presenter(s): TBD

Sponsor(s): NOAA One Health and NOAA's Regional Collaboration Network

Seminar Contact(s): bethany.perry@noaa.govLocation: Webinar


Remote Access: Please Register at:https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3714447577605350752
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For your awareness, this webinar will be recorded and shared.

Accessibility: Please email aja.szumylo@noaa.gov if you need special accommodations to attend.

Abstract: The NOAA Regional Collaboration Network invites you to join us from 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. ET on Friday, August 11, for a special webinar designed to share experiences and information about NOAA's role related to air quality. From forecasting, to scented products, to volcanic ash, you will have the chance to hear straight from the experts on a wide array of topics! In addition, presenters will address questions from the audience. This is the final webinar in a series NOAA is hosting in preparation for the NOAA One Health Summit (August 15-16 in Washington DC). The full series to highlights specific health work being done in each of eight NOAA regions.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recordings or other materials will be available after the seminar.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

10 August 2023

Title: NOAA CoastWatch: River WQ for Recreation, Meso Eddies & Reefs
Presenter(s): Joy Chakrabartty, GEO Blue Planet; Heather Roman-Stork, GST
Date & Time: 10 August 2023
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title 1: Measuring the Value of Water Quality Improvements for Recreational Use on an Urban River in the USA: A Travel Cost Contingent Behavior Approach

Presenter 1: Joy Chakrabartty, Knauss Fellow - GEO Blue Planet

Abstract 1: We estimate the value of water quality improvements for recreational activities on and near the Brandywine Creek in Delaware. We divide water-based recreational activities into two groups: water-contact and non-water-contact and consider the behavioral change of the recreationists in each group when faced with different water quality improvements to estimate welfare increase in monetary terms.

Title 2: Mesoscale Eddies Inform Mesophotic Reef Health

Presenter 2: Heather Roman-Stork, GST

Abstract 2: The Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) is a high latitude, mesophotic reef (16-140 m) located on the shelf-edge in the Gulf of Mexico. We use a combination of mesoscale eddy tracking and Argo data to analyze the eddy field in the FGBNMS compared to the overall Gulf of Mexico and determine climatological characteristics of eddies that pass over and around the reef.

Sponsor(s): NOAA CoastWatch (STAR)

Seminar Contact(s): Victoria.Wegman@noaa.gov
Slides, Recordings Other Materials: available 24-48 hours following the seminar at this link:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: Postponed (TBD): #The_fish_was_HOW_big_really?: Overcoming biases and applying unconventional data sources to support coral reef fishery management
Presenter(s): Tim Grabowski, USGS
Date & Time: 10 August 2023
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:



Title: #The_fish_was_HOW_big_really?: Overcoming biases and applying unconventional data sources to support coral reef fishery management

Presenter(s): Tim Grabowski, U.S. Geological Survey Hawai'i Cooperative Fishery Research Unit

Sponsor(s): NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.donovan@noaa.govLocation: Webinar


Remote Access:
Adobe Connect
1. To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/
2. Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio.

Abstract:
Managing coral reef fisheries is a daunting challenge to say the least. While taken as a whole, coral reef fisheries are large and critically important to the food security and economic well-being of the people dependent upon them, the sobering reality is that catch and effort is distributed amongst dozens, if not hundreds, of species stretching the capacity and resources of management agencies to adequately characterize and monitor these fisheries and their impacts on sensitive reef habitats. While community partnerships show tremendous promise in co-producing both knowledge and management decisions, building these relationships and data collection processes is a slow process limiting the ability of managers to respond proactively to changing social, economic, and ecological conditions. Unconventional data sources, particularly social media platforms and citizen science, offer a potential treasure of timely fisheries-dependent and independent data available at a range of spatial scales that can be gathered with minimal resources. However, understanding the biases inherent with these data and identifying appropriate ways to analyze the data to account for these biases remains a major impediment to their application to management questions. I will present three case studies from the Hawaiian Islands demonstrating how publicly available, unconventional data sources, such as social media platforms and citizen science, have the potential to inform and help support management decisions. I will discuss how catch pictures captured on a photo sharing social media platform, i.e., Instagram, expanded our knowledge of an understudied noncommercial razorfish Iniistius spp. fishery in Hawai'i, including validation of the reliability of the data collected from such photos. I also will show how similar pictures were used to characterize changes in the Hawaiian nearshore noncommercial fishery associated with the impacts of and responses to the global COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, I will present initial results of models constructed from citizen science data to inform adaptive management of Achilles Tang (Pku'iku'i) Acanthurus achilles on the leeward side of Hawai'i Island and demonstrate how these valuable data can be integrated with more conventional monitoring data.
NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

9 August 2023

Title: 1. Mapping and monitoring turbidity in estuaries using remote sensing and in-situ measurements 2.Uncertainties in the retrieval of remote sensing reflectance from OC satellite observations
Presenter(s): 1. Stephany Garcia, NOAA CESSRST Graduate Scholar and MS student, San Diego State University; 2. Eder Herrera Estrella, NOAA CESSRST-II Graduate Scholar and PhD student, City University of New York
Date & Time: 9 August 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Google Meet
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Titles: 1. "Mapping and monitoring turbidity in estuaries using remote sensing andin-situ measurements"

2. "Uncertainties in the retrieval of remote sensing reflectance from OC satellite observations"

Presenter(s): 1. Stephany Garcia, NOAA CESSRST Graduate Scholar and MS student, San Diego State University

2. Eder Herrera Estrella, NOAA CESSRST-II Graduate Scholar and PhD student, City University of New York

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science CentersSeminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/xjr-zfee-aet

Phone Number
(US)+1 219-321-0478
PIN: 651 945 406#

Abstracts: 1. Satellite imagery of Southern California's Tijuana River Outlet shows frequent turbid water plumes extending out into coastal water after storms and cross border flow events (Ayad et al., 2020). Turbid water has high concentrations of organic and inorganic materials that can carry harmful bacteria and pathogens (Warrick et al., 2012). In fresh and saline water systems, such as estuaries, water reflectance can reveal information about the biological productivity at different trophic states, benthic environment suppression, nutrient cycling, and the overall habitat quality for water-dependent organisms (Barbier et al., 2011; Topp et al., 2020). However, reflectance-based turbidity mapping is complicated by atmospheric conditions, clouds, and the reflectance of bottom materials in shallow water. Understanding the timing, frequency, and duration of turbid water events is often site-specific, because of regional climate, varying anthropogenic pressures, sediment loading rates, and geology (Elliott & McLusky, 2002). For my NERTO, a shallow water turbidity algorithm was used to identify turbidity hotspots in the tidal inland channels of TRNERR using the Sentinel-2 satellites. The goal was to quantify the accuracy of turbidity maps created from remote sensing by conducting Kayak Surveys and testing the water for suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) and Loss on Ignition (LOI). Initial findings revealed that ordering and receiving materials post-COVID was not possible in the course during a three-month NERTO period. Additionally, because of high contamination levels in the TJR Estuary, fieldwork was often prohibited. Moreover, because the data sondes we are using have 6+ sensors, equipment knowledge, and troubleshooting became an essential part of my NERTO experience.

2. Uncertainties in retrieving remote sensing reflectance, Rrs, from Ocean Color (OC) satellite sensors have a substantial impact on the performance of algorithms, such as for the estimation of chlorophyll-a concentrations, and inherent optical properties (IOPs). The impact is highest in the blue bands, especially in coastal waters with low blue-band Rrs values. Sunlight propagates to the water and back to the top of the atmosphere (TOA) with the total radiance measured by the sensor capturing the radiances related to the instantaneous state of in-water conditions, sky, and sunlight reflected from the wind-roughened wave facets and light scattered on molecules and aerosols in the atmosphere. All these components are associated with uncertainties, which together with the effects of the instrument noise and uncertainties in aerosol models in the atmospheric correction process, contribute to uncertainties in the retrieved water-leaving radiance and remote sensing reflectance. Assuming that these uncertainties are mostly proportional to the corresponding radiances and taking advantage of the differences in the spectra of these radiances, we analyzed the contribution of the components above to the total Rrs uncertainties in the SNPP-VIIRS level 2products for multiple scenes in the open ocean and coastal waters at different spatial resolutions. Results are complemented by data from several AERONET-OC sites and the VIIRS validation/calibration cruises and showed that the Rayleigh component (molecular scattering and surface effects) is the main source of ''' uncertainties for any water type followed by water variability, which has a bigger role in coastal areas, while the contributions of other components including aerosol scattering are usually smaller.

Bio(s): 1. My name is Stephany Garcia, and I am a NOAA EPP/MSI Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Scholar, starting in CESSRST-I in Cohort 5, now in CESSRST-II in Cohort 1, pursuing an M.S. in Geography with an emphasis on Watershed Science at San Diego State University. My central research focuses on surface water quality remote sensing in extremely shallow water channels in the Tijuana River Estuary by using PlanetScope and Sentinel-2 satellites. I plan to test a global turbidity retrieval algorithm that worked well in deep coastal water by adding a depth correction factor. This research helps NOAA meet its mission to understand and predict changes in coasts.

2. My name is Eder Herrera Estrella, and I am a NOAA EPP/MSI Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Scholar, currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Earth and Environmental Sciences at the Graduate Center, CUNY. In CESSRST-I, I completed my Master's as a Cohort 1 fellow, and started my PhD as a Cohort 3 fellow, continuing in CESSRST-II in Cohort 1. My central research focuses on understanding the uncertainties from ocean color satellite products and their sources to improve the atmospheric correction algorithm's performance. This research helps NOAA meet its mission to better understand and predict changes in oceans, and coasts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: 1. A characterization of mesophotic octocoral microbiomes from the western Gulf of Mexico 2. Understanding the Role of Mean and Eddy Momentum Transport in the Rapid Intensification of Hurricane Irma (2017) and Hurricane Michael (2018)
Presenter(s): 1. Edward -Ted- Gniffke, NOAA CCME-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley; 2. Alrick Green, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and PhD student, Howard University
Date & Time: 9 August 2023
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Titles: 1. "A characterization of mesophotic octocoral microbiomes from the western Gulf of Mexico"

2. "Understanding the Role of Mean and Eddy Momentum Transport in the Rapid Intensification of Hurricane Irma (2017) and Hurricane Michael (2018)"

Presenter(s): 1. Edward (Ted) Gniffke, NOAA CCME-II Graduate Scholar and MS student, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

2. Alrick Green, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and PhD student, Howard University

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science CentersSeminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/gxp-aftp-ufs

Phone Number
(US)+1 319-449-0257
PIN: 700 942 070#

Abstracts: 1. Mesophotic Coral Ecosystems are highly diverse and productive ecosystems in the western Gulf of Mexico which are composed of, in part, by octocorals (subclass Octocorallia). Despite their importance as foundational organisms octocorals are an understudied group in this region, with little known about their microbial community. Ninety-eight Octocoral samples collected from the western and northwestern Gulf of Mexico were sequenced using 16S rRNA sequencing to characterize their microbial communities. The sequenced microbiomes were generally low in diversity composed of a few core microbial taxa. Octocoral group was the main driver of microbiome composition as opposed to depth, season, region, and reef type. The effect of sequencing depth on a subset of 24 samples was examined, and showed low sequencing depth was sufficient to capture microbiome community trends. This microbiome data may be used to improve our understanding of the biology of octocorals in the Gulf of Mexico and contribute to conservation efforts in the future.

2. The prediction of rapid intensification (RI) in tropical cyclones (TCs) is a challenging problem. In this study, the RI process and factors contributing to it are compared for two TCs: an axis-symmetric case (Hurricane Irma, 2017) and an asymmetric case (Hurricane Michael, 2018). Both Irma and Michael became major hurricanes that made significant impacts in the United States. The Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting (HWRF) model was used to examine the connection between RI with forcing from the large-scale environment and the subsequent evolution of TC structure and convection. The observed large-scale environment was reasonably reproduced by HWRF forecasts. Hurricane Irma rapidly intensified in an environment with weak to moderate vertical wind shear (VWS), typically favorable for RI, leading to the symmetric development of vortical convective clouds in the cyclonic, vorticity-rich environment. Conversely, Hurricane Michael rapidly intensified in an environment of strong VWS, typically unfavorable for RI, leading to major asymmetries in the development of vortical convective clouds. The tangential wind momentum budget was analyzed for these two hurricanes to identify similarities and differences in the pathways to RI. Results suggest that eddy transport terms associated with convective processes positively contributed to vortex spin up in the early stages of RI and inhibited spin up in the later stages of RI in both TCs. In the early stages of RI, the mean transport terms exhibited notable differences in these TCs; they dominated the spin up process in Irma and were of secondary importance to the spin up process in Michael. Favorable aspects of the environment surrounding Michael appeared to aid in the RI process despite hostile VWS.

Bio(s): 1. Edward (Ted) Gniffke graduated from Western Washington University with a BS in Cell & Molecular Biology. After graduating I spent time working in biotech, volunteering with the NPS on sea turtle conservation and as a research associate studying neuroscience and COVID-19. I just completed my Ocean, Coastal, and Earth Sciences MS program at UTRGV and was a NOAA CCME II Scholar. My thesis research was focused on characterizing the microbiomes of octocorals in the Western Gulf of Mexico using 16s sequencing. I currently work as a senior researcher at Shape Therapeutics studying viral gene therapy.

2. Alrick Green is a NCAS-M II Cohort 1 fellow earning a PhD in the Howard University Program for Atmospheric Science (HUPAS) at Howard University. He is interested in the NOAA Science and Technology focus area Data in support of the NCAS-M II research theme: Interdisciplinary scientific research for building resilient communities against weather extremes. His research falls under the NCAS-M II research pathway: Process-level understanding and enhanced data assimilation/analysis and modeling capacities. Mr. Green's NOAA mission-aligned recent research experience involved completing a NERTO titled: Understanding the Role of Mean and Eddy Momentum Transport in the Rapid Intensification of Hurricane Irma (2017) and Hurricane Michael (2018). His NOAA mentor was Dr. Sundararaman Gopalakrishnan at NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/Hurricane Research Division in Miami, Florida.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

8 August 2023

Title: Best Practices for Engaging Underrepresented Communities in Citizen/Participatory Science at NOAA
Presenter(s): Manashree Padiyath, Hollings Scholar; and Anne-Marie Runfola, Senior Advisor to the Directors at the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 8 August 2023
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Best Practices for Engaging Underrepresented Communities in Citizen/Participatory Science at NOAA: Feat. A Case Study from the Stellwagen Sanctuary Seabird Stewards ProjectNOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Manashree Padiyath, Hollings Scholar; and Anne-Marie Runfola, Senior Advisor to the Directors at the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s): NOAA Education and NOAA Central LibrarySeminar Contacts: library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9122485680679109723

Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: This seminar will discuss the findings of a Hollings Scholar summer project, exploring best practices in involving underrepresented groups in citizen science, based on perspectives from NOAA project managers. Recommendations derived from their insights will be presented, along with a case study of a successful citizen science project (Stellwagen Sanctuary Seabird Stewards) that emphasized accessibility and inclusivity, exemplifying the potential impact of these practices.Keywords: Citizen Science, Accessibility, Diversity

Bio(s): Manashree Padiyath is a Hollings Scholar and a rising Senior at the University of Minnesota studying Political Science (BA), Sociology (BS), and Climate & Society (BiS). She is interested in pursuing a career in Risk Communication at NOAA. Anne-Marie currently serves as a Senior Advisor to the Directors at the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. Before that, she served as the Program Coordinator for Volunteers at the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

7 August 2023

Title: 1. Small Unpiloted Aircraft System (sUAS) Studies of Boundary Layer Meteorology 2. Antimicrobial assessment of macroalgae species for use as feed additives during aquaculture of sablefish
Presenter(s): 1. Anaiya Reliford, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and PhD Candidate, Howard University; 2. Emily Andrade, NOAA LMRCSC-II Graduate Scholar and MS Student, Delaware State University
Date & Time: 7 August 2023
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Google Meet
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Titles: 1. "Small Unpiloted Aircraft System (sUAS) Studies of Boundary Layer Meteorology"

2. "Antimicrobial assessment of macroalgae species for use as feed additives during aquaculture of sablefish"

Presenter(s): 1. Anaiya Reliford, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and PhD Candidate, Howard University

2. Emily Andrade, NOAA LMRCSC-II Graduate Scholar and MS Student, Delaware State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science CentersSeminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/npv-gwob-hth

Phone Number
(US)+1 224-662-0378
PIN: 776 113 957#

Abstracts: 1. The advent of small, Unpiloted Aerial Systems (UASs) for chemical sensing and atmospheric research promises to provide new opportunities to make meteorological measurements in the lowest layer of the Earth's atmosphere. This technology is used to measure changes of temperature and relative humidity with altitude, to map the temperature and character of the Earth's surface, and to perform in-situ air quality readings in a way never before available. This method is also faster, cheaper, and safer than using traditional remote sensing techniques, including piloted aircraft. A flight plan for the use of an optical particle sensor " the Alphasense OPC-N2 " to obtain particulate data mounted on a quadrotor UAS was developed. Sensor placement positions to reduce uncertainties in measurements obtained from UASs were evaluated via computational fluid dynamics. The goal of this research is to prove that UASs can be used more reliably for routine sampling of the Earth's boundary layer structure as well as develop and evaluate sensor placement positions to reduce uncertainties in measurements obtained from UASs. This research will aid the engineering and scientific community on gathering data to improve predictive atmospheric chemistry and climate models, ultimately corroborating methods to understand the influence of global climate change and local particulate matter and pollution.

2. Excessive use of antibiotics in aquaculture is a practice that can lead to antibiotic resistance in many pathogens. The increased desire for natural food supplements to replace antibiotics in aquaculture diets has inspired the testing of many different plant additives to assess potential increased bacterial resistance and immune system responses in commercially raised species. The purpose of the project as a whole was to develop experimental tools and assess which macroalgae species are capable of dietarily boosting the disease resistance and immune function of cultured sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria). The objectives of this initial step of the project were to assess the antimicrobial activity of two species of seaweed, Turkish towel (Chondracanthus exasperates) and dulse (Palmaria palmata) using a resazurin assay. Resazurin, a compound that changes color with bacterial growth, was added to 96-well plates and monitored in a spectrophotometer over time after the addition of macroalgae extract. Results indicate a need for additional extraction methods and expanded time frames for any additional work that might be conducted. In addition to the data generated, this project also created a standard framework and procedure for future kinetic analysis work using spectrophotometer readings and resazurin assays.

Bio(s): 1. Anaiya Reliford is a NCAS-M II Cohort 1 fellow earning a PhD in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at Howard University. She is interested in the NOAA Science and Technology focus area " Uncrewed Systems in support of the NCAS-M II research theme: Innovative observations for advancing the analysis and prediction of weather, climate, and atmospheric chemistry. Her research falls under the NCAS-M II research pathway two: Improved quantification of forecast skills for weather, water, air-pollution, and climate events. Ms. Reliford's NOAA mission-aligned recent research experience involved completing a NERTO titled: Small Unpiloted Aircraft System (sUAS) Studies of Boundary Layer Meteorology under the mentorship of Dr. LaToya Myles, Director of the Atmospheric Turbulence & Diffusion Division (ATDD) of NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory (ARL).

2. Emily Andrade is a second-year graduate student at Delaware State University and is funded by NOAA Living Marine Research Cooperative Science Center. She is originally from Southern California and attended the University of San Diego for her undergraduate education. She credits her parents for inspiring a deep love of science in her and her two older sisters, one of whom was also a NOAA LMRCSC fellow. She loves swimming, dancing hula, tide pooling, and her two chihuahuas back in California. Her master's project is focused on oyster aquaculture in Delaware Inland Bays, but this presentation is focused on her NERTO experience during the Summer of 2022.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

3 August 2023

Title: Assessments of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus levels and Microbial Community Compositions in Blue Crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and Seawater Harvested from the Maryland Coastal Bays
Presenter(s): Jasmine Smalls, NOAA LMRCSC-II Graduate Scholar and PhD Candidate, University of Maryland Eastern Shore
Date & Time: 3 August 2023
1:30 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Assessments of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus levels and Microbial Community Compositions in Blue Crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and Seawater Harvested from the Maryland Coastal Bays

Presenter(s): Jasmine Smalls, NOAA LMRCSC-II Graduate Scholar and PhD Candidate, University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science CentersSeminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/bau-msrj-xfj
Phone Number

(US)+1 575-383-4139
PIN: 731 201 845#

Abstract: Fluctuations in environmental physicochemical parameters can affect the diversity and prevalence of microbial communities, including vibrios, associated with aquatic species and their surrounding environments. This study aimed to investigate the population dynamics of two Vibrio species as well as the microbial community diversity of whole crab and seawater from the Maryland Coastal Bays (MCBs), using 16S rRNA sequencing. During this study, three crabs and one liter of seawater were collected monthly from two sites for three months. Hemolymph and crab tissue were extracted and pooled for each site. Extracted hemolymph, crab tissue, and seawater were analyzed for Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus using Most Probable Number (MPN) real-time PCR. For 16S rRNA microbiome analysis, three different DNA
extraction kits were evaluated to extract microbial DNA from individual crabs. Also, 500 ml of each seawater sample was filtered for DNA extraction. Results indicated that sample types and sampling periods had a significant effect on the alpha diversity of the microbial community of crabs and seawater (p < 0.05); however, no statistical difference was found between DNA extraction kits. Beta diversity analysis also found that the microbial composition between sample types and temporal distributions were statistically significant. Taxonomic classification revealed that Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were present in both crab and seawater samples. Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus were also detected in both crab and seawater samples, although crabs contained a higher concentration of the bacterium compared to the seawater samples. It was found that vibrios were not a dominant species in the microbial community of crab or seawater samples. Results from this study provide further insight into species diversity and phylogenetic compositions of blue crabs and seawater from the MCBs. These approaches will help in risk assessments that are essential in the overall advancement of public health.

Bio(s): Jasmine Smalls is a Ph.D. candidate and a Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center (LMRCSC) fellow, working in the Food Microbiology Safety Laboratory at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) under the supervision of Dr. Salina Parveen. Ms. Smalls primary research focus aims to investigate the spatial, seasonal, and inter-annual variations in the occurrences of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and seawater in correlation with biotic and abiotic factors in the Maryland Coastal Bays. She received her M.S degree in Natural Resources from Delaware State University, where her thesis research consisted of investigating the effects of novel probiotics in shrimp cultures. Her bachelor's degree was completed at Cheyney University of Pennsylvania in Marine Biology with a concentration in Aquaculture, where she assisted in maintaining rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) populations.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

2 August 2023

Title: Keeping It Cool: Managing River Temperature for Coldwater Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Ann Willis, American Rivers
Date & Time: 2 August 2023
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar and 110 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz, CA
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Keeping It Cool: Managing River Temperature for Coldwater Ecosystems

Presenter(s): Ann Willis, California Regional Director, American Rivers

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology DivisionSeminar contact: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m5de8b1fe08b663314db3a6a3b2f367fd; Password (if needed): fedsem1nar! ; Join by phone: 415-527-5035 (US only, not a toll-free number), Access code/meeting number: 2762 421 0654

Abstract: Over the past few decades, research has shown how rivers need patterns of flow similar to their natural flow regime to sustain native ecosystems. More recently, research has shown that stream temperature must be managed similarly " rather than managing for temperature thresholds, we need to understand and replicate seasonal thermal regimes. Despite considerable effort to manage temperature on regulated rivers, few regulated rivers replicate natural thermal regimes. Process-based restoration projects are showing how natural thermal regimes can be restored despite upstream regulation.

Bio(s): Dr. Ann Willis is the California Regional Director for American Rivers, a national non-profit organization dedicated to restoring and protecting rivers for people and nature. Prior to joining American Rivers, Dr. Willis led a research group at the U.C. Davis Center for Watershed Sciences. Her research focused on understanding natural stream temperature processes, how to restore them in degraded rivers, and how to manage stream thermal regimes in working landscapes where coldwater ecosystems and agriculture overlap. She has worked extensively in the Klamath watershed, including studying pre-dam removal temperature patterns on the mainstem Klamath and restoring stream thermal regimes in the Shasta River. She has also studied thermal regimes of coastal rivers like Walker Creek. Her work on managing thermal regimes has earned her awards from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program, Southwest Climate Adaptation Science Center, and UC Davis Institute for the Environment.

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; link to recording available upon request.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

1 August 2023

Title: Improving the Dust Emission Algorithm in HYSPLIT
Presenter(s): Joscelyne Guzman, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and PhD student, The University of Texas at El Paso
Date & Time: 1 August 2023
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Improving the Dust Emission Algorithm in HYSPLIT

Presenter(s): Joscelyne Guzman, NOAA NCAS-M-II Graduate Scholar and PhD Candidate, The University of Texas at El Paso

Sponsor(s): NOAA EPP/MSI Cooperative Science CentersSeminar Contacts: oed.epp10@noaa.gov, Audrey.Trotman@noaa.govLocation: Webinar

Remote Access: Google Meet Link: meet.google.com/nyj-czmp-rjg

Phone Number
(US)+1 317-747-1209
PIN: 877 214 397#

Abstract: The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model, better known as HYSPLIT, is a model utilized to calculate the trajectories of air particles to obtain the distance and direction traveled by air particles. As one of the most widely used atmospheric transport and dispersion models, HYSPLIT has several applications such as prediction of wildfire smoke, volcanic ash, windblown dust events, and the release of various chemicals. Two wind " blown dust emission algorithms are present in the HYSPLIT model. The first algorithm was developed for Asia, the Middle East, and the Sahara dust, while the latest algorithm was developed for North America. However, there are some uncertainties when utilizing these algorithms. The primary goal of this project is to improve HYSPLIT ability to represent dust emissions by implementing the NOAA ARL FENGSHA dust emission model. The FENGSHA dust emission model utilizes the modified Owen equation and is a function of wind speed, soil moisture, soil texture and erodible land types. Previously, the FENGSHA dust emissions model has been coupled with a time " reversed Lagrangian particle dispersion model known as STILT. Upon implementation of the FENGSHA dust scheme into HYSPLIT, simulations will take place utilizing ground and satellite observations. These observations will be then compared to HYSPLIT simulations utilizing the existing dust emissions algorithms.

Bio(s): Joscelyne Guzman is a NCAS-M II Cohort 1 fellow earning a PhD degree in the Department of Environmental Science and Engineering at The University of Texas at El Paso. She is interested in the NOAA Science and Technology focus area Uncrewed Systems in support of the NCAS-M II research theme: Innovative observations for advancing the analysis and prediction of weather, climate, and atmospheric chemistry. Her research falls under the NCAS-M II research pathway: Improved quantification of forecast skills for weather, water, air-pollution, and climate events. Ms. Joscelyne Guzman's NOAA mission-aligned recent research experience involved completing a NERTO titled: Improving the dust emission algorithm in HYSPLIT. Her NOAA mentor was Dr. Christopher Loughner of NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, Air Resources Laboratory.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: 2023 Professional and Technical (ProTech) Services Update
Presenter(s): Jay Standring, NOAA/AGO/SSAD/ProTech
Date & Time: 1 August 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Professional and Technical (ProTech) Services Update

NOAA Central Library Seminars

Presenter(s): Jay Standring, NOAA AGO SSAD Professional & Technical Services (ProTech) Branch Chief

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library

Seminar Contacts: Jay Standring (jay.standring@noaa.gov) and the NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2109701562540592474



Accessibility: Captions are added to the recordings of presentations once uploaded to the NOAA Central Library YouTube Channel. Sign language interpreting services and closed captioning are available, but need to be requested at least 5 days before the event.

Abstract: This presentation will provide the status of the ProTech Domain acquisitions and program.


Bio(s): Jay Standring joined NOAA as the Professional and Technical Services Branch Head in November, 2016. His previous civil service career was with the Department of Defense (Navy and Marine Corps).

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

31 July 2023

Title: Tropical Cyclone Analysis and Forecast Improvements using JPSS Data and Products
Presenter(s): Monica Bozeman, JPSS PGRR Tropical Cyclones Initiative Facilitator, NWS Office of Central Processing | Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 31 July 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Tropical Cyclone Analysis and Forecast Improvements using JPSS Data and Products

Presenter(s): Monica Bozeman, JPSS PGRR Tropical Cyclones Initiative Facilitator, NWS Office of Central Processing | Silver Spring, MD

Sponsor(s): NOAA JPSS Program

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access:
Meeting ID
meet.google.com/zfb-pmfk-sws
Phone Numbers
(US)+1 440-462-3278
PIN: 785 479 325#

Abstract:
The JPSS Proving Ground/Risk Reduction tropical initiative is supporting three research projects to improve the use of JPSS imager and sounder data for tropical cyclone analysis and forecasting. These projects are comprised of the development of a machine learning model to estimate the TC surface wind field from microwave sounder data, new methods for diagnosing transitions between tropical, extratropical and subtropical cyclones from imager and sounder data, development of shear-relative moisture flux products for TC intensity forecasting and an improved method for JPSS data processing and product generation. The status and future plans for these new products will be described, including preliminary results, user interactions and paths to operations.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available upon Request


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27 July 2023

Title: Investigating Climate Change scenarios with the Northeast US Atlantis ecosystem model
Presenter(s): Joe Caracappa, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 27 July 2023
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Investigating Climate Change scenarios with the Northeast US Atlantis ecosystem model

Presenter(s): Joe Caracappa, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Seminar Contact(s): Vince Saba Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Location: Webinar

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Flying Slime: Lakes, Aerosols, and Harmful Algal Blooms
Presenter(s): Andrew Ault, Associate Professor of Chemistry, University of Michigan