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NOAA Science Seminar Series
2017 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

20 December 2017

Title: Overcoming Uncertainty through Climate Scenario Planning: Lessons from Kachemak Bay and Tijuana River NERR
Presenter(s): Danielle Boudreau, Tijuana River NERR; and Syverine Bentz, Kachemak Bay NERR
Date & Time: 20 December 2017
2:00 pm - 2:45 pm ET
Location: Please register through GoToWebinar (https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4664384898436367362).
Description:

OneNOAAScience Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Danielle Boudreau (Tijuana River NERR) and Syverine Bentz (Kachemak Bay NERR)

Title: Overcoming Uncertainty through Climate Scenario Planning: Lessons from the Tijuana River and Kachemak Bay reservesSeminarsponsor: NERRS Science Collaborative

Abstract: Join project team members Dani Boudreau (Tijuana River NERR) and Syverine Bentz (Kachemak Bay NERR) as they discuss how climate scenario planning overcame multiple barriers to climate adaptation planning in Alaska's Kenai Peninsula. Multiple barriers hinder effective adaptation planning in South central Alaska, including the uncertainty around future climate trajectories and limited capacity for interagency collaboration. To address these issues, the Tijuana River NERR (Imperial Beach, CA) partnered with their sister reserve in Kachemak Bay (Homer, AK) to share their experiences with climate scenario planning to enhance the regional adaptation capacity of Alaska's coastal communities. Learn more about climate scenario planning in both the Kachemak Bay and the Tijuana River Reserves, and how the project has resulted in multiple unexpected outcomes for each.Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or boumad@umich.eduSubscribe to the OneNOAAScience Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Bering Canyon: Physics, Flow and Zooplankton
Presenter(s): Colleen Harpold, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA and Carol Ladd, Physical Oceanographer, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 20 December 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Colleen Harpold, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA and Carol Ladd, Physical Oceanographer, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (https://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/).

Abstract: Zooplankton of Bering Canyon and how the physics and flow of the region affect their distribution.

Seminar POC for questions: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: What does it mean to end overfishing?
Presenter(s): Richard D. Methot Jr., NOAA Senior Scientist for Stock Assessments, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NMFS. Presenting remotely from Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 20 December 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Richard D. Methot Jr., NOAA Senior Scientist for Stock Assessments, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NMFS. Presenting remotely from Seattle, WA.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Overfishing is catching too many fish. Overfishing depletes fish stocks, harms ecosystems, and diminishes future fishing opportunities. The need to prevent it is a strong focus of the Sustainable Fisheries Act since its origins in 1976 and a global perspective shows that the U.S. and several other industrialized nations are achieving sustainable fisheries by implementing a science-based fishery management system with strong enforcement of strict guidelines. Yet instances of overfishing persist and are rampant in some regions of the world. The conceptual basis for sustainable fisheries is rooted in the same ecological principles that underlie all natural resource management. The mix of species within an ecosystem has an inherent quasi-stable carrying capacity toward which it will grow if disturbed. Think of an old growth forest or undisturbed prairie. Humans are a new top predator in these systems, an invasive species, that introduces a disturbance, fishing in this case, that resets the balance point. In a fished system, fished species are less abundant and younger than at carrying capacity, but now have a harvestable surplus production. The role of fishery science is then to guide us towards a point that produces food and benefits for human society, but does not result in an unsustainable ecosystem; different, but sustainably so. In this presentation I will discuss the prevention of overfishing from four perspectives: political, management, operational-tactical science, strategic-holistic science.

Methot Jr., R.D., Tromble, G.R., Lambert, D.M. and Greene, K.E. 2013. Implementing a science-based system for preventing overfishing and guiding sustainable fisheries in the U.S. ICES JMS. DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fst119.

Bio(s): Richard Methot serves as NOAA's Senior Scientist for Stock Assessments. During his 36-year career with NOAA Fisheries he has worked in the Southwest, Alaska, and Northwest Fisheries Science Centers and Office of Science & Technology. Throughout his career, he has focused on development and application of fishery assessment models and communication of assessment results to the fishery management process. In 2008, he was awarded the Department of Commerce Gold Medal for his development of the Stock Synthesis assessment approach. Dr. Methot has a prominent role in several national and international committees related to marine fish stock assessment and management. In his senior scientist role, he strives to improve assessment methods, including bringing more ecosystem and environmental information into the assessments, and to improve communication of the role that assessments serve in supporting sustainable fisheries.

Dr. Methot's educational background includes a B.S. in Fisheries (1975) from the University of Washington; Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego (1981); and a post-doctoral position at the Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

19 December 2017

Title: Migratory Species Conservation Project Tools: New Spatial Decision Support Tool for the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Jorge Brenner, Associate Director of Marine Science, The Nature Conservancy, Texas Chapter, and Valerie Pietsch McNulty, Marine GIS Manager, The Nature Conservancy, Texas
Date & Time: 19 December 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Medium Conference Room - 9348
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jorge Brenner, Associate Director of Marine Science, The Nature Conservancy, and Valerie Pietsch McNulty, Marine GIS Manager, The Nature Conservancy. Presenting remotely from Texas.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Marine species migrate to fulfill essential needs: to find food, reproduce, or seek out a more habitable location. The Gulf of Mexico hosts a wealth of active biodiversity migration -70% of highly migratory fish, five sea turtles, one-third of the bird species in North America, and most of the North Atlantic's marine mammals migrate through this ecosystem. Since 2016, the Conservancy has led the development of a framework for migratory species assessment and conservation in the Gulf with the publication of the Pathways, Threats and Conservation report. More recently we published the Migratory Species Conservation project web site (http://www.migratoryblueways.org/), to share our vision to identify migratory blueways - and address the knowledge gap of migratory pathways, threats, and opportunities for their conservation. Additionally we created an accompanying online Blueways Conservation Decision Support Tool (DST -http://maps.bluewaysconservation.org/) to provide support for planners, resource managers, government officials, and the ocean conservation community to understand marine species blueways, threats, and key stopovers. The DST is built from more than one-thousand animal satellite tracking data from over 100 researchers and institutions in the United States, Mexico, and Cuba. The tool includes a visualization platform to highlight information about migration corridors, movement density, occurrence hotspots, and stopovers, along with marine environmental data, and human and climate-related threats and contains several apps that can be used for careful marine planning and resource management.

Bio(s): Jorge Brenner is an Associate Director of Marine Science with The Nature Conservancy in Houston, Texas. The focus of his work is marine biodiversity conservation, spatial analyses, ecological economics, climate change adaptation and spatial tools development. He has experience conducting research in marine species ecology, biodiversity informatics, coastal zone management, ecosystem services valuation, geographic information systems (GIS), sea-level rise and coastal resilience and conservation planning. He has worked in the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea of Cortez and Mediterranean. In his current position with The Nature Conservancy in the Gulf of Mexico large marine ecosystem he oversees species to habitat to whole system conservation projects, supports multinational conservation planning efforts, online coastal resilience and biodiversity decision support tools development and collaborates with a variety of partnership networks, including Mexico and Cuba. Dr. Brenner is currently a member of several initiatives around the Gulf that seeks its restoration, and has previously participated with the National Academies. Valerie Pietsch McNulty is the Marine GIS Manager for The Nature Conservancy in Houston, TX. In this position, her work includes data analyses for Gulf of Mexico marine conservation projects, creative design and implementation of marine planning decision support tools, and program website management. Valerie has previously worked as a Spatial Analyst for The Conservancy's New York City program, mapping green roof infrastructure and its relationship with the urban heat island effect. She has a MA in Climate and Society from Columbia University and a BS in Environmental Engineering from Cornell University.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Assessing vulnerability of Interior Alaskan Subsistence Users to Impacts of Environmental Change on Travel and Access
Presenter(s): Helen Cold, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 19 December 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Helen Cold, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy ACCAP, a NOAA RISA Team https://accap.uaf.edu/

Remote Access: https://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=503ec327e1&e=9097598e1a

Abstract: Changes in climate are disproportionately affecting northern latitudes, and this is altering relationships between human societies and their environments. Rural communities in boreal Alaska rely heavily on natural resources for provisional and cultural purposes, and have reported challenges caused by contemporary environmental changes. Environmental disturbances associated with climate change, such as shifts in fire regime, hydrologic changes affecting waterways, thawing of permafrost, extreme weather events, and unstable snow and ice conditions, have been qualitatively associated with altered accessibility of subsistence resources. Our research objective was to quantify the impact of disturbances driven by climate change on access to ecosystem services in Interior Alaska. In collaboration with nine rural boreal Alaska communities, we documented changes observed by subsistence users. Through combining traditional ecological knowledge and scientific analysis, we characterized the impact of climate change on travel networks used for subsistence resource harvest across the study region and provide information that collaborating communities can use to optimize community resilience and self-reliance. These data can be used by agencies and local communities to foster adaptation to a rapidly changing climate.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Shoreline hardening and upland land use affect estuarine fish and crustaceans at local and system scales: lessons from a Chesapeake Bay meta-analysis
Presenter(s): Matthew S. Kornis, Ph.D., Research Associate, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, and Fish Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Presenting remotely from Wisconsin.
Date & Time: 19 December 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series This seminar is also part of the Mid-Atlantic Shoreline Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Matthew S. Kornis, Ph.D., Research Associate, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, and Fish Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Presenting remotely from Wisconsin.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar hosts are Elizabeth.Turner@noa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Shoreline hardening and human alternation of land cover are intensifying due to human population growth and sea level rise. We sought to describe how fishes and crustaceans valuable to coastal systems are affected by these changes by examining patterns in the abundance, biomass, size structure, and diversity of nearshore taxa at two natural (wetland, beach) and two hardened (bulkhead, riprap) shoreline types. These local-scale analyses demonstrated that shoreline hardening had predominantly negative effects on estuarine fauna, with responses mediated by functional species group and body size. Species abundance patterns from 39 subestuaries from Chesapeake Bay and Delaware Coastal Bays were also examined across gradients of urban and agricultural land cover as well as the percent of shoreline comprised of wetland and hardened shoreline to evaluate system-scale relationships.This meta-analysis provided empirical evidence that shoreline hardening had cumulative, negative system-scale effects on the abundance of most species, and that abundances of four bottom-oriented species were also negatively related to watershed cropland cover. These results highlight important issues for conservation and management strategies in coastal environments, and will require managers and policymakers to navigate difficult decisions at local and regional scales.

Bio(s): Matt received a Ph.D. in limnology and marine science in 2011 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has conducted research on issues ranging from shoreline and land use stressors, invasive species, food webs, and fisheries. His work in coastal estuaries stemmed from a post-doctoral fellowship with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. He is currently a fish biologist and data analyst with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service working in the Great Lakes on issues pertaining to the survival, movement, wild recruitment, and diet of salmon and trout. Away from work he enjoys spending time with his wife and two sons, gardening, hiking, and fishing.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

18 December 2017

Title: It's Dark in Alaska, but the Future of Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) is Bright
Presenter(s): Carl Dierking and Eric Stevens, Geographic Information Network of Alaska, GINA
Date & Time: 18 December 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Bldg, 7700 Hubble Drive, Lanham MD 20771, Conference Room S650
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Carl Dierking and Eric Stevens, Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA)

Sponsor(s): Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) December Science Seminar
POC for questions: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Webex:
877-401-9225
pc: 53339716
JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=ma247c34e47fc91c1ccfad89ac1715a20
Meeting number: 744 026 354
Host key: 162816
Meeting password: Jpss2017!

Abstract: Surveilling Alaska's weather presents unique challenges. Alaska is large, topographically complex, and compared to much of the CONUS suffers from a sparsity of observations from weather radars, METARs, and radiosondes. However, Alaska does have one advantage: thanks to its high latitude, Alaska receives very frequent coverage from polar orbiting weather satellites such as S-NPP and (soon) NOAA-20. The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) operates two direct broadcast antennas to track and receive data from these and other satellites. The data are then processed by GINA and fed into NWS Alaska's AWIPS via an LDM pathway. The advantage of this approach is a reduction in latency: NWS meteorologists are examining the latest imagery on AWIPS within approximately 15 minutes of a satellite's passage over Alaska, with the motivation that even the highest quality satellite imagery is of little use to forecasters if it arrives too late to be included in the decision making process.

This arrangement, the High Latitude Satellite Proving Ground, has served Alaska for a number of years, with each year bringing upgrades and improvements. Building on this success, several new products and enhancements to existing products have been implemented during 2017. These achievements include generation of mosaic imagery where successive passes of a given wavelength are stitched together with the most recent image always on top, thereby mitigating to some extent the problem of hard edges outlining each swath. Two new multispectral RGBs developed specifically for use in the fire weather context were enthusiastically embraced during the summer wildfire season. A number of microwave-based products were also introduced, with a formal assessment of new microwave imagery used by the NWS Alaska Sea Ice Program (ASIP) conducted during the spring of 2017.

Plans are also in the works to continue expanding the relationship between GINA and NWS Alaska in 2018. For years the spatial resolution of imagery products has been made coarser due to considerations of bandwidth and storage. Now, with the implementation of a tiling approach, GINA will soon deliver full-resolution imagery to NWS Alaska for display in AWIPS. And lastly, a handful of CLAVR-X cloud products is planned for production in 2018.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

14 December 2017

Title: Positioning in a Multi-global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) World
Presenter(s): Jacob Heck, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 December 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jacob Heck, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9128878192824215811. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (415) 930-5321 ; Access Code: 465-664-973; Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar; Webinar ID: 204-791-819.

Abstract: By 2020, three other complete global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) will be in operation alongside GPS, providing new observables that could improve positioning solutions. This webinar will discuss NGS' plans on incorporating these newly available signals in its next generation positioning software, which would also be integrated into tools like OPUS.

Bio(s): Jacob Heck works within the Geodetic Research Division at NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 December 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: From the land to the sea: how human activities affect submersed aquatic vegetation in Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Dr. Jonathan Lefcheck, Post-doctoral Researcher, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Science, East Boothbay, Maine. Presenting at NOAA, in Silver Spring, MD.
Date & Time: 14 December 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Jonathan Lefcheck, Post-doctoral Researcher, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Science, East Boothbay, Maine. Presenting at NOAA, in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: The Chesapeake Bay is the one of the iconic and valuable bodies of water in the world, and since the first permanent European settlement in 1607, has undergone profound changes as the result of human activities. Among the habitats affected is submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV), which includes many species of marine and freshwater plants. These underwater grasses provide important services to humanity, and because of their sensitivity to water quality and shoreline development, serve as 'coastal canaries' for the health of the Bay. In this seminar, I provide an overview of the status of SAV in Chesapeake Bay, focusing on the impacts of multiple stressors on two key seagrasses, eelgrass (Zostera marina) and widgeongrass (Ruppia maritima). I then draw on 30 years of high-resolution monitoring and modeling data to explicitly and mechanistically link activities in the watershed to trends in SAV. Finally, I show how proactive management efforts have led to a >250% increase in SAV in Chesapeake Bay since the 1980s, providing a roadmap for future restoration efforts, both in the Chesapeake and around the world.

Bio(s): Dr. Lefcheck received his Ph.D. in Marine Science from the College of William & Mary in 2015, and served as a post-doctoral fellow at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. He is currently based at the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in East Boothbay, Maine. His areas of expertise include marine community ecology, biodiversity studies, global change biology, and ecological statistics. He has published over 25 papers in journals such as Nature and PNAS. You can read more about his work at: www.jonlefcheck.net.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

13 December 2017

Title: Applying the IEA process to inform EBM in the Gulf of Mexico (Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series)
Presenter(s): Christopher R. Kelble, NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory
Date & Time: 13 December 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/AsFkcd, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Christopher R. Kelble, NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the December EBM/EBFM seminar: https://goo.gl/AsFkcd After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Chris Kelble will discuss how Integrated Ecosystem Assessments have evolved throughout NOAA with a specific focus on the Gulf of Mexico. IEA's were originally viewed and communicated as a product, process, framework, and tool. This led to the Gulf of Mexico implementing the IEA to answer big questions about the holistic status of the entire Gulf of Mexico that advanced our scientific understanding, but the connection to ecosystem management was missing. We are now tailoring our IEA implementation in conjunction with management partners to support specific management processes. This has required us to change the geographic scale of the IEA and work conjointly with our management partners when creating IEA products. Chris will highlight how the IEA has advanced our understanding of the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem and is actively working with resource management partners to improve decision-making.

Bio(s): Chris Kelble is a research oceanographer at OAR's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML). Chris Kelble leads the ecosystem assessment and modeling research group at AOML. His research focuses on taking a socioecological approach to understand ecosystem structure, function, and management. He has also chaired the NOAA Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Steering Committee for the past 6-years.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Shifting spawn timing in Gulf of Alaska walleye Pollock
Presenter(s): Lauren Rogers, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 13 December 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Lauren Rogers, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/). Remote Acess: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Larval otoliths provide evidence of past shifts in spawn timing linked to climate and demographics. Seminar POC for questions: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

12 December 2017

Title: Effects of multiple stressors on the benthic ecosystem in the Arctic Barents Sea: use of bycatch from fish assessment trawls
Presenter(s): Dr. Lis Jorgensen, Institute of Marine Research, Tromso, Norway
Date & Time: 12 December 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Lis Jorgensen, Institute of Marine Research, Tromso, Norway

Seminar sponsor: This a special addition to the NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/).

Remote Acess: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/241961541

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 241-961-541


Abstract: Being national fisheries agencies, fish assessment surveys are an important mission of both NOAA and IMR (Institute of Marine Research,Norway). Long term monitoring of commercial fish stocks by demersal trawls also collect invertebrate "by-catch". Measuring the whole catch provides valuable insight into the benthic ecosystem. These data help answer questions such as - how does the benthic community change temporally and spatially when impacted by invasive species, increased temperature and bottom trawling. The Arctic Council working group Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP) recently published a report including Pan Arctic diversity of benthic invertebrate megafauna. A recent workshop produced more detailed maps of distribution and species diversity. Next, a collaboration between NOAA (AFSC) and IMR will evaluate the distribution, temperature sensitivity and trawl vulnerability of benthic invertebrate communities in the Barents, Chukchi and Bering Seas.

Seminar POC for questions: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: The Value of NOAA Data Provided by NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information
Presenter(s): Mike Brewer, Ph.D., Acting Chief of the Climate Information Services Branch, and Chief of the Customer Engagement Section Center for Weather and Climate, of the NOAA NESDIS National Centers for Environmental Information
Date & Time: 12 December 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Mike Brewer, Ph.D., Acting Chief of the Climate Information Services Branch, and Chief of the Customer Engagement Section Center for Weather and Climate, of the NOAA NESDIS National Centers for Environmental Information. Presenting remotely from Asheville, NC.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) is the world's largest repository of climate data. Customer analytics and uses of NCEI information are critical to understanding and evolving NCEI's suite of use-inspired data and information to make them applicable to decision making. Over the past three years, NCEI's Center for Weather and Climate has made a concerted effort to: 1) Establish a system for collection of user requirements, 2) Ensure that collected information informs product area management and prioritization activities, and 3) Include user insights into future products and product versions. These process changes require a long-term commitment to climate services and are success is not possible with a 'build it and they will come' mentality nor with a 'drop-in, drop-out' customer engagement strategy. This presentation will focus on the path necessary to get from effective user engagement, centered on collection and adjudication of user requirements, all the way through the outcomes of the changed products and services and how those have benefited users, including economic examples.

Bio(s): Mike Brewer is a Physical Scientist with NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information's Center for Weather and Climate in Asheville, North Carolina. He is the acting Chief of the Climate Information Services Branch, and the Chief of the Customer Engagement Section. He is responsible for connecting users and customers to the data they need to make decisions, conduct their business, or address their issues. Mike is also responsible for overseeing the capture of customer requirements, documenting and reporting on user analytics, and for capturing the economic value of NCEI data to various sectors. Mike's career in NOAA has included stints at National Weather Service Headquarters and in NCEI's predecessor, the National Climatic Data Center, where he operated the web presence for the US Drought Early Warning System and the Global Drought Information System. Dr. Brewer earned a Ph.D. in Climatology from the University of Delaware. He has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on the effect of weather and climate on living things, applied climatology, and drought. Mike is a recipient of multiple Department of Commerce Bronze Medals and NOAA Administrator Awards, in addition to the National Weather Service Assistant Administrator's Award. He was the NOAA Employee of the Month in May 2013 and the Weather Channel Geek of the Week in July 2015.

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11 December 2017

Title: Hurricane Response in Puerto Rico: My Experiences as NOAA's First Surge Capacity Force Volunteer for FEMA
Presenter(s): Dr. Dwayne Meadows, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service
Date & Time: 11 December 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 131 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/vQTTPD, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Dwayne Meadows, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service

Remote Access: Please register at: https://goo.gl/vQTTPD After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Since Hurricane Katrina FEMA has been authorized to train and deploy volunteers from other Federal agencies to help in their disaster response operations. For the first time in history FEMA took volunteers for this Surge Capacity Force from outside of the Department of Homeland Security. Dr. Meadows will discuss his experiences with the Surge Capacity training in Alabama and his deployment doing Disaster Survivor Assistance in Puerto Rico this fall.

Bio(s): Dr. Dwayne Meadows is a conservation biologist and educator. Currently he is an endangered species biologist for the National Marine Fisheries Service. Prior to that he worked at the NMFS Pacific Islands Science Center as a coral reef biologist and directed the research of the Pacific Whale Foundation in Maui Hawaii.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

7 December 2017

Title: Considering economic efficiency in ecosystem-based management: the case of horseshoe crabs in Delaware Bay
Presenter(s): Sunny Jardine, Ph.D. Associate Professor, School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, University of Washington
Date & Time: 7 December 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sunny Jardine, Ph.D. Associate Professor, School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, University of Washington Join Webex https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D559007857%26UID%3D4893665142%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATLhtse-XNhcpPV2sA3m8RonKvbFAFHPMQzn3HBWheMmb7BTHrbfLj0V3ueHok32TOy2e7iPyiUGBMmykbDpz0b0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmbe8bb14ed1e132b10b62cf91809643c3 Meeting number and Access Code: 804 755 712 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412 Host: Monster Seminar (https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: vicky.krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: The welfare gains from incorporating ecosystem considerations into fisheries management are unclear and can vary widely between systems. Additionally, welfare gains depend on how ecosystem considerations are adopted. This paper uses an empirically parameterized bioeconomic model to explore the welfare implications of two definitions of ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM). We first define EBFM as a fishery management plan that maximizes the net present value of ecosystem services. We then explore an alternative definition that adds ecosystem considerations to a fishery managed with regulated open access. Our biological model reflects horseshoe crabs in Delaware Bay, which are harvested in a commercial fishery and are ecologically linked to migrating shorebirds populations, e.g. the endangered red knot. We find that introducing ecosystem considerations to a regulated open access fishery generates welfare gains on par with gains from addressing the commons problem even when fishery rents are completely dissipated. Additionally, solving the commons problem within an EBFM approach can provide substantial welfare gains above those from solving the commons problem in a single-species management framework. BIO Sunny L. Jardine received her Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California at Davis in 2013. In 2013, she started her academic career in the School of Marine Science and Policy at the University of Delaware. In 2016, she joined the faculty in the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs at the University of Washington. Her main research interests include natural resource economics, marine resource economics, and public economics. She has published articles on topics such as developing product quality in the seafood industry, invasive species, blue carbon conservation, and ecosystem based management. She is currently working on research questions related to recreational fisheries management, the economic impacts of harmful algal blooms, and managing migrating barrier island systems.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Arkansas River Instream Habitat Restoration Project: How Can Monitoring be Used to Inform Adaptive Management?
Presenter(s): Eric Richer, Colorado Parks and Wildlife
Date & Time: 7 December 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Eric Richer, Colorado Parks and Wildlife Seminar

Sponsor(s): NOAA and USFWS; NOAA Points of Contact are NOAA's Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov, and US Fish and Wildlife Service's Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov Seminar Registration: https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e3y9wv1gvm1o/event/registration.html Invitations to register for the webinar will be emailed a week or two prior to the event. For the best viewing experience, please use Internet Explorer.

Abstract: Eric Richer will provide an overview of the project design, goals, and long-term monitoring of the Upper Arkansas River in-stream restoration to rehabilitate and enhance aquatic habitat for a five mile reach with the primary goals of increasing trout population density and to improve age and size class structure.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Influence of Mississippi River plume on surface oil in the northern Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Dr. Matthieu Le Henaff, Assistant Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 7 December 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA AOML (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Matthieu Le Hnaff, Assistant Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote Access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/511390189 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (786) 535-3211 Access Code: 511-390-189

Abstract: The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 highlighted the vulnerability of the Gulf of Mexico to oil pollution. In particular, oil exploration is very intense along Louisiana and near the Mississippi Delta, and the interaction between the oil and the Mississippi River plume is poorly known. In April 2017, scientists from various institutions performed field experiments near the Taylor Energy site, where oil has been observed since the destruction of an oil rig by hurricane Ivan in 2004. Various types of ocean drifters were released in the surface oil, and oceanographic observations from a research vessel were also collected. Remotely sensed images of the river plume and the oil surface were taken, in addition to in situ data. Finally, we also performed a high-resolution model simulation of the region to analyze the surface transport pathways. These data show how surface oil, as well as drifters, are advected along pathways defined by the Mississippi River plume evolution under the influence of dominant winds and river discharge trends.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 December 2017

Title: What is Coral Bleaching?
Presenter(s): Kelly Drinnen, NOAA Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 6 December 2017
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kelly Drinnen, NOAA Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/696223242835034627

Abstract: Coral bleaching is one of the side effects of an increasingly warmer ocean. Episodes of coral bleaching are happening more regularly and with greater severity as the years progress. But, what exactly is coral bleaching? Is bleached coral, dead coral? Is bleaching preventable? Can coral recover from bleaching? Join us to look at the biology of corals to understand what coral bleaching is and its potential long-term effects on coral reefs. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Feeding ecology in wild-caught early stage Sablefish
Presenter(s): Alison L. Deary, Research Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 6 December 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Alison L. Deary, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/).

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Feeding dynamics of early stage Sablefish and how developmental patterns may influence feeding ability and prey selectivity. Seminar POC for questions: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Finding Conservation Opportunities along Estuary Margins
Presenter(s): Brian Fulfrost, Principal at Oregon Freshwater Solutions and David Thomson, Habitats Program Director at San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 6 December 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Brian Fulfrost, Principal at Oregon Freshwater Solutions, and David Thomson, Habitats Program Director at San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Land managers working in estuaries must understand the ecological importance of habitats found along the upland margins of tidal marshes. These so-called upland transitional habitats provide critical functions both to tidal marsh fauna and their own obligate flora, as well as potential accommodation space for marsh migration during rapid sea level rise. The current status and location of these habitats in the San Francisco Bay estuary was not well understood nor were potential conservation opportunities easily identified. We found accommodation space for upslope migration of tidal marsh in response to rapid sea level rise lacking in the lower estuary, so work must also be done to prepare the landscape for their migration up-estuary. Initially funded by the US Fish & Wildlife Service to assess the status and distribution of upland transitions, we set out to better describe these habitats, develop a way to use topography data and tidal gauges to predict the location of land surfaces within their elevation range (relative to the tides), and then use a set of GIS based metrics to rank their relative utility to estuarine conservation. We also mapped two sea level rise scenarios (61cm and 167cm) to project future distributions of these habitats to inform planning. This mapping and assessment forms the basis of our decision support system. Land managers use it to predict baseline condition of these habitats in the estuary, find opportunities and assess constraints, and to inform restoration planning and site design. Our decision support system can also be used to visualize this process in the context of sea level rise and either find opportunities for connectivity or prepare assisted migration scenarios for constraints imposed by the landscape.

Bio(s): Brian Fulfrost is currently Principal at Oregon Freshwater Simulations (http://freshwatersim.com) and also teaches GIS at WSU and SFSU as well as remote sensing at the University of West Florida (online). Brian has spent more than 20 years utilizing GIS, remote sensing and geospatial technologies to better inform conservation planning, resource management and sustainable planning. For the last ten years, Brian has worked on mapping and building decision support tools for coastal environments. This work includes the use of high resolution multispectral imagery for mapping marshes and mudflats for the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration authority, developing decision support systems for estuarine-upland transition zones under sea level rise, and using GIS based modeling to map shoreline vulnerability and coastal flood zones. David Thomson (MS in Biology from SE Louisiana U) is the Habitats Program Director for the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory (www.sfbbo.org). He leads applied research projects on the management of estuarine-terrestrial transitional plant communities around San Francisco Bay, supporting large scale tidal marsh ecosystem restoration projects. He has been collaborating with Brian Fulfrost to map the distribution of upland transitional habitats and predict their value to tidal marsh ecosystem conservation.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

5 December 2017

Title: The Dream and the Reality: Meeting Decision-Making Time Frames While Incorporating Ecosystem and Economic Models into Management Strategy Evaluation
Presenter(s): Dr. Jon Deroba, NOAA Fisheries; Dr. Sarah Gaichas, NOAA Fisheries; and Dr. Min-Yang Lee, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 5 December 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3, Rm 13817, Silver Spring, MD or via webinar; see remote access info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Jon Deroba (NOAA Fisheries), Dr. Sarah Gaichas (NOAA Fisheries), and Dr. Min-Yang Lee (NOAA Fisheries)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Fisheries Quantitative Ecology and Socioeconomics Training (QUEST) Program; Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://goo.gl/5CLf3Y

Abstract: Management strategy evaluation (MSE) uses simulation to evaluate the trade-offs involved with alternative management options in the face of uncertainty. MSEs require time, however: time for stakeholder input, time for data collection, and time for model development. Fishery managers may want to make decisions within time frames that are inconsistent with the time required to thoroughly construct an MSE. What, then, are scientists to do when faced with the conflict between wanting to construct their ideal MSE and providing managers with timely information for decision-making? This presentation chronicles our experience developing an MSE on a very truncated timetable (<12 months) required to meet management time frames. We evaluate the relative performance of herring harvest control rules at achieving stakeholder-defined objectives, and identify lessons learned throughout the process, especially as they relate to using MSE as a tool to advance an ecosystem based approach to management. About the speaker: Jon Deroba is a Research Biologist at the NEFSC that conducts research on stock assessments and leads efforts in MSE. He is the lead assessment scientist for Atlantic herring. He serves on the New England Fishery Management Council's Herring Plan Development Team, the NOAA Fisheries national MSE Working Group, the NEFSC's MSE working group, and the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council's Ecosystem Fishery Management Action Team. Sarah Gaichas is a biologist at the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) who has conducted research on food web modeling and integrated ecosystem assessment in the Northeast U.S. and Alaska. She co-chairs the NOAA Fisheries national Management Strategy Evaluation (MSE) Working Group, and serves on the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee. Min-Yang Lee is an economist at the NEFSC who has conducted research on seafood marketing and demand, recreational fishing, policy analysis of the scallop fishery, and economic geography. He serves on the New England Fisheries Management Council's Herring Plan Development Team.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Vibrio pathogens in the Chesapeake Bay under future climate change scenarios
Presenter(s): Barbara Muhling, University of California, Santa Cruz and NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center. Presenting remotely from California.
Date & Time: 5 December 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s): Barbara Muhling, University of California, Santa Cruz and NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary app works fine.

Abstract: Bacteria in the genus Vibrio can cause illness to people through eating of contaminated seafood, or exposure to contaminated water. Vibrios occur naturally in the Chesapeake Bay, but their abundance varies with water temperature, salinity and other factors. We assessed the potential effects of climate change on the future abundance of three Vibrios in the Chesapeake Bay using outputs from four statistically downscaled climate models. We show that abundance of Vibrios in the water column, and in oysters, may increase as temperatures warm and flow regimes change. In addition, the seasons of highest risk may last longer, compared to the present day. This suggests that Vibrio-related illnesses in the Chesapeake Bay region may increase in the future, unless current management measures can adapt.

Bio(s): Barbara Muhling is currently a fisheries oceanographer working with NOAA through the Cooperative Institute for Marine Ecosystems and Climate (CIMEC) in California. She completed her PhD through Murdoch University in Western Australia, and her post-doc at the University of Miami in Florida. From 2015-2016, she was an associate research scholar at Princeton University, and worked with scientists at NOAA GFDL, NMFS and NOS to complete the research described in this seminar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

4 December 2017

Title: Carbon Comes Home - Kelp Aquaculture to Benefit both Sea and Soil
Presenter(s): Meg Chadsey, Washington Sea Grant
Date & Time: 4 December 2017
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Meg Chadsey, Washington Sea Grant Sponsor NOAA SOARCE POC for seminar questions: noaa.oceanacidification@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8709150626780545025 After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

Abstract: Phytoremediation"broadly defined as the use of living plants to clean up contaminated soil, air, and water"has been generating a lot of buzz as a potential strategy to ease ocean acidification. Phytoremediation in this context refers to harnessing the photosynthetic power of marine algae (i.e. kelp and seaweed) to absorb dissolved carbon dioxide in order to boost seawater pH and reduce stress on shelled organisms like mussels and oysters. Scientists are evaluating this approach in shellfish growing states like Washington and Maine, and the mariculture industry and government agencies that are already getting behind commercial cultivation of sea vegetables' are poised to capitalize on this potential co-benefit to seawater chemistry. In this webinar, we'll follow the evolving story of an experimental kelp farm in Washington's Hood Canal, including a serendipitous partnership with a local terrestrial farmer, review relevant curricular materials published by Maine's Island Institute and others, and explain how phytoremediation can used to teach essential concepts about the earth's carbon cycle. About our speaker: A microbiologist by training, Meg discovered her true calling in 2010 when she happened to read Elizabeth Kolbert's seminal 2006 article about ocean acidification (OA), The Darkening Sea, in The New Yorker magazine. As Washington Sea Grant's OA specialist, Meg is a resource on OA science, policy and outreach for diverse stakeholders, including government agencies, academic institutions, tribes, marine industries and the public. She also serves as Sea Grant's liaison to NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, a unique appointment created to facilitate the flow of NOAA's world-class OA research to the greater scientific community and the public. Prior to joining Sea Grant, she worked with the UW School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, the Marine Stewardship Council and Seattle Chefs Collaborative. She's (practically) a native Seattleite and is interested in everything that happens on or beneath the waves.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Physical and biological consequences of the 2010 record negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation
Presenter(s): Dr. Elizabeth - Libby - Johns, NOAA/AOML/PhOD
Date & Time: 4 December 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA AOML (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Elizabeth (Libby) Johns (NOAA/AOML/PhOD) Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote Access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/199662973 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3112 Access Code: 199-662-973

Abstract: During the winter of 2009-2010, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index reached its most extreme negative values since 1895. The winds, currents, and weather patterns associated with this NAO event caused numerous physical and biological consequences in the North Atlantic Ocean and bordering coastal areas of the US and Europe. The transport of large masses of Sargassum seaweed out of the Sargasso Sea in response to the anomalous winds and its well-publicized subsequent pile-ups on the beaches of the Caribbean Sea during 2011 has recently been shown to be one of these consequences. The negative2010 NAO has also been shown in the literature to have caused such large-scale physical consequences as record cold temperatures in the eastern US and northern Europe, extreme flooding events in Spain, Portugal, France, and the Madeira and Canary Islands, and the highest sea level ever observed in the Mediterranean Sea. It also contributed to the lowest transport of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) at 26.5N recorded since measurements began in 2004. Biological consequences in addition to the Caribbean Sargassum inundations, which caused deleterious effects not only to tourism but also to Caribbean seagrass beds and coral reefs, included a massive coral die-off in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, and much loss of life of livestock and humans in Europe due to the extreme cold temperatures and flooding. Finally, a massive Portuguese man o' war (Physalia) influx into the Mediterranean that severely impacted the seaside tourist industry during the summer of 2010 has also been attributed to the NAO. These events, all traced to a single large-scale climate anomaly, the negative NAO, suggest that in a future changing climate the interaction of physical forcing (meteorological and oceanographic) and land and sea-based biological ecosystems may produce a variety of unexpected consequences.

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1 December 2017

Title: A vision for development and implementation of the Warn on Forecast concept
Presenter(s): Pam Heinselman, NSSL
Date & Time: 1 December 2017
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar.

Presenter(s): Pam Heinselman, NSSL

Title: A vision for development and implementation of the Warn on Forecast concept Date, Time, Room: December 1st,2017, at 10:30am in NCWCP Rm 2155 Contact: Jack Kain Jack.Kain@noaa.gov JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN Dial in 866-756-2072 (Participant Pass code: 4546287#) Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract: Deterministic modeling approaches to forecasting severe weather presume a single solution for the evolution of storms and the environments in which they form. Similarly, deterministic severe weather warnings assume severe weather impacts are equally likely within the warning's spatial and temporal extent. This approach fails to represent forecast uncertainty that we know exists, owing to the chaotic nature of the atmosphere, imperfect observations, imperfect prediction models, and other causes. Advancements in data assimilation, ensemble modeling, high-performance-computing, and probabilistic forecast and verification methods provide the means and opportunity to better represent these uncertainties within severe weather prediction systems. The Warn-on-Forecast project at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman, OK, USA, aims to improve severe weather forecasts, warnings, and decision support for high-impact events (e.g., tornadoes, hail, wind, and flooding) by leading convective-scale research and development activities that enable a new paradigm where convection-allowing, ensemble model forecasts become a key resource for NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Watch and Warning operations. The result of these efforts is the development of a prototype Warn-on-Forecast system called the NSSL Ensemble Warn-on-Forecast System for ensembles (NEWS-e). NEWS-e is a frequently updated, regional-scale, on-demand convection-permitting ensemble analysis and prediction system, nested with an hourly convection-allowing ensemble forecast system. The 2017 version of this system assimilates radar, satellite, and surface data every 15 minutes, and generates new probabilistic 3-hour and 1.5-hour forecasts at the top and bottom of each hour, respectively, at grid spacing O(~3 km). This multiscale data assimilation system uses the advanced research version of WRF, version 3.8+ (ARW) to produce storm-scale ensemble analyses and forecasts. Details of the system configuration will be provided within the presentation. NEWS-e seeks to improve 0"3-h predictions of individual convective storms and mesoscale aspects of convection that provide enhanced probabilistic forecast guidance. Forecast swaths produced by this system, such as probability of simulated reflectivity > 40 dBZ and ensemble 90th percentile values of accumulated rainfall, 2"5-km updraft helicity, and 0"2 km vertical vorticity, are expected to revolutionize forecasters' ability to anticipate not only storm location, mode, intensity, but also high-impact threats and their impacts on society. Toward this end, this prototype system is being tested in real time during peak severe weather season in the U.S. Following each storm season, findings from rigorous quantitative and qualitative case study evaluations are used to direct enhancements of the system. Example cases and the associated forecast verification will be shown. //////////////////////////////// Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

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30 November 2017

Title: Tools for applying adaptive mesh refinement and automated tuning to wave model simulations
Presenter(s): Richard M. Gorman, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research New Zealand
Date & Time: 30 November 2017
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction,Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar.

Presenter(s): Richard M. Gorman (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand) and Jose-Henrique G.M. Alves (NCEP/EMC)

Title: Tools for applying adaptive mesh refinement and automated tuning to wave model simulations Contact: Jose-Henrique G.M. Alves Henrique.Alves@noaa.gov JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=mb213dd44eb09c8a893102632c8b12f28 Meeting number: 902 694 099 PHONE 866-756-2072 Leader: 7046913# Participant: 4546287# Can't join the meeting? https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

Abstract: Tools for applying adaptive mesh refinement and automated tuning to wave model simulations Richard M. Gorman[1], Jose-Henrique G.M. Alves[2], Hilary J. Oliver[1] [1]National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand [2] SRG/EMC/NCEP/NOAA, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, College Park, MD, USA This presentation will cover two areas of research undertaken during a sabbatical visit to NCEP. The first involves development of an adaptive-grid version of WAVEWATCH III. We will also discuss development and application of an optimisation suite (Cyclops) based on the Cylc workflow engine, and its application to improve the skill of NWPs. A fully adaptive quadtree grid has been added to the WAVEWATCH III model package, to dynamically vary spatial resolution to match the requirements of the evolving solution. This enables it to give the finest resolution where wave energy density has the strongest variation (e.g. in the vicinity of an intense, moving storm system), while only using lower resolution elsewhere. This has the potential to significantly improve the trade-off between model accuracy and simulation time. The optimisation suite Cyclops, based on the Cylc workflow engine (http://cylc.github.io/cylc/), implements a wide selection of optimisation algorithms to calibrate any modelling system that has itself been implemented as a (separate) Cylc model suite. Cyclops is designed so that the separate optimisation and model suites only need to be set up to exchange parameter values and computed error metrics as simple file I/O. This makes it relatively straightforward to apply the optimisation suite to calibrate a modelling system that has already been implemented in an existing Cylc suite. Results from applications of Cyclops to calibrate wind-wave hindcasts using the WAVEWATCH III model are presented for simulations made using ECMWF and NCEP atmospheric forcing. For the latter case, significant wave model skill-score improvements are obtained when using the spatial average of the root-mean-square error of significant wave height, relative to collocated altimeter records, as the cost function guiding a nonlinear optimization algorithm within Cyclops. ====== Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Restoration of Shad and Anadromous Fish to the White Clay Creek National Wild and Scenic River in Delaware
Presenter(s): Gerald Kauffman, University of Delaware, Water Resources Center
Date & Time: 30 November 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Gerald Kauffman, University of Delaware, Water Resources Center Seminar

Sponsor(s): NOAA and USFWS; NOAA Points of Contact are NOAA's Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov, and US Fish and Wildlife Service's Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov Seminar Registration: https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e3y9wv1gvm1o/event/registration.html Invitations to register for the webinar will be emailed a week or two prior to the event. For the best viewing experience, please use Internet Explorer.

Abstract: Gerald Kauffman will discuss the first dam removal project for fish passage in the entire state of Delaware. This project is the first of seven planned removals to ultimately reopen 14 miles of the creek to fish passage.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ecophysiology and potential for persistence in a changing ocean
Presenter(s): Jacquline Padilla-Gamino, Ph.D.; Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 30 November 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium (2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jacquline Padilla-Gamino, Ph.D.; Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington Join Webex https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D559007857%26UID%3D4893665142%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATLhtse-XNhcpPV2sA3m8RonKvbFAFHPMQzn3HBWheMmb7BTHrbfLj0V3ueHok32TOy2e7iPyiUGBMmykbDpz0b0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmbe8bb14ed1e132b10b62cf91809643c3 Meeting number and Access Code: 804 755 712 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412 Host: Monster Seminar Jam (https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: vicky.krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: Global change is a multi-dimensional problem that can affect organisms at many levels of biological organization and at multiple life history stages. My research explores how the ecology, physiology and reproduction of marine organisms are influenced by global change in both tropical and temperate systems. In my lab we combine field and laboratory techniques to examine the importance of transgenerational effects in acclimatization and local adaptation and investigate the synergistic effects of multiple stressors on coastal ecosystems. In this seminar I present work on (i) the ecophysiology and biological consequences of ocean acidification on early life history stages of key marine species along the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem and (ii) the reproductive ecology of important reef building corals in the Pacific. I discuss how larvae of marine invertebrates and algal spores respond to ocean acidification in California and examine the natural variation and adaptation potential of species located across gradients in upwelling intensity. I also present current work with the Applied Physics Laboratory and Taylor Shellfish Farm exploring the role of parental effects and identifying resistant genotypes of the farmed mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis and the purple-hinged rock scallop (Crassadoma gigantea). This study will allow us to determine the relative contribution of acclimatization, maternal and genetic effects in growth and survival of offspring during a thermal stress, which will provide critical information to mussel farmers for designing genetic improvements in broodstock in the context of climate change. In the second section I demonstrate how coral reproduction varies across different temporal and spatial scales using biochemical signatures, histology and in situ nocturnal observations and collections using a novel system specifically designed to collect spawn from shallow colonies. I finish by presenting current research on the impact of global warming on coral reproduction and discuss future work to understand how corals can allocate energy to reproduction under thermal stress. The research presented here will help to understand the physiological flexibility and potential for local adaptation of marine organisms in ecologically and economically important ecosystems already affected by global change. BIO Dr. Padilla-Gamio is a marine biologist interested in understanding how global change will affect the ecology, physiology and reproduction of organisms in both tropical and temperate systems. She graduated from Universidad Autnoma de Baja California with a BS in Oceanography. Padilla-Gamio completed a MS in Biology at California State University Northridge and a PhD in Oceanography at the University of Hawaii. Her graduate research work focused on the effects of habitat quality on the physiology and reproductive biology of important reef-building corals in the Pacific and thermal stress tolerance and photobiology of algae from temperate and tropical regions. During her postdoctoral work at the University of California Santa Barbara she lead a component of an NSF-funded project to study the biological consequences of ocean acidification on key marine species along the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem. She is an author of the bilingual children's book Kupe and the Corals' published in 2014 and translated into Spanish, Hawaiian, French, Tahitian and Paumotu. Padilla-Gamio is currently an assistant professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Public Perception of Aquaculture and the Role of Aquariums
Presenter(s): Maggie Allen, NOAA Office of Education
Date & Time: 30 November 2017
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar Register https://goo.gl/WkHtZ2
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Maggie Allen, 2017 Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of Education. POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Knauss Fellow Coordinator (Nov): Chris Katalinas (christopher.katalinas@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Megan Hall will present at 12 PM and Maggie Allen will present at 12:30 PM. If you register for the November Knauss webinar, you will have access to both presentations. Register for the November Knauss webinar here: https://goo.gl/WkHtZ2 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: NOAA Office of Education has a partnership with 26 aquariums across North America, called the Coastal Ecosystem Learning Center Network (CELC). Through this Network, NOAA can share resources and experts with these aquariums, and these organizations can, in turn, educate their community about important marine issues. Although NOAA has identified aquaculture as a major priority, nearly half of Americans perceive negatively of aquaculture. Therefore, NOAA Education hopes to work with these aquariums to increase awareness of the merits of sustainable aquaculture. Because opinions of aquaculture are grounded in place, it is essential to understand how perception differs by region. This initial literature review highlights the various views of this activity across the country and addresses gaps and opportunities, in order for this initiative to move forward.

Bio(s): Maggie Allen received her Bachelor's Degree in Environmental Studies and Sociology from Whitman College in Washington State in 2012 and her Master's Degree in Marine Affairs from the University of Washington in 2014, where her thesis focused on an advocacy coalition between an indigenous community and environmental groups to halt development of a coal terminal. Maggie has worked as a social scientist for the Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle; an internship coordinator at the South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve; and as an environmental educator in the Florida Keys. She is passionate about community-based conservation and environmental education.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Impactful Science: An Assessment of Characteristics, Grantee Reflections, and Lessons Learned
Presenter(s): Julia Wondolleck, University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability
Date & Time: 30 November 2017
12:00 pm - 12:45 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Julia Wondolleck, University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability

Sponsor(s): National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) Science Collaborative (http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar) POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Join collaboration scholar, Julia Wondolleck, Professor of Environment and Sustainability at University of Michigan, as she outlines what she has learned from examining projects supported by the National Estuarine Research Reserve System's (NERRS) Science Collaborative. NERRS research teams are committed to consequential collaboration with end users and to conveying what they have learned to others. They are exceptional at leveraging resources. In this webinar learn about: The ways in which end user and researcher interaction throughout the duration of a NERRS project incorporates local knowledge and networks to bring new ideas and opportunities to interactive science teams; The impact of NERRS Science Collaborative project teams in improving understanding and community relationships likely to endure beyond the life of each project; and The unique characteristics of collaborative science that set it apart from more traditional approaches to conducting research. See Full Assessment Report: http://seas.umich.edu/ecomgt/pubs/reports/NERRS_Science_Collaborative_APRIL_2017.pdf NERRS Science Collaborative Projects: An Assessment of Characteristics, Grantee Reflections & Lessons Learned, Julia M. Wondolleck, Anna Bengtson, and Dietrich Bouma, University of Michigan (U-M), School for Environment and Sustainability and the U-M Water Center, part of the Graham Sustainability Institute, April 2017.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Dose-dependent Impacts of Copper and Ocean Acidification on Mytilus californianus Larval Development and Gene Expression
Presenter(s): Megan Hall, NOAA NOS Policy and Constituent Affairs
Date & Time: 30 November 2017
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar Register https://goo.gl/WkHtZ2
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Megan Hall, PhD Candidate, University of Southern California and 2017 Knauss Fellow, NOAA NOS Policy and Constituent Affairs. POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Knauss Fellow Coordinator (Nov): Chris Katalinas (christopher.katalinas@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Megan Hall will present at 12 PM and Maggie Allen will present at 12:30 PM. If you register for the November Knauss webinar, you will have access to both presentations. Register for the November Knauss webinar here: https://goo.gl/WkHtZ2 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Coastal ecosystems have faced enduring exposure to land- and boat-derived toxins such as copper. Meanwhile, the developing challenge of ocean acidification (OA) poses a compounding threat to coastal organisms, particularly calcifying organisms. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that exposure to OA and copper would have detrimental impacts on larval development in the California mussel (Mytilus californianus). We sought to detect effects of OA at a range of copper doses, and to probe underlying mechanisms of these effects using transcriptome (gene expression) profiling.

Bio(s): Megan Hall is originally from Fort Lauderdale, FL. Megan graduated from Duke University in 2009 with B.S. in Biology, with a concentration in Marine Biology. Megan is currently a PhD Candidate at the University of Southern California in the Marine Biology & Biological Oceanography Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Jellyfish blooms around the world: the roles of climate and humans
Presenter(s): Jennifer E. Purcell, Ph.D., Biology Department, Western Washington University
Date & Time: 30 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jennifer E. Purcell, Ph.D., Biology Department, Western Washington University

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: I will introduce the many types of jellyfish around the world, regions where more jellyfish blooms have occurred, possible causes for the increases, and the problems they cause for humans. Jellyfish traditionally are considered to be nuisances to humans and of little ecological importance. I will use examples of research on Aequorea spp. that highlight how important jellyfish are, but how much still needs to be learned. Most species with a swimming stage also have an attached stage that probably is key to bloom formation, but whose extent and ecology are not known. Jellyfish of large sizes are reported from citizen science programs and caught in fishing trawls; therefore, abundance data exist from commercial fishing areas. Dietary data show that jellyfish are potentially important predators and competitors of fish. Although their potential importance seems obvious, jellyfish have been studied little relative to fishes. As jellyfish and opportunities to study them increase, new technology and methods will provide new insights into their biology.

Bio(s): Jennifer (Jenny) Purcell received her PhD in 1981 from the University of California, Santa Barbara, followed by postdoctoral appointments at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the University of Victoria, British Columbia, and Assistant Professor at Oregon State University to Full Professor the University of Maryland. She currently is a Research Associate in the Biology Department of Western Washington University. She is the author of over 125 publications, editor of four symposium volumes, and associate editor of Marine Biology. She has studied the trophic interactions and population dynamics of pelagic cnidarians and ctenophores in many regions of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic oceans. She explores the roles of jellyfish as predators and competitors of zooplanktivorous fish and climate effects on the formation of jellyfish blooms.

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29 November 2017

Title: Distributed Biological Observatory Line 1 and M8: A Changing Ecosystem
Presenter(s): Phyllis Stabeno, Physical Oceanographer, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 29 November 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Phyllis Stabeno, Physical Oceanographer, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Seattle, WA Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/).

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: Effects of decreasing ice and warming temperatures are already changing the northern Bering Sea ecosystem. Seminar POC for questions: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Leveraging the Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units (CESU) Network to help complete your work!
Presenter(s): Jen Lechuga, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, NOAA CESU
Date & Time: 29 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jen Lechuga, ONMS Environmental Compliance Coordinator and NOAA CESU Program Manager; Bill Thompson, North Atlantic Coast CESU Research Coordinator; Danny Filer, Chesapeake Watershed CESU Research Coordinator Seminar POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator/webinar host: judith.salter@noaa.gov; NOAA CESU: Jen Lechuga Jennifer.Lechuga@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at https://goo.gl/7oSidq After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP). Abstract/Summary: The talk will explain the background and purpose of the Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units (CESUs) network and how NOAA program managers can benefit from accessing universities and NGOs at a 17.5% overhead rate. Bill and Danny will focus their presentation on how leveraging the Chesapeake Watershed and North Atlantic Coast CESUs, in particular, can help NOAA accomplish its mission. The network can be used to support virtually any type of technical assistance, education, or research; the network's breadth is as deep as the university departments and expertise that encompass the national network. The presentation will also include types of projects that are currently being executed within the network among several federal partners.

Bio(s): Jen has been supporting NOAA's participation in the National Cooperative Ecosystem's Studies Units (CESUs) since 2012. CESUs are a network of universities, federal agencies, and other nonfederal partners that engage in cooperative agreements to further research in the biological, physical, social, cultural and engineering disciplines. In assisting the NOAA representative to the National CESU Network (Dr. Cisco Werner, NOAA Fisheries Chief Scientist), Jen has worked to problem solve various challenges that NOAA has experienced in being a full participant in the National CESU Network. Through Jen's leadership, NOAA has issued CESU awards in supporting collaborative research with the Universities of Hawaii, Alaska (Anchorage and Southeast), and California. In addition to her role as NOAA's CESU Program Manager, Jen serves as the Environmental Compliance Coordinator for the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. Jen earned her B.S. at Tulane University and a M.S. in Interdisciplinary Ecology from the University of Florida. Prior to becoming the North Atlantic Coast CESU Research Coordinator, Bill Thompson was the regional inventory and monitoring (I&M) coordinator for the Northeast Region of the USFWS-National Wildlife Refuge System in Hadley, MA since 2010. Before that, he was the biometrician/terrestrial wildlife program leader for the Southwest Alaska Network for the National Park Service's I&M Program in Anchorage, AK during 2004-2010. Bill also has served as Assistant Unit Leader (Wildlife) at the USGS Arkansas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit in Fayetteville (2000-2004), as a research biologist with the U.S. Forest Service's Rocky Mountain Research Station in Boise, ID (1997-2000), as a postdoctoral research fellow at Colorado State University, Fort Collins (1994-1997), and as an environmental research consultant in Bozeman, MT (1994). Bill has degrees in wildlife and fisheries biology (B.S., University of Vermont), fish and wildlife sciences (M.S., Pennsylvania State University), and biological sciences (Ph.D., Montana State University; statistics minor). His professional interests include developing designs for sampling and monitoring fish and wildlife populations, decision analysis, and modeling ecological data. Bill's personal interests include fitness training, wilderness hiking/camping, and wildlife photography (especially birds). He was born and raised in RI. In addition to serving as an adjunct professor for the History and Philosophy Departments, Danny serves as the Chesapeake Watershed CESU Research Coordinator (www.cesu.psu.edu) for the National Park Service where he works with 15 different federal agencies and nearly 30 university partners to provide education and technical assistance to federal program managers. The types of research Danny facilitates ranges from anthropology to zoology and everything in between! Danny also serves as the president of the Foundation for Frostburg (www.foundationforfrostburg.org), as the Secretary for the Allegany County Historical Society, and as an alternate for the City of Frostburg's Historical Commission. Danny is a Frostburg native and attended Frostburg State University for his undergraduate (B.A. in History) and graduate degrees (M.Ed. and MBA). He also holds a Doctor of Education degree from West Virginia University.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Improving Estimation and Prediction of Extremes via Conditional Bias-Penalized Kalman Filter
Presenter(s): D. J. Seo, University of Texas at Arlington
Date & Time: 29 November 2017
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar.

Presenter(s): D. J. Seo, University of Texas at Arlington Date, Time, Room: Wednesday NOvember 28th, 2017 at 9:30 in Rm 2155, NCWCP

Title: Improving Estimation and Prediction of Extremes via Conditional Bias-Penalized Kalman Filter Contact: MIke Ek michael.ek@noaa.gov JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=m84a1e1fde0b9ab873a78a45642bdbe2f Meeting number: 904 426 547 JOIN BY PHONE 877-953-0315 Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# ====== Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

28 November 2017

Title: The Cylc Workflow Engine: An Introduction and Live Demonstration.
Presenter(s): Hilary Oliver, NIWA New Zealand
Date & Time: 28 November 2017
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, RM 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar.

Presenter(s): Hilary Oliver, NIWA New Zealand

Title: The Cylc Workflow Engine: An Introduction and Live Demonstration. Date, Time, Room: Tuesday Nov 28 at 4pm in NCWCP rm 2155 Contact: Henrique Alves henrique.alves@noaa.gov JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me51b90dfc2e302cc44d12772002d3a27 Meeting number: 903 664 469 JOIN BY PHONE 877-577-6071 3124918#

Abstract: Cylc ("silk") is an Open Source workflow engine for cycling systems. Cylc implements a novel meta-scheduling algorithm with no global cycle loop: it only sees the dependence between individual tasks (even across cycles) in a single ongoing workflow. Consequently Cylc does not need to wait for one cycle to finish before starting the next, and it can catch up very efficiently from failures and delays. Other features include an intuitive dependency graph notation with ISO 8601 date-time (or integer) recurrence expressions for cycling configuration; multiple inheritance for efficient sharing of all common task run time settings; and the Jinja2 template processor for efficient programmatic generation of workflow definitions. Cylc has comprehensive event handling capabilities and robust inter-workflow triggering to support large operations, but as a distributed system with no central server it is also easy to use for individuals and small groups. The entire production and research workload of the UK Met Office (NWP and climate) is managed with Cylc, and it is now part of the official software infrastructure of the Unified Model system. In the U.S. Cylc is used by the NRL Marine Meteorology research division; by the 557th Weather Wing of the Air Force (with the Unified Model); GFDL Princeton is rewriting its FRE infrastructure around Cylc; and NCAR has adopted it for CESM CMIP6 production runs. Cross-planet video conferencing bandwidth permitting, project lead Hilary Oliver (NIWA, New Zealand) will give a general introduction to Cylc, with a live demo. ====== Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Dynamics of Oil and Gas during a Subsea Accidental Oil Well Blowout
Presenter(s): Scott A. Socolofsky, Professor, Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University. Collaborators include: Jonas Gros, Texas A&M University; Anusha Dissanayake, Texas A&M University, now at University of Georgia; Inok Jun,Texas A&M University; Lin Zhao, New Jersey Institute of Technology; Michel Boufadel, New Jersey Institute of Technology; Christopher M. Reddy, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; and J. Samuel Arey, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology. Presenting at NOAA, SIlver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 28 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Scott A. Socolofsky, Professor, Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University. Collaborators include: Jonas Gros, Texas A&M University; Anusha Dissanayake, Texas A&M University, now at University of Georgia; Inok Jun,Texas A&M University; Lin Zhao, New Jersey Institute of Technology; Michel Boufadel, New Jersey Institute of Technology; Christopher M. Reddy, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; and J. Samuel Arey, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology. Presenting at NOAA, Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Predicting the fate and transport of oil and gas released from accidental subsea oil well blowouts is critical for directing response to the spill and determining the natural resource damages following the disaster. We have developed a comprehensive model system to describe the properties of oil and gas in the deep ocean and to track their dynamics in the near field (within 10 km of the wellhead) of a subsea spill. We compared the model simulations to results for the Deepwater Horizon accident for the period between June 4 and July 15. The model shows good skill at predicting atmospheric measurements of volatile components of the oil and subsea sequestration of the release gas and light hydrocarbons in the intrusion layer that formed at about 1100 m depth. The model was validated during a period when subsea dispersant injection (SSDI) was on-going. We also used the validated model to assess how the results may have been different without SSDI. Our analysis show that, while SSDI does not significantly change the total mass of oil reaching the sea surface, the smaller droplets resulting from the dispersant injection do significantly increase the fraction of light hydrocarbons dissolved in the ocean water column. For example, emissions to the atmosphere were reduced overall by 28% with SSDI, including a 2000-fold decrease in benzene emissions. This talk will present the key elements of our modeling system, discuss the validation to data from the Deepwater Horizon, and highlight these results related to subsea dispersant effectiveness.

Bio(s): Dr. Scott Socolofsky is professor of Civil Engineering with joint appointments in Oceanography and Ocean Engineering at Texas A&M University in College Station, TX. Dr. Socolofsky earned a B.S. degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1994 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1997 and 2001. His research area is in environmental fluid mechanics, with applications in multiphase flow, coastal mixing, and accidental deep ocean oil well blowouts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Hydrometeorology in the Red Sea region: An analysis based on observations and climate downscaling simulations
Presenter(s): Shannon Davis,Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Date & Time: 28 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar.

Presenter(s): Shannon Davis, Physical Oceanography Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Title: Hydrometeorology in the Red Sea region: An analysis based on observations and climate downscaling simulations Date,Time, Room: November 28, 2017 at noon in NCWCP Rm 2155 Contact: Brad Ferrier JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract: The complex terrain surrounding the Red Sea has a profound influence on atmospheric circulation and global climate processes. Based on in situ observations and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model climate downscaled NCEP-FNL simulations, an analysis of the regional atmospheric dynamics and hydrologic cycle is performed. We advance that seasonal gap wind jets (the Tokar Gap Jet in particular) and a vigorous year round land-sea-breeze-cycle (LSBC) frequently enhance lateral moisture fluxes above basin. The influence of the gap wind jets are tied to large scale dynamics such as the migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), and the onset of the summer Indian Ocean monsoons. The LSBC, in contrast, is enhanced by local topographic elements and sharp gradients in the sensible heat fluxes throughout the year. The LSBC and the gap wind jets both contribute to mesoscale storm development above the Red Sea and its surrounding regions. ====== Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

21 November 2017

Title: Weather applications development: transitioning basic research to operations by utilizing service-oriented practices
Presenter(s): Kremena Darmenova, Northrop Grumman Mission Systems
Date & Time: 21 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar.

Presenter(s): Kremena Darmenova, Northrop Grumman Mission Systems

Title: Weather applications development: transitioning basic research to operations by utilizing service-oriented practices Contact: Brad Ferrier JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract: This presentation focuses on the development of a variety of weather applications derived from mesoscale model simulations. The examples encompass dynamical downscaling for regional climate assessment, dust emission characterization in desert regions, solar and wind resource characterization, basin-scale water availability and tactical weather decision aids. The subject of operationalizing and streamlining large volumes of weather data within service-oriented practices is explored along with the latest framework for development of weather applications in the context of agile processes and micro services. ========================== Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

20 November 2017

Title: European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Next Generation Software Stack for the IFS Model and Product Generation: Future Workflow Adaptations
Presenter(s): Dr. Tiago Quintino, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts -ECMWF-
Date & Time: 20 November 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA David Skaggs Research Center, Broadway Street and Rayleigh RD, Conference Room, 2A305, Boulder Colorado
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Tiago Quintino, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Seminar sponsor: Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation

Remote Access: Access it from your desk via Webex and Teleconference: Webex: Event Number: 997 215 789 Event Password: cj295m5s Event Address: https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=ea5044cbe2de9f745eb55ceeb1c9166a8 Seminar Line Information: Phone Number: 1-866-715-2479 Passcode: 9457557 International: 1-517-345-5260 Seminar may also be attended (remotely) at: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, Conference Room 2552-2553, College Park, MD - there will be a webex set up for the entire conference room.

Abstract: Starting 2014, ECMWF has embarked on a research program on HPC Scalability, aiming to achieve Exascale numerical weather prediction systems by 2025. ECMWF operational forecast generates massive amounts of I/O in short bursts, accumulating to tens of TB in hourly windows. From this output, millions of user-defined daily products are generated by a complex chain of transformations and regridding operators and finally disseminated to member states and commercial clients. These products are processed from the raw output of the IFS model, within the time critical path and under strict delivery schedule. Upcoming resolution increases and growing popularity will increase both the size and number of these products. Based on expected model resolution increases, by 2020 we estimate the operational model will output over 100 TB/day and need to archive over 400 TB/day. Given that the I/O workload is already one of the strongest bottlenecks in ECMWF's workflow, this is one of the main challenges to reach Exascale NWP. We present a new software stack that ECMWF is developing to tackle these future challenges in the scalability of model I/O and product generation, and reworking its operational workflows to adapt to forthcoming I/O technologies. In particular, we will present the adaptation of IFS I/O server to the use of NVRAM technologies as a way to buffer large amounts of forecast outputs en route to the product generation and archival systems, thus minimizing file-system I/O within the operational critical path and collocating post-processing with model computation.

Bio(s): Dr. Tiago Quintino is the Team Leader for Scalability at the ECMWF's Development Section, in Reading, United Kingdom. His career spans 17 years researching numerical algorithms and developing high performance scientific software in the areas of Aerospace and Numerical Weather Prediction. Lately he is focusing on scalable data handling algorithms for generation of meteorological forecast products, optimizing their workloads and I/O of massive data-sets.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NOAA NESDIS Snowfall Rate Product and its Applications
Presenter(s): Dr Huan Meng, NOAA NESDIS STAR Satellite Climate Studies Branch, Cooperative Research Program
Date & Time: 20 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV - 7700 Hubble Dr Lanham MD 20706 Conference Room S561
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Dr Huan Meng, NOAA NESDIS STAR Satellite Climate Studies Branch, Cooperative Research Program

Sponsor(s): JPSS November Science Seminar

Remote Access: 877-401-9225 pc: 20335107 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=md56b2c5ee2f2440e3b4459efc189bf77 Meeting number: 746 643 326 Host key: 512485 Meeting password: Jpss2017!

Abstract: The NESDIS Snowfall Rate (SFR) product utilizes measurements from passive microwave sensors aboard polar orbiting satellites. With the support of the JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction Program, an S-NPP ATMS SFR algorithm has been developed and will be transitioned to operation in the near future. More recent development includes the enhancement of the ATMS snowfall detection and rate algorithms, and the addition of more sensors/satellites to the SFR product suite. The existing product is retrieved from cross-track scanning sounders while the newly developed algorithms are for conical-scanning imagers with high frequencies, i.e. GMI onboard the NASA Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) core satellite and SSMIS onboard the DMSP F16, F17, and F18. With the new sensors, SFR will be produced from a total of nine satellites which significantly improves the temporal resolution of the product and will greatly benefit its applications. NASA SPoRT and NESDIS began partnering in 2013 to transition the NESDIS SFR product to National Weather Service forecasters and conduct product assessments to gain feedback on the utility of the product in operations. A winter assessment in 2014 focused on use of the product where radar observations are limited led to product improvements to reduce latency and improvements to usability in colder temperature regimes. A second product assessment in 2016 indicated the updates to the product gave forecasters more confidence for identifying snowfall in radar-deprived regions. End user interaction has been valuable to gain insight into how the product can be used in operations to improve guidance or lead time before snow reaches the ground, anticipate rain to snow transitions, and validate snowfall reports. This two-part seminar will present the latest development in the SFR project, and give highlights from previous assessments and describe the upcoming assessment planned for winter 2017-2018. About the speaker: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/Meng_H.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 November 2017

Title: The Blob, El Niño, La Niña, and North Pacific marine ecosystems
Presenter(s): Laurie Weitkamp, Ph.D.; Research Fisheries Biologist, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 16 November 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Laurie Weitkamp, Ph.D.; Research Fisheries Biologist, Northwest Fisheries Science Center Join Webex https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D559007857%26UID%3D4893665142%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATLhtse-XNhcpPV2sA3m8RonKvbFAFHPMQzn3HBWheMmb7BTHrbfLj0V3ueHok32TOy2e7iPyiUGBMmykbDpz0b0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmbe8bb14ed1e132b10b62cf91809643c3 Meeting number and Access Code: 804 755 712 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412 Host: Monster Seminar Jam (https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: vicky.krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: Since early 2014, the Warm Blob, an extremely strong El Nio, and La Nia have caused unprecedented warming of surface waters across the Northeast Pacific Ocean. This has resulted in dramatic changes to marine ecosystems at all trophic levels from diatoms to marine mammals. This talk will describe how the Blob and El Nio changed the ocean and the biological response to those changes, including many observations from our local area. These impacts are expected to continue into the future due to lags in response by many commercial species, and continuing unusual conditions. BIO Laurie has been a Salmon Biologist at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center since 1992, moving from Montlake to the Newport Research Station in 2004. She has been involved in the scientific basis for West Coast coho salmon listing and recovery under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and contributed to many status review updates for ESA-listed populations. Her research focuses on the ecology of salmon in estuarine and marine environments, specifically how physical conditions influence biological processes that are important for survival. This topic includes documenting the impacts of recent anomalous conditions on marine ecosystems across the North Pacific Ocean. Laurie received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Washington.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Modeled Impact of Quagga Mussels and Nutrients in Lake Michigan
Presenter(s): Dr. Darren Pilcher, research scientist at the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean-JISAO, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
Date & Time: 16 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Darren Pilcher, research scientist at the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO), NOAA/OAR Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Primary productivity in Lake Michigan has significantly decreased over the past decade. This decrease is often attributed to filter feeding by invasive quagga mussels, though some studies also implicate reductions in lake-wide nutrient concentrations. We use a 3D biogeochemical model to evaluate the effect of changing nutrient concentrations and quagga mussel filtering on phytoplankton production and phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass. Sensitivity experiments are used to assess the net effect of each change separately and in unison. Quagga mussels are found to have the greatest impact during periods of vertical mixing, while nutrients have the greatest impact during thermal stratification. The combined impact of both processes drives substantial reductions in phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass, particularly in nearshore regions where mussel grazing continues year-round. These results support growing concern that considerable losses of phytoplankton and zooplankton will yield concurrent losses at higher trophic levels. Comparisons to observed productivity suggest that both quagga mussel filtration and lower lakewide total phosphorus are necessary to accurately simulate recent changes in primary productivity in Lake Michigan.

Bio(s): Dr. Pilcher's research uses computational models to better understand the physical and biogeochemical mechanisms of aquatic carbon cycling at both global and regional spatial scales. Current projects include simulating the impact of glacial runoff on ocean carbon uptake in the Gulf of Alaska and using downscaled Earth System Model output to produce regional-scale projections of ocean acidification in the Bering Sea. He is also interested in understanding the role of the Laurentian Great Lakes within the regional carbon cycle. His work towards this goal includes resolving the seasonal carbon cycle in Lake Michigan and looking at how this cycle may have changed due to invasive Dreissena mussels.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NOAA/ESRL Earth-System Modeling for Great Lakes Applications
Presenter(s): Stan Benjamin, Senior scientist for advanced modeling systems, NOAA Earth System Research Lab, Global Systems Division
Date & Time: 16 November 2017
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Stan Benjamin, Senior scientist for advanced modeling systems, NOAA Earth System Research Lab, Global Systems Division Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2004557418708324610

Abstract: NOAA/ESRL/GSD continues its development on improved atmospheric modeling and data assimilation for short-range up to subseasonal time scales, but with increasing ties to GLERL on prediction of cold-season precipitation and all-season near-surface winds. New innovative data assimilation and model physics designs within new versions of the hourly updated 3km HRRR and 13km RAP models will be described (HRRRv3, RAPv4, scheduled for NCEP implementation in April 2018). The key improvements are for more accurate thunderstorm forecasts avoiding a high bias, and better use of surface, cloud, and radar observations to improve cold-season and warm-season precipitation events. Enhancements to boundary-layer treatment for improved near-surface winds are another key focus area for GSD. Accuracy of HRRR/RAP precipitation and wind accuracy and biases, including over the Great Lakes, will be examined. The next version of the HRRR and RAP will include direct smoke/aerosol cycling and 3km ensemble-based data assimilation to further improve short-range prediction and allow a 3km HRRR Ensemble tested more thoroughly in 2017. Subseasonal forecasting skill at 3-4-week duration is a growing critical need for NOAA guidance, but with a new set of rules for establishing skill and predictability for the traditional 2m temperature and precipitation. GSD is now running real-time coupled atmosphere-ocean predictions (including some of its scale-aware physics) to contribute to the real-time NOAA Subseasonal Experiment (SubX) " this effort will also be described including biases over the Great Lakes region. These topics will guide further discussion on earth-system atmospheric-water prediction for the Great Lakes in NOAA including GSD and GLERL.

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15 November 2017

Title: Communicating science for understanding and action: tips and tricks to making your work make sense to everyone else
Presenter(s): Dave Snider, NOAA National Weather Service
Date & Time: 15 November 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dave Snider, NOAA National Weather Service

Sponsor(s): NOAA Risa and Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy POC:Tina Buxbaum, Program Manager Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, ACCAP, tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/VAWS_Communication

Abstract: Complicated ideas and scientific data are often hard to understand for public or community partners. Reframing your information to serve your audience is the first step in managing your message.

Bio(s): Dave Snider is the Alaska Weather TV Desk program leader for the National Weather Service Alaska Region at the Anchorage Weather Forecast Office. Dave has over 20 years of broadcast television and graphics experience in Alaska, Colorado, North Carolina, and Missouri. He's earned an Emmy and other awards for covering crippling Front Range blizzards, hurricanes, and tornado outbreaks up to the Joplin tornado in 2011. Now, Dave's using those experiences and tools to help Alaska's citizens and partners receive and understand the National Weather Service weather and preparedness message through social media and the Alaska Weather TV Show. Dave is a father of two boys, a husband and grew up in Saint Louis.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Marine Heat Waves in Alaskan Waters: Past, Present and Future
Presenter(s): Nick Bond, Research Meteorologist, Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 15 November 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Nick Bond, Research Meteorologist, Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/).

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: This presentation will be on the early results on the probable changes in the frequency and severity of extreme events. Seminar POC for questions: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ensuring and Improving the Quality of Earth Science Data and Information
Presenter(s): Ge Peng, PhD., Research Scholar, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellite-North Carolina of North Carolina State University and affiliated with the NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information. Presenting remotely from Asheville, North Carolina
Date & Time: 15 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ge Peng, PhD., Research Scholar, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellite-North Carolina (CICS-NC) of North Carolina State University and affiliated with the NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Presenting remotely from Asheville, North Carolina.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: The data and information quality is multi-dimensional and is always of concern to end users. Ensuring and improving data and information quality is an end-to-end process and a shared responsibility of all stakeholders, including kay players (data producers, stewards, providers or distributors) and other major stakeholders (sponsor, power users, and management). Clearly defined roles and responsibilities of stakeholders allows for effective cross-disciplinary communication and better resource allocation, supporting organizations in meeting the challenges of stewarding digital Earth Science data products in the Open Data and Big Data era. Consistent descriptive information including the quality of individual data products is important to users in making informed and effective use or stewardship decisions. It is necessary for establishing the trustworthiness of the data and information and meeting transparency requirement. This presentation describes some of the researches in these areas, including categorization of information quality based on data product life stages. The goal of the researches aims to facilitate the processes of curating and integrating consistent quality descriptive information for both human and machine end-users.

Bio(s): Dr. Ge Peng is a Research Scholar at the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellite-North Carolina (CICS-NC) of North Carolina State University and is affiliated with the NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Dr. Peng holds a Ph. D. in meteorology and is experienced in assessing and monitoring quality of Earth Science data products. She has extensive knowledge of digital data management and experience in working with metadata specialists and software developers. Dr. Peng came to NCEI"NC, formally National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in late 2009. She is currently leading the development of sea ice climate normal products based on an NOAA climate data record and application of the NCEI/CICS-NC Scientific Data Stewardship Maturity Matrix (DSMM). Dr. Peng has also been coordinating the development of a NCEI data use/service maturity matrix under the NCEI Use/Service Maturity Matrix Working Group. She is an active member of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) " a member of its Data Stewardship Committee and co-chair of Information Quality Cluster, where she leads the effort in defining and formalizing roles and responsibilities of major product key players and stakeholders for ensuring quality and improving usability of Earth Science data products, in collaboration with NCEI.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Update on the NOAA Institutional Repository (IR): Compliance, Submissions and Plan for Public Access to Research Results (PARR)
Presenter(s): Jennifer Fagan-Fry, OAR/NOAA Central Library; Sarah Davis, OAR/NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 15 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/jTSNw9, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS, and Sarah Davis, MLS

Abstract: NOAA now has an Institutional Repository to provide long-term public access to NOAA publications and articles. Join us in the library to learn more about your responsibilities regarding submitting publications to the repository and how to submit your publication plus a discussion about 508 compliance and a Q&A session. Bring your questions!

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the webinar: https://goo.gl/jTSNw9 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Bio(s): Jennifer Fagan-Fry received her MLIS from Catholic University and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2015. Jenn manages the IR ingest. Sarah Davis received her M.L.S from the University of Maryland and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2008. She heads the bibliometrics team and also works with the NOAA Institutional Repository and the library website.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

14 November 2017

Title: The Ecological Atlas of the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas
Presenter(s): Max Goldman, Marine Ecologist, Audubon Alaska
Date & Time: 14 November 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Max Goldman, Marine Ecologist, Audubon Alaska Registration: https://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=2254a15fd5&e=241879cbad

Sponsor(s): NOAA Risa and Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy POC:Tina Buxbaum, Program Manager Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, ACCAP, tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

Abstract: The Ecological Atlas of the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas takes you on a scientific journey through natural history and ecological relationships in the Arctic marine environment. This comprehensive atlas is organized into six sections: Physical Setting, Biological Setting, Fishes, Birds, Mammals, and Human Uses. Audubon Alaska and their collaborators synthesized data from multiple studies, species, decades, and seas into more than 100 seamless maps. Through publication of the Ecological Atlas, Audubon aims to inform sustainable management of the Arctic's natural resources and inspire an appreciation for this spectacular place. See atlas:http://ak.audubon.org/conservation/ecological-atlas-bering-chukchi-and-beaufort-seas

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Lexis training for NOAA
Presenter(s): Brenna Clanton, LexisNexis
Date & Time: 14 November 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring and via webinar https://goo.gl/o37n6W, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Brenna Clanton, LexisNexis Federal Government Training Solutions Consultant Summary: Join us in the library for a database training on Lexis Advance. Need a Lexis Advance username and password? Email your request to: library.reference@noaa.gov

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the webinar: https://goo.gl/o37n6W After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Climate change induced resource synchronization disrupts Kodiak brown bear and salmon food webs
Presenter(s): William Deacy, Postdoctoral fellow, Oregon State University. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: 14 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): William Deacy, Postdoctoral fellow, Oregon State University. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Climate change is altering the seasonal timing of life-cycle events in organisms across the planet, but the magnitude of change often varies among taxa. This can cause the temporal relationships among species to change, altering the strength of interaction. A large body of work has explored what happens when co-evolved species shift out of sync, but virtually no studies have documented the effects of climate-induced synchronization, which could remove temporal barriers between species and create novel interactions. We explored how a predator, the Kodiak brown bear (Ursus arctos middendorffi), responded to asymmetric phenological shifts between its primary trophic resources, sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and red elderberry (Sambucus racemosa). In years with anomalously high spring air temperatures, elderberry fruited several weeks earlier and became available during the period when salmon spawned in tributary streams. Bears departed salmon spawning streams, where they typically kill 25-75% of the salmon, to forage on berries on adjacent hillsides. This prey switching behavior attenuated an iconic predator-prey interaction and likely altered the many ecological functions that result from bears foraging on salmon. We documented how climate-induced shifts in resource phenology can alter food webs through a mechanism other than trophic mismatch. The current emphasis on singular consumer-resource interactions fails to capture how climate-altered phenologies reschedule resource availability and alter how energy flows through ecosystems. .

Bio(s): Will Deacy has worked across the American west studying wolves, pikas, Sierra Nevada red fox, desert tortoises, and stick bugs. During his doctorate, he collaborated with the Flathead Lake Biological Station and the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge to research the foraging behavior of brown bears on Kodiak Island, Alaska. He is now a post-doc working with Jonny Armstrong at Oregon State University.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

9 November 2017

Title: Attributions of North American heat waves and the pivotal role of natural variability versus climate change
Presenter(s): Dr. Hosmay Lopez, Assistant Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 9 November 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA AOML (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Hosmay Lopez, Assistant Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote Access: GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/479286189 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (872) 240-3212 Access Code: 479-286-189

Abstract: Climate projections for the 21st Century suggest an increase in the occurrence of heat waves. However, the timing for the externally forced signal of anthropogenic climate change (ACC) to emerge against the background natural variability (i.e., Time of Emergence, ToE) particularly on regional scale make reliable future projections of heat waves challenging. Here, we combine observations and model simulations under present and future climate forcing to assess internal variability versus ACC in modulating US heat waves. The results indicate that ACC forcing will dominate heat wave occurrence over the Western (Great Lakes) region with ToE occurring as early as in 2020s (2030s) and driven by reduced transient eddy activity (storminess). In contrast, internal variability will dominate over the Northern (Southern) Great Plains with ToE occurring in 2050s (2070s) as a result of projected increase of the Great Plain low-level jet and moisture transport, attenuating the surface warming due to ACC.

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Title: Deriving High-accuracy Ellipsoid Heights with OPUS-Projects
Presenter(s): Dan Gillins, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 November 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 8836 and webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dan Gillins, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/511662513088623364. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (415) 655-0052 ; Access Code: 185-624-087; Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar; Webinar ID: 830-201-947.

Abstract: In the late 1990s, NGS released detailed "height modernization" surveying guidelines for deriving high-accuracy ellipsoid heights on marks with GNSS. In 2013, NGS released OPUS-Projects which is a useful tool for managing static GNSS survey campaigns. This webinar presents empirical research on the accuracy of OPUS-Projects, and presents guidance on the potential use of OPUS-Projects for future height modernization surveys.

Bio(s): Dan Gillins works within the Observations and Analysis Division at NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.

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Title: Problem-solving for fisheries scientists: Integrative-transdisciplinary approaches for addressing new and wicked problems in fisheries management
Presenter(s): Kai Lorenzen, Ph.D, Professor of Integrative Fisheries Science, Program in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida
Date & Time: 9 November 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or NOAA's NWFSC Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kai Lorenzen, Ph.D, Professor of Integrative Fisheries Science, Program in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Monster Seminar Jam. Seminar coordinators are Stacey.Miller@noaa.gov, Vanessa.Tuttle@noaa.gov Please visit the Monster Seminar JAM web page for additional information about the Series, as well as upcoming installments. The NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM is part of the OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminar Series and is open to all who wish to attend. The views expressed in this message are those of the weekly presenter and do not necessarily reflect the views of NOAA or any of its sub agencies.

Remote Access: Join Webex (https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D559007857%26UID%3D4893665142%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATLhtse-XNhcpPV2sA3m8RonKvbFAFHPMQzn3HBWheMmb7BTHrbfLj0V3ueHok32TOy2e7iPyiUGBMmykbDpz0b0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmbe8bb14ed1e132b10b62cf91809643c3) Meeting number and Access Code: 804 755 712 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 Need help joining? Contact Support (https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412)

Abstract: As fisheries scientists, we have learned to provide increasingly sophisticated answers to a limited set of important, well-defined questions. Our science can support good management outcomes when governance systems are strong and science-based, and when outcomes are defined in relation to the questions we know how to answer. For example, sophisticated stock assessments combined with a firm policy imperative to avoid biological overfishing and mandatory use of science in setting catch limits has been successful in ending overfishing for most federally managed stocks in the U.S. However, there are many problems (matters or situations regarded as unwelcome or harmful and needing to be dealt with and overcome', Oxford English Dictionary) in fisheries management that we as scientists find difficult or impossible to address. Many of these problems are unwieldy: they involve biological and human dimensions, considerations outside or across disciplinary boundaries, unique features that defy application of general rules, novelty, uncertainty and conflict. Examples include management of fisheries with weak governance systems (e.g. in the developing world), inherently complex interventions beyond harvest management such as fisheries enhancements, or political processes that bypass or subvert fisheries governance systems. The central tenet of my presentation is that, as fisheries scientists, we can and must do better at addressing unwieldy problems. I will start by discussing examples from my research group's work on three unwieldy problems: improving outcomes of complex inland fisheries in the Mekong region, developing frameworks and tools to enable integrative management of fisheries enhancements, and strengthening constructive engagement of stakeholders in the management of Florida's recreational fisheries. Building on insights from these studies and theories from multiple disciplines, I will then outline some general principles and approaches that can help us address unwieldy problems.

Bio(s): Kai Lorenzen is Professor of Integrative Fisheries Science at the University of Florida. He uses integrative, trans-disciplinary approaches to address complex fisheries management problems. His research integrates quantitative ecology with human dimensions and engages closely with management initiatives. A particular focus is on assessing and improving the use of hatchery and habitat enhancement and restoration measures in fisheries management. He also conducts basic research in fish population biology. Other interests include the conservation of aquatic resources in agricultural landscapes, design of aquaculture systems, domestication effects and interactions between cultured and wild fish, assessing fisher attitudes and behaviors, and innovative approaches to fisheries governance.Kai earned a PhD in Applied Population Biology at the University of London in 1997, and an MS in Biology with Mathematics at Kiel University, Germany in 1993. Kai started his career as a fisheries development consultant, working mostly in Southeast Asia, and subsequently spent 13 years on the faculty of Imperial College London. He was the 2007-08 Mote Eminent Scholar in Fisheries Ecology at Florida State University, and returned to Florida in 2010 to take up his current position.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Recent research efforts on Ensemble-based Data Assimilation within GSI, Development of Hybrid Radar DA Capabilities, and Enhancements and Testing with FV3 for Convection-Allowing and Global Forecasts at CAPS
Presenter(s): Ming Xue, University of Oklahoma
Date & Time: 9 November 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar.

Title: Recent research efforts on Ensemble-based Data Assimilation within GSI, Development of Hybrid Radar DA Capabilities, and Enhancements and Testing with FV3 for Convection-Allowing and Global Forecasts at CAPS

Presenter(s): Ming Xue, University of Oklahoma Date, Time, Room: 2pm on November 9, 2017 in NCWCP Rm 2155 Contact: Jack Kain Jack.Kain@noaa.gov JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN Dial IN (EMC 4th line) To be appear as meeting info in WebEx 866-756-2072 (Participant Pass code: 4546287#) Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract: Recent research efforts on Ensemble-based Data Assimilation within GSI, Development of Hybrid Radar DA Capabilities, and Enhancements and Testing with FV3 for Convection-Allowing and Global Forecasts at CAPS By Drs. Ming Xue, Youngsun Jung and Chunxi Zhang Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms, University of Oklahoma This tag-team seminar will briefly report on recent results on several operations-relevant efforts at the Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms (CAPS). The first is on enhancement and testing of GSI for ensemble-based data assimilation on CONUS-scale 3-km grid, with emphasis on radar data assimilation and realtime testing and evaluation through the Hazardous Weather Testbed (HWT) Spring Experiments. The evaluation of the 2017 EnKF system will be presented focusing on precipitation skills and spectral power analysis. The second part is on development of direct variational and hybrid assimilation of radar reflectivity data (as well as radial velocity data) for convective-scale data assimilation, and inter-comparisons of 3DVAR, EnKF, pure En3DVar and hybrid En3DVar algorithms via OSSEs and a real case. Several technical issues will be discussed. The third part reports on recent efforts implementing additional microphysics and PBL schemes within FV3, and preliminary testing results for CONUS 3 km CAM forecasts, and for global 13 km forecasts. Preliminary evaluations on CAPS and GFDL's ~3-km FV3 forecasts using GFDL's and Thompson microphysics during 2017 HWT Spring Experiment will also be reported. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 November 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: Business Planning for Protected Areas
Presenter(s): Andrew Rylance, Technical Advisor to the Government of Seychelles-United Nations Development Programme-Global Environment Facility -GOS-UNDP-GEF- Protected Area Financing Project, 2016-2021
Date & Time: 9 November 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Andrew Rylance,Technical Advisor to the Government of Seychelles, United Nations Development Programme-Global Environment Facility (GOS-UNDP-GEF) Protected Area Financing Project (2016-2021) Register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5824376261725463298

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OCTO). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Abstract: A workshop on business planning was recently held to support the financial future of protected areas in Seychelles. Outputs developed under this project have global application. This presentation will outline the importance of business planning for protected areas and how business plans can be used as tools to leverage financial support for conservation management. The presentation will also provide an introduction to the components of business plans and a database of protected area business plans where users can access over 45 examples of protected area business plans and guidelines.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Tracking progressive oxygen loss in ancient oceans
Presenter(s): Chadlin M. Ostrander, School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA. And Department of Geology and Geophysics, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, USA
Date & Time: 9 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Chadlin M. Ostrander, School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA, and the Department of Geology and Geophysics, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, USA.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Right now, Earth's oceans are losing oxygen. Increasing surface temperature is decreasing the solubility and ventilation of oxygen throughout the ocean, and nutrients within wastewaters are enhancing the consumption of oxygen in more localized pockets (e.g. seasonally in the Gulf of Mexico). This is bad news for marine habitats, and also for the humans who rely on them. This is not the first time Earth's oceans have experienced large-scale oxygen loss, however, as many previous episodes have been identified in the geologic record. In this presentation, I will discuss some new and existing geochemical evidence for a progressive loss of oxygen in Earth's oceans preserved in ancient marine sedimentary rocks leading to a major climatic event known as Oceanic Anoxic Event 2. The processes driving large-scale marine deoxygenation 94 million years ago are very similar to what is occurring today, and thus allow for an unfortunate but timely comparison.

Bio(s): Chad is currently a second year Ph.D. student at Arizona State University where he is attempting to become an Isotope Geochemist. His work to date focuses on Earth's oxygenation history. Specifically, when did oxygen first accumulate in the atmosphere and oceans, and how has this changed with time? Before arriving at Arizona State, where he also received his B.S. in Geological Sciences in 2016, Chad worked construction, was an old-west reenactor, and served five years in the Marines.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

8 November 2017

Title: Ecosystem-based Fisheries Management (EBFM) in action: linking ecosystem science to fisheries management in Alaska
Presenter(s): Kerim Aydin, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 8 November 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: via webinar https://goo.gl/su7wyz NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kerim Aydin, Ph.D., Supervisory Fishery Research Biologist and program leader of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Resource Ecology and Ecosystem Modeling program.

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the November EBM/EBFM webinar: https://goo.gl/su7wyz After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Kerim Aydin will discuss the recent evolution of ecosystem-based fishery management practices in Alaska " in particular, (1) the expansion of Alaska Fisheries Science Center's long-standing Ecosystem Status Report to deliver direct, targeted, and timely fishery management advice for each of Alaska's four large marine ecosystems; (2) an Ocean & Atmospheric Research (OAR) and NOAA Fisheries operational ecosystem modeling suite for the eastern Bering Sea implemented as part of Alaska's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) program; and (3) the direct inclusion of ecosystem information in the stock assessment preparation and review process. In particular, Kerim will highlight cases where environmental data were used throughout the management process to highlight the need for increased caution in making quota decisions. Further, Kerim will discuss the development of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council's Fisheries Ecosystem Plan for the Bering Sea, designed to lay out best practices for implementing EBFM in Alaska in a focused, action-informing rather than action-enforcing manner.

Bio(s): Kerim Aydin is a supervisory fishery research biologist and has been the program leader of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Resource Ecology and Ecosystem Modeling program since 2004. His research includes the development of marine food web models and their applicability to ecosystem-based fishery management. He received a PhD in Fisheries Science from the University of Washington, Seattle in 2000.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

7 November 2017

Title: Benefits and risks of diversification for individual fishers in Alaska, 1975 - 2015
Presenter(s): Sean Anderson, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and Eric Ward and Ole Shelton, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 7 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 or via Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sean Anderson, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and Eric Ward and Ole Shelton, NOAA Fisheries, all presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Individuals relying on natural resource extraction for their livelihood face high income variability driven by a mix of environmental, biological, management, and economic factors. Key to managing these industries is identifying how regulatory actions and individual behaviour affect income variability, financial risk, and, by extension, the economic stability and the sustainable use of natural resources. In commercial fisheries, communities and vessels fishing a greater diversity of species have less revenue variability than those fishing fewer species. However, it is unclear if these benefits extend to the actions of individual fishers and how year-to-year changes in diversification affect revenue and revenue variability. Using 40+ years of data from Alaska, we evaluated two axes by which fishers can diversify fishing activities. We show that, despite individuals becoming increasingly specialized, fishing a set of permits with higher species diversity reduces individual revenue variability and fishing an additional permit is associated with higher revenue and lower variability. However, increasing species diversity within the constraints of existing permits has a fishery-dependent effect on revenue and is usually (87% probability) associated with increased revenue uncertainty the following year. Our results demonstrate that the most effective option for individuals to decrease revenue variability is to participate in additional or more diverse fisheries. However, this option is expensive, often limited by regulations such as catch share programs, and consequently unavailable to many individuals. With increasing climatic variability it will be particularly important that individuals relying on natural resources for their livelihood have effective strategies to reduce financial risk.

Bio(s): Sean Anderson was a post-doc at the University of Washington and Northwest Fisheries Science Center, and is now a fisheries scientist with Fisheries and Oceans Canada in Nanaimo, British Columbia. Eric Ward and Ole Shelton are fisheries scientists at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NMFS, NOAA) in Seattle. This collaborative work was possible because of a National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) working group investigating long-term change and variability in the Gulf of Alaska after the Exxon Valdez oil spill (1989).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Film Screening: Ocean Frontiers III: Leaders in Ocean Stewardship & the New Blue Economy
Presenter(s): Karen Meyers, Executive Director, Greenfire Productions
Date & Time: 7 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Auditorium, Silver Spring, MD.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Karen Meyers, Executive Director, Greenfire Productions Points of Contact: Heidi.Lovett@noaa.gov and Brenda.Rupli@noaa.gov No remote access About the Event: Please join us along with the film producer, Karen Meyers, for the special screening of "Ocean Frontiers III: Leaders in Ocean Stewardship & the New Blue Economy," This inspiring 55-min. film -- the latest in the award winning series from Green Fire Productions -- focuses on the country's first regional ocean plans. It explores the intersection of national security, maritime commerce, fishing, recreation, and conservation, plus expanding offshore wind energy and aquaculture, coupled with scientific discovery. Special features include a segment with Martha Nizinski on NOAA's exploration of the underwater canyons of the Atlantic Coast, and a 4 min. video short on NOAA's Southeast Deep Coral Initiative. Film trailer @ https://ocean-frontiers.org/the-films/ocean-frontiers-3/ Thie film will be followed by a 30-minute Q&A.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ten years of the Great Lakes Evaporation Network: Progress Made and Opportunities for the Future
Presenter(s): Dr. Christopher Spence, Environment and Climate Change Canada
Date & Time: 7 November 2017
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Christopher Spence, Environment and Climate Change Canada Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2007397456817558017

Abstract: The period of sustained low water levels from 2006 " 2012 renewed interest in the water budgets of the Laurentian Great Lakes. At the time, there had not been a sustained coordinated effort to directly measure evaporation over the world's largest freshwater surface. Instrumentation was deployed in 2008 on Lake Superior as part of the International Upper Great Lakes Study to evaluate operational atmospheric and hydrological models in both Canada and the United States of America. This original field campaign has evolved into the consortium that is the Great Lakes Evaporation Network. This presentation will summarize significant advances in process understanding, water budget regime characterization, operational modelling and observational technologies for which the network is responsible. There remain challenges that will be discussed. These include knowledge gaps in the spatial distribution of evaporation and resilience of the thermal regime; forecast model assessment; and operationalization.

Bio(s): Chris was born in Hanna, Alberta and raised in Regina, Saskatchewan. Chris holds a B.A. (Hons.) and M.Sc. from the University of Regina and a Ph.D. from McMaster University. He began his career as a GIS/remote sensing technician with the National Hydrology Research Institute of Environment Canada. Between 1994 and 2004 he worked as a hydrologist with (what was then) Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Environment Canada in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. In 2004, he relocated back to Saskatoon where he now works as a research scientist for Environment and Climate Change Canada. He holds adjunct professor appointments at the Universities of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. His research focuses on hydrological and hydrometeorological processes in cold regions, with field studies in complex landscapes such as the Canadian Shield and Prairie, and the Laurentian Great Lakes. He has a beautiful wife with whom he has a daughter. Loves them dearly. Away from work, he enjoys mountain biking, backpacking, and drumming with the North Saskatchewan Regiment Pipes and Drums. He likes to travel, and see how other people live, and hear their perspectives.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

2 November 2017

Title: Climate fiction in an age of denial
Presenter(s): Jesse Oak Taylor, Ph.D, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of Washington
Date & Time: 2 November 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jesse Oak Taylor, Ph.D, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of Washington Join Webex https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D559007857%26UID%3D4893665142%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATLhtse-XNhcpPV2sA3m8RonKvbFAFHPMQzn3HBWheMmb7BTHrbfLj0V3ueHok32TOy2e7iPyiUGBMmykbDpz0b0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmbe8bb14ed1e132b10b62cf91809643c3 Meeting number and Access Code: 804 755 712 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412 Host: Monster Seminar Jam (https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm) POC: vicky.krikelas@noaa.gov ABSTRACT Recent years have seen the emergence of a new genre: climate fiction, or "cli fi," consisting of narratives that seek to imagine and dramatize futures in which anthropogenic climate change has become ever more extreme. This talk will situate the emergence of cli fi within the history of the novel, and indeed the idea of fiction itself, in order to explore the role of such avowedly imaginative scenarios within a debate typically framed in terms of the argument for (or against) the reality of climate change. Taylor will suggest that works of fiction are capable of serving as climate models, akin to the simulations scientists use to project future scenarios, while also arguing for a more historically expansive view of the relationship between climate change and fiction, encompassing not merely recent works like Margaret Atwood's MaddAddam trilogy or Kim Stanley Robinson's New York 2140, but also Charles Dickens's Bleak House, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, and even William Shakespeare's The Tempest. In so doing, he will argue for the necessity of both imaginative fiction and historical scholarship in confronting the realities of an Anthropocene future. BIO and PUBLICATIONS Jesse Oak Taylor is Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Study in the English Department at the University of Washington. His publications include The Sky of Our Manufacture: The London Fog in British Fiction from Dickens to Woolf (2016), which won the Association for the Study of Literature & Environment (ASLE) book award in ecocriticism, Anthropocene Reading: Literary History in Geologic Times (2017), co-edited with Tobias Menely, and Empowerment on an Unstable Planet: From Seeds of Human Energy to a Scale of Global Change (2011), co-authored with Daniel C. and Carl E. Taylor, as well as numerous articles and book chapters. He is currently at work on a project situating Victorian evolutionary theory within the emergence of the Anthropocene.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: IMPAC4: Highlights & Next Steps from 4th International Marine Protected Areas Congress
Presenter(s): Lauren Wenzel, MPA Center Director; Dan Laffoley, Marine Vice Chair World Commission on Protected Areas; Gonzalo Cid, MPA Center International Coordinator; and others TBA
Date & Time: 2 November 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Lauren Wenzel, NOAA National MPA Center Director; Dan Laffoley, Marine Vice Chair World Commission on Protected Areas; Gonzalo Cid, MPA Center International Coordinator; and others TBA Register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6147953737043331586

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Abstract: Over 1,100 people from 59 countries attended the 4th International Marine Protected Areas Congress (IMPAC4) in Chile in September 2017. Join us to learn about what happened, including major themes, accomplishments, messages, and next steps

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: In situ effects of shoreline type and watershed land use on submerged aquatic vegetation habitat quality in the Chesapeake and Mid-Atlantic Coastal Bays
Presenter(s): J. Brooke Landry, Natural Resource Biologist, Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Date & Time: 2 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): J. Brooke Landry, Natural Resource Biologist, Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Elizabeth.Turner@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) is an ecologically and economically valuable component of coastal estuaries that acts as an early indicator of both degrading and improving water quality. This study aimed to determine if shoreline hardening, which is associated with increased population pressure and climate change, acts to degrade SAV habitat quality at the local scale. In situ comparisons of SAV beds adjacent to both natural and hardened shorelines in twenty-four subestuaries throughout the Chesapeake and Mid-Atlantic Coastal Bays indicated that shoreline hardening does impact adjacent SAV beds. Species diversity, evenness, and percent cover were significantly reduced in the presence of riprap revetment. A post hoc analysis also confirmed that SAV is locally affected by watershed land use associated with increased population pressure, though to a lesser degree than impacts observed from shoreline armoring. When observed over time, SAV recovery at the local level took approximately three to four years following storm impacts, and SAV adjacent to natural shorelines showed more resilience to storms than SAV adjacent to armored shorelines. The negative impacts of shoreline hardening and watershed development on SAV shown here will inform coastal zone management decisions as increasing coastal populations and sea level rise drive these practices.

Bio(s): Brooke Landry is a Natural Resource Biologist at Maryland's Department of Natural Resources, and Chair of the Chesapeake Bay Program's Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Workgroup. She has been working on Chesapeake Bay SAV since 2009, specializing in human impacts to the Bay's SAV habitat. Before that, she worked at NOAA's Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research in Beaufort, NC, where she studied seagrasses from North Carolina to the Caribbean. Brooke has a Master's in Marine Science from the University of North Carolina Wilmington and a Bachelor's in Environmental Science from the University of Virginia.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: IBM: Analytics/Data Science Experience
Presenter(s): IBM
Date & Time: 2 November 2017
9:00 am - 5:00 pm ET
Location: IBM McLean TEC, 8401 Greensboro Drive - Suite 120, McLean, VA 22102 (No online access)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Host: NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) POC for questions: Adrienne Simonson and Shane Glass The first day will focus on Bluemix and includes hands-on lab time. The second day will focus on Analytics/Data Science Experience and also includes hands-on lab time. The location information for both days is at IBM's McLean facility. The address and parking information is noted at the bottom of the day 2 agenda. Day 1 - November 1st from 9:00-5:00 1. Definition of Relevant Technology Terms -Cloud, Cognitive/AI, Data & Analytics, API's & Microservices 2. IBM POV on Above Technologies -How does IBM fit? What story is IBM telling? 3. Bluemix 101 -How do we connect the above technologies? -Deployment models: How you can access the Bluemix tool -Opensource story, anti lock-in -Show Bluemix Catalog: 140+ Services to choose from and use! 4. Bluemix Demos -Show how quickly you can provision a service for use -Stitch together services to create your own application Bluemix Labs: 1. (2) Data & Analytics Labs 2. (2) Cognitive/Watson Labs 3. (1) IoT Lab 4. (1) NodeRed Analysis Lab Close: Help NOAA set up Bluemix accounts Day 2 - November 2nd from 9:00-5:00 Hands on Introduction to Data Science and Data Science Experience (DSX) 1. Overview of Data Science, Data Science Experience and Spark. 2. Lab 1: Learning Data Science Experience / Bluemix - Begin loading raw data into dashDB for Analytics and interacting with that data from a Jupyter notebook in DSX with python. 2. Lab 2: Machine Learning for Classification - Leverage Spark machine learning (SparkML) on the loaded data to create categorical predictions using pyspark and a supervised learning model and store the results back to the database. 3. Lab 3: R, Shiny and GUI Interfaces - Guide participants in creating a UI in DSX using RStudio then deploying the completed application into a Shiny application server. 4. Art of the possible / Wrap up Location: IBM McLean TEC 8401 Greensboro Drive - Suite 120 McLean, VA 22102 Please note: A pay parking system has been implemented in the garage at 8401/8405 Greensboro Drive. Parking for non-tenants will be free for less than 2 hours, and $10 for day. Visitors will receive a ticket upon entry, and may pay with cash or credit card at a kiosk in the garage, or with a credit card upon exiting the garage. Please park in the underground garage and not the visitor parking spaces. The visitor parking is strictly for 2 hours.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

1 November 2017

Title: Underwater imaging, automatic identification, and ecology of plankton with a focus on the Arctic ecosystem
Presenter(s): Moritz S Schmid, Postdoctoral Scholar, Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University, Newport, OR
Date & Time: 1 November 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Moritz S Schmid, Postdoctoral Scholar, Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University, Newport, OR Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/).

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract: How the lipid content of individually-imaged Arctic copepods influences their depth distributions and seasonal vertical migrations. Seminar POC for questions: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Overview of Climate Change Research within NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Presenter(s): Vincent S. Saba, Ph.D., Acting Branch Chief, Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University Forrestal Campus. Presenting from New Jersey.
Date & Time: 1 November 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Vincent S. Saba, Ph.D., Acting Branch Chief, Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University Forrestal Campus. Presenting from New Jersey.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: This presentation will give an overview of recent NEFSC climate change research focused on the U.S. Northeast Continental Shelf marine ecosystem. Much of this research relies on high-resolution global climate modeling and thus a close partnership with NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Presently, most research is focused on the impacts of continued ocean warming on the distribution of marine species' thermal habitat with implications for fisheries. While these distribution models are based primarily on NEFSC fisheries-independent survey data, laboratory studies are currently be conducted to assess thermal habitat model uncertainty. Laboratory studies are also being conducted to determine impacts of ocean acidification on phytoplankton, shellfish, and finfish. Future research needs explore other variables beyond ocean temperature and focus on multiple factors such as primary and secondary productivity, predator-prey interactions, recruitment, ocean acidification, fisheries mortality, and disease.

Bio(s): Vincent Saba received a Ph.D. in marine science in 2007 from the College of William and Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science. He is currently the Acting Branch Chief of the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch within the NEFSC. His research interests are in the fields of marine ecosystems and climate variability, climate change impacts on living marine resources, fisheries oceanography, sea turtle biology, and high-resolution global climate modeling.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: IBM: Bluemix and includes hands-on lab time
Presenter(s): IBM
Date & Time: 1 November 2017
9:00 am - 5:00 pm ET
Location: IBM McLean TEC, 8401 Greensboro Drive - Suite 120, McLean, VA 22102 (No online access)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Host: NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) POC for questions: Adrienne Simonson and Shane Glass The first day will focus on Bluemix and includes hands-on lab time. The second day will focus on Analytics/Data Science Experience and also includes hands-on lab time. The location information for both days is at IBM's McLean facility. The address and parking information is noted at the bottom of the day 2 agenda. Day 1 - November 1st from 9:00-5:00 1. Definition of Relevant Technology Terms -Cloud, Cognitive/AI, Data & Analytics, API's & Microservices 2. IBM POV on Above Technologies -How does IBM fit? What story is IBM telling? 3. Bluemix 101 -How do we connect the above technologies? -Deployment models: How you can access the Bluemix tool -Opensource story, anti lock-in -Show Bluemix Catalog: 140+ Services to choose from and use! 4. Bluemix Demos -Show how quickly you can provision a service for use -Stitch together services to create your own application Bluemix Labs: 1. (2) Data & Analytics Labs 2. (2) Cognitive/Watson Labs 3. (1) IoT Lab 4. (1) NodeRed Analysis Lab Close: Help NOAA set up Bluemix accounts Day 2 - November 2nd from 9:00-5:00 Hands on Introduction to Data Science and Data Science Experience (DSX) 1. Overview of Data Science, Data Science Experience and Spark. 2. Lab 1: Learning Data Science Experience / Bluemix - Begin loading raw data into dashDB for Analytics and interacting with that data from a Jupyter notebook in DSX with python. 2. Lab 2: Machine Learning for Classification - Leverage Spark machine learning (SparkML) on the loaded data to create categorical predictions using pyspark and a supervised learning model and store the results back to the database. 3. Lab 3: R, Shiny and GUI Interfaces - Guide participants in creating a UI in DSX using RStudio then deploying the completed application into a Shiny application server. 4. Art of the possible / Wrap up Location: IBM McLean TEC 8401 Greensboro Drive - Suite 120 McLean, VA 22102 Please note: A pay parking system has been implemented in the garage at 8401/8405 Greensboro Drive. Parking for non-tenants will be free for less than 2 hours, and $10 for day. Visitors will receive a ticket upon entry, and may pay with cash or credit card at a kiosk in the garage, or with a credit card upon exiting the garage. Please park in the underground garage and not the visitor parking spaces. The visitor parking is strictly for 2 hours.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

31 October 2017

Title: The Tropical Atlantic Current Observations Study (TACOS) at 4N, 23W
Presenter(s): Dr. Renellys Perez, NOAA/AOML/PhOD
Date & Time: 31 October 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online only and at NOAA AOML (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Renellys Perez (NOAA/AOML/PhOD) Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML POC for seminar questions: roberta.lusic@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/827580181

Abstract: Hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean and rainfall over the neighboring continents are impacted by air-sea fluxes in the tropical Atlantic. These fluxes are highly dependent on upper-ocean temperature and salinity. To better quantify temperature and salinity variations in the tropical Atlantic, upper ocean velocity variations need to be measured and their contributions to advection and vertical turbulent mixing determined. As a first step toward resolving fine vertical scale (less than 10 m) velocity variations in the upper ocean, the Tropical Atlantic Current Observations Study (TACOS) was initiated in March 2017. As part of the first TACOS deployment, the PIRATA Northeast Extension (PNE) mooring at 4N, 23W was augmented with ten Nortek Aquadopp acoustic current meters. The current meters are distributed between 7 and 87 m depth with vertical resolution of 5 m in the surface mixed layer and 10 to 20 m below the surface mixed layer. This novel data set will be combined with temperature, salinity, and meteorological data from the PNE mooring to examine how currents vary on diurnal to intraseasonal time scales and how these velocity variations influence temperature and salinity at 4N, 23W.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Feedbacks between small herbivores and habitat complexity: a new hope for degraded coral reefs?
Presenter(s): Robert Dunn, PhD Candidate, San Diego State University & University of California, Davis, and Andrew Altieri, Staff Scientist, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Date & Time: 31 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Robert Dunn, PhD Candidate, San Diego State University & University of California, Davis, and Andrew Altieri, Staff Scientist, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar,hosted by Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Habitat complexity plays a vital role in shaping ecological communities, but many coral reef ecosystems are shifting to alternative states with altered community assemblages and reduced structural complexity. Small-bodied herbivores, such as sea urchins and small parrotfish, are common inhabitants of reefs, and their importance for controlling the distribution and abundance of algae in marine ecosystems is well understood. Less understood is the role of habitat complexity and species identity of foundational species in dictating the abundance of this increasingly-important suite of herbivores. We explored the feedbacks between habitat complexity and herbivory on fringing coral reefs of Bocas del Toro, in Caribbean Panama, and showed that small-bodied species (sea urchin: Echinometra viridis, parrotfish: Scarus iseri) make up the vast majority of herbivore biomass and increase resilience of coral reefs by consuming macroalgae. However, the ability of small-bodied herbivores to provide this ecosystem function is dependent on the availability of structurally complex habitats. Understanding the drivers of herbivore habitat associations is vital for predicting the persistence of coral-dominated reefs due to feedbacks between changing coral reef communities (both species identity and habitat complexity) and shifts to algal dominance.

Bio(s): Robert Dunn is a PhD candidate in the Joint Doctoral Program in Ecology at San Diego State University and the University of California, Davis. His research focuses broadly on the community ecology of subtidal reefs in both temperate and tropical ecosystems. For his dissertation, Robert is using a combination of empirical and theoretical modeling studies to understand the effects of habitat complexity, fishery harvest, and size-structured interactions on predator-prey dynamics and ecosystem resilience. He earned his Bachelor's in Environmental Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Master's in Marine Science at North Carolina State University. See robertpdunn.wordpress.com for more information. Dr. Andrew Altieri's research explores human interactions with coastal ecosystems. He examines drivers of change that include overfishing, pollution, species invasions and extinctions, and habitat loss. Using a combination of perspectives grounded in natural history and ecological theory, he explores mechanisms of resilience in biodiversity and ecosystem function of coral reefs, mangrove forests, rocky shores and seagrass meadows. Andrew earned his B.A. at UC Santa Cruz and his Ph.D. at Brown University, and he is now a staff scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. More information at www.altierilab.org/.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

30 October 2017

Title: Why do we need inter-calibration after satellite launch?
Presenter(s): Likun Wang, NOAA / NESDIS / STAR - Satellite Calibration and Data Assimilation Branch Research Scientist
Date & Time: 30 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: M-Square Building #950 Room #4102 (Large Conference Room) 5825 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s): Dr. Likun Wang, ESSIC/UMD

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Alan.Lewitus@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Webex at: http://goo.gl/XrAqxJ Meeting number (access code): 733 588 966 Meeting password: essic

Abstract: The observations from weather satellite have become an integral part of the modern information age with dependence across all aspects of society: public, academic, commercial, and government. Improved calibration of space-based Earth-observing instruments is a fundamental, urgent scientific need. On the other hand, inter-calibration of satellite instruments involves relating the measurements of one instrument to those of another with a stated uncertainty. Instruments can be inter-calibrated when they are viewing the same scenes at the same times from the same viewing angles. In this seminar, based on the many years' inter-calibration experiences of NOAA weather satellite sensors, the speaker will demonstrate an important role of inter-calibration in support of NOAA satellite sensor calibration program, including 1) monitoring instrument performances, 2) characterizing operational calibration accuracy, and 3) recalibration of long-term archived satellite data. In the first part, the speaker will brief the basic concept on satellite sensor calibration using IR Instrument as an example. How are satellite measurements calibrated on-orbit from signal inputs (counts or voltage) to meaningful physical quantities? What are the spectral, radiometric, and geometric calibration? What are the purpose of pre-launch and post-launch calibration? What are the difference between calibration and validation? How do we characterize the calibration uncertainties in term of precision, accuracy, and stability through inter-calibration efforts? In the second part, the speaker will focus on the importance of inter-calibration that supports for the NOAA weather satellite post-launch calibration using serval cases. First, the inter-calibration of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-12 imager with the Atmospheric Infrared (IR) Sounder (AIRS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) is helpful for diagnosis of denomination effects on calibration accuracy. Second, long-term stratospheric temperature records can be constructed by inter-calibration of Stratospheric Sounding Unit (SSU) onboard historical NOAA polar-orbiting satellites. Third, inter-calibration between Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) can improve both radiometric and geometric calibration accuracy of CrIS.

Bio(s): Likun Wang received the B.S. degree in atmospheric sciences and the M.S. degree in meteorology from Peking University, Beijing, China, in 1996 and 1999, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in atmospheric sciences from University of Alaska Fairbanks, in 2004. He currently is a research scientist with Dell Services Federal Government in support of satellite sensor calibration and validation program for NOAA/NESDIS. Before that, he worked on lidar/radar remote sensing of clouds as a postdoctoral research associate with University of Maryland from 2004 to 2005. His current principal areas of interest include: 1) improving accuracy and preciseness of satellite measurements and products through calibration and validation efforts; and 2) recalibrating NOAA's historic satellite data records to create consistent, homogeneous long-term satellite measurements for climate studies.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 October 2017

Title: Using Web of Science to support NOAA aquaculture research
Presenter(s): Kristen Faeth, Web of Science, Clarivate Analytics
Date & Time: 26 October 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: via Webinar and NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, NOAA HQ SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kristen Faeth, Product Specialist, Web of Science, Clarivate Analytics Seminar

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library; POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator: (judith.salter@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: JOIN WEBEX MEETING (via Clarivate Analytics) https://clarivate.webex.com/clarivate/j.php?MTID=m6f64b2c7bd29dcc4e165cd9843ee405c Meeting number (access code): 802 340 980 Meeting password: 25aJ4fXw JOIN FROM A VIDEO SYSTEM OR APPLICATION Dial sip:802340980@clarivate.webex.com JOIN BY PHONE: +1-240-454-0887 US Toll Global call-in numbers: https://clarivate.webex.com/clarivate/globalcallin.php?serviceType=MC&ED=603482762&tollFree=0 Can't join the meeting? https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412 You are also welcome to follow along with Librarians in the Brown Bag area of the NOAA Central Library. IMPORTANT NOTICE: Please note that this WebEx service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter. By joining this session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, discuss your concerns with the host or do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Your Science is Awesome, Now Show the World Through Video: Case Studies for NOAA Fisheries
Presenter(s): Paul Hillman, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Communications and External Affairs
Date & Time: 26 October 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Paul Hillman, Science & Natural History Filmmaker, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Communications and External Affairs

Remote Access: Join Webex https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D559007857%26UID%3D4893665142%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATLhtse-XNhcpPV2sA3m8RonKvbFAFHPMQzn3HBWheMmb7BTHrbfLj0V3ueHok32TOy2e7iPyiUGBMmykbDpz0b0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmbe8bb14ed1e132b10b62cf91809643c3 Meeting number and Access Code: 804 755 712 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412 Host: Monster Seminar Jam, https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm POC: Vicky Krikelas, Outreach Coordinator Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Tips and Strategies to Communicate Success and Share Your CSC Story with Internal and External Stakeholders
Presenter(s): Dr. Tia C. M. Tyree, Professor, Department of Strategic, Legal and Management Communications, Howard University
Date & Time: 26 October 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Tia C. M. Tyree, Professor, Department of Strategic, Legal and Management Communications, Howard University Remote access to seminar: http://connectpro46305642.adobeconnect.com/rrv2v9anw0qj/ POC for questions: Dr. Audrey Trotman, NOAA OEd EPP Cooperative Science Center Program Manager, audrey.trotman@noaa.gov

Abstract: It's important in today's society to not only communicate properly within organizations, but communicate what is happening internally to external stakeholders, too. However, it starts with understanding who your stakeholders are, what they want to know, and how to effectively share information in our fast-paced, nonstop, oversaturated information world. This seminar will offer participants a way to understand who internal and external stakeholders are, how to identify and share messages internally and how to present science information in a digital space. An emphasis will be placed on providing tips to create key messages, identify key internal "faces" and external influencers and develop external platforms and content to share information and stories. About The

Presenter(s): Dr. Tia C. M. Tyree is a Professor at Howard University within the Department of Strategic, Legal and Management Communications. She teaches graduate and undergraduate communications courses. Her research interests include hip hop, rap, reality television, film, social media as well as African-American and female representations in mass media. She has several published book chapters and peer-reviewed articles in journals, such as those in Women and Language; Howard Journal of Communications; Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism; Journal of Black Studies and the International Journal of Emergency Management. She is the author of The Interesting and Incredibly Long History of American Public Relations and coeditor of HBCU Experience " The Book, Social Media: Pedagogy and Practice as well as Social Media: Culture and Identity. She is also cofounder of the Social Media Technology Conference and Workshop, which is a two-day conference designed to bring both professionals and academicians together to discuss cutting-edge research and trends in social media. Speaker's Email: ttyree@howard.edu Note: This seminar is part of the 2017/2018 NOAA EPP Cooperative Science Center Seminar Series. The work was supported by NOAA Office of Education, Educational Partnership Program Award # NA16SEC4810006.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (All Attribution - Dr. Tia C. M. Tyree, Professor, Department of Strategic, Legal and Management Communications, Howard University) URL for viewing, http://connectpro46305642.adobeconnect.com/rrv2v9anw0qj/
Title: Public acceptance of U.S. wind energy: Historical lessons and results from the first nationally representative survey of wind farm neighbors
Presenter(s): Joe Rand, Research Affiliate, and Ben Hoen, Research Scientist, both with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Joe is presenting remotely from Arcata, CA and Ben from Milan, NY.
Date & Time: 26 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Joe Rand, Research Affiliate, and Ben Hoen, Research Scientist, both with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Joe is presenting remotely from Arcata, CA and Ben from Milan, NY.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Joe Rand and Ben Hoen will present on their work as part of a three-year Dept of Energy funded effort to characterize the baseline of attitudes and annoyances near US wind installations. Joe recently published a literature review that was the first step in the project, entitled, Thirty Years of North American Wind Energy Acceptance Research: What Have We Learned?" That review encompassed over 100 papers primarily focused on existing and proposed North American wind projects through 2016. He will summarize some of the key takeaways from that review, such as community perceptions of economic aspects, sound and visual/landscape aspects, environmental concerns, and development process fairness. In 2016, following the literature review, survey data were collected from over 1,700 individuals living within 5 miles of 234 US wind projects. Ben Hoen, the PI for the project, will overview results from the analysis of those data, such as: overall attitudes and their drivers; what influences the perception that the planning process was fair; and, how well does modelled sound predict audibility and annoyance to turbines. This first-of-its-kind research provides the first nationally applicable baseline of attitudes, annoyances, and other opinions toward existing wind projects. These results can help enlighten existing and potential wind project hosting communities, as well as wind project developers, on various impacts of wind development, the drivers of attitudes and annoyance, and how to promote responsible wind deployment.

Bio(s): Joseph Rand is Research Affiliate at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the Electricity Markets and Policy Group. Joe conducts research and analysis on renewable energy, including: cost and market analysis; spatial data analysis; and research related to public acceptance and deployment barriers of renewable energy. He was awarded the Switzer Environmental Fellowship, the Hydro Research Fellowship, and the 'Novus Ventus' award from the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Power Program in 2015. Joe's research has been published in Energy Research and Social Science. Joe holds an MS in Energy and Resources from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA in Environmental Studies from Macalester College in St. Paul, MN. Ben Hoen is a Research Scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the Electricity Markets and Policy Group. Ben conducts research and analysis on renewable energy, including: renewable energy policy analysis and assistance; cost, benefit and market analysis; and, public acceptance and deployment barriers. Much of his work has focused on real estate, as a proxy for public acceptance. He has led teams to conduct seminal research in the areas of property value impacts near wind energy facilities, solar home market valuations, and most recently on the attitudes and annoyances of those living close to wind energy facilities. His work has been published in the Journal of Real Estate Research, Contemporary Economic Policy, the Appraisal Journal, Energy Research and Social Science, Renewable Energy Focus and Energy Economics. He has presented over 100 times to groups ranging from 10 to 500. Ben has Bachelor's degrees in Finance and General Business from University of Maryland and a Master of Science degree in Environmental Policy from Bard College.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

25 October 2017

Title: Seeing the invisible in coastal waters: imaging systems for ecological monitor and forecasts
Presenter(s): Dr. Hongsheng Bi, University of Maryland
Date & Time: 25 October 2017
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Hongsheng Bi, University of Maryland Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/520920407257382146

Abstract: Imaging systems have been proven useful for marine ecology. However, deploying them in shallow coastal waters are often hampered by complex dynamic processes which often lead to sub-ideal image quality, highly variable contents and backgrounds. In the present study, we deployed a shadowgraph imaging system (PlanktonScope) to understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of dominant plankton taxa and an adaptive resolution imaging sonar (ARIS) to quantify forage species and their habitat utilization in shallow water estuaries. Results from PlanktonsCope captured a full bloom cycle of Noctiluca sp. in Shenzhen Bay in 2016, while the deployment of ARIS system in Chesapeake Bay in 2016 " 2017 yielded useful estimates of forage abundance and their habitat utilization. Our results highlight that imaging systems could be useful for ecological monitor and forecasts in coastal waters and provide better insights on the spatial and temporal dynamics of key species, trophic interactions and habitat utilization.

Bio(s): Hongsheng Bi is a fisheries Oceanographer specializing in the fine scale spatial distributions of different marine organisms and their trophic interactions. Hongsheng deploys advanced optical imaging systems and high resolution sonar imaging systems to quantify the spatial distributions and overlap of plankton, forage fish, and jellyfish. He is particularly interested in understand jellyfish dynamics and their interactions with other trophic levels. He is currently funded by NSF to investigate jellyfish dynamics and their impact on the Bering Sea ecosystem structure by deploying towed zooplankton imaging system (PlanktonScope) and the adaptive resolution imaging sonar (ARIS) systems. Hongsheng also operates a time-resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ecological Models to Assess the Response of Narragansett Bay Hypoxia to State-imposed Nutrient Reductions
Presenter(s): Mark J Brush, Ph.D., Virginia Institute of Marine Science, and Jamie Vaudrey, Ph.D., University of Connecticut
Date & Time: 25 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars This seminar is part of the Mid-Atlantic Shoreline Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Mark J Brush, Ph.D., Virginia Institute of Marine Science, and Jamie Vaudrey, Ph.D., University of Connecticut

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Alan.Lewitus@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Narragansett Bay (NB) is a moderately-sized temperate estuary characterized by seasonal-periodic hypoxia during summer. Most of the external nutrient loading derives from wastewater treatment facility effluent discharged directly to the bay or in the surrounding watershed. A targeted 50% reduction in wastewater loading has been ongoing in recent years through the addition of tertiary treatment, reaching the final stages of completion in 2014. These load reductions were undertaken concurrent with a changing climate, presenting an ideal natural experiment for understanding estuarine response to changing nutrient loads and warming temperatures, and for application of a novel, management-focused modeling approach to predict bay response and inform future nutrient loading targets. We will present the results of our recently-completed NOAA Coastal Hypoxia Research Program project in NB, in which we applied a reduced complexity model to predict the response of hypoxia to load reductions and climate warming, and leveraged extensive observations to develop and validate the resulting models. Ecological modeling consisted of two complementary approaches (denoted EcoGEM and EcoOBM) with nearly identical ecology formulations " including a reduced set of state variables, rate processes, and parameters " and coarse-resolution spatial elements, but different means of computing exchanges between spatial elements. EcoGEM utilized a gross exchange matrix (GEM) method, based on dye simulations from a highly resolved ROMS model, focused on two contrasting years, while EcoOBM utilized a salt balance approach to simulate a 14-year period. The models reproduced observed water quality and metabolic rates across the bay, and predicted strong responses to nutrient load reductions in summer but not spring. The 50% load reduction resulted in a reduction in the duration and spatial extent of modeled hypoxia, but a 75% reduction was required to eliminate hypoxia from most of the bay. Effects of increased water temperatures on hypoxia due to climatic warming were small, given the dominance of inorganic nutrients compared to organic matter in the external loads. Both models have been provided directly to managers for their use, EcoGEM via an executable and user guide, and EcoOBM via an online interface.

Bio(s): Dr. Jamie Vaudrey is an Assistant Research Professor with the Department of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut. Dr. Vaudrey received a B.A. in Biology with a minor in Philosophy from Wellesley College, MA. She worked as an environmental educator for six years in the Florida Keys, New Hampshire, and Oregon before completing her Ph.D. in Oceanography at the University of Connecticut, followed by a postdoctoral position at UConn. Her research interests are in the area of ecosystem dynamics in the coastal zone, specifically in the effect of land-use on the coastal environment and how anthropogenic changes to the landscape may change our coastal ecosystems. She is specifically interested in the relationship between human activities and expression of eutrophication in large systems (Narragansett Bay, Long Island Sound) and small embayments of these larger systems. Dr. Vaudrey has worked on modeling the relationship between nitrogen input and hypoxia in Narragansett Bay and on developing a model relating nitrogen load to trophic status in Long Island Sound embayments. She also has an interest in seagrass systems as indicators of a desirable state of water quality and inputs to coastal systems. Dr. Vaudrey is a member of the Long Island Sound Study's (LISS) Science and Technical Advisory Committee and the Narragansett Bay Estuary Program's (NBEP) Science Advisory Committee. Dr. Vaudrey is also involved with local community-based monitoring groups and NGOs as a science advisor (Save the Sound, CUSH, Save the River-Save the Hills) and is involved with encouraging and supporting community-based monitoring throughout Long Island Sound via the Unified Water Study initiative. Dr. Mark Brush is an Associate Professor of Marine Science at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) in Gloucester Point, VA, part of the College of William and Mary. Dr. Brush received his B.S. in Biological Sciences from Cornell University in 1995 and his Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography from the University of Rhode Island in 2002, and has been at VIMS since 2002 as a postdoctoral fellow, research scientist, and faculty member. His lab focuses on the ecology of coastal marine ecosystems such as estuaries and lagoons, through both field-based ecological investigations and synthetic, interdisciplinary ecosystem simulation modeling. Recent projects have focused on modeling the response of coastal systems to nutrient enrichment and climate change, with a focus on water quality (e.g., algal blooms, hypoxia/anoxia) and ecosystem function (metabolism, nutrient cycling, and source/sink dynamics of carbon). Projects have also included modeling watershed nutrient loading and the carrying capacity and ecosystem impacts of restored and cultured bivalves (primarily oysters and hard clams). A key aspect of Brush's research involves development of reduced complexity, readily accessible modeling tools that can be delivered online for direct use by other researchers, managers, and educators. Brush teaches courses in interdisciplinary coastal field research, estuarine ecology, and ecosystem modeling. He recently served as President of the Atlantic Estuarine Research Society and is currently a Member-at-Large for the Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation.

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24 October 2017

Title: California Collaborative Fisheries Research Program: Using a Citizen Science Model to Monitor California's Nearshore Fisheries
Presenter(s): Dr. Dean Wendt, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo; Dr. Rick Starr, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories; and Dr. Melissa Monk, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 24 October 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3, Rm 3404, Silver Spring, MD or via webinar; see remote access info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Dean Wendt (Cal Poly San Luis Obispo), Dr. Rick Starr (Moss Landing Marine Laboratories), and Dr. Melissa Monk (NOAA Fisheries)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Fisheries Quantitative Ecology and Socioeconomics Training (QUEST) Program; Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://goo.gl/KZYTiM

Abstract: This webinar will focus on the development and implementation of the California Collaborative Fisheries Research Program (CCFRP), a citizen-science based program to support fisheries management. The CCFRP was formed in 2006 to participate in the monitoring of marine reserves established through California's Marine Life Protection Act. It was conceived and planned through a collaboration of scientists, managers and fishermen on the central coast of California. Data are collected each year by scientists and volunteers, including. The program, now in its 11th year, has expanded statewide and includes the involvement of 5 universities collaborating with fishing communities along the entire California coast. During the webinar we will talk about how we 1) engaged the community and government scientists in the development of the program, 2) how we involve citizens in the data collection, 3) what the data show about the impact of marine reserves on fish populations, and, 4) how the data are important to management of marine resources by state and federal agencies. About the speaker: Dean Wendt is a Professor at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. His focus is on marine ecology and conservation. A long-standing research project is working with the local fishing community to collect data to better understand the status of our nearshore fish populations. Dean earned his B.S. in Biology from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo (1993) and his Ph.D. at Harvard University (1999). He is also Dean of the College of Science and Mathematics at Cal Poly. Rick Starr is a Research Faculty member at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. His focus is on the biology and ecology of fished species and finding solutions to marine conservation problems. In 2006, he and Dean Wendt created the California Collaborative Research Program to work with the fishing community to monitor Marine Protected Areas in California. Rick's current research entails developing and testing new tools and techniques to identify the distribution and abundance of species and habitats, understand fish movements, and describe changes in fish abundance through time. Melissa Monk is a Research Mathematical Statistician with NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center's Fisheries Ecology Division. Melissa's research includes understanding the link between recreational fishing effort and habitat of West Coast rockfishes, as well as research related to improving fisheries stock assessments. She received her Bachelor of Science from Virginia Tech in Wildlife Science (2004), a Masters of Science from Virginia Tech in Fisheries (2007), and PhD from Louisiana State University (2012) in Oceanography and Coastal Sciences.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Assessment of the Application of Climate Information in Wildfire Management in Alaska: Experiences from the Alaska Fire Science Consortium
Presenter(s): Melanie Colavito, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 24 October 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Melanie Colavito, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): ACCAP Alaska Climate Webinar POC: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu To register for the webinar, please follow the registration link available at: https://accap.uaf.edu/Assessment_AFSC

Abstract: The Alaska Fire Science Consortium (AFSC) is a boundary organization that works across the science-management interface to enhance the role that scientific information plays in decision-making for fire management in Alaska. We conducted a case study of AFSC to examine how they facilitate the delivery, development, and application of climate and related information and to determine the outcomes of their work. Specifically, this talk will outline the evolution of AFSC to examine how the activities they use to deliver science and facilitate new research development, their engagement with climate science information, and the outcomes of their work change over time.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Mercury in the Great Lakes: Can We Explain Trends?
Presenter(s): Dr. Mark Cohen, Physical Scientist, NOAA OAR Air Resources Laboratory. Presenting at NOAA, SIlver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 24 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Mark Cohen, Physical Scientist, NOAA OAR Air Resources Laboratory. Presenting at NOAA, SIlver Spring, MD

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Many top predator fish in the Great Lakes (GL) have Hg concentrations high enough to pose risks to public health and to fish-eating wildlife. Atmospheric mercury emissions and subsequent atmospheric mercury deposition is the largest current loading pathway for mercury (Hg) to the GL, and newly introduced Hg may be more bioavailable than legacy contamination. Emissions, atmospheric concentrations, and atmospheric deposition of mercury have been decreasing in recent years in the United States and Canada, but concentrations of mercury in some Great Lakes fish have been increasing. Why is this happening? This talk will discuss recent measurement and modeling results as well as possible explanations for this puzzling development. The NOAA Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) carries out research and development on several atmospheric chemistry, dispersion, and surface exchange topics, including the measurement and modeling of atmospheric mercury.

Bio(s): Dr. Mark Cohen is a Physical Scientist with the NOAA Air Resources Laboratory. He has developed and applied special versions of the NOAA HYSPLIT model to simulate atmospheric toxic pollutants such as mercury and dioxin. The overarching goal of his work is to estimate the relative importance of different air emissions sources in contributing atmospheric deposition of a given pollutant to a given ecosystem.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Out of the Vault: Discovery of the Sea Floor (Talk 12-12:45)
Presenter(s): Albert "Skip" Theberge, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 24 October 2017
11:00 am - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Albert "Skip" Theberge, Reference, NOAA Central Library

Abstract: The NOAA Central Library will hold it's latest Out of the Vault exhibit: Discovery of the Sea Floor! Join us in the library for an exhibit of rare maps and documents from our collection and an informative talk from the library's own Skip Theberge on the history of discovering the seafloor, NOAA's role in these discoveries and the evolution of modern earth sciences. Join the NOAA Central Library as Skip Theberge, retired NOAA Corps officer, now with the NOAA Central Library, discusses the history of discovering the seafloor from the early charts of Waghenaer through late Twentieth century satellite altimetry. Discover the surprising role of NOAA and its ancestor agencies in making these discoveries and their role in the evolution of modern earth sciences. Accompanying Skip's discussion of the history of seafloor mapping will be a selection of rare maps and documents residing in the collections of the NOAA Central Library that illustrate the evolution of our knowledge of the seafloor. These treasures include a facsimile edition of the Waghenaer Atlas of charts, the first map of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge produced in 1876 following the Challenger Expedition, some of the famous Heezen-Tharp maps, maps from the premier geographic journal of the Nineteenth century Petermann's Geographische Mittheilungen, and a number of maps produced by the Coast and Geodetic Survey that were the first of their kind.

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Special Collections Talk from 12-12:45 PM EDT: https://goo.gl/TN24Yo

Bio(s): Skip Theberge, retired from NOAA Corps in 1995 after 27 years of primarily hydrographic surveying and seafloor mapping. Since joining the Library he has become quite familiar with the rare books in the library special collections and was heavily involved in the development and dedication of the Library's Charles Fitzhugh Talman Special Collections Room. Besides Library duties, he has remained active in the ocean mapping community having served for 12 years on the Advisory Committee for Undersea Features of the United States Board on Geographic Names and for three years on its international counterpart. He was part of the NOAA science team that helped design the Sant Ocean Hall of the Smithsonian Institution Museum of Natural History. He is the history editor of Hydro International magazine and the author of over 80 papers dealing with the history of hydrographic and geodetic surveying, seafloor mapping, and various aspects of oceanography. He is a recipient of both a Department of Commerce Gold Medal Award and a NOAA Distinguished Career Award.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

23 October 2017

Title: Development and Application of Gridded NOAA Unique Combined Processing System (NUCAPS) for Operational Forecasting Challenges
Presenter(s): Emily Berndt, NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center
Date & Time: 23 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Room S561 Greentech IV Building 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771 or via webinar; see remote access info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Emily Berndt, NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT)

Remote Access: 877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m97b03eba6edf81ab29cb05a2df1ea044 Meeting number: 742 618 901 Host key: 991999 Meeting password: Jpss2017!

Sponsor(s): JPSS PROVING GROUND SEMINAR POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Abstract: Cross-track Infrared Sounder/Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (CrIS/ATMS) soundings processed though the NOAA Unique Combined Processing System (NUCAPS) (i.e. NUCAPS Soundings) are currently available in AWIPS-II for forecasters to diagnose unique forecasting challenges. Vertical temperature and moisture soundings are useful to diagnose the pre-convective environment; however, they are limited to a single-point (footprint) based measurement. A team of scientists and forecasters developed the capability to view 2-D gridded plan view and cross section displays of NUCAPS Soundings (i.e. Gridded NUCAPS) in AWIPS-II. The capability was initially developed in conjunction with the Anchorage, Alaska, Center Weather Service Unit (CWSU) to diagnose layers of cold air aloft which are hazardous to aviation activities. The CWSU routinely issues Meteorological Impact Statements (MIS) to alert the aviation community to hazardous conditions. Gridded NUCAPS provided an additional dataset beyond model data and observations to diagnose such events. After successful demonstration of the Gridded NUCAPS with the CWSU, the product was introduced to forecasters in a testbed environment at the Hazardous Weather Testbed (HWT). Forecasters had the opportunity to analyze temperature and moisture fields as well as stability indices during the Spring Experiment and provide feedback on the utility of the data for convective forecasting. This presentation outlines the development of the Gridded NUCAPS product for display in AWIPS-II and highlights application examples from the 2016-2017 winter evaluation with the CWSU and 2017 HWT Spring Experiment. Future work includes continued development to address forecaster feedback and suggestions to improve the usability and functionality of the product

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

19 October 2017

Title: Does thinking concretely about climate change promote support for carbon emissions reductions? Results from a national survey
Presenter(s): Ann Bostrom, P.h.D., Weyerhaeuser Endowed Professor in Environmental Policy
Date & Time: 19 October 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ann Bostrom, P.h.D, Weyerhaeuser Endowed Professor in Environmental Policy Join Webex https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D559007857%26UID%3D4893665142%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATLhtse-XNhcpPV2sA3m8RonKvbFAFHPMQzn3HBWheMmb7BTHrbfLj0V3ueHok32TOy2e7iPyiUGBMmykbDpz0b0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmbe8bb14ed1e132b10b62cf91809643c3 Meeting number and Access Code: 804 755 712 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412 Host: https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm POC: Vicky Krikelas, Outreach Coordinator Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov (206) 554-1724 ABSTRACT Comprehensive analysis of the results from 20 years of public opinion surveys on global warming reveals that Americans have tended to discount the threat of climate change due to the perception that its consequences are far in the future (Nisbet & Myers, 2007). Indeed, although the Yale Climate Change Studies November 2016 study describes it as the highest level of worry they have recorded (since 2008), only 19% of their U.S. nationally representative sample reported being very worried about global warming, and the study concludes that most people think of global warming as a relatively distant threat. This is consistent with research in the U.S. and elsewhere, which has shown that people often view climate change as a distant threat and of lesser concern than other issues such as health, family, personal comforts, and finances. These factors"global rather than local, future rather than now, others rather than me"are thought to increase what is referred to as psychological distance, which is associated with lower concern about climate change. Experimental studies of consumer choices demonstrate that psychological distance and level of abstraction influence each other. Furthermore, there is evidence that psychological distance systematically influences attitudes and choice through level of abstraction, independent of personal relevance. Thus, concern may be more directly related to abstraction than to psychological distance. We hypothesize that as people think more concretely about climate change, psychological distance will decrease, and concern and support for mitigation policy will increase. To test this, we fielded a national survey experiment in the U.S. in February 2017 through GfK (N=1820), in which participants were assigned to one of three experimental treatments, (1) a treatment designed to increase concrete thinking, (2) a treatment to increase abstract thinking, or (3) a control group. The concrete (how) treatment significantly increases support for reducing climate change by reducing carbon emissions. However, the effect is small, and on closer examination is entirely due to a shift among the politically conservative. Unexpectedly, certainty (perceived likelihood) that human actions have changed global climate is higher than expected; a majority (63%) believe it likely, very likely, or extremely likely, with no significant difference by treatment, yet feelings about climate change remained tepid. BIO Ann Bostrom is the Weyerhaeuser endowed Professor in Environmental Policy at the Daniel J. Evans School of Public Policy & Governance, University of Washington, Seattle. She studies how people understand and make decisions about risks. She is currently researching perceptions and communications about climate change, and about earthquakes and earthquake early warning. Bostrom is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Washington State Academy of Sciences, and the Society for Risk Analysis, past president of the Society for Risk Analysis and the recipient of its Chauncey Starr Distinguished Young Risk Analyst Award for her work on mental models of hazardous processes. She co-directed the Decision Risk and Management Science Program at the National Science Foundation from 1999-2001, and is currently serving on the international Integrated Research on Disaster Risk Science Committee, and on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Science Advisory Board Environmental Information Services Working Group (EISWG). She holds a Ph.D. in public policy analysis from Carnegie Mellon University, an M.B.A. from Western Washington University, and a B.A. from the University of Washington.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Caught between a rockwall and a farmed place: Effects of land use and shoreline armoring on submerged aquatic vegetation in Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Christopher J. Patrick, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Life Sciences, Texas A&M University Corpus Christi, and Donald E. Weller, PhD, Senior Scientist, Ecological Modeling Lab, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Date & Time: 19 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series NOS Special Seminar Series: The Mid-Atlantic Shorelines Project; Seminar No. 2

Presenter(s): Christopher J. Patrick, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Life Sciences Texas A&M University Corpus Christi and Donald E. Weller, PhD, Senior Scientist, Ecological Modeling Lab, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Elizabeth.Turner@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) is a foundational component of coastal systems and an environmental sentinel (both providing an indication of environmental conditions and actively engineering the environment), but SAV are in global decline. We draw lessons on the causes and management of this decline from recent research in and near Chesapeake Bay. We synthesize multiple publications and on-going research on the effects of shoreline alteration and human land cover on SAV abundance. Both groups of stressors can have negative effects and interact with each other, but the net effects vary among hardening and land use types. SAV responses to stressors are hierarchically dependent on environmental conditions, SAV community composition, and species traits.

Bio(s): Chris Patrick is an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi (http://patricklab.weebly.com/) and coordinates MarineGEO Texas (https://marinegeo.si.edu/gulf-coast-texas) with collaborators at University of Texas Marine Science Institute. He works in aquatic ecosystems to identify and understand underlying generalities in the processes that drive community assembly and the maintenance of ecosystem functioning across spatial and temporal scales. Prior to coming to TAMUCC, he was an AAAS S&T Fellow with EPA OW/OST, a post-doc with the Ecological Modeling Lab at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, and earned a PhD in Ecology from the University of Notre Dame. Don Weller is a Senior Scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, MD; and he has expertise in ecological modeling and landscape ecology. His work considers the linkages among ecosystems and the role of human activities in complex landscapes. His recent research has focused on the transfer of materials through landscapes and on the linkages of watersheds to wetland condition, to stream chemistry and biology, and to estuarine health. Don earned a B.A. in Biology from Wabash College and a Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of Tennessee. More information on his research and his publications are available at https://serc.si.edu/labs/ecological-modeling. and

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Development of American Holothurian Aquaculture in Rural Coastal Communities
Presenter(s): Charlotte Regula-Whitefield, Ph.D., 2017 John Knauss Fellow, Alaska Sea Grant
Date & Time: 19 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Charlotte Regula-Whitefield, Ph.D., 2017 John Knauss Fellow, Alaska Sea Grant Seminar sponsors: NOAA Central Library; Knauss Brown Bag Program. Seminar POCs: Knauss October coordinator: melissa.karp@noaa.gov; Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator/webinar host: judith.salter@noaa.gov Register for the October Knauss webinar here: https://goo.gl/yCgVKz After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: International markets import sea cucumber products from both cold and warm water areas from around the world. Sea cucumber skin and meat are highly valuable products in Asian seafood markets, particularly in China. Consumer prices for dried sea cucumbers can range from dozens of dollars per kilogram to more than a thousand. The Northeast Pacific Red sea cucumber (Parastichopus californicas) is a premium species, likely due to its relatively large size and unique texture, from developing in a pristine, cold water environment. Wild harvest opportunities in Alaska and Washington states have been declining due to predation by sea otters and overharvesting. This has resulted in reduced industry participant incomes in many coastal fishing communities in the Northeast Pacific. Here, I will explain some of the emerging sea cucumber aquaculture technology being developed in Alaska and Washington states, and discuss the potential for regional economic losses due to declining fisheries.

Bio(s): Charlotte received her Bachelor Degree in marine biology from Roger Williams University in Rhode Island in 2008, then her Master Degree in marine science from University of New England in Maine in 2010. She then traveled to Alaska, where she completed her Doctorate of Philosophy in marine biology in 2016. Charlotte's dissertation research addressed biochemical, ecological, and fisheries management questions related to the commercially harvested Red sea cucumber species. Specifically, she studied the effects of shifting food supplies due to regional climate changes on maternal reproductive status and larval development.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

18 October 2017

Title: NOAA Marine Debris Toolkit for Educators: Incorporating Citizen Science and Community Action into an Educational Setting
Presenter(s): Alyssa Nally, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 18 October 2017
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Alyssa Nally, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3312901487443898882

Abstract: The Marine Debris Toolkit serves as a unique collaborative effort between NOAA's Marine Debris Program and Office of National Marine Sanctuaries to reduce our impact on the ocean through hands-on scientific monitoring, targeted education, and community outreach. Composed of teacher resources, data collection and analysis guidelines, and community engagement and outreach activities, this toolkit empowers students to become ocean stewards by taking action against marine debris on campus, in their local community, and at home. During this presentation, participants will receive an in-depth look into this free education tool. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Integrating Polar-Orbiting Products into the Forecast Routine for Explosive Cyclogenesis & Extratropical Transition
Presenter(s): Michael Folmer, Satellite Liaison, NOAA
Date & Time: 18 October 2017
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Note time change

Sponsor(s): NOAA Risa Team, Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium VAWS

Remote Access:

Presenter(s): Michael Folmer, Satellite Liaison, NOAA

Remote Access: https://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=68ff79556a&e=9097598e1a

Abstract: The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) was added to the Satellite Proving Ground for Marine, Precipitation, and Satellite Analysis in late 2012, just in time to introduce forecasters to the very high-resolution imagery available from the Suomi-National Polar Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument when observing and forecasting Hurricane Sandy (2012). These new data sets have led to research projects at the OPC and TAFB that have specifically been looking into the early identification of stratospheric intrusions that lead to explosive cyclogenesis or extratropical transition of tropical cyclones. This presentation seeks to show some early analysis and potential uses of the polar-orbiting datasets to compliment the geostationary imagery and therefore lead to earlier identification and possible warnings.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: MOVED TO 1/10/18: Synthesis​ ​of​ ​public​ ​water​ ​supply​ ​use​ ​in​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States: Spatio-temporal patterns and socio-economic controls
Presenter(s): Sankar Arumugam, Ph.D., Professor and University Faculty Scholar, Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
Date & Time: 18 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series RESCHEDULED TO 1/10/2018

Presenter(s): Sankar Arumugam, Ph.D., Professor and University Faculty Scholar, Dept. of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Recent U.S. Geological Survey water-use report suggests that increasing water-use efficiency could mitigate the supply-and-demand imbalance arising from changing climate and growing population. However, this rich data have neither analyzed to understand the underlying patterns, nor have been investigated to identify the factors contributing to this increased efficiency. A national-scale synthesis of public supply withdrawals (withdrawals) reveals a strong North"south gradient in public supply water use with the increasing population in the South contributing to increased withdrawal. Contrastingly, a reverse South"north gradient exists in per capita withdrawals (efficiency), with northern states consistently improving the efficiency, while the southern states' efficiency declined. Our analyses of spatial patterns of per capita withdrawals further demonstrate that urban counties exhibit improved efficiency over rural counties. Improved efficiency is also demonstrated over high-income and well-educated counties. Given the potential implications of the findings in developing long-term water conservation measures (i.e., increasing block rates), we argue the need for frequent updates, perhaps monthly to annual, of water-use data for identifying effective strategies that control the water-use efficiency in various geographic settings under a changing climate.

Bio(s): Dr. Sankar Arumugam is a Professor in the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering at NCSU. He is also a University Faculty Scholar (2013-2018). He is primarily associated with the Environmental, Water Resources, and Coastal Engineering and Computing and Systems groups within the department. Dr. Arumugam currently teaches CE 383 " Hydrology and Urban Water Systems, CE 586 " Engineering Hydrology, CE 777 " Stochastic Methods in Water and Environmental Engineering and CE 786 " Hydroclimatology. Dr. Arumugam currently serves as the associate editor for the Journal of Hydrology (Elsevier) and for the Journal of Hydrometeorology (AMS). He also served as the associate editor for Water Resources Research (AGU), Journal of Hydrologic Engineering (ASCE) and as the editor of Journal of Water and Climate Change (IWA). Dr. Arumugam is also a member of American Geophysical Union, American Meteorological Society and Environmental Water Research Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He earned his B.S. in agricultural engineering in 1991, his M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering in 1996, and his Ph.D. in Water Resources Engineering in 2001.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Professional and Technical (ProTech) Services Update
Presenter(s): Jay Standring, NOAA/AGO/SSAD/ProTech
Date & Time: 18 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jay Standring, NOAA AGO SSAD Professional & Technical Services (ProTech) Branch Chief Seminar POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); ProTech Branch Chief: Jay Standring (jay.standring@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://goo.gl/N8XU9u Please register for access to the webinar. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP). Abstract/summary: The Professional and Technical Services (ProTech) program is well underway. The ProTech program consists of a suite of Multiple-award Indefinite-Delivery/Indefinite Quantity services contracts, each supporting the major NOAA mission areas (Satellites, Fisheries, Oceans, Enterprise Operations and Weather). The Satellite Domain was awarded June 12th, 2017 - and other Domain awards will follow 2017-2018. Jay Standring, the ProTech Branch Chief will review the program status and future events/schedule at the Brown Bag Seminar, Wednesday, October 18th.

Bio(s): Jay Standring joined NOAA/AGO in November 2016 as the ProTech Services Branch Chief. His previous contracting assignments were with the Department of Defense including Headquarters, USMC Installation Logistics (Contracting Policy) and the Military Sealift Command.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

17 October 2017

Title: Know Before You Go: Rip Current Science, Forecasting and Communication at NOAA
Presenter(s): Greg Dusek, Chief Scientist, NOAA/NOS/CO-OPS - Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services - Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 17 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Greg Dusek, Chief Scientist, NOAA/NOS/CO-OPS - Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Rip currents are the greatest public safety risk at the beach and cause an estimated 100 drownings each year in the U.S. Over the past two decades, NOAA has led efforts to increase public awareness about these hazardous, fast-moving surf zone currents. The well-known Break the Grip of the Rip! campaign has shown evidence of successfully conveying to beachgoers the swim parallel strategy to escape a rip current. This evidence suggests that more people than ever before are generally aware of the dangers rip currents pose, and what to do if caught in one. Despite these successes, there remains a public knowledge gap regarding what one can do to avoid being caught in a potentially life-threatening rip current in the first place. There are several ongoing efforts at NOAA with the aim to reduce this knowledge gap. A statistical rip current model, which provides an hourly 5-day forecast of the likelihood of hazardous rip currents every kilometer along shore, is being validated at coastal locations across the U.S. Social science researchers have investigated how to communicate this rip current forecast to the public and how to enhance the preparedness and prevention aspects of rip current messaging. Lastly, new videos and other outreach material were developed using the most recent social and physical science research on rip currents to be more effective. Through these efforts, NOAA hopes to encourage the public to know before you go and to continue to raise awareness and reduce rip current rescues and drownings.

Bio(s): Greg Dusek is a coastal physical oceanographer and the Chief Scientist for the NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). Greg has been at CO-OPS for about six years and prior to serving as Chief Scientist, he was an oceanographer on the currents team where he led a range of physical oceanographic projects. Notable projects include a large-scale, multi-year current survey of Puget Sound where over 130 current profilers were deployed; and the development of a High Frequency Radar Surface Current web product. Prior to joining NOAA, Greg completed his PhD in physical oceanography at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill where he studied coastal processes and rip currents. His research resulted in the development of the statistical rip current forecast model presently being implemented into operations at NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

12 October 2017

Title: NOAA's Continually Updated Shoreline Product
Presenter(s): Doug Graham, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 October 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 8836 and webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Doug Graham, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2730019581103431684. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (213) 929-4232; Access Code: 418-725-047; Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar; Webinar ID: 829-577-507.

Abstract: NOAA's Continually Updated Shoreline Product (CUSP) provides the most current tidal-datum referenced shoreline representation of the United States and its territories using NOAA and non-NOAA contemporary sources to update our nation's dynamic shorelines. Shoreline data supports coastal mapping applications and assists decision makers in developing coastal community plans, managing resources, mitigating hazard events, determining sustainable strategies to coastal infrastructures, and conducting environmental analyses to meet our nation's economic, social, and environmental needs.

Bio(s): Doug Graham works within the Remote Sensing Division at NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Resolving the Dynamics of Marine and Aquatic Community Responses to Environmental Changes using Metagenomics
Presenter(s): Carol Stepien, Ph.D, NOAA PMEL Ocean Environment Research Division Leader
Date & Time: 12 October 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Speaker :Carol Stepien, Ph.D, NOAA PMEL Ocean Environment Research Division Leader Join Webex https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D559007857%26UID%3D4893665142%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATLhtse-XNhcpPV2sA3m8RonKvbFAFHPMQzn3HBWheMmb7BTHrbfLj0V3ueHok32TOy2e7iPyiUGBMmykbDpz0b0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmbe8bb14ed1e132b10b62cf91809643c3 Meeting number and Access Code: 804 755 712 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412 Host: https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm POC: Vicky Krikelas, Outreach Coordinator Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov (206) 554-1724

Abstract: Metagenomics here is defined as the simultaneous study of the genetic diversity, population genetics, and genomic adaptations of entire communities (multiple taxa, ranging from microbes, viruses, plants, animals, etc.) recovered directly from a variety of samples. Environmental and organismal samples include water (containing shed mucus, waste, cells), sediments, sediment cores (dating back thousands of years), plankton, gametes, larvae, gut contents, otoliths, scales, spines, skeletons, parts of organisms, and/or entire organisms. Metagenomic and high-throughput sequencing approaches, bioinformatics, and in situ sampling technology today allow researchers the ability to accurately identify all operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to species and population levels, which are being widely applied across oceanic and aquatic OTUs and ecosystems. Scientists and managers will soon be able to simultaneously sample, monitor, and analyze data to understand the adaptations and patterns of entire systems, cross-linking biological parameters (systematics, taxonomy, population genetics, genomics, morphology, biogeography, ecology, physiology, population exploitation, etc.) with physical measurements (acidification, temperature, chemical parameters, current patterns, sea levels, weather, greenhouse gases, geology, historic geography, physical alterations, climate change, etc.). Through this seminar presentation, we will explore examples from aquatic and marine ecosystems, and their research translation to entire communities, including those in the deep sea, sediment cores dating back thousands of years, as well as plankton, gut contents, fisheries, and pathogens. The limitations posed by the current paucity of morphological data and correct OTU identities, museum samples, taxonomic expertise, and accuracy and coverage of genetic databases - including GenBank and the Barcode of Life " are discussed, as well as the potential future of these and other evolving genomic approaches. Throughout the next two decades, metagenomic applications and bioinformatic technology, which are evolving every day, are forever transforming scientific understanding of life in our oceans and freshwaters, their patterns across time and space, and relationships to physical conditions in the face of climate and anthropogenic changes. BIO Dr. Carol Stepien specializes in genetic and genomic approaches to understand their evolutionary diversity and adaptations over time and space, focusing on marine and aquatic fishes and invertebrates. She has been working with her lab and collaborators to develop sets of metagenomic high-throughput sequencing assays to assess entire communities, from environmental DNA in water and plankton samples. Her G3 research laboratory " Genetics and Genomics Group " relocated in fall 2016 to NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle from the University of Toledo in Ohio, where she holds the lifetime appointment of Distinguished University Professor of Ecology and served as tenured full professor and the Director of the Lake Erie Research Center from 2004-2016. In 2017, she became an affiliate Professor of Oceanography at the University of Washington and affiliate Professor of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. She also was honored to become a fellow of the AAAS (American Association for Advancement of Science). Carol did her graduate work (M.S. and Ph.D.) at the University of Southern California, much of it SCUBA diving at the Wrigley Marine Lab on Santa Catalina Island, and her postdoctoral work at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, supported by her own NSF grant and the Sloan Foundation. She then was an NRC (National Research Council) fellow at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center in San Diego, where her research focused on the population genetics of Pacific Coast ground fishes. She has published 101 scientific papers and book chapters, and has headed over $12.5 million in extramural grant awards from the NSF, NOAA, USEPA, USDA, etc. She is enjoying her return to marine research on the Pacific Coast!

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Restoring an Urban River: The Acushnet Sawmill Ecological Restoration Project.
Presenter(s): Sara Quintal, Buzzards Bay Coalition
Date & Time: 12 October 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sara Quintal, Buzzards Bay Coalition Seminar

Sponsor(s): NOAA and USFWS; NOAA Points of Contact are NOAA's Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov, and US Fish and Wildlife Service's Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov Seminar Registration: https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e3y9wv1gvm1o/event/registration.html Invitations to register for the webinar will be emailed a week or two prior to the event. For the best viewing experience, please use Internet Explorer.

Abstract: Sara Quintal (Buzzards Bay Coalition) will discuss the restoration of a 19-acre former industrial property. This extensive project includes dam and impervious surface removal, and the creation of swamp and freshwater marsh.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 October 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: Can animal culture drive evolution?
Presenter(s): Carolyn Beans, Science Journalist and Associate Editor of PNAS's Front Matter. Presenting at NOAA in SIlver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 12 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Carolyn Beans, Science Journalist and Associate Editor of PNAS's Front Matter. Presenting at NOAA in SIlver Spring, MD. .

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Scientists once placed culture squarely in the human domain. But discoveries in recent decades suggest that animals show a wide range of cultural practices"from foraging tactics and vocal displays to habitat use and play. Scientists are now exploring whether these cultural behaviors may shape the genes and traits of future generations, possibly even leading to the evolution of new species. Science journalist Carolyn Beans will explore research in this emerging field, which she recently reported on for PNAS. Her takeaway: Work on whales, dolphins and birds suggests that animal culture may commonly drive evolution. But testing this hypothesis remains a monumental challenge.

Bio(s): Carolyn Beans is a science journalist and editor specializing in ecology, evolution and health. From her home base in Washington, D.C., she's writes for PNAS, NPR, American Scientist, BioScience, and other outlets. She is the associate editor of PNAS's Front Matter. Carolyn earned a PhD in biology from the University of Virginia and a BA in English from Pennsylvania State University.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

11 October 2017

Title: NOAA Provides Tampa Bay Pilots with an Integrated Oceanographic and Meteorological Forecast Tool
Presenter(s): Cristina Urizar, Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS/Center for Operational and Oceanographic Products and Services - CO-OPS. Cristina will be presenting from St. Petersburg, Florida.
Date & Time: 11 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Cristina Urizar, Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS/Center for Operational and Oceanographic Products and Services - CO-OPS. Cristina will be presenting from St. Petersburg, Florida.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: On August 1, 2017, NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) launched the Tampa Bay Marine Channels Forecast, an integrated suite of oceanographic and meteorological forecast products focused along the navigation channels of Tampa Bay. The product, initially developed by the National Weather Service (NWS) Tampa Bay Weather Forecast Office (TBWFO) at the behest of local pilots, includes a critical visibility forecast for the region. As a result of this new product, ship pilots no longer have to check multiple sources for information as they navigate the marine channels. The map-interface tool integrates forecasted water levels and tidal currents from CO-OPS with 24-hour weather forecasts, including winds, wind gust, visibility, rain chance, and marine hazard alerts from the TBWFO. In addition to providing an overview of the product, Cristina will discuss various technical challenges that were resolved to integrate the two sets of forecast products. Additionally, Cristina will describe CO-OPS' methods for maintaining this operational product reliably on a long-term basis.

Bio(s): Cristina Urizar grew up in Houston, Texas where she received her B.S. in Geophysics from the University of Houston. Cristina received her M.S. in Oceanography from Texas A&M University. She was a 2006 John A. Knauss Fellow when she began her career as an oceanographer at CO-OPS.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

10 October 2017

Title: What caused the most toxic algal bloom ever recorded in Monterey Bay, California?
Presenter(s): John Ryan, Biological Oceanographer and Senior Research Specialist, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, MBARI. Presenting from California
Date & Time: 10 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): John Ryan, Biological Oceanographer and Senior Research Specialist, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). Presenting from California.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: An ecologically and economically disruptive harmful algal bloom (HAB) affected much of the northeast Pacific margin in 2015, during a prolonged oceanic warm anomaly. Caused by diatoms of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia, this HAB produced the highest particulate concentrations of the biotoxin domoic acid (DA) ever recorded in Monterey Bay, California. Bloom inception followed strong spring upwelling, which introduced nutrients and eliminated the warm anomaly locally. Subsequently, moderate and intermittent upwelling created favorable conditions for growth and accumulation of HAB biomass, which was dominated by a highly toxigenic species, P. australis. High cellular DA concentrations were associated with available nitrogen for DA synthesis coincident with silicate exhaustion, a condition known to increase toxicity. Disproportionate depletion of silicate in upwelling source waters during the warm anomaly, the most severe depletion observed in a quarter century, was a key factor in HAB causality.

Bio(s): John Ryan received the BS degree in biology in 1988 from the University of Massachusetts, and the MS and PhD degrees in biological oceanography in 1993 and 1998 from the University of Rhode Island. He began a postdoctoral fellowship in fall 1998 at Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) where he is now Senior Research Specialist. John was awarded an Office of Naval Research fellowship in support of his MS and a NASA New Investigator grant in support of his postdoctoral research. His research explores oceanographic processes driving variations in marine life, from microscopic algae to whales. Working with engineers at MBARI, John contributes to augmenting capabilities of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) so that they can recognize and respond to unpredictable encounters with dynamic features, such as phytoplankton blooms.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Near-surface Salinity and Temperature Structure Observed with Dual-Sensor Drifters in the Subtropical South Pacific
Presenter(s): Dr. Shenfu Dong, NOAA/AOML/PhOD
Date & Time: 10 October 2017
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Shenfu Dong (NOAA/AOML/PhOD) Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML POC for seminar questions: roberta.lusic@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/887843605

Abstract: Three surface drifters equipped with temperature and salinity sensors at 0.2 m and 5 m depths were deployed in April/May 2015 in the subtropical South Pacific with the objective of measuring near-surface salinity differences seen by satellite and in situ sensors and examining the causes of these differences. Measurements from these drifters indicate that water at a depth of 0.2 m is about 0.013 psu fresher than at 5 m and about 0.024C warmer. Events with large temperature and salinity differences between the two depths are caused by anomalies in surface freshwater and heat fluxes, modulated by wind. While surface freshening and cooling occurs during rainfall events, surface salinification is generally observed under weak wind conditions (4 m/s). Further examination of the drifter measurements demonstrates that (i) the amount of surface freshening and strength of the vertical salinity gradient heavily depend on wind speed during rain events, (ii) salinity differences between 0.2 m and 5 m are positively correlated with the corresponding temperature differences, and (iii) temperature exhibits a diurnal cycle at both depths, whereas the diurnal cycle of salinity is observed only at 0.2 m when the wind speed is less than 6 m/s. The amplitudes of the diurnal cycles of temperature at both depths decrease with increasing wind speed. The mean diurnal cycle of surface salinity is dominated by events with winds less than 2 m/s.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 October 2017

Title: An Aquaculture Alliance: How & Why the U.S. is Supporting Sustainable Aquaculture in Morocco
Presenter(s): Dr. Najat El Moutchou, PhD, NOAA/NCCOS/Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Beaufort
Date & Time: 6 October 2017
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: An Aquaculture Alliance: How & Why the U.S. is Supporting Sustainable Aquaculture in Morocco

Presenter(s): Dr. Najat El Moutchou, NOAA/NCCOS/Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Beaufort

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; webinar host is James.Morris@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Dr. Najat El Moutchou, a foreign national guest scientist from Morocco with NOAA/NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, will be presenting Seminar: "An Aquaculture alliance: How & Why the U.S is supporting Sustainable Aquaculture in Morocco". Dr. El Moutchou is working with the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) and the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) in the implementation of a finfish aquaculture model 'DEPOMOD' that predicts depositional effluents from aquaculture using oceanographic and biological parameters. This model allows aquaculture managers to select suitable sites and develop environmental monitoring plans. Dr. El Moutchou's work supports the U.S.-Morocco Free Trade Agreement, which aims to foster sustainable aquaculture industry growth in both countries.

Bio(s): Najat El Moutchou is currently a postdoc at NOAA National Ocean Service, National Centers for Costal Ocean Science, Beaufort NC. Based on previous scientific accomplishments, Najat was chosen by the US and Moroccan governments to participate in a technology transfer in a strategic initiative set forth by the US State Department to develop guidelines for sustainable marine aquaculture. She has more than six years of experience working with consulting firms and provides consulting services to maintain and uphold rigorous environmental standards with built-in sustainability. Najat has completed a dual PhD awarded cum laude from the University of Cordoba (Spain) and the University of Tangier (Morocco). She also has M.S and B.S degrees in Environmental sciences and speak English, Spanish, French and Arabic.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

5 October 2017

Title: Sandy and Science: Lessons Learned
Presenter(s): Kevin Werner, Ph.D, MPA, Science and Research Director, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 5 October 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kevin Werner, Ph.D, MPA Science and Research Director Northwest Fisheries Science Center Join Webex https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D559007857%26UID%3D4893665142%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATLhtse-XNhcpPV2sA3m8RonKvbFAFHPMQzn3HBWheMmb7BTHrbfLj0V3ueHok32TOy2e7iPyiUGBMmykbDpz0b0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmbe8bb14ed1e132b10b62cf91809643c3 Meeting number and Access Code: 804 755 712 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 Host: https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/events/weekly_seminars/monster.cfm POC: Diane Tierney (diane.tierney@noaa.gov; 206-860-3380)

Abstract: Following Hurricane Sandy's impact on the mid-Atlantic region, President Obama established the Sandy Rebuilding Task Force to ensure that the Federal Government continues to provide appropriate resources to support affected State, local, and tribal communities to improve the region's resilience, health, and prosperity by building for the future. Kevin was detailed from NOAA to the Task Force between January and June 2013 to both represent NOAA and to build a Science Coordination Group from the federal science agencies. As the Task Force and others began to take stock of the region's needs and develop plans to address them, many diverse approaches emerged from different areas of expertise including: infrastructure, management and construction, housing, public health, and others. Decision making in this environment was complex with many interests and variables to consider and balance. Although often relevant, science and technical expertise was rarely at the forefront of the Task Force. Kevin will describe his experience with the Sandy Task Force focusing on challenges and lessons learned from organizing federal scientific expertise to support the work of the Task Force. In light of an active 2017 hurricane season with major impacts so far in Texas and Florida, Kevin will revisit the 2013 lessons learned and discuss comparisons and application to the 2017 hurricanes.

Bio(s): Kevin Werner is the Director of the Northwest Fisheries Science Center at NOAA Fisheries. Prior to joining the NWFSC, he served as the Director of the NOAA's National Weather Service's Office of Organizational Excellence. There he led and managed activities enabling the Weather Service to become the agile and effective organization required for building a Weather-Ready Nation. Prior to that, Dr. Werner was the Regional Climate Service Director in NOAA's Western Region. In that role he coordinated and advised on NOAA's climate services investments in an eight-state region in the Western U.S., including activities and programs from NOAA Weather, NOAA Research, the National Climatic Data Center and NOAA Fisheries. From 2012 to 2104, he was a Fellow in NOAA's Leadership Competencies Development Program where he completed three important details " he was the Climate Adaptation Advisor to EcoAdapt and The Nature Conservancy; the Science Advisor to the President's Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force, and a Special Assistant to NOAA Fisheries' West Coast Regional Administrator. He was also a Service Coordination Hydrologist at the Weather Service's Colorado Basin River Forecast Center from 2008 to 2014; a Hydrologic Science Program Manager in the Weather Service's Western Region from 2004 to 2008; and an officer in the NOAA Corps from 1999 to 2004. While in the NOAA Corps he was the Field Operations Officer on the NOAA Ship KA'IMIMOANA. He also served as the Officer In Charge on the FRV Oscar Allen Sette preparing it to enter service into the NOAA fleet. Dr. Werner received his Doctorate in Political Science in 2015 from the University of Utah; a Master of Public Administration in 2009 from University of Utah; a Master of Science in Atmospheric Sciences in 1999 from the University of Washington; and a Bachelor of Science in Atmospheric Sciences and Mathematics in 1996 from the University of Washington.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Product circularity and the hidden economic opportunities of discarded fishing nets and ropes
Presenter(s): Martin Charter, Director of The Centre for Sustainable Design of the University for the Creative Arts
Date & Time: 5 October 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Martin Charter, Director of The Centre for Sustainable Design of the University for the Creative Arts Register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8478172917184475907

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract: Circular economies aim to minimize resource inputs, emissions, and energy leakage by designing long-lasting products; maintaining, repairing, and reusing them; and recycling them at the end of their useful life. This is in contrast to traditional linear economies utilizing 'take, make, dispose' models of production. The talk will provide guidance on how organizations can implement circular economy principles related to products, processes, and business models. It will also introduce the Circular Ocean project which pursues innovative and sustainable solutions for marine plastic waste arising from waste fishing nets and ropes (FNRs). Issues related to waste FNRs, existing products that utilize FNRs, and potential new business models for waste FNRs will be presented. Read more about the Circular Ocean project at http://www.circularocean.eu.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

4 October 2017

Title: Should I stay or should I go? Modelling year-round habitat suitability and drivers of residency for fin whales in the California Current
Presenter(s): Elliott Hazen, Research Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division. Presenting remotely from Monterey, CA. Co-authors of the study include: KL Scales, GS Schorr, EL Hazen, SJ Bograd, PI Miller, RD Andrews, AN Zerbini & EA Falcone
Date & Time: 4 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 or via webinar - see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Elliott Hazen, Research Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division. Presenting remotely from Monterey, CA. Co-authors of the study include: KL Scales, GS Schorr, EL Hazen, SJ Bograd, PI Miller, RD Andrews, AN Zerbini & EA Falcone. Presenting from California.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: The aim of this work was to better understand the spatial ecology of endangered species, which is is crucial to predicting habitat use at scales relevant to conservation and management. We aimed to model the influence of biophysical conditions on habitat suitability for endangered fin whales, Balaenoptera physalus, with a view to informing management in a heavily impacted ocean region. We satellite-tracked the movements of 67 fin whales through the California Current System (CCS), a dynamic eastern boundary upwelling ecosystem in the Northeast Pacific. We use a multi-scale modelling framework to elucidate biophysical influences on habitat suitability for fin whales in the CCS. Using generalized additive mixed models, we quantify the influence of a suite of remotely sensed variables on broadscale patterns of occupancy and present the first year-round, high-resolution predictions of seasonal habitat suitability. Further, we model the influence of contemporaneous biophysical conditions on individual-level residence times in high-use habitat. In our results we present evidence of year-round habitat suitability in the southern California Current System, robust to interannual variability, that North Pacific fin whales do not follow the canonical baleen whale migration model. Within the high-use habitat in the Southern California Bight (SCB), individual-level residency in localized areas (n = 16 for >30 days; n = 4 for >6 months) was associated with warm, shallow, nearshore waters (>18C, <500 m), with cool waters (14"15C) occurring over complex seafloor topographies and with convergent (sub)mesoscale structures at the surface. Main Conclusions: Biophysical conditions in the southern CCS generate productive foraging habitats that can support the fin whale population year-round and allow for extended periods of residency in localized areas. High-use habitats for fin whales are colocated with areas of intense human use, including international shipping routes and a major naval training range. Seasonal habitat suitability maps presented here could inform the management of anthropogenic threats to endangered baleen whales in this globally significant biodiversity hotspot.

Bio(s): Elliott Hazen is a Research Ecologist with NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center's Environmental Research Division and an adjunct professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UC Santa Cruz. Elliott's research includes foraging ecology of rorqual whales (Humpback whales in Antarctica and the Gulf of Maine, Blue whales in the Southern California Bight), spatial ecology of top predators in the Pacific Ocean, climate change effects on marine top predators and their ecosystems, and use of species-environment relationships to create fine scale spatial management tools to maximize ecological and economic sustainability. Elliott also contributes to the California Current Integrated Ecosystem Assessment, co-leading the risk component. Prior to joining NOAA Fisheries, Elliott was a research associate at UC Santa Cruz and a NRC postdoctoral fellow before that. He received his Bachelor of Science from Duke University in Biology in 2000, a Masters of Science in 2003 from the University of Washington in Fisheries, and a PhD in 2008 from Duke University in the field of Ecology.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

3 October 2017

Title: Communicating Best Practices for Mentoring Underrepresented Students in STEM
Presenter(s): Leticia D. Williams, Ph.D., Howard University, Fellow, NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 3 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Leticia D. Williams, Ph.D., Howard University, Fellow, NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar, co-hosted by Lonnie.Gonsalves@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: NOAA scientists play a critical role in supporting the development of the next generation of STEM talent. NOAA programs such as the Hollings Scholarship, Cooperative Science Centers, and the Education Partnership Program Scholarship bring over 100 students to NOAA facilities annually. These students receive valuable hands-on training directly from NOAA professionals who play a pivotal role in the development of a diverse future science workforce. During this presentation we will discuss best practices for mentoring underrepresented STEM students and address key challenges NOAA staff may be facing. Since the 1980s, scholars, educators, and science practitioners have developed mentoring programs to increase the diversity of STEM students, specifically women, African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans. Nationally these mentoring programs have had minimal success in increasing the population of underrepresented students in the STEM pipeline. Communication practices of mentors are critical to the mentoring process. This project demonstrates the importance of communication, race, gender, and culture to mentor underrepresented graduate STEM students. All those involved or interested in student mentoring and workforce development are encouraged to attend.

Bio(s): Dr. Leticia Williams is a recent graduate from Howard University's Communication, Culture, and Media Studies program. She is currently a research fellow at the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology (NCAS-M) at Howard University. After completing her bachelor's degree in journalism at the University of Southern California, Leticia joined Fox Sports and MyNetworkTV as a research analyst. This experience as an analyst prompted her return to academia at California State University, Fresno where she earned a master's degree in communications. Her research interests include technology, media, and science communication to explore how scientists communicate their research. And also the role of communication in increasing awareness of issues related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and diversity. The objective of Leticia's current research is to examine how to facilitate multicultural mentoring practices among STEM faculty and STEM professionals to matriculate underrepresented students into the STEM pipeline.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Developments in the ECMWF humidity background errors
Presenter(s): Elias Holm, ECMWF
Date & Time: 3 October 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, College Park, Room 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar.

Presenter(s): Elias Holm, ECMWF

Title: Developments in the ECMWF humidity background errors Presentation: http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2017/Holm_NCEPHumBerr_slides171003.pdf YouTube video: https://youtu.be/WW0uhNs481U Contact: Andrew Collard JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract: The background error used in 4D-Var and the EDA has unbalanced relative humidity as control variable, with analytic balance operator between humidity and temperature in cloudy conditions. Recent developments have added humidity background error variances taken directly from the Ensemble of Data Assimilations (EDA), like for all other variables. This replaces earlier background and level dependent statistical estimates of the humidity variances. This change improved forecast scores and background fit to observations, including winds, and went operational 11 July 2017. I will show some selected results from this change and discuss some further developments. These include single observation experiments with a new analytic balance operator coupling humidity and dynamic background errors and the sensitivity of the analysis to using stratospheric humidity variances from the EDA versus tapering them to very small values, as done operationally. ====== Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

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2 October 2017

Title: A look forward: Technological advances and how NOAA can benefit
Presenter(s): Neal Fishman, IBM
Date & Time: 2 October 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Neal Fishman, IBM Host: NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) POC for questions: Adrienne Simonson and Shane Glass webinar log on: https://apps.na.collabserv.com/meetings/join?id=7628-3672 Join as "guest", enter your name and your affiliation/company password: noaa_ibm (lower case) dial in: 1-888-426-6840, Participant code: 97550952#

Abstract: In the past few years, a number of techie buzzwords and capabilities have taken hold - not just in IT, but also in business and in society. Words and phrases like cloud computing, fog computing, containerization, on-prem, hybrid, cognitive, AI (whether artificial intelligence or augmented intelligence), platform-as-a-service and the plethora of other as-a-service paradigms including software, data center, infrastructure, mobile, etc. are readily spoken about at work and even on the 6 o'clock news. Let's spend an hour curating these new terms and grounding ourselves into what they mean, what they are, and what they are intended to provide.

Bio(s): Neal Fishman is the Program Director for Data Based Pathology within IBM's Hybrid Cloud and Advanced Analytics group. He leads a group of architects worldwide for the Public Sector Team. Neal is the author of "Viral Data in SOA: An Enterprise Pandemic" and the co-author of "Enterprise Architecture Using the Zachman Framework.

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28 September 2017

Title: Inter-basin differences in the relationship between SST on tropical cyclone intensification
Presenter(s): Dr. Gregory Foltz, NOAA/AOML/PhOD
Date & Time: 28 September 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Gregory Foltz, NOAA/AOML/PhOD

Sponsor(s): NOAA AOML; POC: Roberta Lusic (roberta.lusic@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/341794021

Abstract: Sea surface temperature (SST) is one of the most important parameters for tropical cyclone (TC) intensification. Here it is shown that the relationship between SST and TC intensification varies considerably from basin to basin, with SST explaining less than 3% of the variance in TC intensification rates in the Atlantic, 10% in the western North Pacific, and 17% in the eastern Pacific. Two main factors are shown to be responsible for these inter-basin differences. First, variability of SST along TCs' tracks is considerably lower in the Atlantic. This is due to smaller horizontal SST gradients in the Atlantic compared to the eastern Pacific and stronger damping of pre-storm SST's contribution to TC intensification by the storm-induced cold SST wake in the Atlantic. The damping occurs because SST tends to vary in phase with TC-induced SST cooling: in the Gulf of Mexico and northwestern Atlantic where SSTs are highest, TCs' translation speeds are lowest and therefore their cold wakes are strongest. A second factor is that SST tends to vary out of phase with vertical wind shear and outflow temperature in the western Pacific, where high SST is associated with weak wind shear and a cold upper troposphere. This strengthens the relationship between SST and TC intensification more in the western Pacific than in the eastern Pacific or Atlantic. Combined, these factors explain why pre-storm SST is such a poor predictor of TC intensification in the Atlantic compared to the eastern and western North Pacific.

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Title: Overview of Society for Ecological Restoration (SER's) New Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner Program
Presenter(s): Jen Lyndall, Society for Ecological Restoration
Date & Time: 28 September 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jen Lyndall, Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) Seminar

Sponsor(s): NOAA and USFWS; NOAA Points of Contact are NOAA's Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov, and US Fish and Wildlife Service's Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov Seminar Registration: https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e3y9wv1gvm1o/event/registration.html Invitations to register for the webinar will be emailed a week or two prior to the event. For the best viewing experience, please use Internet Explorer.

Abstract: Jen Lyndall will discuss SER's new ecological restoration practitioner certification programs developed to create a high professional standard for ecological restoration.

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Title: Multidecadal Variability and Climate Shift in the North Atlantic Ocean
Presenter(s): James Reagan, Oceanographer, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland and NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information. Co-authors include: Dan Seidov, NOAA NCEI; Alexey Mishonov, ESSIC, UMD and NOAA's NCEI; and Rost Parsons - NOAA's NCEI. Speaker will present at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 28 September 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): James Reagan, Oceanographer, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC), University of Maryland (UMD) and NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Co-authors include: Dan Seidov, NOAA NCEI; Alexey Mishonov, ESSIC, UMD and NOAA's NCEI; and Rost Parsons - NOAA's NCEI. Speaker will present at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: The North Atlantic Ocean is home to diverse marine ecosystems, resources, and plays an integral role in the global thermohaline circulation. It has been well documented that ocean heat content (OHC) has been rising globally over the past ~50 years; however, much less is understood with respect to regional OHC changes. For this study we focus on documenting and investigating regional OHC changes in the North Atlantic Ocean by utilizing the World Ocean Atlas 2013 version 2 (WOA13v2) decadal climatologies. The WOA13v2 contains six decadal climatologies of temperature and salinity dating back to 1955. It provides horizontal resolutions of up to -degree and on 102 standard depth levels from 0 to 5500m. We find, by comparing two 30-year climates from 1955-2012, that OHC changes in the North Atlantic are highly inhomogeneous with the largest increases in OHC occurring to the southeast of the Gulf Stream Extension. Additionally, we find that the multidecadal shift in temperature in the Gulf Stream region occurred primarily at the subsurface between 300 and 500m depths. This presentation will discuss the aforementioned results in more detail as well as a possible connection between North Atlantic OHC changes and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation.

Bio(s): James (Jim) Reagan is an oceanographer at the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center/Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites (ESSIC/CICS-MD) at the University of Maryland. He is a NOAA affiliate and works at the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) in Silver Spring, MD. Jim's primary work involves processing in situ ocean profile data for inclusion in the World Ocean Database and development/quality control of WOD-derived products (e.g., World Ocean Atlas). His current research primarily focuses on global ocean salinity variability and its relationship with the hydrological cycle. He holds a BS in Atmospheric Science from Cornell University (2008), an MS in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science from the University of Maryland (2010), and is currently a PhD student at the University of Maryland.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Harvey & Irma, Part Two: Prediction Across Timescales
Presenter(s): Xianan Jiang, University of California at Los Angeles, Shian-Jiann Lin, NOAA OAR Geophysical Fluid Dynamics laboratory, Kathy Pegion, George Mason University, Gerry Bell, NOAA NWS NCEP Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 28 September 2017
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 - SmTeamRm - 01304 VERY LIMITED SEATING + online access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Xianan Jiang (University of California, Los Angeles), Shian-Jiann Lin (NOAA OAR Geophysical Fluid Dynamics laboratory), Kathy Pegion (George Mason University), Gerry Bell (NOAA NWS NCEP Climate Prediction Center)

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR/CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program Seminar POC: Heather.Archambault@noaa.gov REMOTE ACCESS INFORMATION: - Link: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e18f6cecaf3a759e679092ac80b7f4050 - Passcode: 20910 - For audio: after logging on to the WebEx, click "I will call in" (to hear audio via phone). Make sure to enter both the access code and attendee ID #. Titles and Abstracts: Xianan Jiang - Extended-Range Predictability of Hurricane Genesis in a High-Resolution Global Coupled Model System - Motivated by increasing demand in the community for extended-range prediction of weather extremes, predictability of global tropical cyclogenesis is investigated based on a recently updated global high-resolution coupled model system at GFDL. While encouraging beyond-weather prediction skill (~11 days) is illustrated for selected hurricanes, limited cyclogenesis prediction skill in general is found for tropical cyclogenesis over global oceans during 11 years based on this model, particularly over the North Atlantic (NA). It is further suggested that tropical storms with relatively higher genesis skill are closely linked to local MJO and convectively coupled equatorial wave (CCEW) activities, confirming critical role of the MJO and CCEWs for extended-range prediction of tropical cyclogenesis. Over the NA, where the MJO influences are relatively weak, more predictable cyclogenesis is largely found over a southeast-northwestward belt from the West Africa coast to Caribbean Seas, in accord with local higher predictability of large-scale factors, including low-level relative vorticity, mid-level humidity, and vertical zonal wind shear. In contrast, poor cyclogenesis skill is found over the extratropical NA, where the large-scale factors exhibit low predictability due to extratropical influences. S.-J. Lin - Performance of FV3-based GFS for Hurricane Predictions and a Vision for Long-Range (from 5-day to S2S) Predictions - Up to date long term (2015-2017) statistics on hurricane track and intensity errors from the 13-km FV3-powered GFS will be presented. For the past two seasons (2015-2016), the track errors are slightly lower than the operational GFS. However, there is a significant improvement in the intensity prediction. Even at the relatively low 13-km resolution, the intensity errors are on par with the best intensity model, the HWRF. For the 2017 hurricane season, the FV3-GFS significantly outperformed the operational GFS, particularly for hurricane Harvey. Throughout the 2107 hurricane season, it is clear that a hurricane prediction system capable of long-range predictions would bring significant benefit to the society. We present a vision for the development and ultimately the transition to operation (R2O) of a long-range (from 5-day to S2S) hurricane prediction system, which is based on past and present research on improving MJO simulation in a GFDL model built for hurricane seasonal predictions (GFDL HiRAM, Chen and Lin 2011). A two-way nested global-to-regional FV3-GFS with 3-km resolution over the entire Atlantic basin has also been running experimentally in real-time. For hurricane Harvey, the nested grid version of FV3-GFS is shown to be capable of rapid intensification, producing heavy precipitation over Houston area 5 days in advance, which demonstrated the utility of the global-to-regional approach for long-range hurricane predictions. Kathy Pegion - SubX Predictions of Tropical Cyclone Activity - The Subseasonal Experiment (SubX) is a NOAA/Climate Testbed project focused on subseasonal predictability and predictions. Seven global models are producing seventeen years of ensemble retrospective forecasts initialized weekly to investigate subseasonal prediction and predictability. Additionally, this project began producing real-time predictions in support of the NOAA/NWS Climate Prediction Center as guidance for their week-3/4 outlooks in July 2017. This presentation will provide an overview of the project and a presentation of real-time forecasts for weeks 1-4 during the periods of hurricanes Harvey and Irma. We will focus on forecasts of precipitation and large-scale environmental factors relevant to tropical cyclone development, including shear, vorticity, and sea surface temperatures. Gerry Bell - The Science and Numbers behind NOAA's 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook - NOAA's 2017 Atlantic hurricane season outlook issued in early August indicated that an above-normal hurricane season was likely. It also indicated that the season could be extremely active (ACE 165% of the median) and the strongest since 2010. The outlook reflected predictions for a set of conditions to be in place during August-October which are known to produce active seasons. The factors behind the outlook will be discussed and compared with observations.

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27 September 2017

Title: Observation system experiments with the hourly-updating Rapid Refresh model using GSI hybrid ensemble/variational data assimilation
Presenter(s): Eric James, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory
Date & Time: 27 September 2017
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: David Skaggs Research Center (DSRC), Boulder, CO Room 3C404/405.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Eric James (Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory), eric.james@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s): Assimilation Development Branch of the Global Systems Division. POC: eric.james@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/750625978731724034 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract: This talk will describe results from a recent study published in the August 2017 issue of Monthly Weather Review, describing a set of observation system experiments (OSEs) over 3 seasons using the hourly-updated Rapid Refresh (RAP) numerical weather prediction (NWP) assimilation/system to identify the importance of the various components of the North American observing system for 2-12h RAP forecasts. Aircraft observations emerge as the strongest-impact observation type for wind, relative humidity (RH), and temperature forecasts, permitting a 15-30% reduction in 6h forecast error in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Major positive impacts are also seen from rawinsondes, GOES satellite cloud observations, and surface observations, with lesser but still significant impacts from GPS-PW observations, satellite atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs), radar reflectivity observations, and satellite radiance data. A separate experiment revealed that the aircraft-related RH forecast improvement was augmented by 50% due specifically to the addition of aircraft moisture observations. Additionally, observations from enroute aircraft and those from ascending or descending aircraft contribute approximately equally to overall forecast skill, with the strongest impacts in the respective layers of the observations. Initial results from these OSEs supported implementation of an improved assimilation configuration of boundary-layer pseudo-innovations from surface observations, as well as allowing the assimilation of satellite AMVs over land. The breadth of these experiments over the 3 seasons suggests that observation impact results are applicable to general forecasting skill, not just classes of phenomena in limited time periods.

Bio(s): Eric James is a Professional Research Associate with the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado. Based within the Assimilation Development Branch of the Global Systems Division in the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, his research interests include mesoscale data assimilation for numerical weather prediction (NWP), applications of NWP for renewable energy, and the use of high-resolution NWP for hydrologic forecasting. A core member of the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) development team, Eric supports research and development for NWP data assimilation for operational U.S. weather forecasting. He holds a B.S. in Geography and Meteorology from the University of Utah, and an M.S. degree in Atmospheric Science from Colorado State University.

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Title: Harvey & Irma, Part One: Attribution, Precipitation, & Flooding
Presenter(s): Adam Sobel, Columbia University, Tom Knutson and Sarah Kapnick, NOAA OAR Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas A&M University, Amir AghaKouchak, University of California at Irvine, Youlong Xia, NOAA NWS/NCEP Environmental Modeling Center
Date & Time: 27 September 2017
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 OAR CPO Fishbowl Room 12871 and Online Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Adam Sobel (Columbia University), Tom Knutson and Sarah Kapnick (NOAA OAR Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory), John Nielsen-Gammon (Texas A&M University), Amir AghaKouchak (University of California, Irvine), Youlong Xia (NOAA NWS/NCEP Environmental Modeling Center)

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR/CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program Seminar POC: Daniel.Barrie@noaa.gov REMOTE ACCESS INFORMATION: - Link: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e538d03f67149d9e4d63200675513301f - Passcode: 20910 - For audio: after logging on to the WebEx, click "I will call in" (to hear audio via phone). Make sure to enter both the access code and attendee ID #. Titles and Abstracts: Adam Sobel - Event attribution: the NAS 2016 report and comments on Harvey - I will briefly summarize key points from the National Academy report _Attribution of Extreme Weather Events in the Context of Climate Change_ published in 2016. I will argue that in general, we should no longer repeat the old chestnut "one can't attribute any single event to climate change," at least not without qualification. One can never attribute any single event *exclusively* to climate change, as there are always multiple causes, but attribution science provides a basis for more probabilistic statements quantifying the role of climate change as one of them. I will then make a few remarks on Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. As no formal attribution studies have yet been done on these events - and in fact doing them is probably just at the edge of what is possible with today's methods - one cannot justify strong or precise statements at present. However, based on our broader understanding of similar events and their relations to climate, there are some things that can be said. Tom Knutson and Sarah Kapnick - Hurricanes Harvey and Irma: Did Climate Change Play a Role? - Hurricane Irma was an exceptionally intense storm. It likely set a global record for the satellite era as the longest duration that a tropical cyclone has maintained surface wind speeds of at least 185 mph. There is indirect evidence that the severity of some of Irma's impacts, specifically storm surge levels and rainfall rates, were increased by anthropogenic climate change through increased sea level and atmospheric moisture. However, increased hurricane surge levels and hurricane rainfall rates have not been clearly detected in observed climate data. Scientists expect that Atlantic hurricanes will become more intense on average as the climate continues to warm, but there is no clear observational evidence to date for this connection. Climate change is expected to increase the global frequency of intense storms similar to Irma in the future, but quantifying the effect remains difficult, and there is only low confidence for such an increase in the Atlantic basin. John Nielsen-Gammon - Harvey: An Exceptional Event - The real-time multi-sensor daily rainfall estimates produced by NOAA's River Forecast Centers are used to place the extent and severity of heavy rainfall associated with Harvey into historical context. Over a wide range of sizes, ranging from smaller than Rhode Island to larger than Pennsylvania, the average rainfall produced by Harvey over multiple days appears to have been unprecedented among measured storms in the continental United States. Some records, particularly at longer durations, were broken by more than 50%. Harvey has potentially important implications for the design standards necessary for critical infrastructure to survive extreme rainfall. Amir AghaKouchak - Compounding Effects of Ocean and Fluvial Flooding in a Warming Climate - Common flood hazard assessment practices typically account for one driver at a time (e.g., either fluvial flooding only or ocean flooding only), whereas coastal areas are at risk for flooding from multiple drivers (e.g., extreme coastal high tide, storm surge, and river flow). Here, we propose a bivariate flood hazard assessment approach that accounts for compound flooding from river flow and coastal water level, and we show that a univariate approach may not appropriately characterize the flood hazard if there are compounding effects. Sea level rise (SLR), a well-documented and urgent aspect of anthropogenic global warming, threatens population and assets located in low-lying coastal regions and can exacerbate coastal flooding. Using copulas and bivariate dependence analysis, we also quantify the increases in failure probabilities for 2030 and 2050 caused by SLR under representative concentration pathways 4.5 and 8.5. The increase in failure probability is shown to be strongly affected by compounding effects of both ocean and terrestrial drivers. The proposed failure probability method offers an innovative tool for assessing compounding flood hazards in a warming climate. Youlong Xia - Using the Operational and the Experimental NLDAS Monitoring Systems to Investigate the Impact of Hurricane Harvey and Irma on Flooding - In a three-week span during the 2017 Atlantic Basin hurricane season, Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Texas (25August " 02 September 2017) and Irma made landfall in Florida (10-13 September 2017) bringing huge effects on the United States society and economy by damaging powerlines, houses, and buildings, as well as causing catastrophic flooding. Harvey was the wettest tropical hurricane on record in the contiguous United States and it brought more than 1000 mm (~40 inches) of rain in many regions of Texas and Louisiana during a four-day period, leading to over 70 fatalities people died and at least $70 billion economic losses recorded to date. Hurricane Irma was the most powerful hurricane ever recorded in the open Atlantic Ocean, making landfall in Florida on 10 September. The North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS), developed by multi-institutions and continuously sponsored by NOAA/CPO/MAPP project, is a widely-used monitoring tool for drought and flood. The NLDAS monitor, in particular its experimental realtime system recently jointly developed by NCEP/EMC and NASA/GSFC/HSL, is providing some guidance for the occurrence, persistence, and recovery of floods in the regions affected by these storms. The NLDAS system is also used to post-diagnose conditions, and to investigate its capabilities and weaknesses, using Harvey and Irma as two typical examples. In this presentation, NLDAS precipitation, soil moisture for different soil layers, evapotranspiration, and total runoff/streamflow was analyzed for the whole period from 20 August " 20 September 2017. Soil moisture conditions before hurricane landfall and total runoff/streamflow after landfall are addressed. The results show that there is a significant benefit to monitor floods when the realtime system is used in comparison to using the near-realtime operational system. The four-day delay of the current operational system is not sufficient to timely monitor flooding cases caused by hurricane and other significant rain events. This suggests the importance and need of a truly realtime NLDAS system upgrade for operational flood monitoring tasks.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NRL/JPSS Extending CrIS/ATMS Assimilation and Calibration/Validation through correlated error, over clouds and to the surface
Presenter(s): Benjamin Ruston, Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey CA
Date & Time: 27 September 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room S600 Greentech IV Building 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Benjamin Ruston, Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey CA

Sponsor(s): JPSS PROVING GROUND SEMINAR POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Remote Access: 877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m19275095e0f9ddd21343af8728fee030 Meeting number: 749 280 309 Host key: 964235 Meeting password: Jpss2017!

Abstract: NRL Monterey contributions to the JPSS proving ground include developed techniques, to assess the on-orbit performance of ATMS, sources of calibration noise, and explore optimization calibration and scene noise reduction methodologies. Further, to explore enhancement of operational ATMS/CrIS usage with systems run operationally by the US Navy at Fleet Numerical Oceanography and Meteorology Center (FNMOC), the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM) and the global NRL Variational Data Assimilation System " Accelerated Representer (NAVDAS-AR). We are exploring correlated error for ATMS, CrIS and IASI; adding surface sensitive channel assimilation; and the best exploitation of the CrIS full spectral resolution (FSR) data.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Can we predict Zika using good climate forecasts?
Presenter(s): Angel G. Munoz, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, AOS, Princeton University
Date & Time: 27 September 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): ngel G. Muoz, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS), Princeton University

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Given knowledge at the time, the recent 2015"2016 zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic probably could not have been predicted. Without the prior knowledge of ZIKV being already present in South America, and given the lack of understanding of key epidemiologic processes and long-term records of ZIKV cases in the continent, the best related prediction could be carried out for the potential risk of a generic Aedes-borne disease epidemic.

Bio(s): Muoz is a PostDoc at the Atmospheric and Oceanic Program, Princeton University, working on cross-timescale interference and diagnostics of climate models, subseasonal-to-seasonal predictability, vector-borne diseases and lightning. Before arriving at Princeton, Muoz did research at the IRI-Columbia University, related to cross-timescale interference and predictability of climate extreme events. He was associate professor in the Dep't. of Physics of Zulia University, and co-founder of the Center for Scientific Modeling (CMC), in Venezuela. He also helped create the Latin American Observatory for Climate Events.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 September 2017

Title: Data Assimilation in Marine Ecosystem Models
Presenter(s): J. Paul Mattern, Department of Ocean Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz
Date & Time: 26 September 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): J. Paul Mattern, Department of Ocean Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Yizhen.Li@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Marine ecosystem models have become important tools for predicting the biochemical state of the ocean and interpolating it to places where no observation are available. Yet unconstrained model simulations can quickly diverge from realistic results and much can be gained from combining these numerical models with observations: comparison with observations can yield better estimates of biological rate parameters and the assimilation of data into models can drastically improve their results. We present several examples of ecosystem model applications related to biological parameter estimation and data assimilation: two plankton parameters of a coastal model in the northwestern North Atlantic reveal a time-dependence consistent with biological seasonal cycles in that area. The parameter values have an annual periodicity that can be used to improve the forecasting abilities of the model. Results of a data assimilation application for the U.S. west coast show the benefits of assimilating a large number of physical and biogeochemical observations jointly. When comparing two ecosystem model formulations that differ in the number of variables and biogeochemical pathways that are simulated, we assess whether additional complexity in marine ecosystem models leads to improved results and better forecasting abilities.

Bio(s): J. Paul Mattern is an applied statistician with research interests focused on the development and implementation of statistical methods that combine large sets of observations with complex numerical models, including data assimilation, optimization and uncertainty analyses. He earned a BS and MS in computational life sciences, and his PhD in Statistics, with an emphasis on Oceanography. His PhD thesis was titled, Parameter, State and Uncertainty Estimation for 3-dimensional Biological Ocean Models.' He currently works as a Research Scientist at the Institute of Marine Sciences, at UC Santa Cruz.

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25 September 2017

Title: California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook September Webinar
Presenter(s): David Simeral, Western Regional Climate Center; Amanda Sheffield, National Integrated Drought Information System; Ken Nowak, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, representative of NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 25 September 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): David Simeral (Western Regional Climate Center), Amanda Sheffield (National Integrated Drought Information System), Ken Nowak (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation), representative of NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center. Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) Seminar POC for questions: amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4260134048179051266 TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the Webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (415) 655-0052 Access Code: 918-836-443 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar

Abstract: These drought and climate outlook webinars are designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and associated impacts in California and Nevada (including fisheries), as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia). Additional presentations include an update on the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's Sub-Seasonal Climate Forecast Rodeo. The webinar is one of the activities of NIDIS's California-Nevada Drought Early Warning Information System. Contributors include the California-Nevada Climate Applications Program, a NOAA RISA Program, the Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC)/Desert Research Institute (DRI), Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's Sub-Seasonal Climate Forecast Rodeo, and NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

21 September 2017

Title: Using sound to understand pelagic predator behavior
Presenter(s): Adrienne Copeland, Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, OAR NOAA
Date & Time: 21 September 2017
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Adrienne Copeland, Ph.D., 2017 Knauss Fellow, Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, OAR NOAA Seminar sponsors: NOAA Central Library; Knauss Brown Bag Program. Seminar POCs: Knauss September coordinator: maggie.allen@noaa.gov; Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator/webinar host: judith.salter@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the September Knauss webinar here: https://goo.gl/JjzgWe After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Patchiness of prey can influence the behavior of a predator, as predicted by the optimal foraging theory which states that an animal will maximize the energy gain while minimizing energy loss. While this relationship has been studied and is relatively well understood in some terrestrial systems, the same is far from true in marine systems. It is as important to investigate this in the marine realm in order to better understand predator distribution and behavior. Micronekton, organisms from 2 " 20 cm, might be a key component in understanding this as it is potentially an essential link in the food web between primary producers and higher trophic levels, including cephalopods which are primary prey items of deep diving odontocetes (toothed whales). This talk assesses the spatial and temporal variability of micronekton in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Additionally it focuses on understanding the relationship between the spatial distribution of micronekton and environmental and geographic factors, and how the spatial and temporal variability of this micronekton relates to deep diving odontocete foraging. A Simrad EK60 echosounder recorded water column micronekton backscatter and a passive acoustic system detected the presence of foraging clicks from deep diving beaked, sperm, and short-finned pilot whales. These results provide insight into what might be contributing to hotspots of micronekton. These hotspots may be good predictors of the distribution of some deep-diving toothed whale foragers since the hotspots potentially indicate a food web supporting the prey of the cetaceans.

Bio(s): Adrienne is originally from Washington State and received her Bachelor of Science in Biology and Certificate in Mathematical Biology from Washington State University. Adrienne received her Ph.D. in Zoology with Marine Biology specialization from University of Hawaii at Mnoa in 2016. Adrienne has been on over 20 seagoing expeditions and was chief scientist on six of these trips, including a 2014 research cruise on Schmidt Ocean Institute's Ship Falkor.

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Title: Inorganic carbon dynamics in a marsh-dominated estuary
Presenter(s): Shiyu Rachel Wang, Office of Aquaculture, NMFS, NOAA
Date & Time: 21 September 2017
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Shiyu (Rachel) Wang, 2017 John Knauss Fellow, Office of Aquaculture, NMFS, NOAA Seminar sponsors: NOAA Central Library; Knauss Brown Bag Program. Seminar POCs: Knauss September coordinator: maggie.allen@noaa.gov; Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator/webinar host: judith.salter@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the September Knauss webinar here: https://goo.gl/JjzgWe After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Carbon dynamics in salt marsh estuarine ecosystem has been gaining great attention from scientists and policy makers because of their tremendously high rates of primary production, their support for commercial fisheries, and their disproportionately large contribution to the global carbon budget relative to their size. A free-water mass balance-based study was conducted to address the rate of metabolism and net carbon exchange for the tidal wetland and estuarine portion of Georgia coastal ocean. We observed that the overall estuarine system was a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere and the coastal ocean. Rates of metabolism were extremely high, with respiration (43 mol m'2 yr'1) greatly exceeding gross primary production (28 mol m'2 yr'1), such that the overall system was net heterotrophic. A significant percentage of the overall estuarine aquatic metabolism is attributable to metabolism of marsh organisms during inundation.

Bio(s): Rachel received her master's degree in Marine Sciences at the University of Georgia. Her research focused on the carbon exchange in salt marsh estuaries. Before coming to the US, she had lived in China for 22 years and got her bachelor's degree in Chemistry from the Ocean University of China. Prior to her Knauss fellowship, she worked with GA Sea Grant and National Marine Sanctuaries on acoustically active animals living in the ocean, and taught a marine biology summer class to middle school students. (Fun fact about her: Rachel enjoys meeting people from all over the world. Her first American football game experience was watching it with a group of international students and no one knew what was going on through the entire game, but they still ended up having lots of fun.)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: National Snow Analysis: 13 Years of Operations - NOTE CORRECTED TIME
Presenter(s): Greg Fall - OWP / NOHRSC
Date & Time: 21 September 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP, conference room 2552-2553 (Large Conference Room), 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Greg Fall of Office of Water Prediction / NOHRSC

Sponsor(s): This seminar is sponsored by STAR and the OWP, contact: Ralph Ferraro at: ralph.r.ferraro@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Event name: 398 562 842 Webex address: https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=e690376c3598d2ca939682821bde73242 Conference Dial In: 1-650-479-3207 and passcode is 398 562 842 If you have not previously accessed Webex, make sure to test your access early so that you can install any needed plugins.

Abstract: Operational since October 2004, the National Snow Analysis (NSA) will complete its 13th year of operations in 2017. The NSA is a collection of operational products and services derived primarily from the Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS). SNODAS combines a mass and energy balance model of the surface snowpack over the CONUS and southern Canada, driven by numerical weather prediction (NWP) model analyses and forecasts, with an assimilation system that updates SNODAS states using observations collected by surface stations and surveyors, satellites, and aircraft (via NOAA's Airborne Snow Survey program). Clients of the NSA include NWS River Forecast Centers and other government agencies, emergency managers, policymakers, and the general public. The NSA provides clients with near-real-time raster data sets, imagery, basin averaged snowpack information, and a wide variety of other products available via an interactive web interface. Given its years of operations, the NSA now performs routine comparisons of SNODAS states with period-of- record (currently consisting of water years 2005-2016) normals, providing valuable context for real-time analyses. This presentation will provide an overview of the NSA and SNODAS, with some highlights from the winter of 2016-17. About Mr. Fall: Greg Fall joined the National Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center (now the OWP-Chanhassen, MN) in 1999 and contributed to the design, development, and implementation of the Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS). He is currently the lead for the Office of Water Prediction's (OWP) National Snow Analysis function, which encompasses SNODAS and related products and services. Greg also serves as lead for the National Water Model Forcing Data Improvement Project and the Experimental Gridded Snowfall Analysis Project at OWP.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

20 September 2017

Title: Manta Rays: Studying an Ocean Icon
Presenter(s): Joshua Stewart, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Date & Time: 20 September 2017
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Joshua Stewart, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at Scripps Institution of Oceanography Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access: Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6825035192294764034

Abstract: Manta rays are one of the most iconic marine megafauna in the ocean, reaching wingspans of over 20 feet and delighting divers and snorkelers with their gregarious behavior. Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar Joshua Stewart will give a presentation on the biology and ecology of manta rays, current threats and conservation action, including his latest research on mantas, and how new technology is providing insights into these mysterious creatures' lives. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: How Does the Early 21st Century Drought in the U.S. Compare to the Drought Episodes of the 1930s and 1950s?
Presenter(s): Richard R. Heim Jr., Meteorologist, NOAA/NESDIS/National Centers for Environmental Information - NCEI. Presenting remotely from Asheville, NC
Date & Time: 20 September 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Richard R. Heim Jr., Meteorologist, NOAA/NESDIS/National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Presenting remotely from Asheville, NC.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar, coordinated by Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: The United States experienced a severe drought which peaked in 2012 and which was characterized by near-record extent, record warmth, and record dryness in several areas. For some regions, the 2012 drought was a continuation of drought which began in earlier years and which continued through 2014. The 1998-2014 drought episode is compared to the two other major drought episodes of the 20th century in terms of duration, areal extent, intensity, and spatial pattern, using operational datasets produced by NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information. This drought episode is characterized by more short-term dryness, more concurrent (regional) wetness, and warmer temperatures than the other two drought episodes. The implications of these differences for water resource managers and decision-makers are discussed.

Bio(s): Richard R. Heim Jr. earned a bachelors degree in Mathematics (with 5 minors) and a masters in meteorology/climatology from the Geography Department at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. During his 35 years with NOAA, Mr. Heim managed the 1961-1990 U.S. and Global Climate Normals project, the Snow Climatology Project, and the first two years of the U.S. Climate Reference Network. He has been involved in drought monitoring and drought research at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Research since 1988, is an author of the U.S. Drought Monitor and North American Drought Monitor, and is collaborating with colleagues in the U.S. and internationally on the creation of the Global Drought Information System.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Science - Society: Equilibrating Our Understanding of Ocean Acidification
Presenter(s): Carla Edworthy, Nelson Mandela University, South Africa
Date & Time: 20 September 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Carla Edworthy, Nelson Mandela University, South Africa

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Acidification; jennifer.bennett@noaa.gov

Abstract: Ocean acidification is a hot topic in the science community which is focusing more and more research into understanding this complex chemical phenomenon and its impacts on our marine resources. Even though our scientific understanding of ocean acidification is in its early stages, the need to engage the non-science community on this topic is greater than ever to ensure that we can manage and adapt to its consequence on our communities in a proactive way. It is essential that our understanding of ocean acidification develops concurrently and that we recognize the mutual need to investigate, understand and manage this phenomenon that is occurring on a global scale. This webinar will focus on a personal experience with mobilizing citizen and professional science in South Africa by means of a continentally co-ordinated event on World Ocean Day 2017. It will highlight the methods of engagement with both the science and non-science community as well as present the various challenges and lessons learnt from this experience.

Past seminars: http://oceanacidification.noaa.gov/WhatWeDo/EducationOutreach.aspx#14965

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

19 September 2017

Title: Exploring the largest biome on Earth - the midwater: tools, taxonomy and "fake data"
Presenter(s): Dr. Dhugal Lindsay, JAMSTEC
Date & Time: 19 September 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Dhugal John Lindsay, Marine Biologist, Research Scientist with the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science & Technology (JAMSTEC)

Seminar POC: NOAA Central Library; Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator/webinar host: judith.salter@noaa.gov; NOAA Ocean Exploration & Research Dr. Amanda Netburn, Research Program Administrator.

Abstract: Exploration of the ocean's midwater zone, requires an array of tools due to the great diversity in size, speed and fragility of its inhabitants. Tools for investigating various subcomponents exist, but understanding how they interact can only be achieved by combining such tools or developing new tools. In the deep pelagic under highly oligotrophic surface waters most organisms are expected to be small and occur at low densities. In the deep Sargasso Sea, a MOCNESS net with a mouth area of 10 m2 and mesh aperture of 330 m was used to sample the deep pelagic. However, a recent cruise to the highly oligotrophic Arctic Ocean, using an ROV with high-resolution cameras, discovered large populations of taxa such as ctenophores and siphonophores. Such fragile animals may well have been underrepresented in the Sargasso samples due to fragmentation and destruction through contact with the net. Other optics-based tools deployed in the Arctic allowed the marine snow field to be characterized. Video cameras and other optical instruments deployed on opening-closing nets in Japanese waters indeed record fragile organisms that do not survive net collection as well as giving information on other organic particulates/food sources. From the porthole of a submersible it is possible to observe gelatinous zooplankton from a few millimeters in size to over 40 m in length. The human eye possesses the necessary resolution and refocusing speed to make observations on the greater part of this fauna but it lacks recording capability. Recent advances in imaging technology, such as 8K video cameras and a nested approach to tackle problems of scale may offer a solution. Areas targeted for exploratory midwater surveys can be determined in a number of ways. Rapidly changing areas such as the Polar regions are, of course, high priority targets but several regions in the world's oceans have very different vertical profiles of physico-chemical parameters such as temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen and allow studies on drivers and processes to be combined with exploratory work. Areas that are the Type Localities of various species can also be fruitful targets. Recent work that involved surveying and collecting a number of jellyfish morphotypes that had all been synonymized as "Aegina citrea" led to the splitting of this species into 6 distinct species and the erection of two new families and three new genera to contain them. This work also found that 100% of the entries in GenBank and over 90% of the entries in OBIS for this species are actually referable to different species, illustrating the importance of revisiting type localities with the best tools and taxonomists.

Bio(s): Dr. Dhugal John Lindsay is a Research Scientist with the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science & Technology (JAMSTEC) and holds adjunct professorships at Yokohama Municipal University and Kitasato University. Dr. Lindsay's research focuses on mid-water ecology, particularly concentrating on gelatinous organisms. Dr. Lindsay has extensive experience with the Japanese research vessel and submersible fleet, both as Chief Scientist and as a member of multidisciplinary teams. He is Project Leader of JAMSTEC's PICASSO Project. He served on the Steering Committee of the Census of Marine Zooplankton (Census of Marine Life: CoML) and on the National Regional Implementation Committee for Japan. Dr. Lindsay is also a renowned and prolific haiku poet, working in the Japanese language.

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14 September 2017

Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 September 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: Satellite tracking sharks and fishing vessels to assess a remote MPA
Presenter(s): Tim White, Stanford University
Date & Time: 14 September 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Tim White of Stanford University Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2334009580381970945

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract: Large marine protected areas (MPAs) have recently been established throughout the world at an unprecedented pace, yet the value of these reserves for mobile species conservation remains uncertain. This webinar will describe how recent advances in satellite technology and big data analytics have improved our ability to observe and understand the benefits of large MPAs. As a primary case study, the webinar will outline recent efforts to track fishing vessels and reef sharks within the Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, a U.S.-administered protected area in the central Pacific Ocean.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Simulating the Impacts of Nutrient Reductions on Hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico: Implications for Nutrient Management
Presenter(s): Katja Fennel, PhD., Professor, Dep't of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada, presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD. Co-author: Dr. Arnaud Laurent, Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Halifax
Date & Time: 14 September 2017
9:00 am - 10:00 am ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series NOTE: This seminar is on Sept 14, 9-10am EDT (moved from 9/14, 12-1pm EDT).

Presenter(s): Katja Fennel, PhD., Professor, Dep't of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada, presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD. Co-author: Dr. Arnaud Laurent, Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Alan.Lewitus@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: A large hypoxic area (15,000 km2 on average) forms every summer over the continental shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Hypoxia results from decay of organic matter that is primarily derived from nutrient inputs from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River System. Efforts are underway to reduce the extent of hypoxic conditions through nutrient management in the watershed; for example, the interagency Hypoxia Task Force is developing Action Plans with input from various stakeholders that set out targets for hypoxia reduction. Open questions are how far nutrient loads would have to be decreased in order to produce the desired reductions in hypoxia, and when these would be measurable given significant natural variability. We have simulated a large number of multi-year nutrient load reduction scenarios with a regional biogeochemical model for the region. The model is based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), explicitly includes nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) species as inorganic nutrients, and has been shown to realistically reproduce the key processes responsible for hypoxia generation. We have quantified the effects of differential reductions in river N and P loads on hypoxic extent. An assessment of the effects of N versus P reductions is important because, thus far, nutrient management efforts have focused on N, yet P is known to limit primary production in spring and early summer. Our results strongly indicate that N is the ultimate' limiting nutrient to primary production determining the areal extent and duration of hypoxic conditions in a cumulative sense, while P is temporarily limiting in spring. Although reductions in river P load would decrease hypoxic extent in early summer, they would have a much smaller effect than N reductions on the cumulative extent and duration of hypoxic conditions. Combined reductions of N and P have the greatest effect.

Bio(s): Dr. Katja Fennel is Professor in the Department of Oceanography at Dalhousie University. As head of the Marine Environmental Modeling Group (http://memg.ocean.dal.ca) she leads the development of marine ecosystem and biogeochemical models at Dalhousie. For over two decades, Dr. Fennel has developed and applied numerical models of marine ecosystems and biogeochemistry with particular focus on continental shelf systems and the cycling of nitrogen, carbon and oxygen. In addition to implementing biogeochemical models, Dr. Fennel has developed and applied methods for the assimilation of observations into these models in order to improve their predictive capabilities. She serves as co-editor-in-chief of the high-impact journal Biogeosciences, and has served on the editorial boards of three other scientific journals and on several international science advisory bodies including the IMBER/LOICZ Continental Margins Task Team and the CLIVAR Working Group on Ocean Model Development. Currently she is science team member of GODAE OceanView, co-chairs the GODAE Marine Ecosystem Analysis and Prediction Task Team, and serves on the international science advisory board of the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service in Europe, the Scientific Committee of the Ocean Frontier Institute at Dalhousie, and the international Biogeochemical Argo Steering Committee.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

13 September 2017

Title: Sea-level rise 'hot spots' along the U.S. Atlantic coast
Presenter(s): Arnoldo Valle-Levinson, Professor, University of Florida, Civil and Coastal Engineering Department
Date & Time: 13 September 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Arnoldo Valle-Levinson, Professor, University of Florida, Civil and Coastal Engineering Department

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Sea-level rise (SLR) accelerated in a hot spot along the north of Cape Hatteras over the past several decades, including an abrupt rise of ~13 cm in 2009-2010. This regional acceleration in SLR has been attributed to weakening in Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), although this causal link remains debated. Professor Valle-Levinson will talk about a striking shift in the pattern of SLR along the U.S. Atlantic coast during 2011-2015, whereby SLR decelerated north of Cape Hatteras and accelerated south of the Cape to >20 mm/yr, despite continued decline in AMOC strength. Tide-gauge records, 95-yr long, show that similar SLR intervals have occurred repeatedly over ~1500-km stretches of coastline. Causes for this variability are likely associated with the cumulative effects of ENSO and NAO. The regional expression of SLR hot spots documented here is a key factor in determining coastal vulnerability in the context of continued global mean sea-level rise and should be captured in global climate models of regional sea-level change.

Bio(s): Arnoldo Valle-Levinson carried out undergraduate studies at the University of Baja California, in Mexico, and graduate studies on Marine Sciences at Stony Brook University, New York. He is author in 160+ peer-reviewed publications in international journals. His research concentrates in coastal hydrodynamics, specifically in the areas of morphologic effects on estuarine and coastal circulation, and on wind-driven, tidally driven and density-driven circulation. Arnoldo has been Visiting Researcher at several institutions in the Netherlands, Spain, Australia, Mexico, Chile, Japan, and France. He is one of the 100 worldwide Corresponding Members of the Mexican Academy of Sciences. He is Associate Editor of Continental Shelf Research, Estuaries and Coasts, and Oceanography.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

12 September 2017

Title: The US Arctic Research Commission's Working Groups
Presenter(s): Dr. Cheryl Rosa, Deputy Director, US Arctic Research Commission
Date & Time: 12 September 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Cheryl Rosa, Deputy Director, US Arctic Research Commission

Sponsor(s): ACCAP Alaska Climate Webinar (http://www.accap.uaf.edu/) POC: Tina Buxbaum

Remote Access: Registration and more information available at: https://accap.uaf.edu/USARC_WorkingGroups

Abstract: A primary duty of the US Arctic Research Commission (USARC; https://www.arctic.gov/) is to interact with Arctic residents, international Arctic research programs and organizations, and local institutions including regional governments, in order to obtain the broadest possible view of Arctic research needs. To facilitate this, the USARC coordinates working groups to examine and develop research needs for specific topics"generally based on feedback from stakeholders. USARC's Anchorage-based office currently coordinates three working groups: the Alaska Rural Water and Sanitation Working Group (ARWSWG), the Arctic Renewable Energy Working Group (AREWG) and the Arctic Mental Health Working Group (AMMHWG). This webinar will present an overview of the mission and objectives of the three US Arctic Research Commission working groups, as well as ways to connect with their activities.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Nutrients and Chlorophyll near Estuarine Shores
Presenter(s): Thomas E. Jordan, Donald E. Weller, and Carey E. Pelc, all from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD. Presenting at NOAA in SIlver Spring.
Date & Time: 12 September 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series NOS Special Seminar Series: The Mid-Atlantic Shorelines Project; Seminar No. 1

Presenter(s): Thomas E. Jordan, Donald E. Weller, and Carey E. Pelc, all from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD. Presenting at NOAA in SIlver Spring.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Elizabeth.Turner@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Nutrient inputs have degraded estuaries worldwide. We investigated the sources and effects of nutrient inputs by comparing water quality at shallow (<2m deep) nearshore (within 200m) locations in a total of 49 Chesapeake subestuaries and Mid-Atlantic coastal bays with differing local watershed land-use. During July-October, concentrations of total nitrogen (TN), dissolved ammonium, dissolved inorganic N (DIN), and chlorophyll-a were positively correlated with the percentages of cropland and developed land in the local watersheds. TN, DIN, and nitrate were positively correlated with the ratio of watershed area to subestuary area. Total phosphorus (TP) and dissolved phosphate increased with cropland but were not affected by developed land. The relationships among N, P, chlorophyll-a, and land-use suggest N limitation of chlorophyll-a production from July-October. We compared our measurements inside the subestuaries to measurements by the Chesapeake Bay Program in adjacent estuarine waters outside the subestuaries. TP and dissolved inorganic P concentrations inside the subestuaries correlated with concentrations outside the subestuaries. However, water quality inside the sub-estuaries generally differed from that in adjacent estuarine waters. The concentration of nitrate was lower inside the subestuaries, while the concentrations of other forms of N, TP, and chlorophyll-a were higher. This suggests that shallow nearshore waters inside the subestuaries import nitrate while exporting other forms of N as well as TP and chlorophyll-a. The importance of local land-use and the distinct biogeochemistry of shallow waters should be considered in managing coastal systems. Dr. Thomas Jordan is a Senior Scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC). He received a BS in Biology from Bucknell University, Pennsylvania; and a PhD in Biology from Boston University, Massachusetts. His research is on the transport and transformation of the nitrogen and phosphorus in ecosystems. Human alterations of the global cycles of these essential plant nutrients have led to their overabundance in aquatic ecosystems and detrimental impacts on coastal waters worldwide. Since starting at SERC in 1980, Jordan has studied the sources of nutrient releases from watersheds, the uptake of nutrients by wetlands and riparian forests, and the fates and effects of nutrients in estuaries, especially in Chesapeake Bay and its watershed.

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7 September 2017

Title: Are there common, fundamental, emergent properties of all marine ecosystems, and if so are they useful?
Presenter(s): Jason Link, PhD, NMFS
Date & Time: 7 September 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, NOAA HQ SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jason Link, PhD, Senior Scientist for Ecosystem Management, NOAA Fisheries

Remote Access: https://goo.gl/vRjRsq Note: Dr. Link is presenting remotely, but you are welcome to follow along in the Brown Bag area of the Library, SSMC#3, 2nd Floor

Abstract: Whether there are common and emergent patterns from marine ecosystems remains an important question because marine ecosystems provide billions of dollars of ecosystem services to the global community, but face many perturbations with significant consequences. Here, we develop cumulative trophic patterns for marine ecosystems, featuring sigmoidal cumulative biomass (cumB)"trophic level (TL) and hockey-stick' production (cumP)"cumB curves. The patterns have a trophodynamic theoretical basis and capitalize on emergent, fundamental, and invariant features of marine ecosystems. These patterns have strong global support, being observed in over 120 marine ecosystems. Parameters from these curves elucidate the direction and magnitude of marine ecosystem perturbation or recovery; if biomass and productivity can be monitored effectively over time, such relations may prove to be broadly useful. Curve parameters are proposed as possible ecosystem thresholds, perhaps to better manage the marine ecosystems of the world.

Bio(s): Jason Link, PhD, is the first-ever Senior Scientist for Ecosystem Management for NOAA Fisheries. In this role, Dr. Link is the agency's senior-most authority on ecosystem science, conducting research and coordinating activities of NOAA Fisheries' science support for effective ecosystem-based management. He leads approaches and models to support development of ecosystem-based management plans throughout the agency. During his career with NOAA Fisheries, Dr. Link's work has revolved around the scientific underpinnings for ecosystem-based marine resource management. His expertise in food web dynamics and his exemplary work with the Ecosystem Assessment Program at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole prior to his current position has led to his and NOAA's acknowledgement around the world, resulting in comparable programs in other regions and countries. While pelagic communities and predator-prey ecology remain important to him, Dr. Link's work has moved more towards applied ecological modeling and practical fisheries science for management. Recent efforts have focused on multi-species models, ecosystem models, emergent features and common patterns in marine ecosystems, essential fish habitat, risk evaluation, and developing resource management tools and systems with a strong ecological, and now climatological, basis.

Bio(s): Dr. Link has extensive experience working in marine and Great Lakes systems around the world. He is an adjunct professor at multiple regional universities and serves on and chairs several national and international working groups, review panels, and committees dealing with fisheries ecosystem issues, being a commonly requested speaker at various fora and venues. He received his B.S. from Central Michigan University and his Ph.D. from Michigan Technological University. He received the Fisheries Society of the British Isles Medal for significant advances in fisheries science and a Department of Commerce Bronze medal for work clarifying the trophic relationships among fishes in the northwest Atlantic.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Emerging role of wetland methane in driving 21st-century climate change
Presenter(s): Zhen Zhang, University of Maryland. Co-author: Ben Poulter, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Date & Time: 7 September 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Zhen Zhang, University of Maryland. Co-author: Ben Poulter, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Conventional greenhouse gas mitigation policies ignore the role of global wetlands in emitting methane (CH4) from feedbacks associated with the changing climate. We investigate wetland CH4 feedbacks and whether, and to what degree, wetlands will exceed anthropogenic 21st century CH4 emissions using an ensemble of climate projections and a biogeochemical methane model with dynamic wetland area and permafrost. We find that climate-change induced increases in wetland CH4 could dominate anthropogenic CH4 warming effect due to processes mainly related to the sensitivity of methane emissions to temperature and changing global wetland area.This highlights the need to accelerate the CH4 mitigation technologies to balance the potential warming feedbacks from wetlands CH4, and the need to consider wetland CH4 feedbacks in mitigation policies aiming to keep global warming below 2C.

Bio(s): Dr. Zhen Zhang is a biogeochemical modeler and climate change researcher currently working on modeling greenhouse gases from global wetlands in the Anthropocene using global dynamic vegetation models and climate models. Currently he is a postdoctoral scientist at the University of Maryland and a guest scientist of the Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, a research institute in ETH domain, where he had worked for three years as postdoc. He's also a joint scientific research staff at the Northwest Eco-Environments Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 September 2017

Title: EndNote Training for NOAA: with a subject focus on Aquaculture
Presenter(s): Donna Kirking, Clarivate Analytics
Date & Time: 6 September 2017
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: via Webinar and NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, NOAA HQ SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Donna Kirking, Product Specialist, EndNote Duration: approximately 90 minutes, including time for questions

Remote Access: Webinar registration link (via Clarivate Analytics): https://thomsonreuters.webex.com/thomsonreuters/k2/j.php?MTID=t63378faf022a224e0bbb6eafc7e14275 Each attendee logging in will need to register in advance because each person receives a unique link to the class"and only one person can use that link. If people will be meeting as a group in a conference room, only the person logging in needs to register. You are also welcome to follow along with Librarians in the Brown Bag area of the NOAA Central Library. Note: this training will not be archived by the library, but we will post the links to the EndNote recording in our archives. There is a class recording of a similar class at https://youtu.be/qv0TzM38GYM. NOAA has a site-wide EndNote 8X license provided by the NOAA Central Library. Download EndNote software and product keys for NOAA staff at: https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/nites-endnote/ Endnote Training Guide: http://clarivate.libguides.com/endnote_training

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Chasing Coral: A Film Documentary
Presenter(s): Jennifer Koss, Director, Coral Reef Conservation Program; Mark Eakin, Lead Scientist, Coral Reef Watch Program and co-Chief Scientific Advisor of Chasing Coral; and Britt Parker, CRCP Senior Climate and International Specialist
Date & Time: 6 September 2017
10:00 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Rm 1W611 (first floor large conf. room); No webinar.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Featuring a Q&A Discussion Panel with: - Jennifer Koss, Director, Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) - Mark Eakin, Lead Scientist, Coral Reef Watch Program and co-Chief Scientific Advisor of Chasing Coral, and - Britt Parker, CRCP Senior Climate and International Specialist

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; One NOAA Science Seminars, NOAA/NOS/OCM Coral Reef Conservation Program, and NOAA/NESDIS Coral Reef Watch Program. Point of contact is Miguel.Figuerola@noaa.gov Note: No webinar is available for this event.

Abstract: The full environmental and economic value of coral reefs is estimated at $375 billion per year. 93% of the heat trapped in the atmosphere is absorbed by the ocean, with sea surface temperatures rising at an average rate of 0.13F per decade since 1901. In the 2016 global bleaching event, we lost 29% of the Great Barrier Reef. Chasing Coral is an ocean adventure film. It reveals the story of a team of photographers, scientists and other experts who discover and try to capture one of the world's largest coral bleaching events. It took 3.5 years to make and features over 500 hours of underwater footage with submissions from over 30 countries. The film is about 90 minutes long and we'll be watching all the way through to enjoy Frozen's own Kristen Bell sing the final song and another special surprise.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

5 September 2017

Title: Corals, Canyons, and Conservation: Science Based Fisheries Management Decisions in the Eastern Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Steve MacLean, Protected Species Coordinator, North Pacific Fishery Management Council and Dr. Chris Rooper, Research Fish Biologist, NOAA, NMFS, AFSC, RACED
Date & Time: 5 September 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 or via webinar - see login below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Steve MacLean, Protected Species Coordinator, North Pacific Fishery Management Council and Dr. Chris Rooper, Research Fish Biologist, NOAA, NMFS, AFSC, RACED. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: When making science matter for conservation, marine conservation practitioners, and managers must be prepared to make the appropriate decision based on the results of the best available science used to inform it. For nearly a decade, many stakeholders encouraged the North Pacific Fishery Management Council to enact protections for deep-sea corals in several canyons in the Eastern Bering Sea slope. In 2014, at the request of the Council, the National Marine Fisheries Service, Alaska Fisheries Science
Center conducted a strip-transect survey along the Eastern Bering Sea slope to validate the results of a model predicting the occurrence of deep-sea coral habitat. More than 250,000 photos were analyzed to estimate coral, sponge, and sea whip abundance, distribution, height, and vulnerability to anthropogenic damage. The results of the survey confirmed that coral habitat and occurrence was concentrated around Pribilof Canyon and the adjacent slope. The results also confirmed that the densities of corals in the
Eastern Bering Sea were low, even where they occurred. After reviewing the best available scientific information, the Council concluded that there is no scientific evidence to suggest that deep-sea corals in the Eastern Bering Sea slope or canyons are at risk from commercial fisheries under the current management structure, and that special protections for deep-sea corals were not warranted.

Bio(s):

Steve MacLean started at the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council in 2011, after spending six years as the Polar Marine Program Director for The Nature Conservancy in Alaska where he worked closely with Bering Sea commercial fishing interests to reduce potential impacts to protected species and habitat. Steve has also worked for a private ecological consulting firm, State and University wildlife management departments, oil and gas environmental department, and a donut shop. Steve received his BA in Biology from Whitman College in Walla Walla WA, and a MS in Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences from Texas A&M University. Steve has been swimming in every ocean, including north of the Arctic Circle, and south of the Antarctic Circle.

Originally from Oregon, Chris Rooper went to undergraduate school at Oregon State University (think Harvard of the west coast), completed a M.S. at the University of Alaska Fairbanks in Juneau AK, and a Ph.D. at the University of Washington. He began work for the Alaska Fisheries Science Center in the bottom trawl survey group in 2002. Most of my research to date has focused on rockfish ecology and assessment. Where we are actively pursuing methods to assess rockfish using alternate sampling gears in areas of untrawlable seafloor, such as combinations of acoustics and optics. Since 2011 I have been working on coral and sponge research in Alaska.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

31 August 2017

Title: Will landowner behavior and resilient forests hold back marsh migration in Long Island Sound?
Presenter(s): Chris Field, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, National Socio-environmental Synthesis Center, University of Maryland, presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD. Co-authors include: Ashley Dayer, PhD, Assistant Professor, Global Change Center, Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech, and Chris Elphick, PhD, Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut
Date & Time: 31 August 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 or via Webinar - see login info below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Chris Field, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, National Socio-environmental Synthesis Center, University of Maryland, presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD. Co-authors include: Ashley Dayer, PhD, Assistant Professor, Global Change Center, Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech, and Chris Elphick, PhD, Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: The future of tidal marshes globally will be determined in large part by the potential for landward migration, which depends on physical, ecological, and social factors. While we are starting to understand more about the physical factors that will influence the extent of marsh migration, there are still major gaps in our understanding of ecological and social factors. We present the results of two coast-wide surveys from Long Island Sound aimed at filling these knowledge gaps. The ecological survey quantified the extent of recent migration and coastal forest dieback. The social survey quantified the proportion of landowners who are likely to build sea walls or participate in conservation agreements that would allow migration. We also measured beliefs and attitudes that might influence landowners' stated intentions and found surprising correlations that raise questions about the effectiveness of common conservation strategies, such as raising awareness of the ecosystem services provided by tidal marshes. The results of these surveys highlight significant challenges for encouraging migration in Long Island Sound, including coastal forest that may be persistent in the face of sea-level rise and social challenges to using common strategies for protecting migration corridors.

Bio(s): Chris Field is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Socio-environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) at the University of Maryland. He conducted his dissertation research at the University of Connecticut, where he studied the effects of sea-level rise on the birds, vegetation, and human communities of tidal marsh ecosystems.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

30 August 2017

Title: A Look at 2016: Takeaways from the Annual State of the Climate Report
Presenter(s): Jessica Blunden, Ph.D., Climatologist, NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information
Date & Time: 30 August 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jessica Blunden, Ph.D., Climatologist, NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: A new State of the Climate report confirmed that 2016 surpassed 2015 as the warmest year in 137 years of recordkeeping. Last year's record heat resulted from the combined influence of long-term global warming and a strong El Nino early in the year. Major indicators of climate change continued to reflect trends consistent with a warming planet. Examples of the indicators include various types of greenhouse gases; temperatures throughout the atmosphere, ocean, and land; cloud cover; sea level; ocean salinity; sea ice extent; and snow cover. Several markers such as land and ocean temperatures, sea level and greenhouse gas concentrations broke records set just one year prior. This is the 27th annual issuance of the report, led by NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. The report is based on contributions from more than 450 scientists from more than 60 countries around the world and reflects tens of thousands of measurements from multiple independent datasets. It provides a detailed update on global climate indicators, notable weather events and other data collected by environmental monitoring stations and instruments located on land, water, ice and in space.

Bio(s): Jessica Blunden is a climatologist, working in the Center for Weather and Climate at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information in Asheville, North Carolina. She holds Masters and Doctorate degrees in Atmospheric Science from North Carolina State University. For the past seven years, Jessica has served as a lead editor for the State of the Climate report, an annual peer reviewed report published by the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society that examines climate and climate change across the globe. She has previously served as the lead scientific consultant for the Statement on the Status of the Global Climate report, published by the United Nation's World Meteorological Organization.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

28 August 2017

Title: Using VIIRS and MODIS Fire Radiative Power data to simulate biomass burning emissions, plume rise and smoke transport in HRRR-Smoke air quality modeling system
Presenter(s): Ravan Ahmadov, NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory/Global Systems Division and CU Boulder CIRES
Date & Time: 28 August 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greebtech IV Building, Conference Room S600, 7700 Hubble Drive, Lanham, MD 20706
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ravan Ahmadov, NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory/Global Systems Division and CU Boulder CIRES Host: JPSS proving ground seminar POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m98cfcf3cf7b2e70dcc92a8715e0fc3f5 Meeting number: 748 671 848 Host key: 851898 Meeting password: Jpss2017!

Abstract: Seminar focus is on using satellite-derived fire radiative power (FRP) products to simulate wildland fire emissions and plume rise in a 3D model. The High Resolution Rapid Refresh coupled with smoke (HRRR-Smoke) is an online meteorology-smoke model. The model simulates plume rise and smoke concentrations in real-time over two high resolution (3km) domains covering CONUS and Alaska. The HRRR-Smoke modeling system and its smoke forecasting capabilities are presented in this seminar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

24 August 2017

Title: Acoustic and biological trends on coral reefs off Maui, Hawaii
Presenter(s): Max Kaplan, Ph.D, 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Executive Fellow, NOAA Ocean Acidification Program
Date & Time: 24 August 2017
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring,MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Maxwell Kaplan, 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Executive Fellow, NOAA OAR, Ocean Acidification Program Seminar sponsors: NOAA Central Library; Knauss Brown Bag Program. Seminar POCs: Knauss August coordinator: megan.hall@noaa.gov; Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator/webinar host: judith.salter@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the August Knauss webinars here: https://goo.gl/qmSSdP After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Coral reef soundscapes comprise a range of biological sounds. To investigate how the sounds produced on a given reef relate to the species present, 7 Hawaiian reefs that varied in their species assemblages were equipped with acoustic recorders operating on a 10% duty cycle for 16 months, starting in September 2014. Benthic and fish visual surveys were conducted 4 times over the course of the study. Acoustic analyses were carried out in 2 frequency bands (50-1200 Hz and 1.8-20.5 kHz) that corresponded with the spectral features of the major sound-producing taxa on these reefs, fish and snapping shrimp, respectively. In the low-frequency band, the presence of humpback whales (December-May) was the major driver of sound level, whereas in the high-frequency band sound level closely tracked water temperature. On shorter timescales, the magnitude of the diel trend varied in strength among reefs and related to species assemblages, despite seasonal variability. Thus, long-term acoustic recordings can capture and distill the substantial acoustic variability present in coral reef ecosystems.

Bio(s): Max Kaplan completed his PhD in biological oceanography in the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Oceanography. Prior to that, Max completed a BSc in Marine Biology at the University of St Andrews in Scotland.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Informing Red Drum Stocking Strategies in South Carolina
Presenter(s): Christopher Katalinas, M.S., 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Executive Fellow, NOAA Sea Grant
Date & Time: 24 August 2017
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Christopher Katalinas, M.S., 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Executive Fellow, NOAA OAR, National Sea Grant College Program Seminar sponsors: NOAA Central Library; Knauss Brown Bag Program. Seminar POCs: Knauss August coordinator: megan.hall@noaa.gov; Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator/webinar host: judith.salter@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the August Knauss webinars here: https://goo.gl/qmSSdP After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) began stocking red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, in 1989 to augment the abundance of juveniles available for recreational harvest in SC estuaries. Katalinas et al. (2017) examined the genetic influences of stocking on the adult population offshore the Charleston Harbor estuary from 1999-2011. This study aimed to forecast the genetic influences of stock enhancement on the wild spawning population by validating an individual-based model (IBM) using empirical estimates of genetic diversity. Simulations monitored changes in genetic diversity under several stocking scenarios, which differed in the number of breeders in the hatchery (2, 6, and 10), the contribution of stocked fish to each year-class in the wild (30, 60 and 90%), and the census size of the wild adult population (500, 5,000 and 50,000). The IBM accurately simulated empirical measures of genetic diversity estimated from 1999 to 2011, and can therefore inform responsible strategies for future red drum stocking efforts. Model results indicate that the SCDNR red drum stock enhancement program should maintain mean contributions of stocked fish per year-class no greater than 30% over a 45-year stocking period, coupled with a hatchery effective population size of at least 10 broodstock.

Bio(s): Christopher Katalinas grew up in Manchester, NH, but migrated out of New England to receive his B.S. in Biology at Dickinson College. Christopher received his M.S. in Marine Biology from the College of Charleston.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

23 August 2017

Title: Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium Webinar: HRRR-AK: Status and Future of a High-Resolution Forecast Model for Alaska
Presenter(s): Trevor Alcott, NOAA and Jiang Zhu, GINA/UAF
Date & Time: 23 August 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online or at IARC/Akasofu 407, 930 Koyukuk Drive, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Rescheduled from August 16.

Presenter(s): Trevor Alcott (NOAA) and Jiang Zhu (GINA/UAF)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy. Point of contact is Tina Buxbaum, tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

Remote Access: http://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=7deb5c10b9&e=9097598e1a

Abstract: The High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) Alaska model (HRRR-AK) is a new weather forecast model that uses a specially configured version of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model to predict atmospheric and surface conditions over all of Alaska, at 3-km grid spacing, out to 36 hours. HRRR-AK is cycled every 3 hours at NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL), assimilating many novel and conventional observations to produce a best initial atmospheric state, and benefiting from recent improvements to the existing contiguous-US HRRR physics suite. However, Alaska lies at the functional fringe of geostationary satellite coverage and is notorious for a scarcity of conventional surface observations. To address this issue, ESRL has partnered with the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) group at University of Alaska Fairbanks to explore the effective use of polar orbiting satellite data. This talk will cover the current configuration of HRRR-AK, known strengths and weaknesses, and ongoing work at GINA toward assimilating new satellite datasets for improved HRRR-AK forecasts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

17 August 2017

Title: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center diversity and inclusion roadshow
Presenter(s): Dr. Daniel Krieger, Diversity and Inclusion and ADR Program Manager, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Date & Time: 17 August 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 Room 14836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Daniel Krieger, Diversity and Inclusion and ADR Program Manager, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Sponsor(s): Latinos@NOAA ERG Distinguished Lectures/Mentoring Session Join us remotely from your computer, tablet or smartphone: Link: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/493238141 Dial: +1 (312) 757-3129; Access Code: 493-238-141 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting; Meeting ID: 493-238-141

Abstract: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center diversity and inclusion

Bio(s): Dr. Dan Krieger is the Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) Program Manager and the Alternative Dispute Resolution Program Manager for NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. As such, he is on the staff of the Director of Goddard Space Flight Center and serves as his senior official for D&I and dispute resolution. He is renowned as an expert on diversity and inclusion in federal government and has also successfully mediated hundreds of disputes, both at NASA and throughout the Federal government. In his 27-year career with NASA, he spent time in various roles within human capital and equal employment opportunity, served as the Special Assistant to the Director of Goddard, Special Assistant to the Director of Engineering, and as an International Programs Specialist at NASA Headquarters, responsible for NASA's interaction with South and Central America, Spain, Portugal, and the Caribbean. Dan received his bachelor's degree cum laude in Spanish and Psychology from the University of Maryland, his master's degree in Applied Behavioral Science from the Johns Hopkins University, and his doctorate in Human Resources Development from George Washington University. A lifelong resident of Prince George's County, Maryland, he currently resides in Bowie with his wife and three boys.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 August 2017

Title: Resche'd to 8/23: Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium Webinar: HRRR-AK: Status and Future of a High-Resolution Forecast Model for Alaska
Presenter(s): Trevor Alcott, NOAA and Jiang Zhu, GINA/UAF
Date & Time: 16 August 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online or at IARC/Akasofu 407, 930 Koyukuk Drive, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Trevor Alcott (NOAA) and Jiang Zhu (GINA/UAF)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy

Remote Access: http://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=7deb5c10b9&e=9097598e1a

Abstract: The High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) Alaska model (HRRR-AK) is a new weather forecast model that uses a specially configured version of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model to predict atmospheric and surface conditions over all of Alaska, at 3-km grid spacing, out to 36 hours. HRRR-AK is cycled every 3 hours at NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL), assimilating many novel and conventional observations to produce a best initial atmospheric state, and benefiting from recent improvements to the existing contiguous-US HRRR physics suite. However, Alaska lies at the functional fringe of geostationary satellite coverage and is notorious for a scarcity of conventional surface observations. To address this issue, ESRL has partnered with the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) group at University of Alaska Fairbanks to explore the effective use of polar orbiting satellite data. This talk will cover the current configuration of HRRR-AK, known strengths and weaknesses, and ongoing work at GINA toward assimilating new satellite datasets for improved HRRR-AK forecasts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: What to Expect for the Peak Months of the 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season
Presenter(s): Dr. Gerald Bell, NOAA's Lead Seasonal Hurricane Forecaster, NOAA's National Weather Service, Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 16 August 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 or via Webinar - login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Gerald Bell, NOAA's Lead Seasonal Hurricane Forecaster, NOAA's National Weather Service, Climate Prediction Center. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: NOAA's updated Atlantic hurricane season outlook, to be updated August 9th, will be presented. Climate factors and conditions expected to influence the upcoming peak months (August-October) of the hurricane season will be discussed from both a general and scientific perspective. The updated outlook will also serve to highlight issues related to hurricane preparedness and understanding, both of which are fundamental to help minimize potential hurricane effects and to better make a weather ready nation.

Bio(s): Gerry Bell is a hurricane climate specialist, a global climate monitoring and analysis specialist, and a research meteorologist at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center (CPC) in College Park, Maryland. Gerry has been at the CPC since 1990. Dr. Bell's extensive research into the climate factors controlling seasonal hurricane activity contributed to the establishment of NOAA's seasonal Atlantic hurricane outlooks in 1998. Since that time he has been the lead scientist of NOAA's Seasonal Hurricane Outlook Team, and lead author of both the Atlantic and eastern Pacific seasonal hurricane outlooks. Dr. Bell has published numerous scientific papers and given many lectures and webinars on Atlantic hurricane variability and on the climate factors controlling hurricane activity.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NOAA Big Data Project status update
Presenter(s): Dr. Ed Kearns, Chief Data Officer at NOAA
Date & Time: 16 August 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 Room 4702 (Capacity 15)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Ed Kearns, Chief Data Officer at NOAA

Sponsor(s): NCEI. POC: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Phone: 1-877-725-4068 (8634769#). For Webcast access go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c

Abstract: In 2015, NOAA signed 5 distinct yet identical Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) with several Infrastructure as a Service (Iaas) cloud providers to research new means of providing data access. Now nearly two and a half years into the project, Dr. Ed Kearns, NOAA's Chief Data Officer and Big Data Project (BDP) Director, will provide an update on the NOAA Big Data Project's (BDP) status, as well as look ahead at the future of the project. The discussion will highlight of several data activities currently underway, including the availability of the WSR-88D (NEXRAD) historical archive and several Climate Data Records as an example of the potential impact such a data distribution scheme can have to improve the level of service for NOAA's data customers. Slides (08162017): https://docs.google.com/a/noaa.gov/presentation/d/1miSX8H1n5_sJpLrREBbw5wEaeyy5Y2mJnIEuqSJHoFk/edit?usp=sharing PDF: https://drive.google.com/a/noaa.gov/file/d/0BxRB-4YPi2CUUk9wMk9EeG5XQmc/view?usp=sharing

Bio(s): Dr. Ed Kearns is NOAA's first Chief Data Officer (CDO) and the director for NOAA's Big Data Project, and resides in Asheville, NC. Ed earned B.S. degrees in Physics & Marine Science from the University of Miami (1990) and his Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography from the University of Rhode Island (1996). As a professor at the University of Miami, Ed worked on satellite sensor characterization and calibration for ocean products from NASA's satellites, and the development of regional integrated ocean observing and data management systems. In 2005, he joined the National Park Service to lead the evaluation of coastal ecosystem restoration project plans and guide Everglades restoration efforts. Ed moved to Asheville, NC and joined NOAA in 2008 to lead work on satellite climate data records, big data, archive and stewardship issues. He also worked in the Office of Management and Budget as the program examiner for NASA Science and Education during the 2014 budget season. Prior to being appointed NOAA CDO within NOAA's Office of the Chief Information Officer in 2017, Ed led the weather science and monitoring groups for NOAA's new National Centers for Environmental Information.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

15 August 2017

Title: Physics-Based Parameterizations for Cloud Microphysics and Turbulent Entrainment-Mixing Processes: Addressing Crucial Gaps
Presenter(s): Yangang Liu, Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory
Date & Time: 15 August 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Yangang Liu, Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory Sponsor EMC seminar. Contact: Ruiyu Sun - The pdf presentation is posted at http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2017/YangangLiu_20170815.pdf Youtube Presentation https://youtu.be/Sv9IazytGCo Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook. JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract: Despite decades of research, clouds and precipitation continue to present one of the greatest challenges to accurately understand and predict weather and climate systems. Significant knowledge gaps remain in understanding cloud microphysics and thus in the parameterization for large scale models. This seminar is focused on three closely related topics. First, I will discuss the potentials of statistical physics ideas in building a theoretical framework for developing cloud microphysics parameterization in large scale models. Second, I will discuss turbulent entrainment-mixing processes and their effects on cloud microphysical properties. A unified parameterization is explored to cover all the different types of entrainment-mixing processes. Finally, I will introduce the particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (P-DNS) model recently developed at BNL to address the knowledge gaps at the fundamental level. The P-DNS is designed to track individual particles in clouds and resolve the smallest turbulent eddies in clouds, thus providing the bottom-up benchmark for evaluating microphysical parameterizations as well.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ecological responses to water diversion of the eastern route of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project (SNWDP) of China
Presenter(s): Dr. Yushun Chen, Ph.D., Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Date & Time: 15 August 2017
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Yushun Chen, Ph.D., Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/605285931270821634

Abstract: The South-to-North Water Diversion Project (SNWDP) of China is the largest water diversion project in the world, diverting water from the Yangtze River to alleviate the pressure of water scarcity in northern China. The eastern route of the SNWDP pumps water from the Lower Yangtze River near Yangzhou, Jiangsu, passes the Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal and a series of storage lakes, and finally provides water for provinces of Shangdong and Tianjin. We monitored water quality, plankton, macroinvertebrates, aquatic plants, and fishes in two storage lakes, Gaoyou and Dongping, since April 2016 and wanted to detect the effects of the water diversion on lake ecosystems. The current study showed: (1) water depth increased and varied in the studied lakes; (2) the monitored water quality parameters such as nutrients (nitrate, total ammonia nitrogen, phosphate), total suspended solids (TSS), and conductivity showed seasonal variations in both lakes; (3) heavy metals such as Pb, Zn and Mn showed significantly higher concentrations in summer in both lakes; (4) the abundance of resident fishes (e.g., Culter oxycephaloides (Kreyenberg et Pappenheim), Chanodichtys oxycephalus (Bleeker), Abbottina rivularis) was reduced while lake-river migration fishes (e.g., Mylopharyngodon piceus, Ctenopharyngodon idellus) were increased in both lakes; and (5) the estuary fish Taenioides cirratus was also observed in Gaoyou Lake. The operation of the eastern route SNWDP could change the structure and function of the associated lakes significantly and needs more attention in the future.

Bio(s): Dr. Yushun Chen is currently a professor and group leader for the Aquatic Ecosystems Health Research Group at the Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. With funding from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and others, Dr. Chen and his lab are conducting research on fish and aquatic communities, water quality, and aquatic ecosystem health in the Yangtze River Basin, basins along the Eastern Route of China's South to North Water Diversion Project, and the Mississippi-Yangtze Large River Basins through international collaborations. Since 2013, Dr. Chen and colleagues have been promoting large river/lake basin collaborations between the USA and China, and beyond. Before his current position, Dr. Chen earned his Ph.D. from West Virginia University, then worked as a Post-Doc at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, NOAA National Coastal Data Development Center, and as a faculty member at the Aquaculture and Fisheries Center, University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

10 August 2017

Title: Integrating Natural Capital Principles into the Ocean Economy
Presenter(s): Anika Kreckel and Breanna Parker, NOAA's Office of the Chief Economist, Supervisors are Monica Grasso and Valerie Were
Date & Time: 10 August 2017
2:15 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Room 9415
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series This presentation is part of the NOAA College-Supported Internship Seminar Series taking place on Wednesday, August 9, and Thursday, August 10. For over 15 years, NOAA has partnered with selected US colleges to provide undergraduate students with college-funded summer internships in science, policy, and science communication. For more information about the program, or to explore the possibility of mentoring students in future summers, please contact Ruth.Kelty@noaa.gov or Natasha.White@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Anika Kreckel and Breanna Parker, NOAA's Office of the Chief Economist Supervisors are Monica Grasso and Valerie Were.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is adele.birkenes@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Breanna and Anika are both working with Dr. Valerie Were on the Natural Capital project. The work involves contributing to the development of an Ocean Supplement to the Natural Capital Protocol. The Protocol is a step-by-step guide for businesses on how to account for impacts and dependencies on nature into their planning and operations. The project also involves working with other bureaus in the Department of Commerce to develop concrete steps to help America's businesses apply the concepts from the Protocol.

Bio(s):

Abstract: Breanna and Anika are both working with Dr. Valerie Were on the Natural Capital project. The work involves contributing to the development of an Ocean Supplement to the Natural Capital Protocol. The Protocol is a step-by-step guide for businesses on how to account for impacts and dependencies on nature into their planning and operations. The project also involves working with other bureaus in the Department of Commerce to develop concrete steps to help America's businesses apply the concepts from the Protocol.

Bio(s): Anika will graduate with a B.A. in Economics from Clark University in December 2017 and plans to use her interest in the social sciences to advance environmental causes by appealing to the interests of businesses. Anika grew up in Rhode Island and has a deep fascination for and love of water which makes her commitment to helping with the development of a protocol for Marine Natural Capital, all the more powerful. Breanna is a senior at Smith College in Massachusetts where she studies Environmental Science & Policy, as well as Astronomy. After graduating, her goal is to work towards a sustainable future for all by increasing the use of renewable energy technology. In her free time, Breanna enjoys spending time in nature by kayaking, hiking, and travelling to lakes, mountains, and national parks.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Rapid Bathymetry for Safer Navigation: Developing an Automated Process to Get Water Depth from Satellite
Presenter(s): Tyler Anderson, Intern, NOAA/NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Stressor Detection and Impacts Division. Supervisors are Richard Stumpf and Michelle Tomlinson
Date & Time: 10 August 2017
2:00 pm - 2:15 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4, Room 9415
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series This presentation is part of the NOAA College-Supported Internship Seminar Series taking place on Wednesday, August 9, and Thursday, August 10. For over 15 years, NOAA has partnered with selected US colleges to provide undergraduate students with college-funded summer internships in science, policy, and science communication. For more information about the program, or to explore the possibility of mentoring students in future summers, please contact Ruth.Kelty@noaa.gov or Natasha.White@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Tyler Anderson, Intern, NOAA/NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Stressor Detection and Impacts Division. Supervisors are Richard Stumpf and Michelle Tomlinson.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is adele.birkenes@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Knowing water depth or bathymetry is critical for coastal navigation and management. Hurricanes and winter storms can move channels and shoals, posing a risk to navigation. Many remote areas of the U.S. and the world have limited or extremely old surveys. Satellite data can offer a rapid way to provide an assessment of water depth for these places. We are working on automating the process to obtain water depth from satellite in order to complement tradition surveys (from LIDAR or from sonar) using a variety of satellite products.

Bio(s): Tyler is a rising senior at Clark University in Worcester, MA, where he is studying Environmental Science: Earth System Science. While at Clark he gained an interest in how Satellite Remote Sensing can be used to easily monitor the earth for a variety of topics, allowing those with limited resources to study the earth's systems. adele.birkenes@noaa.gov
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 10 August 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: Timing the flood: sea level rise, tidal flooding and future exposure along America's coasts
Presenter(s): William Sweet, Oceanographer, NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services - CO-OPS, Planning, Monitoring and Analysis Branch
Date & Time: 10 August 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series So many attended the July 5th presentation, we are reprising this seminar!

Presenter(s): William Sweet, Oceanographer, NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS), Planning, Monitoring and Analysis Branch

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Because of relative seal level rise (SLR), frequencies of high tide (nuisance) flooding causing minor impacts occur upwards of 300% to 1000% more often than in the 1960s. Annual flood frequencies are accelerating in dozens of U.S. locations and currently pose a costly challenge to several afflicted cities. This presentation will address: i) current trends and patterns of high tide flooding, and ii) when in the future more severe coastal flooding posing a 'serious risk to life and property' may become the new normal along U.S. coastlines under the new sea level rise scenarios.

Bio(s): William Sweet is a NOAA oceanographer researching changes in coastal exposure due to sea level rise (SLR). He recently helped the U.S. military assess SLR risks to their coastal installations and led the production of a new set of regional SLR scenarios for the 4th U.S. National Climate Assessment. He now lives in Annapolis and experiences SLR effects first-hand.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

9 August 2017

Title: Identifying Gaps in Risk Communication
Presenter(s): Jack Herscowitz, Intern, NOAA's Office of the Chief Economist; Supervisor is Denna Geppi.
Date & Time: 9 August 2017
2:30 pm - 2:45 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4 Room 10153 or via Webinar - login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series This presentation is part of the NOAA College-Supported Internship Seminar Series taking place on Wednesday, August 9, and Thursday, August 10. For over 15 years, NOAA has partnered with selected US colleges to provide undergraduate students with college-funded summer internships in science, policy, and science communication. For more information about the program, or to explore the possibility of mentoring students in future summers, please contact Ruth.Kelty@noaa.gov or Natasha.White@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Jack Herscowitz, Intern, NOAA's Office of the Chief Economist; Supervisor is Denna Geppi.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar series; seminar coordinator is adele.birkenes@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: The Performance, Risk and Social Science Team provides the intellectual leadership and analytical expertise needed to implement an innovative, NOAA-wide social science agenda that advances the Department's goals of climate adaptation and mitigation, resilient coastal communities and economies, a weather-ready nation, and healthy oceans. NOAA is working across its line offices to transition research on risk communication and behavior to application. However, gaps remain in identifying existing risk communication research. Building on the findings of the NOAA Report: Risk Communication and Behavior: Best Practices and Research Findings, I have been working to advance risk communication priorities by identifying and researching existing gaps that remain in risk communication research and promoting social science priorities within the agency.

Bio(s): Jack Herscowitz has just finished his first year at Middlebury College where he is considering a double major Environmental Policy and Ethnomusicology/ Musicology. A native of Bethesda, MD, Jack is thrilled to be interning with NOAA.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Data Can Tell a Story: Retrospective Analysis of NOAA/NMFS Marine Mammal Data
Presenter(s): Adele Birkenes, Intern, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology, Protected Species Science Branch. Her project supervisor is Mridula Srinivasan
Date & Time: 9 August 2017
2:15 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 10513 or via Webinar - login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series This presentation is part of the NOAA College-Supported Internship Seminar Series taking place on Wednesday, August 9, and Thursday, August 10. For over 15 years, NOAA has partnered with selected US colleges to provide undergraduate students with college-funded summer internships in science, policy, and science communication. For more information about the program, or to explore the possibility of mentoring students in future summers, please contact Ruth.Kelty@noaa.gov or Natasha.White@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Adele Birkenes, Intern, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology, Protected Species Science Branch. Her project supervisor is Mridula Srinivasan.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar series; seminar coordinator is adele.birkenes@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Since 1995, the Marine Mammal Protection Act has required that the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Fish and Wildlife Service develop Stock Assessment Reports (SARs) for all marine mammal stocks that occur regularly in U.S. waters. Much of this historic data is stored in PDF reports, which do not lend themselves to quantitative analysis. My task was to make this data compatible with a new national database managed by NMFS Office of Science and Technology entitled Protected Species Information System (PSIS). This database will use SAR data to generate graphs in population indicators of individual marine mammal stocks over time, thus serving both as an invaluable tool for policymaking and as grounds for further scientific analysis. My project also involved mapping marine mammal SAR data using GIS.

Bio(s): Adele is a rising sophomore at Vassar College majoring in biology and geography. She is originally from Silver Spring and plans to pursue a career in marine biogeography.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Using High Resolution Satellites to Detect Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)
Presenter(s): Carly Robbins, Intern, NOAA/NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Stressor Detection and Impacts Division. Her project supervisor is Richard Stumpf.
Date & Time: 9 August 2017
2:00 pm - 2:15 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC-4, Room 10153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series This presentation is part of the NOAA College-Supported Internship Seminar Series taking place on Wednesday, August 9, and Thursday, August 10. For over 15 years, NOAA has partnered with selected US colleges to provide undergraduate students with college-funded summer internships in science, policy, and science communication. For more information about the program, or to explore the possibility of mentoring students in future summers, please contact Ruth.Kelty@noaa.gov or Natasha.White@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Carly Robbins, Intern, NOAA/NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Stressor Detection and Impacts Division. Her project supervisor is Richard Stumpf.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinator is adele.birkenes@noaa.gov Webinar Acess: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Harmful algal blooms pose a threat to aquatic ecosystems and human health and are expected to intensify with changing environmental conditions. In turn, harmful algal bloom detection and monitoring through remote sensing is critical. NOAA scientists have been using Sentinel 3 for bloom detection, but the recent launch of Sentinel 2 provides opportunity to detect blooms in smaller lakes undetectable by Sentinel 3. We will discuss methods for relating Sentinel 3 products to Sentinel 2 products between lakes and dates.

Bio(s): Carly Robbins is a rising senior at Clark University majoring in Geography and minoring in Environmental Science. After completing her undergraduate degree, she plans on getting a Masters in GIS from Clark. Her research interests include climate science and the Arctic system.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Machine Learning and Spatial Forecasting for Dynamical Insights into Coral Reef Systems
Presenter(s): Dr. Kenneth Ells, Project Scientist, Dep't of Physics and Physical Oceanography, University of North Carolina at Wilmington-UNCW. and Dr. Dylan McNamara, Chair/Associate Professor, Dep't of Physics and Physical Oceanography, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, UNCW
Date & Time: 9 August 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Kenneth Ells, Project Scientist, Dep't of Physics and Physical Oceanography, University of North Carolina at Wilmington (UNCW), and Dr. Dylan McNamara, Chair/Associate Professor, Dep't of Physics and Physical Oceanography, UNCW.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Coral reefs are among the most biodiverse and productive habitats on the planet, and provide a host of economic services including shoreline protection, fisheries and tourism. These ecosystems have experienced unprecedented changes over the past quarter century from a combination of anthropogenic and natural stressors. Recent advances in underwater imaging have provided a deluge of data showing the configuration of coral and algal species over spatial scales that encompass many thousands of individual species, a scale that was previously impossible with existing underwater survey techniques. However, current efforts investigating these images are hampered by the time required to identify species at each pixel location within the large photo mosaics. We describe the application of cutting-edge machine learning technologies for image classification of coral reef benthic species over large spatial scales and then apply the classification technology to photo mosaic images taken from reefs in states ranging from pristine to degraded. We will also discuss how classified images can answer dynamical questions about coral reef configuration. The organizational rules for species across a reef seemingly have both random and deterministic features. For example, the landing of coral recruits in a turbulent water column or periodic disturbances from wave events can be considered random spatial influences while hierarchical competition for space between coral and algal species would be considered deterministic. It is not clear whether random or deterministic spatial dynamics dominate the configuration of coral species in space and common aggregate spatial statistics are not useful in making this distinction. We will present a novel spatial forecasting tool that can clearly distinguish randomness from determinism and apply the technique to classified images of coral and algal species from Palmyra Atoll, a relatively pristine reef in the Southern Pacific Ocean. We find that the spatial distribution of coral and algal species shows clear signs of determinism, suggesting that nonlinear spatial dynamics dominate the battle for space in coral reef systems.

Bio(s): Dr. Kenneth Ells received his Ph.D. in Earth Sciences from Duke University. After the completion of his Ph.D., Dr. Ells has been a postdoctoral researcher and project scientist at UNCW in the Complex Adaptive Systems Laboratory in the Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography. Dr. Ells research interests include large-scale coastal morphodynamics, entropy, and machine learning. Dr. Ells has contributed to projects funded by the UNCW Center for Marine Science, the National Science Foundation, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Dr. Dylan McNamara received his M.S. degree in Physics from San Diego State University and his Ph.D. in Oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UCSD. After completing his Ph.D., Dr. McNamara was a postdoctoral scholar at Duke University in the Earth and Ocean Sciences Division before joining the faculty at UNCW in 2008. Dr. McNamara has broad research interests with publications in many fields including; Optics, Coastal Science, Coral Reef Ecology, Chaos Theory, and Environmental Economics. His expertise lies in Complex Systems Analysis, Numerical Modeling, and Nonlinear Forecasting. Dr. McNamara has received grants to support his research from the National Science Foundation, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and the North Carolina Sea Grant.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

8 August 2017

Title: Regional Climate Center (RCC) Overview: Western RCC & Midwestern RCC
Presenter(s): Nina Oakley, Western Regional Climate Center and Beth Hall, Midwestern Regional Climate Center
Date & Time: 8 August 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Nina Oakley (Western Regional Climate Center) and Beth Hall (Midwestern Regional Climate Center) Seminar sponsor: National Weather Service, Climate Services Branch

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/394234676393622531

Abstract: Nina Oakley from Western Regional Climate Center and Beth Hall from Midwestern Regional Climate Center will give an overview of their RCC tools, projects, and programs. Seminar POC for questions: emily.timte@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Climate Change May Alter Predator-Prey Arms Races
Presenter(s): Joshua Lord, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, Moravian College, Bethlehem, PA
Date & Time: 8 August 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Joshua Lord, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, Moravian College, Bethlehem, PA. Presenting at NOAA Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Predator-prey interactions often drive ecological patterns and are influenced by the evolutionary arms race between predators and prey. Invasive species can also play a large ecological role by disrupting food webs, driving species to extinction, and influencing evolutionary changes in prey defense mechanisms. Our research described a substantial reduction in the behavioral and morphological responses of several gastropod species to an invasive predatory crab under ocean acidification conditions. There were also drastic differences in crab survival and prey response in experiments comparing native and invasive crabs. While snails with varying shell mineralogies were similarly successful at deterring predation, those with primarily aragonitic shells were more susceptible to dissolution and erosion under high CO2 conditions. Although aragonite may be structurally superior to calcite for defense against predators, its greater solubility suggests that prior evolution favoring aragonite for shell strength in some taxa may be an evolutionary dead end' with escalating ocean acidification.

Bio(s): Josh is starting as an Assistant Professor in the Biological Sciences Department at Moravian College after spending nearly two years as a postdoctoral researcher at the MontereyBay Aquarium Research Institute studying the ecological effects of climate change on intertidal organisms. He got his BA at Colby College, his MS at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, and his PhD at the University of Connecticut, where he studied oysters and biofouling. Three years ago he taught and conducted research as a Visiting Assistant Professor at Bates College in Maine, where he studied the effects of climate change on crabs and other invasive species. His current research targets species interactions, testing how global warming and ocean acidification will affect competition and predation in a variety of marine communities.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

3 August 2017

Title: Wetland Restoration: Contemporary Issues and Lessons Learned
Presenter(s): Marla Stelk is a Policy Analyst at the Association of State Wetland Managers - ASWM
Date & Time: 3 August 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Marla Stelk is a Policy Analyst at the Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM). Seminar

Sponsor(s): NOAA and USFWS; NOAA Points of Contact are NOAA's Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov, and US Fish and Wildlife Service's Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov Seminar Registration: https://nctc.adobeconnect.com/e3y9wv1gvm1o/event/registration.html

Abstract: Numerous studies have documented the shortcomings of wetland mitigation and voluntary restoration projects to achieve stated goals. There is general agreement among restoration professionals that the science exists to achieve restoration goals and that wetland restoration performance will improve if certain barriers are addressed. In 2013, the Association of State Wetland Managers began to identify some of the barriers and established a national work group of 25 restoration experts, including practitioners, academics, consultants, regulators, and policy makers, to further identify and analyze these barriers and develop recommendations to address them. This project spanned two US EPA Wetland Program Development Grant cycles and included 24 educational webinars, monthly work group conference calls and outreach at several national events, culminating in a white paper that summarizes the project's findings. This presentation will provide an overview of the white paper's findings and provide strategic recommendations to improve wetland restoration outcomes.

Bio(s): Marla Stelk is a Policy Analyst at the Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM). She has been ASWM's project leader for two U.S. EPA wetland restoration grants and coordinates a wetland restoration workgroup with the goal of identifying barriers, articulating solutions and implementing strategies to improve restoration outcomes. Marla coordinates and moderates the Wetland Mapping Consortium and the Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance webinar series. She is also the Association's Communications Team leader and the Editor of Wetland Breaking News. Marla has been involved in climate change science and policy for 20 years and is currently serving as ASWM's representative on the national Advisory Committee on the Water Information Water Resources Adaptation to Climate Change Workgroup. Marla has a MA in Community Planning and Development from the Edward S. Muskie School of Public Service and a BA in Environmental Issues from Colorado College.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Monitoring dynamic spatio-temporal ecological systems optimally: a case study using sea otters in Glacier Bay, Alaska
Presenter(s): Perry Williams, Post-doctoral research fellow, Colorado Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University
Date & Time: 3 August 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Perry Williams, Post-doctoral research fellow, Colorado Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Ecological invasions and colonizations occur dynamically through space and time. Estimating the distribution and abundance of a spreading population is critical for efficient management or conservation. We describe a dynamic spatio-temporal statistical model for simultaneously estimating occupancy and abundance of a spreading population. Our method accounts for several issues that are common when modeling spatio-temporal ecological data including: multiple levels of detection probability, multiple data sources, and computational limitations that occur when making fine-scale inference over a large spatio-temporal domain. We then describe a cohesive framework for monitoring a spreading population that explicitly links our model of population spread with survey design and monitoring objectives. We apply the framework to develop an optimal survey design for sea otters in Glacier Bay, Alaska. Sea otters were first detected in Glacier Bay in 1988 and have since increased in both abundance and distribution; abundance estimates increased from 5 otters to more than 5,000 otters, and they have spread faster than 2.7 km per year. By explicitly linking animal movement models and survey design, we were able to reduce uncertainty associated with predicted abundance, and distribution. The framework we describe is general, and can be applied to novel systems and taxa.

Bio(s): Dr. Perry Williams is a post-doctoral research fellow at Colorado State University co-located in the Department of Statistics and the Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology. He holds an M.S. in Wildlife Ecology from the University of Minnesota, an M.S. in Statistics from Colorado State University, and a Ph.D. in Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology from Colorado State University. His research focuses on statistical and mathematical methods for estimating population processes to improve wildlife management and conservation.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

2 August 2017

Title: An Ocean Acidification Risk Assessment For Alaska's Fisheries
Presenter(s): Dr. Jeremy Mathis, NOAA OAR
Date & Time: 2 August 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Jeremy Mathis, NOAA OAR

Remote Access: https://goo.gl/gZ5gYU After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone or computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Highly productive Alaskan commercial and subsistence fisheries are located in seas projected to experience rapid transitions in temperature, pH, and other chemical parameters caused by global change, especially ocean acidification (OA). Many of the marine organisms that are most intensely affected by OA, such as mollusks, are native to Alaska and contribute substantially to the state's valuable commercial sheries and traditional subsistence way of life. This presentation will describe the first-ever risk assessment for the effects of ocean acidification on the state of Alaska as well as stakeholders throughout the United States.

Bio(s): Dr. Mathis is the Director of NOAA's Arctic Research Program (ARP) in the Office of Ocean and Atmospheric Research. Before joining the ARP, Dr. Mathis was the Director of the Ocean Environment Research Division at NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, WA from 2012 " 2015 and a Professor of Oceanography at the University of Alaska Fairbanks from 2008 - 2012. Dr. Mathis has an extensive background in engineering, oceanography, and climate science. His work focuses on improving understanding of climate change and ocean acidification, particularly in the Arctic. Dr. Mathis has published more than 80 peer-reviewed journal articles on his work and serves on a number of national and international committees.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Pulse of the Planet: Monitoring the world and national climate for, and with, NOAA
Presenter(s): Derek "Deke" Arndt, Chief, Monitoring Branch, Center for Weather and Climate, NOAA/NESDIS National Centers for Environmental Information - NCEI
Date & Time: 2 August 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Derek "Deke" Arndt, Chief, Monitoring Branch, Center for Weather and Climate, NOAA/NESDIS National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Twice each month, once for the US climate and once for the global climate, the National Centers for Environmental Information issues its monthly climate reports and associated data. These reports synthesize several NOAA datasets, as well as those fro outside partners, to provide the "play by play" of the climate system. This presentation will share some details of how these reports come together, the various associated tools that accompany the reports, and a brief overview of the state of the climate system as of mid-2017.

Bio(s): Deke Arndt is the Chief of the Climate Monitoring Branch at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information in Asheville, NC. The CMB are the scorekeepers of the global climate system. They track climate on large scales (global warming) and on smaller scales (regional drought). The U.S. Drought Portal (drought.gov) is also housed in the CMB. Mr. Arndt is the lead editor of the State of the Climate report, the "annual physical" of the climate system, published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. This year's version was written by 460 authors from 62 countries. Mr. Arndt is the chair of the U.S. Global Change Research Program's (GCRP's) Climate Indicator Working Group. He holds a Bachelor's and Master's degree in meteorology from the University of Oklahoma.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

1 August 2017

Title: Identifying biological and ecological Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs) for global sustained observations
Presenter(s): Dr. Patricia Miloslavich, Project Officer, Global Ocean Observing System -GOOS- Biology and Ecosystems Panel, University of Tasmania
Date & Time: 1 August 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Patricia Miloslavich is the Project Officer of the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) Biology and Ecosystems Panel based at the University of Tasmania and co-supported by the Australian Institute of Marine Science and the US Marine Mammal Commission. Prof. Patricia Miloslavich / University of Tasmania (Australia) and Universidad Simon Bolivar (Venezuela)

Remote Access: https://goo.gl/rK6ftP After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone or computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Increased, better focused, and sustained biological oceanographic observations are needed globally to determine and monitor appropriate trade-offs between conservation and sustainable use, effectively mitigate or manage changes, and to predict and prepare for potential future changes. These observations must be supported by the international scientific, governance and policy communities and will help measure progress against inter-governmentally agreed goals and to set up baselines for more informative evidence-based international goals in the future. Because measuring the state of marine ecosystems is complex and expensive, our aim is to develop a global ocean observing system that is relevant for science, informs society and is technologically feasible. SPECIAL TIME: Tuesday, August 1 @ 3PM EDT About the speaker: Patricia is a marine biologist with a Ph.D. in Oceanography from the University of Quebec at Rimouski. In more than 25 years of academic experience, she has led or co-led more than 20 research projects focused on national (Venezuelan), regional (Caribbean and South America) and global topics, and authored more than 70 peer reviewed publications in marine biology including a review book of the state of knowledge of Caribbean marine biodiversity.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

31 July 2017

Title: Current Satellite Moisture/Precipitation Products That Will Be Enhanced in the JPSS Era
Presenter(s): Sheldon Kusselson, Retired NOAA/NESDIS/Satellite Analysis Branch, Silver Spring, Maryland
Date & Time: 31 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building 10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham MD 20706
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sheldon Kusselson, Retired NOAA/NESDIS/Satellite Analysis Branch, Silver Spring, Maryland

Sponsor(s): JPSS Science Seminar. POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Remote Access: 877-401-9225, pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m0921ff1e69f2525c3da82b6359ac73c6 Meeting number: 745 966 126 Host key: 451787 Meeting password: Jpss2017!

Abstract: Seminar focus is on satellite-derived moisture and precipitation products that the speaker collaborates with government forecasters and scientists and university researchers. Products that will be further enhanced in the JPSS era like Blended Total Precipitable Water (TPW), Percent of Normal TPW, Snowfall Rate, Layered Precipitable Water and Ensemble Tropical Rainfall Potential (eTRaP) will be discussed along with applications. Where these products currently reside on the web and who uses them will also be discussed.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

27 July 2017

Title: Integrated Ecological-Economic Fisheries Models – Evaluation, Review and Challenges for Implementation
Presenter(s): Dr. Eric Thunberg, Chief, Social Sciences Branch, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 27 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Eric Thunberg, Chief, Social Sciences Branch, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Integrated ecological"economic fisheries models (IEEFMs) of marine systems are needed to evaluate impacts and sustainability of potential management actions and understand, and anticipate ecological, economic, and social dynamics at a range of scales from local to national and regional. To make these models most effective, it is important to determine how model characteristics and methods of communicating results influence the model implementation, the nature of the advice that can be provided and the impact on decisions taken by managers. The findings of a meta-data analysis recently accepted for publication in Fish and Fisheries that was led by the ICES Working Group on Integrated Models for Management (WGIMM) is presented. The paper provides a comparative evaluation of 35 IEEFMs applied to marine fisheries and marine ecosystem resources to identify the characteristics that determine their usefulness, effectiveness and implementation. The focus is on integrated models that allow for feedbacks between ecological and human processes though not all models that were reviewed achieve that.

Bio(s): Eric received a B.S. in natural resource economics from the University of New Hampshire in 1982. He attended Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and received a M.S. in 1985 and Ph.D. in 1988. Eric was an Assistant Professor in the Food and Resource Economics Department at the University of Florida where he had a teaching, research and extension appointment in marine resource economics. He joined the Social Sciences Branch at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in 1993 where he served on the groundfish Plan Development Team from 1995 to 2010. Eric was the Program Lead for commercial fisheries economics at the Office of Science and Technology from 2011-2015 before becoming Chief of the Social Sciences Branch at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in 2016. Eric's research has primarily focused on the role and contribution of economic analysis in fishery management policy and regulatory design. Recent projects included development and implementation of indicators of fisheries performance, risk assessment for fishing vessel safety, and measures of fleet diversity in the groundfish fishery. Current projects are analysis of changes in vessel ownership in the groundfish fishery, comparative analysis of coupled economic and ecological models, and methodological considerations in the collection and use of cost data.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ocean Observing and Modeling Technology to Enable Operational Forecasting
Presenter(s): Yi Chao, CEO, Seatrec, Inc. & Scientist, Remote Sensing Solutions, Inc.
Date & Time: 27 July 2017
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Yi Chao, CEO, Seatrec, Inc. & Scientist, Remote Sensing Solutions, Inc. Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4512647892657672963

Abstract: Weather forecast information is now available anywhere anytime thanks to a comprehensive atmospheric observing system and mature modeling technology. Operational ocean forecasting however is still in its infancy. This talk will describe two technology breakthroughs to enable operational ocean forecasting. The first breakthrough is to power underwater systems by ocean temperature differences. Currently, all autonomous underwater systems are powered by primary battery and therefore have limited lifetime. Replacing or recharging battery at sea is a very expensive operation and certainly not scalable on the global scale. Harvesting energy from vertical temperature differences in the ocean is shown to be a viable solution to power underwater systems (e.g., floats, gliders, AUVs) indefinitely. The second technology breakthrough is the data assimilation method to combine observational data with a numerical model simulation to enable forecasting. For our California coastal ocean forecast system, the three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) data assimilation method was selected because of its computational efficiency as compared to other advanced methods such as 4DVAR or Kalman Filter. The California coastal ocean forecast system is run in near real-time to produce a nowcast every six hours and a 72-hour forecast every day. The performance of this forecast system will be presented. Our experience working with users (e.g., search and rescue operation, oil spill response) will be described. A decade-long hindcast will be also presented to describe the seasonal-to-interannual variability including the most recent warming conditions during 2014-2016 associated with El Nio and Pacific Decadal Oscillation.

Bio(s): With a Ph.D. from Princeton University, Dr. Chao worked at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of Caltech for more than 20 years. He has published more than 100 peer-reviewed journal papers in the areas of ocean modeling and satellite remote sensing. He has been granted two patents in harvesting energy from the ocean temperature differences. In 2012, Dr. Chao left NASA JPL/Caltech to start a new career in private industry with a goal to transfer government-funded research and development to commercial applications.

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26 July 2017

Title: Navigating the Steps to Resilience in Coastal Alaska
Presenter(s): Daniel Ahren, NOAA Hollings Student
Date & Time: 26 July 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Daniel Ahren, NOAA Hollings Student http://www.noaa.gov/office-education/hollings-scholarship

Sponsor(s): NOAA Alaska Regional Coordinator POC: amy.holman@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Zoom Connection Information Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://iarpc.zoom.us/j/9407335675 Or iPhone one-tap (US Toll): +14086380968,9407335675# or+16465588656,9407335675# Or Telephone: Dial: +1 408 638 0968 (US Toll) or +1 646 558 8656 (US Toll). Meeting ID: 940 733 5675. International numbers available: https://iarpc.zoom.us/zoomconference?m=I2ry4RjKWLYRxcrtbpYmqVjMn9z33IWl First time using Zoom? You can connect to Zoom via Mac or PC, as well as both IPhone or Android phones. We recommend you test your connection ahead of time here: https://zoom.us/testWhile we recommend downloading Zoom, you can also join without downloading. Instructions are here: https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/214629443-Zoom-Web-App

Abstract: In this NOAA Hollings Internship, Daniel worked with the core team for the 2016 Promoting Coastal Resilience and Adaptation in Alaska workshops and the relocation framework team of the federal Arctic Executive Steering Committee's Coastal Resilience Working Group to look at what is and isn't available to help communities reach resiliency. Through his project he documented Alaska based tools and case studies for the NOAA Climate Resilience Toolkit evaluated where federal funding programs and Alaska based tools fall within the steps to resilience used emergency response plans as an example of the process, and looked at lessons learned from past relocation efforts. Hear what he found and discuss actions/policies he'd recommend About the speaker: https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniel-ahrens-71876642/

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Scientific integrity: Fostering a Culture in NOAA
Presenter(s): Dr. Cynthia Decker, NOAA Scientific Integrity Officer
Date & Time: 26 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr Cynthia Decker, NOAA Scientific Integrity Officer

Remote Access: https://goo.gl/7qDW3K After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone or computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: NOAA has a world-class reputation for premier science; that reputation for quality is enhanced every day by its employees and their adherence to research integrity. Come and learn a little more about the scientific integrity enterprise from NOAA's Scientific Integrity Officer, Cynthia J Decker. Dr. Decker will cover the purpose and scope of NOAA's scientific integrity policy, review what constitutes misconduct, remind us of what is important about scientific integrity, and provide some resources. Finally, you will participate in fun, role-playing scenarios where you can showcase your scientific integrity knowledge and explore potential real-life conundrums. Please join us! POC: Patricia Geets Hathaway (patricia.hathaway@noaa.gov); NOAA Central Library: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov)

Bio(s): Cynthia J. Decker is the NOAA Scientific Integrity Officer and Chair of the NOAA Scientific Integrity Committee. She also serves as the Executive Director of the NOAA Science Advisory Board. She serves as the designated federal official for the Board, overseeing all of their activities and ensuring coordination of NOAA input to them as well as facilitating communication between the Board and various NOAA activities. She also oversees the work of the five standing working groups of the Board as well as their various ad hoc task forces. She also currently serves as the Designated Federal Officer for the Advisory Committee for the Sustained National Climate Assessment. Prior to coming to NOAA in 2006, Dr. Decker was the Deputy Chief of the External Programs Branch for the Oceanographer of the Navy. This office is responsible for coordination at the policy level of Navy operational oceanography and meteorology programs with other military services (e.g. Air Force), civilian agencies (e.g. NOAA, NSF), and international organizations (e.g. NATO, WMO, IOC). Dr. Decker was formerly the Director of Research for the Consortium for Oceanographic Research and Education (CORE, now the Consortium for Ocean Leadership), which represents over 100 academic, government, industry and non-profit ocean institutions around the United States. At CORE, she was also Director of the International Secretariat for the Census of Marine Life, a research program dedicated to assessing and explaining marine biodiversity around the world and Executive Director for the National Oceanographic Partnership Program, a collaborative research program among 14 federal agencies. She received her Ph.D in Coastal Oceanography from the State University of New York at Stony Brook (Stony Brook University) and her Master's in Zoology from Louisiana State University. She has previously worked for the U.S. Office of Naval Research running a marine environmental research program, and for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, where she administered an estuarine management program on behalf of the state.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

25 July 2017

Title: SEARCH for Arctic Answers
Presenter(s): Brendan Kelly, Executive Director, SEARCH,k University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 25 July 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Brendan Kelly, Executive Director, SEARCH,k University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): ACAP POC: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

Remote Access: http://uaf.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=d2776d089a&e=9097598e1a

Abstract: Communities and governments need reliable information to adapt to rapid changes in the Arctic environment. Scientists need to continually advance the body of knowledge and"at the same time"answer immediately practical questions. The Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) brings together researchers from diverse disciplines and institutions to accelerate cross-discipline syntheses and to make scientific understanding more readily accessible to policy makers and other stakeholders. Knowledge pyramids utilized in the creation of Arctic Answers foster syntheses and broad understanding across sectors and stakeholder groups, including at the policy level. Brendan Kelly, Executive Director of SEARCH, will discuss SEARCH and the Arctic Answers initiative.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: A Digital Atlas of the Choptank River Watershed in Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Dan Dorfman, Senior Marine Spatial Ecologist, CSS Inc., on contract to the Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, and David Moe Nelson, from the same group. Co-authors include: Ayman Mabrouk, Laurie Bauer, Chris Clement, and Larry Claflin
Date & Time: 25 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Rescheduled from July 6th!

Presenter(s): Dan Dorfman, Senior Marine Spatial Ecologist, CSS Inc., on contract to the Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, and David Moe Nelson, Marine Biologist, also with the NOAA/NCCOS Marine Spatial Ecology Division. Co-authors include: Ayman Mabrouk, Laurie Bauer, Chris Clement, and Larry Claflin.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: The Choptank River Complex, including the tidal Choptank and Little Choptank Rivers on Maryland's Eastern Shore and watershed extending into Delaware, has been selected as a Habitat Focus Area under NOAA's Habitat Blueprint Program. To support the management, conservation, and restoration objectives, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) has developed a Digital Atlas of the Choptank Habitat Focus Area The Digital Atlas can be used as a tool for conservation planning, resource analysis, data exploration, and other purposes. The Digital Atlas consists of three components: Geodatabase of existing relevant data sets from NOAA and partner organizations Interactive web portal for mapping and displaying relevant data sets Baseline status report published as a NOAA Technical Memorandum. The information presented in all three components are organized into seven themes: Land Cover, Shoreline Composition, Water Quality, Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity, Submerged Aquatic Vegetation, Fish, and Oysters. For each theme, pertinent data sets from partner organizations have been processed, summarized, and scaled to be used in the web mapping portal.

Bio(s): Dan Dorfman is a Senior Marine Spatial Ecologist for CSS Incorporated. He has been working on-site for NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science for the past eight years. Prior to working with NOAA, Dan was the Principal Investigator for Intelligent Marine Planning. His work for Intelligent Marine Planning focused on developing methods for coastal and marine systematic resource management planning and decision making. Previously, Dan has worked for The Nature Conservancy, Greenpeace, and the Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii. Dan holds a Master's in biology from Boston University and a Bachelor's in ecology from the University of California at San Diego. David Moe Nelson is a marine biologist with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, with a specialty in broad-scale assessments of coastal and estuarine living marine resources. He grew up in Champaign, Illinois, and completed an M.S. in Fisheries at the University of Minnesota before coming to NOAA as a Knauss Fellow in 1989.

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Title: Assessing Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Vulnerability to Climate Change
Presenter(s): Matt Lettrich, Protected Species Science Branch, Division of Assessment and Monitoring, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 25 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 12836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Matt Lettrich, Protected Species Science Branch, Division of Assessment and Monitoring, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of NOAA Fisheries Office Science and Technology Brown Bag Seminar Series POC: Jihong.Dai@noaa.gov

Remote Access: 877-984-9436 Passcode: 8591340

Remote Access: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/st_brown_bag_seminar_25_july_2017/ (1) In the field "Name"; type your name as you would like to be seen in the meeting (2) Click "Enter Room" *** NO PASSWORD IS NEEDED*** (3) The Adobe Connect will open in a separate window, shown you as participate (4) Participate will have a blank screen until the host has share the screen

Abstract: A changing climate has significant implications for conservation of marine protected species. NOAA Fisheries is developing, testing, and implementing a methodology to assess the vulnerability of marine mammal and sea turtle species to help guide science and management actions by providing decision-makers with information on what species may be most vulnerable and why. This presentation describes the development process, the assessment method, and opportunities to engage with the assessment as it moves from the testing stage to implementing the approach with marine mammals in the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean. About the speaker: Matt Lettrich works as the coordinator on the development and implementation of vulnerability assessments for marine mammals and sea turtles. He has previously worked on marine mammal distributions under a changing climate and the National Fish, Wildlife, and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy among other climate efforts. He holds a B.S in Marine Biology and M.S. in Marine Science, both from the University of North Carolina Wilmington where he studied nutrient fluxes in coastal wetlands.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

24 July 2017

Title: California-Nevada Drought and Climate Outlook
Presenter(s): Julie Kalansky, California-Nevada Climate Applications Program -CNAP-; Jordan Goodrich, CNAP; Andrea Bair, National Weather Service; and Dan Cayan, CNAP
Date & Time: 24 July 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Remote access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Julie Kalansky, California-Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), a NOAA RISA Program; Jordan Goodrich, CNAP; Andrea Bair, National Weather Service; and Dan Cayan, CNAP Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) Seminar POC for questions: amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/121622858765051394 TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the Webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (213) 929-4232 Access Code: 119-344-371 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar

Abstract: The NIDIS California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) July 2017 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia). On the agenda for July 24: -- Drought & Climate Status Update -- Groundwater Status Update -- Drought & Climate Outlook -- Drought Scenario from the 4th California Climate Change Assessment -- Q&A

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

20 July 2017

Title: Algae are what they eat: How nitrogen chemical form can impact the toxicity and isotope signature of a marine dinoflagellate
Presenter(s): Taylor Armstrong, M.S., 2017 Knauss Fellow, Ocean Acidification Program, OAR and Office of Science and Technology, NMFS, NOAA
Date & Time: 20 July 2017
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Taylor Armstrong, M.S., 2017 Knauss Fellow, Ocean Acidification Program, OAR and Office of Science and Technology, NMFS NOAA POC: Library: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Knauss Brown Bag Coordinator (July): Katie Geddes (katie.geddes@noaa.gov) 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Fellow Lecture Series

Abstract: Despite a global interest in the relationship between harmful algal blooms (HABs) and eutrophication, the impact of natural versus anthropogenic nutrient sources on composition and toxicity of algal species remains unclear. Here we investigated the effects of different nitrogen chemical forms (nitrate, ammonium and urea) on the nitrogen isotope ratio and toxin content in isolates of the saxitoxin-producing dinoflagellate, Alexandrium catenella. Ultimately, we expect these results will aid in the identification of the nitrogen sources impacting dinoflagellate blooms. Register for the Knauss July webinars here: https://goo.gl/tFLc3a After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone or computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Bio(s): Originally from Louisville, Kentucky, Taylor Armstrong graduated from University of South Carolina with a B.Sc. in Marine Biology in 2013. Armstrong went on to receive a Master's of Science in Marine Science from Virginia Institute of Marine Science-College of William and Mary (VIMS) in 2017.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Discard Mortality of Deep-Sea Sharks
Presenter(s): Brendan Talwar, MSc, 2017 Knauss Fellow, Marine Mammal Commission
Date & Time: 20 July 2017
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Brendan Talwar, MSc, 2017 Knauss Fellow, Marine Mammal Commission 2017 Sea Grant Knauss Fellow Lecture Series POC: Library: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Knauss Brown Bag Coordinator (July): Katie Geddes (katie.geddes@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring please register for the seminar https://goo.gl/tFLc3a After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone or computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Bycatch interactions with deep-sea elasmobranchs are increasingly common and can lead to dramatic declines in abundance over short time scales. Sharks hooked in the deep sea could face a higher likelihood of severe physiological disturbance, at-vessel mortality, and post-release mortality (PRM) than their shallower counterparts. Unfortunately, robust PRM rates have not yet been estimated for longline-caught deep-sea sharks and as such are not currently incorporated into total fishery mortality estimates or bycatch assessments, limiting the effectiveness of current conservation or management initiatives. We empirically estimated PRM for two focal taxa of deep-sea shark, the Cuban dogfish Squalus cubensis and the gulper shark Centrophorus sp. using post-release enclosures deployed at-depth. Our results suggest that PRM rates of deep-sea sharks are high and highlight the need for filling in this gap in fishery mortality estimates for other common discards in the future.

Bio(s): Brendan Talwar graduated from Furman University in 2011 with a B.Sc. in Biology before jumping into the marine sciences full time. After teaching and conducting research for a few years around the Caribbean and elsewhere, Talwar received a Master's of Science in Ecology & Evolution at Florida State University in 2016.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Can Vessel Buybacks Pay Off: An Evaluation of an Industry Funded Fishing Vessel Buyback
Presenter(s): Daniel S. Holland, Economist, Conservation Biology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, NOAA. Co-authors include: Erin Steiner, Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, NOAA; and Amanda Warlick, NOAA/NMFS Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 20 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Daniel S. Holland, Economist, Conservation Biology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, NOAA. Co-authors include: Erin Steiner, Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, NOAA; and Amanda Warlick, NOAA/NMFS Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Fishing vessel and permit buyback programs have been implemented to reduce excess capacity and improve profitability in a number of fisheries around the world. These programs are generally publicly funded, but in a few cases they have been financed by loans to be paid back by the remaining fleet. In 2003, a buyback permanently removed 91 vessels and 239 fishing permits from the Pacific groundfish trawl fishery and associated corollary fisheries of Dungeness crab and pink shrimp. The buyback was financed with $10 million in public funding and a $36 million loan to be repaid over 30 years with fees on landings. In the same year, a control date was set for catch share program in the groundfish trawl fishery. When the catch share program was implemented in 2011, the permit owners that remained in the fishery after the buyback were allocated the quota shares that would otherwise have been issued to the permits bought back in 2003. Estimates of the annual profits generated by this quota are compared to the cost of servicing the buyback loan. The results provide evidence that a buyback program, when implemented in conjunction with catch shares, can enable a sustained increase in profitability for the remaining vessels sufficient to justify its cost. However, using landings taxes as the mechanism to repay the loan may result in a mismatch between those who benefit from and pay for the buyback.

Bio(s): Dan Holland is an economist with NOAA's Northwest Fishery Science Center where he leads the human dimensions team in the Conservation Biology Division. He earned a Ph.D. in environmental and natural resource economics at the University of Rhode Island in 1998 and an M.S. in agricultural economics from the University of Illinois in 1993. He has worked for government, academia, and industry in different parts of the US and in New Zealand. His research is focused primarily on design and evaluation of fishery management strategies and on governance of fisheries and marine ecosystems. He has a long standing interest in spatial aspects of fishery management such as marine reserves and area management and in understanding and modeling fishing behavior. Current research foci include approaches for limiting fishery bycatch, bioeconomic modeling of coupled natural and human systems, fishery diversification, catch share quota markets, and fishery participation and location choice modeling.

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Title: Mentoring, a source of inspiration and achievement
Presenter(s): Orlando Figueroa, CEO Orlando Leadership Enterprise, LLC and Retired NASA Senior Executive Service
Date & Time: 20 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC2 Room 17250
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Orlando Figueroa (CEO Orlando Leadership Enterprise, LLC and Retired NASA Senior Executive Service)

Sponsor(s): The NOAA Civil Rights Office, Line Office EEO/Diversity Program Managers, the Department of Commerce's Office of the Civil Rights, and Latinos at NOAA Group Join us remotely from your computer, tablet or smartphone: Link: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/493238141 Dial: +1 (312) 757-3129; Access Code: 493-238-141; Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 493-238-141 A sign language interpreter will be on-site.

Abstract: Mentorship is very much akin to and an integral part to the development of leadership skills in the organization. As such, we must embrace it as a core value, a source for the transfer of knowledge and inspiration from generation to generation. My upbringing and career was enriched in immeasurable ways by the contribution of mentors. They took great pleasure in learning, in learning from others, and in passing on what they learned unselfishly. They embraced mentorship as a value, all for the satisfaction that came from their accomplishments, from mission success! About the speaker: Orlando Figueroa retired from NASA in 2010 to start the Orlando Leadership Enterprise, LLC aerospace consulting company. The company specializes in assisting the aerospace community through expert advice in: space missions and technology, organization and enterprise/program management, strategic planning, and 4D Systems leadership and team development. Mr. Figueroa's career with NASA spanned 33 years; throughout which he demonstrated a record of consistent achievements in the planning, design, development and oversight of multi-faceted scientific space missions. He is well versed in interacting with national and international government and non-government organizations. Considered a highly competent strategist and director of scientific space systems and technology, the management of large (>1300 employees) multi-disciplinary engineering organizations; and experienced in the management of complex multi-project programs with total budgets in excess of $4 billion. Experiences over his 33 years in federal service at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and Headquarters (HQ) include the following: GSFC Deputy Center Director for Science and Technology, GSFC Director for the Applied Engineering and Technology Directorate, HQ Deputy Associate Administrator for Programs in the NASA Science Mission Directorate; HQ Director for the Solar System Exploration Division; HQ Director for Mars Exploration; and HQ NASA Deputy Chief Engineer for Systems Engineering, GSFC Director of Systems, Technology and Advanced Concepts, GSFC Explorers Program Manager; GSFC Manager for the Small Explorers (SMEX) project; GSFC Manager for the Superfluid Helium On Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) Shuttle Experiment; GSFC Head of the Cryogenics Technology Section; and GSFC Lead Cryogenic Engineer for the Cosmic Background Explorer mission. Mr. Figueroa has received numerous achievement and performance awards. Among the most notable are: the 2008 Smithsonian Latino Center Legacy Award, the 2005 Service to America Federal Employee of the Year Medal, NASA Presidential Rank Awards (2004 - Distinguished, 2010 and 2002 - Meritorious) for sustained extraordinary accomplishment in management of programs of the United States Government; Hispanic Business Magazine ranking as one the most influential Hispanics in the Nation in 2004, 2005, and 2010; the 2002 Pioneer Award from the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Awards Corporation; NASA Outstanding Leadership Medals in 2004 and 1993; and the 1994 Community Stars Award from the Maryland Science Week Commission. Mr. Figueroa received an honorary doctorate degree in science from Dominican College in New York in 2004. He is the author of several technical publications in the field of cryogenics, the SMEX missions, and the Mars Exploration Program. He obtained a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus in 1978, and completed advanced studies in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Maryland. Mr. Figueroa is fully bilingual in English and Spanish. Source: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/mars/news/Figueroabio.html

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19 July 2017

Title: Seasonal Forecasting Using an Analog Technique
Presenter(s): Brian Brettschnieder, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 19 July 2017
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Brian Brettschnieder, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): NOAA RISA

Remote Access: http://accap.adobeconnect.com/analog/event/registration.html

Abstract: Many places have a local saying that reads, if you don't like the weather, wait 15 minutes. This idiom is not as applicable to Alaska, where strong seasonality is an ever present fact of life. In December, January, and February, all of Mainland Alaska has snow on the ground and experiences sub-freezing temperatures. In June, July, and August, long days mean warm temperatures, clouds, rain, and mosquitoes. Within those seasons, large variation exists from one year to the next. Winter 2016-17 is much colder and snowier than either of the previous two winters. Those differences are meaningful in the cold season for activities that involve travel on frozen rivers and shorefast ice, following game tracks in snow, meat and fish storage, and more. In summer, year-to-year differences in climate affect fish runs, berry production, river runoff, and fire activity. An IARC project that I am working on with John Walsh and Rick Thoman uses an analog technique to forecast seasonal conditions based on previous months' conditions. If conditions over a 1, 2, 3, or more month time period are similar to some other year, then highlighting that match year is useful for determining what the current year's conditions will resemble 1, 2, 3, or more months in the future. For example, a forecast for June temperatures based on the three years with the best global 500 mb geopotential height match to October-December 2016 in the northern hemisphere indicate near normal temperatures for most of the state with slightly below normal temperatures for the eastern interior. This type of pattern-match analog forecasting provides long lead-time indications for seasonal conditions. Check the tool: http://data.61n150w.com/analogs.php

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Title: Quantifying and predicting responses to a US West Coast salmon fishery closure
Presenter(s): Kate Richerson, Postdoctoral researcher at University of Washington starting in July; currently with NOAA/NMFS/NWFSC/Conservation Biology Division
Date & Time: 19 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kate Richerson, Ecologist, Postdoctoral Researcher, affiliated with the University of Washington and NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. Presenting remotely from Seattle.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: As anthropogenic changes interact with natural climate cycles, the variability of marine ecosystems is likely to increase. This variability influences the behavior of fishers, which can affect the profitability and sustainability of stocks and may have wider economic and ecological effects. We use data from the US West Coast salmon troll fishery before, during, and after a large-scale closure to illustrate how altered resource availability influences the behavior of fishing vessels in heterogeneous ways. We find that vessels were less likely to participate in fishing during the closure, with >40% of vessels ceasing fishing temporarily and 17% exiting permanently. Vessels that were more dependent on salmon were more likely to cease fishing, and more diversified vessels were more likely to continue. In spite of a high level of cross-participation, we find limited evidence that vessels increased their participation in other fisheries. Based on our models and the composition of the current fleet, we predict that a closure in the near future would cause another economic disaster and lead to a large fraction of vessels exiting fishing. However, our results suggest that effects on fisheries linked by cross-participation are likely to be low.

Bio(s): Kate Richerson is a post-doctoral researcher affiliated with the University of Washington and the Northwest Fisheries Science Center. She is interested in fisheries, social-ecological systems, and marine conservation.

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18 July 2017

Title: Reef-Wide Shifts in Fish Population Structure Following Establishment of Philippine Marine Protected Areas
Presenter(s): Robert Fidler, Ph.D., Florida Institute of Technology.
Date & Time: 18 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Robert Fidler, Ph.D., Florida Institute of Technology. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Marine protected areas (MPAs) have become critical components of fisheries management programs worldwide. Here, we aim to standardize conclusions regarding MPA performance throughout the Philippines using a reef-wide' meta-analysis. This analysis uses pooled visual census data from 39 matched pairs of MPAs and fished reefs surveyed twice over a mean period of 3 yr, allowing for the comparison of abundance and demographic structure of fishes across both protected and fished areas over time. The meta-analysis revealed that (1) although fish density was higher inside MPAs within individual sampling periods, reef-wide fish density generally either increased or remained stable over time, and (2) reef-wide increases in large-bodied fish were evident between survey periods, indicating positive demographic shifts within both MPAs and adjacent areas. These results suggest that, over relatively few years of protection, MPAs in the Philippines are able to promote beneficial shifts in fish population structure throughout entire reef systems rather than simply maintaining stable populations within their borders. The reef-wide framework of MPA assessment demonstrated in this study presents the advantages of including adjacent fisheries as integrated components when quantifying MPA performance, revealing trends that are indistinguishable when using spatial comparisons between MPAs and fished reefs.

Bio(s): Dr. Robert Fidler is a fisheries biologist, with a focus on coral-reef ecosystems. His research examines the use of marine reserves or marine protected areas (MPAs) in fisheries management and coral-reef conservation. Specifically, his work examines the ability of MPAs to promote phenotypic recovery from fisheries-induced evolution in exploited populations using both large-scale meta-analysis and empirical investigations. Dr. Fidler received a B.S. from the University of Virginia, an M.S. and Ph.D. from the Florida Institute of Technology, and was a 2014-2015 U.S. Student Fulbright Scholar in the Philippines.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Collecting and managing ocean and coastal information in South Africa: from the Constitution, to operational ocean observing systems, to marine information management and dissemination
Presenter(s): Dr. Deirdre Byrne, Oceans and Coasts, Department of Environmental Affairs, South Africa
Date & Time: 18 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Deirdre Byrne, Special Scientist and Physical Oceanographer, Oceans and Coasts, Department of Environmental Affairs, South Africa

Remote Access: https://goo.gl/47UkiX After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone or computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: South Africa as a free democracy is a country only 22 years old. Its constitution guarantees the right of everyone "to have the environment protected, for the benefit of present and future generations, through reasonable measures that prevent pollution and ecological degradation; promote conservation; and secure ecologically sustainable development and use of natural resources." These constitutional rights translate into mandates for the Department of Environmental Affairs: Oceans and Coasts Branch - to monitor and understand the ocean environment, to protect it for future generations and to promote sustainable use and ecosystem resilience. This talk will provide a broad overview of some of our current efforts to establish operational ocean observing as well as improving marine data stewardship and assisting in the development of decision-making support tools for the marine environment. POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); NCEI: Don Collins (donald.collins@noaa.gov), Krisa Arzayus (krisa.arzayus@noaa.gov)

Bio(s): Dr. Deirdre Byrne is a physical oceanographer with a passion for science in service to an environmentally sustainable and resilient society. This interest led her from a PhD at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, to a career in academia (U Maine, 1997-2010), to NOAA (2010-2015), and most recently to the Oceans and Coasts Branch of the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA), South Africa (2015-present). Her geographic area of specialization is the ocean around southern Africa. Deirdre's own research foci at present are SST and altimetry.

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Title: Efficient Estimation of the Impact of Observing Systems using Ensemble Forecast Sensitivity to Observations (EFSO)
Presenter(s): Tse-Chun Chen, University Maryland College Park
Date & Time: 18 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar.

Title: Efficient Estimation of the Impact of Observing Systems using Ensemble Forecast Sensitivity to Observations (EFSO)

Presenter(s): Tse-Chun Chen, University of Maryland College Park Presentation: http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2017/TC_Chen_PQC_EMC.pdf Youtube Presentation: https://youtu.be/F_8QLGV1Zlo Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook. JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract: Massive amount of observations are being assimilated into operational NWP. New observing systems with high temporal, spatial, and spectral sampling rates are being developed and deployed fairly regularly. The need to evaluate the usefulness of these observations can not be satisfied by the prevailing OSEs, which are computationally expensive and have limited applicability. We demonstrate that Ensemble Forecast Sensitivity to Observations (EFSO), which quantifies the impact of each observation on the forecasts at low cost, could be implemented as an online monitoring tool of the impact of each observation. Thus EFSO can efficiently identify detrimental impact episodes and the associated observations. To avoid such detrimental episodes, Hotta et al. (2017) have shown EFSO-based Proactive Quality Control (PQC) can reduce forecast error in cases of "skill dropout". We further devised two other data denial strategies: THReshold (THR), which rejects observation if the Moist Total Energy error impact is more detrimental than 10-5 J-kg-1, and Beneficial Growing Mode (BGM) that only keeps observations that are beneficial in 6-hr forecasts and continue to be beneficial after 24 hours. We show in the presentation that both THR and BGM outperform the original PQC method, and BGM (useful for reanalyses) performs even better than THR.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

17 July 2017

Title: The historic tornadoes of 2011: A case study on how to improve weather preparedness
Presenter(s): Ena Keys, National Weather Service
Date & Time: 17 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ NOAA Central Library, SSMC3 2nd Floor
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ena Keys, National Weather Service Intern. Dr. Vankita Brown, Social Scientist, NWS Headquarters, Office of the Chief Operating Officer. POC: Library: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov);

Remote Access: https://goo.gl/mk8qoE and the direct link to register is: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5957317110626799619 Introduction: Dr. Vankita Brown, Social Scientist, NWS Headquarters, Office of the Chief Operating Officer.

Abstract: The 2011 Super Outbreak was the largest, costliest, and one of the deadliest tornado outbreaks ever recorded, affecting the Southern, Midwestern, and Northeastern United States. There is no exact science to one of natures most striking features. We don't know how strong a tornado will be, what path it will follow, or how long it will last, so what can we do? We implement security measures to insure safety, if only it where that simple. This presentation will go into depth on why we continue to struggle with community safety and possible solutions.

Bio(s): Ena Keys is a native of Jackson, Mississippi and has lived in Columbia, Maryland for the bulk of her life. Ena is going into her third year at Jackson State University in Jackson, Mississippi, majoring in meteorology with and interest in space weather. She is a current intern at The National Weather Service Headquarters under social scientist, Dr. Vankita Brown. Once the summer is complete she will be returning back to school to complete her undergraduate studies.

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14 July 2017

Title: Combining Multiple NEFSC Data Sets to Build a Better Understanding of the Importance of Euphausiids to the NEUS-LME
Presenter(s): Dr. Mike Lowe, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA
Date & Time: 14 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Clark Conference Room, 166 Water St., Woods Hole, MA 02543
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Mike Lowe, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA

Sponsor(s): Joint Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) Seminar. Point of contact: Mike Jech, NEFSC, michael.jech@noaa.gov Remote Access Information: Meeting Name: Joint NEFSC/WHOI Seminar 11 URL: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/cinar-11/ Teleconference No: 866-658-7997 (toll-free, US) or +1 517-833-7464 (toll, outside US) Participant Code: 4319624

Abstract: Euphausiids are reported to be a key link between primary production and higher-level trophic levels in the Gulf of Maine, but are not monitored well. I will briefly discuss some of my previous work using NEFSC's ECOMON and food habits data to examine the broad-scale spatial distribution of euphausiids and the consumptive removal by fish predators in the NEUS-LME. For the remainder of the talk, I will describe how acoustic estimates of herring abundance and euphausiid biomass in the Georges Bank region of the Gulf of Maine from 1999-2012 are being used to continue those efforts and to improve mass balance ecosystem models in a two-step process. First, krill biomass estimates are compared to gut evacuation rate model outputs for herring to examine the potential impact of consumptive removal of krill biomass by herring. Second, euphausiid consumption by fish predators is used to inform ecosystems models and assess the importance of krill in the ecosystem and their trophic significance. This information potentially fills critical knowledge gaps in our understanding of Gulf of Maine foodwebs.

Bio(s): Dr. Mike Lowe was recently a joint NEFSC/WHOI postdoctoral researcher and is now a postdoctoral researcher at the LSU Agricultural Center where he is using long-term monitoring data to improve stock assessment models for Louisiana's eastern oyster fishery. Archive of past seminars: An archive of past seminars can be found at the Cooperative Institute for the North Atlantic Region (CINAR) website: http://www.cinar.org/seminars.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

13 July 2017

Title: Forecast for Harmful Algal Blooms in Lake Erie in 2017
Presenter(s): Dr. Christopher Winslow, Director, Ohio Sea Grant, Stone Laboratory; Dr. Rick Stumpf, Oceanographer, National Center for Coastal Ocean Science, NOAA, et al.
Date & Time: 13 July 2017
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Gibraltar Island, Put-In-Bay Township, OH 43456
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Christopher Winslow, Director, Ohio Sea Grant & Stone Laboratory, Dr. Rick Stumpf, Oceanographer, National Center for Coastal Ocean Science, NOAA, et al. Register at: https://ohioseagrant.osu.edu/news/calendar/2017/07/13/i4dnu/webinar-2017-habs-forecast Seminar sponsor: Ohio State University Stone Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: jentes.1@osu.edu

Abstract: Ohio Sea Grant and Stone Laboratory will host a public webinar to explain NOAA's 2017 Seasonal Forecast of Harmful Algal Blooms for Lake Erie. The event will feature expert commentary, a discussion of the history of this issue on Lake Erie, and the U.S. response to the problem.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Blueprint for 2022, Part 1: Geometric Coordinates
Presenter(s): Dr Dru Smith, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 13 July 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: online access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dru Smith, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA NGS; POC for questions: Frank.Mowry@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6312558315187729156. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (562) 247-8321; Access Code: 728-650-998; Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar; Webinar ID: 141-678-467.

Abstract: Since 2008, NGS has been stating that its official policy is to replace NAD 83, but details on the exact method have taken years to determine with any certainty. In 2017 this situation changed with the release of NOAA Technical Report NOS NGS 62, entitled Blueprint for 2022, Part 1: Geometric Coordinates, which reflect many of the technical and policy decisions NGS has arrived at in their goal to replace NAD 83.

Bio(s): Dr. Dru Smith was Chief Geodesist of NOAA's National Geodetic Survey from 2005 until 2015, and now serves as the NSRS Modernization Manager, responsible for overseeing the replacement of NAD 83 and NAVD 88. He first entered NGS in 1995 after receiving his Ph.D. in geodetic science from The Ohio State University. He has published over 40 papers on research topics ranging from geodetic surveying to ionosphere determination to geoid modeling.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 13 July 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Title: Green Fins: A tool for reducing the direct impacts of diving and tourism industries
Presenter(s): Chloe Harvey, Programmes Manager, The Reef-World Foundation
Date & Time: 13 July 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Chloe Harvey, Programmes Manager, The Reef-World Foundation Register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/912037580904846081

Sponsor(s): This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract: Join Chloe Harvey of Reef-World, to learn about Green Fins, a public-private partnership developed by UNEP and The Reef-World Foundation that leads to a measurable reduction in negative environmental impacts associated with SCUBA diving and snorkeling. This webinar will provide information on the Green Fins approach, share successes, and discuss lessons learned. The presentation will highlight newly released tools and resources available to support managers who are interested in reducing the impacts of marine tourism and applying the Green Fins approach in their areas.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

12 July 2017

Title: Animal and Human Research Subjects (including survey respondents) Welfare: Issues for Federal Funders and Scientists
Presenter(s): Dr. Dwayne Meadows, NMFS, Office of Protected Resources
Date & Time: 12 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Dwayne Meadows, NMFS Office of Protected Resources

Remote Access: Please register: https://goo.gl/J9Skx5 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone or computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: There are many laws, regulations and policies designed to protect the human and animal subjects of research, testing, and training. These include protections for non-invasive human research including personal data and survey responses. Researchers, grant funding personnel, supervisors, and institutions all have responsibilities and liabilities for the protection of research subjects. Dr. Meadows will summarize these rules and responsibilities, highlight upcoming changes to the Federal government's Common Rule for Human Subjects, and consider compliance across NOAA.

Bio(s): Dr. Dwayne Meadows is a conservation biologist and educator. Currently he is an endangered species biologist for the National Marine Fisheries Service. Prior to that he worked at the NMFS Pacific Islands Science Center as a coral reef biologist and directed the research of the Pacific Whale Foundation in Maui Hawaii. Dr. Meadows spent 8 years as an Assistant and then Associate professor of Zoology where he initially volunteered to serve on an Animal Care and Use Committee. He later chaired this committee and the human subjects Institutional Review Board for the state of Utah Science Fair and chaired NMFS' first ever Animal Care and Use Committee in 2009.

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Title: Migration Induced by Sea-level Rise Could Reshape the US Population Landscape
Presenter(s): Mathew E. Hauer, PhD. Applied Demographer, University of Georgia
Date & Time: 12 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Mathew E. Hauer, PhD., Applied Demographer, University of Georgia

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Many sea level rise (SLR) assessments focus on populations presently inhabiting vulnerable coastal communities, but to date no studies have attempted to model the destinations of these potentially displaced persons. With millions of potential future migrants in heavily populated coastal communities, SLR scholarship focusing solely on coastal communities characterizes SLR as primarily a coastal issue, obscuring the potential impacts in landlocked communities created by SLR induced displacement. Here I address this issue by merging projected populations at-risk of SLR with migration systems simulations to project future destinations of SLR migrants in the United States (U.S.). I find that unmitigated SLR is expected to reshape the U.S. population distribution, potentially stressing landlocked areas unprepared to accommodate this wave of coastal migrants" even after accounting for potential adaptation. These results provide the first glimpse of how climate change will reshape future population distributions and establishes a new foundation for modelling potential migration destinations from climate stressors in an era of global environmental change.

Bio(s): Matt Hauer is a recent doctoral graduate in geography with academic training spanning sociology, demography and population geography, or spatial demography. He displays remarkable acumen in identifying timely policy-relevant research topics and is recognized for his dissertation, which explored sea level rise and human migration. He developed his own population projection methods that addressed the limitations of existing approaches, and, working with detailed geographic assessments of sea level, he generated the first national projections of sea level rise-induced migration and its impacts. He has already developed a keen ability to communicate his research in a variety of governmental and nongovernmental settings and is a sought-after speaker and participant in policy-making. Hauer is currently a faculty member at UGA's Carl Vinson Institute of Government and serves as director of the CVIOG Applied Demography Program.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

11 July 2017

Title: Regional Climate Center (RCC) Overview: High Plains RCC & Southern RCC
Presenter(s): Natalie Umphlett, High Plains Regional Climate Center and Kyle Brehe, Southern Regional Climate Center
Date & Time: 11 July 2017
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Natalie Umphlett (High Plains Regional Climate Center) and Kyle Brehe (Southern Regional Climate Center) Seminar sponsor: National Weather Service, Climate Services Branch

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1475547187116650243

Abstract: Natalie Umphlett from High Plains Regional Climate Center (HPRCC) and Kyle Brehe from Southern Regional Climate Center (SRCC) will give an overview of their RCC tools, projects, and programs. Seminar POC for questions: emily.timte@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: An Update on the NOAA Institutional Repository
Presenter(s): Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS and Sarah Davis, MLS, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 11 July 2017
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS and Sarah Davis, MLS, NOAA Central Library POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter judith.salter@noaa.gov; IR Managing Librarian: Jennifer Fagan-Fry (jennifer.fagan-fry@noaa.gov); Sr. Bibliometrics Librarian: Sarah Davis (sarah.davis@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: please register for the webinar: https://goo.gl/DSdjr6 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone or computer mic & speakers (VoIP). Abstract/summary: The White House Office of Science and Technology issued a memo in February 2013 mandating that research focused agencies make their research publicly available. In response to this NOAA created the NOAA Institutional Repository, where NOAA researchers are required to deposit their publications. Join our NOAA IR managers Jennifer Fagan-Fry and Sarah Davis for a discussion about the IR that will include a live demo, discussion of what should be submitted for inclusion, how to submit publications, and a Q&A session.

Bio(s): Jennifer Fagan-Fry received her MLIS from Catholic University and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2015. In addition to working as one of the IR managers, Jenn provides other cataloging and metadata services and works with the library's website. Sarah Davis received her M.L.S from the University of Maryland and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2008. She heads the bibliometrics team as well as managing the NOAA Institutional Repository and the NOAA Central Library website.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Supercontinent Coalescence and Breakup Controls the Trajectory of Global Marine Biodiversity
Presenter(s): Dr. Andrew Zaffos, Senior Research Scientist, Arizona Geological Survey. Co-authors include Dr. Seth Finnegan, University of California-Berkeley, and Dr. Shanan Peters, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Date & Time: 11 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Andrew Zaffos, Senior Research Scientist, Arizona Geological Survey. Co-authors: Dr. Seth Finnegan, University of California-Berkeley, and Dr. Shanan Peters, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: James Valentine proposed two seminal paleobiological hypotheses in 1970. First, he argued that diversity increases when continents are farther apart and decreases when continents move closer together. Second, in a separate paper, he proposed that global biodiversity began to exponentially increase during the Middle Mesozoic (~200 Ma). Putting those two ideas together, he further surmised that the breakup of the supercontinent Pangaea was at least partly responsible for this explosive growth. His first proposition was widely accepted by the scientific community because it made intuitive sense, but it was untestable with the data available at the time. In contrast, his second proposition, exponential growth, was and continues to be heavily debated despite a wealth of data. Our study was the first to quantitatively test the first proposition. In a modification of the original hypothesis, we found that while the separation of continents promotes increasing marine biodiversity, the collision of continents does not cause biodiversity to fall. Instead, continental collision causes diversity to plateau. This implies that Valentine was partially correct in arguing for exponential growth of diversity over time, but only when continents are fragmenting. Because we are currently entering a new period of continental collision, we should see long-term stabilization of global marine biodiversity. Furthermore, if we lose many species to extinction in the near future, the global ecosystem is unlikely to recover to current levels of diversity until the next period of net continental separation.

Bio(s): I am a Senior Research Scientist at the Arizona Geological Survey and University of Arizona. My primary interest is the extinction and diversification of marine organisms. Specifically, I study how patterns of marine deposition and erosion controlled fossil biodiversity throughout the history of complex animal life. I also study the phenomena of niche conservatism and biogeographic conservatism in ancient marine biotas, at both regional and global scales. I am currently part of several geoinformatics initiatives - the Macrostrat Database, Paleobiology Database, the Rockd and Flyover Country social media applications, and the GeoDeepDive Library of machine-readable scientific documents - which are all working to increase the accessibility of geoscience data for the scientific community and general public.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

10 July 2017

Title: Atlantic sharks research & management: Long-term data for long-lived fishes
Presenter(s): Dr. Richard McBride, Supervisory Research Fishery Biologist, Chief, Population Biology Branch, Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 10 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Richard McBride, Supervisory Research Fishery Biologist, Chief, Population Biology Branch, Northeast Fisheries Science Center.

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring please register for the seminar https://goo.gl/KKES7W After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone or computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Predictions about shark populations require data of recruitment, growth, and survival rates measured across a biologically-realistic geographic domain. Monitoring these population traits, at large spatial scales, is difficult for any fish population. This is particularly true for sharks, because as top (or apex) predators, they are uncommon or rare, and generally data and information deficient. NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) has assembled historic samples and long-term data sets since the 1960s to meet assessment needs for these long-lived species. This talk will provide vignettes about the NEFSC Apex Predators Program's monitoring and research. Specific examples include: 1) defining population boundaries, 2) measuring growth, longevity, mortality, and reproduction, 3) monitoring abundance trends, 4) defining essential shark habitat, and 5) providing diet data for ecosystem models. These diverse tasks are integrated by a complementary set of initiatives: the Cooperative Shark Tagging Program, a Large Coastal Shark Survey, a Cooperative Atlantic States Shark Pupping and Nursery (COASTSPAN) Survey, and tournament sampling.

Bio(s): Dr. Richard McBride, Supervisory Research Fishery Biologist, Chief, Population Biology Branch, Editorial Committee member, Fishery Bulletin Northeast Fisheries Science Center National Marine Fisheries Service. Rich McBride is the Branch Chief for the Population Biology Branch of NOAA Fisheries' Northeast Fisheries Science Center, in Woods Hole, Massachusetts (http://nefsc.noaa.gov/staff/mcbride.html ). The Branch's main activities are to collect, process, and interpret biological samples of marine fishes, using best practices to optimize cost efficiency and build reliable datasets for stock and ecosystem assessments (http://www.nefsc.noaa.gov/femad/pbio/). Rich's research integrates an organism's life history " their age, size, reproduction, mortality, trophic and habitat dynamics " to better understand changes in living marine resources. He received his B.S. in Biology from Eckerd College (Florida), an M.S. in Marine Science from Stony Brook University (New York), and a Ph.D. in Ecology & Evolution from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 July 2017

Title: Rescheduled to July 25: A Digital Atlas of the Choptank River Watershed in Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Dan Dorfman, Senior Marine Spatial Ecologist, CSS Inc., on contract to the Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 6 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Rescheduled to July 25

Presenter(s): Dan Dorfman, Senior Marine Spatial Ecologist, CSS Inc., on contract to the Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Co-authors include: David Moe Nelson, Ayman Mabrouk, Laurie Bauer, Chris Clement, and Larry Claflin.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: The Choptank River Complex, including the tidal Choptank and Little Choptank Rivers on Maryland's Eastern Shore and watershed extending into Delaware, has been selected as a Habitat Focus Area under NOAA's Habitat Blueprint Program. To support the management, conservation, and restoration objectives, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) has developed a Digital Atlas of the Choptank Habitat Focus Area The Digital Atlas can be used as a tool for conservation planning, resource analysis, data exploration, and other purposes. The Digital Atlas consists of three components: Geodatabase of existing relevant data sets from NOAA and partner organizations Interactive web portal for mapping and displaying relevant data sets Baseline status report published as a NOAA Technical Memorandum. The information presented in all three components are organized into seven themes: Land Cover, Shoreline Composition, Water Quality, Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity, Submerged Aquatic Vegetation, Fish, and Oysters. For each theme, pertinent data sets from partner organizations have been processed, summarized, and scaled to be used in the web mapping portal.

Bio(s): Dan Dorfman is a Senior Marine Spatial Ecologist for CSS Incorporated. He has been working on-site for NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science for the past eight years. Prior to working with NOAA, Dan was the Principal Investigator for Intelligent Marine Planning. His work for Intelligent Marine Planning focused on developing methods for coastal and marine systematic resource management planning and decision making. Previously, Dan has worked for The Nature Conservancy, Greenpeace, and the Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii. Dan holds a Master's in biology from Boston University and a Bachelor's in ecology from the University of California at San Diego.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

5 July 2017

Title: Timing the flood: sea level rise, tidal flooding and future exposure along America's coasts
Presenter(s): William Sweet, Oceanographer, NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services - CO-OPS, Planning, Monitoring and Analysis Branch
Date & Time: 5 July 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): William Sweet, Oceanographer, NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS), Planning, Monitoring and Analysis Branch

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts (temporary plugin works fine).

Abstract: Because of relative seal level rise (SLR), frequencies of high tide (nuisance) flooding causing minor impacts occur upwards of 300% to 1000% more often than in the 1960s. Annual flood frequencies are accelerating in dozens of U.S. locations and currently pose a costly challenge to several afflicted cities. This presentation will address: i) current trends and patterns of high tide flooding, and ii) when in the future more severe coastal flooding posing a 'serious risk to life and property' may become the new normal along U.S. coastlines under the new sea level rise scenarios.

Bio(s): William Sweet is a NOAA oceanographer researching changes in coastal exposure due to sea level rise (SLR). He recently helped the U.S. military assess SLR risks to their coastal installations and led the production of a new set of regional SLR scenarios for the 4th U.S. National Climate Assessment. He now lives in Annapolis and experiences SLR effects first-hand.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Underwater noise impact assessment of the potential offshore wind farm sites in the west coast of Taiwan
Presenter(s): Dr. Chi-Fang Chen, Professor, Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, National Taiwan University
Date & Time: 5 July 2017
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ, NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Chi-Fang Chen, Professor, Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, National Taiwan University

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS Office of Protected Resources; NOAA Central Library; POC: Dr. Shane Guan (shane.guan@noaa.gov); Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov)

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS Office of Protected Resources; NOAA Central Library. Register for remote access: https://goo.gl/LenHeq

Abstract: Anthropogenic underwater noise impact becomes a concern since 2009 when R/V Langseth conducted marine geophysical survey in the offshore region around Taiwan. The reason of the concern is the Eastern Taiwan Strait humpback dolphin, also known as Chinese White Dolphin and Sousa chinensis in the coastal region of Western Taiwan. Its population size meets the ICUN Red List as critically endangered in 2009. Moreover, Taiwan government has planned to establish offshore wind farms in the offshore regions of Western Taiwan, about 600 offshore wind turbines before 2030, and the first two offshore wind turbines were installed in September, 2016. Thus underwater noise impact of these activities to the ETS humpback dolphin is of great concern. This talk presents noise impact simulation of pile driving activities and wind turbine operations, and results show that pile driving noise impact zones can be limited to 750m if the source level is below 220 dB re 1uPa, and the accumulation of operational noise would cause increment of ambient noise level. This work is supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan under Project No. MOST105-3113- E-002- CC2.

Bio(s): Dr. Chi-Fang Chen received her Ph.D. in the Department of Ocean Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1991, and started her career as the faculty member of the Department of Naval Architecture of National Taiwan University in 1991. (Department of Naval Architecture was renamed as Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering in 2000). Her research expertise and interest is underwater acoustics. She has been involved in many EIA projects in Taiwan concerning underwater noise measurement and modeling and noise impact assessment study. Lately she has carried out underwater noise measurement during the construction of the first two offshore wind turbines in the west coast of Taiwan. She is also doing bioacoustics study in recognizing the voice calls from different species in the ocean which includes Sousa chinensis in Taiwan waters.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

29 June 2017

Title: Does loss of habitat mean loss of function? Impacts of habitat and predators on bivalve functional diversity in Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Cassandra N. Glaspie, Oregon State University. Co-authors, include: Rochelle D. Seitz, Virginia Institute of Marine Science; Matthew B. Ogburn, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center; Christopher F. Dungan, Maryland Cooperative Oxford Laboratory; and Anson H. Hines, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.
Date & Time: 29 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150, Cassia Glaspie
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Cassandra N. Glaspie, Oregon State University. Presenting from Oregon. Co-authors include: Rochelle D. Seitz, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Matthew B. Ogburn, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Christopher F. Dungan, Maryland Cooperative Oxford Laboratory, and Anson H. Hines, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: Habitat loss is occurring rapidly in coastal systems worldwide. In Chesapeake Bay most historical oyster reefs have been decimated, and seagrass loss is expected to worsen due to climate warming and nutrient pollution. This loss of habitat may result in declining diversity, but whether diversity loss will equate to loss in ecosystem function is unknown. A bivalve survey was conducted in a variety of habitat types (seagrass, oyster shell, shell hash, coarse sand, detrital mud) in three lower Chesapeake Bay subestuaries from spring 2012 through summer 2013 to examine the correlation between bivalve densities (including the commercially important bivalves, soft shell clam (Mya arenaria) and razor clam (Tagelus plebeius)), habitat type, habitat volume (of material retained on 3-mm mesh), and predator density. Bivalves were analyzed as functional groups based on feeding mode, living position, and predator defense strategy. On average, seagrass supported one additional functional group than all other habitat types, and diversity was increased 68-94% in seagrass compared to the other habitats examined. The bivalve functional group that was consistently found in seagrass, and relatively rarely found in other habitat types, contained thin-shelled suspension-feeding bivalves that live near the sediment surface, either as shallow-burrowing infauna or epifauna. Densities of bivalves in functional groups that were expected to be most susceptible to predation (including small, thin-shelled bivalves) were negatively correlated with predator densities, including blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and cownose rays, (Rhinoptera bonasus). The odds of finding M. arenaria and T. plebeius were higher in seagrass than any other habitat type. Overall, bivalve diversity and distribution were associated with habitat type, habitat volume, and predator densities. These results suggest that all habitats, and particularly seagrass, play a role in maximizing bivalve functional diversity in Chesapeake Bay.

Bio(s): Dr. Cassandra Glaspie is a postdoctoral scholar at Oregon State University in the Fisheries and Wildlife Department. Cassandra received her PhD in Marine Science from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. Cassandra's research involves marine food webs and predator-prey interactions, especially as they relate to changes in the environment. At OSU, she studies climate-related changes in ocean habitat quality for ecologically and economically important fish in the Pacific Northwest and in the Northern Gulf of Mexico.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

28 June 2017

Title: Biomass estimates of euphausiids in the Georges Bank region from 1999 - 2012
Presenter(s): Michael Jech, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, MA
Date & Time: 28 June 2017
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Clark Conference Room, NEFSC Aquarium, 166 Water St., Woods Hole, MA 02543
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Michael Jech, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, MA

Sponsor(s): Joint Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) Seminar. Point of contact: Mike Jech, NEFSC, michael.jech@noaa.gov Remote Access Information: Meeting Name: Joint NEFSC/WHOI Seminar URL: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/cinar-10/ Teleconference No: 866-822-6179 (toll-free, US) or +1 517-466-0552 (toll, outside US) Participant Code: 5003656

Abstract: Euphausiids are a key link between primary production and higher-level trophic levels in the Gulf of Maine, but are not monitored well. Estimates of euphausiid biomass in the Georges Bank region of the Gulf of Maine were derived from annual acoustic/midwater trawl surveys from 1999 through 2012. Acoustic data were collected with Simrad EK500 and EK60 echo sounders operating at 18, 38, and 120 kHz, and euphausiids classified using a combination of empirically- and theoretically based methods. Distorted-Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) scattering predictions of euphausiid target strength and biological metrics were used to scale acoustic data to biomass. We highlight approaches to incorporate DWBA predictions in classification algorithms, with emphasis on the Z-score method. Biomass estimates were compared among classification methods and to depth-stratified quantitative net samples to evaluate whether the acoustically-derived biomass estimates were commensurate with historical estimates. This information can be used to assess the importance of euphausiids in the ecosystem and fill knowledge gaps in our understanding of Gulf of Maine foodwebs.

Bio(s): Michael Jech a Research Fisheries Biologist in the Ecosystem Survey Branch at the NEFSC conducting acoustical and optical surveys and research on pelagic and mesopelagic communities. Archive of past seminars: An archive of past seminars can be found at the Cooperative Institute for the North Atlantic Region (CINAR) website: http://www.cinar.org/seminars.

27 June 2017

Title: 2017 Hurricane Outlook
Presenter(s): Tom DiLiberto, Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 27 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SOS room, SSMC3 1315 East-West Hwy., Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Tom DiLiberto, NOAA/NWS, Climate Prediction Center Sponser: NOAA Office of Education, Science On a Sphere Brown Bag Series Point of Contact: erik.macintosh@noaa.gov

Remote Access: http://connectpro46305642.adobeconnect.com/rkqv5g9xvex2/ Please make sure you have installed the necessary plugin prior to joining.

Abstract: Building the 2017 Hurricane Outlook Every month, scientists at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center make predictions about what the upcoming seasons (three month periods) will bring to the United States. But twice a year as the days get hotter and our eyes turn towards the Tropics, additional outlooks are issued that are a bit more specialized. During late May, forecasters at the Climate Prediction Center issued their annual Atlantic Hurricane Outlook, predicting an above-average year for tropical storms and hurricanes. What goes into these outlooks? Do scientists look at different things compared to the usual outlooks issued for the United States? Wait, how do you issue climate outlooks in the first place? On June 27, all of these questions will be answered and hopefully more will be created as Tom Di Liberto takes us on a climate journey. Science On a Sphere is a room-sized, global display system that uses computers and video projectors to display planetary data onto a six foot diameter sphere, analogous to a giant animated globe. For more information, visit noaa.gov/sosinssmc.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

23 June 2017

Title: Alaska Region Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Richard Thoman,Climate Science and Services Manager, NWS Alaska Region
Date & Time: 23 June 2017
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: 407 Akasofu Building, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Richard Thoman, Climate Science and Services Manager, NWS Alaska Region Seminar

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, Point of Contact: accap@uaf.edu

Remote Access: Register at https://accap.uaf.edu/NWS_Briefings

Abstract: This webinar will review recent conditions and current state of the climate system in and near Alaska and the status of important global climate drivers, review guidance available for the monthly and seasonal scale outlooks and finish up with the official outlooks by NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. Recordings from past Briefings available here: http://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=6b7287a9eb&e=9097598e1a

Bio(s): Richard Thoman works as the Climate Science and Services Manager, for NWS Alaska Region Headquarters. He works closely with NOAA line offices and partners throughout Alaska providing information on climate monitoring, analysis and forecasting at the two week to one year time frame

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

22 June 2017

Title: Site Fidelity and Growth Rate of Juvenile Black Sea Bass, Centropristis striata, in the Maryland Coastal Bays Using Mark-Recapture
Presenter(s): Rebecca Peters, 2017 Knauss Fellow, Office of Science and Technology, NOAA NMFS
Date & Time: 22 June 2017
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rebecca Peters, 2017 Knauss Fellow, Office of Science and Technology, NOAA NMFS POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Library Reference Desk: (Library.Reference@noaa.gov); Knauss Fellow Coordinator (June): Aimee Hoover (aimee.hoover@noaa.gov) For remote access: If you are unable to attend in person, please register for the Knauss webinars occurring on Thursday, June 22nd at: https://goo.gl/B0IsNv (Note: This link will also provide access to Emily Parker presenting Stormwater, Biofilters, and Kangaroos: Investigating Green Infrastructure Down Under at 12:00pm). After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract: Studies comparing habitat use and growth rates of fish between habitats within estuaries are needed to more accurately delineate essential fish habitat. Juvenile black sea bass, Centropristis striata, are captured around structured habitats, but few studies have assessed their specific habitat utilization and growth in estuaries. In 2015 and 2016, juvenile eel traps were set at sites with different structured habitats (rock jetty, bridge piling, wood pilings, marsh edge, and seagrass beds), and fish captured from March to December were tagged with external tags in 2015 (n=665) and internal tags in 2016 (n=875) and released at the sites they were captured. Recapture frequencies were 9.3% (2015) and 9.9% (2016). In 2015 all recaptured fish (n=62) were caught in the same location as initial tagging, and in 2016 only two of the recaptured fish (n=87) were caught in different sampling locations than their previous capture. This supports the notion that black sea bass exhibit high site fidelity to structured habitats in estuaries. Overall growth rate in 2015 was 0.39 mm/day 0.07 SE, which is similar to growth rate (0.45 mm/day) previously estimated for juvenile C. striata in a New Jersey estuary. The growth rate in 2016 was, however, lower (0.27 mm/day 0.02 SE), possibly due to low dissolved oxygen (<4 mg/L) that was observed in summer 2016. Recapture frequencies were highest in both years at two habitat types with artificial structure: bridge pilings and wood pilings, although no significant differences were observed in growth rates among habitat types. Three year-classes (ages 0, 1, and 2) of black sea bass occurred in the MCBs; age 0 fish were most abundant around bridge piling and wood piling sites. These suggest that bridge pilings and wood pilings are important habitats for juvenile C. striata in the MCBs. The results from this study will allow future management to target conservation efforts more effectively to protect and possibly enhance these essential habitats within the MCBs.

Bio(s): Rebecca attended Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA and received her bachelor of science degree in Biology. After graduation she worked as a marine science educator in the FL Keys and interned with the Shark Population Assessment Group at the NMFS lab in Panama City, FL. She then attended the University of Maryland Eastern Shore in their marine estuarine and environmental science program and received her MSc in December 2016.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Improved Estimates of Ocean Heat Content from 1960 to 2015
Presenter(s): John Abraham, Professor, School of Engineering, University of St Thomas. Co-authors include: Lijing Cheng, Kevin Trenberth, John Fasullo, Tim Boyer, and Jiang Zhu
Date & Time: 22 June 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): John Abraham, Professor, School of Engineering, University of St Thomas. Co-authors include: Lijing Cheng, Kevin Trenberth, John Fasullo, Tim Boyer, and Jiang Zhu.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugin for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract: A number of new techniques are used to quantify the rate of ocean warming over the past 55 years. Since more than 90% of global warming ends up in the oceans, if we want to measure global warming, we really need to measure ocean warming. But, measuring the oceans is challenging because they are vast and deep and the instruments we use change over time.This presentation, which is extracted from a recent publication in Science Advances, presents the most updated estimate of this important measurement. We also compare ocean warming with climate model predictions and they are very close.

Bio(s): Dr. John Abraham is a fluid mechanics expert. He began work on climate change through his desire to improve the quality of temperature measurements made from devices like the Expendable BathyThermograph. He continues to work, with colleagues, on improving ocean temperature measurements and our understanding of climate change.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Stormwater, Biofilters, and Kangaroos: Investigating Green Infrastructure Down Under