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NOAA Science Seminar Series
2018 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

21 December 2018

Title: December 2018 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: 21 December 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminr Series

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov or rthoman@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/December2018

Abstract: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for January 2019! and the winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: JPSS Training: Satellite Foundational Course for JPSS (SatFC-J)
Presenter(s): Jorel Torres, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, CIRA / CSU, Fort Collins, CO
Date & Time: 21 December 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771, Conference Room S561, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jorel Torres, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) / CSU, Fort Collins, CO

877-401-9225
pc: 53339716

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mff3529cec4b7bfac63c4f2be763cc6ff
Meeting number: 743 922 378
Host key: 243204
Meeting password: Jpss2018!

Abstract

For National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters, satellite training has been developed and will be distributed to forecasters and non-NOAA users, tentatively scheduled for 1QTR CY2019. A part of the satellite training is the Satellite Foundational Course for JPSS (SatFC-J), comprised of satellite training modules that address the following topic areas: microwave remote sensing, satellite constellations and instrumentation, and forecast applications. In addition to the SatFC-J, there is a separate JPSS Product Application' section that incorporates product reference materials for users, such as Quick Guides' (1-2 page documents), 'Quick Briefs' (3-5 minute videos), and Job Aids' (product exercises). The foundational course and reference materials can be viewed in the NOAA Commerce Learning Center (NOAA CLC) and the Satellite Training and Operations Resources (STOR) within the NOAA Virtual Lab (NOAA VLab) for NWS users. For non-AWIPS users, training materials can be accessed via Virtual Institute of Satellite Integration Training (VISIT) webpages. Additional polar-orbiting satellite training resources and web-links for users will also be featured in the oral presentation.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

20 December 2018

Title: Spatial and temporal variability in Texas Brown Tide abundances in Baffin Bay, Texas
Presenter(s): Emily Cira, EPA
Date & Time: 20 December 2018
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:



OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Emily Cira, Knauss Fellow, EPA National Nutrient Criteria Program

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part of the monthly Knauss Fellows Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Aureoumbra lagunensis (Texas brown tide) is an ecosystem disruptive algal species associated with seagrass loss and fish kills. Once limited to Baffin Bay, TX, Texas brown tide blooms have recently been reported elsewhere, including systems in Florida and Cuba. Because of this, there is a need for understanding bloom dynamics of this organism. Here, data from a 3-year A. lagunensis monitoring program in Baffin Bay are presented, showing spatial and temporal variability as well as relationships with environmental factors.

Bio(s): Emily Cira is a Ph.D. candidate at Texas A&M University " Corpus Christi and a 2018 Texas Sea Grant Knauss Fellow with the EPA National Nutrient Criteria (NNC) Program. She has been working in the water quality field for the past decade, and for her dissertation she is describing the nutrient-phytoplankton dynamics in Baffin Bay, TX.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: International Negotiations in Bycatch Reduction: A Case Study on the Tuna-Dolphin Agreement
Presenter(s): Brianna Elliott, Knauss Fellow, Department of State
Date & Time: 20 December 2018
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Brianna Elliott, Knauss Fellow, Department of State, Office of Marine Conservation

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part of the monthly Knauss Fellows Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: By the mid-to-late late 1990s, millions of the dolphins had been killed in the purse seine fishery for tuna in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Following years of negotiations, the Agreement on the International Dolphin Conservation Program (AIDCP) entered into force to reduce dolphin mortality in the fishery. Here, AIDCP is presented as a successful case study in reducing bycatch in international fisheries " still the only legally binding, multilateral agreement of its kind in international fisheries nearly 20 years after its entry into force.

Bio(s): Brianna Elliott is a current Knauss Marine Policy Fellow at the State Department's Office of Marine Conservation, primarily focused on international fisheries issues. Before becoming a Fellow, she worked in NMFS's Office of Protected Resources working on Marine Mammal Protection Act Authorizations. She received her master's in coastal management from Duke University in 2017, where she also focused on protected species policy related to fisheries and ocean noise.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: The JCSDA Community Radiative Transfer Model: From Development to Operations
Presenter(s): Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson - JCSDA
Date & Time: 20 December 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553 , NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson - JCSDA

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx
Event Number: 905 776 033
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=md8d79cffbe41f5b7949986d2b669c0ed

Audio:
USA participants: 866-832-9297

Passcode: 6070416

Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/20181220_Johnson.pdf
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/20181220_Johnson.pptx

Abstract:
The Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) is a fast, 1-D radiative transfer model designed to simulate top-of-the-atmosphere radiances consistent with a wide variety of satellite based sensors. The CRTM was primarily developed by JCSDA-funded scientists with essential contributions from NOAA/STAR and NOAA/EMC scientists. The primary goal of CRTM is to provide fast, accurate satellite radiance simulations and associated Jacobian calculations under all weather and surface conditions. CRTM supports all current operational and many research passive sensors, covering wavelengths ranging from the visible through the microwave. The model has undergone substantial improvement and expansion, since the first version in 2004. The CRTM has been used in the NOAA/NCEP and U.S. Navy operational data assimilation systems and by many other JCSDA partners such as NOAA/NESDIS/STAR, NOAA/OAR, NASA/GMAO, Naval Research Laboratory, Air Force Weather, and within multiple university environments. Over the past 14 years, both external research groups and operational centers alike have made essential contributions to the continued development and growth of CRTM.
A major goal of the CRTM core team is to ensure that CRTM becomes a true community radiative transfer model for all users. The CRTM official baseline code is developed and maintained based on internal and community-wide inputs, consisting of both improvements and externally contributed codes.
This presentation will briefly review the scientific and technical basis of CRTM, including its many strengths and limitations. There will also be an overview of the current status of the recently released CRTM version 2.3.0; and the future planned release of CRTM version 3.0.0 - which will represent a major milestone in CRTM's development and capabilities.

Bio(s):

Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson joined NOAA/NESDIS/STAR (via AER, Inc.) in support of JCSDA in July 2015. In January 2017, he was hired through UCAR as the JCSDA project lead for the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM). Dr. Johnson's primary responsibilities are to ensure that the CRTM project continues to be proactively developed and managed to meet operational user requirements. This involves coordinating efforts and support for a large number of users and developers across a wide range of agencies and universities, both domestic and international.

Dr. Johnson received a B.S. in Physics from Oklahoma State University, with an emphasis on hard-sphere sedimentation crystallization and photonics. Combining his interest in weather, computing, and physics, he studied Atmospheric Science at Purdue University, where he received a M.S. degree. The next stop was the University of Wisconsin, where he completed his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science advised by Dr. Grant Petty. Before completing his Ph.D. in 2007, Dr. Johnson started working at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in 2004 on the Global Precipitation Measurement mission, primarily focused on precipitation retrieval algorithm development and satellite observation simulations. During the intervening years, he has coordinated multiple NASA field campaigns as a mission scientist, and actively participates in the CGMS/WMO International Precipitation Working Group (IPWG), International TOVs Working Group (ITWC), and the International Workshop on Space-based Snowfall Measurement (IWSSM). He is a member of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), and the American Meteorological Society (AMS).
Dr. Johnson's primary areas of expertise are measuring and simulating cloud microphysical processes, theoretical and applied atmospheric radiative transfer, satellite remote sensing of clouds and precipitation, and satellite-based radar simulations in cold-cloud precipitating scenes.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

19 December 2018

Title: RESCHEDULED: New technology support for remote sensing of lake water quality using automated field radiometers
Presenter(s): Dr. Timothy S. Moore, Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory
Date & Time: 19 December 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room #3555, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

STAR Seminars Series, with SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group

This seminar was originally scheduled for 12/5/2018.

Presenter(s): Dr. Timothy S. Moore - Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory, Institute for Earth, Oceans and Space University of New Hampshire


Sponsor(s): SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group
The NOCCG is a NOAA organization founded in 2011 by Dr. Paul DiGiacomo, Chief of the Satellite Oceanography and Climatology Division at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR. The purpose of the NOCCG is to keep members up to date about developments in the field of satellite ocean color and connect ocean color science development with users and applications. We have representatives from all the NOAA line offices, including National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, National Ocean Service, National Weather Service and from several levels of the National Environmental and Satellite Data and Information Service (where Paul is housed). Dr. Cara Wilson of South East Fisheries Science Center is our current chair. We meet bi-weekly on Wednesday afternoons, 3 PM Eastern Time in room 3555 at the National Center for Weather and Climate Prediction building in College Park, MD with teleconferencing and Webex for out of town members and guests. We host a guest speaker, usually about once a month.

Remote Access: WebEx: Event Number: 907 721 095 Password: NOCCG
Event address for attendees: https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=mf7555abe45f0f5eb592ac618bd9b38b1

Audio: USA participants: 866-564-7828 Passcode: 9942991

Abstract: In the summer of 2016, a robotic sun photometer called the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurements (SeaPRISM), was deployed at a Coast Guard channel marker in western Lake Erie, measuring atmospheric properties and spectral water-leaving radiance. The instrument was deployed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to support remote sensing validation and harmful algal bloom (HAB) satellite products. The Lake Erie SeaPRISM is also part of the international federated AERONET program maintained by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and more specifically is part of the AERONET Ocean Color (AERNOET-OC) network. The main purpose of this component of AERONET is specific to calibration/validation efforts for ocean color. In the summer of 2017, a new 12-channel version was deployed at the same site with additional channels in the red and near-infrared. This unit is the first lake' version of the SeaPRISM. In this webinar, the data collected by the SeaPRISM at this site over the last three years (2016-2018) will be examined in the context of HABs and remote sensing validation. The SeaPRISM observations in relation to remote sensing validation and on cyanobacteria blooms from hourly to weekly time scales will be highlighted in this presentation.

Bio(s): Dr. Moore has been working with ocean color remote sensing for over 25 years. Throughout that time, he has been involved with bio-optical algorithm development, application, and satellite validation. He was worked with ocean color imagery in marine and freshwater systems. He was a member of the NASA MODIS Science Team and NASA PACE Science Team. For the past six years, he has been working extensively in the western Lake Erie system collaborating with NOAA GLERL and other regional entities. Under a collaborative project between NOAA NESDIS, NOAA GLERL and UNH, Dr. Moore led the effort to introduce an autonomous, robotic radiometer to Lake Erie with a unique band configuration, which will be the subject of his presentation.

POC: Nolvia Herrera, 301-683-3308, Nolvia.Herrera@noaa.gov
NOCCG Coordinator: Veronica P. Lance, PhD, NOAA, 301-683-3319, Veronica.Lance@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Using Satellite Climate Data Records to Study the Shortwave Radiation Budget of Snow vs Sea Ice and Arctic vs Antarctic
Presenter(s): Jeff Key, Center for Satellite Applications and Research
Date & Time: 19 December 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jeff Key (Center for Satellite Applications and Research, NOAA/NESDIS)

Seminar sponsor: OAR / CPO / RISA Program

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/VAWS_Dec2018

Abstract: The AVHRR Polar Pathfinder Extended (APP-x) climate data record provides cloud properties, surface temperature and albedo, sea ice thickness, and radiative fluxes over the Arctic and Antarctic from 1982 through the present. APP-x was recently used in two studies of absorbed solar radiation at the surface. One study compares changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic and Antarctic and examines their effects on the shortwave radiation budget. It was found that increasing shortwave absorption over the Arctic Ocean is not balanced by trends in the Antarctic. The second study compares the ice-albedo and snow-albedo feedbacks in the Arctic. The positive trend of solar absorption over the Arctic Ocean is more than double that over Arctic land, and the magnitude of the ice-albedo feedback is four times that of the snow-albedo feedback in summer. Therefore, decreasing sea ice cover, not changes in terrestrial snow cover, has been the dominant radiative feedback mechanism over the last few decades.

Seminar POC for questions: sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Additional presenters field:
Title: A New Diet Index: Predicting fish length from diet composition
Presenter(s): Nissa C. Ferm, Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Contractor with Lynker Inc., Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 19 December 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Nissa C. Ferm, Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Contractor with Lynker Inc., Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.


Remote Access: Please join our meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Abstract: What did the fish eat? On the surface this seems to be a relatively simple question. However, when diet data are incorporated into models, there are both logistical and ecological limitations. Understanding the methodologies of how diet data are generated, combined with an understanding of the underlying predator-prey ecology, can help generate more informed models. I will present an overview of diet data methodologies used to investigate feeding of young of the year Walleye Pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus). Based on this knowledge, I will describe a Random Forest model, built upon the scaffold of predator-prey ecology that was designed to predict Walleye Pollock condition. The model I developed predicts fish length from consumed prey taxa weight and composition. Fish length is related to known ontogentic shifts in diet that are important milestones for juvenile Pollock survival and ability to overwinter. Using the difference between the actual length of the fish and the modeled length gives us a metric. This metric tells us how far away a fish is from an average diet for its specific length. The metric was determined to have a significant non-linear relationship with dry energy density. When modeled fish size was much larger than observed, dry energy density declined. I concluded that fish were not consuming their optimal prey for their particular size in order to meet energetic demands. One possible mechanism for not meeting these energetic demands is a spatial mismatch between the fish and optimal prey.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Sendan email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

18 December 2018

Title: Resilience Dialogues: Connecting communities with experts via online dialogues to lay the groundwork for long-term climate resilience
Presenter(s): Sarah Zerbonne, Resilience Dialogues team et al. see description
Date & Time: 18 December 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sarah Zerbonne & Rachel Jacobson (Resilience Dialogues team); Catherine Kemp & Alexandra Long (Anchorage Mayor's Office)

Seminar sponsor: NOAA / OAR / CPO / RISA Program

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/Resilience_Dialogues

Abstract: Using a facilitated online dialogue process, Resilience Dialogues enables communities to engage with scientists and resilience practitioners to identify challenges, locate relevant resources, and prioritize achievable action steps towards resilience. A public-private collaboration launched in 2016, the Resilience Dialogues is led by the American Society of Adaptation Professionals (ASAP), in close coordination with the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and several other public and private entities. Nearing the end of its third year of implementation, the Resilience Dialogues has supported over 20 US communities on their journey to build community resilience to a changing climate.

Seminar POC for questions: sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Additional presenters field:
Title: ORCID for Researchers: Discovery Made Easy and Open
Presenter(s): Eric Olson, Engagement and Partnerships Lead, North America, ORCID
Date & Time: 18 December 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 2nd Floor NOAA Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Eric Olson, Engagement and Partnerships Lead, North America, ORCID

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Central Library

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4150028968874624514

Abstract: Researchers spend hundreds of hours every year dealing only with the administrative components of submitting publications, grants, and institutional reporting; entering their personal information, affiliations, and activities again and again. Even after publication, they may be confused with other researchers with the same or similar name. ORCID, Open Researcher and Contributor Identifier, is an organization, a portable and persistent identifier for researchers, a set of protocols for systems in scholarly communication to exchange data, and a global community open research effort. ORCID's mission is to provide open source tools that increase the visibility and discoverability of not only the researcher her or himself, but also all of the contributions that are crucial to a career in scholarship. This talk will describe current high-profile projects, including those with federal agencies, that are saving researchers time and enabling connections between their staff/users and works of many varieties, funding awards, facilities and equipment use.

Bio(s): Eric supports communities in North America as they develop necessary infrastructure for connecting researchers and institutions to the many kinds of activities that they contribute and share. Before joining ORCID, Eric worked on science communication and program assessment projects at George Mason University and the College of William and Mary. His other projects include organizing scholarly and science communication communities, the development of curricula for the new field of history communication, and conferences on the benefits of science and humanities convergence. Eric received a BA in Communication from George Mason University and a MA in Communication from Virginia Tech.
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5989-8244

Accessibility: *This presentation will be recorded and available on our YouTube Channel. If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program (http://www.wfm.noaa.gov/workplace/RAC_inter_bus_rules.html).

Seminar POC for questions: library.brownbag@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

17 December 2018

Title: Fishing for Solutions: A Science Briefing on Ocean Change and Fisheries
Presenter(s): Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor in Dept.of Ecology, Evolution & Natural Resources, Rutgers University; Michael Luisi, Monitoring and Assessment Division Director, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chair of the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Roger Griffis, Climate Coordinator, NOAA's Fisheries Service; Heather Mannix, Assistant Director of Policy Engagement, COMPASS; and Stephen Posner, Assistant Director of Policy Engagement, COMPASS
Date & Time: 17 December 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor in Department of Ecology, Evolution & Natural Resources, Rutgers University;
Michael Luisi, Monitoring and Assessment Division Director, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, and Chair of the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council;
Roger Griffis, Climate Coordinator, NOAA's Fisheries Service;
Heather Mannix, Assistant Director of Policy Engagement; COMPASS; and
Stephen Posner, Assistant Director of Policy Engagement with COMPASS

Sponsor(s): COMPASS and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; contacts are Jacob.Robertson@compassscicomm.org and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/4615410924533/WN_cFozyDw2QfytHHWi0pvLOg
Questions? Email Jacob.Robertson@compassscicomm.org

Abstract: Ocean warming and a host of related stressors - including ocean acidification, hypoxia, and sea-level rise - have profound implications for marine life and human communities worldwide. The rate and scale of change that we see now is impacting fish, the ecosystems that fish depend on, and the communities, businesses, and economies that a rich fishing culture supports. As fisheries change, society needs to effectively respond to interconnected ecological, social, and economic challenges - including: how the ocean is changing, what this means for fisheries and for people, what is at risk, and how management systems can respond. This webinar will discuss science, policy and management gaps and opportunities across fisheries, marine ecology, social science, policy, law, and management fields that arose from a 2-day roundtable convened by COMPASS in 2018. Aligning the capabilities of science with the mounting challenges of a changing ocean is about gaps in current knowledge, and also about how to mobilize people based on the knowledge we have now. Productive dialogue among scientists, decision makers, non-governmental organizations, and ocean resource managers can support the development and implementation of effective fisheries policies based on relevant scientific evidence.

Bio(s):
Malin Pinsky is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources at Rutgers University. He leads a research group studying the ecology and evolution of global change in the ocean, including conservation and management solutions. He developed and maintains the OceanAdapt website to document shifting ocean animals in North America, a resource used by governments and NGOs for climate adaptation planning. He has published articles in Science, PNAS, and other journals, and his research has received extensive coverage in the press. He has received early career awards and fellowships from the National Academy of Sciences, American Society of Naturalists, and the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. Previously, he was a David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellow at Princeton University. He has a Ph.D. from Stanford University, an A.B. from Williams College, and grew up along the coast of Maine.

Michael Luisi serves as the director of monitoring and assessment with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources fishing and boating services. He was appointed to the Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management Council as Maryland's State Official Designee in June 2010 and was elected as Council Chairman in 2016. Mike also serves as one of Maryland's administrative representatives on the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission. His career in fisheries began at the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries while working as a technician on the Statewide Stream Survey Project. Since joining MDNR in 2000, he has held multiple positions in the department, including the management of the State's Commercial Striped Bass Fishery and the Coastal Fisheries Program. Mike has a B.S. degree from Mary Washington College and a M.S. from Tennessee Technological University.

Roger Griffis is a marine ecologist with 20 years of experience advancing science and management of marine and coastal resources with NOAA. As Climate Coordinator for NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), he works with many partners to increase the production, delivery and use of climate-related information to fulfill NMFS mandates in a changing world. Past positions include Manager of NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program and Policy Advisor in NOAA's Office of Policy and Strategy Planning.

Heather Mannix is an Interim Co-Director of Policy Engagement at COMPASS, where she works to facilitate constructive discussion and interaction between scientists and decision makers. Before coming to COMPASS, she spent over seven years at the Consortium for Ocean Leadership in Washington D.C. working with large ocean research programs such as the Census of Marine Life and the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative. Heather also managed the Ocean Research Advisory Panel, a science advisory body to the Federal Government. She received her B.A. from Hood College in Environmental Science and Policy and my M.A. from American University in Global Environmental Policy.

Title: Drought & the 4th National Climate Assessment: What Might the Future hold for the Pacific Northwest
Presenter(s): s): Kelsey Jencso, Montana State Climatologist; Andrea Bair, NWS Western Region; Gabrielle Roesch-McNally, USDA Norhtwest Climate Hub; Roger Pulwarty, NOAA Earth System Research Lab, Physical Sciences Division
Date & Time: 17 December 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kelsey Jencso, Montana State Climatologist; Andrea Bair, NWS Western Region; Gabrielle Roesch-McNally, USDA Norhtwest Climate Hub; Roger Pulwarty, NOAA Earth System Research Lab, Physical Sciences Division

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)

Seminar POC for questions: britt.parker@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the webinar at: https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/pacific-northwest-drought-climate-outlook-webinar-december-17-2018

The Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (PNW DEWS) December 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia). This webinar takes place at 12 pm MT/11 am PT on Monday, December 17, 2018.

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Climate Recap and Current Conditions
Kelsey Jencso | Montana State Climatologist

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Andrea Bair | NWS Western Region

Fourth National Climate Assessment: Northwest Region - Summary Findings & Key Messages
Gabrielle Roesch-McNally | USDA Northwest Climate Hub

Fourth National Climate Assessment: Water - Summary Findings & Key Messages
Roger Pulwarty | NOAA Earth System Research Lab, Physical Sciences Division

Bio(s):

Kelsey Jencso is the Montana State Climatologist and an Assistant Professor in the College of Forestry and Conservation at the University of Montana

Andrea Bair is the Climate Services Program Manager for the Western Region of the National Weather Service. Andrea serves as a liaison between the 27 western NWS field offices and NWS Headquarters, as well as with other NOAA line offices. She also coordinates regional scale climate services between the NWS in the west and key NOAA partners within the climate community. Andrea has been with the NWS for 23 years.

Gabrielle Roesch-McNally is a Fellow with the USDA Northwest Climate Hub, assisting with the goal of supporting land managers efforts to address climate change impacts and reduce vulnerability in their operations. Gabrielle will be communicating science, building on current research efforts and strengthening partnerships and capacity across the region. Gabrielle received her PhD at Iowa State University where she was a research assistant as part of a landmark $20 million USDA-NIFA Regional Approaches to Climate Change & Cropping Systems Coordinated Agricultural Project. As part of her duties with the Climate Hubs, she has brought her social science expertise to efforts to characterize farmer and agricultural advisor perspectives on climate change, their attitudes toward adaptive/mitigative strategies, and the types of decision support resources that key stakeholders will need to contend with increasingly variable weather patterns. Gabrielle also received here M.S. from the University of Washington School of Environmental and Forestry Science, with a focus on environmental economics and has five years of experience working with Washington State University Extension on agriculture and forestry activities.

Roger Pulwarty is the Senior Advisor for Climate Research in the NOAA Climate Program. His research and publications focus on climate, impacts assessment, and adaptation in the U.S., Latin America and the Caribbean. Roger is a lead author on a number of national and international climate assessments, including the UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction Global Assessment of Disasters, the UN IPCC Special Reports on Water Resources and on Extremes. He is a Convening Lead Author on Adaptation Planning and Implementation in the 2014 IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. Dr. Pulwarty has acted in advisory capacities on climate, natural resources and disaster risk reduction to several national and international agencies, including the Organization of American States, the Caribbean Economic Community (CARICOM) the Global Framework on Climate Services, the UNDP, UNEP and the InterAmerican Development and World Banks. He co-chairs the UN World Meteorological Organization Climate Services Information System implementation team and the White House Committee on Environment, Natural Resources and Sustainability Task Force on the Water-Energy-Food nexus. Roger has provided testimonies before the U.S. Congress, on climate, adaptation, and natural resources, served on science advisory committees of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and is regularly called on by media outlets, including the New York Times and the BBC. He is the co-recipient of NOAA Administrator and Department of Commerce awards for linking science and decision making, and is the recipient of the 2014 Gold Medal in Applied Sciences and Technology from the Government of Trinidad and Tobago. Roger is Professor-Adjunct at the University of West Indies, and the University of Colorado, Boulder.

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(

Presenter

13 December 2018

Title: NOAA Central Library Publishers Series: PLOS ONE Presentation
Presenter(s): katie.rowley@noaa.gov
Date & Time: 13 December 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:


Join us in the NOAA Central Library for a presenation by PLOS ONE's Editor-In-Chief Joerg Heber!

Remote? Join us via webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3846129451433211139

Presenter(s): Joerg Heber, Editor-in-Chief of PLOS One.

Advancing Open Science at PLOS ONE

PLOS ONE is one of the largest multi-disciplinary journals in the world and is committed to advancing PLOS' mission as an Open Access publisher of all science. All work that reaches rigorous technical and ethical standards is published and freely and immediately available to everyone. This presentation provides an overview of the journal and its editorial operations and stringent peer review process. We will conclude with an outlook towards the broader editorial strategy of PLOS ONE in the context of journal innovations in open science.

Bio(s): Joerg Heber is the Editor-in-Chief of PLOS ONE. He holds a degree in physics from the University of Erlangen in Germany. Having subsequently obtained a PhD in semiconductor physics from Imperial College London in 2000, he went on to postdoctoral positions at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, USA, and the University of Marburg in Germany. In 2005 he joined what is now Springer Nature as a manuscript editor at Nature Materials, and moved on to Nature Communications in 2012. Having held several managerial positions there, he became the journal's Executive Editor in 2015. In 2016, he was appointed PLOS ONE's Editor-in-Chief.
Twitter Handle: joergheber

POC: Katie Rowley,
Title: Dynamic Responses of Coastal Wetlands to Sea Level Rise
Presenter(s): Karim Alizad, PhD, Research Assistant Professor, Belle W. Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences. University of South Carolina. Presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring
Date & Time: 13 December 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Dynamic Responses of Coastal Wetlands to Sea Level Rise

Presenter(s): Karim Alizad, PhD, Research Assistant Professor, Belle W. Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences. University of South Carolina. Presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ , click "guest", and please enter your first and last names. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Coastal wetlands are one of the valuable ecosystems that are significantly vulnerable to sea level rise and climate change. These systems are prone to lose their productivity and inundation under increasing rates of sea level rise. That highlights the imperative need for researchers to assess the response of susceptible coastal wetlands under projected sea level rise scenarios. Research outcomes such as maps, tools, and possible restoration activities contribute to well-informed decisions of coastal managers.

In order to quantify the evolution of marsh systems, an integrated hydrodynamic-marsh model, the Hydro-MEM model, was developed. This model couples a hydrodynamic (ADCIRC) and salt marsh (MEM) model and analyzes the complex interrelation between physics and biology in wetlands within a large-scale domain. The Hydro-MEM produced spatial maps of projected marsh productivity, hydrodynamics, and marsh migration possibility under sea level rise scenarios. The results are used in multiple states over the past few years by National Estuarine Research Reserves, Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA.

Bio(s): Karim Alizad is a research assistant professor in the Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences at the University of South Carolina. His research is focused on the effects of climate change and sea level rise on coastal ecosystems and coupling field collected data with large-scale numerical modeling. He received his PhD in civil engineering at University of Central Florida (UCF) and worked two years as a postdoctoral research associate in the Center for Coastal Resiliency (CCR) at Louisiana State University (LSU). He has earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Semnan University; an M.S. in energy conversion from the University of Tehran; and completed his second M.S. in mechanical engineering at the University of California, Riverside. Dr. Alizad has served as a reviewer for more than 15 peer-reviewed journals and conferences, and currently is a guest editor of the Advances in Coastal Hydrodynamics and Wetland Modeling special issue in the Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (JMSE). He founded and led the International Association of Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research (IAHR) student chapter at UCF and participated in the leading committee of LSU Postdoctoral Society, UCF and UCR Graduate Student Associations, and UCR International Education Committee of Academic Senate.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website,

12 December 2018

Title: Ecosystem-based fisheries management in the Southern Ocean: Antarctic krill
Presenter(s): Jefferson Hinke, Research Fish Biologist, NMFS/SWFSC/AERD
Date & Time: 12 December 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jefferson Hinke, Research Fishery Biologist, Southwest Fisheries Science Center (Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division)

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov); Webinar host: Librarian Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://goo.gl/fddvsB Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Formed from the desire to minimize ecosystem-level impacts of harvesting, the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Living Marine Resources provided an early form of ecosystem-aware fisheries management. It specified ecosystem-level considerations for management and was implemented with a desire for a form of feedback management system that accounted for the status and trends of harvested and indicator species. Over the three decades since its inception, a precautionary approach to fisheries management has prevailed while approaches to a feedback-based approach have been developed and considered. This talk overviews contributions by AERD and general progress toward EBFM in the Antarctic krill fishery in the Southern Ocean.

Bio(s): Jefferson Hinke is a Research Fishery Biologist at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center. He coordinates seabird research at two small field camps in the Antarctic Peninsula region with research centered on Antarctic penguin responses to environmental changes and fisheries effects. Jefferson holds a BS and MS from the University of Wisconsin and the PhD from the University of California- San Diego. He Joined the SWFSC Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division in 2009.

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Title: Analyses of multi species ichthyoplankton data along the US west coast as indicators of ecosystem changes
Presenter(s): Jens Nielsen Ph.D., NRC postdoctoral researcher, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA.
Date & Time: 12 December 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jens Nielsen Ph.D., NRC postdoctoral researcher, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA.

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.


Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Abstract: Do different fish larvae communities have shared responses to climatic changes?

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

11 December 2018

Title: NOAA Research and Development Database (NRDD): Project Management Data for NOAA’s R&D
Presenter(s): Meka Laster & Shanie Gal-Edd, OAR
Date & Time: 11 December 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Meka Laster, Director and Shanie Gal-Edd, Program Manager, for the NOAA Research & Development Database

POC: Outreach Librarian, Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6001639534869668609 Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Introduction to the NOAA Research and Development Database (NRDD). NRDD is a secure, web-based enterprise performance management / business intelligence tool, designed to contain information about the R&D projects conducted and funded by NOAA.

Bio(s): Meka Laster works in the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and joined the NRDD team in 2016. Shanie Gal-Edd also works in the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and joined the NRDD team in 2017. Shanie worked at NOAA since her Knauss Fellowship year in 2016.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Interaction of commercial fishing gears and long-lived structure forming invertebrate species in the Aleutian Islands: A risk assessment
Presenter(s): John Olson, Fisheries Biologist, Habitat Conservation Division, Alaska Regional Office
Date & Time: 11 December 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): John Olson, Fisheries Biologist, Habitat Conservation Division, Alaska Regional Office

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access via WebEx:

2018 AFSC Groundfish Seminar Series - John V. Olson
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
10:00 am | Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00) | 1 hr
Meeting number: 902 266 463
Meeting password: noaa

When it's time, join the meeting.
Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-888-456-5038, Attendee passcode:8480290#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

10 December 2018

Title: One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish...What Fish?
Presenter(s): Alexandra M. Avila, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at Oregon State University
Date & Time: 10 December 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Alexandra M. Avila, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at Oregon State University Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4809704059044303373

Abstract: Are all the fish dying? Have we over fished everything? What are sustainable fisheries? Can I eat tuna? Learn more about the fish you eat, where it came from, and how/where it was caught to help you make sustainable choices to help protect our ocean. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 December 2018

Title: Salmon Ocean Ecology in British Columbia
Presenter(s): Jackie King, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Date & Time: 6 December 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jackie King, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT

International Year of the Salmon is approaching! I would like to take this opportunity to update colleagues on the current, and future, juvenile salmon ocean research projects undertaken by my program at the Pacific Biological Station (Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), Nanaimo, BC). Since 1998, this program has conducted field-based research on juvenile salmon off the west coast of Vancouver Island, central and northern British Columbia and into southeast Alaska. In recent years it has become more integrative with other programs both within and outside of DFO. Summer fieldwork has refocused as a month-long integrative pelagic ecosystem survey for the whole Vancouver Island continental shelf with the intent of placing juvenile salmon fully within an ecosystem context. Field-based observations on juvenile salmon are now being incorporated into the new DFO State of the Salmon Program which annually synthesizes information on the state of freshwater and marine ecosystems across the life cycle of Pacific salmon. In addition, research projects with collaborators are linking climate and ocean conditions to the interannual variability in migration timing, distribution and condition of juvenile salmon in order to augment assessment models and the forecasts of adult returns. A new initiative this year with NMFS colleagues from NWFSC and AFSC is the collective reporting of 2018 summer survey results for the relative abundance and condition of juvenile salmon from Oregon northward to southeast Alaska. The collaborative report, produced in early December, will provide agency assessment staff and managers with a synopsis for early ocean conditions and any anomalous observations. Addressing ecological impacts of changing climate and ocean conditions requires international science that is integrative" and collaboratively addressing hypotheses for these highly migratory species, that are a shared resource between nations, is an exciting opportunity for us all. My research goal is to move beyond International Year of the Salmon and, together with colleagues from NMFS, initiate long-standing collaborative projects across salmon ecosystems to provide our agencies with relevant science advice for their assessment and management of Pacific salmon.

BIO

Dr. Jacquelynne (Jackie) King is a Research Scientist with Fisheries and Oceans Canada at the Pacific Biological Station in Nanaimo, BC. Her research investigates linkages between basin-scale drivers, such as climate forcing, and fish productivity through coastal processes. She collaborates in integrative pelagic field studies along the continental shelf, with her primary focus on understanding the factors controlling the abundance, distribution, and production of juvenile salmon and associated species in marine ecosystems. Her research includes climate change impacts on marine ecosystems and methods of incorporating climate variability into stock assessment advice. She is also the lead for Canadian Pacific elasmobranch research and conservation and has published research on age determination, migration, stock delineation and assessment of chondrichthyans.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: The Little Rapids Restoration Project: A 25 year partnership to improve habitat in the St. Mary's River Area of Concern
Presenter(s): Eric Ellis and Ashley Moerke, Great Lakes Commission. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 6 December 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Little Rapids Restoration Project: A 25 year partnership to improve habitat in the St. Mary's River Area of Concern

Presenter(s): Eric Ellis and Ashley Moerke, Great Lakes Commission

Sponsor(s): Restoration Webinar Series, sponsored by FWS and NOAA. Please direct all requests for closed captioning or other accommodation needs to Eric Tsakiris, 304-876-7430, eric_tsakiris@fws.gov, TTY 800-877-8339 at least three business days in advance of the event. NOAA contact is Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov

Remote Access: For more information, or to register for the webinar:
1. Go to https://doilearn2.webex.com/doilearn2/onstage/g.php?MTID=e0f1a0ae02aa7405eafee3158741be68a
2. Click "Register".
3. Fill out the registration form and then click "Submit".
For more information and for upcoming webinars visit the Restoration Webinar Series program page. Check out the flier for a schedule of our upcoming webinars.

Abstract: Eric Ellis and Ashley Moerke of the Great Lakes Commission will highlight
the aspects of the planning, implementation, and monitoring associated with the 25 Year Project to Restore Rapids Habitat in the Binational St. Mary's River Area of Concern.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Coastal Blue Carbon as a Negative Emissions Technology
Presenter(s): Tiffany Troxler, Florida International University
Date & Time: 6 December 2018
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Tiffany Troxler, Florida International University

Seminar Host: U.S. National Academies of Sciences
NOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s): OAR, NMFS and NOS (as co-sponsors of the NAS report)

Remote Access:
Register online for webinar here.

Abstract: Negative emissions technologies (NETs) that aim to remove and sequester excess carbon from the atmosphere have been identified as an important part of the portfolio of responses to climate change. These approaches have been garnering new attention as the international community has identified lower thresholds for global temperature increases, which can only be accomplished with net negative carbon emissions to the atmosphere. Negative Emissions Technologies and Reliable Sequestration: A Research Agenda, which was released in October 2018, provides a detailed research and development agenda needed to assess the benefits, risks, and sustainable scale potential for carbon dioxide removal and sequestration approaches; and increase their commercial viability.

One of the carbon removal approaches the committee assessed is coastal blue carbon, which involves land use and management practices to increase the carbon stored in living plants and soils of coastal ecosystems, particularly mangroves, tidal marshes, and seagrass beds. Committee member, Tiffany Troxler, Florida International University, will present findings and recommendations from the report with a focus on coastal blue carbon. The webinar will cover the state of knowledge related to carbon capacity and flux in coastal systems, the processes driving sustainability of coastal wetland carbon storage in the future, and the essential components of a coastal blue carbon research and development program, including its estimated costs and potential impact. The webinar will be held on Thursday, December 6, 2018 at 10am ET.
Register for the webinar here.
More information on the 2018 NAS report: https://nas-sites.org/dels/studies/cdr/

Seminar POC: Meredith Muth/OAR (meredith.f.muth@noaa.gov, 301-734-1217) and Janine Harris/NMFS (janine.harris@noaa.gov, 301-427-8635)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

4 December 2018

Title: [RESCHEDULED] Assessing climate vulnerability of World Heritage properties - coral reefs and beyond
Presenter(s): Scott Heron, NESDIS
Date & Time: 4 December 2018
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Scott F. Heron, Senior Physical Scientist, NOAA NESDIS Coral Reef Watch

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3072214003958783235 Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Heat stress events have increasingly caused severe bleaching and mortality of coral reefs around the world as the ocean has rapidly warmed over the past three decades. Of 29 World Heritage-listed coral reef properties, 15 were exposed to recurrent severe heat stress during the record-setting 2014-2017 global bleaching event. Beyond acute heat stress events, virtually all World Heritage properties in general are subject to other increasing climate pressures. Assessing the climate vulnerability of all World Heritage properties requires a rapid assessment framework that is applicable to natural, cultural and mixed properties; however, no such tool exists. The Climate change Vulnerability Index (CVI) has been developed to identify key climate drivers projected to affect World Heritage, assessing impacts to the attributes leading to World Heritage designations and to the human communities and industries directly associated with the properties. The concept of the CVI was presented during the 2018 meeting of the World Heritage Committee, and has support from the World Heritage advisory bodies.

Bio(s): Dr. Scott Heron is a senior physical scientist contracted to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Coral Reef Watch program and Adjunct Principal Research Fellow in Physics at James Cook University. His research and product development focus is on coastal and near-shore environmental physics, involving the synthesis of physical information with the biological and/or chemical characteristics of the environment. His current work investigates impacts on coral reefs, including coral bleaching and disease, reef resilience and conservation management, within the context of climate change. Scott was the lead author of the 2017 UNESCO report Impacts of Climate Change on World Heritage Coral Reefs: A First Global Scientific Assessment, and the 2018 update to that report.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Making a case for model-based estimation of data products from fisheries-independent surveys
Presenter(s): Stan Kotwicki, Program Manager, Groundfish Assessment Program, Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 4 December 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Stan Kotwicki, Program Manager, Groundfish Assessment Program, Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access via WebEx:

2018 AFSC Groundfish Seminar Series - Stan Kotwicki
Tuesday, December 4, 2018
10:00 am | Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00) | 1 hr
Event number: 905 043 057
Event password: noaa


When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-888-456-5038, Attendee passcode: 8480290#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Acquiring Multispectral Images Using a Commercial Camera
Presenter(s): Carlos Iturrino, Electrical Engineer, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Currently he is completing his Master of Science degree in Digital Signal Processing at UPRM as a CREST Scholar. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: 4 December 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Acquiring Multispectral Images Using a Commercial Camera

Presenter(s): Carlos Iturrino, Electrical Engineer, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Currently completing his Master of Science degree in Digital Signal Processing at UPRM as a CREST Scholar. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators for this seminar are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Robert.A.Warner@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.To join, please go to link below, click on Guest, and then please add your first and last name:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets. Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Multispectral Images are a powerful tool for many marine scientists but they have to rely on satellite information and/or expensive instruments. Carlos presents a useful system that can acquire multispectral information using a commercial camera. The goal of this work is for this system is to be mounted on a drone for data acquisition of ocean color in coastal regions, especially where satellite optical sensors do not have sufficient spatial or temporal resolution.

Bio(s): Carlos Iturrino was born in 1991 in San Juan Puerto Rico. He graduated from the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, specializing in Instrumentation and automatic control. Currently he is completing his Master of Science degree in Digital Signal Processing at UPRM as a CREST scholar. His project is based on acquiring spatial and spectral information using a commercial camera. In other words, he is developing a multispectral camera. Its main application is to measure ocean color, so this system will be mounted on a drone. Carlos will be at NOAA Silver Spring until the end of December (SSMC4, cube 9XXX), please stop by his office if you are interested in this work. Carlos has loved the ocean since he was a little boy. Almost all of his hobbies and the things that he likes to do in Puerto Rico are in the ocean, including surfing, fishing, spear fishing, diving, sailing, snorkeling, etc. As an engineer and a sea lover, he tries to look for the best way to incorporate both. So through his college years he has worked on projects like an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), where he and his team developed the instrumentation and camera systems for the AUV. Another relevant project was a wave measuring buoy, with data transmitted to a smart phone. Currently he is developing a camera for measuring ocean color to be mounted on a drone. Carlos hasn't decided what he will do after he receives his MS in Electrical Engineering from UPRM. He is considering continuing his education for a PhD or working in marine engineering.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

29 November 2018

Title: Update: El Niño and the Southwest Drought
Presenter(s): s): Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Mike Halpert, Deputy Director, NOAA NWS Climate Prediction Center; Royce Fontenot, Senior Hydrologist, NOAA National Weather Service
Date & Time: 29 November 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Mike Halpert, Deputy Director, NOAA's Climate Prediction Center; Royce Fontenot, Senior Hydrologist, NOAA's National Weather Service

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with the National Weather Service

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the webinar at: https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/update-el-nino-and-southwest-drought

Abstract:

What is the current status of El Nio and how has El Nio affected the drought in the Southwest? This webinar will provide up-to-date information on the drought, its impacts, and how El Nio may influence temperature and precipitation in the region, which includes portions of Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. The webinar series is a collaboration of NOAA/NIDIS, NWS, USDA, state climatologists, universities and other drought experts.

Bio(s):

Elizabeth Weight is the Regional Drought Information Coordinator for both the Intermountain West and Southern Plains Drought Early Warning Systems (DEWS) for NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS). Elizabeth has more than 20 years of international water management and research experience in 14 countries in Asia and Africa, most recently with the CGIAR's International Water Management Institute in Sri Lanka.

Mike is the Deputy Director of the Climate Prediction Center (CPC). In this capacity, he provides support to the director ensuring the day-to-day operation of the CPC. Mike leads efforts to communicate CPC's goals and vision to customers, stakeholders, the media and the public, serving as CPC.'s point of contact for NWS Public Affairs. He also serves as CPC's property custodian and works to ensure the successful execution of budget priorities. He is also a member of the ENSO and seasonal forecast teams. He led CPC's real-time climate monitoring efforts throughout much of the 1990s and their forecast operations between 2002 and 2007. He has co-authored many peer-reviewed journal articles on numerous topics in climate variability and climate prediction, including papers detailing El Nio impacts around the globe. He received his bachelor's degree in Meteorology from Cook College, Rutgers University and his master's degree in Atmospheric Science from the University of Michigan. He began is career at CPC as a summer student in 1981.

Royce Fontenot is the Senior Service Hydrologist at the NWS Weather Forecast Office in Albuquerque, NM. Royce manages the hydrologic services programs for both the Albuquerque and El Paso, TX forecast offices and serves as the NWS state liaison to State and Federal agencies throughout New Mexico. In addition to his duties as a hydrologist, Royce also is an NWS Incident Meteorologist (Trainee), providing on-site weather support to wildland fire incidents. Before being located in Albuquerque, he has worked at NWS offices in Alaska, Louisiana, and Washington State. Prior to his NWS career, Royce was on staff at the Southern Regional Climate Center and the LSU AgCenter in Baton Rouge, LA. He has a B.Sci in Geography and a Masters in Natural Science, both from Louisiana State University.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

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Presenter
Title: NOAA's Aquaculture Program: Having Our Fish and Eating Them Too
Presenter(s): Laura Hoberecht, Ph.D., Aquaculture Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region
Date & Time: 29 November 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Laura Hoberecht, Ph.D., Aquaculture Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Seminar sponsor: NOAA NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series

Seminar POC for questions: please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207

ABSTRACT
NOAA recognizes that marine aquaculture is vital for supporting our nation's seafood production, rebuilding protected species and habitats, providing employment in coastal communities, and enhancing commercial and recreational fisheries. The U.S. imports about 90% of the seafood we eat by value (a $15 billion seafood trade deficit), with more than 50% coming from farmed products. By increasing domestic marine aquaculture production we can maintain the economic benefits while ensuring appropriate regulatory oversight. The U.S. has a small and vibrant commercial aquaculture industry, which accounted for 21% of the value of U.S. seafood production in 2015. The U.S. aquaculture industry is supported by a world-class research and technology sector that uses the best available science to drive innovation and viability. NOAA, with its partners and collaborators, is continuing to develop environmentally and economically sustainable marine aquaculture practices in U.S. waters.

NOAA's Aquaculture Program includes activities in three agency line offices: National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), National Ocean Service, and Oceanic and Atmospheric Research. Both the Department of Commerce (DOC) and NOAA Fisheries have Aquaculture Policies. Aquaculture is also highlighted in the DOC 2018-2022 Strategic Plan and the NOAA Fisheries FY18 Priorities. Efforts are currently underway to develop a Marine Aquaculture Action Plan for NOAA. Regional Aquaculture Coordinators are employed in all five NOAA Fisheries Regional Offices to manage aquaculture tasks and priorities. The bulk of agency aquaculture research is conducted at the Northeast and Northwest Fisheries Science Centers.

In the Northwest, commercial, restoration, and enhancement aquaculture are all practiced. Commercial aquaculture includes shellfish (oysters, clams, mussels) and finfish (Atlantic salmon and steelhead). Restoration aquaculture is used for pinto abalone, Olympia oysters, Pacific salmon, and bull kelp. Aquaculture is also used to enhance commercial, recreational, and tribal fisheries for Pacific salmon. Emerging species for aquaculture production in the Northwest include sablefish, purple hinged rock scallops, sea cucumbers, and macroalgae. Challenges and opportunities for the Northwest aquaculture industry will be discussed and Regional/Science Center collaborations to address these issues will be highlighted.

BIO
Dr. Hoberecht has worked in the field of marine science for nearly 25 years. She received her BS degree in Food Science and Nutrition from the University of California, Berkeley in 1993 and her MS and PhD degrees in Aquatic and Fishery Science from the University of Washington in 2001 and 2006 respectively. Dr. Hoberecht's graduate work focused on population dynamics modeling and marine lipids. She has worked for NOAA Fisheries since 1997, starting as a contractor conducting field work in Alaska, then as a Fishery Biologist in California doing ESA/EFH consultations, and currently as one of two Aquaculture Coordinators in the West Coast Region. As the Aquaculture Coordinator for Oregon and Washington, some of the larger projects Dr. Hoberecht has been involved with include development and implementation of the Washington Shellfish Initiative, formation of the Shellfish Interagency Permit Team, initiation of the Kenneth K. Chew Center for Research and Restoration, and improving information about the interactions of shellfish aquaculture and eelgrass. Dr. Hoberecht is also the chair of the National Shellfisheries Association Pacific Coast Section.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: air-LUSI: How we flew a Lab Instrument on an Airplane at 70,000 Feet
Presenter(s): Thomas C. Larason of NIST
Date & Time: 29 November 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553 , NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Thomas C. Larason of NIST

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx Event Number: 905 337 337
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=mb3bd4127edcc02c1c808a287305d0fc0

Audio:
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode: 6070416

Abstract:
Due to the stability of the lunar reflectance and the fact that it is an exo-atmospheric target with flux levels close to levels observed by Earth Remote Sensing instruments, many sensors routinely measure the lunar spectral irradiance. While many sources of uncertainly that arise when vicariously calibrating sensors using land targets are eliminated, lunar measurements are complicated - though predictable - because of the lunar irradiance is a function of the relative positions of the Sun, Moon, and Observer among other variables. The United States Geological Survey has developed a model, called the Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) Model of lunar reflectance/irradiance that accounts for changes in lunar irradiance as a function of these variables; utilizing the ROLO Model, NASA has demonstrated the ability to track sensor responsivity changes at the 0.1 % level. The current uncertainties in the ROLO Model are estimated to be between 3 % and 6 % in the VNIR spectral region and are not traceable to the International System of Units (the SI). The objective of the airborne Lunar Spectral Irradiance (air-LUSI) project is to make highly accurate (sub-0.5 % uncertainty), SI-traceable measurements of the lunar spectral irradiance in the VNIR region using a laboratory instrument on an airplane at 70,000 feet. The measurements, corrected for residual atmospheric attenuation, will be compared with the ROLO model-predicted exo-atmospheric lunar irradiance and may be used to establish limits on the uncertainty in the ROLO Model as well as to possibly serve as tie-points to the Model over this spectral range. The first step was to integrate the air-LUSI instrument onto a NASA ER-2 research aircraft and have Engineering Flights to demonstrate that the instrument concept was valid and that the instrument could function properly at-altitude. Two Engineering Flights took place in August 2018 in Palmdale, CA at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center. The talk will focus on what happened during the deployment both from a technical and personal point of view; results of the radiometric measurements and the performance of the instrument lend insight into a path forward to lower uncertainty measurements during the next Flight Campaign and will be presented.


Bio(s):
Mr. Thomas Larason is an Electronics Engineer in the Sensor Science Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). His career at NIST began in 1989 where his research has focused on the development, characterization and calibration of detectors that measure ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared light. Additional research areas include the measurement of photocurrent, aperture area, and the development of new transfer standards. He has collaborated with both university and industry researchers on various projects, for example, investigating UV light sensors used for the inactivation of pathogens for drinking water. He has twice received the Department of Commerce Bronze Medal Award.

Title: Warming Seas, Falling Fortunes - Stories of Fishermen on the Front Lines of Climate Change
Presenter(s): Avery Siciliano, former ocean policy research associate at the Center for American Progress and current program integrity specialist at Best Aquaculture Practices, and Alexandra Carter, ocean policy research associate at the Center for American Progress
Date & Time: 29 November 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Warming Seas, Falling Fortunes - Stories of Fishermen on the Front Lines of Climate Change

Presenter(s): Avery Siciliano, former ocean policy research associate at the Center for American Progress and current program integrity specialist at Best Aquaculture Practices (presenting remotely), and
Alexandra Carter, ocean policy research associate at the Center for American Progress (presenting in person)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will use Adobe Connect.To join a session, please go to this site: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ , enter as "guest", and please enter your first and last name. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: As the northwest Atlantic warms, more than two-thirds of marine species are moving north in search of cooler water. Similar changes are occurring from Alaska to Florida; fish and shellfish once found in large numbers in certain locations are now scarce in those same places. These shifts are causing economic hardships as fishing stocks and fishing effort become misaligned. In the absence of a global carbon solution, many fishermen have changed the way they do business to compete in this new environment.

The report pulls first-hand experiences of over a dozen fishermen from around the country and couples them with current scientific evidence to illustrate man-made climate change impacts on the industry.

Bio(s):

Avery Siciliano: Avery Siciliano is a specialist at the Global Aquaculture Alliance's Best Aquaculture Practices certification program. Her focus is on advancing environmental and social responsibility in the global aquaculture supply chain. Prior to joining Best Aquaculture Practices, Avery advocated for sustainable fisheries policy and seafood traceability at the Center for American Progress and Oceana in Washington, DC.

Alexandra Carter is a research associate for Ocean Policy at the Center for American Progress. Her primary field experience is in fisheries management, having worked with the California and Oregon Departments of Fish and Wildlife and as a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-certified fisheries observer in the Bering Sea, Alaska. Prior to joining American Progress, Carter worked in the office of Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-OR).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

28 November 2018

Title: Modeled impact of coastal biogeochemical processes and climate variability on ocean acidification in the Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Dr. Darren Pilcher, Research Scientist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 28 November 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Darren Pilcher, Research Scientist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.


Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Abstract: Examination of spatial and temporal variability of the carbon cycle from 2003-2012 and the connection to ocean acidification.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Satellite-Based Tropical Cyclone Intensity Estimation in the JPSS-GOES-R Era
Presenter(s): Derrick Herndon Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, CIMSS; Madison, WI
Date & Time: 28 November 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771, Conference Room: S650
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Derrick Herndon Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) Madison, WI

Sponsor(s): JPSS Program: Bill Sjoberg, bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov

877-401-9225
pc: 53339716
JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m606cdbd843327880fd2fd90950c16ae6
Meeting number: 746 721 241
Host key: 467591
Meeting password: Jpss2018!

The SATellite CONsensus (SATCON) algorithm is being run as a real-time proving ground demonstration product at CIMSS starting in the 2017 tropical cyclone (TC) season. The algorithm blends concurrent TC intensity estimates from the geostationary-based Advanced Dvorak Technique (including GOES-16), microwave sounder TC intensity estimates from the CIMSS AMSU and SSMIS algorithms, CIMSS and CIRA ATMS estimates from S-NPP and JPSS, and TC structure information from the CIMSS ARCHER algorithm. Each SATCON input is situationally-weighted based on the member's statistical performance over several seasons. The final SATCON estimate is adjusted based on TC eye size, storm motion and storm structure inputs to produce an estimate that is more skillful than the individual members or a simple average of their estimates. Engagement, feedback and training of NHC/CPHC/JTWC end users have resulted in increased operational use of the SATCON intensity estimates during the 2018 season. NHC final storm reports now include the SATCON estimates as one of the TC intensity sources for determination of their final Best Tracks. Performance statistics for the 2017-2018 seasons compared to aircraft ground truth will be presented along with example cases that highlight the algorithm performance during challenging intensity analysis scenarios.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: A multidisciplinary approach for generating globally consistent data on mesophotic, deep-pelagic and bathyl biological communities: The General Ocean Survey and Sampling Iterative Protocol
Presenter(s): Lucy Woodall, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: 28 November 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: VIa webinar (see login below) or for NOAA staff: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A multidisciplinary approach for generating globally consistent data on mesophotic, deep-pelagic and bathyl biological communities: The General Ocean Survey and Sampling Iterative Protocol

Presenter(s): Lucy Woodall, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation. Presenting remotely.

Co-Authors and Affiliations: Dominic A. Andradi-Brown, World Wildlife Fund-US; Andrew S. Brierley, University of St Andrews, Malcolm R. Clark, National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research; Douglas Connelly, National Oceanography Centre; Rob A. Hall, University of East Anglia; Kerry L. Howell, University of Plymouth; Veerle A.I. Huvenne, National Oceanography Centre; Katrin Linse, British Antarctic Survey; Rebecca E. Ross, University of Plymouth; Paul Snelgrove, Memorial University of Newfoundland; Paris V. Stefanoudis, Nekton Foundation; Tracey T. Sutton, Nova Southeastern University; Michelle Taylor, University of Essex; Thomas F. Thornton, University of Oxford; Alex D. Rogers, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect. To join a session, please go to this site:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/, enter as "Guest", and please add your first and last name. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: In marine science there are almost as many sampling methods as there are researchers. Our individual research questions are fundamental to how we conduct our research and the data we collect; however, understanding the patterns of diversity of ocean life over different temporal and geographic scales requires extensive data both biological and environmental. Therefore, to address these questions, extensive collaboration and comparable data are required. GOSSIP (General Ocean Survey and Sampling Iterative Protocol) is a multidisciplinary framework for generating globally comparable data for biological communities, which has been designed as a guide on how these data can be collected. In this presentation we will share the 20 parameters that have been chosen, explain why each is considered important and how the framework could be utilised. GOSSIP is intended to change over time as technology and techniques evolve. Alongside this recently published paper, we have produced a technical guide that simply pulls together data on current protocols and indicates where further information can be found.

Bio(s): Lucy is a marine biologist and her research sits within the theme of Ocean Risk. She is based at Oxford University where she lectures in Marine Ecology and Animal Adaptions. Lucy's current work broadly focuses on understanding the processes that drive biodiversity in the marine biome and how human activities modify these. She has conducted work into microplastics and litter in the marine environment, and her microplastics research was the first to reveal the ubiquity of this pollutant in the deep sea. She continues to publish research about microplastics and marine litter, is actively involved in policy consultations and leads a program to develop a model to help prioritise location specific solutions to minimising litter. Alongside her work in marine plastics, Lucy leads a program in deep-sea exploration, sits on the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC) for seahorses and pipefish, and leads the legislation implementation working group for this team. Lucy regularly provides expert evidence for national and international organisations and through Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative (DOSI), is actively engaged in providing solutions that can be used in the high-seas regulation implementing agreement that is currently being negotiated at the UN.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

27 November 2018

Title: Using fishing industry catch data directly for stock assessment: Aleutian Islands Golden King Crab
Presenter(s): Chris Siddon, Marine Fisheries Scientist, Division of Commercial Fisheries, Alaska Department of Fish and Game
Date & Time: 27 November 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Chris Siddon, Marine Fisheries Scientist, Division of Commercial Fisheries, Alaska Department of Fish and Game

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Remote Access: AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.

2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, Liz Dawson, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, November 27, 2018
10:00 am | Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00) | 1 hr
Meeting number: 805 217 062
Meeting password: dawson


When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode: 5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Integration of Habitat Mapping & Acoustic Technologies to Advance Ecosystem Based Management
Presenter(s): Dr. Mark Monaco, Director, Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, NCCOS. Presenting in person in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 27 November 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Integration of Habitat Mapping & Acoustic Technologies to Advance Ecosystem Based Management

Presenter(s): Dr. Mark Monaco, Director, Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). Presenting in person in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: NOAA/NCCOS's Marine Spatial Ecology Division and partners couple satellite-based and air-borne remote sensing (e.g., multi-spectral imagery) and ship-based (e.g., multi-beam soundings) technologies to map coastal and benthic habitats. The map products are key components in structuring sampling designs to monitor reef fish distribution and abundance through visual and fish acoustic surveys. The habitat maps and reef fish monitoring data support development of ecologically relevant hydro-acoustics arrays to define species' habitat utilization patterns and movements through acoustic telemetry. The integration of the biophysical data advances our ability to define ecological connectivity of marine ecosystems based on species' habitat utilization patterns and is a key component to advance EBM through spatial management of marine resources. We present results of benthic habitat mapping efforts coupled with underwater acoustic telemetry to quantify diel movements, spatial patterns, and habitat affinities of reef fishes and pelagic prey in the U.S Caribbean. Fish presence and movement data contribute to defining ecological connectivity among habitats (e.g., corals, algae, seagrasses) and associated management areas. Results aid in assessing the efficacy of managed areas designed to enhance coral reef ecosystems and provided evidence of ecological connectivity across habitat types in the seascape and among management areas to support EBM efforts.

Bio(s): Dr. Mark E. Monaco of NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) has been a practicing scientist and manager in the field of marine spatial planning for over 35 years. His current position is Chief of the Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science that is comprised of about 120 Federal and contract staff located around the country. During his career at NOAA, he led development and implementation NOAA's Biogeographic Assessment Framework that has been used in conducting geospatial assessments to facilitate marine spatial planning processes and implementation plans. Applications include defining and evaluating the efficacy of marine protected areas, defining and modifying the spatial boundaries of NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries, and supporting US States in developing marine spatial plans with emphasis on the siting of alternative energy facilities. He currently serves as the co-chair of the steering committee for NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program that provides a framework to inform ecosystem-based management decisions. He represents NOAA on the Chesapeake Bay Scientific Technical Advisory Committee and co-Leads NOAA's Ecological Forecasting-Habitat Science and Ecological Forecasting Technical Team that is addressing how habitats are changing in quantity and quality over space and time to forecast ecosystem responses to habitat modifications. Today he will present an integrated suite of remote sensing technologies to couple habitat and species distributions to support Ecosystem Based Management.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Launching PArticle Size, Image, and Velocity probe (PASIV): Innovation for Severe Storm In-Situ Sensing
Presenter(s): Sean Waugh, OAR
Date & Time: 27 November 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAAScienceSeminar

Join the NOAA Central Library and the Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) for the new NOAA Innovators Series! This series and inaugural presentation will be facilitated by Derek Parks, Technology Transfer Program Manager.

Please register for the webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5012577148641287427 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Presenter(s): Dr. Sean Waugh, Research Meteorologist, National Severe Storms Laboratory, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Abstract: The NSSL Field Observing Facilities and Support group (FOFS) has built a special balloon-borne instrument called a PArticle Size, Image, and Velocity probe or PASIV, which is designed to capture high-definition images of water and ice particles as it is launched into, and rises up through a thunderstorm.

Dr. Sean Waugh will tell us about the innovative design, the creative and design processes the FOFS team used to develop the instrument, and how it is now being used by NSSL to better understand the macro and microphysical properties in thunderstorms.

Bio(s): Dr. Sean Waugh earned his Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma in 2016 when he started working for the National Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman, Oklahoma. His career there began much earlier when he started working with NSSL back in 2007, quickly becoming the go-to source for developing instrumentation and equipment needed for a variety of field projects such as VORTEX 2, DC3, MPEX, and a even deployments to Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Florence. His interest in a wide range of weather conditions and instrumentation leads to his involvement in a variety of field work.

POC: Outreach Librarian, Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 November 2018

Title: Preparing your Winter Toolbox: Drought & Climate Outlook for California-Nevada
Presenter(s): Julie Kalansky, CNAP-NOAA RISA, Scripps Institution of Oceanography-SIO; Michelle L'Heureux, NWS Climate Prediction Center; Brian Kawzenuk, Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes, SIO; NWS California Nevada River Forecast Center
Date & Time: 26 November 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Julie Kalansky, CNAP (a NOAA RISA), Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO); Michelle L'Heureux, NWS Climate Prediction Center; Brian Kawzenuk, Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes, SIO; NWS California Nevada River Forecast Center

Seminar sponsor: National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA Climate Program Office

Seminar POC for questions: amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the webinar at: https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/california-nevada-drought-climate-outlook-webinar-nov-26-2018

Abstract

Will drought come back to California and Nevada this winter? December is typically the beginning of wetter winter conditions in California and Nevada, but dry winters are not uncommon for the region. This creates a fair amount of uncertainty, which makes tracking precipitation and potential drought impacts through the winter crucial for future planning. This webinar will provide an overview of current conditions and outlooks for winter, and special guest speakers will share a toolbox of partner tools that can help track dry or wet progress through winter. Co-hosted by NIDIS and CNAP (a NOAA RISA team), this webinar will feature speakers from the CNAP, the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes (CW3E), and the National Weather Service.

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) November 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlooks webinars designed to provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. This webinar will take place on Monday, November 26th, 2018 at 11:00 am PT/2:00 pm ET

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Drought & Climate Update
Julie Kalansky | CNAP (a NOAA RISA), Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO)

Drought & Climate Outlook
Michelle L'Heureux | NWS Climate Prediction Center

Preparing Your Winter Toolbox
Julie Kalansky | CNAP, SIO
Brian Kawzenuk | Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes (CW3E), SIO
TBD | NWS California Nevada River Forecast Center

Bio(s):

Julie Kalansky is a climate scientist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography/UC San Diego and program manager with CNAP (California Nevada Climate Application Program - a NOAA RISA) at Scripps.

Michelle L'Heureux is a meteorologist with NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. Her primary responsibility is to coordinate a team that updates the official status and forecast for the El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

Brian Kawzenuk is a Hydrometeorological Research Analyst at the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Brian specializes in extreme precipitation, hydrometeorology, atmospheric dynamics, and improving atmospheric predictability.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

20 November 2018

Title: Population Consequences of Disturbance by Offshore Oil and Gas Activity for Endangered Sperm Whales (Physeter macrocephalus)
Presenter(s): Dr. Nick Farmer, Chief, Species Conservation, Protected Resources Division, NOAA Fisheries, Southeast Regional Office. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 20 November 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Population Consequences of Disturbance by Offshore Oil and Gas Activity for Endangered Sperm Whales (Physeter macrocephalus)

Presenter(s): Dr. Nick Farmer, Chief, Species Conservation, Protected Resources Division, NOAA Fisheries, Southeast Regional Office. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using Adobe Connect. To join a session, please go to the following website and hit button "Enter as Guest", then add your first & last name: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac; google chrome often works too. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.

Abstract: Sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) populations are still recovering from massive population declines associated with commercial whaling operations. The species continues to face a suite of contemporary threats, including pollution, ship strikes, fisheries interactions, habitat loss and degradation, oil spills, and anthropogenic noise. The sperm whale stock in the northern Gulf of Mexico was exposed to oil from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill and is exposed to high levels of anthropogenic noises generated by geological and geophysical (G&G) surveys for hydrocarbon deposits. Population impacts from oil and gas activities were predicted from models that incorporated two stressors: (i) oil exposure from DWH and (ii) noise from G&G surveys. Oil exposure was projected to reduce survival and reproductive success, causing a mean stock decline of 26% by 2025. Additionally, exposure to underwater noise can adversely impact whale hearing, communication, foraging efficiency, and disturb essential behaviors. Exposures to G&G survey noise were determined by simulating individual movements through three-dimensional sound fields generated by different survey methods. Behavioral disturbance was evaluated as reduced foraging opportunities under four dose-response functions. Bioenergetic models tracked the depletion of reserves in blubber, muscle, and viscera. All simulations suggested significant reductions in relative fitness of reproductive females were a likely consequence of persistent disturbances to foraging behaviors. Under a 160dB SPL unweighted dose-response function, up to 4.40.3% of the stock may reach terminal starvation due to behavioral disturbance associated with future G&G surveys, leading to abortions, calf abandonment, and up to 25% greater stock declines beyond those predicted from DWH oil exposure. Uncertainty in our results emphasizes a need for further controlled exposure experiments to generate behavioral disturbance dose-response curves and detailed evaluation of individual resilience following disturbance events. Given our focus on a limited suite of threats and need for field verification of these modeled impacts, precautionary management application of our results is recommended for this endangered species.

Bio(s): Dr. Farmer earned his Ph.D. in Marine Biology and Fisheries from the University of Miami. He is the Chief of Species Conservation in the Protected Resources Division at the NOAA Fisheries Southeast Regional Office. His research includes reef fish movement tracking, efficient marine reserve design, acoustic monitoring of fish spawning aggregations, fishery-independent monitoring of reef fish populations, species distribution models for protected species, dynamic stock assessment projection management decision tools, the population consequences of multiple stressors for endangered cetaceans, and satellite tracking of giant manta rays.

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19 November 2018

Title: Causes for the record low sea-ice extent in the Bering Sea in 2018
Presenter(s): Phyllis Stabeno Ph.D., Oceanographer, NOAA Research, Seattle, WA.
Date & Time: 19 November 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Phyllis Stabeno Ph.D., Oceanographer, NOAA Research, Seattle, WA.

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.


Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

First GoToMeeting? Let's do a quick system check: https://link.gotomeeting.com/system-check

Abstract: An in-depth look at the driving factors of a warm Bering Sea including ice arrival, extent, and implications

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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16 November 2018

Title: November 2018 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: 16 November 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov or rthoman@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/November2018

Abstract: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for December and the winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

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Title: Rapid warming in the tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans-and its impacts on MJO and the global climate
Presenter(s): Dr. Roxy Mathew Koll, NRC Senior Research Associate at PMEL, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 16 November 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/110386877
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Roxy Mathew Koll, NRC Senior Research Associate at PMEL, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab


Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/110386877

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (312) 757-3121
Access Code: 110-386-877

Bio(s): Dr. Roxy Mathew Koll joined PMEL as a Visiting Scientist in August 2018. He is a Climate Scientist at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology and an Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Pune, in India. Roxy is currently leading research on the rapid warming in Indian Ocean and its impact on the tropical climate variability including the monsoon"and the marine ecosystem. He is a Co-Chair of the CLIVAR Indian Ocean Region Panel, and a Lead Author of the IPCC Special Report on Oceans and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate. He was awarded the Kavli Fellowship by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in 2015. The Indian Meteorological Society felicitated him with the Young Scientist Award in 2016, for his research on the changes in the Monsoon and the Indian Ocean. Learn more about Dr. Koll and his work on his lab's homepage: http://climate.rocksea.org

Seminar POC: adi.hanein@noaa.gov

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15 November 2018

Title: An Updated Estimate of Salinity for the Atlantic Ocean Sector Using Temperature-Salinity Relationships
Presenter(s): Dr. Marlos Goes, Assistant Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 15 November 2018
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Marlos Goes, Assistant Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote Access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/125198549

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (646) 749-3112
Access Code: 125-198-549

Abstract: Historically, temperature profiles are much more abundant than simultaneous temperature and salinity profiles. Several methods have been developed to derive salinity solely based on temperature profile observations, such as expendable bathythermograph (XBT) temperature measurements, for which concurrent salinity observations are typically not available. These empirical methods used to date contain uncertainties as a result of temporal changes in salinity and seasonality in the mixed layer, and are typically regionally based. In this study, a new methodology is proposed to infer salinity in the Atlantic Ocean from the water surface to 2000-m depth, which addresses the seasonality in the upper ocean and makes inferences about longer-term changes in salinity. Our results show that when seasonality is accounted for, the variance of the residuals is reduced in the upper 150 m of the ocean and the dynamic height errors are smaller than 4 cm in the whole study domain. The sensitivity of the meridional heat and freshwater transport to different empirical methods of salinity estimation is studied using the high-density XBT transect across 34.5S in the South Atlantic Ocean. Results show that accurate salinity estimates are more important on the boundaries, suggesting that temperature"salinity compensation may be also important in those regions.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Working with NOAA and Multiple Partners to Restore Oysters, Abalone, and Kelp and Develop Sustainable Shellfish and Kelp Aquaculture
Presenter(s): Louisa Harding, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Date & Time: 15 November 2018
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Louisa Harding, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT
Human populations continue to grow in coastal communities throughout the United States. For example, the central Puget Sound region is expected to grow by 1.8 million people by the year 2050. Expanding urbanization, rising development and concomitant increases in traffic, transportation networks, and other forms of impervious surfaces will increase the loading of toxic stormwater runoff to aquatic habitats. Additionally, local population growth will invariably increase wastewater treatment plant effluent discharges and contaminant inputs to receiving waterbodies. In this way, coastal population growth will increase both point and nonpoint source pollution to coastal ecosystems with implications for aquatic life. In this talk, I will discuss 1) impacts of wastewater treatment plant effluent on salmon reproduction, 2) effects of stormwater runoff exposure on herring embryonic development, and 3) implications for current monitoring efforts to assess impacts of contaminants on Puget Sound fish health.

BIO
Louisa Harding is a research scientist at Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife in the Toxics-focused Biological Observation System (TBiOS) team. She earned a Ph.D. (2016) from the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington working with Dr. Graham Young and Dr. Penny Swanson (NWFSC) on reproductive physiology of salmon and endocrine disruption. As a postdoctoral researcher, Louisa examined the impacts of stormwater runoff on forage fish embryos with Dr. Jenifer McIntyre at Washington State University in collaboration with the Ecotoxicology Program at the NWFSC. Louisa is currently developing tools to monitor the impacts of chemical contaminants on the health of English sole and other Puget Sound indicator species.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Vertical Datum Changes for Floodplain Mapping
Presenter(s): Nicole Kinsman, NGS Regional Geodetic Advisor for Alaska and the U.S. Arctic
Date & Time: 15 November 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Nicole Kinsman, NGS Regional Geodetic Advisor for Alaska and the U.S. Arctic

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2956162749437058061
This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar provides an introduction to geodetic control in the context of flood mapping, presents case studies that highlight the importance of well-defined heights, and outlines the expected impacts of a modernized vertical datum on flood maps and related products.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge is helpful.
To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit:
https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are usually held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like #25DaysofFishmas: Science Communication through Education and Entertainment
Presenter(s): Katherine O'Reilly, OAR
Date & Time: 15 November 2018
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Katherine O'Reilly, Knauss Fellow, NOAA OAR National Sea Grant Office

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part of the monthly Knauss Fellows Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: A major goal in science communication is producing a personal response towards science. Using an example hashtag campaign I created called #25DaysofFishmas, I illustrate how social media (e.g., Twitter) can create opportunities for scientists to communicate with diverse audiences and produce personal responses towards environmental issues. Social media is not simply a tool for scientists to broadcast their research to diverse audiences, but also a platform to engage and affect personal responses towards science.

Bio(s): Katie (Katherine) O'Reilly is a 2018 Knauss Fellow serving as the Science Communication Specialist in the National Sea Grant Office and currently a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Notre Dame studying the ecology of coastal Great Lakes food webs. She received her B.S. in Marine Science and Biology from the University of Miami.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Marine Heatwaves under Global Warming: Discovering Risks for Marine Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Prof. Thomas Frlicher, Assistant Professor in Ocean Modelling, Climate and Environmental Physics, University of Bern, Switzerland. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 15 November 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Marine Heatwaves under Global Warming: Discovering Risks for Marine Ecosystems

Presenter(s): Prof. Thomas Frelicher, Assistant Professor in Ocean Modelling, Climate and Environmental Physics, University of Bern, Switzerland. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using Adobe Connect for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time, click on "Guest" and add your first and last name:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test. Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Extreme climate and weather events shape the structure of biological systems and affect the biogeochemical functions and services they provide for society in a fundamental manner. There is overwhelming evidence that the frequency, duration and intensity of extreme events on land are changing under global warming, increasing the risk of severe, pervasive and in some cases irreversible impacts on natural and socio-economic systems. In contrast, we know very little about the past occurrences and the future progression of marine heatwaves. This knowledge gap is of particular concern as some of the recently observed marine heatwaves revealed the high vulnerability of marine ecosystems and fisheries to such extreme climate events.

Here we use satellite observations and a suite of Earth system model simulations to show that the number of marine heatwave days doubled between 1982 and 2016, and this is projected to increase further if global temperature continue to increase. If temperature were to rise by 3.5 degrees Celsius relative to preindustrial levels, as is predicted to result from current national policies for the reduction of global carbon emissions, the average probability of marine heatwaves occurring would be 41 times higher than in preindustrial times. Such an increase in marine heatwaves will probably increase the risk of severe and long-lasting impact on marine organisms, such as coral reefs and those living at low latitudes, where many marine species live close to their upper thermal limits. Potential impacts on physical and human systems will also be discussed.

Bio(s): Thomas Frlicher is currently a SNF Assistant professor at the Climate and Environmental Physics Division of the University of Bern and interested in marine ecosystem-carbon-climate interactions with focus on ocean extreme events and their impacts on marine organisms and ecosystem services. He studied environmental sciences at ETH Zrich and graduated at the University of Bern. He worked 2 years as a postdoctoral fellow at Princeton
University and 4 years as a senior researcher at ETH Zrich. He is also the recipient of a SNF Ambizione fellowship. He authored or co-authored 46 peer-reviewed publications, is the lead author of chapter six of the upcoming IPCC Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a changing climate, and contributed to the fifth assessment report of working group II of the IPCC. A portrait about Thomas' work is available on
http://www.zeit.de/2016/20/thomas-froelicher-klimaforscher-schweiz

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14 November 2018

Title: CANCELLED: A Rare Great Lakes Ecosystem: Exploring the Sinkholes of Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Stephanie Gandulla, NOAA Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 14 November 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Stephanie Gandulla, NOAA Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4895467060831741186

Abstract: Underwater explorations in Lake Huron have revealed unique hotspots of biogeochemical activity at several submerged groundwater vents in Lake Huron. Learn about the techniques scientists use to explore unique single-celled microorganism communities that dominate this freshwater habitat. Educators will be provided with information and links to lessons that feature this unique Great Lakes research topic.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Insights and Resources to Guide Climate Change Communication
Presenter(s): Kristin Timm, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 14 November 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kristin Timm, George Mason University

Seminar sponsor: NOAA / OAR / CPO / RISA Program

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/VAWS_Nov2018

Abstract: There is a growing body of social science related to communicating climate change and related weather hazards. This research offers several insights on how different audiences perceive and understand climate change and what communication approaches to adopt with each, whether you are trying to raise awareness, discuss risks, or encourage people to adopt a new behavior. This talk will provide a summary of important ideas from the field of climate change communication, with a focus on practical recommendations for weather and climate professionals. Additionally, it will describe several high quality, evidence-based resources that are now freely available to help climate communicators.

Seminar POC for questions: sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Additional presenters field:

Title: Bridging the gap between Science, Management and Communities in the Pacific Islands
Presenter(s): Jamison Gove, Research Oceanographer, NMFS/PIFSC/ESD & Gerry Davis, Assistant Regional Administrator for Habitat Conservation, NMFS/PIR/PIRO/HCD
Date & Time: 14 November 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account, NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jamison Gove and Gerry Davis, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center and Regional Office.

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov); Webinar host: Librarian Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://goo.gl/fddvsB Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: The success of Ecosystem-Based Management (EBM) is dependent upon the partnership between scientists, managers, and stakeholders. In this presentation we will highlight collaborative efforts by the Habitat Focus Area and the Integrated Ecosystem Assessment to build lasting partnerships and work alongside local community members and the State of Hawaii in support of resource management in the region

Bio(s): Dr. Jamison Gove is a Research Oceanographer in the Ecosystem Sciences Division of the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center and is the lead of the West Hawaii Integrated Ecosystem Assessment. Gerry Davis is the Assistant Regional Administrator for the Habitat Conservation Division and a Co-chair of the Habitat Focus Area in West Hawaii.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: The return of Maine’s kelp forests: patterns, drivers and implications for stakeholders
Presenter(s): Thew Suskiewicz, PhD, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, Portland, ME.
Date & Time: 14 November 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Thew Suskiewicz, PhD, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, Portland, ME.

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.


Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Abstract: How intense overfishing on both groundfish and the herbivores has pushed the Gulf of Maine into a novel ecosystem

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: A Proof-of-Concept Application of a New Ecosystem Assessment/Decision Framework: Restoring Rookery Islands of the Mission-Aransas Reserve
Presenter(s): John H. Gentile, Harwell Gentile & Associates, LC, Cape Cod, MA, and Mark A. Harwell, Harwell Gentile & Associates, LC, Port Orange, FL
Date & Time: 14 November 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): John H. Gentile, Harwell Gentile & Associates, LC, Cape Cod, MA, and Mark A. Harwell, Harwell Gentile & Associates, LC, Port Orange, FL

Co-Authors: Larry D. McKinney, Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, TX, and John (Wes) W. Tunnell Jr., Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, TX

Sponsor(s): NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Kathleen.Ernst@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will use the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to the following site, select, 'Guest', and please enter your first and last name:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Over the past century, the environment of the Gulf of Mexico has been significantly altered and impaired by extensive human activities. A national commitment to restore the Gulf was finally initiated in response to the unprecedented Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010. Consequently, there is now a critical need for an assessment framework and associated set of indicators that can characterize the health and sustainability of an ecosystem having the scale and complexity of the Gulf. Such an assessment framework presented here has been developed as an integration of previous ecological risk- and environmental management-based frameworks for assessing ecological health. This conceptual framework is in its essence a comprehensive conceptual model of the coupled human-ecological system. It was designed to identify the natural and anthropogenic Drivers, Pressures, and Stressors impinging on ecosystems and ecosystem services and the ecological Conditions that result, manifested as effects on valued ecosystem components. Four types of societal and ecological Responses are also specified: reduction of pressures and stressors, remediation of existing stressors, active ecosystem restoration, and natural ecological recovery. From this conceptual framework are derived the specific indicators to characterize ecological condition and progress towards achieving defined ecological health and sustainability goals. We present a proof-of-concept evaluation of this integrated assessment/ decision framework to inform specific environmental management decisions of the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve. This pilot study has demonstrated the utility of the assessment and decision-support framework in restoring Texas coastal resident and migratory bird populations through enhancement of rookery islands in the Reserve.

Bio(s):
Dr. John H. (Jack) Gentile is an ecologist whose primary interest is the design and implementation of watershed- and regional-scale integrated risk assessments. Dr. Gentile was a senior scientist with the U.S. EPA for 30 years, where he directed programs in marine ecotoxicology, ocean disposal of hazardous wastes, ocean incineration, marine water quality criteria, and the disposal of dredged materials. As a visiting scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Dr. Gentile developed strategies and methods for conducting ecological risk assessments in near-coastal environments. He concluded his US EPA career as Senior Science Coordinator for the Risk Assessment Forum, where he played a leading role in the development of the US EPA Framework for Ecological Risks. Dr. Gentile has published numerous scientific papers on topics ranging from toxic blue-green algae, marine ecotoxicology, water quality criteria, hazardous waste disposal, incineration-at-sea, the ecological effects of climate change, ecological risk assessment, and ecosystem management. While Senior Research Scientist at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School, Dr. Gentile participated a series of interdisciplinary studies on human interactions with the South Florida environment, including field, mesocosm, and modeling studies in Biscayne Bay and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, as well as the US MAB project on ecological sustainability and ecosystem management of the Everglades. Dr. Gentile, along with Dr. Harwell, has conducted several large ecological risk assessments, including on Tampa Bay, Biscayne Bay, the Coeur d'Alene River basin, Prince William Sound, and the Bay of Fundy. Working with the South Florida Water Management District, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force, Dr. Gentile facilitated the development of Assessment Guidance for evaluating the success of the Everglades Ecosystem Restoration. Dr. Gentile, working with Dr. Harwell and teams of scientists, developed a series of conceptual ecosystem models for several National Estuarine Research Reserves, and for Prince William Sound. He has worked extensively on characterizing the long-term residual ecological risks and recovery from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and along with Dr. Harwell is developing an ecosystem health report card for the Gulf of Mexico.

Dr. Mark A. Harwell is an ecosystems ecologist specializing in ecological risk assessments, ecological modeling, and ecosystem management. He (with colleague Dr. Jack Gentile) was a leader in the development of the US EPA ecological risk assessment framework, which has been widely adopted by US EPA and throughout the federal government; they have led several large-scale ecological risk assessments, including on Biscayne Bay, Tampa Bay, Apalachicola Bay, Prince William Sound, the Coeur d'Alene River basin, and the Bay of Fundy. He and Dr. Gentile conducted extensive risk assessment studies on residual exposures and effects in the PWS ecosystem from the Exxon Valdez oil spill, and they presently are developing a framework for an ecosystem health report card for the Gulf of Mexico. Dr. Harwell spent 25 years in academia, primarily leading interdisciplinary environmental research centers at Cornell University and the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School. He chaired the US Man and the Biosphere Program's Human-Dominated Systems Directorate, and led its core project to develop ecosystem management principles and apply them to the Florida Everglades, providing the conceptual framework for the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration. He served for over ten years as a member of the US EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB), including two terms as Chair of the Ecological Processes and Effects Committee. He led the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) 5-year international study to assess the global environmental effects of nuclear war on ecological and agricultural systems, and directed a series of case studies on the ecological effects of climate change on Venezuela, India, Japan, China, and Sub-Saharan Africa. He served on the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) panel on ecological risks in the US and Poland and the NA

13 November 2018

Title: Standing at the Brink: The upcoming winter and what it means for western Alaska sea ice
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 13 November 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR / CPO / RISA Program

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/Sea_ice_webinar

Abstract: The winter of 2017-18 brought record late freeze-up and extremely low sea ice cover to the southern Chukchi and Bering Seas with dramatic impacts to the ecosystem this past summer. Naturally, inquiring minds want a heads-up on the upcoming season. This presentation will review the current and forecast state of the oceans and atmosphere and provide several scenarios for the winter and spring with an emphasis on sea ice.

Seminar POC for questions: sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Additional presenters field:

Title: Impacts of the 'warm blob' on Gulf of Alaska Pacific cod: A 1st year of life perspective
Presenter(s): Ben Laurel, Research Fish Biologist, Fish Behavior Ecology, Resource Assessment and Conservation Ecology, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 13 November 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ben Laurel, Research Fish Biologist, Fish Behavior Ecology, Resource Assessment and Conservation Ecology, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Remote Access: AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.

2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, November 13, 2018
10:00 am | Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00) | 1 hr
Meeting number: 804 776 791
Meeting password: dawson


When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Cownose Ray Migrations along the US Atlantic Coast: Implications for Management and Conservation
Presenter(s): Matthew B. Ogburn, Marine Ecologist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Date & Time: 13 November 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Cownose Ray Migrations along the US Atlantic Coast: Implications for Management and Conservation

Presenter(s): Matthew B. Ogburn, Marine Ecologist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using Adobe Connect for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time, click on "Guest" and add your first and last name:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test. Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: The Cownose Ray is a large, migratory batoid ray that occurs along much of the US Atlantic coast. Once vilified as a suspected cause of declines in shellfish fisheries, the species now receives attention from the conservation community for its potential susceptibility to overfishing. Cownose Rays have not been under management, but Maryland is currently drafting the first fishery management plan for the species. Ogburn and his team at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center have tracked Cownose Ray migrations using passive acoustic telemetry, documenting the first full annual migration cycle and evaluating migratory connectivity and philopatry. Study results provide information on the spatial and temporal scales at which management strategies could be targeted.

Bio(s): Dr. Matthew B. Ogburn is a Marine Ecologist and lead Principal Investigator of the Fish and Invertebrate Ecology Lab at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) in Edgewater, MD. His research interests range from Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management to Community Ecology and Movement Ecology. Focal study species include blue crabs, river herring, elasmobranchs, non-native fish, and striped bass. He is a leader in the Movement of Life and Working Land and Seascapes Initiatives of the Smithsonian Conservation Commons (https://conservationcommons.si.edu/), is the Chesapeake site Co-PI for the Smithsonian Marine Global Earth Observatory (https://marinegeo.si.edu/), is a member of the US Animal Telemetry Network Steering Group, and participates in scientific committees for the River Herring Technical Expert Working Group and Chesapeake Bay Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See the OneNOAA Science Seminar website for upcoming seminars.

9 November 2018

Title: CLIMAS Colloquium Series: New Mexico State University Dust Research
Presenter(s): Dave DuBois, CLIMAS & New Mexico State University, et al. see description
Date & Time: 9 November 2018
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dave DuBois, Jaylen Fuentes, Zahra (Vida) Ghodisidah, and Josue Gutierrez; Climate Assessment for the Southwest and New Mexico State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA / OAR / CPO / RISA Program

Point of Contact: sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://bit.ly/2PGhUtA

Abstract:
Dave DuBois and Jaylen Fuentes: Preparing for the next dust storm: Collaborations with state and federal agencies with roadway dust hazards


The likelihood of driving through a dust storm in the desert Southwest is high particularly during drought. Because of this, our office has been providing technical assistance to the NM Department of Transportation along interstate 10 to collect and interpret dust storm data to help them reduce these hazards. We will be talking about our current efforts and some of the successes and challenges in the project.

Zahra (Vida) Ghodisidah: Modeling of Dust Emissions over the Chihuahuan Desert


Dust storms are frequent phenomena in the southwestern United States. Dust source areas in the region are often (partly) crusted. A critical prerequisite in dust aerosol modeling is an accurate representation of dust emission. While several dust emission schemes have been developed, their applicability for crusted surfaces is not well tested. In this study, we examine the applicability of Shao (2004) size-resolved dust emission scheme (S04), which estimates dust emission based on the soil volume removed by saltation particle impacts, to model dust emission from a crusted surface in New Mexico, USA, for three dust events in spring 2016. Our results show that the scheme is able to model dust emission from a crusted surface by replacing the minimally- and fully-dispersed PSDs of the top ~1 cm soil layer with the PSDs of, respectively, loose erodible material and crust, and adapting appropriate scheme parameters. Further tests are required in the future to investigate the parameter variability for different crusted surfaces.

Josue Gutierrez: Dust Classification from Weather Observation Stations and Remote Sensing


Giving warning of dust storms while driving through a dust prone area has always been a challenge. Based on our current with the NM Department of Transportation and a local trucking company we are building an automated traffic camera image classifier using machine learning to detect dust storms. This involves building a neural network for the existing archive of time-lapse cameras on the Lordsburg Playa. The goal is to construct an early warning tool for decision makers who are tasked with closing the interstates due to dust hazards.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

8 November 2018

Title: Vertical turbulent cooling of the mixed layer in the tropical Atlantic ITCZ and trade wind regions
Presenter(s): Dr. Greg Foltz, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 8 November 2018
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Greg Foltz (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote Access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/142757501

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3212
Access Code: 142-757-501

Abstract: The processes responsible for vertical turbulent cooling of sea surface temperature (SST) and its seasonal modulation are not well known and potentially contribute to coupled model biases. In this study, the seasonal cycles of vertical turbulent cooling at the base of the mixed layer are examined using observations from moorings at 4N, 23W and 15N, 38W, together with one-dimensional mixing models. The 15N, 38W mooring samples the trade wind region, which experiences a strong annual cycle of SST and weak seasonal variations of wind speed. The 4N, 23W mooring is located in a region with much weaker seasonal variability of SST and a stronger seasonal cycle of winds. At 4N, 23W the modeled turbulent cooling agrees with indirect estimates from the mooring heat budget residual. Both show a maximum in cooling of 25-45 W/m^2 during boreal winter and spring and a minimum of 0-15 W/m^2 during summer and fall. The maximum in winter and spring is found to be driven by strong high-frequency variations of current shear (period < 1 day) that are likely generated by tides and other remotely forced internal waves. In summer and fall the mixed layer and thermocline are deeper and current shear is much weaker, leading to reduced turbulent cooling of SST. At 15N, 38W the seasonal cycle of turbulent cooling is out of phase with that at 4N, 23W, with largest cooling during boreal fall. However, the mechanism appears to be similar: a thinner mixed layer in the fall leads to stronger current shear and mixing. These results suggest that most of the turbulent cooling at these locations is driven not by local wind or surface buoyancy forcing but by a complex mix of remotely-generated internal waves.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Measuring and Modeling Ecological Interactions in the Wild
Presenter(s): Andrew Hein, Ph.D., Research Ecologist, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, UC Santa Cruz Institute of Marine Sciences
Date & Time: 8 November 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): ANDREW HEIN, Ph.D., Research Ecologist, Southwest Fisheries Science Center,
UC Santa Cruz Institute of Marine Sciences

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT
Scientists are increasingly being asked to determine how climate and human actions will affect natural ecosystems. Predicting how species and communities will respond to these perturbations is challenging because they affect not only individual organisms, but also the ecological connections among them. In the past, these connections often had to be inferred from correlations in species abundances. With the advent of new technologies for tracking and observing animals in the field and generating realistic environments in the lab, we now have the opportunity to measure these ecological interactions directly. In this talk, I will discuss methods that we are developing to infer ecological interaction rules from behavioral data, and emerging opportunities and challenges in applying these techniques to build a data-driven understanding of ecological interactions in oceans and rivers.

BIO
Andrew Hein is an ecologist and ethologist based at NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center Fisheries Ecology Division / UC Santa Cruz Institute of Marine Sciences. Prior to joining NOAA/UCSC, he was a James S. McDonnell fellow at Princeton University working with Simon Levin and Iain Couzin. He received his PhD at the University of Florida, where he was co-advised in Biology and Mathematics.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Enterprise Environmental Data Records (EDR) Assessment at NOAA's Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR)
Presenter(s): Tony Reale of NESDIS/STAR/SMCD
Date & Time: 8 November 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553 , NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tony Reale of NESDIS/STAR/SMCD

Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx Event Number: 908 568 560
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=me248ee288f8f1f1719f234c2afd921ee

Audio: USA participants: 866-832-9297

Passcode: 6070416

Download slides at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/20181108_Reale.pdf

Abstract:
A difference in current NESDIS STAR (post 2000) and pre-2000 Office of Research and Applications (ORA) infra-structure is the lack of an independent Research to Operation (R2O) sanctioning function for EDRs that is overseen by the government. At least for operational atmospheric soundings, the responsibility for assessments leading to R2O transition currently lies mainly with the developer. Enterprise assessment, in simplest form, means comparing different product suites for a given EDR to the same targets. This seminar focuses on what enterprise validation should entail and then cites examples using the NOAA Products Validation System (NPROVS) currently operated at STAR for EDR soundings (vertical temperature and moisture profiles). The seminar also explores enterprise validation scenarios for gas profiles and non-sounding products. The goal is to entice STAR and developers that it is in the mutual best interest to reconsider the original ORA structure.
In general, the underlying framework of enterprise validation consists of routinely compiled datasets of collocated ground-truth, models and EDR products from multiple satellites, sensors and product suites. This is the carrot, STAR would inherit the mundane, time consuming dirty-work (when you consider monitoring, reprocessing missing data, etc) of creating and maintaining enterprise validation datasets. Once compiled however, these datasets are a source for reliable, routine assessment across multiple EDR suites and highly useful to identify problem areas and provide a stamp of approval for proposed upgrades including for new satellites (Small Satellites, COSMIC-2 ). This does not replace developer assessment, but shifts that assessment to focus on development and leaving the busy, mundane work of enterprise assessment to the government (STAR). Examples of enterprise validation and value to developers in product monitoring and identifying problem areas is demonstrated using NPROVS for atmospheric temperature and moisture soundings. Soundings inherit the relatively large and diverse global radiosonde network including subsets of reference observations providing multiple targets for assessment. This is not true for other products, so extending enterprise assessment to product suites such as of gases, surface temperature, clouds, aerosol, fires etc requires a separate consideration for each. As discussed, the key for each suite is defining/accessing the available sets of products (including test products) and then underscoring them common sets of ground-truth targets, models, intensive observations, etc. These steps clearly must leverage and integrate the existing capabilities and expertise from respective developers requiring extensive interaction. Questions concerning why developers should bother when they can do it themselves (can they? do they?) and perceptions that STAR managed enterprise assessments would undermine (not enhance) developers are addressed.

Bio(s):
Anthony Reale received B.S. degrees in Meteorology and Physics from the State University of New York, College at Oswego in 1976. Following three years as a research fellow at the University of Nevada, Reno, he received his M.S. degree in Atmospheric Physics in 1979. He then spent three years in the field conducting remote sensing measurements programs to establish background air-quality and meteorological profiles at selected locations in the pristine eastern Mohave Desert. Mr. Reale was hired as a NOAA support contractor in 1983 where he began working on the problem of deriving atmospheric sounding products from remote satellite sensors onboard NOAA operational polar orbiting satellites. Mr. Reale was hired by NOAA in 1984 where he provided technical guidance and direction to government and support contractor staff focused on the development of scientific software and associated graphical evaluation tools to assess atmospheric sounding products from operational satellites. Beginning 2008, he became task leader for the development of the NOAA Products Validation System (NPROVS), designed to provide an enterprise approach for assessing atmospheric profiles from multiple satellites against in-situ (radiosonde) observations. This was expanded in 2013 to include reference radiosondes from the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Reference Upper Air network (GRUAN).

7 November 2018

Title: Uncertainty in the Retrieval of Coastal Aquatic Properties from Remote Sensing Imposed by Sensor Noise
Presenter(s): Dr. Steven G. Ackleson, Section Head, Oceanographer at U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
Date & Time: 7 November 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room #3555, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
with SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group

Presenter(s):

Dr. Steven G. Ackleson, Section Head
Oceanographer at U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
(presenting in person)

Sponsor(s):

SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group
The NOCCG is a NOAA organization founded in 2011 by Dr. Paul DiGiacomo, Chief of the Satellite Oceanography and Climatology Division at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR. The purpose of the NOCCG is to keep members up to date about developments in the field of satellite ocean color and connect ocean color science development with users and applications. We have representatives from all the NOAA line offices, including National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, National Ocean Service, National Weather Service and from several levels of the National Environmental and Satellite Data and Information Service (where Paul is housed). Dr. Cara Wilson of South East Fisheries Science Center is our current chair. We meet bi-weekly on Wednesday afternoons, 3 PM Eastern Time in room 3555 at the National Center for Weather and Climate Prediction building in College Park, MD with teleconferencing and Webex for out of town members and guests. We host a guest speaker, usually about once a month.

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number: 904 100 286
Password: NOCCG
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=m24421776bea92bc59a200ac492d83c49

Audio:
USA participants: 866-564-7828 Passcode: 9942991

Abstract: Satellite remote sensing systems designed for coastal aquatic applications strive to provide high quality data across the visible and near infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Data quality is driven by uncertainties related to sensor design and environmental variability. The work is focused on the impact of sensor signal to noise (SNR) on the retrieval of key aquatic ecological parameters; water column impurity concentration (chlorophyll, colored dissolved organic matter, and suspended sediment) water depth, and benthic cover. Uncertainty is defined as parameter variability producing a reflectance signal that is indistinguishable from the true condition. The impact of sensor SNR is investigated using modeling methods and remote sensing data analyses. The results quantify parameter retrieval uncertainty as a function of sensor design SNR and environmental noise attributed to surface glint. The results will be discussed within the context of future satellite systems designed for coastal applications, such as the NASA Surface Biology and Geology sensor.

Title: Northern rock sole recruitment response to winds and temperature in the eastern Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Dan Cooper, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 7 November 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dan Cooper, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA.

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Abstract: Creating environment-recruitment models for short and long-term forecasting of rock sole.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 November 2018

Title: Ecological interactions among major groundfish species in the Gulf of Alaska
Presenter(s): Cheryl Barnes, Ph.D. Student, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 6 November 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Cheryl Barnes, Ph. D. Student, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Remote Access: AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.

2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, November 6, 2018
10:00 am | Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00) | 1 hr
Meeting number: 800 147 324
Meeting password: dawson


When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Coastal Wetlands Reduce Disaster Risk, Protect Biodiversity, and Promote Human Health and Well-Being
Presenter(s): Ariana Sutton-Grier, Director of Science the MD-DC Chapter of the Nature Conservancy and Associate Research Professor University of Maryland. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring. And Paul Sandifer, Director of the Center for Coastal Environmental and Human Health at the College of Charleston. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: 6 November 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Coastal Wetlands Reduce Disaster Risk, Protect Biodiversity, and Promote Human Health and Well-Being

Presenter(s): Ariana Sutton-Grier, Director of Science for the MD/DC Chapter of the Nature Conservancy & Associate Research Professor University of Maryland, and
Paul Sandifer, Director of the Center for Coastal Environmental and Human Health at the College of Charleston

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will use Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to the following site, click "Guest" and please enter your first and last name:
"Enter as Guest": https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets. Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: There is substantial, growing literature that details positive human health effects, psychological and physiological, of exposure to nature, including green and blue space, with evidence suggesting that diversity of species or environments may have specific positive human health benefits. These health benefits are important ecosystem services provided by healthy ecosystems. In this presentation, we discuss several critical ecosystem services provided by wetlands including disaster risk reduction, with an emphasis on benefits to human health and well-being. Impacts to human health via damage to ecosystem services from disasters have rarely been considered in disaster planning or mitigation, nor have the health benefits been part of the framework for planning urban greenspaces and land-use. Coastal wetlands can be part of natural and nature-based solutions, minimizing the impacts of disasters by buffering coastal communities from storms and erosion and absorbing flood waters. In addition, mental and physical health benefits of experiencing healthy wetlands could offset some stress and disease encounters related to disasters. Thus, coastal wetlands should be part of a strategy for reducing the risk posed by disasters and facilitating recovery. We conclude with recommendations for research priorities and specific inclusion of wetlands in coastal community planning for disaster response and recovery.

Bio(s):
Dr. Ariana Sutton-Grier is the Director of Science for the Maryland/DC Chapter of the Nature Conservancy and is also a Visiting Associate Research Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Sutton-Grier is an ecosystem ecologist with expertise in wetland ecology and restoration, biodiversity, biogeochemistry, climate change, and ecosystem services. She holds Honors Bachelor degrees from Oregon State University in Environmental Science and International Studies and a doctoral degree from Duke University in Ecology. Her research interests include the relationships between nature/biodiversity and human health, coastal blue carbon, and natural and nature-based coastal resilience strategies.

Dr. Paul Sandifer is the Founding Director of the Center for Coastal Environmental and Human Health at the College of Charleston where he conducts research and advises graduate students. He has a broad background in ecological and aquaculture research, natural resource management, science policy, and the intersection of environmental and human health. He is currently working on the development of a community health observing system for the Gulf of Mexico and implementation of a new NIEHS-funded Center for Oceans and Human Health at the University of SC. His prior career includes nearly 12 years as a Senior Scientist and Science Advisor in NOAA and 31 years as a scientist and manager, including as agency Director, with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Paul has been a member of numerous boards, commissions, and committees including the US Commission on Ocean Policy. He is an Honorary Life Member of the World Aquaculture Society, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Fellow of the Ecological Society of America, and Emeritus Member of the National Association of Marine Laboratories.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

1 November 2018

Title: Effects of Temperature on Fish Sex Determination: Potential Bioindicators of Global Climate Change
Presenter(s): Yoji Yamamoto, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology
Date & Time: 1 November 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): YOJI YAMAMOTO, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

Abstract:
Sex determination in several fishes such as those from Atheriniform families is strongly dependent on the water temperature experienced during early life (so-called temperature-dependent sex determination or TSD). In recent years, water temperature change due to climate change has been concerning on a world-wide level. Fish that have TSD are expected to be seriously affected (e.g. extreme unbalanced sex ratios). Our recent studies have shown that some Atheriniform species possess a major, if not master, testis determining gene, the Y-chromosome-linked anti-Mllerian hormone (amhy). This discovery now makes it possible to detect mismatches (sex reversals) between genotypic (XX or XY) and phenotypic (ovary or testis) sex and demonstrate effects of temperatures on sex determination in wild populations. Using such high temperature sensitivity in sex determination/differentiation and the Y-chromosome linked gene marker, we have been working to establish Atheriniform fish species as bioindicators for the impacts of global warming/climate change on fish reproduction worldwide.

Bio(s):
Yoji Yamamoto is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Marine Biosciences at Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology (TUMSAT). He received a B.S. (1998), M.S. (2000) and Ph.D. (2006) from TUMSAT in Fisheries. He was a post-doc in Tateyama Field Science Center of TUMSAT from 2006-2008 and established a method for transgenesis using microinjection in marine fish species that produce small pelagic eggs. He then moved to Seattle for a second post-doc (2008-2011) at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington (based at the NWFSC) where he studied the relationship between food availability and gonadal development in coho salmon. After returning to TUMSAT in 2011, Yoji initiated research on sex determination mechanisms in fish. More recently, he has been developing silversides as bioindicators to assess effects of abnormal temperatures on fish sex determination in the wild.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

31 October 2018

Title: Are fieldwork studies being relegated to second place in conservation science?
Presenter(s): Dr. Carlos Antonio Ros-Saldaa, BioCrima/Technological Institute of Linares, Arteaga, Coahuila, Mexico. Presenting from Coahuila, Mexico
Date & Time: 31 October 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Are fieldwork studies being relegated to second place in conservation science?

Presenter(s): Dr. Carlos Antonio Ros-Saldaa, BioCrima/Technological Institute of Linares, Arteaga, Coahuila, Mexico. Presenting from Coahuila, Mexico.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using Adobe Connect for this webinar. To join a session, please go to the following site, select Guest", and please enter your first and last name: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE, Edge or Google Chrome on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

Audio will be available thru the computer only (voice over IP) - no phone. Adjust the volume of your computer speakers or headset to hear the speaker. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: The collection of biological information, including data gathered in the field, is fundamental to improve our understanding of how human impacts on biological systems can be recognized, mitigated or averted. However, the role of empirical field research has faded appreciably in the past decades with sobering implications. Indeed, important instruments to help set national and global priorities in biodiversity conservation (i.e. synthetic analyses and big data approaches) can be severely handicapped by a lack of sound observational data, collected through fieldwork. Here, we show that the proportion of fieldwork-based investigations in the conservation literature dropped significantly from the 1980s until today; and we found that the most highly cited academic journals in conservation science published fieldwork studies less frequently than the lower rank journals. We contend that an apparent decrease in fieldwork-based investigations is the result of bottom-up pressures, including those associated with the publishing and the academic reward systems, while a second set acts top-down, driven by current societal needs and/or priorities. We urge researchers, funders and journals to commit, respectively, to conducting, funding and divulging relevant fieldwork research, and make some recommendations on specific steps that can be adopted in that direction.

Bio(s): Antonio Ros is co-founder and director of a Mexico-based biodiversity nonprofit called BioCrima. He is also a research associate in the Technological Institute of Linares. Antonio is acknowledged by the National System of Researchers (Sistema Nacional de Investigadores or SNI), a governmental agency established to promote both the quantity and quality of scientific research in Mexico. He received a Bachelor's degree in Forestry from the Universidad Autnoma de Nuevo Len (UANL, for its acronym in Spanish), Mexico. Afterward, he obtained a Master of Science degree in Wildlife Research and a Ph.D. in Wildlife Management and Conservation, both, in the University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. His research focuses on game management, ecology and wildlife conservation. Antonio received the Professional Development Award by the UANL in 2017 (Mexico). Additionally, he won the Research Award Cuenta Joven 2006 by the Caja Espaa (Spain) and the Award for Excellence in the Social Service by the UANL in 2004 (Mexico). He lives with his wife and two dogs in Saltillo, Mexico, and enjoys kayaking, dog walking and travel.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

30 October 2018

Title: Reproduction and population biology of rockfish and flatfish in Alaskan waters
Presenter(s): Todd TenBrink, Research Fish Biologist, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 30 October 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Todd TenBrink, Research Fish Biologist, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Remote Access: AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.

2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, October 30, 2018
10:00 am | Pacific Daylight Time (San Francisco, GMT-07:00) | 1 hr
Meeting number: 801 520 707
Meeting password: dawson


When it's time, join the meeting.

Abstract: In this presentation, I will summarize life history information collected and analyzed from several species of rockfish and flatfish. Rockfishes studied were shortspine thornyhead, shortraker, harlequin, and redstripe rockfish, with a goal to support upward movement from their current Tier 5 designation (e.g. Tier 4). Current work on yellowfin sole and Alaska plaice biology from the eastern and northern Bering Seas will also be discussed.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

25 October 2018

Title: Ghosts of Oceans Past: How Fishing Reshapes Communities of Fishes and their Parasites
Presenter(s): Chelsea Wood, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 25 October 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): CHELSEA WOOD, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT
Marine ecosystems contain a vast diversity of ecologically influential parasites. My work aims to pinpoint ways in which fishing may reshape these assemblages. My past research has focused on quantifying variability in parasite abundance and diversity across contemporary spatial variation in fishing pressure. I have tackled this challenge with empirical work in several marine systems (e.g., coral reefs of the Northern Line Islands archipelago, marine reserves in central Chile) and by using synthesis techniques. These data have shown that fishing tends to erode parasite diversity and shift parasite assemblage composition away from complex life cycle parasite taxa and toward directly transmitted parasite taxa. An obvious implication of this work - that the accumulation of fishing impacts on marine ecosystems may have driven similar shifts in parasite assemblages over time - has never been addressed. Our lab group is currently working to turn back the clock, by generating primary data on the dynamics of marine parasites over long time profiles and at unprecedented temporal, spatial, and taxonomic resolutions, and I'll show some preliminary data from this effort.

BIO
Chelsea is a marine ecologist interested in how fishing drives change in parasite assemblages. She received her Ph.D. in 2013 from Stanford University, where she was a student of marine ecologist and conservation biologist Fiorenza Micheli. She went on to complete post-docs at the University of Colorado and the University of Michigan. Chelsea is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Understanding Underwater Behavior of Humpback Whales to Mitigate Ship Strike and Entanglement
Presenter(s): Dave Wiley, Sanctuary Research Coordinator, NOAA"s Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 25 October 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Understanding the Underwater Behavior of Humpback Whales to Mitigate Ship Strike and Entanglement

Presenter(s): Dave Wiley, Sanctuary Research Coordinator, NOAA"s Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156.
No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract: Recent innovations in technologies available to investigate the underwater behavior of whales (multi-sensor acoustic and video recording tags) and analytic software (TrackPlot and GeoZUI4D) have enabled scientists and collaborators from the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary to gather unprecedented information about large whales. Since 2004, the team has tagged 193 humpback whales and analyzed hundreds of hours of tag-derived data. Analysis and data visualizations suggest that humpback's demonstrate complex behaviors that indicate cooperation and competition for resources, and feed primarily in the top and bottom portions of the water column. The latter make the animals particularly vulnerable to interactions with ships and bottom-set fishing gears.

Bio(s): Dr. David Wiley is the Research Coordinator for NOAA's Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. His research focuses on the ecology of large whales and seabirds and his numerous publications include being featured on the cover of journals as diverse as Conservation Biology and Behaviour. He has been awarded a Gulf of Maine Visionary Award, the Society for Marine Mammalogy's award for Excellence in Scientific Communication and the Department of Commerce's Gold Medal for Scientific Leadership. He is a recipient of an Ian Axford/Fulbright Fellowship in Public Policy and is adjunct faculty in the School of Science and Mathematics at the University of Massachusetts - Boston and the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

24 October 2018

Title: NOAA Geospatial (Geographic Information System) Hot Topics
Presenter(s): Tony LaVoi, NOAA Geospatial Information Officer, NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer and Integrated Information Services Division Chief, NOAA Office for Coastal Management; and Randy Warren, GIS Coordinator, National Ocean Service, Office for Coastal Management
Date & Time: 24 October 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Geospatial (Geographic Information System) Hot Topics

Presenter(s):
  • Tony LaVoi, NOAA Geospatial Information Officer, NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer, and Integrated Information Services Division Chief, NOAA Office for Coastal Management;
  • Randy Warren, GIS Coordinator, National Ocean Service, Office for Coastal Management


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using Adobe Connect for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time, click on "Guest" and add your first and last name:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test. Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: NOAA's diverse mission is enabled by the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies. During this webinar we will demonstrate several ways how GIS is used to meet NOAA's mission. We will also provide an overview of the NOAA GIS Committee, resources for end users including the NOAA GIS Community website, and discuss benefits of the new NOAA Esri Enterprise License Agreement, which includes access to software, ArcGIS Online, and GIS training.

Bio(s):
Tony LaVoi holds a dual role within NOAA. He serves as the NOAA Geospatial Information Officer (GIO) in the NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer. Tony and his GIO team serve as the focal point for enterprise geospatial projects, strategies, policy development, standards, and coordination activities across the organization. In his other role at NOAA, heTony serves as the Chief of the Integrated Information Services (IIS) Division within NOAA's Office for Coastal Management, of the National Ocean Service. Outside NOAA, Tony is a member of the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) Executive and Steering Committees, is active in the United Nations Global Geospatial Information Management Working Group, and is a member of FEMA's Technical Mapping Advisory Council.

Randy Warren has been on contract with NOAA for over 11 years. During that time he has become the de facto coordinator for many geospatial activities in NOAA. He is the lead administrator for the NOAA GeoPlatform (ArcGIS Online), a core team member of the NOAA Esri Central Support, and Executive Secretariat for the NOAA GIS Committee. He also leads several geospatial activities for the Office of Coastal Management of the National Ocean Service.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See the OneNOAA Science Seminar website for upcoming seminars.

Title: The Developing El Niño and the Ongoing Drought in the Southwest
Presenter(s): s): Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Gerry Bell, NWS Climate Prediction Center; David Simeral, Desert Research Institute/DRI, Western Regional Climate Center/WRCC
Date & Time: 24 October 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Gerry Bell, NWS Climate Prediction Center; David Simeral, Desert Research Institute (DRI), Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC)

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with the National Weather Service

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the webinar at: https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/developing-el-ni%C3%B1o-and-going-drought-southwest

Abstract:

What does El Nio mean for the exceptional drought in the Southwest? This webinar will provide an El Nio overview and share up-to-date information on the long-term drought, its impacts, and how El Nio may influence temperature and precipitation in the region, which includes portions of Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. The webinar series is a collaboration of NIDIS, NWS, Western Water Assessment (WWA, a NOAA RISA), Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS, a NOAA RISA), Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), USDA Southwest Climate Hub, the National Drought Mitigation Center, state climatologists, universities and other drought experts.

Bio(s):

Elizabeth Weight is the Regional Drought Information Coordinator for both the Intermountain West and Southern Plains Drought Early Warning Systems (DEWS) for NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System. Elizabeth has more than 20 years of international water management and research experience in 14 countries in Asia and Africa, most recently with the CGIAR's International Water Management Institute in Sri Lanka.

Gerry Bell is a meteorologist, climate specialist, and El Nio expert with NOAA's Climate Prediction Center (CPC) in Camp Springs, Maryland. Dr. Bell specializes in monitoring and predicting global climate variability, especially patterns related to the El Nio/ La Nia cycle and other large-scale atmospheric processes. He is a forecaster for NOAA's monthly El Nio predictions, and a co-editor for NOAA's weekly El Nio updates. Dr. Bell is also the chief editor and co-author of the monthly Climate Diagnostics Bulletin, which provides the latest El Nio analyses and diagnoses along with a description and analysis of global weather and climate conditions. Dr. Bell has published numerous scientific papers, and given many lectures and webinars, on El Nio and its impacts, and he has received NOAA-wide awards for accurate El Nio predictions.

Dave Simeral is an Associate Research Scientist of Climatology with the Division of Atmospheric Sciences at the Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) in Reno, Nevada. Dave's interests cover a broad spectrum within the fields of climatology, meteorology, physical geography, and snow science. Over the past 15 years at the DRI/WRCC, Mr. Simeral has worked on a wide variety of projects in the fields of meteorology and climatology with state, federal, and university entities. Mr. Simeral is one of twelve national authors for the U.S. Drought Monitor and serves on several steering committees for the NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

(

Presenter

23 October 2018

Title: Effects of Sea Level Rise on New England Salt Marshes
Presenter(s): Jennifer West, Narragansett Bay National Estaurine Research Reserve
Date & Time: 23 October 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Please register through GoToWebinar (see below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jennifer West, Narragansett Bay National Estaurine Research Reserve, Email: jennifer@nbnerr.org

Sponsor(s): NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html or http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar).

Remote Access: GoTo

Remote Access: http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar

Abstract: Join us to learn from a regional workshop led by the New England NERRS that brought together scientists and managers to discuss the latest developments on salt marshes and sea level rise. The workshop increased knowledge of the regional status and trends of salt marsh condition; increased awareness of partnership and collaboration opportunities; improved connections between research, management, and restoration sectors; created a more robust information sharing network; and increased awareness of NERRs as unique sites suitable for long-term research and management test beds for management strategies.

Bio(s): Jennifer West has been the Coastal Training Program Coordinator with the Narragansett Bay Research Reserve since 2005. In this position, she develops and delivers training events and technical assistance programs for municipal officials and other decision-maker audiences on topics related to water quality, habitat protection, and climate change. Jennifer has expertise in program design, management, and evaluation; communicating science to diverse audiences; meeting facilitation; and planning and implementing collaborative methods for engaging stakeholders in successfully addressing environmental issues.

Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or boumad@umich.edu

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Fish age estimation using Fourier transform-near infrared spectroscopy: A pathway to operationalization
Presenter(s): Thomas Helser, Program Manager, Age and Growth, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 23 October 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Thomas Helser, Program Manager, Age and Growth, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Abstract: Estimating the age of fish is of national relevance since the availability of age-structure for stock assessments tends to reduce uncertainty in catch projections, in support of sustainable fishery management. Thus, fish age data play a vital role in identifying appropriate overfishing and annual catch limits. Age data are also essential for estimating growth"and its variability over time and space"and estimating recruitment success, which are key components for ecosystem drivers of population dynamics. Fish age is usually determined by visual microscopic counting of opaque and translucent growth bands from otoliths and other hard structures, which requires a large expense in human capital, equipment and quality control to ensure reliability of the data. With the demand for age data outstripping our capacity to deliver them using conventional means, new innovative approaches for fish age determination are needed. Fourier Transform-near infrared spectroscopy, which is widespread in the pharmaceutical, chemical, and petrochemical industries, represents a new and transformative technology in fisheries science to rapidly, reliably, and accurately estimate age from otoliths and other hard structures. Beyond ageing fish, other potential applications, including analysis of gonad samples for maturity status and stomach contents for diet analysis, could fundamentally change biological sample collection either at-sea or in the laboratory. This seminar will focus theoretical aspects of the technology, highlight recent developments and case studies, and discuss a pathway to operationalizing FT-NIRS for age estimation.

Remote Access: AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.

2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, October 23, 2018
10:00 am | Pacific Daylight Time (San Francisco, GMT-07:00) | 1 hr
Meeting number: 806 264 950
Meeting password: dawson


When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Preparing Ocean Governance for Species on the Move
Presenter(s): Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor, Rutgers University. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 23 October 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 for NOAA Silver Spring staff
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Preparing Ocean Governance for Species on the Move

Presenter(s): Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor, Rutgers University. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Science and Technology and National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; co-hosts are Roger Griffis and Tracy Gill

It is likely you will be able to obtain a PDF or video of this presentation by contacting Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov or Roger.Griffis@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: We will be using Adobe Connect for this webinar. To join a session, please go to the following site at the scheduled date and time, hit button "Enter as Guest", and then please enter your first & last name:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.; Google Chrome often works too.You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Fisheries provide critical sources of food and employment for people around the world, and yet rapid shifts in the geographic distribution of marine animals represent an emerging governance challenge for which states and international bodies are underprepared. Past experience suggests that conflict, overfishing, and ultimately fewer marine resources to share are common outcomes when fished stocks move across political boundaries. Moreover, the projected widespread emergence of new transboundary stocks and the gaps in current institutions suggest that new policy and legal approaches are needed to facilitate cooperation. Potential solutions could include broadening the scope of negotiations and mandates, regular governance updates to reflect changes in stock distribution, internationally tradable fisheries permits, and neutral research bodies to guide negotiations. The challenges of shifting fisheries are entirely foreseeable, and with sufficient preparation, ocean fisheries can continue to provide the benefits relied upon by billions of people.

Bio(s): Malin Pinsky is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources and an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow in Ocean Sciences at Rutgers University. He leads a research group studying the ecological and evolutionary impacts of climate change in the ocean, and he developed the OceanAdapt website to document shifting ocean animals in North America. He has published articles in Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and other international journals, and his research has received coverage in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, BBC, National Public Radio, and other media. He has a Ph.D. from Stanford University, an A.B. from Williams College, and earlier connections along the coast of Maine.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

22 October 2018

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): s): Phil Mote, Oregon State Climatologist; NWS Climate Prediction Center; Emily York, CIRC; Kris Ray, Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation
Date & Time: 22 October 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Phil Mote, Oregon State Climatologist; NWS Climate Prediction Center; Emily York, CIRC; Kris Ray, Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

Seminar sponsor: National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Climate Impacts Research Consortium (CIRC - a NOAA RISA), NOAA Climate Program Office

Seminar POC for questions: britt.parker@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the webinar at: https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/pacific-northwest-drought-climate-outlook-webinar-october-22-2018

Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar

The Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (PNW DEWS) October 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia).

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Climate Recap and Current Conditions
Phil Mote | Oregon State Climatologist

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Dan Collins | NWS Climate Prediction Center

Health Effects of Drought and Wildfire in the Northwest
Emily York | CIRC

An Introduction to Smoke Ready Communities
Kris Ray | Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

Bio(s):

Phil Mote is a professor of atmospheric sciences at Oregon State University and heads CIRC's (a NOAA RISA) Climate Science activity. Along with co-leading CIRC, Phil directs the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute (OCCRI) and the Oregon Climate Service, and has helped co-lead several long-term research projects looking into the impacts of climate change. You might also find him rowing along the Northwest's scenic waterways.

Dr. Dan Collins is a research meteorologist with the Operational Prediction Branch of the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) within the National Weather Service and NOAA, responsible for the management of several interagency NOAA Climate Test Bed (CTB) projects developing subseasonal to seasonal (S2S) forecast capabilities based on hybrid statistical-dynamical methods and multi-model ensembles. Prior to CPC, Dr. Collins worked as a research scientist at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and Georgia Tech. Dr. Collins is originally from New Jersey and earned a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.S. from Rutgers University, and a Ph.D. from New York University.

Emily York leads the Oregon Climate and Health program and is an author of the Northwest Chapter of the forthcoming U.S. National Climate Assessment. She chairs the Healthy Environments section of the Oregon Public Health Association, co-chairs the NW Climate and Health Network and a steering committee member of the International Transformational Resilience Coalition. She has graduate degrees in public health and sustainability from Portland State University and undergraduate degrees in planning and visual communications from the University of Washington. Before joining the State, Emily led local policy initiatives at the City of Portland and worked with the Coalition for a Livable Future.

Kris Ray has worked for the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation for many years and now manages the Air Quality Program for the last 9.5 years. Currently the program is developing the concept of smoke ready communities to provide practical methods to minimize health related problems due to wood smoke. The program also instigated the Okanogan River Airshed Partnership to look at the many sources of emissions on and off the Reservation and then develop strategies for decreasing exposure. The program operates three PM 2.5 BAM 1020 monitors, an E-BAM, a pesticide deposition monitor and multiple sensors. The program also conducts yearly emissions inventories, participates in compliance and permitting activates, issues agricultural burn permits, determines burn bans and has delegation for several parts of the Federal Air Rules for Reservations. Kris is an EPA credentialed inspector for air quality.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

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Presenter
Title: Southern Plains Drought & El Niño Webinar
Presenter(s): s): Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Kyle Brehe, Southern Regional Climate Center; Victor Murphy, NWS Southern Region
Date & Time: 22 October 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Kyle Brehe, Southern Regional Climate Center; Victor Murphy, NWS Southern Region

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with the National Weather Service

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the webinar at: https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/southern-plains-drought-el-ni%C3%B1o-webinar-october-22-2018

Abstract: This webinar will focus on the current drought, its impacts, and El Nio and the fall/winter drought outlook in the Southern Plains region. The webinar will be led by NIDIS, the National Weather Service, the Southern Regional Climate Center, Southern Climate Impacts Planning Program (SCIPP, a NOAA RISA), the USDA Southern Plains Climate Hub, the National Drought Mitigation Center, and state climatologists in the region.

Bio(s):

Elizabeth Weight is the Regional Drought Information Coordinator for both the Intermountain West and Southern Plains Drought Early Warning Systems (DEWS) for NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System. Elizabeth has more than 20 years of international water management and research experience in 14 countries in Asia and Africa, most recently with the CGIAR's International Water Management Institute in Sri Lanka.

Kyle Brehe is the Regional Climatologist for the Southern Regional Climate Center at LSU which oversees Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Tennessee. As Regional Climatologist, Mr. Brehe provides weekly US Drought Monitor support, summarizes regional climate conditions in monthly, quarterly, and yearly regional and state reports, supervises and performs duties related to regional climate services, designs web-based climate data product interfaces, serves as the Louisiana state CoCoRaHS coordinator, oversees social media accounts, and performs outreach, among other duties.

Victor Murphy is the Climate Services Program Manager for the NWS Southern Region which comprises New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, and the Gulf Coast States. In this capacity, Mr. Murphy works with NWS Weather Forecast Offices and River Forecast Centers to provide partners with climate data, information, and forecasts to help ensure resiliency and mitigation in decision making processes.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

(

Presenter

19 October 2018

Title: October 2018 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: 19 October 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov or rthoman@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/October2018

Abstract: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for November and the early winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

18 October 2018

Title: Touching salmon, when is it wrong? Consequences of release or escape from fisheries capture
Presenter(s): Scott Hinch, Ph.D., Professor, Fisheries Conservation, University of British Columbia
Date & Time: 18 October 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Scott Hinch, Ph.D., Professor, Fisheries Conservation, University of British Columbia

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov. Directions to NWFSC.

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/108607180658221999?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT
Humans touch' in excess of 90 MT of fish each year through fisheries harvest involving a variety of different gears. In many cases, fish are kept and either sold or kept for personal use. However, many fish either are released or escape from capture. Bycatch makes up 40% of global commercial fish harvest and these non-targeted fish are usually released, often injured or dead, or at least to an uncertain fate. Large segments of recreational harvest are also released because of conservation or regulatory reasons. What happens to fish that we touch' and let go alive. Unseen to most fishers are fish that encounter their gear but escape from being captured. What is their fate? Over the past decade, we have been exploring these issues in adult Pacific salmon from physiological, behavioural, survival and fitness perspectives, using an individual based approach involving telemetry tracking and field experiments, and high throughput genomics to understand underlying mechanisms. We have worked directly with different fisheries and different species, in both fresh and saltwater. In this presentation, I will overview some of our key findings that involve approaches for predicting fate of released salmon, ways to minimize mortality of released salmon, the unseen impacts of escaping gear, and the overarching influence of climate change.

BIO
Dr. Hinch completed his undergraduate and MSc degrees at the University of Western Ontario (London, Ontario; 1981-1987), a PhD at the University of Toronto (Toronto, Ontario; 1988-1991), and a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of British Columbia (UBC; 1992-1994). In 1994, he became an Assistant Professor at UBC where currently he is a Professor in Fisheries Conservation. He is an expert in the field of fish migrations, ecophysiology and behavioral ecology and is the Pacific leader of Canada's Ocean Tracking Network. He pioneered the field of conservation physiology in salmon. His current work utilizes telemetry tracking and genomic transcriptome approaches to examine behaviour and mortality of smolts and adults during their coastal and riverine migrations, the effects of migration obstacles (dams, high temperatures, and fisheries gear encounters) on adult salmon, and the role that pathogens, disease and climate change has on these migration issues. He works closely with fisheries managers so that research results can be readily applied. In collaboration with social scientists, he is investigating ways that science and knowledge can be more effectively mobilized by stakeholders and decision makers. He has authored ~ 300 peer-reviewed papers and has served on several federal investigations into declining salmon stocks. Hinch was one of eight Canadians elected into the inaugural group as a Fellow of the American Fisheries Society (AFS), and has been awarded the AFS Award of Excellence (Fisheries Mgt. Section), and the AFS Award in Fisheries Education.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Forecasting Bird Migration at Continental Scales
Presenter(s): Benjamin Van Doren, PhD student at the University of Oxford
Date & Time: 18 October 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Forecasting Bird Migration at Continental Scales

Presenter(s): Benjamin Van Doren, PhD student at the University of Oxford. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will use the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and "enter as guest", and please enter your name: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Billions of migratory birds cross the globe each year, and monitoring birds during migration provides important information on their populations and ecology. However, monitoring efforts can be hampered by the unpredictability of migratory movements. We developed a bird migration forecast system at a continental scale by leveraging 23 years of spring observations to identify associations between atmospheric conditions and bird migration intensity. Our models explained up to 81% of variation in migration intensity across the United States at altitudes up to 3000 meters, and performance remained high in forecasting events 1 to 7 days in advance (62 to 76% of variation was explained). Avian migratory movements across the United States likely exceed 500 million individuals per night during peak passage. We hope that bird migration forecasts will reduce collisions with buildings, airplanes, and wind turbines, inform a variety of monitoring efforts, and engage the public.

Bio(s): Benjamin Van Doren studies bird migration across scales, from individuals to continents. As a PhD student at the University of Oxford, he focuses on change and flexibility in migration and how environmental drivers shape migratory behavior. He attended Cornell University as an undergraduate, where he worked with the BirdCast project to study and predict migration.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Instrument Calibration and Radiance Validation of GOES-R ABI
Presenter(s): Xiangqian "Fred" Wu of NESDIS/STAR/SMCD
Date & Time: 18 October 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553 , NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Xiangqian "Fred" Wu of NESDIS/STAR/SMCD

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx Event Number: 994 102 241
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=ea1573d2cb2ba8fa8087bdacc9ce7a9e7

Audio:
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode: 6070416

Abstract:
This seminar summarizes the plan, execution, and results of the instrument calibration and radiance validation for the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites R-Series (GOES-R). GOES-R is the new generation of NOAA's GOES that provides constant surveillance of the United States and its surrounding for the next two decades, with GOES-16 operational since December 2017 and GOES-17 to be operational in December 2018. We begin with a review of transition to Imager, the instrument for NOAA's 2nd generation of GOES, with emphasis on the technological advancement at the time that brought much improved performance to meet users' demands and calibration difficulties that challenge the instrument scientists. Some of these difficulties were anticipated, some even overly prepared, but some not so much. The transition to ABI, the key payload of NOAA's 3rd generation of GOES, resembles many of the last transition, meanwhile some new tools have become available (e.g., Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System or GSICS) or applicable (e.g., Rayleigh scattering). The GOES-R Calibration Working Group (CWG) planned and executed the ABI calibration and validation with all these considerations. We end with a summary of ABI performance.

Bio(s):

Xiangqian (Fred) Wu leads calibration support for NOAA's operations of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on POES (since 2002), Imager and Sounder on GOES (since 2004), Ozone Mapper Profiler Suite (OMPS) on S-NPP (2011-2014), and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) on GOES-R (since 2014). He has been a member of the WMO-sponsored Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System (GSICS) Research Working Group since its inception in 2006, and served as its first chair.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

17 October 2018

Title: CANCELLED: Understanding Ocean Acidification - Using NOAA’s New Educational Tools
Presenter(s): Amy Dean, NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System
Date & Time: 17 October 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Amy Dean, NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/690023097051840771

Abstract: Data in the Classroom is designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional and global scale. In this presentation, participants will dive deep into Data in the Classroom's Ocean Acidification Module to explore the processes that cause acidification, examine data from across the globe and take a virtual tour of the new web-based curricular modules and data tools.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Be a claw abiding citizen: learn how ocean acidification could affect Dungeness crab
Presenter(s): Dr. Shelly Trigg, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center and U.S. School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences
Date & Time: 17 October 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online participation only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Shelly Trigg, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center and U.S. School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2370987267820717569

Abstract: What is ocean acidification? And how could it affect the future of Dungeness crab, one of our favorite seafoods? Join us as we walk through a new national marine sanctuaries educational toolkit to equip you for teaching others about what ocean acidification could mean for the Dungeness crab, how this is currently being investigated, and resources to get more involved.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Alaska Climate Webinar Series: Recent Alaska Climate Variations - An Update
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: 17 October 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): John Walsh (ACCAP) & Rick Thoman (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/Climate_Variations

Abstract:
Environmental change and extreme events are an ongoing part of the Alaskan scene, impacting individuals, communities, businesses, tribes and governments on time scales of hours to decades. Impacted areas range from Interior Alaska to coastal and offshore areas. This review will provide updated examples of climate and environmental change in Alaska, results of recent research on the drivers of these changes, and a look ahead at what the best information we have suggests future decades will bring to Alaska.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Models & Databases for Restoration & Management of Gulf of Mexico Fisheries
Presenter(s): James D. Simons, PhD, Adjunct Research Scientist, Center for Coastal Studies, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, and Cameron H. Ainsworth, PhD, Associate Professor, College of Marine Science, University of South Florida
Date & Time: 17 October 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Models & Databases for Restoration & Management of Gulf of Mexico Fisheries

Presenter(s): James D. Simons, PhD, Adjunct Research Scientist, Center for Coastal Studies, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, and Cameron H. Ainsworth, PhD, Associate Professor, College of Marine Science, University of South Florida

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar and NOAA RESTORE Science Program; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and "Enter as guest" and please add your first and last name:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: We conducted a comprehensive review and assessment of restoration and fisheries ecosystem modeling efforts in the Gulf of Mexico and attempted to align current and future ecosystem modeling efforts with management needs and restoration activities. The project involved a diversity of federal, state, academic and non-governmental organization collaborators. The project consisted of four components: (1) a comprehensive review of restoration and fisheries ecosystem modeling efforts in the Gulf of Mexico; (2) a workshop in Tampa, Florida to align modeling efforts with management needs and restoration activities; (3) a gap analysis of the potential predictive capabilities of some current Ecopath with Ecosim, OSMOSE, and Atlantis models; and (4) the creation of bridges between Fishbase and SeaLifeBase databases and the OSMOSE modeling approach and the Gulf of Mexico Species Interaction database.

Bio(s):
Dr. James Simons is currently an adjunct Research Scientist at the Center for Coastal Studies at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, and a Research Affiliate at the Department of Integrative Biology at the University of Texas at Austin. He received a PhD in Biological Oceanography at Texas A&M University in College Station, where he studied the food habits of fishes on the Mississippi-Alabama continental shelf for his dissertation research. After graduation, he was employed for 14 years at Texas Parks and Wildlife, in the Resource Protection and Coastal Fisheries Divisions. In 2011 he obtained a Research Scientist position at the CCS at TAMUCC until he retired from active state service in August of 2017. He
conceived the idea for the Gulf of Mexico Species Interaction (GoMexSI) database in 2003, and was a co-PI on the development of the Global Biotic Interactions (GloBI) database. He is currently focused on seeing that the historical species interaction data that he has collected gets extracted and loaded into the GoMexSI database.

Dr. Cameron Ainsworth is an Associate Professor of Fisheries Science at the University of South Florida. He uses end-to-end' models and statistical models to study anthropogenic influences on marine ecosystems. His recent work has considered fishing, climate change and oil spills as drivers of ecosystem change. His most recent publications describe ecosystem impacts from the Deepwater Horizon and IXTOC oil spills. He keeps a heavily applied focus, working with NOAA and state fisheries managers on common research themes and serving as a member of the Ecosystem Science and Statistical Committee of the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed and technical articles. Awards include a Sloan Research Fellowship for early career scientists and an Outstanding Faculty Award. His Ph.D. is in Resource Management and Environmental Studies from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 October 2018

Title: Why juvenile rock sole are moving north and juvenile yellowfin sole are not
Presenter(s): Cynthia Yeung, Research Fish Biologist, Groundfish Assessment Program, Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 16 October 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Cynthia Yeung, Research Fish Biologist, Groundfish Assessment Program, Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Remote Access: AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.

2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, October 16, 2018
10:00 am | Pacific Daylight Time (San Francisco, GMT-07:00) | 1 hr
Meeting number: 808 602 671
Meeting password: dawson

When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode:5944500#

Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Abstract: Looking through 36 years of RACE EBS bottom trawl survey data, we found that the variability in the distribution and abundance of juvenile northern rock sole are very much tied to the thermal stanzas. We thought that juvenile yellowfin sole might show the same relationships with thermal stanzas, given the similarities in their morphometrics and trophodynamics. In fact, juveniles of the two flatfishes behaved differently in response to thermal shifts.

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

15 October 2018

Title: A Place for Satellite Soundings in Severe Weather Forecasting
Presenter(s): Nadia Smith, Science and Technology Corp., Columbia, MD
Date & Time: 15 October 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Conference 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771 Conference Room S561
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Nadia Smith, Science and Technology Corp., Columbia, MD 877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m4fee95958efb2ba99e5475c90bdae907 Meeting number: 744 955 357 Host key: 823786 Meeting password: Jpss2018! This seminar will discuss how NUCAPS soundings from low-earth orbiting satellites add value to severe weather forecasting. Space-based soundings with a top-of-atmosphere vantage point, spatially uncorrelated footprints and dependable coverage day and night complement radiosondes, which forecasters have known and trusted for decades. Observations are needed so that forecasters can verify numerical weather prediction models in real-time and improve their situational awareness of what is actually happening as opposed to what is forecasted to happen. NUCAPS provide forecasters with observations that uniquely characterize the pre-convective environment ahead of storms.

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11 October 2018

Title: Geodesy Fundamentals
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 11 October 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar: To register, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Collective Sensing and Navigation in Mobile Animal Groups
Presenter(s): Andrew Bardahl, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, university of
Washington
Date & Time: 11 October 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Andrew Bardahl, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207
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ABSTRACT
Collective behaviour (schooling, flocking, herding, etc.) has evolved across a wide variety of taxa and environments, and is especially common in fishes and marine systems. A growing body of research suggests that by moving together individuals may be better able to sense and respond to cues in their environments. Here I will present mechanisms behind such collective sensing and also explore potential implications of the resulting group behaviours on population dynamics, patterns of gene flow, and the persistence of locally adapted populations.

BIO
Andrew Berdahl recently joined the faculty at UW's School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences as as assistant professor. Prior to this he was an Omidyar Fellow at the Santa Fe Institute for complex systems in New Mexico. He received his PhD from Princeton University in the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology his BSc and MSc in physics from the Universities of Waterloo and Calgary, respectively. Andrew combines field work, experiments, simulations and theory to explore collective behaviours in mobile animal groups.

RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS

A. Berdahl, A. Kao, A. Flack, P. Westley, E. Codling, I. Couzin, A. Dell and D. Biro. Collective animal navigation and migratory culture: from theoretical models to empirical evidence. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 20170009. (2018).

A. Berdahl, P. Westley and T. Quinn. Social interactions shape the timing of spawning migrations in an anadromous fish. Animal Behaviour, 126, 221"229. (2017).

A. Berdahl, P. Westley, I. Couzin, S. Levin and T. Quinn. A collective navigation hypothesis for homeward migration in anadromous salmonids. Fish & Fisheries 17, 525-542. (2016).

A. Berdahl, A. van Leeuwen, S. Levin and C. Torney. Collective behavior as a driver of critical transitions in migratory populations. Movement Ecology 4, 1-12. (2016).

A. Hein, S. Rosenthal, G. Hagstrom, A. Berdahl, C. Torney and I. Couzin. The evolution of distributed sensing and collective computation in animal populations. eLife 4, e10955. (2015).

A. Berdahl, C. Torney, C. Ioannou, J. Faria, and I. Couzin. Emergent sensing of complex environments by mobile animal groups. Science 339, 574-576. (2013).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: The Morphology and Systematic Biology of Fishes: A Renaissance
Presenter(s): Eric Hilton Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine Science, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA
Date & Time: 11 October 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Eric Hilton Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marine Science, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI visiting scientist seminar series in conjunction with the bi-annual EcoFOCI Seminar Series, focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.


Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Traditional and cutting-edge approaches for the morphology of fishes, and the importance of both

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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Title: Why People Matter When Designing and Implementing Large-scale Marine Protected Areas
Presenter(s): Patrick Christie, Professor, University of Washington's School of Marine and Environmental Affairs and Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Date & Time: 11 October 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 for NOAA Silver Spring staff
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Why people matter when designing and implementing large-scale marine protected areas

Presenter(s): Patrick Christie, Professor, University of Washington's School of Marine and Environmental Affairs and Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will use the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and 'Enter as guest':
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Large-scale marine protected areas (LSMPAs) are rapidly increasing. Due to their sheer size, complex socio-political realities, and distinct local cultural perspectives and economic needs, implementing and managing LSMPAs successfully creates a number of human dimensions challenges. This paper draws on the results of a global Think Tank on the Human Dimensions of Large Scale Marine Protected Areas involving 125 people from 17 countries, including representatives from government agencies, non-governmental organizations, academia, professionals, industry, cultural/indigenous leaders and LSMPA site managers. The overarching goal of this effort was to be proactive in understanding the issues and developing best management practices and a research agenda that address the human dimensions of LSMPAs. Identified best management practices for the human dimensions of LSMPAs included: integration of culture and traditions, effective public and stakeholder engagement, maintenance of livelihoods and wellbeing, promotion of economic sustainability, conflict management and resolution, transparency and matching institutions, legitimate and appropriate governance, and social justice and empowerment. A shared human dimensions research agenda was developed that included priority topics under the themes of scoping human dimensions, governance, politics, social and economic outcomes, and culture and tradition.

Bio(s): Patrick Christie is a professor at the University of Washington's School of Marine and Environmental Affairs and Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. His scholarship focuses on the human dimensions of marine conservation and climate change social movements. In particular, he studies why citizens, fishers, and policy makers either accept or reject environmental policies. He believes, like many, that We don't manage the fish, we manage the people.' Increasingly he is researching and teaching on the social movements surrounding oil pipeline resistance movements, especially those led by indigenous communities. He draws from his three years of experience living in a Philippine fishing community implementing a community-based marine protected area as a Peace Corps Volunteer and many years as a co-investigator for a participatory-action research project on the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua. He is a Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation, the Editor-In-Chief for the peer reviewed journal Coastal Management, and board member of the Coastal Conservation and Education Foundation in the Philippines. He has a bachelor's degree in zoology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a master's degree in conservation biology and doctorate in environmental sociology and policy from the University of Michigan.

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See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Implications of climate change for managing coastal and marine protected habitats and species
Presenter(s): Paul Buckley of the Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Cefas
Date & Time: 11 October 2018
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Paul Buckley of the Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas)

Thursday, October 11, 10 am EDT/7 am PDT/2 pm UTC/3 pm British Summer Time

Abstract: Climate change is already affecting a wide range of marine and coastal conservation features (habitats, species and communities). Impacts on the quality, composition and presence of these protected features presents challenges to their conservation within protected sites and their wider networks. Here we present findings from recent studies undertaken by the UK Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership (MCCIP) on the implications of climate change for protected features and wider marine biodiversity legislation. Case studies on the vulnerability of specific marine conservation features to climate change are presented, and potential management options explored. Broader issues for the implementation of legislation that includes coastal and marine biodiversity are discussed, including mechanisms that exist within these obligations to accommodate' impacts of climate change. Finally, wider challenges, and opportunities, for the conservation of marine species, habitats, and communities in a changing climate are explored.

Webinar Access and Registration: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bhcxAfSETNioIwFsdnY3hA

Sponsor(s): Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

Webinar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@NOAA.gov

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10 October 2018

Title: Science in support of ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM): where do we all fit in?
Presenter(s): Chris Harvey, Research Fish Biologist, NMFS/NWFSC/CBD
Date & Time: 10 October 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Chris Harvey, Supervisory Research Fishery Biologist, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov); Webinar host: Librarian Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://goo.gl/fddvsB Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: NOAA Fisheries has taken major steps toward adopting ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM), including release of an EBFM policy and implementation "road map," support of integrative ecosystem assessment (IEA) as a science framework for supporting EBFM, and greater emphasis of ecosystem considerations in stock assessment. However, understanding how these initiatives and frameworks fit together is an inherent challenge, as is finding one's own place as a researcher in this shifting science landscape. In this presentation, I hope to address some of these concerns in an entertaining way, based on my own experiences working on the California Current IEA and the West Coast EBFM road map team.

Bio(s): Chris Harvey is an ecologist in the Ecosystem Sciences Program at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center, and one of the co-leads of the California Current Integrated Ecosystem Assessment team. His research interests include food web interactions, and also on the nexus between ecosystem science and management. Chris received a BS from Wake Forest University, an MS from the University of Washington and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin, and was a post-doc at Stockholm University and at the NWFSC before joining NOAA in 2002.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

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Title: The SPOC (SPectral Ocean Color Imager) CubeSat Mission
Presenter(s): David Cotten, Research Scientist, The University of Georgia Small Satellite Research Laboratory, presenting remotely
Date & Time: 10 October 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room #3555, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series
STAR Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
David Cotten, Research Scientist
The University of Georgia Small Satellite Research Laboratory, presenting remotely

Sponsor(s):

SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group
The NOCCG is a NOAA organization founded in 2011 by Dr. Paul DiGiacomo, Chief of the Satellite Oceanography and Climatology Division at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR. The purpose of the NOCCG is to keep members up to date about developments in the field of satellite ocean color and connect ocean color science development with users and applications. We have representatives from all the NOAA line offices, including National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, National Ocean Service, National Weather Service and from several levels of the National Environmental and Satellite Data and Information Service (where Paul is housed). Dr. Cara Wilson of South East Fisheries Science Center is our current chair. We meet bi-weekly on Wednesday afternoons, 3 PM Eastern Time in room 3555 at the National Center for Weather and Climate Prediction building in College Park, MD with teleconferencing and Webex for out of town members and guests. We host a guest speaker, usually about once a month.

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number: 998 627 277
Password: NOCCG
Event address for attendees:
https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=e3e2ab01b46387376f54953be0be5f502

Audio:
USA participants: 866-564-7828 Passcode: 9942991

Abstract:

This work introduces the mission concept, technologies, and development status for the Spectral Ocean Color (SPOC) small satellite mission, which will use an adjustable multispectral imager to map sensitive coastal regions and off coast water quality near the state of Georgia and beyond. SPOC is being developed by The University of Georgia's Small Satellite Research Laboratory (SSRL) with funds from NASA's Undergraduates Student Instrument Project (USIP). The project is led by undergraduates from a wide range of backgrounds and supervised by a multidisciplinary team of Principal Investigators. The mission will collect spectral data along a 300km swath using the grating spectrometer to diffract the incoming radiation into the 440-865 nm spectral range. The resulting images will be 75 km x 300 km in size, have a 120 m spatial resolution, and a spectral resolution of 20 nm, covering 16 adjustable spectral bands.

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Title: American Lobster in a Pinch? Epizootic Shell Disease and the Decline of the Southern New England Stock
Presenter(s): Dr. Maya Groner, Prince William Sound Science Center, U. S. Geological Survey Western Fisheries Science Center. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 10 October 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: American Lobster in a Pinch? Epizootic Shell Disease and the Decline of the Southern New England Stock

Presenter(s): Dr. Maya Groner, Ecologist, Prince William Sound Science Center, U. S. Geological Survey Western Fisheries Science Center. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will use the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to the following website at the scheduled date and time and "enter as guest", and please enter your name: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Maladaptive changes in phenology resulting from altered timing of environmental cues (phenological mismatch), is an increasing concern in many ecological systems, yet its effects on disease processes are poorly characterized. American lobster (Homarus americanus) is declining at its southern geographic limit. Rising seawater temperatures are associated with seasonal outbreaks of epizootic shell disease (ESD), which peaks in prevalence in the fall. We used a 34-year mark-recapture dataset to investigate relationships between temperature, molting phenology, and ESD in Long Island Sound. Warming spring temperatures are correlated with earlier spring molting. Lobsters lose diseased cuticle by molting, and early molting increases the intermolt period in the summer, when disease prevalence is increasing to a fall peak. In juvenile and adult male lobsters, September ESD prevalence is correlated with early molting, while October ESD prevalence is correlated with summer seawater temperature. This suggests that temperature-induced molting phenology affects the timing of the onset of ESD, but later in the summer this signal is swamped by the stronger signal of summer temperatures, which we hypothesize are associated with an increased rate of new infections. October ESD prevalence was 80% in years with hot summers and 30% in years with cooler summers. Diseased lobsters are more than twice as likely to die than healthy lobsters. Therefore, the population impacts of ESD are expected to increase with increasing seawater temperatures. These results more broadly demonstrate the powerful application of mark-recapture methodologies for inferring disease processes in fished species.

Bio(s): Maya Groner is an ecologist, interested in how shifting relationships between hosts, pathogens and the environment alter disease processes in marine and freshwater ecosystems. Her research is highly quantitative and frequently employs field and lab studies, mathematical modeling and fisheries models. Some of the study systems she has focused on include chytridiomycosis in amphibians, seastar wasting in asteroids, eelgrass wasting disease on eelgrasses, mycobacteriosis in striped bass, epizootic shell disease in American lobster, sea louse infections of salmonids and a variety of diseases in Pacific herring. Maya Groner is a research scientist at the Prince William Sound Science Center in Cordova, AK, however she spends much of her time at the U. S. Geological Survey's Marrowstone Marine Field Station and Western Fisheries Research Center in WA.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Assessing the Impact of Underwater Sound on Marine Mammal Hearing in R Shiny: Increasing Accessibility of Tools for Managers and Stakeholders
Presenter(s): Emily Markowitz, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 10 October 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 8836
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Emily Markowitz, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology

Sponsor(s): NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology
POC for Seminar Questions: Jihong.Dai@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
(1) Click the link: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/accessibility_of_tools_for_managers_and_stakeholders/

(2) In the field "Name"; type your name as you would like to be seen in the meeting
(3) Click "Enter Room" *** NO PASSWORD IS NEEDED***
(4) The Adobe Connect will open in a separate window, shown you as participate
(5) Participate will have a blank screen until the host has share the screen

You can also dial in using your phone:
United States: +1(877)984-9436
Passcode: 8591340

Abstract

Shiny is an open source R package that provides an elegant and powerful web framework for building web applications using R. Shiny helps turn analyses into interactive web applications without requiring HTML, CSS, or JavaScript knowledge. Many projects are using this application to increase accessibility of tools and knowledge between scientists, managers, and the public. One such project that has greatly benefited from this is NOAA Fisheries' Technical Guidance for Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Sound on Marine Mammal Hearing. The Technical Guidance describes and provides criteria to quantify the effects of human-made sounds on marine mammal hearing. The criteria is can be used to predict the onset of permanent and temporary changes in marine mammal hearing for all underwater sound sources. Currently, an optional user spreadsheet tool created in Microsoft Excel that predicts impact calculations, based on the Technical Guidance's criteria, has been made available for end users. However, this Microsoft Excel tool can be an overwhelming interface for most end users.This presentation describes how these impact calculations were translated from Microsoft Excel to R to provide a cleaner and more succinct interface for the end user. This is an example of translating complex scientific calculations and programming code into a more intuitive and management-friendly decision-making tool to predict the impacts of anthropogenic sound on marine mammal hearing.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

9 October 2018

Title: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plastics in the Environment
Presenter(s): Sarah-Jeanne Royer, University of Hawa'ii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, School of Ocean and Earth Science & Technology. Presenting from Hawai'i.
Date & Time: 9 October 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Medium Conference Room - 9348
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plastics in the Environment

Presenter(s): Sarah-Jeanne Royer, University of Hawa'ii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center (IPRC)
School of Ocean and Earth Science & Technology (SOEST). Presenting from Hawai'i.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and "enter as guest":
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Mass production of plastics started nearly 70 years ago and the production rate is expected to double over the next two decades. While serving many applications because of their durability, stability and low cost, plastics have deleterious effects on the environment. Plastic is known to release a variety of chemicals during degradation, which has a negative impact on biota. Here, we show that the most commonly used plastics produce two greenhouse gases, methane and ethylene, when exposed to ambient solar radiation. Polyethylene, which is the most produced and discarded synthetic polymer globally, is the most prolific emitter of both gases. The study demonstrated that as the surfacearea of the plastic increases due to weathering and break-down in the ocean, there is a tremendous increase in methane and ethylene off-gassing: For example, LDPE powders off-gases methane 488 times more than when the same weight of LDPE is in pellet form. In addition, low-density polyethylene emits these gases when incubated in air at rates ~2 times and ~76 times higher than when incubated in water for methane and ethylene, respectively. Our results show that plastics represent a heretofore unrecognized source of climate-relevant trace gases that are expected to increase as more plastic is produced and accumulated in the environment.
Link to the study: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0200574

Bio(s): Dr. Sarah-Jeanne Royer is an oceanographer and currently doing a post-doctorate on marine debris at the International Pacific Research Center at the University of Hawaii. Her research is linked to the pathways and fate of marine debris and plastic pollution in the ocean. She also started recently a project on micro-fibres at SCRIPPS Institute of Oceanography with Dimitri Deheyn. Her work on the on the emissions of greenhouse gases from plastics in the environment was conducted at the Center for Microbial Oceanography, Research and Education. She has been highly involved with the organization named Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii, which is the biggest organization of beach cleanups in Hawaii. For three years she served as the science advisor and started using data collection from volunteers for citizen science projects. Her goal is to pursue plastic research to understand better the degradation and fragmentation
processes of plastic and fate in the ocean in addition to the plastic accumulationon the different island of Hawai'i. Her long-last objective is for policymakers to use data from scientists and volunteers to design better laws and policies to reduce plastic production &amp; consumption.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: From vessels to models: Steps to measure the value of age/length/diet sampling in data collection and model-based management advice
Presenter(s): James Thorson, Program Lead, Habitat and Ecological Processes Research, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 9 October 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): James Thorson, Program Lead, Habitat and Ecological Processes Research, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Remote Access: AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.

2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, October 9, 2018
10:00 am | Pacific Daylight Time (San Francisco, GMT-07:00) | 1 hr
Meeting number: 801 275 321
Meeting password: dawson

When it's time, join the meeting.
Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode:5944500#

Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Abstract: I propose a workflow to allocate age and length subsampling in fisheries and surveys. To do so, I review recent research that starts with the number of length and age samples (field sample size), applies a spatio-temporal model to estimate input sample sizes, and fits this in Stock Synthesis to estimate effective sample size. I hypothesize that compiling field, input, and effective sample size for a wide range of species can inform and justify ongoing data-collection from bottom trawls and other similar surveys.

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Title: An Environmental DNA (eDNA) Approach for Investigating the Reproductive Biology of Sea Scallops
Presenter(s): Skylar Bayer, Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, Minority
Date & Time: 9 October 2018
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Skylar Bayer, Knauss Fellow, Senate Environment and Public Works Committee (Minority)

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part of the monthly Knauss Fellows Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library.POC: Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Broadcast spawners release their gametes into the water column for fertilization, but gametes from different taxa are nearly impossible to discriminate by microscopy. Monitoring spawning events for the commercially harvested sea scallop (Placopecten magellanicus) would inform predictions of future stocks, however detecting such events in real-time is extremely difficult using traditional techniques. The main objective of our project was to develop a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay as a quick and reliable way to detect sea scallop gametes (eggs and sperm) in plankton samples. Our results suggest that this method holds great potential to be applied more widely to other free-spawning taxa to gain more realistic estimates of the timing and magnitude of reproductive events in the field.

Bio(s): Skylar Bayer is a 2018 Knauss Fellow in the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Minority Office. Bayer received her B.Sc. in Marine Biology at Brown University (2008), her M.Sc. in Biological Oceanography from the MIT-WHOI Joint Program (2011) and her Ph.D. in Marine Biology from the School of Marine Sciences at the University of Maine. Her research focuses on reproduction, ecology, and population dynamics of marine invertebrates.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Marine Renewable Energy and the Blue Economy
Presenter(s): Carrie Schmaus, DOE
Date & Time: 9 October 2018
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Carrie Schmaus, Knauss Fellow, DOE Water Power Technologies Office

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part of the monthly Knauss Fellows Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library.POC: Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Marine renewable energy " energy from waves, currents, and tides " has the potential to provide a locally sourced, emissions free, reliable form of power where electricity could otherwise not be generated. This energy could power distributed maritime markets and coastal communities, as well as alleviate electricity access challenges for isolated island communities, national disaster responders, and ocean researchers. Additionally, energy innovation in these markets could power growth in the booming Blue Economy, estimated by some to contribute $1.5-3 trillion annually, or roughly 3-5% of the global GDP. The Water Power Technologies Office (WPTO) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) is working to advance cutting-edge technology in this sector. In this presentation, I will discuss the work at WPTO and look ahead to what the future could hold.

Bio(s): Carrie Schmaus is a 2018 Knauss Fellow at the Water Power Technologies Office at the US Department of Energy, where she works as a marine science analyst and interagency coordinator. Before joining DOE, she worked as a research fellow at the National Council for Public-Private Partnerships, a DC-based non-profit that educates about successful public-private partnership models. She graduated with her master's from the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs at the University of Washington after graduating Phi Beta Kappa from Wittenberg University with a degree in biology.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

5 October 2018

Title: Analysis of Forecastability of Rapid Growth Periods of Alaska Wildfires in both Boreal and Tundra Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Celia Fisher, NOAA Hollings Scholar and James White, NOAA Hollings Scholar
Date & Time: 5 October 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Celia Fisher and James White (NOAA Hollings Scholars)

Seminar sponsor: OAR / CPO / RISA Program

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/Fire_forecast

Abstract: Alaska experiences extremely variable and increasingly active wildland fire seasons, with 6.6 million acres burned in 2004 and 5.1 million in 2015 respectively. The majority of acres burn in relatively brief periods of extremely warm and dry weather. Our hypothesis is that there are localized weather characteristic and identifiable large-scale weather patterns conducive to such rapid wildfire growth. The likelihood of these patterns can be the target of forecasts over periods of several days to several weeks in order to inform decision-makers and other potentially affected stakeholders.

The Hollings Scholars utilized an existing database of daily wildfire acreage back to at least the 1990s. They identified sub-monthly periods of rapid wildfire growth in both boreal and tundra ecosystems and performed analysis of associated atmospheric conditions and synoptic weather patterns using online and UAF available meteorological reanalysis data. This presentation will present the findings of their work.

Seminar POC for questions: sean.bath@noaa.gov

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Additional presenters field:

4 October 2018

Title: Working with NOAA and Multiple Partners to Restore Oysters, Abalone, and Kelp and Develop Sustainable Shellfish and Kelp Aquaculture
Presenter(s): Betsy Peabody, Executive Director and Founder, Puget Sound Restoration Fund
Date & Time: 4 October 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): BETSY PEABODY, Executive Director and Founder, Puget Sound Restoration Fund

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
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Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207
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ABSTRACT
Native oysters, abalone, and kelp contribute to ecosystem health in myriad ways, through natural filtration, nearshore habitat, carbon sequestration, food webs, and grazing, in the case of abalone. They have also helped sustain humans along this coast for thousands of years, contributing to our vision of Northwest abundance and culture. A decline in abundance of all these species diminishes ecosystem function. Restoring oysters, abalone, and kelp to rebuild living habitats and regain ecosystem services requires the use of aquaculture tools, from seed production to cultching to outplanting in priority locations. Culturing shellfish and kelp for food also plays a role in Puget Sound recovery efforts by providing important nutrient uptake services and highlighting the importance of clean water. With all of this in mind, NOAA and Puget Sound Restoration Fund collaborated in 2013 to establish a shellfish restoration hatchery at the Manchester Research Station called the Kenneth K Chew Center for Shellfish Research and Restoration. Operated through a collaborative research and development agreement, the hatchery advances restoration aquaculture to restore Olympia oysters, Pinto abalone, and Bull kelp and supports sustainable aquaculture by propagating sugar kelp seed and culturing species to enhance tribal fisheries. The State and Tribes have become important investors and co-collaborators in the K Chew Center to help sustain year-round full-time hatchery operations. Five years in, the hatchery is actively restoring, researching, and culturing native shellfish and other living marine resources to improve marine systems and implement goals of the Blue Ribbon Panel on Ocean Acidification, the Washington Shellfish Initiative, and multiple stock rebuilding plans.

BIO
Betsy Peabody is founder and executive director of Puget Sound Restoration Fund (PSRF), a nonprofit organization working since 1997 to restore marine habitat, water quality and native species in Puget Sound. She serves as President of the Pacific Shellfish Institute, a research organization developing and disseminating scientific information to foster sustainable shellfish resources and a healthy marine environment. She is also an active partner in Washington's Shellfish Initiative. In 2012, Betsy served on the Governor's Blue Ribbon Panel on Ocean Acidification and continues to work closely with the Marine Resources Advisory Council to investigate OA mitigation and communication strategies. In 2013, PSRF partnered with NOAA to establish a restoration hatchery at the Manchester Research Station to help restore native shellfish and other living marine resources. Betsy has a Bachelor's Degree in English from Stanford University and a lifelong interest in the marine world and its importance to humans.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Biogeographic Assessment and Geospatial Decision Support for Place-Based Management
Presenter(s): Dan Dorfman, Senior Marine Spatial Ecologist at CSS Inc., working for NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science NCCOS, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch
Date & Time: 4 October 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar for for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Biogeographic Assessment and Geospatial Decision Support for Place-Based Management

Presenter(s): Dan Dorfman, Senior Marine Spatial Ecologist at CSS Inc., working for NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will use the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and "enter as guest", and please enter your name: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: The Biogeographic Assessment Framework (BAF) compiles, analyzes, and integrates information on marine, ecology, and human uses to deliver geospatial data and derived products to support management decisions. The NOAA/NCCOS Marine Spatial Ecology group uses a variety of geospatial tools and analytical approaches, including the application of Marxan simulated annealing statistical analysis to support geospatial decision-making. We discuss three examples to illustrate the use of Marxan and BAF to inform and support place-based management decisions for two National Marine Sanctuaries and a Marine Corridor Reserve in Puerto Rico. For the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary, we supported the deliberations of the Boundary Expansion Working Group by integrating information on shallow-water, mesophotic, and deep-sea ecosystems, and human uses. Through a series of ten stakeholder workshops, we quantified and mapped areal extents for areas of relatively high ecological significance with minimal human-use conflicts (e.g., fishing, shipping, and oil and gas activities). During these workshops, we used interactive on-the-fly GIS to review and visualize spatial patterns and overlaps among ecologically important areas and extractive human activities to guide spatial prioritization, placement of boundaries, and identification of additional areas for Sanctuary expansion. For the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, we are using a similar approach to select preferred alternatives from among several management boundary options proposed by stakeholder working groups during the regulatory review of the Sanctuary's Management Plan. Through our assessment and geospatial analysis for Northeast Puerto Rico, we identified ecologically significant places to support the development of a Management Plan for the Northeast Corridor Reserve. When applying Marxan, we explored several iterations of representation criteria for each of these cases. These approaches enable us to support place-based management decisions in a responsive manner.

Bio(s): Dan Dorfman is a Senior Marine Spatial Ecologist for CSS Inc. working under contract for NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. He has over twenty years of experience applying geospatial technologies to advance natural resource management. His role is to synthesize scientific information to support place-based management decisions. Dan's background includes the development of methods for integrating biological, ecological, and human use information to enable geospatial decision support. Dan participated in the development of the Ecosystem Based Management Tools Network and served as the Senior Marine Conservation Planner for The Nature Conservancy's Global Marine Initiative. Dan's recent work includes the Choptank River Watershed Ecological Assessment, supporting boundary expansion for the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary, and participating in the development of the Deep-Sea Coral Research and Technology Program. Dan holds a Master's in Biology from Boston University and a Bachelor's in Ecology from the University of California at San Diego.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

3 October 2018

Title: Synoptic Climatology of Extreme Snow and Avalanche Events in Southern Alaska
Presenter(s): Kristy C. Carter, Iowa State University
Date & Time: 3 October 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kristy C. Carter, Iowa State University

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) a NOAA RISA Team, Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) and National Weather Service. Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/avalanche

Abstract: Snowfall distribution in southern Alaska during large snowfall events (>12inches/day) is complex and dependent on several small-scale factors. Common synoptic patterns among large snowfall events and cities were studied to create a snow climatology for seven cities in southern Alaska based on the predominant wind flow at the surface and aloft, and the location of the surface low and 500mb height field. Results aid in understanding the synoptic set-up for large snowfall events in each city and provide insight for increased skill in future forecasting applications. In addition, a snow avalanche climatology was created for two ski areas to understand avalanche occurrences and their triggers in southern Alaska.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

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Title: CANCELLED: Portfolio Management: An Assessment of the Research Investments of the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Presenter(s): Natasha D. White, Ph.D., Environmental Scientist/Portfolio Manager, NOAA/NOS/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science - NCCOS
Date & Time: 3 October 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 for NOAA Silver Spring staff
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

CANCELLED

Title: Portfolio Management - An Assessment of the Research Investments of the
National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

Presenter(s): Natasha D. White, Ph.D., Environmental Scientist/Portfolio Manager, NOAA/NOS/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS).

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will use the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and "enter as guest",
and please enter your name: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.
Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) recently conducted a thorough evaluation of its research investments. The FY18 portfolio included $30M in research funding across four priority areas. This presentation will provide a current and historical overview of how and where NCCOS funds are allocated for research.

Bio(s): Natasha White is co-portfolio manager with NOAA's NCCOS Program Coordination office. She is also an environmental scientist with the NCCOS Ecotoxicology branch within Stressors, Detection, and Impacts section where she actively conducts research on the impacts of contaminants on the early life stages of marine organisms.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

2 October 2018

Title: Climate Change in Alaska: Impacts on the Entomofauna
Presenter(s): Derek SIkes, University of Alaska Museum
Date & Time: 2 October 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Derek SIkes, University of Alaska Museum

Sponsor(s): ACCAP, a NOAA RISA Team

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/insects

Abstract and

Bio(s): The University of Alaska Museum Insect Collection is a biorepository for vouchers from varied projects throughout Alaska. A number of examples of possible and potential climate change impacts on the terrestrial invertebrates of Alaska will be presented.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

27 September 2018

Title: Hydrologic response of the Columbia River Basin to Climate Change
Presenter(s): Bart Nijssen, Ph.D., Professor, University of Washington
Date & Time: 27 September 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Bart Nijssen, Ph.D., Professor, University of Washington

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov).

https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/index.cfm. The NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM is also part of the OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminar Series, a joint effort by several NOAA seminar partners to pool seminars of common interest to help share science and management information and to promote constructive dialogue between scientists, educators, and resource managers. All seminars begin at 11:00 AM at the NWFSC's Auditorium and are open to the public.

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207
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ABSTRACT
The Columbia River, which drains much of the Pacific Northwest, is the fourth-largest river by volume in the United States. Hydroelectric facilities on its main stem and tributaries are responsible for nearly half of total U.S. hydroelectric power generation. Pacific Northwest rivers are also home to anadromous fish, such as salmon, that sustain environmentally, economically, and culturally important fisheries. Northwest rivers provide irrigation water for economically valuable crops and support barge transportation on the lower reaches of the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These competing uses can result in conflict at times. For example, as a result of habitat degradation, dam construction, reservoir operation, and other interventions, many salmon, trout, and sturgeon populations in the Pacific Northwest are now listed as threatened or endangered. Climate change can affect the hydrology of the region in a number of ways. Even without changes in precipitation, changes in temperature will affect snow accumulation and melt. Temperature increases will result in more rainfall in winter, less water stored as snow, and earlier melt of these thinner snow packs. For some rivers, peak flows may no longer occur in spring, but may occur in fall and winter instead. Warmer summers may increase drought conditions, especially if less spring and summer runoff is available from mountain snow packs. Changes in precipitation may alleviate or worsen some of these impacts. Here, we report on a recent study to evaluate climate change impacts on the hydrology in the Columbia River basin and evaluate how methodological choices in the modeling process affect the spread in projected changes for different aspects of hydrology.

BIO
Dr. Nijssen is a Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Washington where he heads the UW Hydro | Computational Hydrology group. He has over 20 years' experience in the research, development, and application of hydrological models with a focus on model applications at large spatial scales. He has played an active role in the development and maintenance of hydrological models that are widely used within the hydrological community (including VIC, DHSVM and SUMMA) and currently still maintains the public source code repository for the VIC model. Prior to returning to the University of Washington in 2011, he was Vice-President of Technology at 3TIER, a private sector company that provided forecasting and assessment services for the renewable energy industry. In that role, he managed a team of about 25 software engineers, scientists, data managers and system administrators responsible for the generation of operational weather and hydrological forecasts, forecast delivery, software and web development, information technology and data management, and guided development and implementation of real-time forecast systems for reservoir inflows, wind power production and solar power production. Current research interests and projects include the hydrological impacts of climate change, sub-seasonal to seasonal (S2S) forecasting, data assimilation, stream temperature modeling in regulated systems, and the development of new hydrologic models and innovative ways for model evaluation. He currently serves on the AGU meetings committee and is an associate editor for Water Resources Research.

RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS
Chegwidden, O. S., B. Nijssen, D. Rupp, J. R. Arnold, M. P. Clark, J. Hamman4, S.-C. Kao, Y. Mao, N. Mizukami, P. Mote, M. Pan, E. Pytlak, M. Xiao, 2018: How do modeling decisions affect the spread among hydrologic climate change projections? Earth Futures, in review.

River Management Joint Operating Committee (RMJOC), 2018: Climate and Hydrology Datasets for RMJOC Long-Term Planning Studies, Second Edition: Part I " Hydroclimate Projections and Analyses. 112pp. Available on line at: https://www.bpa.gov/p/Generation/Hydro/Pages/Climate-Change-FCRPS-Hydro.aspx.

Hamman, J. J., B. Nijssen, T. J. Bohn, D. R. Gergel, and Y. Mao, 2018: The Variable Infiltration Capacity Model, Version 5 (VIC-5): Infrastructure improvements for new applications and reproducibility. Geoscientific Model Development, doi:10.5194/gmd-11-3481-2018.

Gergel, D. R., B. Nijssen, J. T. Abatzoglou, D. P. Lettenmaier, M. R. Stumbaugh, 2017: Effects of climate change on snowpack and fire potential in the western United States. Climatic Change, doi:10.1007/s10584-017-1899-y.

Nijssen, B., D. P. Lettenmaier, X. Liang, S. W. Wetzel, and E. F. Wood, 1997: Streamflow simulation for continental-scale river basins. Water Resources Research, doi:10.1029/96WR03517.

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Title: Depth-dependent Temperature Variability in the Southern California Bight with Implications for Cold-water Octocorals
Presenter(s): Elizabeth F. Gugliotti, University of Charleston
Date & Time: 27 September 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4 Room 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Depth-dependent Temperature Variability in the Southern California Bight with Implications for Cold-water Octocorals

Presenter(s): Elizabeth F. Gugliotti, Marine Biologist, University of Charleston. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Peter Etnoyer, both with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.
Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667.
Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join",
click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web.
Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract: Water temperature is an important determinant of cold-water coral distribution. In recent years, several marine heatwave events have impacted marine ecosystems, including in the northeast Pacific Ocean. However, little is known about how these extreme ocean temperatures might impact cold-water corals. Determining the upper thermal limits of cold-water octocorals is an important first step in identifying if these warm-water events pose a potential threat. Live colonies of the common gorgonian octocoral, Adelogorgia phyllosclera, were collected from the CINMS using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). A laboratory study investigated the health, polyp activity, and estimated survival of A. phyllosclera through a series of thermal exposure assays. Results of the temperature analysis indicated that warm-water anomalies occurred frequently at 50 and 100 m, with most of these falling during strong ENSO months. The experimental results suggest that the upper thermal limit of A. phyllosclera could lie near 20. Though this upper thermal limit was not exceeded frequently during the 2015-2016 ENSO event, the anomalously warm conditions could have elicited physiological and cellular effects. Understanding the thermal stress responses of cold-water corals enables prediction of their resilience to predicted ocean warming.

Bio(s): Elizabeth Gugliotti recently graduated with an M.S. in Marine Biology from the University of Charleston, SC where her thesis focused on the implications of warming oceans on cold-water corals. Prior to her graduate work, Elizabeth spent time studying the effects of climate change on the sex ratios of loggerhead sea turtle sex-ratios with Dr. David Owens of the College of Charleston and then conducted coral reef ecology research while studying abroad in Bonaire in the Dutch Caribbean as a part of her undergraduate studies at Wofford College. In addition to pursuing a career in research, Elizabeth has also worked as an environmental education teacher to K-12 students at the Barrier Island Environmental Education Program in South Carolina.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Global meridional overturning circulation inferred from a data-constrained ocean & sea-ice model.
Presenter(s): Dr. Sang-Ki Lee, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 27 September 2018
10:00 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Sang-Ki Lee (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote Access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/400755573

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3212
Access Code: 400-755-573

Abstract: Ocean tracers such as heat, salt and carbon are perpetually carried by the global meridional overturning circulation (GMOC) and redistributed between hemispheres and across ocean basins from their source regions. The GMOC is therefore a crucial component of the global heat, salt and carbon balances. In order to better understand and describe the GMOC, here we carry out a global ocean model simulation with its temperature and salinity corrected toward observations. The derived GMOC is presented and summarized in a new schematic, which highlights two important aspects of the GMOC concerning how the heaviest water mass formed around the Antarctica continent is brought to the near surface and where a deep water mass is formed in the Atlantic Ocean. These important aspects of the GMOC are poorly captured in a model run without the temperature and salinity corrections, suggesting that current generation climate models may have some limitations in reproducing realistic paths of the GMOC and the associated global heat, salt and carbon balances.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 September 2018

Title: Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium: Space Weather and Aurora
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: 26 September 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rodney Viereck, Head of Research, NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) and National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/space_weather

Abstract:
Space weather refers to the conditions in the space environment that impact systems and technologies both in space and on the ground. The relevant regions of the space environment start at the sun, transits the interplanetary space, encompasses Earth's protective magnetosphere, and extend down through the ionosphere to the surface of Earth. Much like terrestrial weather, space weather storms come in many forms including solar flares, energetic protons and electrons, and geomagnetic storms. Each type of space weather storm occurs on different time scales and impacts different types of technologies.

In this presentation, Dr. Viereck will provide an overview of space weather, the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, and customers who use our products and services. He will describe the methods and techniques that forecasters use to predict space weather as well as some of the development activities that are underway to improve existing models and add new models to the suite of tools currently available to the forecasters. This presentation will conclude with an overview of the space weather process that create the aurora.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Deep Sea Coral Communities and Commercial Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Randy Clark & Laughlin Siceloff, both Marine Biologists, with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch. Presenting in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: 26 September 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 for NOAA Silver Spring staff
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Deep Sea Coral Communities and Commercial Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico

Presenter(s): Randy Clark & Laughlin Siceloff, both Marine Biologists, with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch. Presenting in Silver Spring

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Skype often works if you have a good connection.
For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install MyMeeting's WebEx app while logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: Deep sea corals are taxonomically and morphologically diverse and a valuable resource globally. Corals and sponges form complex, three-dimensional biogenic structures that directly and indirectly influence the occurrence and abundance of many fish and invertebrate species. Globally, deep-sea fisheries that target stocks on outer continental shelves and slope habitats may remove or disturb benthic fauna particularly hard and soft corals. Fishing activity may compromise habitat infrastructure and re-occurrence in the same area prevents recovery. In the Gulf of Mexico bottom trawling and bottom longline gear may have significant interactions with sensitive coral communities. This presentation examines fishing effort information and potential impacts with known and predicted deep coral communities in the Gulf of Mexico.

Bio(s): Randy Clark and Laughlin Siceloff are non-beltway NOAA/NCCOS marine biologists with offices at Stennis Space Center, MS. Both enjoy all the great things New Orleans have to offer!

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Title: Avoiding the Ecological Limits of Forage Fish for Fed Aquaculture
Presenter(s): Halley E. Froehlich, Postdoctoral Scholar, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California, Santa Barbara. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 26 September 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 for NOAA Silver Spring staff
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Avoiding the ecological limits of forage fish for fed aquaculture

Presenter(s): Halley E. Froehlich, Postdoctoral Scholar, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California, Santa Barbara. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.
Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web.
Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract: Aquaculture is supporting demand and surpassing wild-caught seafood. Yet, most fed aquaculture species (finfish and crustacea) rely on wild-captured forage fish for essential fatty acids and micronutrients, an important but limited resource. As the fastest growing food sector in the world, fed aquaculture demand will eventually surpass ecological supply of forage fish, but when and how best to avoid this ecological boundary is unclear. Using global production data, feed use trends, and human consumption patterns we show how combined actions of fisheries reform, reduced feed use by non-carnivorous aquaculture and agricultural species, and greater consistent inclusion of fish byproducts in China-based production can circumvent forage fish limits by mid-century. However, we also demonstrate the efficacy of such actions are diminished if global diets shift to more seafood (i.e., pescetarian diets) and are further constrained by possible ecosystem-based fisheries regulations in the future. Long-term, nutrient-equivalent alternative feed sources are essential for more rapid and certain aquaculture sustainability

Bio(s): Dr. Halley E. Froehlich is a postdoctoral scholar and primary researcher from the Science for Nature and People Partnership (SNAPP), Sustainable Open-Ocean Aquaculture Working Group, at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), University of California, Santa Barbara. She is also the co-founder of the Conservation Aquaculture Research Team (CART) " an initiative motivated by the SNAPP research " aimed to build up the scientific foundation of ocean-based aquaculture understanding for improved conservation and management now and in the future. Dr. Froehlich is particularly interested in how to better align marine aquaculture with conservation efforts at multiple scales.

Dr. Halley E. Froehlich received her Ph.D. from the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington and B.Sc. in Animal Biology from the University of California, Davis. As a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, she took an interdisciplinary approach studying the effects of anthropogenic disturbances (e.g., hypoxia) on marine organisms and fisheries. A key facet of Dr. Froehlich's graduate and postdoctoral research is linking important ecological questions with conservation and management objectives.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Or email tracy.gill@noaa.gov and I will have your name and email added.

25 September 2018

Title: Plastics in the Ocean: Facts, Fiction, and Unknowns
Presenter(s): Anna Robuck, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography
Date & Time: 25 September 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote - Online Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Anna Robuck, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6922965402939033090

Abstract: Although plastics are vital in a slew of consumer applications, plastic pollution in the ocean has turned out to be a not-so-fantastic outcome of modern day plastic dependence. This presentation provides an overview of the ocean plastic pollution problem, explaining the difference between marine debris and microplastics. It also will outline the current state of knowledge about microplastic impacts in the ocean and marine food webs, and provide insight into an ongoing research project using seabirds as indicators of plastic pollution in the Northwest Atlantic.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

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Title: Climate-driven species redistribution in marine systems
Presenter(s): Gretta Peci of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies and Centre for Marine Socioecology
Date & Time: 25 September 2018
4:30 pm - 5:30 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Gretta Pecl of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies and Centre for Marine Socioecology

Sponsor(s): Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

Abstract: Climate change is driving a pervasive global redistribution of the planet's species, with manifest implications from genes to ecosystems across multiple temporal and spatial scales. Species redistribution defies current approaches to natural resource management that focus on restoring systems to a baseline and are often based on boundaries drawn in the past. Changes in distribution of marine resources creates difficulties, particularly when species cross jurisdictional boundaries and where historical catch rates and assessment processes may no longer be appropriate. Moreover, we are still a long way from understanding the suite of mechanisms and processes underlying the high variation in rate and magnitude of shifts. We have even less understanding of how species redistribution will drive changes in ecological communities and further complicate aspirations of ecosystem-based management. Climate-driven species redistribution therefore presents intriguing ecological challenges to unravel, as well as fundamental philosophical questions and urgent issues related to ecology, fisheries, food security, Indigenous and local livelihoods, and many other aspects of human well-being. This presentation will highlight some of the progress with adaptation planning and adaptation actions at international, national and local scales, including the need for an interdisciplinary approach and stakeholder engagement.

Remote Access: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_s7RGZ_PxTaCbS7rj78tZNw

Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

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Title: Statistical simulations of drogued vs. undrogued drifters to improve understanding of marine debris transport pathways.
Presenter(s): Dr. Rick Lumpkin, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 25 September 2018
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149), OAR - AOML - 1st Flr Conf Room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Rick Lumpkin (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote Access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/531284381

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3412
Access Code: 531-284-381

Abstract: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: The Impact of the Mississippi River and Its Delta on the Oceanography, Ecology and Economy of the Gulf of Mexico: A Modern Synthesis
Presenter(s): Alexander S. Kolker, Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium and Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Tulane University. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: 25 September 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 for NOAA Silver Spring staff
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Impact of the Mississippi River and Its Delta on the Oceanography, Ecology and Economy of the Gulf of Mexico: A Modern Synthesis

Presenter(s): Alexander S. Kolker, Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium and Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Tulane University

Sponsor(s): NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Janessy.Frometa@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and "enter as guest":
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.
Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: While it has long been recognized that the Mississippi River is the largest source of freshwater, nutrients, and sediments to the Gulf of Mexico; and that the Mississippi River Delta is the largest geomorphological feature in the Gulf, there have been few efforts to holistically evaluate their impacts across the physical, natural and social sciences. This talk will examine the impacts of the Mississippi River and its delta on the Gulf by coupling synthesis products with a critical examination of decades of research, reflecting both investigator-level analyses and the products of a multi-disciplinary working group that meet over a period of several years.
We show that the Mississippi River and Mississippi River Delta have a broad influence on the oceanography, ecology and economy of the Gulf. Critical impacts include the development of a plume that can be >25,000 km2 in area at any given time, the flux of nutrients and carbon that can feed large fisheries, can fuel hypoxia, and provide energy to deep sea communities, while providing for a complex human civilization that depends on living and natural resources. The need to further understand these influences is underscored by critical management concerns that range from climate change and fisheries management to coastal resiliency, navigation, commerce and to the restoration the Gulf after the BP/Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Bio(s): Alex Kolker is a coastal oceanographer; he investigates the physical and anthropogenic activities that drive coastal systems, and focuses on: 1) the hydrology and sedimentology of large rivers and their impacts on the ocean; 2) the impacts of climate variability and change on coastal systems; 3) the geology of coastal wetlands,; and 4) the role of groundwater in river deltas. Alex Kolker currently works at the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium and teaches in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science at Tulane University. Alex is a coastal oceanographer with a PhD in Marine and Atmospheric Science from Stony Brook University, State University of New York.

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24 September 2018

Title: Preparing for the Next Water Year: Drought & Climate Outlook for California-Nevada
Presenter(s): s): Dan McEvoy, Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute; Michelle Mead, NWS Sacramento; Michael Dettinger, USGS
Date & Time: 24 September 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dan McEvoy, Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute; Michelle Mead, NWS Sacramento; Michael Dettinger, USGS

Seminar sponsor: National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA Climate Program Office

Seminar POC for questions: amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the webinar at https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/california-nevada-drought-climate-outlook-webinar-sept-24-2018

Abstract
The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) September 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia). The webinar takes place at 11 a.m. PT, Monday Sept. 24, 2018.

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Drought & Climate Update
Dan McEvoy | Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Desert Research Institute (DRI)

Drought & Climate Outlook
Michelle Mead | NWS Sacramento

Developing New Drought Early Warning Approaches/Indices
Michael Dettinger | USGS

Bio(s):

Dan McEvoy is a regional climatologist with the Western Regional Climate Center at the Desert Research Institute. His research interests include advancing drought monitoring technology, seasonal drought prediction, the role of evaporative demand on drought, quality and uncertainty assessment of weather observations, and climate modeling.

Michelle Mead is the Warning Coordination Meteorologist at the NWS Weather Forecast Office in Sacramento, CA. Michelle manages communications for the Sacramento office, including the social media effort and National Weather Service Impact Decisions Support Services. She received her Bachelors of Science in Earth Science and Meteorology from St. Cloud State University in Minnesota.

Michael Dettinger is a senior research hydrologist for the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Cycle Branch; a research associate of the Climate, Atmospheric Sciences and Physical Oceanography Division at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California; and a resident scientist at the University of Nevada Reno. Dettinger has monitored and researched the hydrology, climates, and water resources of the West for 35 years, focusing on atmospheric rivers and especially their Western impacts, regional surface water and groundwater resources, watershed modeling, causes of hydroclimatic variability, and climatic-change influences on western water and land resources. He has degrees from the University of California San Diego, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles (Atmospheric Sciences).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

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Presenter
Title: Application of Multispectral (RGB) Imagery from JPSS/VIIRS by Operational Forecasters in Alaska
Presenter(s): Kevin Fuell, NASA/Short-term Prediction, Research and Transition - SPoRT - Center Huntsville, AL
Date & Time: 24 September 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Conference 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771 Conference Room 561
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kevin Fuell, NASA/Short-term Prediction, Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center Huntsville, AL 877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mea3d389cce0cae2ec6ee10c2af0a1d78 Meeting number: 745 180 639 Host key: 526312 Meeting password: Jpss2018! Abstract The operational forecasters within the NWS Alaska Region have had experience over the last 5 years in the application of several multispectral imagery products from VIIRS on S-NPP and these RGB products have allowed a more efficient use of the large number of channels available from this polar-orbiting platform. NASA/SPoRT has transitioned several RGBs to Alaska users based on the best practices of others in the satellite community in order to apply these RGB products in support of analysis and short-term forecasts of hazards to the aviation and public communities. SPoRT started with the introduction of a series of microphysical RGBs that communicate the physical, thermal, and phase aspects of cloud objects within a single product. Several challenges were overcome to use VIIRS in combination with other polar-orbiting platforms as well as improve the consistency of the RGB across the swath area. Depending on the time of year, various RGBs were of greater value than others and the local forecasters were actively sharing their experiences with each other in order to support wider use in operations. Unique applications of RGB products to analyze volcanic ash as well as wildfires are also part of the suite of products that have proven good compliments to existing datasets in operations and to help fill vast areas of Alaska lacking in situ observations or that have limited views from geostationary imagers. Various examples of these RGBs and their impact will be presented with forecaster feedback. Discussion will also include the challenges associated with the transition of these into operations and a look at the future for RGBs in Alaska via JPSS resources. NASA/SPoRT (https://weather.msfc.nasa.gov/sport/)

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21 September 2018

Title: September NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: 21 September 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaking: Rick Thoman, National Weather Service

Sponsor(s): NWS
POC: richard.thoman@noaa.gov and Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/August_2018

Abstract: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for September and the Fall/early winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

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20 September 2018

Title: Valuing Blue Carbon in Mid-Atlantic Back-Barrier Wetlands
Presenter(s): Meredith Kurz, OAR/OAP
Date & Time: 20 September 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Meredith Kurz, Knauss Fellow, NOAA OAR Ocean Acidification Program

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part of the monthly Knauss Fellows Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Wetland conservation is rarely considered on the same level as terrestrial forest consevation in the realm of climate change mitigation policies, although they are among the most efficient ecosystems in terms of both annual carbon sequestration rates and carbon storage density per square kilometer. Relative sea level rise directly and indirectly threatens the salt marshes associated with the barrier island systems characteristic of the Mid-Atlantic Delmarva Peninsula. In this study, we estimate the net present value of the carbon sequestration and storage services provided by these marshes under a series of future wetland loss scenarios and consider potential management options.

Bio(s): Meredith Kurz is a 2018 Knauss Fellow in the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program, where she works with a fantastic team on national and international ocean acidification science and policy priorities. Meredith earned her B.S. in Ecology & Evolutionary Biology from Tulane University in 2013, and spent two years teaching high school biology in New Orleans. She returned to school to earn a Master of Marine Policy from the University of Delaware in 2017, where she completed interdisciplinary research on the value of blue carbon in Mid-Altantic salt marshes.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

19 September 2018

Title: Approaches for Addressing Missing Temperature Data for Longitudinal Studies
Presenter(s): Dr. Thomas Grothues, Rutgers University & Jacques Cousteau, National Estuarine Research Reserve System
Date & Time: 19 September 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online access (webinar)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Thomas Grothues, Rutgers University & Jacques Cousteau, National Estuarine Research Reserve System

Sponsor(s): NOAA's NERRS Science Collaborative.
For questions contact dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or boumad@umich.edu

Remote Access: Please register through GoTo

Remote Access:
http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar

Abstract: The National Estuarine Research Reserves' System-wide Monitoring Program (SWMP) data can contribute to research and discussion on climate change. The treatment of temperature data is of particular concern when applied to the analysis of interannual trends. Seasonal cycles can impose fluctuations that greatly exceed diurnal, tidal, or event-scale fluctuations, and seasonally skewed distribution of missing data biases calculations of annual or seasonal means.

This webinar will provide insights on encoded algorithms for measuring temperature trends, including the conservative approach of replacing missing temperature data with smoothed day-of-the-year averages and seasonal decomposition as well as the benefits and disadvantages of alternative approaches.

Bio(s):
Dr. Tom Grothues has a Research Faculty appointment as a fish ecologist at Rutgers University and begins as Research Coordinator for Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve System in Fall 2019. He has been using SWMP data in peer-reviewed publications about fish habitat use, migration, and recruitment since 2007.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Trend Analysis of System-wide Monitoring Program (SWMP) Temperature with Missing Data
Presenter(s): Dr. Thomas Grothues, Rutgers University and Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve
Date & Time: 19 September 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Please register through GoToWebinar (see below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Thomas Grothues, Rutgers University & Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve

Sponsor(s): NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html or http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar).

Remote Access: Please register through GoToWebinar (http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar).

Abstract:
The National Estuarine Research Reserves' System-wide Monitoring Program (SWMP) data can contribute to research and discussion on climate change. The treatment of temperature data is of particular concern when applied to the analysis of interannual trends. Seasonal cycles can impose fluctuations that greatly exceed diurnal, tidal, or event-scale fluctuations, and seasonally skewed distribution of missing data biases calculations of annual or seasonal means.

This webinar will provide training on encoded algorithms for measuring temperature trends, including the conservative approach of replacing missing temperature data with smoothed day-of-the-year averages and seasonal decomposition as well as the benefits and disadvantages of alternative approaches.

Bio(s): Dr. Tom Grothues has a Research Faculty appointment as a fish ecologist at Rutgers University and begins as Research Coordinator for Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve System in Fall 2019. He has been using SWMP data in peer-reviewed publications about fish habitat use, migration, and recruitment since 2007.

Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or boumad@umich.edu

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

18 September 2018

Title: Beyond Dissolving Shells in Acid: New Approaches to Teaching Ocean Acidification
Presenter(s): Brian Erickson, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 18 September 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online access (webinar) Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2372017509769439745
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Brian Erickson, Oregon State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program and Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
For questions contact jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register through GoTo

Remote Access:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2372017509769439745

Abstract: Are you looking for ways to teach about ocean acidification? Sorting through the 90+ teaching resources on ocean acidification developed over the past 10 years can be overwhelming. In this webinar, we: (1) summarize key findings from our review of existing teaching resources, pointing out our favorite dozen and highlighting key gaps, and (2) introduce a new resource, Changing Ocean Chemistry, that attempts to fill in some of these gaps.

Bio(s):
Brian Erickson is a PhD student at Oregon State University in Kelly Biedenweg's Human Dimensions Lab. He is excited to apply an understanding of human behavior and decision making to help make conservation projects more successful. Brian is a former high school science teacher and department chair who has held over 30 jobs in his life (no he wasn't fired 29 times), including: curriculum consultant, outdoor educator, and biological field technician. He holds a BA in Biology from Lewis & Clark College (2006), an MS in Teaching from Fordham University (2011), and an MS in Marine Resource Management from Oregon State University (2018). When not working, he can often be found whitewater kayaking, hiking, or playing his saxophone or banjo.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

13 September 2018

Title: Coral Reef Conservation Program & The Nature Conservancy Partnership in Hawaii
Presenter(s): Emily Fielding, TNC Maui Marine Program Director
Date & Time: 13 September 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar, or for NOAA staff in Silver Spring, SSMC3, Room 4817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Coral Reef Conservation Program & The Nature Conservancy Partnership in Hawaii

Presenter(s): Emily Fielding, TNC Maui Marine Program Director (and updates from the Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) Headquarters)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program; seminar host is Brian.Beck@noaa.gov

Remote Access: WebEx conferencing information:
Meeting No: 746964141 Meeting Passcode: corals1234
1. To join the meeting:
http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746964141&p=corals1234&t=c
2. Enter the required fields.
3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy.
4. Click on Proceed.
To access the sound you must dial in using the following number; it is not computer audio.
Dial: (866) 581-0524 Passcode: 6578691#

Abstract: Come learn about the innovative coral reef conservation programs of the NOAA-CRCP-TNC Partnership in Hawaii, on the Island of Maui. This webinar will focus on the threats to Maui's coral reefs and coastal ecosystems and how community groups have come together to accelerate their learning and effectiveness in marine and coastal management with the State. With a new State goal of 30% marine area effectively managed by 2030, the Conservancy is supporting strategic community and State efforts for effective management through science, policy, planning, including community-led monitoring of corals and intertidal species.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: BETA OPUS-Projects: the Next Generation of OPUS-Projects
Presenter(s): Dr. Mark Schenewerk, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 13 September 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Online Access Only - see access information below

Presenter(s): Dr. Mark Schenewerk, NOAA's National Geodetic Surve)

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1298831484121506049

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: BETA OPUS-Projects will be the next generation of the OPUS-Projects online tool. This webinar is not training, but rather, is an overview of BETA OPUS-Projects highlighting the enhancements and steps needed to submit survey data for publication.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 13 September 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: Autonomous Vehicles - Multiple Missions and Multiple Sensors through Modularity
Presenter(s): AMV). Presenting in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 13 September 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Autonomous Vehicles, Multiple Missions and Multiple Sensors Through Modularity

Presenter(s): David Jochum, President, Tridentis and William Latham, CTO, Tridentis Advanced Marie Vehicles (AMV). Presenting in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, co-host is Rob.Warner@noaa.gov, NOAA/NCCOS.

Remote Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and 'Enter as guest':
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Limited funding cuts the amount of sea time available to researchers and scientists. Ships are expensive to build, operate, and maintain. Where assets are in short supply, how is research to be accomplished? The answer may lie in the use of smaller unmanned platforms that are capable of multiple mission types or easily re-configured to support different sensors. Essentially, give me a pickup truck and I will figure out what to put in the bed. Tridentis Advanced Marine Vehicles (AMV) was the recipient of a NOAA 2017 SBIR Phase I award to develop an autonomous surface vessel that had a modular sensor bay, and that was powered by "green power" to support the coastal monitoring mission set. We successfully completed our design of the Advanced Coastal Monitor (ACM) and proved the potential of the vehicle. We were awarded a NOAA 2018 SBIR Phase II to build a prototype of the ACM which is beginning construction. Tridentis AMV was also awarded a NOAA 2018 SBIR Phase I award to design an autonomous underwater vehicle (Bottom Feeder) that also had a modular sensor bay and optimized for coral health monitoring and satellite sensor calibration and ground truthing. The common thread is that with limited funding available, platforms need to support more mission sets and deploy a wider range of sensors to keep the required at-sea operational tempo. The ACM was a clean sheet design developed around this ideal. A stable platform that could employ atmospheric, surface, and subsurface sensors that was easy to modify or retrofit for each use. The Bottom Feeder follows in this vein in that it is also a clean sheet design that is centered around the employment of both general and specialized sensors. The platform will be designed with multiple operational profiles in mind, high efficiency and high maneuverability, to best deploy the on-board sensors. It will be optionally tethered for higher data bandwidth and real time control. Tridentis AMV is developing the platforms to support ocean sensing and survey missions, how do you want to employ them?

Bio(s):
Mr. David Jochum is the CEO and Founder of Tridentis AMV, a company formed to pursue the commercialization of multiple SBIR awards. He is also the president of Tridentis LLC., and for the past 11 years, has provided Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering oversight for the successful execution of multiple USCG, US Navy and MSC contracts. He is currently the Assistant Program Manager on the USCG ISVS Support Contract, USCG CG-45 Systems Engineering Contract, USS Mount Whitney Extended Service Life Program and the MSC N7 Engineering Design Services Contract. He has also been the Program Manager for other MSC contracts including Naval Architecture (N721) Engineering Support Services, MSC Lessons Learned Program Office, and T-AOE Damaged Stability Analysis. His Engineering Manager experience dealing with major shipbuilding acquisitions has sharpened his knowledge of USCG, ABS, SOLAS, USPHS, ASTM, SNAME, IMO, and U.S. Navy requirements. As the Program Manager on a wide range of contracts, he has a detailed understanding of the ship acquisitions process. He has an MBA, and he is a graduate of the University of New Orleans with a degree in Naval Architecture.

Mr. William Latham is the Senior Naval Architect/Marine Engineer at Tridentis AMV. He has 29 years of technical and engineering program management experience across the full spectrum of ships, craft, and platforms. He recently completed a SBIR Phase I project for NOAA designing an autonomous mobile coastal monitor that is powered by green power supplies and is equipped with a modular sensor bay. Prior to that he designed a surface effect ship ship-to-shore connector under an ONR SBIR. He oversaw and performed feasibility studies to expand the T-AKE mission set to include ship-to-shore connectors and USMC vehicles. He invented and successfully prototyped the stabilizing element and conformal interface surface for the Transfer at Sea (TAS) system, a stabilized ramp system to transfer military vehicles from ship to ship at sea in adverse weather conditions. He then successfully redesigned the TAS system to be used for personnel transfer between ships at sea, and between large ships and small craft in harbor where an advanced concept technology demonstrator was constructed at full scale and successfully shop tested at full load, full speed, and full motion, proving out the complete system design, including launch and recovery. Further he has successfully led or been an instrumental on multiple ship development programs including a hybrid surface effect ship/hovercraft, Canadian 65m fisheries research vessel, 159 passenger ferry for Hampton Roads Transit, 46 foot US Navy workboat, and other military and civilian vessels. He has been responsible for the design and development of subsea systems and operations, ranging from submarine rescue to archaeological recoveries, has operational experience on US Navy fast attack submarines, and was a graduate of Webb Institute of Naval Architecture.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Or email tracy.gill@noaa.gov and I will have your name and email added.

(David Jochum, President, Tridentis and William Latham, CTO, Tridentis Advanced Marie Vehicles

12 September 2018

Title: Management strategy evaluation for ecosystem-based fisheries management: defining objectives and exploring tradeoffs using transdisciplinary approaches
Presenter(s): Kristin Marshall, Research Fish Biologist, NMFS/NWFSC/FRAMD
Date & Time: 12 September 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kristin Marshall, Research Fish Biologist, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov); Webinar host: Librarian Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://goo.gl/fddvsB Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Management strategy evaluation (MSE) is a useful approach to better understand and illustrate objectives and tradeoffs inherent to ecosystem-based fisheries management. MSEs can support decision-making and improve understanding of potential consequences of fisheries management for humans and ecosystems. In this talk, I describe the MSE approach and use examples from Pacific herring and Pacific hake fisheries to show how a transdisciplinary research process advances understanding of sustainability in each social-ecological fishery system.

Bio(s): Kristin Marshall is an ecologist and the Management Strategy Evaluation Coordinator at the Northwest Fishery Science Center. Her research focuses on understanding how species and ecosystems respond to climate change and developing and applying transdisciplinary approaches to support ecosystem-based fisheries management. Kristin earned a PhD from Colorado State University, a MS from University of Washington, a BA from Boston University, and worked as a post-doc at the NWFSC and the UW prior to joining NOAA as a federal employee in 2017.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Solving the Challenge of Predicting Nature: How Close are We and How Do We Get There?
Presenter(s): Michael Dietze, Associate Professor, Department of Earth & Environment, Boston University
Date & Time: 12 September 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Solving the Challenge of Predicting Nature: How Close are We and How Do We Get There?

Presenter(s): Michael Dietze, Associate Professor, Department of Earth & Environment, Boston University

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.
Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667.
Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join",
click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web.
Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract: Is nature predictable? If so, can we use that understanding to better manage and conserve ecosystems? Near-term ecological forecasting is an emerging interdisciplinary research area that aims to improve our ability to predict ecological processes on timescales that can be meaningfully validated and iteratively updated. In this talk I argue that near-term forecasting is a win-win for accelerating basic science and making it more relevant to society. I will focus on the challenges and opportunities in this field, spanning advances in environmental monitoring, statistics, and cyberinfrastructure. I will present a first-principles framework for understanding the predictability of ecological processes and synthesizing this understanding across different systems. Finally, I will highlight ongoing efforts to build an ecological forecasting community of practice.

Bio(s): Michael Dietze leads the Ecological Forecasting Laboratory at Boston University, whose mission is to better understand and predict ecological systems, and is author of the book Ecological Forecasting. He is interested in the ways that iterative forecasts, which are continually confronted with new data, can improve and accelerate basic science in ecology, while at the same time making that science more directly relevant to society. Much of the current work in the lab is organized within the Near-term Ecological Forecasting Initiative (NEFI) and the PEcAn project. NEFI is focused on addressing overarching questions about ecological predictability, while developing forecasts for a wide range of ecological processes (vegetation phenology and land-surface fluxes; ticks, tick-borne disease and small mammal hosts; soil microbiome; aquatic productivity and algal blooms) and advancing statistical and informatic tools for ecological forecasting. PEcAn is focused on the terrestrial carbon cycle, improving our capacity for carbon MRV (monitoring, reporting, verification), forecasting, data assimilation, and multi-model benchmarking and calibration within the land component of Earth System models.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

11 September 2018

Title: POSTPONED to 10/24: NOAA Geospatial (Geographic Information System) Hot Topics
Presenter(s): Tony LaVoi, NOAA Geospatial Information Officer, NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer and Integrated Information Services Division Chief, NOAA Office for Coastal Management; Kim Valentine, Geospatial Data Manager, National Ocean Service, Office of the Assistant Chief Information Officer; and Randy Warren, GIS Coordinator, National Ocean Service, Office for Coastal Management
Date & Time: 11 September 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
  • Tony LaVoi, NOAA Geospatial Information Officer, NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer,
    Integrated Information Services Division Chief, NOAA Office for Coastal Management;
  • Kim Valentine, Geospatial Data Manager, National Ocean Service, Office of the Assistant Chief Information Officer; and
  • Randy Warren, GIS Coordinator, National Ocean Service, Office for Coastal Management


Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and "enter as guest":
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.
Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov
You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.

Abstract: NOAA's diverse mission is enabled by the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies. During this webinar we will demonstrate several ways how GIS is used to meet NOAA's mission. We will also provide an overview of the NOAA GIS Committee, resources for end users including the NOAA GIS Community website, and discuss benefits of the new NOAA Esri Enterprise License Agreement, which includes access to software, ArcGIS Online, and GIS training.

Bio(s):

Tony LaVoi holds a dual role within NOAA. He serves as the NOAA Geospatial Information Officer (GIO) out of the NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer. Tony and his GIO team serve as the focal point for enterprise geospatial projects, strategies, policy development, standards, and coordination activities across the organization. Outside of NOAA, he is a member of the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) Executive and Steering Committees, is an active in the United Nations Global Geospatial Information Management Working Group, and a member of FEMA's Technical Mapping Advisory Council. In his other role in NOAA, he serves as the chief of the Integrated Information Services (IIS) division within the NOAA Office for Coastal Management within the Ocean Service.

Kim Valentine is a Geospatial Data Manager for the NOS Assistant CIO and holds a dual role supporting Tony LaVoi as the NOAA Geospatial Information Officer (GIO). Her work over the past 14 years has focused on supporting NOAA's environmental and geospatial data management activities and specifically supporting our end user communities. Kim has also been heavily involved in establishing our NOAA Esri enterprise licensing contract and implementation of the NOAA Esri Central Support Tier 1 helpdesk system and function for all our users.

Randy Warren has been on contract with NOAA for over 11 years. During that time he has become the de facto coordinator for many geospatial activities in NOAA. He is the lead administrator for the NOAA GeoPlatform (ArcGIS Online), a core team member of the NOAA Esri Central Support, and executive secretariat for the NOAA GIS Committee. He also leads several geospatial activities for the Office of Coastal Management within the National Ocean Service.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: The role of reef acoustic cues in the pelagic stage of reef fish larvae
Presenter(s): Andria Kay Salas, NMFS/OHC/HRD
Date & Time: 11 September 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Andria Kay Salas, Knauss Fellow, NOAA NMFS Restoration Center

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part of the monthly Knauss Fellows Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: The activities of reef-associated organisms produces a reef soundscape that is used by larval fishes as a source of acoustic cues to guide orientation to and inform selection of appropriate settlement habitat. There are three steps in this process: 1) the creation of acoustic cues by soniferous animals, whose behavior creates variations in spatiotemporal cues, 2) the propagation of these sounds, which creates a complex sound field impacting the potential for sound detection by larval fish, and 3) the reception of these sounds by larval fishes and their resulting behavior. In this presentation Andria will present advances in these three components using a combination of soundscape and sound propagation data across a habitat quality gradient, computed tomography imagery from larval fish, and modelling approaches.

Bio(s): Andria Salas is a 2018 Knauss Fellow in the NOAA OHC Restoration Center working with the Deepwater Horizon Program on programmatic evaluation. She is also a Ph.D. student in the Integrative Biology Department at the University of Texas at Austin, planning a fall 2018 defense of her dissertation research exploring how acoustic cues produced by reef-dwelling organisms may serve as navigational signals for the settlement of larval reef fishes. Andria received her Masters degree in Marine Science at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, where she investigated the influence of indirect effects in trophic and evolutionary networks. Andria is from DeWitt, Michigan and earned her Bachelors of Science in Biology in her in her home state at Grand Valley State University.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 September 2018

Title: State of the Nation’s River: How is the Potomac doing?
Presenter(s): Hedrick Belin, President, Potomac Conservancy, and Caitlin Wall, Director of Policy, Potomac Conservancy
Date & Time: 6 September 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see login below) or at NOAA SSMC4, Room 8150 (NOAA staff only)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Hedrick Belin, President, Potomac Conservancy, and Caitlin Wall, Director of Policy, Potomac Conservancy

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Skype often works if you have a good connection.
For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install MyMeeting's WebEx app while logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: In 2018, the Potomac River earned its highest grade ever (a B) from Potomac Conservancy! In a dramatic turnaround for our region's drinking water source, the Potomac's health improved from an abysmal D to a B in just ten years. For the first time in generations, we are within reach of enjoying a healthy, thriving Potomac River. It's taken decades of hard work to strengthen water protections and undo the damage wrought by reckless polluters. But, we're at a critical tipping point and there's more work to be done. Polluted runoff, rapid deforestation, and new attacks on water protections threaten to return dangerous pollution to local waters. The Potomac's journey to an "A" will not be easy, but it's worth fighting for because we all deserve a healthy river and clean water. Learn more about what's going right and wrong with the Potomac.

Bio(s):
Hedrick Belin provides strategic direction to the Potomac Conservancy as it fights to improve the Potomac River and its surrounding lands through conservation and advocacy. Under his leadership, the Conservancy has launched several successful initiatives to promote river-friendly land use and to expand the base of volunteers actively engaged in the stewardship of our local green spaces. He comes to the Conservancy with over 15 years of nonprofit fundraising and leadership experience, most recently as Vice President of the Metropolitan Group, a strategic communication and resource development consulting firm. Before joining the Metropolitan Group, Hedrick worked for several conservation groups, including the National Park Foundation, Izaak Walton League of America, and the League of Conservation Voters. In addition, Hedrick has experience mobilizing grassroots advocates, formulating public policy, partnering with public agencies and developing conservation programs. Hedrick received his bachelor's degree in history from Yale University, and his master's in public administration from George Washington University. He lives with his wife and two children in Silver Spring, Maryland.

Caitlin Wall joined the Potomac Conservancy in 2016 as director of the Conservancy's policy efforts in Maryland and the District of Columbia. She previously worked at Marstel-Day, LLC, leading policy efforts to develop compatible use partnerships between military installations and communities. Caitlin earned a BA from the College of William and Mary in public policy and environmental studies and an MA from Colorado State University in political science. Caitlin has experience with a variety of conservation organizations, including Greenpeace, the Piedmont Environmental Council, AmeriCorps, and Oregon State Parks. She is a Senior Fellow in the Environmental Leadership Program and a Faculty Adviser for the George Mason Washington Youth Summit on the Environment, and enjoys hiking, camping, yoga, and triathlons.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Declining CO2 Price Paths
Presenter(s): Gernot Wagner, Clinical Associate Professor, New York University. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 6 September 2018
11:30 am - 1:15 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Declining CO2 Price Paths

Presenter(s):
Gernot Wagner, Clinical Associate Professor, New York University. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register at:

After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to us Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Pricing greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions involves making tradeoffs between consumption today and unknown damages in the (distant) future. While decision making under risk and uncertainty is the forte of financial economics, important insights from pricing financial assets do not typically inform standard climate"economy models. Here, we introduce EZ-Climate, a simple recursive dynamic asset pricing model that allows for a calibration of the carbon dioxide (CO2) price path based on probabilistic assumptions around climate damages. Atmospheric CO2 is the asset with a negative expected return. The economic model focuses on society's willingness to substitute consumption across time and across uncertain states of nature, enabled by an Epstein"Zin (EZ) specification that delinks preferences over risk from intertemporal substitution. In contrast to most modeled CO2 price paths, EZ-Climate suggests a high price today that is expected to decline over time as the insurance value of mitigation declines and technological change makes emissions cuts cheaper. Second, higher risk aversion increases both the CO2 price and the risk premium relative to expected damages. Lastly, our model suggests large costs associated with delays in pricing CO2 emissions. In our base case, delaying implementation by 1 y leads to annual consumption losses of over 2%, a cost that roughly increases with the square of time per additional year of delay. The model also makes clear how sensitive results are to key inputs.

Bio(s):
Gernot* Wagner is a clinical associate professor at New York University's Department of Environmental Studies and associated clinical professor at the NYU Wagner School of Public Service. He wrote Climate Shock, joint with Harvard's Martin Weitzman and published by Princeton University Press (2015, paperback 2016), among others, a Top 15 Financial Times McKinsey Business Book of the Year 2015.
* It's pronounced like juggernaut without the jug.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

5 September 2018

Title: CCRUN Seminar: Green Infrastructure
Presenter(s): Dr. Franco Montalto, Drexel University
Date & Time: 5 September 2018
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Franco Montalto, Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering, Drexel University

Seminar sponsor: OAR / CPO / RISA Program

Remote Access: http://whoozin.com/3WA-6TM-YFWD

Abstract:

On Sep 5, 2018 the Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN) seminar will be held in Drexel University. Dr. Franco Montalto, Associate Professor of Enironmental Engineering in Drexel University, will give the presentations. CCRUN is a NOAA-funded RISA program (see cpo.noaa.gov/risa).

Topic:
1. Stakeholder Perceptions of Green Infrastructure and Ecosystem Services in New York City

Using New York City (NYC) as a case study, this paper presents a non-economic approach to quantify the ecosystem services (ES) provided by GI. Structured surveys with residents and practitioners of NYC's GI program are used to identify local values and test whether perceptions of the ES are related to an individual's familiarity with GI. The survey results indicate that while stormwater management is the primary driver of GI investment in NYC, residents do not value this service as highly as other ES. Municipal programs that strive to create multifunctional GI and provide multiple ES simultaneously (e.g. enhanced aesthetics, improved quality of life, heat island reduction, etc.) may be more successful in engendering public support than efforts solely focused on stormwater management. Additionally, the results of this research suggest that, to provide the most value to stakeholders, future greening efforts in NYC would ideally expand beyond the right-of-way to include new and enhanced Parks & Natural Areas and Community Gardens.

2.The Long-Term Economic and Social Impacts of Green Infrastructure In New York City

This research uses an agent-model to explore some of the physical, social, and economic consequences of urban GI programs. Using the Bronx, NY as a case study, two alternative approaches to GI application are compared. The first (Model 1) mimics NYC's current GI program by randomly selecting sites for GI within the city's priority watersheds; the second (Model 2) features a more deliberate approach to GI siting, in which the city attempts to maximize opportunities for co-benefits alongside stormwater capture goals. While both models suggest it will be difficult to meet stormwater capture goals solely through pubic investment in GI, Model 2 shows that by integrating GI with other city initiatives (e.g. sustainability goals, resilience planning), synergistic outcomes are possible. Specifically, Model 2 produces stormwater capture rates comparable to those obtained under Model 1 and accompanied by elevated co-benefits for Bronx communities. The results are discussed within the context of future GI policy development in NYC.

Seminar POC for questions: sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Additional presenters field:
Title: Underwater: Rising Seas, Chronic Floods, and the Implications for US Coastal Real Estate
Presenter(s): Dr. Kristina Dahl, Senior Climate Scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: 5 September 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Kristina Dahl, Senior Climate Scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: Sea levels are rising. Tides are inching higher. High-tide floods are becoming more frequent and reaching farther inland. And hundreds of US coastal communities will soon face chronic, disruptive flooding that directly affects people's homes, lives, and properties. Yet property values in most coastal real estate markets do not currently reflect this risk. And most homeowners, communities, and investors are not aware of the financial losses they may soon face. This seminar examines what's at risk for US coastal real estate from sea level rise"and the challenges and choices we face now and in the decades to come.


Bio(s): Dr. Kristina Dahl is a senior climate scientist for the Climate & Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. In her role, she designs, executes, and communicates scientific analyses to make climate change more tangible to the general public, and to policymakers. Her research focuses on the impact of climate change, particularly sea level rise, on people and places. Dr. Dahl holds a PhD from the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

4 September 2018

Title: Upper ocean horizontal velocity and vertical shear in the tropical North Atlantic.
Presenter(s): Dr. Renellys Perez, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 4 September 2018
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Renellys Perez (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote Access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/246938861

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 246-938-861

Abstract: The Tropical Atlantic Current Observations Study sampled upper-ocean horizontal velocity and vertical shear from a mooring at 4degN, 23degW in order to observe the temporal and vertical structure of the currents in this region. In the first year of TACOS data, mean zonal velocity and vertical shear were strongest between 32 and 37 m, with mean near-surface eastward currents that were weaker than expected. Despite the Atlantic cold tongue being anomalously warm, energetic tropical instability waves (TIWs) were observed. Meridional velocity fluctuations were generally larger than those of zonal velocity. TIW velocity fluctuations extended down to 87 m and perturbed the thermocline and the depth of maximum vertical shear squared, although they generated only modest vertical shear when compared to the shear in boreal winter and spring. The phase of these fluctuations propagates upward to the surface with vertical phase speeds between 12 and 15 m day -1 . Coherent velocity, vertical shear, and temperature variations are examined in a composite TIW. Models and ancillary data are used to put the first year of TACOS observations into the context of the long-term variability present at 4degN, 23degW. Early results from the second year of TACOS data will also be shown.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Accessibility of Big Data Imagery for Next Generation Computer Vision Applications
Presenter(s): Sarah Margolis NMFS OST, Knauss Fellow
Date & Time: 4 September 2018
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar


Presenter(s): Sarah Margolis NMFS OST, Knauss Fellow

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1677887022502746113 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

POC: Outreach Librarian, Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)


Abstract: Unprecedented growth of digital imagery information from NOAA's science-based operations requires enhanced data management and storage practices to enable accessibility and use of analytical tools such as machine learning applications. Enriched metadata will optimize the use of analytic tools to reduce the costs of labor intensive post-processing of digital imagery, and increase the quality and timeliness of scientific information for the NOAA mission. Furthermore, improved accessibility of imagery data will promote research and discovery by the wider scientific community and citizen science.

Bio(s): Sarah Margolis graduated from the Boston University Marine Program in 2015 and continued her education at Louisiana State University where she received a master's degree in fisheries oceanography in the Spring of 2018. She is currently a Knauss Fellow working with NMFS Office of Science and Technology as the Advanced Sampling Technology Coordinator.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

30 August 2018

Title: Exploring Deepwater Habitats of the Southeast US Continental Margin
Presenter(s): Dr. Leslie Reynolds Sautter, Dept. of Geology and Environmental Geosciences, College of Charleston. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: 30 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Leslie Reynolds Sautter, Dept. of Geology and Environmental Geosciences, College of Charleston. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
Skype often works if you have a good connection.
For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event",
then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install MyMeeting's
WebEx app while logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: In June 2018 the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Deep Discoverer aboard the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer dove on 17 different seabed locations of the Southeast U.S. Continental Margin from Florida to North Carolina, with a primary mission to identify deep sea coral and sponge habitat while documenting the seabed substrate. Dive sites were located from 30 miles to nearly 200 miles off the coast in water depths ranging from 350 to 3300 m. This region is largely unexplored and has enormous areas not yet mapped in high resolution. ROV dive sites included mud-bottom canyon ridges, methane gas seeps, vertical rock cliffs within terraced slopes, and several deep coral mounds that lie in the path of the Gulf Stream at depths greater than 700 m. A 19th century shipwreck was also mapped for 3D imaging. In this talk, Dr. Sautter will cover the range of seabed environments encountered during the NOAA Ocean Exploration and Research's Window to the Deep 2018 expedition, and the wealth of information gained related to our seaward backyard's deep sea habitats.
https://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1806/welcome.html

Bio(s): Dr. Leslie Reynolds Sautter has been teaching marine geology at the College of Charleston for over two decades. She earned her Ph.D. in Geology at the University of South Carolina and has a background in paleoceanography as well as coastal research and geoscience education. She is founder and director of the BEnthic Acoustic Mapping and Survey (BEAMS) Program (http://oceanica.cofc.edu/beamsprogram ) which allows undergraduate students to conduct research using state-of-the-art seafloor mapping software. Leslie has been on many expeditions to study the seafloor geology and biota using ROVs and submersibles, and thoroughly enjoys taking students out to sea to provide experiential learning experiences. She continues to assist with development of education programming and web resources.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in Tropical Cyclone Monitoring
Presenter(s): Xiaofeng Li, NESDIS/STAR/SOCD/MECB
Date & Time: 30 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Central Library

Presenter(s): Dr. Xiaofeng Li, GST at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR

Slides downloadable at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/LiX_2018-SAR-Hurricane-NOAA-Seminar.pdf

Abstract: We present a suite of hurricane products (wind, wave, rain, pressure, eye location) that can be generated from the Spaceborne synthetic Aperture Radar onboard Canadian RADARSAT and ESA's Sentinel-1 satellites.

Bio(s): Xiaofeng Li received his Ph.D. in physical oceanography from North Carolina State University in 1997. He has been supporting the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) tasks ever since. He has authored more than 130 peer-reviewed publications and edited 3 books. He currently serves as an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing and the Ocean Section Editor-in-Chief of Remote Sensing

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1938566935465839874
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

29 August 2018

Title: Cooperative Monitoring Program for Fish Spawning Aggregations in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Brad Erisman, Assistant Professor of Fisheries Ecology, The University of Texas at Austin. Presenting in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: 29 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Cooperative Monitoring Program for Fish Spawning Aggregations in the Gulf of Mexico

Presenter(s): Brad Erisman, Assistant Professor of Fisheries Ecology, The University of Texas at Austin. Presenting in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Janessy.Frometa@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and enter as guest: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Fish spawning aggregations are key components of ecosystems and fisheries in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, but they've received limited attention for research and management. This presentation will review a project supported by the NOAA RESTORE Act Science Program to compile and evaluate existing information on fish spawning aggregations in the Gulf of Mexico as the basis to design a long-term, cooperative, Gulf-wide monitoring program. The results of the project, including details on existing data gaps and priorities for future research and management, will be highlighted.

Bio(s): Brad Erisman is a fisheries ecologist with expertise on the reproductive biology, spawning behavior, population dynamics, management, and conservation of marine fishes. His current research focuses on characterizing spatial and temporal interactions between fish reproductive dynamics, fisheries, and environmental conditions as a means to assess reproductive resilience in exploited fish populations (https://fisheries.utexas.edu). He is a member of the IUCN Species Survival Commission and the Coastal Resources Advisory Committee for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

Grss, A, Biggs, C., Heyman, W. D., and Erisman, B. (2018). Prioritizing monitoring and conservation efforts for fish spawning aggregations in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. Nature, 8:8473. 10 pp. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-26898-0

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar webpage.

28 August 2018

Title: Telling Stories with Data: The Art of Data Visualization
Presenter(s): Kel Elkins, NASA Scientific Visualization Studio
Date & Time: 28 August 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Telling Stories with Data -- The Art of Data Visualization

Presenter(s): Kel Elkins, NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

Sponsor(s): NOAA Environmental Data Talks, hosted by the National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS); Point of Contact: justin.grieser@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and 'enter as guest': https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/noaa-interview/

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available through the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.

Abstract: How do you communicate complex technical concepts in a way that is intellectually engaging and visually appealing? The Scientific Visualization Studio (SVS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD grapples with this question every day. The studio creates data-drive animations based on NASA missions. This talk will provide an overview of the SVS's work, including a discussion of storytelling and color theory and the roles they play in creating a successful data visualization.

Bio(s): Kel Elkins is a data visualizer with NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. He works with scientists to visualize data from NASA missions, including both observational data (from satellites, planes, etc.) and supercomputer simulations. These visualizations promote a greater understanding of Earth and Space Science research activities at NASA. Prior to joining NASA, Kel worked at an aerospace software company where he specialized in communicating complex technical concepts related to spacecraft and aircraft mission planning. Kel holds a Master's degree in Computer Graphics and Game Technology from the University of Pennsylvania and a Bachelor's degree in Aerospace Engineering from Penn State.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: 2017 Annual Climate Trends and Impacts Summary for the Great Lakes Basin
Presenter(s): Dr. Jeffrey Andreson, Great Lakes Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments team and Michigan State Climatologist et. al.
Date & Time: 28 August 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: 2017 Annual Climate Trends and Impacts Summary for the Great Lakes Basin

Presenter(s):
Jeffrey Andresen, William Baule, Kim Channell, Jenna Jorns - Great Lakes Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) team
Wendy Leger, Sylvain Deland, Nancy Stadler-Salt, Frank Seglenieks, Robert Whitewood - Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC)

Brent Lofgren - NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab (GLERL)
Jonathan Weaver, Beth Hall - Midwestern Regional Climate Center
Meredith Muth - NOAA OAR Climate Program Office
Doug Kluck - NOAA NESDIS National Centers for Environmental Information

Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR, Great Lakes Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) team and the Climate Program Office

Remote Access:
FOR WEBCAST
Blue Jeans web conference: https://bluejeans.com/190594461

FOR AUDIO
Call-in number: +1-888-240-2560
Meeting ID: 190594461

Abstract:
Under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA), the Annex 9 Extended Subcommittee on Climate Change Impacts generated a pilot product for 2017, titled 2017 Annual Climate Trends and Impacts Summary for the Great Lakes Basin.' The product aims to provide a timely and succinct summary of the past year's climate trends, notable climate-related events, and relevant new research, assessments, and relevant activities in the context of the Great Lakes. 2017 was a particularly interesting year for climate events and trends in the basin with higher than average seasonal temperature and precipitation, flooding, and low ice cover. The majority of the region experienced a wet spring with persistent heavy rain and snowfall. Water levels in the five Great Lakes were above average, continuing a similar trend during the past several years. Due primarily to high spring rainfall, Lake Ontario reached its highest ever recorded water level in May 2017 resulting in shoreline flooding in New York and Ontario. Winter and fall warm spells led to record warm temperatures in parts of the basin. At just 15% areal coverage, Great Lakes maximum ice cover for the year was 40% below the long-term average. The United States and Canada (via representatives on the Annex 9 Subcommittee) coordinated on synthesizing this information in a short and easy-to-understand document. This prototype climate information product will be that is intended to be replicated each year if the product is found to be useful to GLWQA annexes, the Great Lakes Executive Committee, and policy and decision makers at all levels in the Great Lakes. This webinar will share the 2017 pilot product and solicit feedback on its utility.

Seminar POC for questions: meredith.f.muth@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: The Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment: An Overview of Volume 1
Presenter(s): Donald J. Wuebbles, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: 28 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA staff, SSMC4, Room 8150, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, in partnership with NOAA.

Climate Seminar 8 of 8:

Title: The Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment: An Overview of Volume 1

Presenter(s): Donald J. Wuebbles, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED.
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and 'Enter as guest':
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Video recordings of the climate seminars can be found here: https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars

Abstract: New observations and new research have increased our understanding of past, current, and future climate change. The Fourth National Climate Assessment confirms prior assessments in concluding that the climate on our planet, including the United States, is changing, and changing rapidly. Observational evidence for a changing climate abounds, from the top of the atmosphere to the depths of the oceans. Documented changes include surface, atmospheric, and oceanic temperatures; melting glaciers; disappearing snow cover; shrinking sea ice; and rising sea level. Many lines of evidence demonstrate that human activities have been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century. Changes in the characteristics of extreme events are particularly important for human safety, infrastructure, agriculture, water quality and quantity, and natural ecosystems. Some extremes have already become more frequent, intense, or of longer duration, and many extremes are expected to continue to increase or worsen, presenting substantial challenges. Heatwaves have become more frequent in the United States since the 1960s, while extreme cold temperatures and cold waves have become less frequent. Heavy rainfall is increasing in intensity and frequency across the United States and globally. These and other trends in severe weather are expected to continue. The Earth's climate is projected to continue to change over this century and beyond. As a result, global average sea levels are expected to continue to rise. This presentation provides an overview of the findings from the new assessment, with a special focus on severe weather.

Bio(s): Donald J. Wuebbles is the Harry E. Preble Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Illinois. He is also a Presidential Fellow at the University of Illinois, with the aim of helping the university system develop new initiatives in urban sustainability. From 2015 to early 2017, Dr. Wuebbles was Assistant Director with the Office of Science and Technology Policy at the Executive Office of the President in Washington DC. He was Head of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois for many years, and led the development of the School of Earth, Society, and Environment, and was its first director. Dr. Wuebbles is an expert in atmospheric physics and chemistry, with over 500 scientific publications related to the Earth's climate, air quality, and the stratospheric ozone layer. He has co-authored a number of international and national scientific assessments, including several international climate assessments led by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), for which IPCC was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He was a leader in the 2013 IPCC international assessment and the 2014 Third U.S. National Climate Assessment. More recently, he co-led the Climate Science Special Report, the 475-page first volume of the Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment published in November 2017 that assesses the science of climate change. Dr. Wuebbles has also led special assessments of the impacts of climate change on human society and ecosystems for the U.S. Midwest, the Northeast, and a special assessment for the city of Chicago. Dr. Wuebbles has received several major awards, including the Cleveland Abbe Award from the American Meteorological Society, the Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and is a Fellow of three major professional science societies, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Meteorological Society.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

27 August 2018

Title: Hot, Dry Conditions Bring Drought and Fire Impacts to the Pacific Northwest
Presenter(s): Nick Bond, Washington State Climatologist; Troy Lindquist, NWS Forecast Office Boise; Julia Ostapiej, Oregon Water Resource Department; Dave Peterson, University of Washington
Date & Time: 27 August 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Nick Bond, Washington State Climatologist; Troy Lindquist, NWS Forecast Office Boise; Julia Ostapiej, Oregon Water Resource Department; Dave Peterson, University of Washington

Seminar sponsor: National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Climate Impacts Research Consortium (CIRC - a NOAA RISA), NOAA Climate Program Office

Seminar POC for questions: britt.parker@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the webinar at https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/pacific-northwest-drought-climate-outlook-webinar-august-27-2018

Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar

The Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (PNW DEWS) August 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia).

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Climate Recap and Current Conditions
Nick Bond | University of Washington

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Troy Lindquist | NWS WFO Boise

A Qualitative, Active Approach to Drought Impacts Collection
Julia Ostapiej | OR Water Resource Department

Climate Risk Management Practices
Dave Peterson | University of Washington

Bio(s):

Nick Bond is an Associate Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Washington, working on Marine Science and Climate, and he also serves as the State Climatologist for the state of Washington. Dr. Bond has an abiding interest (or" obsession") with the weather and climate of the North Pacific and western North America. Past research included documenting the effects of coastal terrain on landfalling storms. Present work involves examining air-sea interactions with tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific, and the atmospheric response to declining sea ice in Alaskan waters. The latter features the collection and analysis of field observations from a research aircraft. On longer time scales and broader spatial scales, he is interested in the causes and effects of climate variations pertaining to marine ecosystems.

Troy Lindquist is the Senior Service Hydrologist at the National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office in Boise, MT, and received his Bachelors of Science in Meteorology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Troy has been part of the National Weather Service for 26 years and has worked at the Boise Weather Forecast Office since September 2011. Prior to moving to Boise, Troy worked at the NWS Office in Pocatello, in addition to NWS offices in California, Indiana, Maryland, and Kentucky. Other positions Troy has held include Senior Forecaster, Fire Weather Forecaster, Incident Meteorologist, and Marine Forecaster.

Julia Ostapiej is a Master of Public Policy candidate at Oregon State University, she received her Bachelors in International Relations from UC Davis. Julia is working as a drought specialist intern at Oregon Water Resources Department.

Dave Peterson is a Professor in the University of Washington School of Environmental and Forest Sciences. He works with the Adaptation Partners team to develop climate change assessments and adaptation strategies in national forests and other lands throughout the western United States. He has conducted research on the effects of climate change and fire on forest ecosystems throughout western North America, has published 230 scientific articles and 4 books, and as a contributing author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was a co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He is a lead author for the Forests chapter of the 2018 National Climate Assessment and recently published the book Climate Change and Rocky Mountain Ecosystems. Dave lives on his family's tree farm in Skagit County.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

23 August 2018

Title: Tidings of the Tides
Presenter(s): William Sweet, Oceanographer, Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, NOAA's National Ocean Service. Presenting in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: 23 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, in partnership with NOAA.

Climate Seminar 7 of 8:

Title: Tidings of the Tides

Presenter(s): William Sweet, Oceanographer, Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, NOAA's National Ocean Service. Presenting in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s): The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED FROM ORIGINAL PLAN.
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and 'enter as guest':
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
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Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window.
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Video recordings of the climate seminars can be found here: https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars

Abstract: Human activities are a significant contributor to the rise in global sea levels, which have risen about 7-8 inches since 1900 with about 3 of those inches occurring since 1993. By 2100, global sea levels are very likely to rise by 1.0"4.3 feet above year 2000 levels depending upon future emissions of greenhouse gases, though emerging science regarding Antarctic ice sheet stability suggests that a rise above 8 feet is physically possible. The amount of relative rise will not be uniform along the U.S. coastlines due to changes in Earth's gravitational field and rotation from melting of land ice, changes in ocean circulation, and vertical land motion. As sea levels have risen, annual flood frequencies of disruptive/minor tidal flooding have been accelerating within Atlantic and Gulf Coast cities over the last couple of decades. With continued rise, it is likely that damaging/moderate coastal flooding will occur several times a year within dozens of U.S. coastal locations within the next several decades.

Bio(s): William Sweet is a NOAA oceanographer researching changes in nuisance-to-extreme coastal flood risk due to sea level rise (SLR). He has assessed risks to U.S. coastal military installations worldwide for the military and is an author of the 4th U.S. National Climate Assessment. He lives in Annapolis, MD to witness SLR effects first-hand.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

22 August 2018

Title: The Devil (Weed) is in the Details: The Spread and Ecology of an Invasive Seaweed
Presenter(s): Dr. Lindsay Marks, California Sea Grant Fellow for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and former Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar
Date & Time: 22 August 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Lindsay Marks, California Sea Grant Fellow for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and former Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9041514304956514562

Abstract: Invasive species are the second-greatest driver of biodiversity loss worldwide, and invasive seaweeds represent a major challenge to ocean health. This talk will share what has been learned about a Japanese seaweed called Devil Weed, which is rapidly spreading rapidly across the reefs of southern California. Topics that will be discussed include: why this seaweed is a successful invader; the ways in which it may affect native species; the role that Marine Protected Areas can play in resisting its spread; and techniques that can be used to control this and other invasive seaweeds.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) Development of Alaska-Relevant Satellite Applications from Suomi-NPP/JPSS-1 and GOES-R
Presenter(s): Steve Miller, Colorado State University
Date & Time: 22 August 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Steve Miller, Colorado State University

Sponsor(s): ACCAP and the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) have created this new webinar series with the National Weather Service (NWS): Virtual Alaska Weather Symposia

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=1edb365d60&e=9097598e1a

Abstract: The Alaska Region achieves a unique resonance of natural hazards spanning the surface to the top of the troposphere and civilian/multi-agency activities impacted directly by them. The remote and data sparse expanses of this region elevate the value to forecasters of satellite-based remote sensing, and take best advantage of polar-orbiting assets in a way that the mid- to low-latitude users cannot.

Over the past decade we have entered a new era of capabilities at the high latitudes thanks to advances on the NOAA new-generation satellite programs. The introduction of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) and Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1, or NOAA-20) satellites, and their Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) sensors, have begun to shed light' on the extended nights of the cool seasons in novel and useful ways. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R Series (GOES-R) promises to far surpass the capabilities of previous GOES imager for Alaska coverage once GOES-17 migrates into position this Fall. Together, these new polar -and geo-satellites pack a formidable one-two punch in terms of providing coverage and capability for this key domain of increasing strategic importance, commercial activity, and attendant infrastructure/population growth.

The Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), established at Colorado State University in 1980, works closely with NOAA to develop algorithms and applications based on its cadre of environmental satellites. Here, we present some of these applications, including the science behind them, with an eye toward their relevance to the Alaska Region. Examples include VIIRS/DNB nighttime applications, estimates of cloud geometric thickness for aviation and cold air aloft, atmospheric moisture retrievals, and products that anticipate GOES-17 ABI utility over all parts of Alaska and surroundings. Some of these products are currently being fielded to Alaskan users via coordination with the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Multi-stressor effects of ultraviolet light, temperature, and salinity on oil toxicity in estuarine species
Presenter(s): Marie DeLorenzo, NOAA, National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science,.Presenting in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: 22 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Multi-stressor effects of ultraviolet light, temperature, and salinity on oil toxicity in estuarine species

Presenter(s): Marie DeLorenzo, NOAA's National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Charleston, SC. Presenting from Charleston.
Co-authors include: Pete Key, Katy Chung, Emily Pisarski, and Ed Wirth. Key and Wirth are also with NCCOS in Charleston, SC; and Chung and Pisarsky are also with CSS Scientific Applications, Charleston, SC.

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.
Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event",
then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web.
Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract: The cumulative and interactive stressors of chemical contaminants and environmental factors are especially relevant in estuaries where tidal fluctuations cause wide variability in salinity and temperature. Changes in depth also affect ultraviolet (UV) light penetration, which is an important modifying factor for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) toxicity. Many early life stages congregate at the surface or in the upper mixing layer making them prone to UV light exposure and thin sheens of oil at the surface. The introduction of oil into estuarine systems may have different levels of effect depending on the tidal stage and time of year. This study examined how the toxicity of thin oil sheens of unweathered Louisiana Sweet Crude (LSC) oil was altered by temperature, salinity, and UV light. Several estuarine species representing different trophic levels and habitats were evaluated. This seminar will present data from one of the estuarine species tested, the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio. Larval grass shrimp were most sensitive to oil sheen exposure under UV light, low salinity, and high temperature conditions. Characterizing the interactions of multiple stressors on oil toxicity will improve prediction of environmental impacts under various spill scenarios.

Bio(s): Dr. Marie DeLorenzo is a research ecologist with the NOAA, National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science laboratory in Charleston, SC. Dr. DeLorenzo received a B.S. in Environmental Resource Management with a minor in Marine Science from Penn State University, followed by a M.S. degree in Ecology from Penn State. She earned her Ph.D. at Clemson University in Environmental Toxicology. Marie is the Program Lead for Environmental Physiology within the Ecotoxicology Branch and is currently serving a detail as Acting Branch Chief for the Monitoring and Assessment Branch. Dr. DeLorenzo serves on the graduate faculty at the College of Charleston, the University of South Carolina, the Medical University of South Carolina, and Florida A&M University's School of the Environment. She is the NOAA representative to the National Water Quality Monitoring Council and is Past President of the Carolinas Chapter of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. Dr. DeLorenzo's research at NOAA includes environmental toxicology of estuarine species, physiological mechanisms of contaminant effects, climate change and multi-stressor assessments, and coastal resource management.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

21 August 2018

Title: Carbon Projects in Alaska: How they work and the risks and rewards
Presenter(s): Nathan Lojewski, Forestry Manager, Chugachmiut; and Clare Doig, Forest Land Management, Inc.
Date & Time: 21 August 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaking: Nathan Lojewski, Forestry Manager, Chugachmiut; and Clare Doig, Forest Land Management, Inc.

Sponsor(s): ACCAP and NWS

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/carbon_offset

Abstract: As forests grow, the trees absorb CO2 from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and store it within their growing biomass (trunk, branches, leaves and root systems). A forest carbon offset, is a metric ton of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e)"the emission of which is avoided or newly stored"that is purchased by greenhouse gas emitters to compensate for emissions occurring elsewhere. Offsets may be developed under voluntary market standards or compliance market standards, each of which has specific carbon accounting and eligibility rules. This presentation will focus on how offset projects work and the different types of forest management activities involved, all with a focus on Alaska. It will also cover specific carbon projects in Alaska and working with land owners (including village corporations) assessing the risks and rewards of such projects and whether or not they want to be involved in a project.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: What, Why, and How of the NOAA Institutional Repository
Presenter(s): Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS; Sarah Davis, MLS, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 21 August 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar, https://goo.gl/KNPTTT, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar


Presenter(s): Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS and Sarah Davis, MLS, NOAA Central Library

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the webinar: https://goo.gl/KNPTTT After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP). Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of NOAA IR seminars.

POC: IR Managing Librarian: Jennifer Fagan-Fry (jennifer.fagan-fry@noaa.gov); Sr. Bibliometrics Librarian: Sarah Davis (sarah.davis@noaa.gov)


Abstract: Welcome to NOAA's Institutional Repository Seminar Series! Each bimonthly NOAA IR seminar will be on a topic related to the NOAA IR. Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. August 2018's topic is a What, Why, and How of the NOAA IR. Join us in the library to learn more about grey literature, the benefits of submitting to the NOAA IR, how the IR is different than the NOAA Publications List and more. A Q&A session will follow the presentation.

Bio(s): Jennifer Fagan-Fry received her MLIS from Catholic University and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2015. Jenn manages the NOAA Institutional Repository, provides cataloging/metadata services and works with the library website. Sarah Davis received her M.L.S from the University of Maryland and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2008. She heads the bibliometrics team and also works with the NOAA Institutional Repository and the library website.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Climate Change will Exacerbate Effects of Coastal Eutrophication in Northern Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Arnaud Laurent, Research Associate, Dalhousie University
Date & Time: 21 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff: SSMC4, Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Multi-stressor effects of ultraviolet light, temperature, and salinity on oil toxicity in estuarine species

Presenter(s): Arnaud Laurent, Research Associate, Dalhousie University.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; moderator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.
Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667.
Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join",
click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web.
Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine

Abstract: The continental shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico experiences eutrophication-driven seasonal low-oxygen conditions (hypoxia) and acidification (a decrease in bottom water pH by respired CO2). Under the future climate, rising surface ocean temperatures, freshwater discharge, and atmospheric CO2 will further exacerbate these conditions. Projections indicate that more severe and prolonged periods of hypoxia will occur, while pH will decrease significantly with lowest values in low-oxygen waters. Lower buffering capacity of seawater and increased stratification will enhance respiration-induced acidification, which will further amplify the climate-induced acidification.

Bio(s): Dr. Arnaud Laurent is a Research Associate working with Katja Fennel in the Oceanography Department at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada. Dr. Laurent's research focuses on biogeochemistry in shelf environments, including deoxygenation and acidification, using coupled circulation-biogeochemical models. Dr. Laurent received a B.S. in Marine Ecology from Pierre et Marie Curie University in Paris followed by a M.S. in Marine and Fisheries Sciences at the University of Aberdeen (Scotland) and a PhD in Biological Oceanography at Dalhousie University (Canada).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

20 August 2018

Title: Saharan Air Layer (SAL) research using Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) resources
Presenter(s): Arunas Kuciauskas, Naval Research Laboratory, Marine Meteorology Division, Monterey, CA
Date & Time: 20 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room S650 Greentech IV Building 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Arunas Kuciauskas, Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Marine Meteorology Division, Monterey, CA

Phone access:
877-401-9225
pc: 53339716

JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mc2de5035d4d6c6f904d48a6a50e9a359
Meeting number: 744 909 128
Host key: 997287
Meeting password: Jpss2018!

Abstract
Since 2011, NRL has been supporting the NWS WFO in San Juan, Puerto Rico (SJU) by developing and leveraging environmental products related to outbreaks of SAL, with an emphasis toward VIIRS retrievals. NRL has provided these near real time products in several public access websites that includes NexSat' and SAL-WEB'. Since the greater Caribbean communities suffer from some of the world's highest rates of asthma, it is paramount that the San Juan WFO issues timely observations and forecasts of impending poor air quality impact associated with the dust-laden SAL. To this end, under the auspices of JPSS/PGRR initiatives (2011 - current), NRL has been supporting SJU with web-based support of near real time satellite imagery, in-situ measurements, and dust model forecasts. Recently, the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) dust forecast products have been utilized extensively by operational forecasters in monitoring SAL outbreaks across the north tropical Atlantic basin. Along with SJU, NRL has expanded its operational user scope to include NOAA agencies within the South Florida region as well as the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH) in Barbados. In 2017, NRL became an invited panel member of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Pan American Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System (WMO SDS-WAS) in relating environmental impacts on health aspects related to Saharan dust. A recent BAMS article (see below) summarizes the NOAA-funded NRL SAL activities during 2011 - 2017.

In 2018, NRL was awarded a new 3-year contract from the STAR/JPSS/PGRR NUCAPS initiative, by investigating the usefulness of NUCAPS product sets toward improvements in assessing the 3-D thermodynamic structure of the SAL air mass, particularly within the data sparse Atlantic basin. During this transitional phase, NRL is participating in the June - September, 2018 SAL field campaign (headed by Dr. Michael Folmer) that assimilates and evaluates the a broad suite of SAL-related products, including NUCAPS, from the perspective of NOAA, HRD, and greater Caribbean affiliates.

Resources described above:
NexSat: www.nrlmry.navy.mil/NEXSAT.html
SAL-WEB: www.nrlmry.navy.mil/SAL.html
NAAPS (dust model): www.nrlmry.navy.mil/aerosol
SAL article: http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/archdat/PUBLIC/BAMS-D-16-0212.pdf

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

17 August 2018

Title: August NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: 17 August 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaking: Rick Thoman, National Weather Service

Sponsor(s): NWS
POC: richard.thoman@noaa.gov and Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/August_2018

Abstract: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for September and the Fall/early winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 August 2018

Title: The Causes and Consequences of a Rapidly Changing Arctic
Presenter(s): Patrick C. Taylor, Climate Research Scientist, NASA Langley Research Center. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 16 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see login below) or for NOAA staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, in partnership with NOAA.

Climate Series, Seminar 6 of 8:

Title: The Causes and Consequences of a Rapidly Changing Arctic.

LINK TO SEMINAR RECORDING: The Causes and Consequences of a Rapidly Changing Arctic.
LINK TO SLIDES

Presenter(s): Patrick C. Taylor, Climate Research Scientist, NASA Langley Research Center. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED.
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and 'enter as guest':
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
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Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window.
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Video recordings of the climate seminars can be found here: https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars

Abstract: Earth's climate system is highly interconnected, meaning that changes to the global climate influence the United States climatically and economically. In much the same way as European and Asian financial markets affect the U.S. economy, changes to ice sheet mass and energy flows in the far reaches of the planet affect our climate. Life on Earth is sensitive to climate conditions; human society is especially susceptible due to the climate-vulnerable, complex, and often fragile systems that provide food, water, energy, and security. Observed changes to the global climate affecting the United States include rising global temperatures, diminishing sea ice, melting ice sheets and glaciers, rising sea levels, etc. These documented changes have global economic and national security implications, including for the United States. For example, sea level rise alone is putting $100 billion dollars of U.S. military assets at risk, according to the Dept. of Defense. Arctic climate change continues to outpace the rest of the globe. Over the last 30 years, rapid and, in many cases, unprecedented changes to Arctic temperatures, sea ice, snow cover, land ice, and permafrost have occurred. While the Arctic may seem far away, changes in the Arctic climate system have a global reach, affecting sea level, the carbon cycle, atmospheric winds, ocean currents, and potentially the frequency of extreme weather. This presentation discusses the changes in the observed in the Arctic, the projected changes, and the potential impacts to us living the U.S.

Bio(s): Dr. Taylor is a research scientist at NASA Langley Research Center. His research focuses on understanding the mysterious life of clouds. Understanding cloud behavior provides valuable information for improving weather and climate models. Dr. Taylor received his PhD from Florida State University in 2009 and has since worked at NASA Langley Research Center receiving that 2012 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) and a NASA Early Career Achievement Medal in 2013 for his research. In 2015, he became a National Academy of Science Kavli Fellow. Dr. Taylor was appointed to the Virginia's Climate Change and Resiliency Commission by Governor McAuliffe, a member of the science working group for the Old Dominion University led Sea Level Rise Initiative, and currently working as a lead author on the Climate Science Special Report commissioned by the NASA, NOAA, and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. At NASA Langley Research Center, Dr. Taylor is a member of the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) science team, leads the climate processes and diagnostics research group, and serves as a member of the Science Directorate 10-year planning committee as co-lead for the Radiation Budget focus area.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Bringing Back the Dinosaurs of the Deep: A Framework for Species Reintroduction
Presenter(s): Jessica Collier, USFWS
Date & Time: 16 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Jessica Collier, Knauss Fellow, USFWS Coastal and Marine Program

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part of the monthly Knauss Fellows Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Species reintroductions are complex strategies to protect and conserve imperiled species and they often require detailed planning and adaptive management to ensure long-term success. Lake sturgeon were once vastly abundant throughout the Great Lakes, but now only exist at 1% of their historic levels. To mitigate and reverse population declines, management groups have focused efforts on rehabilitating lake sturgeon stocks throughout the basin. This presentation outlines a comprehensive approach to incorporate biological, managerial, and community perspectives that facilitate successful reintroduction efforts for restoring lake sturgeon to a Great Lakes tributary.

Bio(s): Jessica Collier is a 2018 Knauss Fellow in the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service's Coastal Program where she gets to work with an amazing team of Biologists on a wide variety of conservation and restoration topics. Jessica earned a B.S. in Biology from the University of Findlay, a M.S. in Conservation Biology from Central Michigan University, and most recently earned her PhD in Ecology from the University of Toledo where she focused on habitat modeling to reintroduce endangered lake sturgeon in a Great Lakes tributary.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

14 August 2018

Title: Science communication @ NOAA: Effective strategies to increase public engagement and understanding of science
Presenter(s): Leticia Williams, NWS/COO/OPS
Date & Time: 14 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Leticia Williams, Postdoctoral Fellow, NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology

POC: Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); Leticia Williams (leticia.williams@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Researchers have defined science communication as sharing science-related knowledge from experts (e.g., scientists) or professional science communicators (e.g., public information officers, journalists) to non-experts (e.g., policy makers, stakeholders) and the lay public. Effective science communication is integral to NOAA's goals to foster an informed and weather-ready nation, healthy oceans, and environmentally sustainable and vibrant communities. Come and learn what tools you can use to accomplish these goals to increase public engagement and understanding of science such as user-centered messaging and visual communication.

Bio(s): Dr. Leticia Williams is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology (NCAS-M) at Howard University, and is currently contributing to social science research at the National Weather Service in the Operations Division for the Office of the Chief Operating Officer. Her research specialization is science communication, which focuses on strengthening public communication and engagement with science.

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4368892252976866819 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: The Value of NOAA Data and Earth Observations
Presenter(s): Christopher Lauer, NOAA Office of Performance, Risk and Social Science
Date & Time: 14 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Valuing NOAA Data and Earth Observations

Presenter(s): Christopher Lauer, Ph.D., NOAA Economist

Sponsor(s): NOAA Environmental Data Talks, hosted by the National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS); Point of Contact: justin.grieser@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and 'enter as guest': https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/noaa-interview/

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available through the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.

Questions? Email justin.grieser@noaa.gov

Abstract: NOAA data creates important value for society, but estimating this value is challenging. Economics and social science can help us understand how to value the information NOAA provides to its users. Valuation techniques are important to help NOAA align its operations with the needs of the public and prioritize future research and investments. This webinar will discuss ongoing valuation efforts to improve our understanding of NOAA's data, products and services.

Bio(s): Chris Lauer is an economist in NOAA's Office of Performance, Risk, and Social Science in Silver Spring, MD. His work involves a range of topics related to weather, the blue economy, the value of NOAA data, natural capital accounting, and marine transportation. Prior to joining NOAA in February 2018, Chris was involved in research to improve wildfire management, from reducing costs and damage caused by these events to improving responder safety. He also worked on projects promoting biomass as a renewable energy source. Chris completed his Ph.D. at Oregon State University in the Department of Applied Economics and has a B.A. in Economics from St. John's University.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Impacts of high-resolution Himawari-8 AMVs on TC forecast in HWRF
Presenter(s): Masahiro Sawada, JMA-EMC
Date & Time: 14 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s): Masahiro Sawada Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA)-visiting EMC

Title: Impacts of high-resolution Himawari-8 AMVs on TC forecast in HWRF
Date,Time, Room: Tuesday August 14 at noon in NCWCP Rm 2155
Contact: Zhan Zhang zhan.zhang@noaa.gov

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
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Meeting number: 900 826 795
Host key: 796253
Meeting password: a3YhdEPN

JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3)
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Abstract:
To investigate the impact of the assimilation of high spatial and temporal resolution atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) derived from the full disk scan of the new generation geostationary satellite Himawari-8 on tropical cyclone (TC) forecasts in a western North Pacific basin, forecast experiments for three TCs in 2016 are performed using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) operational Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting Model (HWRF). Two different data assimilation (DA) configurations (three-dimensional variational DA and ensemble-variational hybrid DA), based on the Grid-point Statistical Interpolation (GSI), are used for the sensitivity experiments.

The results show the inclusion of high-resolution Himawari-8 AMVs (H8AMV) can benefit the track forecast skill, especially for longer-range lead times. The diagnosis of optimal steering flow indicates that the improved track forecast is attributed to the improvement of steering flow surrounding the TC itself, but not in the representation of TC structure. However, the assimilation of H8AMV increases the negative intensity bias and error, especially for short-range lead times. The investigation of the structural change from the assimilation of H8AMV revealed that an increase of inertial stability outside the radius of maximum wind (RMW) which weakens the boundary layer inflow, enhancement of asymmetric component around the RMW, and drying of the inner core region are three factors related to the negative intensity bias. An experiment using ensemble-variational hybrid assimilation demonstrates that combining H8AMV with the hybrid assimilation contributes to a significant reduction in negative intensity bias and error, while retaining the improvement in track forecast.

======
Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar.

Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

9 August 2018

Title: Propagating modes of variability and their impact on the western boundary current in the South Atlantic
Presenter(s): Dr. Sudip Majumder, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 9 August 2018
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Sudip Majumder, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote Access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/953234341

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (646) 749-3112
Access Code: 953-234-341

Abstract: Recent studies have suggested that the South Atlantic Ocean plays an important role in modulating climate at global and regional scales, and can enhance predictability of extreme rainfall and temperature events globally. To understand how propagating modes of variability in this region influence to the circulation of the subtropical gyre and the southward flowing Brazil Current (BC), a Complex Empirical Orthogonal Function (CEOF) analysis was performed on the satellite sea surface height at interannual frequencies. The results suggest that the first three CEOF modes explain about 50% of the total interannual variability and show clear westward propagation with phase speeds comparable to that of baroclinic mode 1 Rossby wave. Another important finding is that there is an exchange of energy among the modes before and after 2005, which may be driven by atmospheric teleconnections to the Pacific Ocean. The first and the third modes significantly influence the interannual variability of the volume transport of the BC at 34.5S and 22.5S, respectively, which are estimated using observations from Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT) transects and satellite altimetry. The results of this study are useful to understand the overall dynamics of the South Atlantic and potentially improve predictability of Meridional Overturning Circulation and extreme events in the region.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: GPS on Bench Marks Update
Presenter(s): Galen Scott and Kevin Ahlgren, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 August 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Online Access Only - see access information below

Presenter(s): Galen Scott and Kevin Ahlgren, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS)

Date & Time: August 9, 2018, 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1597965717085868033

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: In early 2018, NGS released a list of priority bench marks where GPS data is needed to improve GEOID18, our next planned hybrid geoid model. NGS has also created a GPS on Bench Marks 2018 web map to help contributors know where we have the data we need and where we still need GPS observations.

In this webinar, you will learn about submissions on priority marks since early this year, what marks to prioritize before the August 31st deadline, and how future GPS on BM efforts will improve transformation tools in 2022.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Visit the Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Future webinars will be held on the second Thursday of every month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time

Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 August 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: Integrating Social Network Development into Marine Protected Areas (MPA) Management Capacity Building and Institutionalization in the Philippines and Indonesia
Presenter(s): Anne Nelson, NOAA MPA Center International Capacity Building Program, on contract with Lynker Technologies, Inc.; and, Gabrielle Johnson, NOAA International MPA Capacity Building Program / Coral Reef Conservation Program, on contract with The Baldwin Group
Date & Time: 9 August 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Anne Nelson, NOAA MPA Center International Capacity Building Program, on contract with Lynker Technologies, Inc.; and, Gabrielle Johnson, NOAA International MPA Capacity Building Program / Coral Reef Conservation Program, on contract with The Baldwin Group.

Abstract: Integrating social network development into MPA management capacity building and institutionalization in the Philippines and Indonesia by Anne Nelson and Gabrielle Johnson of NOAA. Every MPA site, region, and capacity building program is unique in structure and content, yet all programs need to build trust and community to create a locally-relevant format and framework. To contribute to the ongoing growth of the global social network of marine protected area (MPA) practitioners, the presenters will share observations from the social MPA network building that was part of recent NOAA MPA Center International Capacity Building in the Philippines and Indonesia. These programs deliver technical capacity for effective MPA management and a participatory learning framework for participants to enhance their MPA social network to support long term implementation of gained knowledge and skills.

Remote Access: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_gGfcTtoeS0iae5vzXjVQtg

Seminar POCs: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe). Register for the webinar at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_gGfcTtoeS0iae5vzXjVQtg.

Title: Long-Term Climate Mitigation Perspectives and the 2°C Objective
Presenter(s): Benjamin DeAngelo, Deputy Director, NOAA Climate Program Office. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 9 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA folks, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program,
in partnership with NOAA. Climate Series, Seminar 5 of 8:



Title: Long-Term Climate Mitigation Perspectives and the 2C Objective

LINK TO RECORDING: Long-Term Climate Mitigation Perspectives and the 2C Objective
LINK TO SLIDES

Presenter(s): Benjamin DeAngelo, Deputy Director, NOAA Climate Program Office. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, at location below.

Sponsor(s): The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED.
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site below and 'Enter as a Guest':
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: The presentation addresses estimates of different cumulative carbon budgets in light of future global warming objectives " with a particular focus on the now, oft-cited 2C goal, its origin, and the chances of meeting such an objective.

Bio(s): Benjamin DeAngelo has over 20 years of experience bridging science and policy for the stewardship of the global environment. Ben is the Deputy Director of the Climate Program Office within NOAA's research arm, and serves as the U.S. head of delegation for the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP), a working group under the Arctic Council. Ben was the lead author on the mitigation chapter of the Climate Science Special Report (2017), from which this presentation is largely based. Prior to starting at NOAA in 2017, Ben was the Deputy Director of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and special assistant for climate change to the President's Science Advisor in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and had a 18-year career at the EPA working on climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion.

This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. Video recordings of the climate seminars can be found here: https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

7 August 2018

Title: The NOAA Big Data Project
Presenter(s): Dr. Edward Kearns, NOAA Chief Data Officer
Date & Time: 7 August 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The NOAA Big Data Project

Presenter(s): Dr. Edward Kearns, NOAA Chief Data Officer

Sponsor(s): NOAA Environmental Data Talks, hosted by the National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS); Point of Contact: Justin.Grieser@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and 'enter as guest': https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/noaa-interview/

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available through the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.

Questions? Email justin.grieser@noaa.gov

Abstract: The Big Data Project (BDP) aims to enhance public access to NOAA's open data through public-private partnerships with commercial cloud platform partners. These partnerships were created through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) with Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google Cloud Platform (GCP), IBM, Microsoft Azure, and the Open Commons Consortium (OCC). To date over forty NOAA datasets have been moved onto the various cloud platforms, including both atmospheric and oceanic data, which has resulted in increased visibility and usage of NOAA's data.

Bio(s): As NOAA's first Chief Data Officer, Dr. Edward J. Kearns leads the development of strategies and practices for managing NOAA's data as a national asset. Ed is seeking to promote new uses and wider understanding of NOAA's data through new partnerships and technologies, such as the NOAA Big Data Project. As part of the White House's Leveraging Data as a Strategic Asset initiative, he is helping develop the new Federal Data Strategy. Previously, Ed led the Climate Data Record program and NOAA's data archive and guided Everglades restoration for the National Park Service. He also calibrated NASA satellite products and developed integrated ocean observing systems as a professor at the University of Miami.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Elemental Stoichiometry: A Swiss Army Knife for Long-Term Water Quality Monitoring
Presenter(s): Doug Bell, OAR/OPPE
Date & Time: 7 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Doug Bell, Knauss Fellows, OAR Policy, Planning, and Evaluations

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part of the monthly Knauss Fellows Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: As estuarine water quality continues to be modified by human activity and the impacts of climate change, long-term monitoring programs maintain a critical role in preserving and restoring the function of natural ecosystems. A key challenge of such monitoring activities is linking environmental behavior with a system's natural variability, which is complicated by overlapping physical, chemical, and biological drivers. To address this challenge, elemental stoichiometry provides a convenient method to tease apart natural, anthropogenic, and climatic influences that can ultimately be used to aid restoration efforts and resource management decisions. In this talk, I will discuss some insights gained from carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus stoichiometry within the North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR), South Carolina.

Bio(s): Doug Bell recently graduated with a PhD in Marine Science from the University of South Carolina, where his dissertation focused on marine phosphorus biogeochemistry. Prior to his graduate work, Doug's focus in nutrient cycling began at the University of Michigan while working on a watershed restoration project and continued at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences while working on a long-term oceanographic time-series. Currently, Doug is a South Carolina Knauss Fellow in OAR's Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Identifying Ocean Events & Seasonal Trends of Bio-physical Water Properties & Dynamic Anomalous Marine Conditions in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Prof. Robert Arnone, and Dr. Brooke Jones , Dept. of Marine Science, Ocean Weather Laboratory
University of Southern Mississippi, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 7 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Prof. Robert Arnone, and Dr. Brooke Jones , Div. of Marine Science, Ocean Weather Laboratory
University of Southern Mississippi, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar and NOAA RESTORE Science Program; co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Janessy.Frometa@noaa.gov

Remote Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join the session, please go to this site and click "Enter as a Guest":
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
You may need to download the Adobe Connect software and it might take two tries.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.
Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. You will need a computer speaker,
a headset OR external speakers to hear the audio, and you may need to turn your audio up.
Questions will be addressed in the chat window.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Dynamic anomaly properties (DAP) of multiple bio-physical properties were produced to detect events and monitor response between physical and biological properties. Ocean products are used for monitoring the changes in Gulf of Mexico waters using weekly VIIRS satellite and Physical Ocean model products from 2013- 2018 using a time series of processed 1) 750 m resolution VIIRS bio-optical-physical products and 2) 3 km AMSEAS model temperature, salinity and currents products. The DAP Products use Google earth tools for users to locate where normal and abnormal ocean properties occur to determine ecological and physical hotspots in the Gulf. Results can provide a decision tool for adaptive sampling of ocean processes and characterizing insitu stations hotspots. The seasonal trends of DAP bio-physical properties recognize the nowcast and yearly changes which gives us a vital metric for monitoring climate changes in the Gulf at different locations and abnormal months and stations. Correlations between the monthly seasonal cycle of bio-optical and physical properties such as salinity, chlorophyll were not consistent in all waters. Results show the influence of river plumes on the ecosystem using the seasonal cycles of salinity and chlorophyll-a with improved correlation if chlorophyll-a is delayed one month from salinity at certain locations on the shelf.

DAP products detected abnormal bio-physical conditions from Hurricanes, Flower Garden Bands Reefs, Miss. River Discharge. Marine bio-optical and physical processes in northeastern Gulf of Mexico are largely driven by river discharge and wind-driven circulation. Results from longer term anomalies show elevated ocean color values across the region following a January 2016 river flooding event, and Bonnet Carr Spillway opening, that persist through summer months. The elevated values are compared with river discharge rates and known events (i.e. July and October 2016 Flower Garden Banks mortality), revealing the impacts of the flooding to the region. Monitoring GOM hotspots with dynamic anomaly products are available for decision makers with public data access.

Bio(s):

Robert Arnone is a Researcher Professor at the University of Southern Miss with 43 years' experience in Ocean research with launching and calibration of ocean satellites, ocean optics and SST algorithms, and integration which physical models and insitu optical sensors for bio-physical properties. He heads USM Ocean Weather Laboratory, and NOAA restore grant and is CoChair of SPIE Ocean Sensing and Monitoring, with degrees in Geophysics, Geology (Ga. Tech, Kent State). Is retired Branch head of Ocean Sciences Branch at Naval Research Laboratory and coordinated research between of NAVY, NASA and NOAA. Has the NOAA restore grant.

Brooke Jones received her PhD from USM at Stennis Space Center where she is currently a postdoctoral research associate. She is a project lead for the Dynamic Anomaly Project at USM's Ocean Weather Lab, and is an member of the CONCORDE research consortium. Her research focuses on biogeochemical impacts of land-ocean interactions and the development of novel marine surface products derived from satellite observations and ocean model estimates. Her previous projects have included the off-shelf transport of Mississippi River plume filaments, dipole eddy interactions, and hypoxia/anoxia modeling in Chesapeake Bay.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

3 August 2018

Title: Applications of a Global Database of Altimeter and Radiometer Wave Heights and Wind Speeds
Presenter(s): Ian Young, University of Melbourne
Date & Time: 3 August 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2890
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s): Ian Young, University of Melbourne, Australia

Title: Applications of a Global Database of Altimeter and Radiometer Wave Heights and Wind Speeds
Date,Time, Room: Friday August 3rd at 3pm in NCWCP Rm 2890
Contact: Henrique Alves - NOAA Affiliate <henrique.alves@noaa.gov>

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4
Meeting number: 900 826 795
Host key: 796253
Meeting password: a3YhdEPN

JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3)
1-877-953-0315
1-517-268-7866 (toll number)
Leader: 9702437#
Participant: 1262920#

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Abstract:
Over recent years, we have developed a global database of altimeter wind speed and wave height and radiometer wind speed. The database spans 30 years and contains data from more than 20 individual missions. Each of the instruments has been calibrated in a consistent manner, validated against independent buoys and cross-validated between the satellite platforms. The database has many applications including: global climatology, examination of long term trends and investigation of extreme values. This presentation will describe the database, error metrics, and its application to investigate long term trends in oceanic wind speed and wave height. In addition, extreme value global estimates of wind speed and wave height will be presented.

Presenter

Bio(s): Ian Young is Kernot Professor of Engineering at the University of Melbourne. Prior to this appointment he was Vice-Chancellor at the Australian National University and at the Swinburne University of Technology. His research interests concern wind-generated ocean waves. In recent years, he has conducted a range of field experiments aimed at investigating the form of the wave spectrum in finite depth conditions. He also has published extensively in aspects of remote sensing of the oceans with applications to both engineering design and climate. He is author of more than a 150 refereed papers and two major research monographs in the field, including the Elsevier book "Wind Waves". Prof Young is a consultant to the offshore oil industry in Australia, the United States and Asia, as well as an advisor to the US Navy on ocean wave physics.



======
Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar.

Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

2 August 2018

Title: Climate Potential Surprises - Compound Extremes and Tipping Elements (Climate Science Special Report)
Presenter(s): Radley Horton, Associate Research Professor, Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Presenitng remotely.
Date & Time: 2 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA folks, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, in partnership with NOAA.

Climate Series, Seminar 4 of 8:

Title: Climate Potential Surprises - Compound Extremes and Tipping Elements

Link to Recording and Slides

Presenter(s): Radley Horton, Associate Research Professor, Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED.
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and 'enter as guest':
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
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Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window.
This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Video recordings of the climate seminars can be found here: https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars

Abstract: Diverse lines of evidence suggest that the further the climate system is 'pushed' through increases in greenhouse gas concentrations, the greater the potential for rapid changes that are difficult to model or otherwise foresee. Several examples will be presented within a risk management framework, ranging from a) the probable to b) the low probability but catastrophic should they occur.

Bio(s): Radley Horton's research focuses on climate extremes, tail risks, climate impacts, and adaptation. Radley was a Convening Lead Author for the Third National Climate Assessment. He currently Co-Chairs Columbia's Adaptation Initiative, and is the Lead Principal Investigator for the NOAA-Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments-funded Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast and the WWF-Columbia University ADVANCE partnership. Radley is also the Columbia University lead for the Department of Interior-funded Northeast Climate Adaptation Center. He has also served as Deputy Lead for NASA's Climate Adaptation Science Investigator Working Group, charged with linking NASA's science to its institutional stewardship. Radley also teaches in Columbia University's Sustainable Development department. Radley is a leading climate science communicator, appearing regularly on television, radio, and in print.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

1 August 2018

Title: Understanding Marine and Aquatic Community Responses in Species Composition, Diversity, and Population Genetics: Targeted Metagenomics from eDNA and Plankton Samples
Presenter(s): Dr. Carol Stepien, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab
Date & Time: 1 August 2018
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Carol Stepien, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab

Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7510707146728480769

Abstract: Ecological sampling depends on accurate taxon identification, delineation, and abundances, yet is time consuming, expensive, involves considerable taxonomic expertise, and often is thwarted by lack of diagnostic morphological characters. Multiple targeted metagenomic analyses entailing (1) primer design for specific mitochondrial and nuclear DNA gene regions having appropriate levels of variation, (2) field sampling of water, plankton, sediment and/or gut contents, (3) high-throughput sequencing (HTS), and (4) custom bioinformatics offer means to rapidly and accurately simultaneously characterize the species diversity and compositions of entire communities, along with their relative representation and population genetic variation. This approach is useful for evaluating all taxonomic groups, all members, and all taxonomic levels of biological communities including rare and cryptic species, invasive species, and fishery stocks. Examples are presented of diagnostic assays that characterize fishes and invertebrates from environmental (e)DNA water and plankton samples in various marine and freshwater ecosystems, ranging from the hydrothermal vent plumes at Axial Seamount, the Salish Sea, Alaskan and Arctic waters, the Laurentian Great Lakes, and the Baltic Sea. These examples and analyses illustrate new ability to assess species diversity and population responses of biological communities to changing conditions, including acidification, temperature, harmful algal blooms, and hypoxia. Results from these metagenomic analyses demonstrate considerable application across marine and freshwater ecosystems at a scale, accuracy, complexity, and capacity for automation not otherwise feasible.

Bio(s): Carol Stepien recently joined PMEL as the new Ocean Environment Research Division (OERD) leader. She comes to PMEL from directing the Lake Erie Research Center at the University of Toledo. She brings with her expertise in evolutionary biology, biogeography, and conservation genetics and genomics. Her special research interests include environmental DNA, sensor networks, genomic adaptations, and bioinformatics of marine animals, fisheries, and communities. She mentors several graduate students and postdoctoral associates and will continue to do so while at PMEL through the University of Toledo and the University of Washington's Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean. During her time at the University of Toledo she was honored as a Distinguished University Professor of Ecology. She is also active in the community and enjoys participating in outreach events. Carol serves on the Editorial Board of the journal Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, and is an editor for the new journal Ecological Processes and the genetics editor for the journal Biological Invasions.

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Title: The Coastal Recovery from Storms Tool (CReST): A Model for Assessing the Impact of Sea Level Rise on Natural and Managed Beaches and Dunes
Presenter(s): Peter Ruggiero, Professor, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University. Presenting at NOAA in SIlver Spring.
Date & Time: 1 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar, or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Peter Ruggiero, Professor, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University. Presenting at NOAA in SIlver Spring (For NOAA folks, SSMC4, Room 8150).

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and David.Kidwell@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install MyMeeting's WebEx app while logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: The barrier islands within the North Carolina Sentinel Site Cooperative sustain rich ecosystems, host valuable infrastructure, and protect the mainland coast from sea level rise (SLR) and storms. A transdisciplinary team of coastal geomorphologists and ecologists, led by Dr. Peter Ruggiero from Oregon State University, are developing a new model for evaluating beach dune system response and recovery from storms. This innovative modeling system couples an emerging understanding of the feedbacks between dune vegetation and sand transport with a recently developed coastal dune model to assess beach and dune evolution in both natural (e.g., Cape Lookout National Seashore) and managed systems (e.g., areas which are nourished such as Bogue Banks, NC) in response to SLR and extreme storms. Dr. Ruggiero and team are identifying how dunes respond and recover to storms at the current sea level along with examining a range of sea level rise scenarios.

Bio(s): Peter Ruggiero is a Professor in the College of Earth, Ocean, & Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University (http://ceoas.oregonstate.edu/profile/ruggiero/). Ruggiero's primary research interests include coastal geomorphology and coastal hazards and he has over two decades of experience in observing, modeling, and predicting beach and dune evolution. Presently, Ruggiero's research group is developing probabilistic and interdisciplinary approaches for assessing vulnerability to coastal hazards in light of a changing and variable climate.

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31 July 2018

Title: The NOAA Digital Coast: Turning Coastal Data and Tools into Actionable Information
Presenter(s): Josh Murphy, Geospatial Program Analyst, Doug Marcy, Coastal Hazards Specialist and Nate Herold, Physical Scientist. All with the NOAA/NOS/OCM/Science and Geospatial Division
Date & Time: 31 July 2018
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only - register below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Josh Murphy, Geospatial Program Analyst, Doug Marcy, Coastal Hazards Specialist and Nate Herold, Physical Scientist. All with the NOAA/NOS/OCM/Science and Geospatial Division

Sponsor(s): Webinar hosted by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO & NatureServe), in partnership with NOAA's Digital Coast. NOAA point of contact: Melissa.Rosa@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_WzBSJVBbRlSezGWIljjqDQ.

Abstract: NOAA's Digital Coast is a website and partnership that provides public access to coastal data, tools, training, and resources in order to meet the unique needs of coastal communities. Coastal resource managers can access collections of high quality, authoritative geospatial data (e.g., topography, coastal land cover change, socioeconomic information), tools, and trainings to address coastal and ocean management challenges. More than just a website, the Digital Coast provides the framework and information needed to save organizations time and money and allows groups that might not otherwise work together to join forces. Content on the Digital Coast comes from many sources, all of which are vetted by NOAA. This webinar will provide an overview of the Digital Coast and demonstrate two geospatial tools that turn data into actionable information:
1) Sea Level Rise Viewer (https://coast.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/tools/slr), which visualizes coastal flooding scenarios and social vulnerability due to sea level rise; and
2) Land Cover Atlas (https://coast.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/tools/lca), an online data viewer that provides user-friendly access to coastal land cover and land cover change information developed through NOAA's Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP).
Visit NOAA's Digital Coast at https://coast.noaa.gov/digitalcoast. Webinar hosted by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Marine Megafauna Movement Analytical Program: Convergence of Patterns in Open and Coastal Oceans
Presenter(s): Dr Ana M Sequeira, University of Western Australia. Presenting remotely from Western Australia!
Date & Time: 31 July 2018
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see login below), and for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4 Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr Ana MM Sequeira, University of Western Australia. Presenting remotely from Western Australia!

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
Skype often works if you have a good connection.
For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install MyMeeting's WebEx app while logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: The Marine Megafauna Movement Analytical Program aims to significantly improve our understanding of marine megafauna movement at a global scale to ultimately assist the conservation and management of economically important, charismatic and threatened highly migratory marine species. MMMAP is composed of a core group of 11 international experts in movement ecology, and an increasing network of collaborators from multiple institutions around the world. Since its inception, MMMAP has been working on a range of high impact papers and some of the major outputs so far will be presented at the seminar.



Bio(s): Dr Sequeira is an ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) Research Fellow at the Indian Ocean Marine Research Centre (IOMRC) supported by the University of Western Australia (UWA) and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS). She is interested in the development of models to assist understanding the marine environment with strong emphasis in supporting marine spatial planning and conservation.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

30 July 2018

Title: NWS HeatRisk Product
Presenter(s): Paul Iniguez, Science and Operations Officer, NOAA National Weather Service Forecast Office, Phoenix, AZ
Date & Time: 30 July 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Paul Iniguez, Science and Operations Officer, NOAA National Weather Service Forecast Office, Phoenix, AZ

Seminar sponsor: Severe, Fire, Public and Winter Weather Services Branch; Analyze, Forecast and Support Office; NOAA National Weather Service
Seminar POC for questions: david.soroka@noaa.gov

Remote access only: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2383206138561475331
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. This webinar will be recorded.

Abstract: Heat is one of America's deadliest weather phenomenon. According to the CDC, nearly 700 people each year die due to heat-related illness. It has been widely recognized that no single temperature value adequately serves as a threshold for heat-related impacts across large areas of diverse climates. While several indices are available to describe the threat of heat over maximum/minimum temperature forecasts, they also are susceptible to similar shortcomings. In addition, parameters such as humidity, wind, and solar insolation are introduced, which can also impact heat forecasts. By leveraging high-resolution climate data sets and the most robust forecast parameters available, high and low temperature, the experimental NWS HeatRisk product contextualizes forecasts for any given location in the Lower 48 at any time of year. HeatRisk has been used successfully across the Southwest US for several years now, recently expanding to the remainder of the Western US. Efforts are underway to make it available across the entire CONUS. This presentation will detail how HeatRisk is produced and applied in NWS Western Region operations. HeatRisk performance will also be shown for several past heat events from across the US.

Bio(s): Paul Iiguez is the Science and Operations Officer at the NOAA National Weather Service office in Phoenix, AZ. His primary duties include integrating new science and technology into the office's operations, training the staff of meteorologists to remain proficient in generating official forecasts and issuing warnings, conducting individual research, serving as a liaison with area universities, and assisting with the overall management of the office. Paul has been with NOAA for over 15 years, working in five different states during his career. Originally from Minnesota, Paul holds a Bachelor's in Meteorology from St. Cloud State University (in Minnesota) and a Master's in Geography/Climatology from Arizona State University. Much of his work focuses on extreme heat and how the NWS can continually improve its services for its constituents.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 July 2018

Title: SCIENCE and publishing in SCIENCE
Presenter(s): Dr. Jesse Smith, Science
Date & Time: 26 July 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Dr. Jesse Smith, Science

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Central Library. POC: Outreach Librarian, Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8037155512692908803 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Science was first published in 1880, and to this day continues to be the flagship journal of AAAS. In this presentation, Senior Editor Jesse Smith will discuss the essential elements of what is involved in publishing a manuscript in Science

Bio(s): Dr. Smith is a stable isotope geochemist and climatologist with expertise in the areas of climate, paleoclimate, non-biological oceanography, atmospheric science and ice sheets. He earned his PhD from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, and has been an Editor at Science since 1999.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Droughts, Floods, and Wildfire! (Climate Science Special Report)
Presenter(s): Michael Wehner, Senior Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 26 July 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA folks, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, in partnership with NOAA.

Climate Series, Seminar 3 of 8:


Title: Droughts, Floods, and Wildfire!

LinkS to SEMINAR RECORDING and SLIDES

Presenter(s): Michael Wehner, Senior Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED.
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
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Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Video recordings of the climate seminars can be found here: https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars

Abstract: Droughts, floods, and wildfire have significant negative effects throughout much of the United States. Volume I of the Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4) - aka the Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) - has a chapter that details how climate change exacerbates the risks of such major events. These aspects of climate change are complicated due to the interaction of the changes in temperature and precipitation. Droughts are classified by a hierarchy of meteorological, agricultural, hydrological, or socio-economic types. The effect of global warming is most pronounced on agricultural drought, a deficit of surface moisture, due to increased temperatures. Floods are determined both by extreme precipitation as well as surface characteristics, and vary both on spatial and temporal scales. Short-term extreme precipitation is widely accepted as already having been intensified by climate change and will continue as the climate warms further. Western wildfires are affected both by forest management and climate change. The former leads to changes in fuel density while the latter increases flammability. These topics, as discussed in CSSR Chapter 8, are reviewed in this talk.

Bio(s): Michael F. Wehner is a senior staff scientist in the Computational Research Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Wehner's current research concerns the behavior of extreme weather events in a changing climate, especially heat waves, intense precipitation, drought, and tropical cyclones. Before joining the Berkeley Lab in 2002, Wehner was an analyst at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the Program for Climate Modeling Diagnosis and Intercomparison. He is the author or co-author of over 170 scientific papers and reports. He was a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group I contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) and the second, third, and fourth U.S. National Climate Assessments. He was recently selected as a lead author for the upcoming IPCC Sixth Assessment Report. Dr. Wehner earned his master's degree and Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and his bachelor's degree in Physics from the University of Delaware.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

25 July 2018

Title: Southwest Drought & Wildfire Status, Impacts and Outlook
Presenter(s): s): Nancy Selover, Arizona State Climatologist; Ed Delgado, National Program Manager for National Interagency Fire Center Predictive Services
Date & Time: 25 July 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Nancy Selover, Arizona State Climatologist; Ed Delgado, National Program Manager for National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) Predictive Services

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with the National Weather Service and the National Drought Mitigation Center

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the webinar at https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/southwest-drought-status-webinar-july-25-2018

Abstract:

As "extreme" and "exceptional" drought continues its grip on the Southwest, impacts of the drought deepen and exacerbate wildfire threats. A collaboration of experts will provide up-to-date information on drought in the region, including portions of Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. Join the webinar to learn about drought conditions and impacts and wildfire impacts, predictions and forecasts. Arizona State Climatologist Nancy Selover will discuss drought conditions, impacts and outlook for the Southwest region, and a fire expert will provide updates on wildfire conditions and outlooks for the region.

Bio(s):

Nancy Selover is the State Climatologist for Arizona. Dr. Selover educates groups across the state on climate topics including the urban heat island, monsoon, drought, extreme weather, climate change, and Arizona's climate. She interfaces with state and city agencies, private businesses, researchers, and the public, providing climate data and information to assist these diverse groups. Dr. Selover serves on numerous committees including the Technical Monitoring Committee of the Statewide Drought Task Force and the State Hazard Mitigation Planning team. Nancy regularly teaches a meteorological instruments course at Arizona State University. She also mentors K-12 teachers in a climate course carried out in conjunction with the American Meteorological Society.

Ed Delgado is the National Program Manager for Predictive Services, located at the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) in Boise, Idaho. Predictive Services is a decision support unit that provides weather and fuels assessments and forecasts for the wildland fire managers across the country. Ed has been with Predictive Services for 17 years and has held his current position since 2011. Prior to Predictive Services, Ed worked for the National Weather Service for 15 years with tours at Fort Worth, Denver, Raleigh, and Greer - the last two tours as a senior forecaster.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

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Presenter

24 July 2018

Title: Recent changes in Lake Michigan’s lower food web
Presenter(s): Dr. Hunter J. Carrick, Dept. of Biology and Institute for Great Lakes Research, Central Michigan University
Date & Time: 24 July 2018
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Hunter J. Carrick, Dept. of Biology and Institute for Great Lakes Research, Central Michigan University

Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/277823890655753731

Abstract: Lake Michigan has experienced recent changes in the plankton assemblage coinciding with reductions in watershed nutrient loadings and the introduction of invasive species. As such, we evaluated the population dynamics of key plankton components in Lake Michigan along a series of near to offshore transects in southern Lake Michigan (2013-18). Chlorophyll analysis revealed that the picoplankton fraction (Ppico, <2 m) contributed an average of >50% to total phytoplankton biomass, a percentage much larger than observed prior to 2005. Particulate P made up nearly all of the TP in the water column; this pool was mainly composed of poly-P present in pico-sized particles (>80% of total). The abundance of Ppico (5,200 to 70,700 cells/mL) was considerable and the assemblage was dominated by cyanobacteria taxa and pico-eukaryotes. The occurrence of diatoms (mainly Cyclotella and Discotella taxa) was limited to the nearshore region during the spring and early stratification periods. We estimated growth and grazing losses attributable to small grazers (microzooplankton, protists) and median-sized grazers (mesozooplankton, crustaceans) from enclosure experiments. Ppico had lower growth (0.20 +/- 0.27) relative to grazing losses by microzooplankton (-0.33 +/- 0.37), and limited clearance by mesozooplankton. These results indicate tight coupling between picoplankton and small grazers, suggesting that carbon flow from picoplankton to metazoa may dominate the current, trophic dynamics in the lake.

Bio(s): Hunter has 28 years of experience in the field of environmental science and education (post Ph.D). He received his B.S. Degree in Biology from Binghamton University in 1983, his M.S. Degree from the Bowling Green State University in 1985, and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1990. In 1990-91, He served as the first CILER/CIGLR post-doctoral fellow, when he contributed to a large NOAA project that studied coastal hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. He has served on the faculty at San Francisco State University, University at Buffalo, and Penn State University; he is currently is a professor at Central Michigan University.

Hunter's research focuses on understanding the mechanisms that govern food web dynamics and nutrient cycling in large lakes, streams, and coastal ecosystems. He has published 130 scientific documents (papers, reports, book chapters) and authored 250 professional presentations. His body of work includes 50 completed research projects (total funding >$9 million). His current research evaluates recent changes in the lower food web in Lake Michigan.

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23 July 2018

Title: Climate Change Threatens the World’s Marine Protected Areas
Presenter(s): John Bruno, Professor, Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Date & Time: 23 July 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker, John Bruno, Professor, Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Sponsor(s): Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MarineDebris.info, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

Abstract: MPAs and the species they protect are increasingly being impacted by climate change. Although MPAs are widely promoted as a means to mitigate the effects of climate change, the opposite perspective is more in line with the scientific reality: without drastic reductions in carbon emissions, ocean warming, acidification and oxygen depletion will disrupt the composition and functioning of the ecosystems currently protected within the world's MPAs. The community- and ecosystem-level impacts of climate change threaten to negate decades of progress in conservation and further imperil species and ecosystems that are already in jeopardy.

Remote Access: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_zxkX-c5JStm1vFsMkOrNkw

Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Battling the Extremes: Drought and Fire Outlook for California-Nevada
Presenter(s): s): Dave Simeral, Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute; Amanda Sheffield, National Integrated Drought Information System; National Interagency Fire Center Predictive Services; Julie Kalansky, CNAP - a NOAA RISA, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Date & Time: 23 July 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dave Simeral, Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Desert Research Institute (DRI); Amanda Sheffield, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS); National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) Predictive Services; Julie Kalansky, CNAP (a NOAA RISA), Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Seminar sponsor: National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA Climate Program Office

Seminar POC for questions: amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the webinar at https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/california-nevada-drought-climate-outlook-webinar-july-23-2018

Abstract
The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) July 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia). The webinar takes place at 11 a.m. PT, Monday July 23, 2018.

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Drought & Climate Update
Dave Simeral | Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Desert Research Institute (DRI)

Drought & Climate Outlook
Amanda Sheffield | National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)

Fire Conditions, Impacts & Outlook
National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) Predictive Services

Working to Understand Climate Projections with Southern Nevada Water Authority
Julie Kalansky | CNAP (a NOAA RISA), Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Bio(s):

Dave Simeral is an Associate Research Scientist of Climatology with the Division of Atmospheric Sciences at the Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) in Reno, Nevada. Dave's interests cover a broad spectrum within the fields of climatology, meteorology, physical geography, and snow science. Over the past 15 years at the DRI/WRCC, Mr. Simeral has worked on a wide variety of projects in the fields of meteorology and climatology with state, federal, and university entities. Mr. Simeral is one of twelve national authors for the U.S. Drought Monitor and serves on several steering committees for the NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS).

Amanda Sheffield is a Regional Drought Information Coordinator with the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS). Dr. Sheffield serves are the program point of contact for the California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System and is located at Scripps Institution of Oceanography/UC San Diego.

Julie Kalansky is a climate scientist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography/UC San Diego and program manager with CNAP (California Nevada Climate Application Program - a NOAA RISA) at Scripps.

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Presenter

20 July 2018

Title: July 2018 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: 20 July 2018
4:00 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Remote Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service

Seminar sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (a NOAA RISA team)

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/July_2018

Abstract: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for August and the remaining summer/early fall season.

Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather. Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Seminar POC for questions: Sean Bath, RISA Program Specialist, sean.bath@noaa.gov

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Additional presenters field:
If you have a single speaker or presenter, you would add at the bottom of the description field:

19 July 2018

Title: Bering Sea Subsistence Harvest: Measuring Vulnerability to Climate Change
Presenter(s): Grace Ferrara, NMFS/OAA/OIASI/IA
Date & Time: 19 July 2018
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Grace Ferrara, NMFS Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection, Knauss Fellow

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part 2 of 2 of the monthly Knauss Fellows Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The Bering Sea is a highly productive region of the Pacific Arctic. The timing of the formation and thaw of sea ice each year has a significant impact on the structure of the Bering Sea ecosystem. In its current state, the northern Bering Sea is a benthic-dominated ecosystem that supports many species of marine invertebrates, fish, birds, and mammals. Eight of these mammal species are relied on heavily by Alaska Natives for subsistence. However, this region is already experiencing the effects of climate change in ways that threaten the persistence of these communities as a result of changes in the timing of sea ice advance and retreat. As these changes progress, understanding the ways in which the ecosystem is vulnerable to climate change will be essential for resource managers and local communities to prepare to adapt. Climate change vulnerability analyses (CCVAs) provide a framework for quantifying vulnerability that can be useful for developing, implementing, and monitoring management solutions to reduce vulnerability. This study uses a CCVA to quantify the vulnerability of eight species of marine mammals in the Bering Sea as a first step in understanding how the communities that rely on them for subsistence are also vulnerable. Although some species are more vulnerable than others, this method allows managers to pinpoint sources of vulnerability for each one to develop strategies for reducing their vulnerability.

Bio(s): Grace Ferrara is a Knauss Fellow in the NMFS Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection. She received her Masters in Marine Affairs from the University of Washington's School of Marine and Environmental Affairs in 2017. She first discovered the fascinating world of marine mammalogy as a zookeeper at the Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium before she went on to study marine mammal management and climate vulnerability in graduate school.

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Mitigation of White Band Disease in Acropora cervicornis by a Quorum Sensing Inhibitor
Presenter(s): Rebecca Certner, NOS/MBO/PCAD
Date & Time: 19 July 2018
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Rebecca Certner, OAR Policy and Constituent Affairs Division, Knauss Fellow

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part 1 of 2 of the monthly Knauss Fellows Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Among the greatest threats to global coral reef health are coral epizootics, which are increasing in frequency and severity. In particular, white band disease (WBD) has devastated Caribbean acroporid populations since its initial outbreak in 1979. However, despite its widespread and devastating effects, the etiology of WBD remains largely uncharacterized.

Here we examine the role of quorum sensing (QS) within bacterial communities associated with WBD-infected A. cervicornis. QS refers to the phenomenon in which bacterial gene expression is regulated in response to changes in population density. This is accomplished through the secretion and detection of signaling molecules called autoinducers. Microbial communities isolated from WBD-infected A. cervicornis were exposed to QS inhibitor (an autoinducer antagonist) and then dosed onto healthy test corals. WBD-associated bacteria supplemented with QS inhibitor lost the ability to transmit disease whereas all A. cervicornis exposed to uninhibited (i.e. control) WBD bacterial communities became infected within two days.

In order to determine the species influenced by the addition of QS inhibitor, bacterial samples were taken from each test coral at three time points: (T0) pre-dosing (T1) post-dosing at 12 hours and (T2) post-dosing at 24 hours (after WBD symptoms appeared in control corals). Microbial 16S V3-V4 rRNA metagenomic sequencing and multivariate analyses were then used to identify shifts in the bacterial communities between QS-inhibited and uninhibited WBD-associated bacterial communities.

Bio(s): Rebecca Certner is a recent graduate of Northeastern University with a PhD in Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology. Her dissertation focused on white band disease in critically endangered Caribbean corals, particularly bacterial population structure, quorum sensing, and gene expression. She is a current Knauss fellow in the NOS Policy and Constituent Affairs Division.

Remote Access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Detection and Attribution of Climate Change from the U.S. Perspective (Climate Science Special Report): Video linked in Description
Presenter(s): Thomas R. Knutson, Research Meteorologist, NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 19 July 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA folks, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) Seminar Series, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, in partnership with NOAA.

Climate Series, Seminar 2 of 8:

Title: Detection and Attribution of Climate Change from the (Climate Science Special Report) U.S. Perspective

Presenter(s): Thomas R. Knutson, Research Meteorologist, NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Presenting remotely.

VIDEO RECORDINGS OF THE SEMINAR:

071918_Recording of Climate Seminar 2 of 8_CSSR Climate Seminar Series_ Detection and Attribution of Climate Change from the U.S. Perspective, by Tom Knutson " Google MP4 version

Sponsor(s): The U.S. Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Katie Reeves (kreeves@usgcrp.gov) and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: NOTE: WEBINAR SOFTWARE HAS CHANGED.
We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join the session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
You may need to download the Adobe Connect softwarel it might take two tries!
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.
Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. You will need a computer speaker,
a headset OR external speakers to hear the audio, and you may need to turn your audio up.
Questions will be addressed in the chat window.

You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Contact your help desk if you have any trouble completing this test.

This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Climate change detection and attribution is the process of assessing whether certain observed changes in the climate, including certain extreme events, are unlikely to be due to natural variability alone and whether the changes or events can be attributed to some known forcing mechanism such as increasing greenhouse gases. Based on IPCC AR5 (and reinforced by new record global temperatures since IPCC AR5), it is extremely likely that more than half of the global mean temperature increase since 1951 was caused by human influence on climate. The record-high level of global temperatures in 2016 was not even possible without anthropogenic forcing, according to CMIP5 models. However, going beyond global temperature, the CSSR plays a unique role in focusing on detection and attribution from a U.S. perspective. Examples of detection and attribution statements and summary findings from the CSSR for the U.S. are summarized for a number of variables, including regional surface temperature, precipitation, atmospheric circulation, drought, flooding, wildfires, extreme storms, and sea level rise. An update on more recent post-CSSR research on U.S. precipitation trends by the author will also be presented

Bio(s): Thomas Knutson is a climate scientist with NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, in Princeton, New Jersey. He is a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society, and currently serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Climate. As Chair of the World Meteorological Organization's "Task Team on Tropical Cyclones and Climate Change", he is leading development of a new science assessment on this topic. Recently, he was the lead author on the "Detection and Attribution of Climate Change" chapter of the U.S. Climate Science Special Report. Mr. Knutson's research interests include hurricanes and climate change, and climate change detection and attribution.

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18 July 2018

Title: The NOAA Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MiRS): Products, Applications, and Improvements
Presenter(s): Christopher Grassotti, NESDIS STAR/SMCD
Date & Time: 18 July 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Christopher Grassotti, NESDIS STAR/SMCD

Seminar sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (a NOAA RISA team)

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/VAWS_July2018

Abstract: The Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MiRS) is the official NOAA operational microwave-only retrieval system. It was first introduced into operations in 2007 and currently processes data from NOAA-18, -19, MetopA, MetopB, DMSP F-17, F-18, GPM, Megha-Tropiques, Suomi-NPP, and the recently-launched NOAA-20 satellite. The retrieval algorithm is based on a 1-dimensional variational approach in which the fundamental physical attributes affecting the microwave observations are retrieved physically, including the profile of temperature, water vapor, hydrometeors, as well as surface emissivity and temperature. Further post-processing of the core retrieved variables allows for production of derived products such as surface precipitation rate, sea ice concentration and age, and snow water equivalent. Due to its use of microwave data only, MiRS has the capability of operating in "all weather" conditions. Additionally, the processing of data from multiple polar orbiting satellite platforms leads to higher effective temporal and spatial coverage that increases with latitude. The presentation will cover the background of the MiRS retrieval approach, and then move on to discussion of retrieval products, user applications, and recent work aimed at scientific improvements. Where possible, examples will be chosen that are relevant to users in high-latitude regions such as Alaska.

Seminar POC for questions: Sean Bath, RISA Program Specialist, sean.bath@noaa.gov

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Additional presenters field:
Title: Projecting the Impacts of Climate Change on the Distribution of North American Marine Species
Presenter(s): James W. Morley, postdoctoral researcher, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences
Date & Time: 18 July 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): James W. Morley, postdoctoral researcher, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Todd.Kellison@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install MyMeeting's WebEx app while logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: In recent decades warming oceans have led to shifts in distribution for many marine species around the U.S. These shifts have challenged fisheries management, which is often based on the assumption of static stock boundaries and equilibrium based assessment models. We developed projections for shifts in the preferred thermal habitat for hundreds of species on the U.S. continental shelf in the coming century as a result of climate change using two future carbon emissions scenarios. Projections were conducted by using extensive bottom trawl survey data to develop models of thermal habitat for each species. These models were coupled with sixteen climate projection models, which allowed us to quantify how robust species projections are to uncertain future ocean conditions. These projections of climate change impacts represent an important tool for developing climate adaptive fisheries management.

Bio(s): Jim Morley did his graduate work at North Carolina State University, examining recruitment dynamics of bluefish, particularly how variable winter conditions can impact contributions from two spawning periods. At Rutgers University as a postdoc, he used long term survey data to examine how climate variability impacts marine assemblages on the southeast U.S. continental shelf. Following that study, he conducted the projections that are the topic of the seminar. Presently, he is a postdoc at the University of North Carolina where he continues to analyze sources of uncertainty with species projections. He is also conducting a major field-based investigation on how oyster aquaculture impacts the ecosystem services of estuaries.

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Title: NESDIS snowfall rate product and assessment in NWS Forecast Offices
Presenter(s): Huan Meng, NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research, and Kristopher White, NWS/Huntsville, AL Weather Forecast Office and NASA/MSFC/Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center
Date & Time: 18 July 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Room 2554-2555, NCWCP, 5830 University Research Ct, College Park, MD 20740, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
STAR Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Huan Meng, NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research, and Kristopher White, NWS/Huntsville, AL Weather Forecast Office and NASA/MSFC/Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA NESDIS STARHost and contact: Ralph.R.Ferraro@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Webex - event address for attendees: https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=e6264cd9de7be3b4177ecc46f0791645eEvent number: 991 988 937Event password: STAR
Audio:
Conference #: 1-888-396-1320
Passcode: 9371952Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/Meng20180718.pdf

Abstract:
An over land snowfall rate (SFR) product has been produced operationally at NOAA/NESDIS since 2012. The product utilizes the passive microwave measurements from the ATMS sensor aboard S-NPP and NOAA-20, and from AMSU and MHS sensor pair aboard the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) operated by NOAA and EUMETSAT. Recently, SFR product has also been developed for SSMIS aboard the DMSP satellites and for GMI aboard NASA's GPM core satellite. The SFR algorithm consists of two components: snowfall detection and snowfall rate estimation. Both components mainly rely on the high frequencies at and above 88/89 GHz due to their sensitivity to solid precipitation. The snowfall detection component is a statistical algorithm that optimally combines snowfall probabilities derived from a satellite-based module and a numerical weather prediction model-based module. The snowfall rate component is a physical, 1DVAR-based algorithm. The SFR product has been validated extensively against gauge observations and radar snowfall rate estimates with satisfactory results. As part of a project supported by the JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction program, the SFR product retrieved from eight satellites was also evaluated at some NWS Weather Forecast Offices in winter 2017-2018. NWS meteorologists evaluated and provided feedback regarding the SFR product suite via an online survey, emails and a webinar. Evaluation results affirmed operational utility of the SFR product, especially as it pertains to the analysis and forecast of snowfall rates in regions that lack necessary radar and in-situ observations. Some data issues were also discovered and addressed during the evaluation period, highlighting the positive aspects of the intensive assessment process, which fosters direct interaction between product developers and end-users. Conclusions and recommendations for future iterations of the SFR product will also be discussed.

Bio(s):
Huan Meng: TBDKristopher White: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Hydrologic Prediction through Changes in Soil Moisture and Snowpack: Estimating Natural and Anthropogenic Fluxes
Presenter(s): Ben Livneh, University of Colorado / CIRES
Date & Time: 18 July 2018
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s): Ben Livneh, U of Colorado/CIRES

Title: Hydrologic Prediction through Changes in Soil Moisture and Snowpack: Estimating Natural and Anthropogenic Fluxes Date,Time, Room: Wednesday July 18 at 10:00am in NCWCP Rm 2155 Contact: Youlong Xia youlong.xia@noaa.gov JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract: Water stored at the Earth surface"in the soil and snow"represents a window into the future and past, controlling the rate of water transfer to the atmosphere and rivers, and providing a basis for forecasting. The first part of this presentation will focus on two applications using remotely sensed soil moisture to estimate evaporation and irrigation. Evaporation is an integral component of the water balance, yet it's estimation over large areas is limited by observational scarcity and is hence typically estimated using models. An approach for producing spatial estimates of evaporation using changes in soil moisture from NASA's SMAP satellite will be presented and evaluated at a set of monitoring sites across the U.S. Next, variations in remotely sensed soil moisture are evaluated as a means to estimate irrigation. Water withdrawals for agriculture represent the single largest consumptive use for many parts of the U.S., bearing a large anthropogenic footprint on the water and energy cycles. However, practical challenges exist in estimating irrigation magnitude and resulting impacts on water supply modeling. A synthetic data assimilation experiment is presented to estimate irrigation, with potential errors sources evaluated using land surface outputs in the place of remote sensing. The last part of the presentation will focus on how the predictive value of snowpack-based drought indicators"identified as the most useful and reliable drought indicator by western U.S. water stakeholders"are expected change in a warmer world; where projections show more rain versus snow. Across the western U.S., snow-water equivalent (SWE) at key dates during the year (e.g., April 1) is routinely used in water resource planning as it embodies stored water to be released, through melt, during critical periods later in the summer. The robustness of these snowpack-based drought indicators will be assessed under historical and future climate. ====== Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

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17 July 2018

Title: