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NOAA Science Seminar Series
Past 2021 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

6 January 2021

Title: Remote sensing of phytoplankton size classes on the northeast U.S. continental shelf
Presenter(s): Kyle Turner, URI
Date & Time: 6 January 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

NOCCG Seminar cross-listed with OneNOAA and STAR Seminars

Title: Remote sensing of phytoplankton size classes on the northeast U.S. continental shelf

Presenter(s): Kyle Turner, University of Rhode Island and Summer 2020 NMFS Intern

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s):
Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Abstract: The size structure of phytoplankton communities influences important ecological and biogeochemical processes, including the transfer of energy through marine food webs. A variety of algorithms have been developed to estimate phytoplankton size classes (PSCs) from satellite ocean color data. However, many of these algorithms were developed for application to the open ocean, and their performance in more productive, optically complex coastal and continental shelf waters warrants evaluation. In this study, several existing PSC algorithms were applied in the Northeast U.S. continental shelf (NES) region and assessed by comparison to in situ PSC estimates derived from a local HPLC pigment data set. The effect of regional re-parameterization and incorporation of sea surface temperature (SST) into existing abundance-based model frameworks was investigated, and models were validated using an independent data set of in situ and satellite match ups. Abundance-based model re-parameterization alone did not result in significant improvement in performance in the NES compared with other models, however, the inclusion of SST led to a consistent reduction in model error for all size classes. Of two absorption-based algorithms tested, the best validating approach displayed similar performance metrics to the regional abundance-based model that included SST. The SST-dependent model was applied to monthly imagery composites of the NES region for April and September 2019, and qualitatively compared with imagery from the absorption-based approach. The results indicate the benefit of considering SST in abundance-based models and the applicability of absorption-based approaches in optically dynamic regions.

Speaker

Bio(s): Kyle Turner recently completed his M.S. in Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island with Dr. Colleen Mouw. His thesis focused on evaluating and optimizing phytoplankton size class algorithms for the Northeast U.S. continental shelf. Before his completing his masters, he received a B.S. in Earth Science from George Mason University in December 2017. He participated in the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURFO) REU program at the University of Rhode Island in 2017 and was a summer intern at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in 2015. He is now a research technician in Dr. Maria Tzortziou's lab at the City College of New York.

Slides: When available after the seminar they can be found here: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov
with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

7 January 2021

Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Hernan Garcia, NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI; Lori K. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS
Date & Time: 7 January 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series, for NOAA Seminar Coordinators
We will be offering this webinar later this year and a recording will be available.

Presenter(s):
NOAA Science Seminar team: Lori Brown, NESDIS, Hernan Garcia, NESDIS and Tracy Gill, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Science Seminar Team, NESDIS and NOSSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Lori.Brown@noaa.gov, & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here:
You must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT Admin folks may need to do it, so please do it well ahead of time. To download and test your ability to use Adobe Connect, go to:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, please register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandbolts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar;
this link works only if you have downloaded the adobe connect software.
Attendees are muted and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google (Chrome), IE or Edge in Windows or Safari or Chrome if using a Mac.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have live captioning.

Abstract:
We will be presenting an overview of the NOAA Science Seminar Series, along with how-tos for submitting events to the seminar calendar, best practices, accessibility, and a general opportunity for contributors to ask questions and discuss how we manage and promote the Science Seminar Series. We are interested in learning suggestions and tips from you! We will be running this meeting at least one more time this year to give all contributors who can't make the first meeting an opportunity to attend, and, the session will be recorded.

Slides:
PDF of slides will be available from contacts.

Recordings:
An mp4 recording will be available from contacts.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas
Title: Supporting Initiatives on Ocean Health, Marine Protected Areas, the Blue Economy, and More as a 2020 Knauss Fellow at NOAA
Presenter(s): Dr. Alexandra Skrivanek, Policy Analyst and Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere / Deputy NOAA Administrator
Date & Time: 7 January 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p9b1emhp8geo/

Title: Supporting Initiatives on Ocean Health, Marine Protected Areas, the Blue Economy, and More, as a 2020 Knauss Fellow at NOAA

Presenter(s): Dr. Alexandra (Lexa) Skrivanek, Policy Analyst and Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans & Atmosphere / Deputy NOAA Administrator

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Abstract: Over the past year, as a 2020 Knauss Marine Policy Fellow, I have had the opportunity to apply my expertise in ocean and coastal science to directly shape outcomes of high-level, agency-wide strategies, cooperative agreements, and committees at NOAA. These activities support cooperation and engagement in the management of ocean health,conservation of marine resources, and support of resilient coastal communities.In this presentation, I will share updates on three new NOAA initiatives:1. A NOAA Strategy for Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease Response and Prevention;2. An agreement between NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the Palau International Coral Reef Center,which establishes a Sister Sanctuary partnership between National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa and Palau National Marine Sanctuary and promotes regional cooperation on marine protected areas management,conservation, and stewardship; 3. A NOAA Blue Economy Strategic Plan to strengthen and improve NOAA data, services, resources, and partnerships that contribute to the American Blue Economy.In describing these initiatives, I will highlight some of the exciting work in progress across the agency to integrate multidisciplinary partnerships, transformative ocean science, and emerging technologies to address complex challenges, and discuss how these initiatives intersect to improve ocean health, support effective and sustainable resource management,and expand the U.S. Blue Economy.

Bio(s): While studying Earth & Environmental Sciences, Museum Studies, and Oceanography at the University of Michigan, and earning a Ph.D. in Geology in 2019 from the University of Florida, Lexa has worked to reconstruct the evolution of earth's climate in the past by gathering and analyzing geologic evidence in marine sediments, and to communicate that story to inspire diverse audiences and connect them with current environmental changes in (in)formal education settings. As a NSF Graduate Research Fellow, she investigated evidence preserved in fossil coral reefs across the Caribbean for the response of sea level and ice sheets to a past warm climate, in order to improve projections of future sea-level changes. Currently, Lexa is a Policy Analyst and 2020 Knauss Fellow in the NOAA Office of the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans & Atmosphere / Deputy NOAA Administrator, working to advance priorities related to ocean health, Indo-Pacific marine protected areas, and the blue economy

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 25: AI/ML for Data Fusion/Assimilation, Part 2
Presenter(s): Kyle Hilburn - CIRA/CSU, Sanjay Purushotham - UMBC, Yuhan (Douglas) Rao - CISESS/NCICS/NCSU
Date & Time: 7 January 2021
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 25: AI/ML for Data Fusion/Assimilation, Part 2 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):
Using Deep Learning to Generate Synthetic Radar Fields from GOES ABI and GLM- Kyle Hilburn (CIRA/CSU)

Deep Multi-Sensor Domain Adaptation on Active and Passive Satellite Remote Sensing Data - Sanjay Purushotham (UMBC)

A satellite-station blended daily surface air temperature dataset for the Tibetan Plateau - Yuhan (Douglas) Rao (CISESS/NCICS/NCSU)

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.govRecordings and Presentations:

https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_library.php

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: He Hulikoʻa Kanaloa—Seeking the Depths of Kanaloa: Hawaiian Religious Understandings of the Ocean
Presenter(s): Jane Lokomaikaikeakua Au, Program Director of the non-profit group ina Momona on the island of Molokai
Date & Time: 7 January 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jane Lokomaikaikeakua Au, Program Director of the non-profit group ina Momona on the island of Molokai

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Abstract: This lecture details ancestral Hawaiian understandings of the primary oceanic deity in the Pacific, Kanaloa. The topic aims to provide an overview of how the Native Hawaiian community perceives both Kanaloa and the ocean realm, from a religious and cultural perspective. It makes use of rarely accessed Hawaiian language resources, sharing information that is largely inaccessible to those outside of the Hawaiian language speaking community. This lecture poses the question: In looking at how ancestral Hawaiians understood Kanaloa as a deity, what can be revealed in their understanding of the oceanic realm he represented?

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: On understanding maritime criminality and illegal fishing
Presenter(s): Dyhia Belhabib, PhD, Principal Investigator, Ecotrust Canada
Date & Time: 7 January 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dyhia Belhabib, PhD, Principal Investigator, Ecotrust Canada

Sponsor(s): NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam; POC: Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The fisheries sector is affected by many types of crimes and illegalities, some directly relating to fishing activities but also diverse types of fraud, trafficking, as well as human rights, labor and environmental abuses. We use the most comprehensive illegal fishing and maritime criminality database to look into and understand trends of illegal fishing and maritime criminality in the world's oceans and how they relate to each other, introducing a concept of transversal criminality' in fisheries " a term referring to the co-occurrence of different categories of offences by the same entity, whether a vessel or a company. The main victims of these offences include vulnerable populations exposed to abuses and loss of marine resources, states and citizens losing public revenues, and ecosystems hurt by damaging illegal practices and undermined management regimes. Illegal fishing and other offences are directly hurting the legal part of the fishing industry by frustrating fair competition, eroding the sustainability of its resource base, and tainting its reputation. In turn, as people lose income and agency, they engage in various forms of ocean criminality. In addition to global trends of illegality in fisheries, transversal criminality and what it looks like, I will address the drivers of illegal fishing and ocean criminality, and introduce a new concept enabling these crimes adjacency.

Bio(s): Dr. Dyhia Belhabib is a Principal Investigator of fisheries at Ecotrust Canada. Dr. Belhabib works on fisheries economics, and conservation issues, and created the most comprehensive criminal record of fishing vessels published through Spyglass.fish. Before joining Ecotrust Canada, Dyhia was the lead researcher and engagement focal point for the Sea Around Us Africa at the University of British Columbia (UBC). She has reconstructed fisheries catches in 22 countries of West Africa, and assessed the economic and societal importance of small-scale fisheries and how their resilience and performance are impacted by illegal fisheries, climate change, and lack of adequate data. She is an entrepreneur building AI and technologies to assess criminality risks associated with seafood businesses and vessels across the world and deter illegal fishing and maritime crimes in collaboration with various governmental agencies.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The Woods Hole Assessment Model (WHAM): A General State-Space Assessment Framework
Presenter(s): Brian Stock, Ocean Associates, Inc., Postdoc/Contractor; Tim Miller, NOAA Fisheries NEFSC Population Dynamics Branch
Date & Time: 7 January 2021
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm ET
Location: WEBINAR ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series and the National Stock Assessment Seminar Series

POC: Kristan Blackhart, kristan.blackhart@noaa.gov and NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6385237168749997069


Presenter(s): Brian Stock, Ocean Associates, Inc., Postdoc/Contractor; Tim Miller, NOAA Fisheries NEFSC Population Dynamics Branch

Abstract: We describe the Woods Hole Assessment Model (WHAM) framework and software package. WHAM can estimate time- and age-varying random effects on annual transitions in numbers at age, natural mortality (M), and selectivity, as well as fit environmental time-series with process and observation errors, missing data, and nonlinear links to recruitment and M. Including time-varying processes via random effects or environment-productivity links using WHAM may alleviate serious concerns over changing productivity and retrospective patterns for several U.S. Northeast groundfish assessments. https://timjmiller.github.io/wham/

Keywords: Stock Assessment; Woods Hole Assessment Model (WHAM); State-Space Assessment Model

Bio(s): Brian develops statistical methods to improve our understanding and management of fisheries. He is highly motivated by projects that combine population dynamics modeling with field- and lab-based research into biological processes. He completed his Ph.D. with Dr. Brice Semmens at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, and currently works with Dr. Tim Miller at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center on WHAM. https://brianstock.github.io/

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

11 January 2021

Title: An evaluation of international policies and local management strategies to mitigate cetacean bycatch in data-limited fisheries
Presenter(s): Gregg Verutes, Biogeographer, University of Santiago de Compostela
Date & Time: 11 January 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: An evaluation of international policies and local management strategies to mitigate cetacean bycatch in data-limited fisheries

Presenter(s): Gregg Verutes, Biogeographer, University of Santiago de CompostelaWhen: Monday, January 11, 2021, 12-1pm EST

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Abstract: Sustainable development planning in today's blue economy relies on spatial explicit information and dynamic ocean management to protect biodiversity and ecosystem services (nature's contribution to people). However, when working in developing countries or at local scales these data are often inaccessible, of low quality, or dispersed among multiple sources. Here, we discuss a review of international policies to protect marine mammals and the development of a GIS-based risk assessment tool, with the unifying goal of making better use of available data and reducing fisheries bycatch, the unintended capture of non-target species. We evaluated the historical success of cetacean conservation policies in North American and European waters and designed a cohesive spatial management framework for bycatch risk assessment in two Southeast Asian nations likely to be impacted by a new seafood import rule for compliance with provisions of the US Marine Mammal Protection Act. Key elements of existing policies and agreements were analyzed with respect to management actions for monitoring and mitigating cetacean bycatch, including time and area closures, acoustic alarms (pingers), fishery observers, and remote electronic monitoring. It was noteworthy that, while a precautionary principle can be aspirationally better, policy implementation (i.e. compliance and enforcement) was often less water-tight compared to a more reactionary approach, which had its own set of ecological and social challenges. Putting these insights about enabling and limiting conditions into practice, we leveraged existing data on animal distributions, fisheries effort, and estimates of interaction rates by combining expert knowledge and spatial analyses to visualize and characterize bycatch risk at local scales. By identifying areas of bycatch concern while accounting for data uncertainty, we demonstrate the importance of integrating available geospatial data in an accessible format that taps into local knowledge and can be corroborated by and communicated to stakeholders of data-limited fisheries. Our methodological approach aims to meet a critical need of fisheries managers: to identify emergent interaction patterns between fishing gears and marine mammals and support the development of management actions that can lead to sustainable fisheries and mitigate bycatch risk for species of conservation concern.

Bio(s): With a strong background in spatial analysis, Gregg Verutes blends the fields of geography and technology to empower others who are passionate about protecting the planet. His research interests include biodiversity conservation and natural resource management in the context of intensified human activity and climate change. Gregg specializes in designing scientific tools to support sustainable development planning through data-driven visualization, interactive storytelling, and game-based learning. Gregg is currently completing a Ph.D. in marine science, technology, and management at the University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain. His dissertation compares the US Marine Mammal Protection Act to similar policies in the European Union that aim to protect cetaceans from fisheries bycatch.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information

12 January 2021

Title: Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): David Zierden, Florida Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center;Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia, Christopher Holmes and Holly Nowell, Florida State University
Date & Time: 12 January 2021
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Titles and

Presenter(s):
  • Climate Overview: David Zierden, Florida Climate Center
  • Water Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center
  • Agriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox, University of Georgia
  • Living with Fire in the Southeastern U.S.: Christopher Holmes and Holly Nowell, Florida State University


Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Abstract:
Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems. The January 12 webinar will also feature a presentation on Living with Fire in the Southeastern U.S.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Shifting Sands: Leadership in a Time of Change
Presenter(s): Nicole LeBoeuf, NOAA's National Ocean Service Acting Assistant Administrator, and the permanent Deputy Assistant Administrator
Date & Time: 12 January 2021
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

To access the video and PDF of the presentation after the seminar, visit:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries and look under tab for Past Presentations.

Title: Shifting Sands: Leadership in a Time of Change
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series -These webinars are open to all.

Presenter(s): Nicole LeBoeuf, NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Acting Assistant Administrator, and the permanent Deputy Assistant Administrator

Sponsor(s): NOAA Environmental Leadership seminar series. The NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series was created to provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council. For questions about the seminars, contact:
Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov, or Katie.Rowley@noaa.govTo access the video and PDF of the presentation after the seminar, visit:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries and look under tab for Past Presentations.

Abstract: As the only woman serving as an Assistant Administrator of a NOAA Line Office, Nicole LeBoeuf will describe some of her highlights and lowlights of the last four (4) years of her career, covering her time to date as a member of the Senior Executive Service (SES). Through her personal story, she will provide insights into what it is like to operate within an ever shifting, unstable, professional and political landscape, where she found her own value and remained resilient in the face of myriad unforeseen challenges. She will reflect on the year that was 2020; how it tested her as a leader, and how she applied the many tools from her toolkit to help her grow into her role(s). She will share how much she has come to appreciate the National Ocean Service and its people more than she could have ever imagined. She will share her thoughts on the attributes that "real leaders" are not supposed to have but are essential to success: empathy, imposter syndrome, humanity, and the willingness to take downtime. Finally, she will provide her thoughts on the existential threat of sea level rise as our planet's first major stress test of climate change, and discuss how NOAA programs must work together to collectively prepare the Nation for what is to come next. There will be time for questions and answers.

Bio(s): Nicole LeBoeuf is the Acting Assistant Administrator, and the permanent Deputy Assistant Administrator, for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA's, National Ocean Service (NOS). She provides the strategic vision needed to lead the implementation of activities that support NOS's priorities of safe and efficient transportation and commerce; preparedness and risk reduction; and stewardship, tourism and recreation. She serves as the focal point for conveying the value of NOS products and services within NOAA and to the Department of Commerce, the Office of Management and Budget, and Congress.

Growing up on the Texas Gulf Coast, Nicole can't recall a time in her life when she didn't want to be around, more deeply understand, and protect the ocean. Her profound connection to the coast makes her work at NOS all the more meaningful, and fuels her commitment to the mission to protect and sustain coastal communities. Nicole's passion for science and ocean stewardship are equally matched by her dedication to public service. Nicole has dedicated over 20 years of public service to NOAA's mission, leading various parts of the organization during pivotal times, including serving as Finance Lead during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Nicole has represented NOAA at the U.N. General Assembly and the World Conservation Union regarding the protection of deep sea corals.

Nicole holds a Bachelor's Degree in Marine Biology from Texas A&M University and a Master's Degree in Sustainable Development and Conservation Biology from the University of Maryland. She is also a proud graduate of NOAA's Leadership Competencies Development Program. She lives with her husband, stepchildren, and a handsome hound dog in Kensington, Maryland.


Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information at https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

13 January 2021

Title: Building climate resilience through climate-informed Ecosystem Based Management: new insights from the Alaska Climate Integrated Modeling (ACLIM) project
Presenter(s): Kirstin Holsman, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, based in Seattle, WA. NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 13 January 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kirstin Holsman, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, based in Seattle, WA, NOAA Fisheries

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The Alaska Climate Integrated Modeling (ACLIM) project is a multidisciplinary collaboration to evaluate climate change impacts on Bering Sea fish and fishing communities and the performance of alternative management strategies under future climate scenarios. It connects research on global climate and socioeconomic projections to regional circulation, climate enhanced biological models, and socio-economic and harvest scenarios. ACLIM phase 1 revealed novel insights about the Bering Sea and helped map long-term change to near-term actions to reduce impacts. We will discuss results, lessons learned from the ACLIM approach, and future directions.

Bio(s): Dr. Holsman is a Fishery Research Biologist with the Resource Ecology and Ecosystem Modeling team at the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle (USA). Her research is focused on the development of quantitative methods for Ecosystem Based Management and methods to assess and manage for climate change impacts on fish and fishing communities. She is the co-lead investigator on the ACLIM Project and is a member of multiple national and international climate change strategic initiatives.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Environmental Justice in Philadelphia: the PES Refinery
Presenter(s): Matt Walker, Advocacy Director of Clean Air Council and Harris Steinberg, Executive Director of the Lindy Institute at Drexel University
Date & Time: 13 January 2021
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Zoom
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Matt Walker, Advocacy Director of Clean Air Council;
Harris Steinberg, Executive Director of the Lindy Institute at Drexel University;
and representatives from Philly Thrive (TBA)

Sponsor(s):
Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA RISA TeamRecording: All sessions are recorded and archived on the CCRUN website http://www.ccrun.org/resources/seminars/Abstract: In June 2019, the Philadelphia Energy Solutions (PES) Refinery in South Philadelphia, the largest oil refinery on the East Coast, exploded and one month later filed for bankruptcy. The community surrounding the refinery has long been impacted by the emissions of the refinery, experiencing disproportionately high rates of asthma, cancer, and other chronic health issues. The explosion and subsequent bankruptcy and closure of the refinery has allowed for a unique opportunity to clean up and redevelop this 1,400 acre site.The Clean Air Council in partnership with Lindy Institute for Urban Innovation at Drexel University have developed a report entitled "Visioning the Reuse of the Philadelphia Energy Solutions Refinery Complex" to begin to reimagine the future of the refinery site. Philly Thrive, a grassroots organization made up of residents near the refinery, have been active voices in centering the community's demands in the redevelopment of the site and advocating for a just transition to a fossil-fuel free future. Seminar POC for questions: Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov) or Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body

14 January 2021

Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Hernan Garcia, NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI; Lori K. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS
Date & Time: 14 January 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series, for NOAA Seminar Coordinators
We will be offering this webinar later this year and a recording will be available.

Presenter(s):
NOAA Science Seminar team: Lori Brown, NESDIS, Hernan Garcia, NESDIS and Tracy Gill, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Science Seminar Team, NESDIS and NOSSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Lori.Brown@noaa.gov, & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here:
You must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT Admin folks may need to do it, so please do it well ahead of time. To download and test your ability to use Adobe Connect, go to:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, please register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandbolts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar;
this link works only if you have downloaded the adobe connect software.
Attendees are muted and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google (Chrome), IE or Edge in Windows or Safari or Chrome if using a Mac.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have live captioning.

Abstract:
We will be presenting an overview of the NOAA Science Seminar Series, along with how-tos for submitting events to the seminar calendar, best practices, accessibility, and a general opportunity for contributors to ask questions and discuss how we manage and promote the Science Seminar Series. We are interested in learning suggestions and tips from you! We will be running this meeting at least one more time this year to give all contributors who can't make the first meeting an opportunity to attend, and, the session will be recorded.

Slides:
PDF of slides will be available from contacts.

Recordings:
An mp4 recording will be available from contacts.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas
Title: NOAA's Action Plan on Coral Interventions
Presenter(s): Dr. Tali Vardi, Coral Scientist with ECS, in support of NOAA Fisheries Office of Science & Technology
Date & Time: 14 January 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science SeminarYou may view the recording of this webinar thru adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/psbc8e9ac0j5/

Title: NOAA's Action Plan on Coral Interventions

Presenter(s): Dr. Tali Vardi, Coral Scientist with ECS, in support of NOAA Fisheries' Office of Science & Technology When: Thursday, January 14, 2021, 12-1pm EST

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Abstract: NOAA recognizes the deterioration of global coral reef ecosystems and is committed to intervening in US reefs where it has the authority to act and support, and to promote the restoration and intervention of reefs worldwide. NOAA recently commissioned the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS) to review coral interventions. The reviews helped NOAA to develop this high-level plan of action which will guide how the agency approaches coral interventions in the next one to five years.

Bio(s): Tali has been leading the NOAA/National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Office of Science & Technology (ST) on coral science since 2013. She earned her PhD at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 2011 and was a Knauss Fellow (also in NMFS ST) in 2012. She has been working remotely in Brooklyn, New York for the past five years and welcomes the rest of the world to remote work.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Smokey the Beaver: Can beavers prevent wildfires?
Presenter(s): Emily Fairfax, PhD, Assistant Professor, California State University, Channel Islands
Date & Time: 14 January 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Emily Fairfax, PhD, Assistant Professor, California State University, Channel Islands

More information: NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

Contact Us: Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Abstract: Beaver dams are gaining popularity as a lowtech, lowcost strategy to build climate resiliency at the landscape scale. They slow and store water that can be accessed by riparian vegetation during dry periods, effectively protecting riparian ecosystems from droughts. Whether or not this protection extends to wildfire has been discussed anecdotally but has not been examined in a scientific context. We used remotely sensed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data to compare riparian vegetation greenness in areas with and without beaver damming during wildfire. We include data from five large wildfires of varying burn severity and dominant landcover settings in the western United States in our analysis. We found that beaverdammed riparian corridors are relatively unaffected by wildfire when compared to similar riparian corridors without beaver damming. On average, the decrease in NDVI during fire in areas without beaver is 3.05 times as large as it is in areas with beaver. Perhaps instead of relying solely on human engineering and management to create and maintain fireresistant landscape patches, we could benefit from beaver's ecosystem engineering to achieve the same goals at a lower cost.

BIOGRAPHY: Dr. Emily Fairfax is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Science and Resource Management at California State University Channel Islands. Dr. Fairfax double majored in Chemistry and Physics as an undergraduate at Carleton College, then went on to earn a PhD in Geological Sciences from the University of Colorado Boulder. She uses a combination of remote sensing and field work to research how beaver activity can create drought and fire-resistant patches in the landscape under a changing climate. Her colleagues and students can vouch that when Dr. Fairfax says she can talk about beavers all day, she's not kidding.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

19 January 2021

Title: Social-ecological vulnerability and climate adaptation in Northeast US fishing communities
Presenter(s): Kathy Mills, Research Scientist, Gulf of Maine Research Institute
Date & Time: 19 January 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

You may view this webinar recording thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pjxw7e9rhlq4/

Title: Social-ecological vulnerability and climate adaptation in Northeast US fishing communities

Presenter(s): Kathy Mills, Research Scientist, Gulf of Maine Research Institute

When: Tuesday, January 19, 2021, 12-1pm EST

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/mills/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: Ocean waters on the Northeast U. S. continental shelf have warmed rapidly in recent years, and climate models project this warming to continue. Associated changes in species distributions and productivity are already affecting fishing communities, as they face declines in traditionally-fished species and the appearance of emerging species in their fishing areas. The local impacts of these changes depend on the nature and rate of ecosystem change, patterns of dependence on marine resources, and adaptation capacity and choices. We use climate projections to drive species models as a basis for conducting port-scale assessments of social-ecological vulnerabilities to climate-related species changes. Results of this assessment provide insights into relative vulnerability of fishing communities from Maine to Virginia and help identify key risks in specific ports. For four focus communities, we integrate projected species changes into economic models of the fishing sector to quantify their impacts to landed value and profits. We also consider a suite of adaptation scenarios within the economic models to assess the extent to which different adaptation approaches would buffer the impact of species changes and create new opportunities for fisheries in the community. Interviews with fishermen and municipal officials enable us to evaluate factors that facilitate or constrain implementation of specific adaptation strategies.Ultimately, this information provides a foundation for decision-making and climate adaptation planning at community and regional scales as well as insights into policy and institutional needs to support the resilience of fishing communities in the context of climate change.

Bio(s): Dr. Katherine Mills isa research scientist at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute in Portland,Maine. She earned her Ph.D. in Natural Resources at Cornell University. As aquantitative fisheries ecologist, Kathy studies (1) how physical and ecosystem conditions are changing; (2) how these changes affect fish populations,biological communities, and marine fisheries; and (3) how fisheries and fishing communities can effectively respond. Much of her work is interdisciplinary,seeking to understand and inform management of fisheries as coupled social-ecological systems. This research integrates climate, ecological, social and economic information to link changes in the ecosystem to societal outcomes.Climate adaptation within marine fisheries has become a major recent focus,with emphases on assessing climate adaptation strategies and providing newforms of information to support adaptation planning by fishery participants,fishing communities and fishery managers.


Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Social-ecological vulnerability and climate adaptation in Northeast US fishing communities
Presenter(s): Kathy Mills, Research Scientist, Gulf of Maine Research Institute
Date & Time: 19 January 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Title: Social-ecological vulnerability and climate adaptation in Northeast US fishing communities

Presenter(s): Kathy Mills, Research Scientist, Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/mills/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
Ocean waters on the Northeast U. S. continental shelf have warmed rapidly in recent years, and climate models project this warming to continue. Associated changes in species distributions and productivity are already affecting fishing communities, as they face declines in traditionally-fished species and the appearance of emerging species in their fishing areas. The local impacts of these changes depend on the nature and rate of ecosystem change, patterns of dependence on marine resources, and adaptation capacity and choices. We use climate projections to drive species models as a basis for conducting port-scale assessments of social-ecological vulnerabilities to climate-related species changes. Results of this assessment provide insights into relative vulnerability of fishing communities from Maine to Virginia and help identify key risks in specific ports. For four focus communities, we integrate projected species changes into economic models of the fishing sector to quantify their impacts to landed value and profits. We also consider a suite of adaptation scenarios within the economic models to assess the extent to which different adaptation approaches would buffer the impact of species changes and create new opportunities for fisheries in the community. Interviews with fishermen and municipal officials enable us to evaluate factors that facilitate or constrain implementation of specific adaptation strategies. Ultimately, this information provides a foundation for decision-making and climate adaptation planning at community and regional scales as well as insights into policy and institutional needs to support the resilience of fishing communities in the context of climate change.

Bio(s): Dr. Katherine Mills isa research scientist at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute in Portland,Maine. She earned her Ph.D. in Natural Resources at Cornell University. As aquantitative fisheries ecologist, Kathy studies (1) how physical and ecosystem conditions are changing; (2) how these changes affect fish populations,biological communities, and marine fisheries; and (3) how fisheries and fishing communities can effectively respond. Much of her work is interdisciplinary,seeking to understand and inform management of fisheries as coupled social-ecological systems. This research integrates climate, ecological, social and economic information to link changes in the ecosystem to societal outcomes.Climate adaptation within marine fisheries has become a major recent focus,with emphases on assessing climate adaptation strategies and providing newforms of information to support adaptation planning by fishery participants,fishing communities and fishery managers.


Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Tracking Ocean Acidification in Puerto Rico: A Video Journey
Presenter(s): Lisamarie Carrubba, NMFS Office of Protected Resources & Melissa Melendez, University of Hawai'i Manoa
Date & Time: 19 January 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: TrackingOcean Acidification in Puerto Rico: A Video Journey


Presenter(s): Lisamarie Carrubba, NMFS Office of Protected Resources & Melissa Melendez, University of Hawai'i Manoa

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Sharing Ocean Acidification Resources for Communicators and Educators (SOARCE) series coordinators are jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov and laura.francis@noaa.gov

Abstract: PuertoRico is home to vibrant coral reef ecosystems that support a diversity ofmarine life and livelihoods. Join us as we share our journey in creatingSpanish-language videos (with English subtitles) about ocean acidification, itscauses, consequences, research and possible solutions for the Puerto Ricanpublic and island visitors. The video invites viewers to get involved incommunity actions that reduce other stressors to marine organisms and increasetheir resilience to the effects of ocean acidification. A full length and shortvideo (highlighting key messages) were created in collaboration with a numberof NOAA and non-NOAA partners, including the University of Puerto Rico andParadise SCUBA and Snorkeling Center, and produced by a local videographer,Efra Visuals. You're welcome to view the full video on the producer's YouTube channel prior to thelive webinar.

Bio(s): Dr. Lisamarie (Lee) Carrubba holds aPhD in ecology from the University of Georgia. Lee started her federal careerwith the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, worked for the U.S. EnvironmentalProtection Agency at their research lab in Athens, and has worked for NOAA'sNational Marine Fisheries Service since 2001. Lee was in charge of theCaribbean Field Office working in Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands under theHabitat Conservation Division and then the Protected Resources Division of theSoutheast Regional Office doing fieldwork, outreach, and consultations. She nowworks for the Office of Protected Resources in NMFS' Headquarters in SilverSpring. Lee serves as the climate point-of-contact for her division and was aco-author of the Caribbean chapter in the NCA4 report. She is currently servingas the Acting Deputy Division Chief for the ESA Interagency Cooperation Division.
Dr. MelissaMelndez:Melndezis a postdoctoral researcher at the School of Ocean and Earth Science andTechnology (SOEST), University of Hawai'i at Manoa. Melndez received her Ph.D.in oceanography from the University of New Hampshire in September 2020.Melndez has won the prestigious Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship awardand has published and presented her work locally and internationally, served onPuerto Rico's Climate Change Council, contributed to the fourth annual NationalClimate Assessment, and advised and mentored students from her native PuertoRico to increase minority participation in STEM fields. Melndez is also partof the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON) and the OceanFoundation Pacific and Caribbean Islands Ocean Acidification capacity-buildingprojects. Her research focuses on understanding ocean acidification using newmodeling techniques, ocean observations, and instrumentation. Her work couldlead to an early warning system for coral reefs that are under stress. Melndezuses many ocean-observing buoys worldwide, including observations from theKaneohe Bay Hawaii, one of the most well-instrumented and studied coral reefecosystems in the world.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

20 January 2021

Title: Moved to 2/24: NOAA Sea Level Rise Viewer Updates and Other Sources for Sea Level Rise Data and Visualizations
Presenter(s): Doug Marcy, Coastal Hazards Specialist, NOAA Office for Coastal Management, and
Billy Brooks, Senior Spatial Analyst, Lynker Technologies@ NOAA Office for Coastal Management
Date & Time: 20 January 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesTHIS WEBINAR HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED TO 2/24/21.

Title: NOAA Sea Level Rise Viewer Updates and Other Sources for Sea Level Rise Data and Visualizations

Presenter(s): Doug Marcy, Coastal Hazards Specialist, NOAA Office for Coastal Management &
Billy Brooks, Senior Spatial Analyst, Lynker Technologies at NOAA Office for Coastal Management

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/noaaslrviewer/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: The Sea Level Rise Viewer, available at NOAA's Digital Coast, has been updated for TX, LA, FL, SC, and areas of WA. A total of 15 new Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) were updated and are available for download, in addition to the mapping outputs for Sea Level Rise, Mapping Confidence, Marsh Migration, and High Tide Flooding. A total of 46 map services were updated with the new data. Areas with older and lower resolution data sets have been updated, with most areas now at 3-meter resolution. Users can now zoom in further to see community level impacts. The High Tide Flooding graphics have now been updated to reflect the latest Annual High Tide Flood report. Additionally, photo-realistic simulations for select locations are now viewable for the 7-10FT sea level intervals and 35more simulations will be added soon.The Sea Lever Rise Viewer enables users to visualize potential impacts from sea level rise through maps, regional projections, and photos. They can also download all data and obtain mapping methods, as well as share maps and links via social media.In addition, there are other publicly-available sources for SLR data and visualizations that provide users with similar options and functionality. Several of these will be highlighted and discussed.

Bio(s):
Douglas (Doug) C. Marcy is a Coastal Hazards Specialist at the NOAA Office for Coastal Management in Charleston, SC. He has been with the NOAA 18 years working on flooding and sea level rise geospatial mapping projects, storm surge assessments, and coastal hazards assessment projects contributing to more disaster resilient communities. He worked as a Hydraulic Engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Charleston District from 1999 to 2002, where he focused on flood control projects, H&H modeling, flood inundation mapping, shoreline change analysis, and coastal engineering. From 1997 to 1999 Doug worked at the South Carolina Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management. Doug has a M.S. in marine geology (1997) from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and a B.S. in geology (1994) from the College of Charleston. Doug's current interests include using geospatial technology combined with meteorological, hydrological, and coastal modeling (including sea level change) to enhance inundation forecasting, mapping, and risk assessment.

William (Billy) Brooks is a senior geospatial analyst with Lynker on contract at the NOAA Office for Coastal Management. He has been at NOAA OCM for over 19 years and has worked on a variety of resilience, inundation, and elevation projects, including NOAA's Sea Level Rise and Lake Level Viewers. His current work focuses on using multiple data sources and visualization techniques to communicate the potential impacts of increased water levels on coastal communities.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information

21 January 2021

Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Hernan Garcia, NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI; Lori K. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS
Date & Time: 21 January 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series, for NOAA Seminar Coordinators
We will be offering this webinar later this year and a recording will be available.

Presenter(s):
NOAA Science Seminar team: Lori Brown, NESDIS, Hernan Garcia, NESDIS and Tracy Gill, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Science Seminar Team, NESDIS and NOSSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Lori.Brown@noaa.gov, & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here:
You must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT Admin folks may need to do it, so please do it well ahead of time. To download and test your ability to use Adobe Connect, go to:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, please register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandbolts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar;
this link works only if you have downloaded the adobe connect software.
Attendees are muted and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google (Chrome), IE or Edge in Windows or Safari or Chrome if using a Mac.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have live captioning.

Abstract:
We will be presenting an overview of the NOAA Science Seminar Series, along with how-tos for submitting events to the seminar calendar, best practices, accessibility, and a general opportunity for contributors to ask questions and discuss how we manage and promote the Science Seminar Series. We are interested in learning suggestions and tips from you! We will be running this meeting at least one more time this year to give all contributors who can't make the first meeting an opportunity to attend, and, the session will be recorded.

Slides:
PDF of slides will be available from contacts.

Recordings:
An mp4 recording will be available from contacts.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 26: AI/ML for Information Extraction from Data, Part 2
Presenter(s): Guangming Zheng - NOAA/NESDIS/STAR, Seungkyun Hong - Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Xianglei Huang - University of Michigan at Ann Arbor
Date & Time: 21 January 2021
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 26: AI/ML for Information Extraction from Data, Part 2 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):
Retrieving Chlorophyll concentration from GOES-16 ABI using Deep Learning Techniques- Guangming Zheng (NOAA/NESDIS/STAR)

Kick: Shift-N-Overlap Cascades of Transposed Convolutional Layer for Better Autoencoding Reconstruction on Remote Sensing Imagery - Seungkyun Hong (Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information)

Intra-day Forecast of Ground Horizontal Irradiance Using Long Short-Term Memory Network (LSTM) - Xianglei Huang (University of Michigan at Ann Arbor)

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov
Recordings and Presentations:

https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_library.php

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: NOAA's Water Initiative: Advancing Water Science and Services
Presenter(s): Dr. Thomas M. Graziano, Director, Office of Water Prediction, NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 21 January 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording via adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ppawlzzoy47w/

Title: NOAA's Water Initiative: Advancing Water Science and Services

Presenter(s): Dr. Thomas M. Graziano, Director, Office of Water Prediction, NOAA's National Weather Service

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at: Thi webinar is over.
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: Recognizing the growing challenges related to water and the increasing need for improved and expanded water prediction capabilities and services, NOAA embarked on a oneNOAA effort in 2015 to increase its science and service investments in water. The results of this effort include the establishment of the cross-Line Office NOAA Water Team and the development of the NOAA Water Initiative that have guided, integrated and enhanced water-related activities within NOAA over the past five years and continue to focus NOAA's efforts to expand actionable water-related intelligence. This presentation will include a description of the NOAA Water Initiative, its objectives and outcomes, as well how the NOAA Water Team coordinates activities across NOAA's Line Offices.

Bio(s): Dr. Thomas Graziano is the Director of the Office of Water Prediction (OWP), which researches, develops and delivers state-of-the-science national hydrologic analyses, forecast information, data, decision-support services and guidance to support and inform essential emergency services and water management decisions. Dr. Graziano also serves as the chair of the NOAA Water Team.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: Knauss Fellows 2020 - Wenfei Ni & Cheyenne Stienbarger
Presenter(s): Cheyenne Stienbarger, Global Ocean Observing Fellow, NOAA OAR Global Ocean Monitoring and Observing Program and Wenfei Ni, NOAA OAR Climate Program Office, Modeling, Analysis, Prediction and Projection - MAPP - Program
Date & Time: 21 January 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesThe NOAA Central Library welcomes the 2020 Knauss Fellows. Knauss Fellows present on the third Thursday of every month. Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Register for the webinar: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7856999450908763661

12:00 - 12:30 PM

Title: Understanding the Long-Term Change of Chesapeake Bay Hypoxia: Impacts of Nutrient Management and Climate Change

Speaker 1: Wenfei Ni, OAR Climate Program Office, Modeling, Analysis, Prediction and Projection (MAPP) Program

Abstract: Eutrophication-induced coastal deoxygenation can result in stressful habitat for marine living resources. Watershed nutrient reduction strategies have been implemented in many coastal systems to mitigate hypoxia for decades. However the climate change impacts on hypoxia has not been fully understood and well quantified. This talk will present a modeling study to interpret the long-term change of Chesapeake Bay hypoxia in response to varying external forces in nutrient inputs and climate. The findings of this study can help guide climate adaptation strategies and nutrient load abatement in Chesapeake Bay and other hypoxic estuaries.

Bio(s): Wenfei Ni is a 2020 Knauss Fellow in NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, placed in the Climate Program Office, Modeling Analysis Prediction and Projection (MAPP) Program. She received her B.S. in Marine Science from Nanjing University, China and graduated with PhD in oceanography from University of Maryland last spring. Her graduate research used numerical models to study the impacts of regional climate change and watershed nutrient management on Chesapeake Bay oxygen depletion zone.

12:30 - 1:00 PM

Title: Tiny Plastics, Big Problem? An Assessment of Microplastic Ingestion in a Commercially Valuable Species

Speaker 2: Cheyenne Stienbarger, Global Ocean Observing Fellow, NOAA OAR Global Ocean Monitoring and Observing Program

Abstract: Microplastics have emerged as a global threat to aquatic ecosystems. There are insufficient studies to understand the impacts of microplastic pollution on commercially valuable fisheries. This presentation provides an overview of the first assessment on the effects of microplastic pollution across multiple life stages of a commercial finfish, the black sea bass (Centropristis striata). We demonstrate that trophic transfer is a significant route of exposure to larvae, and early juveniles exhibit physiological stress following a multi-day exposure to certain microplastics in the laboratory. Finally, we confirm and identify the types of plastic ingested by wild-caught adults in North Carolina waters.

Bio(s): Cheyenne Stienbarger is a 2020 Knauss Fellow in NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, placed in the Global Ocean Monitoring and Observing Program. She received her MSc in marine biology from the University of North Carolina - Wilmington in December 2019. Cheyenne's research focus areas included ecotoxicology, aquaculture, and marine debris. Her master's thesis explored the impact of microplastic pollution across multiple life stages of the black sea bass.

POC: 2020 Knauss Fellow POC: Michael Acquafredda (michael.acquafredda@noaa.gov), Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Accessibility: If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Updates to the Infrared Sea Surface Emissivity (IRSSE) Model for Improving Sounding Retrievals and NWP Data Assimilation
Presenter(s): Dr Nicolas Nalli, Senior Research Scientist, IMSG Inc., Validation Lead, SNPP/JPSS NOAA-Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System, NUCAPS
Date & Time: 21 January 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s): Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s): Dr Nicolas Nalli, Senior Research Scientist, IMSG Inc., Validation Lead, SNPP/JPSS NOAA-Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS)

Abstract:
WEBEX Only Satellite infrared (IR) remote sensing of the Earth's surface requires that the spectral emissivity be specified with a high degree of absolute accuracy: 0.5% uncertainty can result in 0.3"0.4 K error in window channels. Over ocean surfaces, the associated IR bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is characterized as quasi-specular, meaning that the reflected sky reflectance originates from a range of downwelling angles around the specular angle, which can lead to an observed systematic underestimation in surface-leaving radiance versus ship-based observations from the Marine Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (MAERI). To account for this problem in a practical manner for fast-models, an IR effective-emissivity (IRSSE) model (Nalli et al., 2008a,b) was developed for the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) in an effort to obtain improved agreement with MAERI. However, recent findings from NCEP's Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) have revealed a significant systematic bias (1 K) on a global scale in cold waters (i.e., the North Atlantic and Southern Oceans). JPSS has thus supported work for model updates to address this problem. This presentation will overview the history of IR ocean emissivity modeling along with recent work on a temperature-dependent IRSSE model. Results will be presented highlighting the preliminary model testing effort using MAERI spectra from cold and warm water ocean campaigns, as well as global NCEP GDAS GSI tests.
Remote Access

Phone Number: 866-240-1897
passcode: 131 321 1161 #

Individual Attendee ID will be given after sign-in to WEBEX
JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m1f2a2e38a0e347151d7ba72946e6ec10
Meeting number (access code): 131 321 1161

Meeting password: Jpss2021!


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Title: Messy rivers are healthy rivers: The role of spatial heterogeneity in sustaining river ecosystems
Presenter(s): Ellen Wohl, PhD, Professor, Colorado State University
Date & Time: 21 January 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ellen Wohl, PhD, Professor, Colorado State University

More information
NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

Contact Us: Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

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Meeting number: 905 389 231
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ABSTRACT Perceptions of river health are strongly influenced by expectations regarding a natural river. Many observers expect clear water, a slightly sinuous river with pools and riffles, and some riparian trees. River health, however, is much more complicated and multifaceted. The physical appearance of a river, for example, depends strongly on geomorphic context and river history. I use mountainous headwater rivers in Colorado to examine the influence of physical complexity on river health. Complexity can be described with respect to the stream bed, banks, cross-sectional form, and planform of the river and floodplain. The configuration of each of these components of a riverine system has implications for habitat abundance and diversity, sensitivity and resilience of the river to natural and human-induced disturbances, retention of water, sediment and nutrients, and connectivity within the riverine system and between the river and adjacent uplands.

Many types of resource use simplify rivers to the point that the river undergoes a metamorphosis, or a thorough, sustained change in channel form and function. Loss of. beaver dams and channel-spanning logjams in mountainous headwater rivers in. Colorado, for example, has resulted in metamorphosis of physically complex, anastomosing channels that were highly connected to adjacent floodplains. These rivers have assumed an alternate stable state as single-thread channels with limited retention and resilience. Effective, sustainable river restoration involves (i) characterizing the magnitude of different forms of physical complexity naturally present in a particular river segment, (ii) understanding the effects of physical complexity on river ecosystem function, and (iii) assessing the degree to which this level of physical complexity can be restored or mimicked. An important part of this process may be educating stakeholders regarding the importance of physical complexity " messiness " in healthy rivers.

BIOGRAPHY Ellen Wohl received a BS in geology from Arizona State University and a PhD in geosciences from the University of Arizona before joining the faculty at Colorado State University in 1989. Her research focuses on physical process and form in river corridors, including interactions with biotic and human communities. She has focused particularly on rivers in bedrock canyons and in mountainous regions, and she has conducted field research on every continent but Antarctica. She is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the Geological Society of America. Much of her current research examines how physical complexity associated with the presence of instream wood and beaver dams influences the form and function of river ecosystems.


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Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Trent Ford, Illinois State Climatologist
Date & Time: 21 January 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Trent Ford, Illinois State Climatologist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7528179497868100876

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

January topics include 2020 in perspective, La Nia (Advisory) Update, the continuing high water levels in the Great Lakes, recent climate/weather impacts and potential impacts, and the latest precipitation, temperature, and drought outlooks for the winter (2 weeks to 6 months).

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Collaborative Science in a Virtual World (Part 2): Collaborating Around Multiple Stressors
Presenter(s): James Arnott, Aspen Global Change Institute, jamesa@agci.org; Jessica McIntosh, Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Jessica.McIntosh@dep.state.fl.us; Susi Moser, NERRS Science Collaborative, promundi@susannemoser.com
Date & Time: 21 January 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Collaborative Science in a Virtual World (Part 2): Collaborating Around Multiple Stressors

Presenter(s): James Arnott, Aspen Global Change Institute; Jessica McIntosh, Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve; Susi Moser, NERRS Science Collaborative
Moderator: Doug George, NOAA Office for Coastal Management

Sponsor(s): This seminar is sponsored by the NERRS Science Collaborative

Seminar Contact(s): Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)

Remote Access: Please register through GoToWebinar (https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9193820874344093200)

Abstract: Collaborative science involves working closely with partners at every stage - from conceptualizing a new project, to conducting the research, to refining tools to best meet a management need. In May 2020, hoping to start a dialogue around virtual engagement for collaborative science, we held a webinar to reflect on the ways in which collaborative science practices have been impacted by COVID-19.
Now, as January 2021 draws to a close, most of us are thinking about the myriad stressors that continue to pose challenges to virtual collaboration, life, and everything in between. In this webinar, we'll discuss what kind of tracking and evaluation we've done to date, and think about how we continue to do our work in the midst of distractions. The discussion will build on panelists' comments to tease out the implications of these new practices for future collaborative science work, and how these lessons can be applied to coastal science within and beyond the NERRS.

Bio(s): Please visit here for biographical information about our speakers.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: How are we doing? 10 Years of Status and Trends of Resources in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument
Presenter(s): Jonathan Martinez, Ph.D., Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument
Date & Time: 21 January 2021
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jonathan Martinez, Ph.D., Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6989196707334297870

Abstract: The Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument recently conducted an assessment of 10 years of status and trends of living resources, habitats, ocean conditions, maritime and cultural archaeological resources, and the human activities and natural events that affect them. The findings are detailed in the 2020 State of the Monument Report on the status and trends of monument resources from 2008-2019. The report supports ongoing adaptive management of the monument by helping to identify not only the status of resources, but also gaps in current monitoring efforts. Jonathan Martinez, Ph.D, the lead editor and author of several sections, will present findings from the report across all resource areas with an emphasis on assessments for coral reef ecosystems during this talk.This presentation is part of the Third Thursday By the Bay Presentation Series at Mokuppapa Discovery Center that is the visitor center for Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument in Hilo, Hawai'i. This lecture series is also supported by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation through a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: 2020 Ed Ricketts Memorial Award and Lecture: From "Doc" and Dogs to Denizens of the Deep: How understanding biological design will save the oceans and ourselves
Presenter(s): Dr. Terrie M. Williams
Date & Time: 21 January 2021
9:00 pm - 10:30 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Terrie M. Williams, University of California, Santa Cruz

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8059774685896380429

Abstract: The 2020 Ricketts Award recipient Dr. Terrie M. Williams will present her collaborative research examining how evolutionary processes in animal design conspire with modern anthropogenic pressures to challenge the survival of marine-living mammals.The Ed Ricketts Memorial Lecture was created to honor scientists who have exhibited exemplary work throughout their career and advanced the status of knowledge in the field of marine science. Recipients are selected by the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Research Activity Panel.For Ed Ricketts Memorial Award information and the complete lecture abstract click here.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

22 January 2021

Title: Potential for Remote Monitoring of Ocean Heat Content
Presenter(s): David Trossman NOAA STAR/NESDIS and Robert Tyler NASA GSFC Geodesy and Geophysics Laboratory and UMBC JCEST
Date & Time: 22 January 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Note: This seminar will be presented online only.

Presenter(s): David Trossman (NOAA STAR/NESDIS) and Robert Tyler (NASA GSFC Geodesy and Geophysics Laboratory and UMBC JCEST)

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Abstract: A new remote sensing-based approach to monitor ocean heat content (OHC) anomalies is proposed to overcome challenges with observing OHC over the entire ocean. The output of an ocean state estimate - using the Estimating the Circulation & Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) framework - is assumed to be perfect observational data and used to identify prospective variables that could be calculated from remotely monitored characteristics of the ocean. The depth-integrated electrical conductivity (potentially derived from magnetometry) is shown to be highly predictive of OHC in poorly observed regions - such as those covered by sea ice - so it is used together with sea surface heights (from altimetry) and ocean bottom pressures (from gravimetry) to estimate OHC. The seafloor depth, sea surface height anomalies, ocean bottom pressure, and depth-integrated electrical conductivity explain virtually all of the variance in OHC. To demonstrate the feasibility of a method that uses these ocean characteristics - inferable from global satellite coverage - to monitor OHC, the output of ECCO is sampled along historical hydrographic transects, a machine learning algorithm - called a Generalized Additive Model or GAM - is trained on these samples, and OHC is estimated everywhere. This remote monitoring method can estimate global OHC within 0.15% spatial root-mean-square error (RMSE) on a bi-decadal time scale. This RMSE is sensitive to the spatial variance in OHC that gets sampled by hydrographic transects, the variables included in the GAM, and their measurement errors when inferred from satellite data - in particular the noise levels of depth-integrated electrical conductivity and ocean bottom pressure. OHC could be remotely monitored over sufficiently long time scales when enough spatial variance in OHC is explained in the training data over those time scales. This method could potentially supplement existing methods to monitor OHC.

Bio(s):

David Trossman is a physical oceanographer, by training. He received his PhD at the University of Washington in Seattle, did a postdoc at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, did another postdoc at McGill University, was a researcher jointly at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Johns Hopkins University through the GESTAR cooperative agreement, was a researcher at the University of Texas in Austin's Oden Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, and is currently a senior scientist at NOAA STAR/NESDIS through Global Science & Technology. In general, his research has taken two trajectories. 1) He has studied the physical and biogeochemical consequences of ocean circulation and mixing as well as the interactions between the ocean and other components of the Earth system in order to understand and improve the realism of Earth system models. 2) He has also probed the information content of physical and biogeochemical observational data sources to advance the reconstruction of the ocean's historical conditions through statistical techniques.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Seminar Contact(s):
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
Title: Three Minute Thesis Webinar: Tropical Weather
Presenter(s): Shirley Murrillo, NOAA Office of Atmospheric Research Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory; John Cangialos ,NOAA National Weather Service National Hurricane Center; Jamie Rhome, NOAA National Weather Service National Hurricane Center; Jennifer Hubbard, NOAA National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office, Tampa Bay Area, Florida; Dennis Feltgen, NOAA Office of Communications; Kyle Ward, NOAA Office of Coast Survey; Michael Jepsen; NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Regional Office; LCDR Becky Shaw, NOAA Office of Marine and Aviation Operations, NOAA Corps
Date & Time: 22 January 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series



Title: Three Minute Thesis

Remote Access: Tropical Weather - January 22, 2:00 - 3:00 (EDT)



Presenter(s):
New Technologies for Sampling Hurricanes -- Shirley Murrillo (NOAA Office of Atmospheric Research Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory)

Three Questions that Guide Hurricane Forecasting -- John Cangialos (NOAA National Weather Service National Hurricane Center)

Trying to Reason with Hurricane Season -- Jamie Rhome (NOAA National Weather Service National Hurricane Center)

Tropical Weather Decision Support Services -- Jennifer Hubbard (NOAA National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office, Tampa Bay Area, Florida)

Selling the Hurricane Story - Know Your Audience -- Dennis Feltgen (NOAA Office of Communications)

After the Storm...How NOAA Helps Re-Open Ports -- Kyle Ward (NOAA Office of Coast Survey)

Disasters R Us? NOAA Fisheries and Disaster Assessments -- Michael Jepsen (NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Regional Office)

Hurricane Hunters on a Record Breaking Season -- LCDR Becky Shaw (NOAA Office of Marine and Aviation Operations, NOAA Corps)



Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Region Collaboration Team



Seminar Contact(s): Keli Pirtle, keli.pirtle@noaa.gov and Bethany Perry, bethany.perry@noaa.gov



Remote Access: Please register for the Three Minute Thesis

Remote Access: Tropical Weather -- https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7627664417396066827 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.



Abstract:

What's a Three Minute Thesis Webinar? Borrowing from a format used by universities across the country, colleagues from NOAA and partners will each have one slide and three minutes to present on their topic. There will also be time for questions from the audience between each group of speakers. We look forward to your attendance and feedback on the webinar - a way to get to know more about your colleagues, partners, noteworthy projects, unique ideas, and more!



Recordings:

Unable to attend in person? A recording of the webinar will be made available at https://www.noaa.gov/centralregion on Monday after the webinar.



Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:

Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body

Title: January 2021 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP/University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 22 January 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar - see description
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: January 2021 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: http://accap.adobeconnect.com/january2021/event/registration.html

Abstract:
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: sean.bath@noaa.gov or tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

25 January 2021

Title: CA/NV at a Crossroads: Drought & Climate Update and Outlook
Presenter(s): Julie Kalansky, CNAP/CW3E/Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Kelsey Satalino | NOAA NIDIS/CIRES
Date & Time: 25 January 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Drought & Climate Update and Outlook
Julie Kalansky | CNAP/CW3E/Scripps Institution of Oceanography

The Redesigned Drought.gov
Kelsey Satalino | NOAA NIDIS/CIRES

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3311851479482296848

POC: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Abstract:
According to the January 12 U.S. Drought Monitor, 95.2% of CA and 99.7% of NV are in drought. We're at a crossroads where winter snowfall is going to be crucial for the region. Unfortunately, much of the Sierra Nevada is currently below normal for Snow Water Equivalent (see snow drought update below). This webinar will provide an overview of the current conditions and outlook for the rest of winter as well as an overview of the new Drought.gov website.

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) January 2021 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia).

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 January 2021

Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Drought and Water Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District
Date & Time: 26 January 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/3055521234554770701

Abstract:
The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar is part of a monthly (twice a month during drought status) webinar series designed to provide stakeholders, water-resource managers, and other interested parties in the ACF region with timely information on current drought status, seasonal forecasts and outlooks, streamflow conditions and forecasts, groundwater conditions, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir conditions.

Recordings:
Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Overwhelmed? Reevaluating Stormwater Design in a Changing Climate Information needs, best practices, and charting the future
Presenter(s): Nancy Beller-Simms, PhD, NOAA/OAR; Maureen Hodgins, The Water Research Foundation, Tamara Houston, NOAA/NESDIS, Ellen Mecray, NOAA/NESDIS, and Karen Metchis, ACQ Consulting
Date & Time: 26 January 2021
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Overwhelmed? Reevaluating Stormwater Design in a Changing Climate - Information needs, best practices, and charting the future
Discussion of results from the recent eight-week seminar series:
Filling the Gap - Climate and
Weather Information for Small- and Medium-size Water Utilities."

Presenter(s):
Nancy Beller-Simms, PhD, NOAA/OAR, nancy.beller-simms@noaa.gov
Maureen Hodgins, The Water Research Foundation, mhodgins@waterrf.org
Tamara Houston, NOAA/NESDIS, Tamara.Houston@noaa.gov
Ellen Mecray, NOAA/NESDIS, ellen.l.mecray@noaa.gov
Karen Metchis, ACQ Consulting, acqclimate@gmail.com

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Climate Program Office/Climate and Societal Interactions Division and the National Centers for Environmental Information, and the Water Research Foundation (WRF). Point of contact is Jennifer.Dopkowski@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1685483566745050382

Abstract: Join NOAA and the Water Research Foundation, along with four water management practitioners, to learn about reevaluating stormwater design and flooding management. The talks will share highlights from the recent workshop series, "Climate and Weather Information for Small- and Medium-size Water Utilities." The eight-workshop series held in spring-summer 2020"attended by more than 900 participants"included community drinking water and wastewater utility managers, stormwater managers, urban planners, and public works departments. Participants' shared their experiences and highlighted their information needs for coping with the changing climate. Beyond providing feedback on how NOAA can improve its delivery of information to support water resource managers in smaller communities, participants shared innovative approaches for evaluating system vulnerabilities and design. Learn more about the workshop series
Who should attend? Local governments, resilience and sustainability planners,stormwater managers, civil engineers, modelers, community decision makers,watershed groups, interested public, state and federal government personnel.

Bio(s): Visit https://cpo.noaa.gov/News/ArtMID/7875/ArticleID/2110/Webinar-Overwhelmed-Reevaluating-Stormwater-Design-in-a-Changing-Climate

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: Are we living in the future? The climate extremes of recent and future Southeast Alaska droughts and floods
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman & Rick Lader, University of Alaska Fairbanks; Jeremy Littell, USGS.
Date & Time: 26 January 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Title: Are we living in the future? The climate extremes of recent and future Southeast Alaska droughts and floods

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
Rick Lader, International Arctic Research Center (IARC) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
Jeremy Littell, Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center (USGS)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar POC for questions: Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov) or Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/se-ak-precip/

Abstract: In the last couple years, SE Alaska has experienced historically unprecedented drought and now historically extreme rainfall. These events have challenged management of regional infrastructure, affected local and regional ecosystems, and more importantly, real consequences for people living and working in the region. Are they just natural variability, chance one-time weirdness, or harbingers of what is to come? Putting these recent events in context of our historical experience helps us understand droughts and deluges now and make sense of just how uncommon they really are in the past. Using the best climate science available, we can also ask how likely these kinds of events may be in the future given what we know about climate change and its impacts on extremes. And we can try to make sense of the risks involved and what the science suggests we can do about adapting to the future before it gets here. Join Rick Thoman, Rick Lader, and Jeremy Littell for a webinar about the past, present and future of precipitation extremes in southeast Alaska.Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Adventures of a Marine Mammal Biologist from Pole to Pole
Presenter(s): Ed Bowlby, retired marine biologist formerly of NOAA's Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 26 January 2021
8:00 pm - 9:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ed Bowlby, retired marine biologist formerly of NOAA's Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5963113763799045388

Abstract: Join Ed Bowlby, retired Marine Biologist, as he shares stories and photos from some of his marine mammal research and adventures in the Arctic, Antarctic, West Coast, and tropics. Over his multi-decade career Ed has investigated a variety of marine mammals ranging from Hawaiian monk seals to sea otters and many species of whales. Ed is also a prolific writer evident in his 16 co-authored articles and technical reports.This webinar event is part of the 2021 Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary and Feiro Marine Life Center Speaker Series.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

27 January 2021

Title: Tipping the balance: Species interactions in a changing ocean and the consequences for marine disease
Presenter(s): Allison Tracy, Postdoctoral fellow at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Date & Time: 27 January 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p7v3qq91zc4c/

Title: Tipping the balance: Species interactions in a changing ocean and the consequences for marine disease

Presenter(s): Allison Tracy, Postdoctoral fellow at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at: [removed]
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
Environmental change can influence organisms directly, but species interactions also mediate these effects through predation, competition, and disease. In the ocean, the shifting impact of disease illustrates how host-parasite interactions can respond to changing ocean conditions. My work in temperate and tropical marine ecosystems explores how changes in the biotic and abiotic environment influence disease in critical habitat-forming species, especially corals and oysters. This seminar will highlight my recent research on co-infection in sea fan octocorals, interactive effects of pollution and temperature, and the combined impact of natural and anthropogenic impacts on Chesapeake Bay oysters.

Bio(s):
Allison Tracy is a postdoctoral fellow at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center where she studies oyster reef ecology in the Chesapeake Bay. Her research focuses on marine ecology, conservation, and infectious disease in wildlife. She completed her PhD at Cornell University where she studied immunity and infectious disease on coral reefs in Puerto Rico.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

28 January 2021

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: CMIP6 Overview
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center and Jasmin John, NOAA/OAR/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory
Date & Time: 28 January 2021
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: via GoToWebinar (registration required)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/CMIP6 Overview

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and
Jasmin John, NOAA/OAR/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory.


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:
Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of January conditions and a discussion on the most recent climate model developments with CMIP6.

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Hernan Garcia, NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI; Lori K. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS
Date & Time: 28 January 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series, for NOAA Seminar Coordinators
We will be offering this webinar later this year and a recording will be available.

Presenter(s):
NOAA Science Seminar team: Lori Brown, NESDIS, Hernan Garcia, NESDIS and Tracy Gill, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Science Seminar Team, NESDIS and NOSSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Lori.Brown@noaa.gov, & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here:
You must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT Admin folks may need to do it, so please do it well ahead of time. To download and test your ability to use Adobe Connect, go to:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, please register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandbolts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar;
this link works only if you have downloaded the adobe connect software.
Attendees are muted and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google (Chrome), IE or Edge in Windows or Safari or Chrome if using a Mac.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have live captioning.

Abstract:
We will be presenting an overview of the NOAA Science Seminar Series, along with how-tos for submitting events to the seminar calendar, best practices, accessibility, and a general opportunity for contributors to ask questions and discuss how we manage and promote the Science Seminar Series. We are interested in learning suggestions and tips from you! We will be running this meeting at least one more time this year to give all contributors who can't make the first meeting an opportunity to attend, and, the session will be recorded.

Slides:
PDF of slides will be available from contacts.

Recordings:
An mp4 recording will be available from contacts.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas
Title: NOAA's high-resolution global climate model utilization in marine species distribution modeling
Presenter(s): Vince Saba, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 28 January 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA's high-resolution global climate model utilization in marine species distribution modeling

Presenter(s): Vince Saba, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register via Google meet at: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: Developing a Cost Effective Air-Deployed Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) for Use in Turbulent Environments
Presenter(s): Jack Elston, Ph.D., Black Swift Technologies LLC
Date & Time: 28 January 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: Tiffany House tiffany.house@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1223032276034781451

Join us for our next NOAA Innovators Seminar on January 28th at 12PM ET!

Presenter(s): Jack Elston, Ph.D., Black Swift Technologies LLC

Abstract: Sampling the lower boundary layer of tropical and other large storms is both extremely useful and difficult. Increased use of targeted in situ measurements has been proposed to continue improving tropical cyclone intensity forecasts. Generally, the number of flights per storm has been limited to single-digit numbers. Increasing the number of flights per storm affords the ability to greatly increase the temporal and spatial sampling, allowing for improved models and forecasts. The largest single barrier to realizing this objective is the total cost of the aircraft, and overcoming this obstacle requires a purpose-built system.

Key Words: UAS, Hurricane, In Situ

Bio(s): Dr. Elston, CEO, and co-founder, Black Swift Technologies, a UAS solutions provider focused on scientific applications. Elston received his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado on work that developed a complex meshed network, UAS, and control algorithms for in situ samplings of tornadic supercell thunderstorms. He has a strong background in conducting in-situ atmospheric measurements from UAS and is intimately familiar with operating unmanned aircraft in hazardous conditions.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 27: AI/ML for Information Extraction from Data, Part 3
Presenter(s): Christina Kumler - CIRES/NOAA/GSL, Jitendra Kumar - Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Mu-Chieh Ko - NOAA/AOML/HRD, Chris Slocum - NOAA/NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 28 January 2021
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 27: AI/ML for Information Extraction from Data, Part 3 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):
Deriving Fire Radiative Power from Numerical Weather Models and Satellites using Machine Learning Methods - Christina Kumler (CIRES/NOAA/GSL)

Convolutional Neural Networks for Hydrometeor Classification using Dual Polarization Doppler Radars - Jitendra Kumar (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

Effects of Balancing Dataset on Support Vector Machine Performance for Tropical Cyclone Intensity Predictions - Mu-Chieh Ko (NOAA/AOML/HRD)

What can we learn from Random Forest in the context of the tropical cyclone rapid intensification problem? - Chris Slocum (NOAA/NESDIS/STAR)

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov
Recordings and Presentations:

https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_library.php

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: Scientific Integrity and Fundamental Research Communications in NOAA
Presenter(s): Cynthia J Decker, NOAA Scientific Integrity Officer
Date & Time: 28 January 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Introducing the NOAA Central Library's Publishing @ NOAA Series of seminars!
Join us every second Thursday for the Publishing @ NOAA Series.

Title: Scientific Integrity and Fundamental Research Communications in NOAA

Presenter(s): Cynthia J Decker, NOAA's Scientific Integrity Officer

Register: Join us on the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2113985238961158413

Abstract: This presentation will give a brief overview of the scientific integrity policy in NOAA as well as the NOAA guidelines for fundamental research communications. The areas where these intersect will be highlighted.

Bio(s): Cynthia Decker is the NOAA Scientific Integrity Officer for NOAA, a position she has held for the past six years. She adjudicates allegations of scientific misconduct, develops training, and works with the DU/O and NOAA Science Council to consider all the ways in which scientific integrity is woven into NOAA's work. Dr. Decker balances this job with that of Executive Director for the NOAA Science Advisory Board. She has a PhD in oceanography and has been at NOAA for 15 years.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Exploring surface slicks as pelagic nurseries and ecological hotspots for diverse assemblage of larval fishes in Hawaii
Presenter(s): Jonathan Whitney, PhD, Research Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries/Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 28 January 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jonathan Whitney, PhD, Research Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries/Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

Contact Us Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 905 389 231
Meeting password: hqM8wrE5kb3

JOIN BY PHONE
1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free, Access code: 905 389 231Can't join the meeting? Contact support.
ABSTRACT The fate of fish larvae during the pelagic phase has profound effects on replenishment of marine populations that are critical for human and ecosystem health. The survival and transport of larvae are expected to be tightly coupled to oceanic features. But, for the majority of fish species we have a poor understanding of where larvae go and what habitats they use. Therefore, we surveyed neustonic zooplankton and ichthyoplankton communities inside and outside of surface slicks along the west coast of the Island of Hawaii. Here, we provide evidence that surface slicks, a ubiquitous ocean convergence feature, provide nursery habitat for more than 100 species of commercially and ecologically important fishes. Our work shows that slicks are oases for food and shelter in an otherwise fluid desert, and that many larvae depend strongly on these nursery habitats for growth and survival. By providing these survival advantages, surface slicks enhance larval supply and replenishment of adult populations from coral reef, epipelagic, and deep-water ecosystems. Our findings suggest that slicks play a previously underappreciated, yet critically important role in enhancing ecosystem and fisheries productivity in tropical marine systems.

BIOGRAPHY Dr. Jonathan Whitney is a Research Ecologist and Geneticist in the Ecosystem Sciences Division of the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) in Honolulu, Hawaii. His research at NOAA is broadly focused on larval fish ecology, fisheries oceanography, population genetics/genomics, and ecology of both pelagic and coral reef systems. He received his B.A. in Zoology from Prescott College in Arizona, where he spent as much time as possible in the Gulf of California. He then earned his PhD in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology from the University of Hawaii at Manoa, where his dissertation combined population genetics/genomics, community ecology, and behavioral experiments to characterize a case of incipient speciation in a coral reef fish. Dr. Whitney is the former Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Joint Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Research (JIMAR), the cooperative institute between NOAA and the University of Hawaii. During this joint position he investigated the biophysical interactions with larval fish and surface slicks in West Hawaii, which will be the topic of this seminar. He has worked at PIFSC since 2016, and just recently joined the federal workforce in the fall of 2020.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

2 February 2021

Title: NIGHTSEA - Practical Tools for Fluorescence Exploration in the Laboratory and the Field, from Micro to Macro Scales
Presenter(s): Charles Mazel, Ph.D., Founder/President, NIGHTSEA, a former subsidiary of Physical Sciences Inc.
Date & Time: 2 February 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Charles Mazel, Ph.D., Founder/President, NIGHTSEA, a former subsidiary of Physical Sciences Inc.

Register: This webinar is over.

POC: Tiffany House tiffany.house@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Join us for our next NOAA Innovators Seminar on February 2nd at 12PM ET!

Keywords: Coral, fluorescence, fluorescence microscopy

Abstract: NOAA's SBIR funding topic intended to create fluorescence-based solutions for a very focused need in coral reef research led to developing general-purpose tools for detecting, viewing, and imaging fluorescence over a wide range of scales. The main products are an economical adapter for adding fluorescence superpowers to ordinary microscopes and flashlight solutions for handheld work in the lab and field. The technologies are finding application in various disciplines and contributing to scientific discovery and research, education and outreach, and many commercial and industrial applications.

Bio(s): Mazel has an MS in Ocean Engineering from MIT and a Ph.D. in Biology from Boston University. Charles Mazel has a diverse background working at small and large companies in academia and research, emphasizing marine-related work. Solving the challenges of finding and photographing fluorescence underwater led to a career shift into research on marine organisms' optical properties, including developing a novel diver-operated underwater spectrometer.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

3 February 2021

Title: Ecological Drought: An Introduction
Presenter(s): Shelley Crausbay, Senior Scientist, Conservation Science Partners. Amanda Cravens, Research Social Scientist, USGS
Date & Time: 3 February 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Shelley Crausbay, Senior Scientist, Conservation Science Partners
Amanda Cravens, Research Social Scientist, USGS

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USGS

Seminar Contacts: Elizabeth Weight (elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov)

Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
Introducing ecological drought as a scientific concept distinct from other definitions of drought, this webinar explores recent research on the topic, including transformational drought impacts and ecological tipping points.

This webinar is the first in a four-part series that seeks to raise awareness of ecological drought, share actions that strengthen ecosystem resilience and mitigate the impacts of droughts, and discuss research and management needs for future drought planning and preparedness. The series is co-hosted by NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System and the USGS National Climate Adaptation Science Center, with expert speakers from the research community, tribal nations, and government agencies.

Information on the additional sessions is listed below:
Ecological Drought: Planning for Resilience, February 17, 2021, 1 " 2:15 pm ET
Ecological Drought: Drought, Wildfire, and Recovery, March 3, 2021, 4 " 5 pm ET
Ecological Drought: Impacts on Coastal Ecosystems, March 17, 2021, 3 " 4 pm ET

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Multigenerational and transgenerational effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of endocrine disruptors in an estuarine fish
Presenter(s): Bethany DeCourten, Ocean Wise Conversation Association, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Date & Time: 3 February 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording of this webinar through Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pn4r2hez24qw/

Title: Multigenerational and transgenerational effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of endocrine disruptors in an estuarine fish

Presenter(s): Bethany DeCourten, PhD, Ocean Wise Conversation Association, Vancouver, BC, CanadaWhen: Wednesday, February 3, 2021, 12-1pm ESTCo-Authors: Forbes, J.P2, Roark, H.K2,Burns, N.P.2, Major, K.M.3, White, J.W.4, Li,J.5, Mehinto, A.C.6, Connon, R.E.7, Brander,S.M.3,4
1. Ocean Wise Conversation Association, Vancouver, BC, Canada
2. Department of Biology and Marine Biology, University of North Carolina Wilmington, NC 3. Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis
4. Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station, Oregon
State University, Newport
5. Bioinformatics Core, Genome Center, University of California Davis, Davis, CA
6. Southern California Coastal Water Research Project Authority, Costa Mesa, CA
7. Department of Anatomy, Physiology & Cell Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine,University
of California, Davis, Davis, CA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Abstract: Studies investigating direct effects of toxicants on exposed organisms are commonplace. However, little is known about the potential effects of toxicant exposures in a parental (P0) generation on unexposed F1 or F2generations (multigenerational and transgenerational effects, respectively) infish. To investigate this possibility, we exposed inland silversides (Menidia beryllina) to environmentally relevant (ng/L) concentrations of ethinylestradiol, bifenthrin, trenbolone, and levonorgestrel in early life stages. We then measured developmental, immune, reproductive, DNA methylation and gene expression endpoints for two subsequent generations following the exposure. Larval exposure to each compound resulted in negative effects in theF0 generation, negative effects on the F1 and, for ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel, the F2 generations. The specific endpoints that responded to exposure in each treatment and generation varied, but included increased incidence of larval deformities, reduced larval growth and survival, impaired immune function, skewed sex ratios, ovarian atresia, reduced egg production,and altered gene expression. Furthermore, altered DNA methylation was detected across all generations, indicating dysregulation of epigenetic control mechanisms in multiple molecular pathways. Models informed by these data predicted declines across chemical treatments. These findings suggest that assessments across multiple generations are key to determine the full magnitude of adverse effects from EDC exposures in early life.

Bio(s): Bethany DeCourten has conducted toxicology research at the University of California, Davis, University of North Carolina, Wilmington and Oregon State University. She earned her doctorate from the University of North Carolina, Wilmington with her dissertation focusing on multigenerational effects of endocrine disruptors and climate change in estuarine fish. Both her graduate and undergraduate research assessed the molecular effects of toxicant exposure in fish, while focusing on environmental relevance. She is currently conducting research on the molecular effects of pollutants in killer whales (Orcinus orca) as a Postdoctoral Fellow with Ocean Wise Conservation Association in British Columbia, Canada.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: Temperature effects on Pacific salmon in high-latitude ecosystems
Presenter(s): Mike Carey, USGS Alaska Science Center
Date & Time: 3 February 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: Temperature effects on Pacific salmon in high-latitude ecosystems

Presenter(s): Dr. Mike Carey, USGS Alaska Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division;coordinator: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: The physiological challenge for anadromous fish to migrate upriver is influenced by river temperature, but the impacts of river temperature can be difficult to predict due to an incomplete understanding of how temperature influences migration costs, especially in highlatitude(>60N) ecosystems. To assess temperature influences on migrating Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), we measured heat stress in Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) migrating through the Yukon River, Alaska to assess the potential that high temperatures contribute to freshwater adult mortality. We identified heat stress in half of Chinook salmon examined (54%, n = 477) across three mainstem locations and three tributaries with water temperatures ranging between 7 and 23C. We also measured heat stress and energy content of Sockeye salmon (O. nerka) throughout their upriver migration in the Pilgrim River, Alaska. We expected Sockeye salmon energy levels would be lower when migrating in warmer river temperatures; however, we found no indication of heat stress and higher energy levels occurred with higher temperatures as temperatures were often < 18C. These contrasting patterns highlight that the influence of changing thermal regimes is complicated by variability in responses to river conditions among species and across watersheds. Understanding interactions between environmental drivers and physiological responses will help managers anticipate future changes for Pacific salmon at the northern edge of their distribution.

Bio(s): Mike Carey received a BS in Zoology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a MSc in Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, and a PhD in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology from the University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign. He worked as a Post-doctoral Researcher at NOAA NWFSC on invasive species before taking his current position as a Research Fish Biologist in the Fish and Aquatic Ecology Program at the U.S. Geological Survey Alaska Science Center in Anchorage, AK. His research program explores three drivers of fish communities and populations in Arctic and Subarctic watersheds: (1) aquatic thermal regimes, (2) Arctic landscapes dynamics, and (3) invasive species. The current focus of his work is on heat stress, permafrost thaw, invasive aquatic plants, and the range expansion of the North American Beaver (Castor canadensis). Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Environmental Justice in NYC: Addressing Toxic Air Quality in North Brooklyn
Presenter(s): Masoom Moitra, Director the Green Light District and Dr. Ana Baptista, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice and Associate Director of the Tishman Environment & Design Center at the New School
Date & Time: 3 February 2021
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Zoom
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Masoom Moitra, Director of the Green Light District
Dr. Ana Baptista, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice and Associate Director of the Tishman Environment & Design Center at the New School

Sponsor(s):
Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA RISA Team

Remote Access:
Must register at https://drexel.zoom.us/webinar/register/1415905103950/WN_BC2utuLTQnm4SRlVdtudBw
Be advised: This meeting uses Zoom, but will be recorded. See info below.Recording: All sessions are recorded and archived on the CCRUN website http://www.ccrun.org/resources/seminars/Abstract: North Brooklyn, and in particular Williamburg's historically Latinx Southside, experiences twice the rate of asthma-related hospitalizations than the rest of Brooklyn and NYC, due in part to the significant amount of industrial infrastructure in the area such as waste transfer stations and peaker power plants that brings heavy truck traffic through residential streets. El Puente, an environmental and social justice organization based in South Williamsburg, has launched dozens of successful campaigns in their nearly four-decade history. El Puente's Green Light District is a strategic community sustainability and development plan that flip[s] the disempowerment of gentrification and put[s] the power of transformation in the hands of its residents and stakeholders. A program that has come out of this work is the Nuestro Aire/Our Air campaign, a citizen science project to monitor toxic air quality in South Williamsburg. Masoom Moitra, Director of the Green Light District, will talk about the Nuestro Aire/Our Campaign, and how El Puente balances the needs of environmental justice communities with the technical expertise that university partners have to offer, exploring the tension of what data means to the communities on the ground. Dr. Ana Baptista, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice and Associate Director of the Tishman Environment & Design Center at The New School, will join the conversation to discuss her role and approach in this partnership with El Puente's Green Light District.
Seminar POC for questions: Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov) or Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body

4 February 2021

Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Hernan Garcia, NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI; Lori K. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS
Date & Time: 4 February 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series, for NOAA Seminar Coordinators
We will be offering this webinar later this year and a recording will be available.

Presenter(s):
NOAA Science Seminar team: Lori Brown, NESDIS, Hernan Garcia, NESDIS and Tracy Gill, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Science Seminar Team, NESDIS and NOSSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Lori.Brown@noaa.gov, & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here:
You must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT Admin folks may need to do it, so please do it well ahead of time. To download and test your ability to use Adobe Connect, go to:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, please register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandbolts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar;
this link works only if you have downloaded the adobe connect software.
Attendees are muted and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google (Chrome), IE or Edge in Windows or Safari or Chrome if using a Mac.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have live captioning.

Abstract:
We will be presenting an overview of the NOAA Science Seminar Series, along with how-tos for submitting events to the seminar calendar, best practices, accessibility, and a general opportunity for contributors to ask questions and discuss how we manage and promote the Science Seminar Series. We are interested in learning suggestions and tips from you! We will be running this meeting at least one more time this year to give all contributors who can't make the first meeting an opportunity to attend, and, the session will be recorded.

Slides:
PDF of slides will be available from contacts.

Recordings:
An mp4 recording will be available from contacts.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 28: Machine Learning Tools and Best Practices, Part 2
Presenter(s): Chuyen Nguyen - Naval Research Laboratory, Anne Hale Miglarese - Radiant Earth Foundation, Daniel Vassallo - University of Notre Dame
Date & Time: 4 February 2021
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 28: Machine Learning Tools and Best Practices, Part 2 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):
Cloud Cover Nowcasts from Process-Based Statistical Models - Chuyen Nguyen (Naval Research Laboratory)

Radiant MLHub: Advancing Utilization of AI Applications on Earth Observations with Benchmark Training Datasets - Anne Hale Miglarese (Radiant Earth Foundation)

Toward the Creation of Widely Applicable Multi-Step Machine Learning Forecasting: An Investigation into ML Modeling Strategies - Daniel Vassallo (University of Notre Dame)

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.govRecordings and Presentations:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_library.php

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: Ocean solutions for nature and people
Presenter(s): Fiorenza Micheli, PhD, Professor Stanford University
Date & Time: 4 February 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Fiorenza Micheli, PhD, Professor Stanford University

Register: This webinar is over.

ABSTRACT The ocean is Earth's last frontier. It comprises most of its habitable volume, is home to a unique and extraordinary diversity of plants, animals, and microbes; regulates its climate; and provides food and livelihood for billions of people. Our future is inextricably linked to the ocean, and to maintaining the flow of critical and irreplaceable services healthy oceans provide. While much investigation and discussion is focused on impacts, there is a critical need and opportunity to develop solutions based in oceans. I will present and discuss ocean-based solutions to two grand challenges, climate and food and nutritional security, highlighting knowns and unknowns in their potential for deployment at scale, and opportunities for expanding global capacity for ocean solutions.

BIOGRAPHY Fiorenza Micheli is co-director of Stanford's Center for Ocean Solutions and of Hopkins Marine Station, and the David and Lucile Packard Professor of Marine Science. Her research focuses on the processes shaping marine communities and coastal social-ecological systems, incorporating this understanding in marine conservation and for co-designing solutions with decision-makers and communities. She investigates climatic impacts on marine ecosystems, particularly the impacts of and adaptation to warming, hypoxia and ocean acidification in marine species, communities and fisheries, marine predators' ecology and trophic cascades, the dynamics and sustainability of small-scale fisheries, and the design and function of Marine Protected Areas. Her research takes place in Mexico, the Mediterranean Sea, Palau, The Line Islands, and the Chagos Archipelago, in addition to California. She is a Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation, a fellow of the California Academy of Sciences, research advisor to the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, Seafood Watch and the Benioff Ocean Initiative, and senior fellow at Stanford's Woods Institute for the Environment.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Ecosystem-linked assessment model for Gulf of Alaska Pacific cod to assess climate change driven changes in productivity
Presenter(s): Steven Barbeaux -- Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Status of Stocks and Multispecies Assessment Program
Date & Time: 4 February 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series and the National Stock Assessment Seminar Series

POC: Kristan Blackhart, kristan.blackhart@noaa.gov and NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register: This webinar is over.


Presenter(s): Steven Barbeaux - Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Status of Stocks and Multispecies Assessment Program

Abstract: This seminar highlights an ecosystem-linked stock assessment for Gulf of Alaska Pacific cod combined with downscaled IPCC RCP projections to investigate changes in productivity with climate change. Modern fisheries are largely managed based on assumptions of stationarity in the productivity of stocks consistent with a baseline time period. Ecosystem-linked model projections assume stationarity in the relationship between environmental conditions and biological elements contributing to productivity instead of assuming stationarity in productivity itself. This modeling provides an opportunity to examine potential changes in productivity based on empirical relationships as environmental conditions trend away from baseline conditions.

Keywords: Climate change, Ecosystem-linked stock assessment, Pacific cod, Gulf of Alaska

Bio(s): Dr. Steve Barbeaux, a graduate of the University of Washington, School of Fisheries, works as a research fisheries biologist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle,and is the lead stock assessment author for the Gulf of Alaska Pacific cod stock. Steve began his career with NOAA as a contracted fisheries observer in Alaska in 1996 and has been employed as a research fisheries biologist with the Status of Stocks and Multispecies Assessment Program since 2002.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

9 February 2021

Title: Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center;Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia, Karin Gleason, National Centers for Environmental Information
Date & Time: 9 February 2021
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Climate Overview
Sandra Rayne | Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview
Jeff Dobur/Todd Hamill | NWS Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update
Pam Knox | University of Georgia

2020 in Review
Karin Gleason | National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NIDIS, (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Register: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems. The February 9 webinar will also feature a presentation on 2020 in Review.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Remote, Self-powered Buoys for Water Quality Monitoring
Presenter(s): Andrew Streett, Swift Engineering, VP of Technology and Chief Scientist
Date & Time: 9 February 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: Tiffany House tiffany.house@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7823588594348615435

Join us for our next NOAA Innovators Seminar on February 9th at 12PM ET!

Keywords: Coastal Monitoring, aquaculture, Blue Economy

Presenter(s): Andrew Streett, Swift Engineering, VP of Technology and Chief Scientist

Abstract: Kelp is a remote situational awareness buoy for coastal, inland, and aquaculture intelligence. It is a self-powered, compact, and easy to deploy buoy carrying wifi, LoRa, and sat comm links to provide the user information at their finger tips on a smart device. The Kelp buoy currently measures dissolved oxygen, salinity, pH, and temperature underwater and has room to scale to additional sensors using open architecture electronics and software. The platform has already been deployed and is ready for its next phase of development.

Bio(s): Andrew directs the Swift-X division at Swift Engineering focused on next generation autonomous systems, robotics, machine vision and digital acceleration as well as their exit to the market. He leads the very talented team behind the Kelp platform who have been able to deploy with federal MPAs, commercial aquaculture, NOAA's NMS team, and municipality-level harbors and bays.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Hanalei (Ahupua`a) Watershed Management in Contemporary Times
Presenter(s): Makaala Kaaumoana, Founder of the Hanalei Watershed Hui
Date & Time: 9 February 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Makaala Kaaumoana, Founder of the Hanalei Watershed Hui

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/969997264765953037

Abstract: Makaala Kaaumoana will discuss the Hanalei ahupua'a area on the North shore of the island of Kauai. She will discuss the area's unique history, issues, and future. This area is directly adjacent to the Kauai boundary of the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine sanctuary. Makaala is also the vice chair of the HIHW Sanctuary Advisory Council and is the director and founder of the Hanalei Watershed Hui.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NOAA/NESDIS Transformation with Innovative Technologies
Presenter(s): Irene Parker, Assistant Chief Information Officer National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, NESDIS, NOAA
Date & Time: 9 February 2021
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

To access the video and PDF of the presentation after the seminar, visit:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries and look under tab for Past Presentations.

Title: NOAA/NESDIS Transformation with Innovative Technologies
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series - These webinars are open to all.

Presenter(s): Irene Parker, Assistant Chief Information Officer National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS), NOAA.

Accessibility: This webinar will have closed captioning.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Environmental Leadership seminar series. The NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series was created to provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council. For questions about the seminars, contact:
Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov,
or Katie.Rowley@noaa.govTo access the video, PDF of the presentation, and summary of the Q&A, visit:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries and look under tab for Past Presentations.

Abstract: NOAA's mission is complex and ever changing due to the availability of new commercial and partner data sources that can enhance the quality of scientific research and numerical weather prediction. This seminar will outline efforts underway to transform how NOAA/NESDIS is leveraging new innovative technologies such as commercial cloud and Artificial Intelligence to provide more timely and cost effective products and services to the general public.

Bio(s): Irene Parker has 20 years of experience in all facets of information technology, security, enterprise architecture, in both public and private sectors. Mrs. Parker's experience ranges from leading information technology organizations, managing cyber risks, and implementing science and technology solutions. Currently, she serves as the Chief Information Officer for National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Services (NESDIS) which is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Prior to joining the federal service, she held senior positions at Deloitte Consulting and Accenture. While in the private sector, she was responsible for process engineering, strategic planning, and business development. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematical Sciences from Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering in Baltimore, MD and received an Executive Masters in Public Administration from American University.


Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information at https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

10 February 2021

Title: NOAA Science Report Seminar: Social Science and Workforce Excellence
Presenter(s): Andrew Carr-Harris, Economist, ECS and NOAA/NEFSC/Social Sciences Branch; Monica Grasso, Chief Economist, NOAA's Office of Chief Financial Officer/Performance, Risk, and Social Science Office; Shobha Kondragunta, Research Scientist, NOAA NESDIS STAR Satellite Calibration and Data Assimilation Branch; and Anna Klompen, PhD Candidate and Chancellor's Doctoral Fellow, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas
Date & Time: 10 February 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA Science Report Seminar: Four projects presented, on Social Science and Workforce Excellence

Register: This webinar is over.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Research and Development Enterprise Committee. Points of contact: Gina Digiantonio gina.digiantonio@noaa.gov) & NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Measuring the economic benefits of the U.S. marine economy, uncovering the mystery of stinging water, conducting socioeconomic surveys about potential fishing policies, and observing air quality changes during COVID-19 lockdown measures - these are just a few of NOAA's scientific accomplishments that are highlighted in the 2020 NOAA Science Report. The NOAA Science Report celebrates NOAA's R&D by showcasing science highlights, bibliometrics, NOAA's scientific workforce, and more. This seminar features 4 projects from the 2020 NOAA Science Report (to be released soon) related to social science, COVID-19, and an educational spotlight.

Keywords: Social science, COVID-19, NOAA Science Report, Holling's Scholarship

Balancing Conservation Objectives and Angler Satisfaction in the Recreational Fishery for Atlantic Striped Bass

Presenter(s): Andrew Carr-Harris, Economist, ECS contractor in support of the NOAA/Northeast Fisheries Science Center/Social Sciences Branch

Bio(s): Andrew holds a bachelor's degree in Environmental Studies from Salisbury University and a Ph.D. in Environmental and Natural Resource Economics from the University of Rhode Island, where he was a NMFS-Sea Grant graduate fellow in Marine Resource Economics. He is currently an economist under contract at the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center, and his research focuses on the human dimensions and nonmarket valuation of recreational fishing.

Our Dynamic Marine Economy: The Prototype Marine Economy Statistics

Presenter(s): Monica Grasso, Ph.D., Chief Economist, NOAA/Office of Chief Financial Officer (OCFO)/Performance, Risk, and Social Science Office (PRSSO)

Bio(s): Dr. Monica Grasso joined NOAA in May 2016 as the Chief Economist working in the Performance, Risk and Social Science Office at the Office of Chief Financial Officer. Dr. Grasso leads NOAA's social science and performance team. She provides expertise and strategic leadership to promote, coordinate, and implement the use of rigorous economic analysis and performance metrics to support NOAA's mission.Prior to joining NOAA, Dr. Grasso served as Chief Economist at the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), providing expert advice, guidance, and assistance to the agency's leadership and key management officials on economic trends in the transportation industry, and the impact of policies on the public and industry. She has also served at the U.S. Coast Guard as Senior Economist, working on key environmental, safety and security issues, such as water quality, control of aquatic invasive species (including ballast water discharge regulations), towing and fishing vessels safety and port security. Dr. Grasso holds a M.Sc. Degree in Oceanography from University of Sao Paulo (Brazil), Ph.D. in Environmental Economics from University of Maryland, certificate in Advanced Business Management from Georgetown University and Executive Education from Harvard Kennedy School.


Relating Human Activity During COVID-19 Lockdown to Air Quality Impacts

Presenter(s): Shobha Kondragunta, Research Scientist, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/Satellite Calibration and Data Assimilation Branch

Bio(s): Dr. Kondragunta's research work focuses on developing atmospheric composition products from NOAA satellites for air quality applications. She received her PhD from the University of Maryland in College Park in 1997 and has been working at NOAA since 1999. She collaborates with NASA, EPA, ESA, EUMETSAT, and various academic institutions and leads the CEOS Atmospheric Composition Virtual Constellation aerosols and air quality subgroup

The Mystery of Stinging Snot in the Upside-down Jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana

Presenter(s): Anna Klompen, PhD Candidate and Chancellor's Doctoral Fellow, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas

Bio(s): Anna Klompen is an evolutionary biologist, budding toxinologist and jellyfish nerd interested in venom evolution and function across the phylum Cnidaria, which includes jellyfish, hydroids, sea anemones, and corals. She earned her Bachelor's of Science in Biology and Chemistry from the College of William and Mary, where she conducted independent research on the early life of a polyclad flatworm from the Chesapeake Bay. During her Holling's Fellowship in the summer of 2016, Anna worked with mentor Dr. Allen Collins (Systematics Lab, NOAA Fisheries and Smithsonian Museum of Natural History) to expand the number of known genes in a family of highly potent jellyfish toxins, a project that continues in her graduate research. She is currently studying how venom composition and function are influenced by complex life traits within the model hydrozoan Hydractinia using a combination of 'omics, phylogenetics, and genome-editing techniques.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: High resolution remotely-sensed water-quality products in service of the aquaculture industry in Maine
Presenter(s): Damian Brady and Emmanuel Boss, University of Maine
Date & Time: 10 February 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

NOCCG Seminar cross-listed with OneNOAA and STAR Seminars

Title: High resolution remotely-sensed water-quality products in service of the aquaculture industry in Maine

Presenter(s): Dr. Damian Brady and Dr. Emmanuel Boss, University of Maine

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/380691725

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (312) 757-3121 Access Code: 380-691-725


Abstract: Funded by National Sea Grant and USDA, U. Maine scientists have been producing and validating water quality products (temperature, turbidity and chlorophyll) using Landsat-8 and Sentinel 2AB. These products serve as inputs to compute suitability indices and growth models for shellfish aquaculture to facilitate decision making regarding siting of new aquaculture leases and optimizing use of existing leases. The Maine coast consists of a series of narrow inlets supporting a growing aquaculture industry (e.g., the Eastern oyster industry grew 9-fold since 2011 and the blue mussel industry has quadrupled over the same time frame). This coastline, however, is too narrow to be monitored effectively with current operational satellites such as VIIRS and MODIS, hence the necessity to use higher resolution satellite-based measurements. In the presentation we will describe the Maine shellfish aquaculture industry and its unique challenges, the ways in which high resolution remote sensing can assist the industry and the specific challenges we had to overcome to obtain reliable products.Speaker Biographies:Dr. Damian Brady is the Agatha B. Darling Associate Professor of Oceanography in the University of Maine's School of Marine Science. Dr. Brady is interested in how oceanographic tools such as remote sensing, numerical models, and water quality monitoring can inform sustainable aquaculture expansion. Toward that end, Dr. Brady is the co-director of the new Aquaculture Experimental Station made possible by a cooperative agreement between the University of Maine and USDA.Emmanuel Boss is a Professor at the University of Maine, where he has held faculty positions since 2002. Prior, he held research and postdoc positions at Oregon State University and University of Washington where he earned his Ph.D. He earned his B.S. in Physics and Math and M.S.in oceanography degrees from Hebrew University. The bulk of his work is concerned with both basic and applied research, developing new methods to use acoustical and optical properties (both from remote sensing and in-situ sensors) to quantify and characterize oceanic particulate materials. He is currently researching the use of measured optical properties (absorption, scattering and attenuation) to obtain the bulk properties of the matter in the ocean (e.g. particulate size distribution, composition).

Slides: When available after the seminar they can be found here: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Using ecosystem-based fisheries management to address climate-related impacts to Gulf of Alaska Pacific cod
Presenter(s): Stephani Zador, Deputy Director, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management Division, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NOAA
Date & Time: 10 February 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Stephani Zador, Deputy Director, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management Division, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NOAA.

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4462794963967362828 Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Management of Gulf of Alaska Pacific cod was challenged by a precipitous decline in biomass closely linked with a marine heatwave during 2014-2016. This seminar will review the management response during and after this time, which has co-occurred with rapid progress in the science underpinning the decline as well as developments in ecosystem-based fisheries management. The recurrence of a marine heatwave in 2019 along with other unprecedented environmental changes underscore the need for fisheries management that can address these events in both short-term tactical decisions and longer-term strategic planning.

Bio(s): Dr. Stephani Zador has worked at NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center since completing her PhD in Aquatic and Fisheries Science from the University of Washington in 2007. Her focus has been on applying marine ecosystem science to tactical fisheries management decisions. She started her scientific career studying seabirds in Alaska and Antarctica, and is excited to see the development of ecosystem-based fisheries management to address challenges in sustainable marine resource management.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Seaside Chats - Manta Rays: The Mysterious Giants in our Backyard
Presenter(s): Dr.Joshua Stewart, Associate Director, The Manta Trust
Date & Time: 10 February 2021
7:30 pm - 8:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Joshua Stewart, Associate Director, The Manta Trust

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar contact: Kelly.Drinnen@noaa.gov, 409-356-0388

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2821221898632131596

Abstract: Manta rays are some of the most poorly studiedocean giants, and are threatened by fisheries, ship strikes, habitatdegradation, and a suite of other human impacts. Many populations around theworld are in decline, and the species was recently listed under the U.S.Endangered Species Act and the IUCN red list. Meanwhile, an undescribed speciesof manta ray has been hiding in plain sight in the Atlantic, including atFlower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. What are these rays doing offthe coast of Texas? What are scientists learning about this population, andwhat remains to be discovered? Join Joshua Stewart, Associate Director ofThe Manta Trust, to find out.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Recordings: You can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

11 February 2021

Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Hernan Garcia, NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI; Lori K. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS
Date & Time: 11 February 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series, for NOAA Seminar Coordinators
We will be offering this webinar later this year and a recording will be available.

Presenter(s):
NOAA Science Seminar team: Lori Brown, NESDIS, Hernan Garcia, NESDIS and Tracy Gill, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Science Seminar Team, NESDIS and NOSSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Lori.Brown@noaa.gov, & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here:
You must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT Admin folks may need to do it, so please do it well ahead of time. To download and test your ability to use Adobe Connect, go to:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, please register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandbolts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar;
this link works only if you have downloaded the adobe connect software.
Attendees are muted and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google (Chrome), IE or Edge in Windows or Safari or Chrome if using a Mac.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have live captioning.

Abstract:
We will be presenting an overview of the NOAA Science Seminar Series, along with how-tos for submitting events to the seminar calendar, best practices, accessibility, and a general opportunity for contributors to ask questions and discuss how we manage and promote the Science Seminar Series. We are interested in learning suggestions and tips from you! We will be running this meeting at least one more time this year to give all contributors who can't make the first meeting an opportunity to attend, and, the session will be recorded.

Slides:
PDF of slides will be available from contacts.

Recordings:
An mp4 recording will be available from contacts.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 29: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 4
Presenter(s): Hugh Runyan - SIO/UCSD, Manil Maskey - NASA, David Kriegman - UCSD, Christin Khan - NOAA/NMFS/NEFSC/READ/PSB
Date & Time: 11 February 2021
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 29: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 4 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):
Automation-assisted segmentation to expedite 3D coral mapping - Hugh Runyan (SIO/UCSD)

Machine Learning for Earth Science Data Systems - Manil Maskey (NASA)

CoralNet: AI for Automatic Annotation of Benthic Imagery - David Kriegman (UCSD)

How NOAA Fisheries Leveraged Competitions and Collaboration to Automate the Identification of Right Whales using Deep Learning - Christin Khan (NOAA/NMFS/NEFSC/READ/PSB)

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.govRecordings and Presentations:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_library.php

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: Decolonizing and Indigenizing Fisheries and Marine Sciences in Alaska
Presenter(s): Jessica Black, PhD and Courtney Carothers, PhD, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 11 February 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

SPEAKER: Jessica Black, PhD and Courtney Carothers, PhD, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Register: This webinar is over.

POC: Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator (NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website); email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: Years of research and collaboration have revealed the deep racial inequities that persist in fisheries education, research, and management systems in Alaska. We document and study the persistent erasure of Indigenous Peoples and our/their knowledge systems, values, and practices from the dominant culture of western education and resource management. We will present on the Indigenizing Salmon Science and Management project that gave rise to
Tamamta "All of Us": Transforming Western and Indigenous Fisheries and Marine Sciences Together, a new NSF grant to transform fisheries education, research, and governance systems in Alaska.

BIOGRAPHY. Dr. Jessica Black is Gwich'in Dena from the villages of Gwichyaa Zhee (Ft. Yukon) and Toghotthele (Nenana), Alaska. Dr. Black currently serves as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Alaska Native Studies, Rural Development and Tribal Governance at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Dr. Black received her bachelor's degree in Social Work (BSW) at UAF and her master's degree and Ph.D. in Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis. Her dissertation and current research examine the relationship between governance and well-being among Alaska Native peoples, especially as it pertains to Tribal Stewardship and Cultural Connectivity. She resides in Fairbanks, Alaska with her family, however, she frequently returns home to Gwichyaa Zhee to hunt, fish, gather, and engage in other, important cultural practices. Dr. Courtney Carothers is a Professor of Fisheries in the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. She holds a Ph.D. in environmental anthropology from the University of Washington. Her research explores how fishery systems are being remade by enclosure and privatization processes. She also partners with Indigenous communities to understand social and cultural dimensions of knowledge systems, climate change, traditional ways of life, and decolonizing research. Her work focuses on human-environment relationships, cultural values, equity, and well-being.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

12 February 2021

Title: I feel the need...the need for Publication DOIs
Presenter(s): Jenn Fagan-Fry, NOAA IR Manager & Jeff Rey, Systems Librarian
Date & Time: 12 February 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Welcome to our next installment of the Publishing @ NOAA Series!

Presenter(s): Jenn Fagan-Fry, NOAA IR Manager & Jeff Rey, Systems Librarian

Register: This webinar is over..

Abstract: This is the first in a two-part series focusing on digital object identifiers, or DOIs. In Part 1, join NOAA Central Library staff as they discuss what digital object identifiers (DOIs) are, how they are used in academic publishing, who is responsible for creating and maintaining them, and more. Additionally, they will debunk a number of misconceptions about DOIs and how NOAA authors can obtain them. Part 2 of the series will be held in March and will feature dataset DOIs and feature staff from NCEI.

Schedule of upcoming webinars in the Publishing @ NOAA Series:
March 11th: DOIs Part 2

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php

16 February 2021

Title: Submerged NC: Hidden Beneath the Waves - Exploring North Carolina's Underwater Cultural Resources
Presenter(s): Tane Casserley, Resource Protection and Permit Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary and Chris Southerly, Deputy State Archaeologist - Underwater, North Carolina Office of State Archaeology
Date & Time: 16 February 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Hidden Beneath the Waves - Exploring North Carolina's Underwater Cultural Resources
Part of "Submerged NC", a Webinar Series hosted by NOAA's Monitor National Marine Sanctuary Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tane Casserley, Resource Protection and Permit Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary andChris Southerly, Deputy State Archaeologist - Underwater, North Carolina Office of State ArchaeologyRegister: This webinar is over.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Monitor National Marine Sanctuary, off North Carolina: coordinator is
Shannon.Ricles@noaa.gov

Abstract: Since the designation in 1975 of the USS Monitor as our first national marine sanctuary, NOAA has worked with the state of North Carolina to research, honor, and protect the hallmarks of North Carolina's underwater cultural heritage - shipwrecks. Learn more about the resources and how they have worked together for over 45 years to tell the stories of the USS Monitor and the many other shipwrecks that lie beneath the waves off North Carolina's coast.

Bio(s):
Tane Casserley, Resource Protection and Permit Coordinator,Monitor National Marine Sanctuary. Tane joined the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries in the spring of 2001. As the Resource Protection and Permit Coordinator, Tane is responsible for the development of policies and programs to address commercial and recreational uses and impacts in and around the sanctuary. Tane's specialties include interagency communications, public outreach, and exhibit design, as well as 19th-century warships and deep-water archaeology. Tane holds a graduate certificate in maritime archaeology from the University of Hawaii and a master's degree from the Program in Maritime Studies at East Carolina University. He has led NOAA archaeological expeditions in the Florida Keys, the Great Lakes, California, the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Alaska, and the USS Monitor. He's participated in projects including a sunken Boeing B-29 Superfortress in Lake Mead, a Civil War blockade runner in Bermuda,USS Arizona, and was most recently part of an expedition to RMS Titanic. Tane's focus now is on the maritime landscape of World War II's Battle of the Atlantic off the coast of North Carolina.

Chris Southerly, Deputy State Archaeologist - Underwater, NC Office of State Archaeology. Chris Southerly joined the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the North Carolina Office of State Archaeology as a staff archaeologist in2000. As the Deputy State Archaeologist-Underwater, Chris is responsible for supervising professional staff in the identification, inventory,evaluation, and management of terrestrial and submerged archaeological resources throughout the state, and the curation of associated archaeological artifacts and data. He serves as co-principal investigator for the Queen Anne's Revenge Shipwreck Project and as the UAB Diving Safety Officer managing the equipment, logistics, and training of the OSA scientific diving program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: The next decade of Alaskan Ocean Acidification Research: What we learned, where 2020 fits, and what’s coming next for the Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Jessica Cross, Oceanographer, NOAA
Date & Time: 16 February 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see description)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jessica Cross, Oceanographer, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
Over the last decade, ocean acidification (OA) has emerged as one of the most prominent issues in Alaskan marine research, and a possible threat to culturally and commercially important marine resources. Multiple communities around the state are now engaged in their own OA studies and monitoring, and are asking a common question: what risks does my region face? These are especially salient questions for Alaskans, given that the intensity, duration and extent of OA events have been greater than other ocean basins. Given the pace of the observed changes due to OA around Alaska, the area is commonly referred to as a bellwether and the proverbial canary in the coal mine for the rest of the global ocean. Here, we will take a look back at the last ten years of OA research in the Bering Sea, and highlight new, cutting-edge biogeochemical modeling, forecasting, and projection efforts that have dramatically increased our capacity to understand Alaskan OA from a large-scale perspective just in the past year. For example, we have scaled point observations to the entire Bering Sea shelf to show that corrosive conditions have covered almost 60% of critical habitat areas in the last ten years, and forecasts indicate that 2020 was even more strongly corrosive compared to the 2003-2019 average. These new insights have been quickly picked up by our colleagues engaged in ongoing laboratory studies of species-specific OA vulnerability and larger-scale ecosystem and bioeconomic analyses of OA impact. Our goal is to continue refining our capacity to identify new risks and emerging resilience of Alaskan ecosystems, and guide sound, evidence-based decisions that support sustainable marine resources in the future.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Alaska Drought Webinar Series 2021: Climate review: history of climate extremes focusing on drought
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP
Date & Time: 16 February 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
Rick Thoman, Alaska climate specialist, who will review past climate information focusing on unusual dry times and will provide a statewide overview, including tools typically used to access drought/precipitation deficit in Alaska.

Learn about the full series here - https://uaf-accap.org/research-activities/alaska-drought-webinar-series/

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

17 February 2021

Title: NOAA Hurricane Hunters - Flying through the historic 2020 Hurricane Season
Presenter(s): Commander Rebecca Waddington, NOAA Corps; Lieutenant Commander Danielle Varwig, NOAA Corps, OMAO
Date & Time: 17 February 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Registration: This webinar is over.

Join us for a look at Hurricane Hunters and the 2020 season!

Presenter(s): Commander Rebecca Waddington, NOAA Corps; Lieutenant Commander Danielle Varwig, NOAA Corps, OMAO

Abstract: NOAA Corps pilots Commander Rebecca Waddington and Lieutenant Commander Danielle Varwig share what it was like to fly the Gulfstream IV-SP Hurricane Hunter during the historic 2020 Hurricane Season. They'll highlight the teamwork required on the ground and in the sky to support these critical data gathering missions from NOAA's Aircraft Operations Center in Lakeland, FL.

Keywords: Hurricanes, Aviation, Research

Bio(s): Commander Rebecca J. Waddington is a senior officer in the NOAA Commissioned Corps and is currently serving as the Chief of Administration at the NOAA Aviation Operations Center. Commander Waddington flies NOAA's Gulfstream IV-SP high altitude research jet and NOAA's King Air aircraft. Lieutenant Commander Danielle Varwig joined the NOAA Corps one year ago and qualified as a NOAA Gulfstream IV-SP pilot. She flew her first hurricane missions during the historic 2020 season. She was formerly an Air Force flight instructor as well as a C-17 and MC-12W pilot.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov); OMAO

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php
Title: Ecological Drought: Planning for Resilience
Presenter(s): Jennifer Cartwright, USGS, Rachel M. Gregg, EcoAdapt, Hannah Panci and Robert Croll, Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission
Date & Time: 17 February 2021
1:00 pm - 2:45 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jennifer Cartwright, Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center, USGS
Rachel M. Gregg, Senior Scientist, EcoAdapt
Hannah Panci, Climate Change Scientist and Robert Croll, Climate Change Program Coordinator, Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USGS

Seminar Contacts: Elizabeth Weight (elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov)

Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
This webinar focuses on planning, restoration, and recovery actions that strengthen ecosystem resilience, mitigate the impacts of natural disasters, and realize co-benefits.

This webinar is the second in a four-part series that seeks to raise awareness of ecological drought, share actions that strengthen ecosystem resilience and mitigate the impacts of droughts, and discuss research and management needs for future drought planning and preparedness. The series is co-hosted by NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System and the USGS National Climate Adaptation Science Center, with expert speakers from the research community, tribal nations, and government agencies.

Information on the additional sessions is listed below:
Ecological Drought: Drought, Wildfire, and Recovery, March 3, 2021, 4 " 5 pm ET
Ecological Drought: Impacts on Coastal Ecosystems, March 17, 2021, 3 " 4 pm ET

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: New Developments of Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Sperm Whales in Hawaiian Waters
Presenter(s): Dr. Yvonne Barkley, PhD candidate at the University of Hawaii at Manoa
Date & Time: 17 February 2021
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Yvonne Barkley, PhD candidate at the University of Hawaii at Manoa

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6348349652827179536

Abstract:
Dr. Yvonne Barkley shares research findings related to tracking whales using passive acoustic monitoring. This talk will discuss a new approach for localizing passive acoustic data of sperm whales collected using towed hydrophone arrays and demonstrate how this information can be incorporated into species distribution models to improve our understanding of sperm whale habitat preferences in Hawaiian waters.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded?
Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/OneNOAASeminars.php
Title: CANCELLED Seaside Chats - Gulf Coast Reefs: Weathering the Storm
Presenter(s): Dr. Adrienne Correa, Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, BioSciences at Rice University
Date & Time: 17 February 2021
7:30 pm - 8:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesSeminar CANCELLED.

Presenter(s): Dr. Adrienne Correa, Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, BioSciences at Rice University

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar contact: Kelly.Drinnen@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/605722461337923084

Abstract: Hurricane Harvey dumped thirteen trillion gallons of rain on southeast Texas in August of 2017. We know what it did on land, but how did this impact the coral reefs off Texas' coast, in Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary? What can we expect from extreme storms in the future? Dr. Adrienne Correa, Assistant Professor of BioSciences at Rice University, will share ongoing research connecting the Gulf Coast, extreme weather, and reef ecosystems.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Recordings: You can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php

18 February 2021

Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Hernan Garcia, NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI; Lori K. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS
Date & Time: 18 February 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series, for NOAA Seminar Coordinators
We will be offering this webinar later this year and a recording will be available.

Presenter(s):
NOAA Science Seminar team: Lori Brown, NESDIS, Hernan Garcia, NESDIS and Tracy Gill, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Science Seminar Team, NESDIS and NOSSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Lori.Brown@noaa.gov, & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here:
You must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT Admin folks may need to do it, so please do it well ahead of time. To download and test your ability to use Adobe Connect, go to:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, please register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandbolts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar;
this link works only if you have downloaded the adobe connect software.
Attendees are muted and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google (Chrome), IE or Edge in Windows or Safari or Chrome if using a Mac.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have live captioning.

Abstract:
We will be presenting an overview of the NOAA Science Seminar Series, along with how-tos for submitting events to the seminar calendar, best practices, accessibility, and a general opportunity for contributors to ask questions and discuss how we manage and promote the Science Seminar Series. We are interested in learning suggestions and tips from you! We will be running this meeting at least one more time this year to give all contributors who can't make the first meeting an opportunity to attend, and, the session will be recorded.

Slides:
PDF of slides will be available from contacts.

Recordings:
An mp4 recording will be available from contacts.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 30: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 5
Presenter(s): Forrest M. Hoffman - Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Yeji Choi - SI Analytics, Soni Yatheendradas - UMD/ESSIC & NASA/GSFC, Yan Zhou - UMD/ESSIC/CISESS, Shujia Zhou - NASA GSFC
Date & Time: 18 February 2021
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 30: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 5 Chairs:
TBD

Presenter(s):
Mapping Arctic Vegetation using Hyperspectral Airborne Remote Sensing Data - Forrest M. Hoffman (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)RU-net for precipitation retrieval from passive microwave observations - Yeji Choi (SI Analytics)

A spatiotemporal quantification of the relative importance of indicator inputs for drought estimation - Soni Yatheendradas (UMD/ESSIC & NASA/GSFC)

Development of a Machine Learning-Based Radiometric Bias Correction for NOAA's Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MiRS) - Yan Zhou (UMD/ESSIC/CISESS)

Radar Reflectivity Surface Rainfall Retrieval with cGAN Algorithm: An Idealized Study - Shujia Zhou (NASA GSFC)

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s):
Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov
Recordings and Presentations:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_library.php

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Beyond the boundaries: How regulation-centered data can inform ocean protection assessments
Presenter(s): Mimi Diorio, Data Manager, NOS/ONMS/Marine Protected Areas Center
Date & Time: 18 February 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Registration: This webinar is over.

Presenter(s): Mimi Diorio, Data Manager, NOAA/NOS/ONMS/Marine Protected Areas Center

Abstract: Understanding the complex seascape of regulations that apply across ocean space in the United States is a critical part of effective resource management and marine planning. A recent paper published in Marine Policy explores the value of regulations data for assessing the level of protection within managed areas in U.S. marine waters and suggests that cumulative restrictions from overlapping regulatory authorities often provide stronger levels of protection within protected areas than protected area authorities alone.

Keywords: MPAs, Managed Areas, Regulations

Bio(s): Dr. Mimi Diorio is the Data Manager for NOAA's Marine Protected Areas Center. She manages the U.S. MPA Inventory, a comprehensive spatial database of U.S. MPAs and works with state and regional partners to help integrate geospatial data and tools into coastal and marine management strategies.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php
Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Becky Bolinger, Colorado Assistant State Climatologist
Date & Time: 18 February 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Becky Bolinger, Colorado Assistant State Climatologist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

February topics include the end of the February cold snap, La Nia (Advisory) Update, the continuing high water levels in the Great Lakes, recent and potential climate/weather impacts (e.g., winter wheat, river and lake ice, frozen soils, snow cover and water equivalent), and the latest precipitation, temperature, and drought outlooks. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Early marine life history experience of juvenile salmon during outmigration through complex coastal habitat mosaics
Presenter(s): Brian Hunt, PhD, University of British Columbia
Date & Time: 18 February 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Brian Hunt, PhD, University of British Columbia

Sponsor(s): NOAA NWFSC's Virtual Monster Jam

Seminar contact:
NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website (POC: Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov)

Register: This webinar is over.

Abstract: Coastal ocean conditions are considered to be a key factor in the recruitment of Pacific salmon, through their impact on the early marine survival of both migrating and non-migrating salmon species. The northeast Pacific coastal ocean, north of and including Washington State, is geomorphologically and oceanographically complex. This complexity should be expected to impart a high degree of variability to the physical and biological conditions experienced by juvenile salmon, with implications for regional survival and response to changing ocean conditions. This presentation outlines a case study examining and characterizing juvenile salmon habitat in the Salish Sea, and an approach to scaling up parameterization to the broader coastal ocean.

Biography: Brian Hunt is an Assistant Professor at the Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, University of British Columbia. A biological oceanographer by training, Brian has conducted lower trophic level and pelagic food webs research from the poles to tropics. The northeast Pacific is currently Brian's primary research focus, and specifically connectivity across the land / sea and shelf / off-shelf interfaces and implications for regional food web dynamics. Brian conducts this research in partnership with the Hakai Institute, Pacific Salmon Foundation, International Year of the Salmon, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, and the NSF funded Coastal Rainforest Network.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Alaska Drought Webinar Series: US Drought Monitor Process
Presenter(s): Dave Simeral, Desert Research Institute
Date & Time: 18 February 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dave Simeral, Desert Research Institute

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: David Simeral, drought monitor author, who will explain the U.S. drought monitor process.

Learn about the full series here - https://uaf-accap.org/research-activities/alaska-drought-webinar-series/

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Understanding Marine Biodiversity in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument
Presenter(s): Dr. Randy Kosaki, NOAA Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument Research Coordinator
Date & Time: 18 February 2021
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Presenter(s): Dr. Randy Kosaki, NOAA Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument Research Coordinator

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
The recent State of the Monument report assessed the status of marine biodiversity in the Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument as good. The waters of the monument are home to an abundant array of corals, algae, invertebrates, and fishes, including a very high percentage of endemic species. Join Dr. Randy Kosaki, the Research Coordinator for NOAA's Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument, as he shares updates about the abundant array of corals, algae, invertebrates, and fishes.This presentation is part of the Third Thursday By the Bay Presentation Series at Mokuppapa Discovery Center that is the visitor center for Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument in Hilo, Hawai'i. This lecture series is also supported by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation through a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded?
Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/OneNOAASeminars.php

19 February 2021

Title: Southwest Drought Briefing
Presenter(s): Peter Bennett Goble, Colorado Climate Center, Kelsey Satalino, NOAA NIDIS/CIRES
Date & Time: 19 February 2021
1:00 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Current Conditions and Outlook
Peter Bennett Goble | Colorado Climate Center

The Redesigned Drought.gov
Kelsey Satalino | NOAA NIDIS/CIRES

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Southwest Climate Hub, Desert Research Institute

Seminar Contact(s): Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov)

RegisterL This webinar is over.

Abstract:
Nearly 50% of the Southwestern United States is currently experiencing the most severe drought classification (D4) conditions. The most recent United States Drought Monitor indicated that all of the Southwest was experiencing drought, and forecasts indicate these conditions are expected to continue through spring. This webinar will provide an update of current drought conditions and forecasts for Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Nevada followed by a demonstration of the new drought.gov website.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: February 2021 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP/University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 19 February 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: February 2021 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: sean.bath@noaa.gov or tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php

20 February 2021

Title: NOAA's Weather & Navigation Virtual Webinar
Presenter(s): Tim Osborn, Physical Scientist, NOAA/NOS Office of Coast Survey, and Lance Frank, Meteorologist, NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 20 February 2021
10:00 am - 11:15 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA's Weather & Navigation Virtual Webinar

Presenter(s): Tim.Osborn@noaa.gov, Physical Scientist, NOAA/NOS Office of Coast Survey, and Lance.Franck@noaa.gov, Meteorologist, NOAA's National Weather Service When: Saturday, February 20, 2021, 10:00am - 11:15am EST

Sponsor(s): NOAA's NWS Office in Tallahassee and NOAA's Office of Coast Survey. Points of contact are Lance.Franck@noaa.gov or Tim.Osborn@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3225072526063547919
Recordings,

Slides: The recording will be available on the NWS-Tallahassee YouTube. A PDF of the slides will be posted to this website. Both should be available by COB 2/22/21.

Abstract: NOAA's National Weather Service Office in Tallahassee and NOAA's Office of Coast Survey are teaming up to offer a virtual seminar on safe navigation and hazardous weather. This will be very informative for the ever increasing numbers of recreational boaters on the water! Some of the topics in this 75-minute seminar include: precision navigation, nautical charts, marine forecasts, and weather warnings. Please feel free to share this announcement and link to the webinar registration via Facebook or Twitter. If you have questions, please contact Lance.Franck@noaa.gov or Tim.Osborn@noaa.gov .

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information

22 February 2021

Title: JPSS and the Record-Setting California Wildfires of 2020
Presenter(s): Eric Stevens, Manager of the Fire Weather Program for the Alaska Fire Service, Fairbanks AK
Date & Time: 22 February 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: JPSS and the Record-Setting California Wildfires of 2020

Presenter(s): Eric Stevens, Manager of the Fire Weather Program for the Alaska Fire Service

Sponsor(s): Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Register: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
Over four million acres of California's landscape burned during the record-setting 2020 wildfire season. Considering the needs and perspective of operational fire weather meteorologists, what role did the JPSS program play in California? Long-term climate forcing set the stage through the La Nia phase of ENSO, and an unusual outbreak of dry lightning in mid-August ignited many fires whose behavior were then driven by persistent dry weather and occasional bouts of heat and Santa Ana winds. California's active wildfire season typically ends in the fall with the arrival of strongly baroclinically forced widespread rains, but the 2020 season continued until late January of 2021 when an atmospheric river finally doused the existing fires and replenished the moisture content of the fuels. The contribution of the JPSS program in these many aspects of the forecast process will be explored.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Karin Bumbaco, Office of the WA State Climatologist; Andy Bryant, Senior Service Hydrologist, NOAA NWS WFO Portland; Amy Garrett, Oregon State University; and Keith Musselman, University of Colorado-Boulder
Date & Time: 22 February 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Climate Recap & Current Conditions
Karin Bumbaco | Office of the WA State Climatologist

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Andy Bryant | Senior Service Hydrologist, NOAA NWS WFO Portland

Dry Farming as a Drought Response: Soil Health Explorations in Dry Farm Contexts, Oregon
Amy Garrett | Oregon State University

Winter Melt Trends Portend Widespread Declines in Snow Water Resources
Keith Musselman | University of Colorado-Boulder

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System, Climate Impacts Research Consortium, USDA Northwest Climate Hub, National Weather Service

Seminar Contact(s): Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Access: Register: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
Snow conditions this winter have been good in parts of Washington and Montana, and average to below average in the rest of the Pacific Northwest. What's the outlook for the rest of winter and spring? Find out conditions, climate outlook, as well as presentations on dry farming as a drought response and winter melt trends.These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

23 February 2021

Title: Organized Chaos: Social Media, Severe Weather, and Disaster Management
Presenter(s): Amber Silver, University at Albany, Assistant Professor; Derek Morrison, University at Albany/National Center for Security & Preparedness, Chief of Staff
Date & Time: 23 February 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Organized Chaos: Social Media, Severe Weather, and Disaster Management

Presenter(s): Amber Silver, University at Albany, Assistant Professor; Derek Morrison, University at Albany/National Center for Security & Preparedness, Chief of Staff

Sponsor(s):
POC: Vankita Brown, vankita.brown@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library,
library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register: This webinar is over.

Abstract: Social media has become a powerful tool for emergency managers and public safety officials during responses to severe weather and other major incidents. The University at Albany (UAlbany), in partnership with other Universities and government agencies in the United States and Taiwan, is using social media data to explore public attention, risk perception, and communication related to acute and diffuse hazards. UAlbany's student-led, expert-guided Virtual Operations Support Team (VOST) is working with emergency managers to deploy these findings directly into the field through just-in-time and after-action reporting.

Key Words: Severe Weather, Social Media Decision-making, Emergency Management

Bio(s): Dr. Amber Silver is an Assistant Professor at the University at Albany's College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security, and Cybersecurity (CEHC) and Principal Investigator for the University's Crisis Informatics Lab and VOST. Her research focuses on risk communication and the ways individuals and groups make decisions before, during, and after high-impact weather. Dr. Silver is currently exploring decision-making related to both acute and diffuse hazards, including Hurricane Dorian and COVID-19.

Derek Morrison is the Chief of Staff at University at Albany's CEHC National Center for Security & Preparedness. He manages VOST and is a subject-matter expert in open source information collection and intelligence. His experience includes five years in the New York State Governor's Office and five years as a United States Marine with three deployments in Iraq, Afghanistan, other Middle East Countries, and Europe.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: The USGS Coastal National Elevation Database (CoNED): Integrated Topobathymetric Models and Applications for the U.S. Coastal Zone
Presenter(s): Jeffrey Danielson, U.S. Geological Survey, CoNED Applications Project Chief, Earth Resources Observation & Science Center, Sioux Falls, SD
Date & Time: 23 February 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the webinar recording, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p43k7cqskvkh/

Title: The USGS Coastal National Elevation Database (CoNED): Integrated Topobathymetric Models and Applications for the U.S. Coastal Zone

Presenter(s): Jeffrey Danielson, U.S. Geological Survey, CoNED Applications Project Chief, Earth Resources Observation & Science (EROS) Center, Sioux Falls, SDWhen: Tuesday, February 23, 2021, 12-1pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Webinar Series and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Seminar coordinators are Amber.Butler@noaa.gov, Executive Secretariat for the Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping team in the National Ocean Service, and the Executive Secretariat for the Interagency Working Group on Ocean and Coastal Mapping which consists of 13 federal agencies." and Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov, NOS science seminar coordinator.

Remote Access: This webinar is over.
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Accessibility:
This webinar will have closed captioning.

Abstract: The USGS Coastal National Elevation Database (CoNED) Applications Project develops enhanced topographic (land elevation) and bathymetric (water depth) datasets that serve as valuable resources for coastal hazards research. These datasets are used widely for mapping inundation zones from hazard events to support science modeling of sediment transport, erosion, and storm surge impact. As part of the vision for a 3D Nation, the CoNED Project is working collaboratively with USGS NGP, NOAA NCEI, and USACE JALBTCX through the IWG-OCM to build integrated elevation models in the coastal zone by assimilating the land surface topography with littoral zone and continental shelf bathymetry. CoNED topobathy development is focused in select regions around the U.S. coast, such as the Northern Gulf of Mexico, the eastern seaboard, California, the Pacific Northwest, the North Slope of Alaska, and select central Pacific islands and atolls. Current topobathymetric digital elevation model (TBDEM) 1-meter integration work will be highlighted in the Northern Gulf of Mexico along with plans for future work. Finally, the use of satellite imagery to derive elevation data using structure-from-motion (SfM) and satellite-derived bathymetry (SDB) techniques will be demonstrated for Cape Cod, Lake Michigan, and Unalakleet, Alaska.

Bio(s): Jeff Danielson is a physical geographer working for the U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation & Science (EROS) Center. He has an extensive background in working with geographic information systems technologies, image processing, remote sensing, and geospatial elevation data. His current work is leading the USGS Coastal National Elevation Database (CoNED) Applications Project for the USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards and Resources Program (CMHRP). Danielson also leads inland bathymetry research for the 3D Elevation Program focusing specifically, on inland elevation data integration. Danielson is the USGS co-chair on the Interagency Working Group for Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IWG-OCM) and JALBTCX representative.Slides and Recording: The slides may be available after the webinar and the recording most likely will. Questions? Contact Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Drought and Water Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District
Date & Time: 23 February 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Drought and Water Monthly Webinar

Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access here: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar is part of a monthly (twice a month during drought status) webinar series designed to provide stakeholders, water-resource managers, and other interested parties in the ACF region with timely information on current drought status, seasonal forecasts and outlooks, streamflow conditions and forecasts, groundwater conditions, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir conditions.

Recordings:
Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Understanding the Interconnectedness of Climate Change, Salt Marsh Resilience, and Nuisance Mosquitos
Presenter(s): Richard Lathrop, Rutgers University, lathrop@crssa.rutgers.edu; Lisa Auermuller, Jacques Cousteau NERR, auermull@marine.rutgers.edu; Kaitlin Gannon, Jacques Cousteau NERR, gannon@marine.rutgers.edu
Date & Time: 23 February 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Understanding the Interconnectedness of Climate Change, Salt Marsh Resilience, and Nuisance Mosquitos

Presenter(s): Richard Lathrop, Rutgers University; Lisa Auermuller, Jacques Cousteau NERR; Kaitlin Gannon, Jacques Cousteau NERR

Sponsor(s): This seminar is sponsored by the NERRS Science Collaborative

Seminar Contact(s): Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: As climate change and sea level rise alter salt marsh habitats, a less understood impact - with implications for human health - is how changes in marsh habitat affect the production and location of nuisance mosquito populations. Understanding how coastal ecosystems are being impacted by climate change, and how nuisance mosquito populations are changing, is critical to ensuring coastal managers make the most informed decisions going forward.
In this webinar, project team members will describe how data-collection, mapping, and modeling efforts have resulted in increased clarity about marsh habitat change to inform mosquito control and coastal restoration efforts in New Jersey. Future modeling and marshupland edge mapping suggest that the marshupland is and will be a hotspot for change, and field sampling confirmed that these new habitats can serve as breeding areas for mosquitoes. The team also developed environmental DNA (eDNA) assays for the most common salt marsh mosquitoes in the Middle Atlantic United States. Working closely with mosquito control agency personnel, the team has made major advancements in mosquito surveillance through the deployment of drone-based sampling of breeding pools paired with the eDNA analyses. The team also developed outreach materials to inform the public about health risks posed by mosquitoes, including how climate change might exacerbate those risks, and a module for middle/high school educators.

Bio(s): Please visit here for biographical information about our speakers.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

24 February 2021

Title: NOAA Sea Level Rise Viewer Updates and Other Sources for Sea Level Rise Data and Visualizations - Moved from 1/20/21
Presenter(s): Doug Marcy, Coastal Hazards Specialist, NOAA Office for Coastal Management, and Billy Brooks, Senior Spatial Analyst, Lynker Technologies@ NOAA Office for Coastal Management
Date & Time: 24 February 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view a recording of the webinar here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/piayvioovl4e/


Title: NOAA Sea Level Rise Viewer Updates and Other Sources for Sea Level Rise Data and Visualizations. Rescheduled from 1/20/21

Presenter(s):
Doug Marcy, Coastal Hazards Specialist, NOAA's Office for Coastal Management, and
Billy Brooks, Senior Spatial Analyst, Lynker Technologies at NOAA's Office for Coastal ManagementWhen: Wednesday, February 24, 12-1pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Accessibility:
This webinar will have closed captioning.

Abstract: The Sea Level Rise Viewer, available at NOAA's Digital Coast, has been updated for TX, LA, FL, SC, and areas of WA. A total of 15 new Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) were updated and are available for download, in addition to the mapping outputs for Sea Level Rise, Mapping Confidence, Marsh Migration, and High Tide Flooding. A total of 46 map services were updated with the new data. Areas with older and lower resolution data sets have been updated, with most areas now at 3-meter resolution. Users can now zoom in further to see community level impacts. The High Tide Flooding graphics have now been updated to reflect the latest Annual High Tide Flood report. Additionally, photo-realistic simulations for select locations are now viewable for the 7-10FT sea level intervals and 35more simulations will be added soon.The Sea Lever Rise Viewer enables users to visualize potential impacts from sea level rise through maps, regional projections, and photos. They can also download all data and obtain mapping methods, as well as share maps and links via social media.In addition, there are other publicly-available sources for SLR data and visualizations that provide users with similar options and functionality.Several of these will be highlighted and discussed.

Bio(s): Douglas (Doug) C. Marcy is a Coastal Hazards Specialist at the NOAA Office for Coastal Management in Charleston, SC. He has been with the NOAA 18 years working on flooding and sea level rise geospatial mapping projects, storm surge assessments, and coastal hazards assessment projects contributing to more disaster resilient communities. He worked as a Hydraulic Engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Charleston District from 1999 to 2002, where he focused on flood control projects, H&H modeling, flood inundation mapping, shoreline change analysis, and coastal engineering. From 1997 to 1999 Doug worked at the South Carolina Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management. Doug has a M.S. in marine geology (1997) from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and a B.S. in geology (1994) from the College of Charleston. Doug's current interests include using geospatial technology combined with meteorological, hydrological, and coastal modeling (including sea level change) to enhance inundation forecasting, mapping, and risk assessment.
William (Billy) Brooks is a senior geospatial analyst with Lynker on contract at the NOAA Office for Coastal Management. He has been at NOAA OCM for over 19 years and has worked on a variety of resilience, inundation, and elevation projects, including NOAA's Sea Level Rise and Lake Level Viewers. His current work focuses on using multiple data sources and visualization techniques to communicate the potential impacts of increased water levels on coastal communities.Slides and Recording: The slides may be available after the webinar and the recording most likely will. Questions? Contact Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: NOAA Sea Level Rise Viewer Updates and Other Sources for Sea Level Rise Data and Visualizations
Presenter(s): Speaker Name and Affiliation here, at the very bottom of the description, inside of braces
Date & Time: 24 February 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Title here / name of your series, if needed {Short titles are STRONGLY preferred}

Presenter(s): Speaker name(s) and affiliation(s) here. {You may include the fact that the speaker is delivering talk remotely, BUT DO NOT ENTER WEB ADDRESSES under this heading.}

Sponsor(s): Sponsoring organization names, information regarding a seminar series name, etc.

Seminar Contact(s): Seminar organizer contact(s) e-mail / title / role.

Remote Access: Webinar and audio access information goes here only, including links, information about muting microphones, passcodes, conference phone numbers, user support, any remote-access-related content. WEBINAR URLs should ONLY be listed here.

Abstract: Place abstract for talk here. Make the abstract less than 300 words. Should be drafted as a guide to possible attendees, not a formal technical abstract.

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Slides: Supply links here for presentation slides.

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Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: NOAA Science Report Seminar: Reducing Societal Impacts from Hazardous Weather and Other Environmental Phenomena
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 24 February 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

NOAA Science Report Seminar: Four projects presented (see below), on reducing societal impacts from hazardous weather and other environmental phenomena.

Register: This webinar is over.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Research and Development Enterprise Committee. Points of contact: Emma Kelley (emma.kelley@noaa.gov) & NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Communicating important information about hurricanes, improving forecasts with advances in regional models, NOAA's National Water Model, and subseasonal to seasonal (S2S) predictability sources to maximize forecasts of opportunity - these are just a few of NOAA's scientific accomplishments that are highlighted in the 2020 NOAA Science Report. The NOAA Science Report celebrates NOAA's R&D by showcasing science highlights, bibliometrics, NOAA's scientific workforce, and more. This seminar features 4 projects from the 2020 NOAA Science Report (to be released soon) related to reducing societal impacts from hazardous weather and other environmental phenomena.

Keywords: Hazardous Weather, Hurricanes, Modeling, National Water Mode, S2S, NOAA Science Report

Improving Forecasts with Advances in Regional Models

Presenter(s):
Terra Ladwig, Ph.D., Chief, Data Assimilation Branch, Assimilation & Verification Innovation Division, Global Systems Laboratory, NOAA/OAR/ESRL

Bio(s):
Terra is a Research Physical Scientist focused on data assimilation to improve convective allowing weather prediction for high impact weather events. In particular, she focuses on research and development for cloud and precipitation observations, their assimilation techniques, and the impacts on general forecasting, severe weather, aviation weather, and renewable energy. She also leads colleagues in the data assimilation branch and provides project management for a number of programs. Terra loves outdoor activities, including chasing tornadoes, kayaking, skiing, hiking, and dancing in the rain.

National Hurricane Center Forecast Skill and Product Improvements

Presenter(s):
Brian Zachry, Ph.D., Branch Chief (Acting), Technology & Science Branch, Science & Operations Officer, Joint Hurricane Testbed Direction, NOAA/NWS/NCEP/ National Hurricane Center

Bio(s):
Brian Zachry, Ph.D., is the Science and Operations Officer in the Technical Science Branch at NOAA's National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida. He is a Florida native, earning his Bachelor of Science degree in Atmospheric Science/Meteorology from Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, FL. After graduation, he was selected as a prestigious National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship Fellow and earned his Doctoral degree in Wind Science and Engineering/ Meteorology from Texas Tech University. His research focused on wind-wave interaction in the nearshore environment during hurricanes to better forecast storm surge flooding and evaluate wind load standards along the hurricane prone coastline. Dr. Zachry has an extensive multidisciplinary background that includes tropical cyclones, wind loading, field instrumentation, damage assessment, ocean waves, and storm surge. He began his career with NOAA in 2013. In August 2019, Dr. Zachry assumed his current position at NHC as the Science and Operations Officer. Some of his responsibilities include overseeing the transfer of new technologies from the research community to the operational environment, consulting with scientists in the NWS, NOAA, other agencies, academia, and the private sector to identify opportunities to enhance and improve forecast procedures and techniques, to serve as a forecaster at the various NHC branches, and to develop and facilitate training and professional development activities for NHC staff.

National Weather Model and Reducing Societal Impacts from Hazardous Weather Events

Presenter(s):
Edward P. Clark, Director of the National Water Center and Deputy Director of the Office of Water Prediction, NOAA, NWS

Bio(s):
Edward Clark is the Director of the NOAA National Water Center (NWC) in Tuscaloosa, AL, and deputy director of the National Weather Service Office of Water Prediction. Clark oversees operations, supports the management and strategic direction of the Office of Water Prediction, and facilitates collaborative efforts to evolve NOAA's water prediction capabilities with federal, academic and private partners, the National Science Foundation, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, among others. For the past 4 years, Clark has led the National Water Center's Innovator's Program, working closely with National Science Foundation, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences, Inc, and federal partners including the US Geological Survey, to explore and develop next generation national flood forecasting and emergency response operations. Before becoming director, Clark served as the director of Office of Water Prediction's Geo-Intelligence Division. He worked closely with multiple federal agency partners, including USGS, USACE and FEMA, on a variety of projects associated with the Integrated Water Resources Science and Services consortium.

Optimized Use of S2S Predictability Sources to Maximize Forecasts of Opportunity

Presenter(s):
David G. DeWitt, Ph.D. Director of the Climate Prediction Center, NOAA NWS



Bio(s):

DeWitt joined NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) in 2012 as the lead modeler within the Science Plans Branch of the Office of Science and Technology. During his tenure at NWS, he served a detail as the acting deputy director for NCEP's Environmental Modeling Center, and as a project manager for the Sandy Supplemental projects, which will accelerate development of NOAA's foundational numerical guidance for weather prediction. David has provided leadership on several NWS and NOAA cross-line office activities targeted toward improving NOAA's products and services. Prior to coming to NOAA, DeWitt worked as a research scientist at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) at Columbia University from 1999-2012. DeWitt received his Bachelor of Arts (1989) degree in meteorology from Kean University, and his Masters (1992), and Ph.D. (1994) degrees in meteorology from the University of Maryland, College Park. He has published over 30 peer-reviewed journal articles, and is a leading expert on short-term climate forecasting and diagnostics, and coupled model development. He served as an executive editor of Climate Dynamics, and as a member of the World Climate Research Program Working Group on Seasonal to Interannual Prediction.



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(Terra Ladwig, Ph.D., Chief, Data Assimilation Branch, Assimilation & Verification Innovation Division, Global Systems Laboratory, NOAA/OAR/ESRL)

Title: Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium (VAWS) - Use of Uncrewed Aerial Systems at the Alaska-Pacific River Forecast Center
Presenter(s): Jessica Cherry, Senior Hydrologist, Alaska-Pacific River Forecast Center, NWS NOAA
Date & Time: 24 February 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium (VAWS) - Use of Uncrewed Aerial Systems at the Alaska-Pacific River Forecast Center

Presenter(s): Jessica Cherry, Senior Hydrologist, Alaska-Pacific River Forecast Center, NWS NOAA

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: The topic of this presentation is the UAS program started by the APRFC in 2019. We will describe missions flown thus far and types of applications well suited for helping the National Weather Service (NWS) provide its core services. We will also discuss the advantages and challenges of in-sourcing' this technology to NWS.Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

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Title: Seaside Chats from the Gulf of Mexico: Remarkable Algae in Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Dr. Suzanne Fredericq, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Date & Time: 24 February 2021
7:30 pm - 8:30 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Suzanne Fredericq, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary

Seminar contact: kelly.drinnen@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3375396656724673551

Abstract:
Extensive sampling of deepwater macroalgae in FGBNMS and the northwestern Gulf of Mexico has resulted in an innovative approach to exploratory research for the discovery, identification, and classification of algal diversity. The research of Dr. Suzanne Fredericq, Professor of Biology at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, focuses on rhodolith or algal nodule beds, which represent an important component of marine diversity that contributes to major ecosystem functions. The critical importance rhodoliths play in the life cycle of algae has revolutionized preconceived ideas about the ecological importance of this unexplored ecosystem.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded?
Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/OneNOAASeminars.php

25 February 2021

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: US Drought Monitor Author Perspectives
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center and David Miskus, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 25 February 2021
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/US Drought Monitor Author Perspectives

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and
David Miskus, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center.


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:
Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of February conditions and a discussion with Dave Miskus on his work as a US Drought Monitor author.

Bio(s): TBD

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Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Hernan Garcia, NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI; Lori K. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS
Date & Time: 25 February 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series, for NOAA Seminar Coordinators
We will be offering this webinar later this year and a recording will be available.

Presenter(s):
NOAA Science Seminar team: Lori Brown, NESDIS, Hernan Garcia, NESDIS and Tracy Gill, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Science Seminar Team, NESDIS and NOSSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Lori.Brown@noaa.gov, & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here:
You must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT Admin folks may need to do it, so please do it well ahead of time. To download and test your ability to use Adobe Connect, go to:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, please register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandbolts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar;
this link works only if you have downloaded the adobe connect software.
Attendees are muted and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google (Chrome), IE or Edge in Windows or Safari or Chrome if using a Mac.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have live captioning.

Abstract:
We will be presenting an overview of the NOAA Science Seminar Series, along with how-tos for submitting events to the seminar calendar, best practices, accessibility, and a general opportunity for contributors to ask questions and discuss how we manage and promote the Science Seminar Series. We are interested in learning suggestions and tips from you! We will be running this meeting at least one more time this year to give all contributors who can't make the first meeting an opportunity to attend, and, the session will be recorded.

Slides:
PDF of slides will be available from contacts.

Recordings:
An mp4 recording will be available from contacts.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas
Title: Use of joint and single species distribution models for the Northeast Regional Habitat Assessment (NRHA).
Presenter(s): Tori Kentner and Chris Haak, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 25 February 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Use of joint and single species distribution models for the Northeast Regional Habitat Assessment (NRHA).

Presenter(s): Tori Kentner / Chris Haak, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 31: AI for Innovation: New Ways to Exploit Environmental Data, Part 2
Presenter(s): Olivera Kotevska, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Negin Hayatbini - Scripps/CW3E/UCSD; and Jeffrey Sadler - USGS
Date & Time: 25 February 2021
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 31: AI for Innovation: New Ways to Exploit Environmental Data, Part 2

Presenter(s):
Energy efficiency and security aspects of Smart Homes - Olivera Kotevska, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Conditional Generative Adversarial Networks (cGANs) for Precipitation Estimation and Forecast from Multiple sources of information - Negin Hayatbini, Scripps/CW3E/UCSD

Benefits of modeling interdependent environmental variables, streamflow and stream temperature, with deep learning - Jeffrey Sadler, USGS

Sponsor(s): AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.govRegister: This webinar is over.Recordings and Presentations: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_library.php

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: Coral reef eco-evolutionary dynamics: Adaptation and connectivity in MPA networks under future climate change
Presenter(s): Helen Fox of Coral Reef Alliance, Lisa McManus of University of Hawaii at Mnoa, and Lukas DeFilippo, of University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 25 February 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Coral reef eco-evolutionary dynamics: Adaptation and connectivity in MPA networks under future climate change

Presenter(s):
Helen Fox, Coral Reef Alliance
Lisa McManus, University of Hawaii at Mnoa
Lukas DeFilippo, University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center


Sponsor(s):
NOAA National MPA Center and OCTO (MPA News, OpenChannels, EBM Tools Network)

Remote Access:
This webinar is over.

Abstract:
While coral reefs face mounting threats, many coral populations are already well adapted to conditions unfavorable to the average coral (e.g., high temperatures, low pH, poor water quality). With the goal of better understanding the drivers of persistence and adaptive capacity and the role of management and MPAs, we developed a general eco-evolutionary framework to explore the influence of network structure and spatial management on a metapopulation's adaptive response to temperature increase. This framework was applied to coral populations in the Caribbean, Southwest Pacific, and Coral Triangle to determine the characteristics of individual reefs that lead to persistence or decline under climate scenarios and test the efficacy of spatial management strategies (MPAs) in these three regions. We also used eco-evolutionary simulations to explore scenarios of coral propagation, transplantation, and assisted evolution and identified potential benefits and risks of these interventions. We find that corals' vulnerability to climate change depends strongly on assumptions of their standing genetic variation, which determines the potential for an evolutionary response. One implication of this work is that MPA networks can promote persistence by protecting coral populations adapted to diverse environments so that corals with evolutionarily favored traits reproduce and spread throughout reef networks.

Bio(s): TBD

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Snowpack Monitoring in the Rocky Mountain West Webinar, Part 1: Observations
Presenter(s): Karl Wetlaufer, USDA-NRCS Snow Survey and Water Supply Forecasting Program;
Jeff Deems, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and Western Water Assessment
Date & Time: 25 February 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see description)
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Snowpack Monitoring in the Rocky Mountain West Webinar, Part 1: Observations
Series

Title: Western Water Assessment Webinars

Presenter(s):

Karl Wetlaufer, USDA-NRCS Snow Survey and Water Supply Forecasting Program;
Jeff Deems, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and Western Water Assessment

Sponsor(s):
Western Water Assessment, a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar Contact(s):
Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov) or Benet Duncan (wwa@colorado.edu)

Remote Access:
This webinar is over.


Accessibility:
If accessibility accommodations needed, reach out to Benet Duncan (wwa@colorado.edu).

Abstract:

Join Western Water Assessment for Part 1 of a two-part webinar in which we share Snowpack Monitoring in the Rocky Mountain West: A User Guide. Guest speakers Karl Wetlaufer (NRCS) and Jeff Deems (CIRES) will discuss the details of snowpack observations, both in situ and remotely sensed: Where, how, and what data are collected, how are they organized, and how are they accessed?


Bio(s):

Karl Wetlaufer is a Hydrologist and Assistant Supervisor for the Colorado office of the USDA-NRCS Snow Survey and Water Supply Forecasting Program. He was born and raised in Western Colorado, spending time in the mountains and on the rivers of Colorado and around the West. Karl attended Montana State University and received his Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Snow Science and Snow Hydrology. He has been working for the Snow Survey program in Colorado for seven years.

Jeff Deems went to Colorado State University where his PhD dissertation examined spatial variations in snowpack distribution and properties. Jeff works at both the National Snow and Ice Data Center and with Western Water Assessment. He is a founding member of the NASA JPL Airborne Snow Observatory Science Team. His interests and expertise in avalanche and snow hydrology research combine field data collection, modeling, and remote sensing in midlatitude mountain locations in the western US and around the globe, and actively further connections between science and management applications.


Slides:
Contact Benet Duncan (wwa@colorado.edu).

Recordings:

A recording will be posted at https://wwa.colorado.edu/outreach/webinars/index.html Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: Towards predicting climate change impacts on phytoplankton communities from the Subtropics to the Arctic
Presenter(s): Gwenn Hennon, PhD, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 25 February 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Gwenn Hennon, PhD, University of Alaska Fairbanks


Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

POC: Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.


JOIN VIA WEBINAR
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Meeting number: 905 389 231
Meeting password: hqM8wrE5kb3

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ABSTRACTPhytoplankton are responsible for about half of global primary production and form the base of marine food webs- supporting the world's fisheries. Anthropogenic carbon dioxide has already altered the marine environment through ocean acidification and warming and these trends are predicted to continue at a rapid pace. Forecasting phytoplankton productivity and community composition in a changing climate will be essential for global food security. Our ongoing projects in the Subtropics, the Gulf of Alaska and the Arctic will provide data for these forecasting efforts. Our methods include characterization of marine microbial communities along natural gradients and in situ incubation experiments to disentangle the impact of climate. drivers on community composition. We also use experiments with phytoplankton isolates to uncover how climate change will impact phytoplankton physiology and transcriptomics to understand the capacity for phytoplankton to acclimate to these changes.

BIOGRAPHYDr. Gwenn Hennon is an Assistant Professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks in the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences. She earned her doctorate from the University of Washington in 2015 and was a postdoctoral researcher at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and a visiting scholar at Scripps Institution of Oceanography before her most recent appointment. Dr. Hennon's lab is focused on questions about how climate change will influence phytoplankton ecology.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Abalone: The Remarkable History and Uncertain Future of California’s Iconic Shellfish
Presenter(s): Ann Vileisis, Environmental Historian and Author
Date & Time: 25 February 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Register:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/9130840849542268687

Presenter(s): Ann Vileisis, Environmental Historian and Author

Abstract: Prized for their iridescent shells and delectable meat, abalone have a long and rich cultural history on the West Coast; but with increasing stresses to marine ecosystems today, these unique mollusks now face enormous challenges. Join award-winning author Ann Vileisis for a deep dive into the environmental history of abalone, based on her new book Abalone: the remarkable history and uncertain future of California's iconic shellfish, including updates on exciting current endangered species recovery efforts.

Key Words: Abalone, History, NMFS Species in the Spotlight

Bio(s): Ann Vileisis is the award-winning author of three environmental history books. Discovering the Unknown Landscape, a history of America's wetlands, won two national history awards. Kitchen Literacy, how we lost knowledge of where food comes from was recognized by Real Simple Magazine as one of 50 books that will change your life. And her latest work, Abalone: the remarkable history and uncertain future of California's iconic shellfish has been called a truly marvelous, unexpected joy of a book by marine conservation biologist Callum Roberts. She studied at Yale and Utah State.

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
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1 March 2021

Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, March 2021: Precipitation Prediction over the Western U.S., and Eddy Resolving Ocean Models
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael DeFlorio, University of California San Diego and Dr. Ben Kirtman, University of Miami - CIMAS
Date & Time: 1 March 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:


OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, March 2021 Webinar

Presenter(s): Dr. Michael DeFlorio, University of California San Diego and Dr. Ben Kirtman, University of Miami - CIMAS

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Weather Program Office S2S Program and NOAA NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration Modeling Program Division

Seminar Contact(s): Karen Keith, karen.keith@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/403016501181344267

Abstract: This monthly webinar series was created to share ongoing work within NWS and OAR at the Weeks 3-4 and S2S timescales. We would like to foster a relaxed, informal dialogue among forecasters, modelers and researchers. This month, Michael DeFlorio will speak about Subseasonal-to-Seasonal (S2S) Prediction of Atmospheric Rivers, Ridging Events, and Precipitation over the Western U.S. to Benefit Water Management. Ben Kirtman will speak about Seasonal Prediction with Ocean Eddy Resolving Models

Recordings: Available on the Weeks 3-4/S2S Webinar Series website: https://vlab.ncep.noaa.gov/web/weeks-3-4-s2s-webinar-series

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov
with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. For more, visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website.

2 March 2021

Title: Regenerative Ocean Farming: The Least Deadly Catch
Presenter(s): Bren Smith, Regenerative Ocean Farmer and Co-Executive Director and Co-Founder of GreenWave
Date & Time: 2 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Regenerative Ocean Farming: The Least Deadliest Catch

Presenter(s): Bren Smith, Regenerative Ocean Farmer and Co-Executive Director and Co-Founder of GreenWaveWhen: Tuesday, March 2, 12-1pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box. This webinar will have closed captioning.Slides and Recording: A PDF of the slides and recording will likely be available after the webinar. Questions? Contact Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: GreenWave's polyculture farming system grows a mix of seaweeds and shellfish that require zero inputs (no freshwater, fertilizer, land, or feed) - making it the most sustainable form of food production on the planet - while sequestering carbon and rebuilding reef ecosystems. Since these farms sit vertically below the surface,they produce high yields with a small footprint. With a low barrier to entry,anyone with 20 acres, a boat, and $20-50K can start their own farm.GreenWave's regenerative ocean farming model is deployed for both reforestation, to restore ocean ecosystems and capture blue carbon, and commercial farming, to grow seaweed and shellfish used for food, fertilizer, animal feed, plastic alternatives, and more. GreenWave is a nonprofit that trains and supports regenerative ocean farmers in the era of climate change. They work with coastal communities throughout North America to create a blue green economy - built and led by regenerative ocean farmers - that ensures we all make a living on a living planet.

Bio(s): Bren Smith, GreenWave Co-Executive Director and owner of Thimble Island Ocean Farm, pioneered the development of regenerative ocean farming. A lifelong commercial fisherman, he was named one of Rolling Stone magazine's "25 People Shaping the Future" and featured in TIME magazine's Best Inventions of 2017. Bren is the winner of the Buckminster Fuller Prize and has been profiled by 60 Minutes, CNN, The New Yorker, Wall Street Journal, National Geographic and elsewhere. He is an Ashoka, Castanea, and Echoing Green Climate Fellow and James Beard Award-winning author of Eat Like a Fish: My Adventures Farming the Ocean to Fight Climate Change.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
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3 March 2021

Title: NOAA Research to Operation Transition Plans - A fireside chat
Presenter(s): Gary Matlock, Lonnie Gonsalves, Hendrik Tolman, Jay Peterson, Fiona Horsfall
Date & Time: 3 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Transition Plans - A fireside chat

Presenter(s): Panelists will include Gary Matlock, Lonnie Gonsalves, Hendrik Tolman, Jay Peterson, Fiona Horsfall, and others.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Seminar Contact(s): Laura Newcomb (laura.newcomb@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: Transition plans are a critical step in NOAA's ability to transition research into operations, application, commercialization, and other uses. That said, there are recognized challenges in the transition process and in developing transition plans. This seminar, designed as an informal fireside chat, is designed to enable participants to come away with a broader understanding of a transition plan as a living document that serves as a continual two way conversation between the researcher and adopter and better understand how transition plans can serve as tools, rather than hurdles in the process. During this panel discussion, the NOAA Line Office Transition Managers will engage in a discussion geared towards demystifying the process around transition plans and will take questions from the audience.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Thiamine deficiency in fishes; A complex story with a long history
Presenter(s): Dale Honeyfield, USGS
Date & Time: 3 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: Thiamine deficiency; A complex story with a long history

Presenter(s): Dr. Dale Honeyfield, USGS (retired)

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division; coordinator: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: Thiamine deficient Chinook salmon have been identified in California waters. Potentially a serious impediment for maintaining salmon populations. Thiamine is an essential dietary nutrient required by all living organisms, including salmon and higher order species. Thiamine deficiency conceivably could lead to population extinction in a worst-case scenario. Thiamine deficiency is not a new problem but in recent times has emerged in wildlife and fisheries managed species and the seriousness of this nutrient deficiency is under appreciated. In Chinese medical documents written around 2700 BC, beriberi (human thiamine deficiency)was described but it was not till 1897-1901 that beriberi was linked to vitaminB1 (thiamine) deficiency. In the late 1960's newly hatched salmonid fry were observed dying from unknown causes in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Similarly, in1974 salmon fry were dying in the Baltic Sea tributaries and the unknown cause was labeled M74. Eventually these cases were linked to thiamine deficiency. In1995 a successful thiamine treatment was published that would prevent fry mortality in salmonid species. The presentation will chronicle the discoveries and progress made in understanding the consequences of salmonid thiamine deficiency since 1995. Although the presentation will focus on thiamine deficiency in top predator fish species, the problem is a much larger natural resource management issue. By focusing on fish thiamine deficiency, the talk will provide a rationale for the need to investigate the enigmatic larger ecosystem issues that exist. Thiamine treatment, while critical in the interim, is only a temporary solution until the underlying ecosystem problems are identified and addressed.

Bio(s): Dale has a BS in chemistry from Eastern New Mexico University and a MS and PhD innutrition from Washington State University. After a postdoc with USFWS/University Idaho, he worked for the next 20+ years with USGS in Wellsboro, PA. He is presently retired and living south of Albuquerque on small farm and continuing to play in the world of thiamine deficiency. To date he has authored/co-authored 66 peer reviewed papers and co-edited one book related to thiamine deficiency. In his long career, he also worked as nutritionist for livestock feed manufacture and a nutritional consultant for an aquaculture feed company.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: The Biden-Harris Transition and the Year of the NOAA Workforce
Presenter(s): Benjamin Friedman, Deputy Under Secretary for Operations, performing the duties of Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator
Date & Time: 3 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Biden-Harris Transition and the Year of the NOAA Workforce
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series. These webinars are open to anyone, in or outside of NOAA.

Presenter(s): Benjamin Friedman, NOAA's Deputy Under Secretary for Operations, performing the duties of Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator

Sponsor(s): NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series and the NOAA Research Council. The NELS Series was created to provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council. For questions about the seminars.

Points of Contact: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov, or Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov

To access the video and PDF of the presentation after the seminar, visit:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries and look under tab for Past Presentations.

Abstract: Ben Friedman is NOAA's Deputy Under Secretary for Operations. He is currently performing the duties of Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator until a new NOAA Administrator is confirmed. Ben will provide an update on the Biden-Harris Transition and how NOAA is working to support the new Administration priorities including climate, diversity and inclusion, and scientific integrity. He will also discuss the Year of the NOAA Workforce, what it means and why it matters.

Bio(s): Benjamin Friedman is NOAA's Deputy Under Secretary for Operations, performing the duties of Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator. He serves as the agency's chief operating officer and is responsible for the day-to-day management of NOAA's national and international operations for oceanic and atmospheric services, research and coastal and marine stewardship. Ben previously served as NOAA's Deputy General Counsel and as Chief of the Office of General Counsel's Enforcement Section. He brings more than 14 years of federal management and leadership experience to his current role.Ben also served as Assistant General Counsel for the Department of Commerce, where he oversaw employment, labor, litigation, and oversight matters for the Department and its bureaus. Prior to joining the Department of Commerce, Ben spent 16years as a federal prosecutor with the Department of Justice, including four years in the Organized Crime and Racketeering Section and 12 years at the US Attorney's Office for the District of Columbia. While with the US Attorney's Office, Ben was responsible for managing two different trial sections and served as a Special Assistant to the US Attorney. Before joining the Justice Department, he was a clerk to Judge Pierce Lively on the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals. Ben is a 1989 graduate of Vanderbilt University with a BS in Molecular Biology and a 1993 graduate of Emory University Law School and the Emory School of Theology, where he earned a masters in Theological Studies. He is a native of Nashville, Tennessee, but has called the District of Columbia home for the last 24 years. See https://www.noaa.gov/our-people/leadership/benjamin-friedman.

Accessibility:
This webinar will have closed captioning.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information at https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php
Title: Data and Tools for Climate and Flood Impacts and Adaptation Planning
Presenter(s): Kytt MacManus, Columbia University; Dr. Philip Orton, Stevens Institute of Technology and CCRUN;
Eric Sanderson, Wildlife Conservation Society
Date & Time: 3 March 2021
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Title:
Data and Tools for Climate and Flood Impacts and Adaptation PlanningSeries

Title: Green Infrastructure, Climate, and Cities Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Kytt MacManus, Columbia University;
Dr. Philip Orton, Stevens Institute of Technology and CCRUN;
Eric Sanderson, Wildlife Conservation Society

Sponsor(s):
Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar Contact(s):
Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov) or Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu)

Remote Access:
This webinar is over.

Accessibility:
Contact Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu)

Abstract:

This seminar will introduce 3 map based decision support tools for future adaptation planning:

Sea level rise and flood mappers typically show static GIS-based bathtub extrapolations of how floods or daily high tides would rise and spread further out into floodplains. Dynamic model-based flood mappers have a greater capacity for merging flood water sources, simulating the changes in flooding including possible interactions between sea level rise, tides, storm surge and river flows. The Hudson River Flood Impact Decision Support System is an interactive map application that allows users to evaluate the scale of potential flooding for tidally-affected shorelines of the Hudson River Valley and Westchester County under a variety of sea level rise and storm scenarios. HRFIDSS was created by CIESIN and Stevens Institute of Technology with funding provided by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The project web page with additional background information can be found here.

Sea level rise and flood mappers also rarely demonstrate how flood adaptation can reduce the flood areas and depths. We will also describe the general concept of flood adaptation mappers, show an example of such a mapper, and outline possibilities for potential future development. AdaptMap is another dynamic model-based flood mapping webtool, and demonstrates the effects of nature-based features on flood hazard zones for the highly populated areas surrounding Jamaica Bay, New York City. The project web page with additional background information can be found here.

Visionmaker is a tool designed to encourage community participation in adaptation planning in New York City. Users from landscape architects to schoolchildren, can define their own area of interest, query the pre-Contact and contemporary ecosystems, and then make their own vision of the future by changing ecosystems, lifestyles, and climate scenarios.


Bio(s):

Kytt MacManus is Senior Systems Analyst at Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), The Earth Institute, Columbia UniversityPhil Orton, Ph.D., is Research Associate Professor of Ocean Engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology and a Principal Investigator of the Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA RISA Team.Eric Sanderson, Ph.D. is a Senior Conservation Scientist for the WCS Global Conservation Program. Sanderson received his Ph.D. in ecology (emphasis in ecosystem and landscape ecology) from the University of California, Davis, in 1998.

Recordings:
All sessions are recorded and posted at http://www.ccrun.org/resources/seminars/Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: Ecological Drought: Drought, Wildfire, and Recovery
Presenter(s): Jeremy Littell, Research Ecologist, Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center, USGS
Bill Tripp, Director of Natural Resources and Environmental Policy for the Karuk Tribe Department of Natural Resources
Date & Time: 3 March 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jeremy Littell, Research Ecologist, Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center, USGS
Bill Tripp, Director of Natural Resources and Environmental Policy for the Karuk Tribe Department of Natural Resources

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USGS

Seminar Contacts: Elizabeth Weight (elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
Drought can exacerbate wildfire frequency, intensity, and severity. This webinar will explore wildfire management approaches based on ecological principles, including those that embed traditional ecological knowledge.

This webinar is the third in a four-part series that seeks to raise awareness of ecological drought, share actions that strengthen ecosystem resilience and mitigate the impacts of droughts, and discuss research and management needs for future drought planning and preparedness. The series is co-hosted by NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System and the USGS National Climate Adaptation Science Center, with expert speakers from the research community, tribal nations, and government agencies.

Information on the additional sessions is listed below:
Ecological Drought: An Introduction, February 3, 2021, 11:30 am " 12:30 pm ET
Ecological Drought: Planning for Resilience, February 17, 2021, 1" 2 pm ET
Ecological Drought: Impacts on Coastal Ecosystems, March 17, 2021, 3 " 4 pm ET

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

4 March 2021

Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Hernan Garcia, NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI; Lori K. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS
Date & Time: 4 March 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series, for NOAA Seminar Coordinators
We will be offering this webinar later this year and a recording will be available.

Presenter(s):
NOAA Science Seminar team: Lori Brown, NESDIS, Hernan Garcia, NESDIS and Tracy Gill, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Science Seminar Team, NESDIS and NOSSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Lori.Brown@noaa.gov, & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here:
You must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT Admin folks may need to do it, so please do it well ahead of time. To download and test your ability to use Adobe Connect, go to:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, please register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandbolts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar;
this link works only if you have downloaded the adobe connect software.
Attendees are muted and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google (Chrome), IE or Edge in Windows or Safari or Chrome if using a Mac.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have live captioning.

Abstract:
We will be presenting an overview of the NOAA Science Seminar Series, along with how-tos for submitting events to the seminar calendar, best practices, accessibility, and a general opportunity for contributors to ask questions and discuss how we manage and promote the Science Seminar Series. We are interested in learning suggestions and tips from you! We will be running this meeting at least one more time this year to give all contributors who can't make the first meeting an opportunity to attend, and, the session will be recorded.

Slides:
PDF of slides will be available from contacts.

Recordings:
An mp4 recording will be available from contacts.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas
Title: Four Steps for the Earth: mainstreaming the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework
Presenter(s): Professor E.J. Milner-Gulland, University of Oxford
Date & Time: 4 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the webinar recording in Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pvrb9jsiq5iq/

Title: Four Steps for the Earth: mainstreaming the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework

Presenter(s): Professor E.J. Milner-Gulland, University of OxfordWhen: Thursday, March 4, 2021, 12-1pm EST

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect before the webinar at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Accessibility: This webinar will have closed captioning.

Abstract: The upcoming meeting of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity, and future adoption of the new Global Biodiversity Framework, represent an opportunity to transform humanity's relationship with nature. Restoring nature while meeting human needs requires a bold vision, but this will only succeed if biodiversity conservation can be mainstreamed in society. E.J. will present an overarching framework that could support this mainstreaming: the Mitigation and Conservation Hierarchy. This novel framework places the well-established four-step Mitigation Hierarchy for mitigating and compensating the impacts of developments on biodiversity (1: Avoid, 2: Minimise, 3: Restore, 4: Offset, towards a target such as No Net Loss of biodiversity) within a broader framing that encompasses all conservation actions. E.J. will illustrate the potential application of the framework in four cases; national governments, sub-national levels (specifically the City of London, a fishery, and indigenous groups), companies, and the general public. The Mitigation and Conservation Hierarchy supports decisions about both the choice of actions to conserve and restore nature, and evaluation of the effectiveness of those actions, across sectors and scales. As such it can guide actions towards a sustainable future for people and nature in support of the CBD's vision. You can read more about this approach at the website www.conservationhierarchy.org.

Bio(s): E.J. Milner-Gulland is the Tasso Leventis Professor of Biodiversity at the University of Oxford. Her PhD was on the wildlife trade, with a focus on ivory, rhino horn and saiga antelopes. Her research group (the Interdisciplinary Centre for Conservation Science) works on a wide range of projects understanding, predicting and influencing human behaviour, and designing, monitoring and evaluating conservation interventions in order to improve their effectiveness. She also runs a large programme tackling the illegal trade in wildlife. She aims to ensure that all the research in her group is addressing issues identified by practitioners, is carried out collaboratively with end-users, and builds the capacity of young conservationists, particularly in developing countries. She is the founder and chair of the Saiga Conservation Alliance and has launched a number of initiatives which aim to change the real-world conversation around conservation, including the Mitigation and Conservation Hierarchy approach to meeting a global vision of restoring nature and the Conservation Optimism movement. She is the Chair of the UK Government's Darwin Expert Committee and a Trustee of WWF-UK.email.Slides and Recording: The slides may be available after the webinar and the recording most likely will. Questions? Contact Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: How to Effectively Compete for the FIS/ET/CSP FY 2022 Request for Proposals
Presenter(s): Lisa Peterson, Contractor with ECS in support of NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology, FIS Coordinator
Date & Time: 4 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: How to Effectively Compete for the FIS/ET/CSP FY 2022 Request for Proposals

Presenter(s): Lisa Peterson, Contractor with ECS in support of NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology, FIS Coordinator

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Register: This webinar is over.

Abstract: The Fisheries Information System program, Electronic Technologies program, and Catch Share Program are collectively making available (subject to appropriations) up to $5.5 million of FY2022 funding to support fishery-dependent data projects in Regional Offices, Science Centers, Headquarters Offices, FIN programs, and State partners through the Interstate Commissions. Join FIS Program Coordinator Lisa Peterson to learn about what makes a high quality proposal and better understand the RFP focus areas.

Bio(s): Lisa Peterson has been working as a contractor with NMFS Fisheries Information System program since completing her Knauss Fellowship in 2018. Every year she helps to coordinate the FIS/ET/CSP RFP that funds projects that improve fisheries data collection and management. She hails from Michigan, but never says Hail to the Victors, only Go Green!

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: Characterizing small-scale marine fisheries in the United States
Presenter(s): Joshua Stoll, PhD, School of Marine Sciences, University of Maine
Date & Time: 4 March 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Joshua Stoll, PhD, School of Marine Sciences, University of Maine

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website
POC: Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

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1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free, Access code: 905 389 231
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ABSTRACTSmall-scale fisheries represent an important segment of the seafood economy, making valuable contributions to health and nutrition, employment, and community well-being. However, small-scale fisheries are not well characterized in the United States or around the world thereby making them difficult to integrate into decision-making processes. To make this sector more "visible" we assemble data on small-scale fisheries in the United States, provide estimates of their socioeconomic contributions, and identify key drivers of change. This presentation will highlight these findings and describe an initiative to strengthen the network of small-scale fisheries in the United States and elevate their role in local and regional food systems.

BIOGRAPHY
Joshua is an Assistant Professor of Marine Policy in the School of Marine Sciences at the University of Maine. His research focuses on questions about coastal community resilience, ocean governance, and fisheries policy and seeks to contribute to the sustainability of our oceans and the communities that depend upon them. He holds a B.A. in Environmental Studies from Bates College, a Masters in Coastal Environmental Management from Duke University, and a PhD in Ecology and Environmental Sciences from the University of Maine. Prior to returning to Maine to join the faculty, he was an early career research fellow in the Global Economic Dynamics and the Biosphere Program at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Sweden.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
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Title: JABBA: An Alternative to Data-Moderate Stock Assessments
Presenter(s): Dr. Felipe Carvalho, Stock Assessment Program Leader, NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center; Dr. Henning Winker, Stock Assessment Scientist, Joint Research Centre
Date & Time: 4 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: JABBA: An Alternative to Data-Moderate Stock Assessments/National Stock Assessment Workshop Seminar

Presenter(s): Dr. Felipe Carvalho, Stock Assessment Program Leader, NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center; Dr. Henning Winker, Stock Assessment Scientist, Joint Research Centre

Sponsor(s): Kristan Blackhart, kristan.blackhart@noaa.gov

Seminar Contact(s): NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.


Abstract: JABBA (Just Another Bayesian Biomass Assessment) is a stock assessment tool that is transparent, reproducible, and customizable for use by anyone in the world. It is an exciting example of international scientific collaboration. Since its publication in 2018, over two dozens stock assessments have used JABBA. Recently, the original model was extended to overcome many limitations common to conventional biomass dynamic models, and from this effort JABBA-SELECT was developed. In this seminar, we describe the JABBA framework, provide examples of stock assessments, and why it can be considered an alternative to data-moderate assessments.

Keywords: State-space framework, Biomass dynamic models, Selectivity

Bio(s): Dr. Felipe Carvalho completed his Ph.D. in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences at the University of Florida in 2014. Immediately after, he joined the stock assessment team at PIFSC in Honolulu. In 2015, Felipe was a visiting scientist at the Center for the Advancement of Population Assessment Methodology (CAPAM) working on model diagnostics for integrated stock assessments. He is passionate about working in the western Pacific region, and currently leads the stock assessment program at PIFSC.

Dr. Henning Winker is the lead developer of the JABBA stock assessment framework (github.com/JABBAmodel). He recently joined the fisheries modelling unit as a stock assessment expert at the Joint-Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission in Italy. Originally from Germany, he lived for more than 12 years in South Africa. Henning completed his Ph.D. at Rhodes University and later worked as a stock assessment scientist on various tuna, billfishes, and shark assessments in the Atlantic & the Indian Ocean.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: USS Monitor – America’s Most Historic Ironclad
Presenter(s): Shannon Ricles, Education and Outreach Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 4 March 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Shannon Ricles, Education and Outreach Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4193556452800082444

Abstract:
Step back to 1862 to learn how the USS Monitor was key in saving the Union. Learn about the ship's inventor and its construction in just 98 days! Explore the role the ship played during and after the Battle of Hampton Roads, and discover how it sank. Relive its discovery and how it became our nation's first national marine sanctuary, while diving into the recovery and conservation of iconic Monitor artifacts. Look at the recreated faces of two Monitor sailors, whose remains were discovered inside the turret, and learn the science behind their recreation. Find out about free USS Monitor and NOAA resources and programs. This webinar is presented by NOAA's Monitor National Marine Sanctuary and the North Carolina Office of State Archaeology in a series titled Submerged NC.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded?
Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/OneNOAASeminars.php

5 March 2021

Title: Climate Change and Alaska Marine Ecosystems: Integrated ecosystem research is a powerful tool for understanding the effect of climate change
Presenter(s): Michael Sigler, PhD, NOAA Retired Fisheries Scientist at Alaska Fisheries Science & Shoals Marine Lab, Bend, OR
Date & Time: 5 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Climate Change and Alaska Marine Ecosystems: Integrated ecosystem research is a powerful tool for understanding the effect of climate change / EcoFOCI Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Michael Sigler, PhD, NOAA Retired Fisheries Scientist at Alaska Fisheries Science & Shoals Marine Lab | Bend, OR

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Abstract: Lessons for conducting integrated ecosystem research and understanding climate change effects. Understanding climate effects is based on a 3-legged stool: 1) monitoring, 2) understanding the ecosystem response through fieldwork, lab experiments and modelling, and 3) forecasting climate change effects based on this understanding. A story of Alaska marine ecosystems is a story of ice haves and have nots, which divide the Arctic from the subarctic and determine ecosystem structure and processes. Climate change affects Alaska marine ecosystems through loss of sea ice, marine heat waves and ocean acidification. Broad ecosystem effects have occurred and based on our understanding, predictions and some forecast mistakes have been made. Learning occurs through integrated ecosystem research that rests on directed research and testing predictions.

Bio(s): Dr. Mike Sigler led the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Habitat and Ecological Process Research (HEPR) Program, which included integrated ecosystem research programs in the Bering and Chukchi seas and ocean acidification research. Since retiring in August 2017, he remains an Affiliate Professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, where he has taught fisheries population dynamics. Mike also has led Steller sea lion prey and predation studies, the Alaska sablefish stock assessment, and the Alaska sablefish longline survey. He has over 30 years of research experience in Alaska in the areas of marine ecology and fisheries stock assessment. Dr. Mike Sigler co-teaches the class Integrated Ecosystem Research and Management at Shoals Marine Laboratory and was a Shoals Undergraduate Research Group (SURG) mentor in 2020.

Accessibility:

Slides: Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker.

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

9 March 2021

Title: Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Spring Flood Outlook
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center;Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia
Date & Time: 9 March 2021
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Climate Overview
Sandra Rayne | Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview
Jeff Dobur/Todd Hamill | NWS Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update
Pam Knox | University of Georgia

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NIDIS, (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/6735992372888130064

Abstract:
Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems. The March 9 webinar will also feature the spring flood outlook.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Targeted High Resolution Water Clarity Mapping for Hydrographic Survey Planning In Alaska
Presenter(s): David Flanagan, TCarta, Marine Remote Sensing Program Coordinator; Ben Page, TCarta, Remote Sensing Analyst & PI
Date & Time: 9 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Targeted High Resolution Water Clarity Mapping for Hydrographic Survey Planning In Alaska

Presenter(s): David Flanagan, TCarta, Marine Remote Sensing Program Coordinator; Ben Page, TCarta, Remote Sensing Analyst

POC: Tiffany House tiffany.house@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8300898687165463821

Join us for our next NOAA Innovators Seminar on March 9th at 12PM ET!

Keywords: Water Quality, Remote Sensing, and Alaska

Abstract: TCarta has developed a hydrospatial analysis tool to map water clarity using harmonized surface reflectances from Sentinel-2 and high-resolution PlanetScope imagery to aid in hydrographic survey planning. Monitoring surface water quality phenology will help forecast clear water conditions for airborne and marine-based hydrographic surveys and support optimal satellite imagery collection.

Bio(s): David Flanagan leads the marine remote sensing program at TCarta in research and development and commercial production efforts. He joined TCarta 2 years ago after completing his MS in Environmental Studies at the College of Charleston.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Ten Ocean Prophecies
Presenter(s): Jason Link, PhD, Senior Scientist for Ecosystems, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service
Date & Time: 9 March 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Ten Ocean Prophecies
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series. These webinars are open to anyone, in or outside of NOAA.

Presenter(s): Jason Link, PhD, Senior Scientist for Ecosystems, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service

To access the video and PDF of the presentation after the seminar, visit:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries and look under tab for Past Presentations.

Remote Access:
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Environmental Leadership seminar series. The NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series was created to provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council. For questions about the seminars, contact:
Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov, or
Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov

Abstract: Society has always needed, reluctantly tolerated, and ultimately had a place for those who remind them of inconvenient facts, point out that the status quo isn't quite working or will soon stop working, challenge the inertia that is resistant to obviously needed change, and predict likely future conditions to drive home the prior three considerations. Today we mostly call those individuals scientists and they are still very much needed. Yet the perils multiply when scientists themselves become so entrenched within their various systems, bureaucracies and operations that they too become resistant to such prophetic nudges. By gently highlighting some predictions extended to their probable impacts, as well as how we can mitigate them, I seek to combat this danger to us as a scientific community.

In case you may have missed it, an observation very relevant to NOAA is that the world's oceans are experiencing unprecedented pressures and challenges, from climate change to excessive resource use to fundamental shifts in major marine ecosystem processes to a host of other perturbations, often beyond anything we have ever observed before. The implications of these impacts for ocean-dependent economies, human well-being, the ocean ecosystem itself, and frankly the entire planet, are not trivial. Here I want to call attention to some of these issues with example forecasts of major marine ecosystem changes, that if left unaddressed will become problematic at ever-increasing scales.

Coupling those two observations - i.e., the need for a prophetic message and the challenges facing marine ecosystems - here I issue a challenge to us as a marine science organization, a call to action of sorts. I present this call to action by briefly noting 10 ocean prophecies. You'll have to listen in to hear what those prophecies or predictions entail. But to tease how might they inform us and how we might address the issues they raise, some common threads among these prophecies include the need to: better communicate maintainable urgency; stop arguing amongst ourselves over trivial, 4th significant-digits decimal point false precision minutia; be even more organizationally flexible, less siloed, less program-oriented, and more outcome focused; incorporate the science of decision-making under uncertainty in all our decision-making protocols; recognize and leverage the value of tradeoffs; and focus on assertively presenting actionable solutions. Though there is always a warning in a prophetic message, there is also always hope; it is the latter upon which I will accentuate.

Bio(s): Jason Link is Senior Scientist for Ecosystem-based Management for the National Marine Fisheries Service, at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole. Dr. Link earned his B.S. in Biology with a minor in Chemistry from Central Michigan University. He then received his Ph.D. from Michigan Technological University. He began his career with NOAA NMFS at the Pascagoula Lab before moving to the Woods Hole Lab.

Accessibility:
This webinar will have closed captioning.To access the video and PDF of the presentation after the seminar, visit:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries and look under tab for Past Presentations.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: What does drought look like in the Aleutian islands & Southwest Alaska
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 9 March 2021
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): Alaska Drought Webinar Series (https://uaf-accap.org/research-activities/alaska-drought-webinar-series/)

Register: https://alaska.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZEucuquqzsrHtxE0cMaT0qPf4OC3ZSqlbzK

Presenter(s): TBD

Abstract: Join a listening session to share your story, experiences or data and hear from others in the region. These two-hour listening sessions will start with four, short presentations from people who live and work in the region with time for questions. Then small group discussions to hear from participants on what they have or are experiencing in terms of unusual dryness in the region and how they have prepared for future drought.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

10 March 2021

Title: Saildrone - Ocean Mapping and Exploration at Scale
Presenter(s): Captain Brian Connon, US Navy, Retired, Vice President, Ocean Mapping at Saildrone, Inc.
Date & Time: 10 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Saildrone - Ocean Mapping and Exploration at Scale

Presenter(s): Captain Brian Connon, US Navy (Retired), Vice President, Ocean Mapping at Saildrone, Inc.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Webinar Series and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Seminar coordinators are Amber.Butler@noaa.gov, Executive Secretariat for the Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping team in the National Ocean Service, and the Executive Secretariat for the Interagency Working Group on Ocean and Coastal Mapping which consists of 13 federal agencies." and Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov, NOS science seminar coordinator.

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/saildrone/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have closed captioning.

Abstract: Saildrone, Inc. has launched a 72 foot (22 m) version of its uncrewed surface vehicles, known as saildrones. Powered by wind and solar energy, saildrones are capable of extreme-duration missions of up to 12 months in the open ocean. This latest and largest version, the first in the Surveyor class of USVs, is called the Saildrone Surveyor, and carries sonar equipment capable of seafloor mapping down to 7,000 m. This seminar will give a brief overview of Saildrone and then focus on how Surveyor can offer a cost-effective, modern solution for national and international ocean mapping and exploration requirements.

Bio(s): Captain Brian Connon, US Navy (Ret) became Vice President, Ocean Mapping at Saildrone, Inc. in December 2020 after serving as Director of the University of Southern Mississippi's Hydrographic Science Research Center. A 28-year veteran of the US Navy, he directed the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency's Maritime Safety Office, served as Superintendent of the US Naval Observatory, Deputy Oceanographer/Navigator of the Navy, Deputy Hydrographer of the Navy, and Commanding Officer of the Navy's Fleet Survey Team. A certified hydrographer, he holds a BS in Geography from the University of South Carolina, an MS in Oceanography and Meteorology from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA, and an MS in Hydrography from the University of Southern Mississippi. He is a Chartered Marine Scientist (Hydrography) and Fellow of the Institute for Marine Engineering, Science and Technology. He also serves as Editor for the International Hydrographic Review and is a Trustee of The Hydrographic Society of America.Slides and Recording: The recording (and possibly a PDF of the slides) will be available after the webinar. Questions? Contact Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: NOAA Science Report Seminar: Sustainable Use and Stewardship of Ocean and Coastal Resources
Presenter(s): Multiple presenters
Date & Time: 10 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

NOAA Science Report Seminar: Four projects presented about sustainable use and stewardship of ocean and coastal resources.

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3687206059398171659 (when you register for one webinar, you are signing up for the entire NOAA Science Report Seminar series)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Research and Development Enterprise Committee. Points of contact: Isha Renta (isha.renta@noaa.gov) & NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Forecasting hazardous algal blooms, estimating bluefin tuna from genetic techniques, supporting Alaska coastal resource management, and testing oyster restoration strategies - these are just a few of NOAA's scientific accomplishments that are highlighted in the 2020 NOAA Science Report. The NOAA Science Report celebrates NOAA's R&D by showcasing science highlights, bibliometrics, NOAA's scientific workforce, and more. This seminar features four projects from the 2020 NOAA Science Report (to be released soon) related to sustainable use and the stewardship of our oceans and coastal resources.

Keywords: NOAA Science Report, Ocean, Coastal, Marine

Forecasting Hazardous Algal Blooms: Modeling and Molecular Tools

Presenter(s):
Mark Rowe, Research Physical Scientist, NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI; Steve Kibler, Oceanographer, NOAA's Beaufort LaboratoryBeaufort, NC

Bio(s)
Mark Rowe works on developing models to understand and predict changes in the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the Great Lakes. His recent work has focused on development of linked hydrodynamic and biological models to simulate harmful algal blooms and hypoxia in Lake Erie, and impacts of invasive quagga mussels on primary production, nutrient cycles, and the lower food web of Lake Michigan. He has contributed to forecast models that provide timely and actionable information to public water systems, anglers, recreational users of Lake Erie. Dr. Rowe received MS and PhD degrees from Michigan Technological University where he conducted research on measurement and modeling of atmospheric deposition of persistent organic pollutants to Lake Superior.

Steve Kibler has a B.S. in marine biology from Long Island University and an M.S. in biological oceanography from Old Dominion University. He has been working on harmful algal bloom-related projects at NOAA's Beaufort Laboratory since 2000. His current work is focused on trophic transfer of toxins during Alexandrium blooms in Alaska.

Genomic Abundance Estimation for Western Atlantic Bluefin Tuna Using Close-Kin Mark Recapture



Presenter(s):
Matthew Lauretta, Research Fishery Biologist, National Marine Fisheries Service, Miami, FL

Bio(s):
Matthew Lauretta is a Research Fishery Biologist at the NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center. He received his Bachelor's degree in Environmental Chemistry at Northern Arizona University, and his Doctorate in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences at the University of Florida. His current research focuses on population assessment and stock forecasting of Atlantic tunas and billfish. Aside from fish, his hobbies include board games, biking, hiking, disc-golf, and native plant gardening.

Kachemak Bay Ecological Assessment: Supporting Alaska Coastal Resource Management

Presenter(s):
Kris Holderied, Director, NOAA Kasitsna Bay Laboratory, Seldovia, AK

Bio(s):
Director of the NOAA Kasitsna Bay Laboratory since 2005, Kris Holderied oversees research and facility operations at the lab, conducts research on coastal ecosystem change and supports marine science education activities. Her research interests in oceanography, estuaries and nearshore habitats are focused on better understanding how changing ocean conditions affect Alaska coastal resources and communities, especially those associated with climate change, harmful algal blooms and ocean acidification. Holderied previously worked as a physical oceanographer with NOAA/NOS/NCCOS in Silver Spring, Md., developing satellite-based products for benthic habitat mapping, harmful algal bloom detection and coastal climate change impacts. Before that, she worked on environmental compliance projects for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Norfolk, VA and served as an active duty oceanography officer in the U.S. Navy. She has a BS degree in oceanography from the U.S. Naval Academy and a MS degree in physical oceanography from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program.

Testing Alternative Oyster Restoration Strategies

Presenter(s):
Jason Spires, Research Ecologist, NOAA Cooperative Oxford Laboratory, Marine Spatial Ecology DivisionNational Centers for Coastal Ocean Science NOAA National Ocean Service Oxford, MD

Bio(s): Jason Spires is a Research Ecologist with NOAA's Cooperative Oxford Laboratory on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. He received his B.S. from the University of Maryland in Geography and GIS in 2005, M.S. in Fisheries Science from the University of Maryland in 2015, and currently is a part-time Ph.D. student at the University of Maryland-Horn Point Laboratory. Jason's work focuses on developing tools and techniques for marking and recapturing calcium carbonate based organisms, primarily oysters. Currently, Jason is collaborating with the NOAA Restoration Center and other federal and state agencies to investigate lower cost, oyster restoration methods. In addition, Jason is also a NOAA scientific diver and actively serves as a graduate student mentor in the NOAA Educational Partnership Program.



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Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php


Title: Managing Harmful Algal Blooms in Tribal Waters, a Three-part Series
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 10 March 2021
1:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Managing Harmful Algal Blooms in Tribal Waters - a Three-part Seminar Series on the impacts of marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their toxins.
These three free seminars are on March 10, 16, & 18, 2021 at 1:00-3:30 pm ET or
10:00 am -12:30 pm PT.

Presenter(s): TBD

Sponsor(s): US EPA, in collaboration with the NOAA and the Sitka Tribe of Alaska, is hosting this three-part webinar series.

Seminar Contact(s): EPACyanoHABs@epa.gov; NOAA contact is Steve.Morton@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register here (free).

Abstract: In this this three-part webinar series on the impacts of marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their toxins, attendees will have the opportunity to:
  • Listen to and talk with Tribes from across the country about their experiences addressing the impacts of HABs and their toxins in fresh and marine waters.

  • Learn about strategies to build tribal capacity for effectively collecting baseline data on HABs.

  • Ask national experts about data collection, funding, outreach, and other HABs management needs.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. For more, visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website.
Title: Snow Crab in a Rapidly Changing Ocean: historical context, recent insights and future perspectives
Presenter(s): Erin Fedewa, erin.fedewa@noaa.gov, Fisheries Biologist at the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center | Kodiak, AK
Date & Time: 10 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - PMEL - EcoFOCI Virtual Seminar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Snow Crab in a Rapidly Changing Ocean: historical context, recent insights and future perspectives / EcoFOCI Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Erin Fedewa, Fisheries Biologist at the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center | Kodiak, AK

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Abstract: Record high Bering Sea water temperatures in 2018 and 2019 were accompanied by dramatic shifts in snow crab population structure, highlighting the importance of ongoing and future research efforts to better understand snow crab responses to continued warming.

Bio(s):

Accessibility:

Slides: Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker.

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: NOAA’s Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program: 10 Years and Counting
Presenter(s): Dr. Stephanie Oakes, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 10 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Stephanie Oakes , NOAA Fisheries, Integrated Ecosystem Assessment program manager

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4462794963967362828 Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) approach engages scientists, stakeholders, and managers to consider all ecosystem components, including humans, in the decision-making process. This helps managers balance trade-offs and contemplate ways to achieve their goals. 2020 marked the 10-year anniversary of NOAA's adoption of the IEA framework. We will discuss the origins of the IEAs approach, and how the approach builds relationships between people and provides the ecosystem science necessary to balance the needs of nature and society.

Keywords: integrated, ecosystems, assessments

Bio(s): Dr. Oakes is a Fishery Biologist with the Marine Ecosystems Division at the NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology in Silver Spring MD (USA). Her research background focused on the study of Antarctic marine ecosystems and food webs. She is now the program manager for the NOAA IEA program, supports initiatives related to ecosystem based management and ecosystem based fisheries management, and implements NOAA and NOAA Fisheries policies related to scientific integrity.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NOAA’s Virtual Open House - From Eyes in the Sky to Action on the Ground at NOAA’s Satellite Operations Facility in Suitland, MD (Geared toward Grades 2-8)
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 10 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA's Virtual Open House - From Eyes in the Sky to Action on the Ground at NOAA's Satellite Operations Facility in Suitland, MD (Geared toward Grades 2-8)

Presenter(s): TBD

Sponsor(s): Grab your VIP' pass to go backstage at NOAA's Virtual Open House https://www.noaa.gov/heritage/stories/grab-your-vip-pass-to-go-backstage-at-noaa-s-virtual-open-house

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4183549797433811216

Abstract: Get a rare chance to come inside mission control at NOAA's state-of-the-art Satellite Operations Facility in Suitland, Maryland, where we command NOAA's satellites and collect the bulk of the data from earth and space observations. Learn what it takes to receive massive amounts of information in this round-the-clock operation and how it helps save lives - from weather forecasting to search and rescue! This NOAA Live! Webinar is part of our NOAA Open House Series during which we will "travel" (virtually) across the country to showcase some of the amazing places our NOAA scientists, engineers, educators, technicians, and interns work. (Live ASL interpretation)
Resources to access at home: 1 minute NOAA satellites video: This is a great video that explains the difference between polar orbiting satellites, geostationary satellites, and deep space satellite.
Making a Weather Forecast with GOES-R: This animated, kids video is about 3 1/2 minutes long.
GOES-R Gets Launched!: This animated, kids video is ~2 minutes long.
Introduction to Copas-Sarsat: This 1-minute video is about a satellite-based search and rescue distress alert detection system.
NASA Launches NOAA Weather Satellite to Improve Forecasts (JPSS-1 Launch) (Credit: NASA): 5-minute video of the launch
NOAA Ocean Today: This 3-minute video is about NOAA's environmental satellites that provide data from space.
See actual live data from NOAA satellites:https://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/goes/

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information

11 March 2021

Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Hernan Garcia, NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI; Lori K. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS
Date & Time: 11 March 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series, for NOAA Seminar Coordinators
We will be offering this webinar later this year and a recording will be available.

Presenter(s):
NOAA Science Seminar team: Lori Brown, NESDIS, Hernan Garcia, NESDIS and Tracy Gill, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Science Seminar Team, NESDIS and NOSSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Lori.Brown@noaa.gov, & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here:
You must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT Admin folks may need to do it, so please do it well ahead of time. To download and test your ability to use Adobe Connect, go to:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, please register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandbolts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar;
this link works only if you have downloaded the adobe connect software.
Attendees are muted and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google (Chrome), IE or Edge in Windows or Safari or Chrome if using a Mac.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have live captioning.

Abstract:
We will be presenting an overview of the NOAA Science Seminar Series, along with how-tos for submitting events to the seminar calendar, best practices, accessibility, and a general opportunity for contributors to ask questions and discuss how we manage and promote the Science Seminar Series. We are interested in learning suggestions and tips from you! We will be running this meeting at least one more time this year to give all contributors who can't make the first meeting an opportunity to attend, and, the session will be recorded.

Slides:
PDF of slides will be available from contacts.

Recordings:
An mp4 recording will be available from contacts.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas
Title: Persistent Contaminants and Herpesvirus Infection are Positively Correlated with Cancer in Wild California Sea Lions
Presenter(s): Dr. Frances Gulland, University of California, Davis; Dr. Alissa Deming, Pacific Marine Mammal Center, California; Prof. Ailsa Hall, University of St Andrews, Scotland; Dr. Irvin Schultz, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 11 March 2021
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Frances Gulland, University of California, Davis; Dr. Alissa Deming, Pacific Marine Mammal Center, California; Prof. Ailsa Hall, University of St Andrews, Scotland; Dr. Irvin Schultz, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5102268728787699984

Abstract: The prevalence of cancer in wild California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) is one of the highest in mammals, with 18"23% of adult animals examined post-mortem over the past 40 years having urogenital carcinoma. Multiple factors have been identified in association with this carcinoma: sea lion genetics, infections and organochlorine pollutants. Two recent publications this year (Links to Gulland and Deming papers) demonstrate that genital herpesvirus infection plays an integral role in carcinogenesis and the importance of persistent organochlorines combined with OtHV1 infection in cancer occurrence in wild sea lions. These sea lion studies provide evidence that herpesvirus infection (OtHV1) is critical to the likelihood of carcinoma occurrence, however the higher the animals' blubber contaminant concentrations, the higher the odds of cancer.Key Takeaways: -Demonstrating unequivocal adverse health effects of persistent contaminants on marine mammals is challenging due to the impossibility of conducting controlled exposure studies, while observational studies on wild animals are challenged with confounding factors causing adverse health effects, life history traits, and the need for ethical and non-invasive monitoring.-These studies are significant because they establish a strong causality between contaminant exposure, viral infection and cancer in sea lions. Such synergism between pollutants and virus in causing cancer has been suggested previously in humans but not in wildlife.-These studies demonstrate the value of long-term collaborative epidemiological studies on stranded animals that control for multiple factors and use large sample sizes.Publications: Two recent publications this year (Gulland et al. and Deming et al.) demonstrate that genital herpesvirus infection plays an integral role in carcinogenesis and the importance of persistent organochlorines combined with OtHV1 infection in cancer occurrence in wild sea lions.

Bio(s): Dr. Frances Gulland is a veterinarian and Research Associate at the University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine. She received her veterinary degree and PhD in Zoology from the University of Cambridge, U.K., in 1984 and 1991 respectively. She then worked at The Marine Mammal Center in California for 25 years providing veterinary care to stranded marine mammals. She has chaired the U.S. Working Group on Marine Mammal Unusual Mortality Events, the Southern Sea Otter Recovery Implementation Team, and currently serves as Commissioner on the U.S. Marine Mammal Commission.Dr. Alissa Deming is the Director of Clinical Medicine at the Pacific Marine Mammal Center. She received her Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine and PhD in Comparative, Diagnostic and Population Medicine from the University of Florida. Her PhD research focused on the role a herpesvirus infection plays in a common cancer seen in wild California sea lions. She has strong background in marine mammal veterinary medicine, having worked as a clinical veterinarian at The Marine Mammal Center, Dauphin Island Sea Lab, SeaWorld San Diego, and the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program. Her principal research interest is to investigate disease patterns in marine mammal populations to better understand the impacts of human and environmental influences on ecosystem health.
Prof. Ailsa Hall is currently Emeritus Professor at the University of St Andrews, Sea Mammal Research Unit. She recently retired as Director of the Unit after 30 years of research focused on factors affecting the survival of marine mammals. With a background in Epidemiology and a PhD in Occupational Medicine she first studied the effects of the phocine distemper virus on UK seal populations in the early 1990s. Since then she has been involved in a wide range of marine mammal epidemiological, toxicological and physiological studies with collaborators from all over the world.Dr. Schultz is program manager of the environmental chemistry group (ECP) at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The ECP studies chemical and biologic agents impacting marine mammals and other marine organisms. Dr. Schultz previously served as a senior scientist at the PNNL"Marine Sciences Lab from 1996-2017, developing research programs on salmonid toxciogenomics, endocrine disruption, marine algal toxins, bioaccumulation of nanomaterials and human exposure monitoring in coastal populations. His areas of expertise includes analytical chemistry, in vitro/in vivo extrapolations, toxicokinetics and biological modeling.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: Snowpack Monitoring in the Rocky Mountain West Webinar, Part 2: Applications
Presenter(s): Gus Goodbody, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS); Patrick Kormos, NOAA Colorado Basin River Forecast Center (CBRFC)
Date & Time: 11 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see description)
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Snowpack Monitoring in the Rocky Mountain West Webinar, Part 2: Applications
Series

Title: Western Water Assessment Webinars

Presenter(s):

Gus Goodbody, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS)
Patrick Kormos, NOAA Colorado Basin River Forecast Center (CBRFC)

Sponsor(s):
Western Water Assessment, a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar Contact(s):
Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov) or Benet Duncan (wwa@colorado.edu)

Remote Access:
Register for Zoom webinar at https://cuboulder.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_6w-eh1rZT4asfkMTLhLI1A


Accessibility:
If accessibility accommodations needed, reach out to Benet Duncan (wwa@colorado.edu).

Abstract:

Join Western Water Assessment for Part 2 of our two-part webinar in which we share Snowpack Monitoring in the Rocky Mountain West: A User Guide. Guest speakers Gus Goodbody (NRCS) and Patrick Kormos (CBRFC) will cover applications of snowpack information, particularly runoff forecasting.


Bio(s):

Angus G. Goodbody has been a Forecast Hydrologist at the National Water and Climate Center, part of the USDA's Snow Survey and Water Supply Forecasting program since 2008, providing systems support and operational water supply forecasts for the Colorado and Rio Grande basins. He has worked as a forecast hydrologist with NOAA's Northwest River Forecast Center and as a research hydrologist with the Rocky Mountain Research Station. He has an M.S. from Colorado State University.

Patrick Kormos is a senior hydrologist at the National Weather Service's Colorado Basin River Forecast Center in Salt Lake City. He focuses on watershed hydrology, snow science, and snow modeling. He received his Ph.D. and Master's degrees from Boise State University, and had postdoc appointments at the National Forest Service's Rocky Mountain Research Station and Agricultural Research Service's Northwest Watershed Research Center.

Slides:
Contact Benet Duncan (wwa@colorado.edu).

Recordings:

A recording will be posted at https://wwa.colorado.edu/outreach/webinars/index.html Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: “Talk to me, Goose” Using Dataset DOIs: Part 2 of our Digital Object Identifier Series
Presenter(s): Don Collins, Oceanographer, NESDIS
Date & Time: 11 March 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Welcome to our next installment of the Publishing @ NOAA Series!

Presenter(s): Don Collins, Oceanographer, NESDIS
Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5906362472614441487This is the second in a two-part series focusing on digital object identifiers, or DOIs. In Part 2 of the series, NCEI oceanographer and archivist Don Collins will discuss data DOIs: what are they, how does NCEI manage DOIs for archived data, and what are similarities/differences between publication and data DOIs. In Part 1, NOAA Central Library librarian Jenn Fagan-Fry discussed what digital object identifiers (DOIs) are, how publication DOIs are used in academic publishing, who is responsible for creating and maintaining them, and more. Watch Part 1 here: I feel the need...the need for Publication DOIs

Bio(s): Don Collins has more than 30 years of experience working at NOAA data centers, starting at the National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) which merged with the other NOAA data centers in 2015 to become the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Don is the current lead for the NOAA Data IDs Working Group and NCEI Data Citation team. He leads a team of science data managers that work on acquiring, ingesting, and archiving data at NCEI and is the current product owner for the OneStop project Collection Manager tools team. One of his current activities is working with the NOAA Data Strategy team to identify and provide guidance about using appropriate licenses for environmental data archived at NCEI.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php
Title: Fishing for answers in the age of genomics
Presenter(s): Devon Pearse, PhD, NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center/University of California, Santa Cruz
Date & Time: 11 March 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Fishing for answers in the age of genomics

Presenter(s): Devon Pearse, PhD, NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center/University of California, Santa Cruz

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website
POC: Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:



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ABSTRACTResearch on the evolutionary genomic characteristics of natural populations has made spectacular progress in the past few years, largely due to the advances in sequencing technology and analysis. However, it is far from clear how our understanding of adaptive genomic variation can or should inform wildlife conservation practice. Before this occurs, consideration must be given to the biological realities of dynamic natural habitats and the implications of using specific genomic targets to set conservation priorities. In this talk I will present examples of genomic variants associated with specific phenotypes in salmonids and other taxa to demonstrate the complex ways in which genomic variation and the environment interact to affect phenotypic variation and individual fitness and to highlight the key issues and limitations for the incorporation of adaptive genomic variation in conservation practice.

BIOGRAPHYDr. Devon Pearse is a Research Geneticist in the Fisheries Ecology Division of the NOAA/NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center, and adjunct professor at the University of California in Santa Cruz, CA. He works as part of a cooperative group of scientists focused on using genetic data to understand the evolutionary processes that affect individuals and populations. This work provides basic insights and informs science policy. Devon's career has spanned a remarkable transition in the field of genetics; he earned his PhD in Genetics from the University of Georgia in Athens, GA where he dabbled in allozymes and used just three microsatellite loci to conduct parentage analysis in freshwater turtles, while projects he is involved in today use whole genome re-sequencing data, providing incredible resolution to identify adaptive genomic variation.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Interactive data visualizations for coral conservation and management in FL and the US Virgin Islands: a collaboration between NOAA and the National Park Service
Presenter(s): Shay Viehman, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science; Christine Buckel, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science; Mike Bollinger, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 11 March 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Interactive data visualizations for coral conservation and management in FL and the US Virgin Islands: a collaboration between NOAA and the National Park Service

Presenter(s):

Shay Viehman, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Christine Buckel, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean ScienceMike Bollinger, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

Sponsor(s):

Coral Collaboration Webinar Series - NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program

Seminar Contact(s):

Robin Garcia, robin.garcia@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Adobe Connect information:
1. To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/
2. Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio.

Abstract:
Coral reefs are increasingly threatened by coral mortality caused by disease and bleaching. US coral reef jurisdictions include many different large-scale long-term coral monitoring efforts, including NOAA's National Coral Reef Monitoring Program, the National Park Service's Inventory and Monitoring Program's coral monitoring, state and territorial monitoring, and stressor-specific monitoring. However, it can be challenging for managers to wade through multiple different datastreams to answer questions about the current status of resources. NOAA and the National Park Service have collaborated to create a web-based Coral Conservation and Management Dashboard that utilizes a combination of maps and charts to help users visualize and query coral data from multiple monitoring programs in National Park areas in Florida and the US Virgin Islands. We will provide an overview of this effort and demonstrate how this application addresses coral management questions. Data are included to visualize coral cover and density, coral bleaching, disease, and photomosaics. In addition, this dashboard also connects directly to existing dashboards of coral disease in FL and the USVI. National Park Service scientists can also add data/observations and images of coral disease in real time. This dashboard will facilitate accessibility of coral data for NPS scientists and managers.

Bio(s):

Shay Viehman is a research ecologist with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science.Christine Buckel is an ecologist with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science.Mike Bollinger is an underwater technical systems research assistant with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body
Title: Dive into a Changing Ecosystem: From Lush Kelp Forests to Urchin Barren
Presenter(s): Kate Vylet, underwater photographer, scientific diver, and divemaster anchored in Monterey Bay, California, Josh Smith, Ph.D. Candidate and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California Santa Cruz, and Karen Grimmer, Resource Protection Coordinator with NOAA's Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 11 March 2021
9:00 pm - 10:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kate Vylet, underwater photographer, scientific diver, and divemaster anchored in Monterey Bay, California, Josh Smith, Ph.D. Candidate and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California Santa Cruz, and Karen Grimmer, Resource Protection Coordinator with NOAA's Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1182517471088080143

Abstract: Tucked along California's coast is a vibrant underwater forest of towering kelp and diverse wildlife. In the last six years, unprecedented outbreaks of purple sea urchins have decimated kelp forests within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, lending several questions: What caused the urchin outbreak? How have sea otters responded? Will intervention and urchin culling enhance kelp recovery? Through underwater photography and observations by Kate Vylet, and a scientific discussion by Josh Smith and Karen Grimmer, this talk will outline how science, art, and community observation intersect to inform the path forward.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded?
Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

15 March 2021

Title: Calibration, Validation, and Assimilation of ATMS observations
Presenter(s): Isaac Moradi, University of Maryland
Date & Time: 15 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s): Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s): Isaac Moradi, University of Maryland


Abstract:
Microwave satellite observations are one of the largest datasets assimilated into Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. However, these observations are subject to errors and uncertainties that need to be corrected before being used for retrieving geophysical variables or assimilated into the NWP models. This talk summarizes the research supporting ATMS Cal/Val activities including validation of radiative transfer models in the microwave region and also using artificial intelligence models for cross-calibration of ATMS and CrIS observations. Additionally, the potential of microwave observations in improving the weather forecasts is limited by the accuracy of all-sky radiative transfer calculations. We introduce a novel Bayesian Monte Carlo technique to improve the assimilation of microwave observations over the rainbands of tropical cyclones. The BMCI technique eliminates the need for a forward model in the data assimilation system. The technique includes three steps, (i) generating a comprehensive dataset using in-situ cloud measurements and atmospheric profiles, (ii) generating synthetic ATMS observations from the training dataset, and (iii) using real observations to estimate the geophysical variables over the rainbands of tropical cyclones. The retrieved profiles of temperature, relative humidity, and cloud water content as well as surface information such as SST were then assimilated into the model. The results show that assimilating the BMCI retrievals can influence the dynamical features of the cyclone, including a stronger warm core, a symmetric eye, and vertically aligned wind columns.
Remote Access
866-240-1897
(access code): 131 938 8542
Individual Attendee ID will be given after sign-in to WEBEX

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m5ede89bc99bcb9fed0fd8cb229f97099

Meeting number (access code): 131 938 8542

Meeting password: Jpss2021!

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php

16 March 2021

Title: Managing Harmful Algal Blooms in Tribal Waters, a Three-part Series
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 16 March 2021
1:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Managing Harmful Algal Blooms in Tribal Waters: a Three-part Seminar Series on the impacts of marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their toxins. These three free seminars are on March 10, 16, & 18, 2021 at 1:00-3:30 pm ET or 10:00 am -12:30 pm PT.

Presenter(s): TBD

Sponsor(s): US EPA, in collaboration with the NOAA and the Sitka Tribe of Alaska, is hosting this three-part webinar series.

Seminar Contact(s): EPACyanoHABs@epa.gov; NOAA contact is Steve.Morton@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register here (free).

Abstract: In this this three-part webinar series on the impacts of marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their toxins, attendees will have the opportunity to:
  • Listen to and talk with Tribes from across the country about their experiences addressing the impacts of HABs and their toxins in fresh and marine waters.
  • Learn about strategies to build tribal capacity for effectively collecting baseline data on HABs.
  • Ask national experts about data collection, funding, outreach, and other HABs management needs.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. For more, visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website.
Title: Oases for Marine Life - Shipwrecks in 3D
Presenter(s): Dr. Avery Paxton, Research Associate, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 16 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Oases for Marine Life - Shipwrecks in 3D

Presenter(s): Dr. Avery Paxton, Research Associate, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Monitor National Marine Sanctuary

Seminar contact: Shannon.Ricles@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2161387385632133901

Abstract: Join Dr. Avery Paxton to explore how North Carolina shipwrecks form homes for a diversity of marine life. Learn how for the past decade, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary and National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Beaufort Lab have led an effort off the coast of North Carolina to document shipwrecks from the Civil War to the Battle of the Atlantic that brought World War II to our shores. This research honors the sacrifices of all who worked, fought, and died in defense of freedom, as well as recognizing the role these nationally significant shipwrecks play in the region's health as habitat for marine ecosystems.This presentation will highlight the role that shipwrecks play as oases for marine life and showcase advanced technologies, including echosounder surveys to create 3D visualizations of shipwrecks and the surrounding marine life. Along with collecting data to interpret this underwater battlefield, the project also demonstrates the significance of these shipwrecks as both ecological and historical wonders. This project is an example of NOAA offices collaborating to use their best assets to document the incredible maritime history and marine life off North Carolina's shores.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: What does drought look like in Interior Alaska
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 16 March 2021
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): Alaska Drought Webinar Series (https://uaf-accap.org/research-activities/alaska-drought-webinar-series/)

Register: https://alaska.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZErde2vrDMoH90sGCTcrtflqDcwxh67-jJ_

Presenter(s): TBD

Abstract: JJoin a listening session to share your story, experiences or data and hear from others in the region. These two-hour listening sessions will start with four, short presentations from people who live and work in the region with time for questions. Then small group discussions to hear from participants on what they have or are experiencing in terms of unusual dryness in the region and how they have prepared for future drought.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

17 March 2021

Title: Vertical Takeoff and Landing Long-Range Drones for Earth and Atmospheric Observations
Presenter(s): Ben Cameron, PhD, Creare LLC
Date & Time: 17 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Vertical Takeoff and Landing Long-Range Drones for Earth and Atmospheric Observations

Presenter(s): Ben Cameron, PhD, Creare LLC

POC: Tiffany House tiffany.house@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Keywords: Long endurance drones, earth observations, atmospheric sensing

Abstract: Creare is developing vertical takeoff and landing fixed-wing drone platforms to meet the needs of earth and atmospheric science missions. Creare's drones range from small electric platforms with flight times less than one hour to large systems with multi-day flight endurance. Applications include measurement of turbulent air around structures, long range sensor deployment, autonomous marine boundary layer measurements, and unattended atmospheric sounding profiles to high altitudes.

Bio(s): Ben Cameron has served as Principal Investigator for multiple NOAA SBIR projects focused on drone platform development. At Creare, Dr. Cameron leads the Unmanned Aircraft Systems research group and oversees development of complete drone systems and airborne sensor packages for specialized scientific missions.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: A Dive into Chukchi Sea Nutrient Cycling: new insights and new technology
Presenter(s): Calvin Mordy, and Bonnie Chang, Nutrient Chemists at the University of Washington Cooperative Institute for Climates, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies CICOES Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 17 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: A Dive into Chukchi Sea Nutrient Cycling: new insights and new technology / EcoFOCI Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Calvin Mordy & Bonnie Chang, Nutrient Chemists at the University of Washington Cooperative Institute for Climates, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies (CICOES) | Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Abstract: Utilizing nitrate and its natural abundance stable isotope composition to infer nutrient cycling in the Chukchi Sea.

Bio(s):
Bonnie joined CICOES in the fall of 2013, first as a postdoctoral research associate, and now as a research scientist, working with John Bullister (NOAA-PMEL) and Rolf Sonnerup (CICOES). She is interested in understanding how microbes in the ocean use nitrogen, an essential element for life. Her current research projects look at how nitrogen enters the ocean (nitrogen fixation), is cycled (nitrous oxide production and consumption), and leaves the ocean (denitrification and anammox).
Calvin is an oceanographer working with physical oceanographers and fisheries scientists to better understand how Alaskan marine ecosystems respond to changes in the environment. He is also a lead PI for the Innovative Technology for Arctic Exploration program which develops and deploys innovative platforms and sensors in the arctic such as the Saildrone, Oculus Coastal Glider and ALAMO floats. Calvin is also part of the the GO-SHIP CLIVAR hydrographic program to build the premier deep-water global nutrient data set.

Slides: Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker.

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium (VAWS) - From Chinooks to Santa Anas: Fire Weather in Alaska and Southern California
Presenter(s): Eric Stevens, Fire Weather Program Manager, Alaska Interagency Coordination Center
Date & Time: 17 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium (VAWS) - From Chinooks to Santa Anas: Fire Weather in Alaska and Southern California

Presenter(s): Eric Stevens, Fire Weather Program Manager, Alaska Interagency Coordination Center

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: Alaska's forests burn every year, and wildfires have consumed an increasing number of acres in recent decades. But Alaska is not the only area experiencing this trend. Wildfires have become similarly concerning in California, with over four million acres burned during the record-setting 2020 season alone. This presentation will compare the 2019 and 2020 wildfire seasons in Alaska and California from the perspective of a fire weather meteorologist supporting the fire crews and land management agencies.
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ecological Drought: Impacts on Coastal Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Kirsten Lackstrom, Research Associate, Carolinas Integrated Sciences & Assessments - a NOAA RISA, Beth Middleton, Research Ecologist, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, USGS , Michael Osland, Research Ecologist, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, USGS
Date & Time: 17 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kirsten Lackstrom, Research Associate, Carolinas Integrated Sciences & Assessments (a NOAA RISA)
Beth Middleton, Research Ecologist, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, USGS
Michael Osland, Research Ecologist, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, USGS

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USGS

Seminar Contacts: Elizabeth Weight (elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
This webinar will share recent research on drought impacts to coastal ecosystems and services.

This webinar is the fourth in a four-part series that seeks to raise awareness of ecological drought, share actions that strengthen ecosystem resilience and mitigate the impacts of droughts, and discuss research and management needs for future drought planning and preparedness. The series is co-hosted by NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System and the USGS National Climate Adaptation Science Center, with expert speakers from the research community, tribal nations, and government agencies.

Information on the additional sessions is listed below:
Ecological Drought: An Introduction, February 3, 2021, 11:30 am " 12:30 pm ET
Ecological Drought: Planning for Resilience, February 17, 2021, 1" 2 pm ET
Ecological Drought: Drought, Wildfire, and Recovery, March 3, 2021, 4 " 5 pm ET

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: NOAA’s Virtual Open House - Dive into Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary at the Sanctuary Exploration Center (Geared toward Grades 2-8)
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 17 March 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA's Virtual Open House - Dive into NOAA's Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary at the Sanctuary Exploration Center in Santa Cruz, CA (Geared toward Grades 2-8)

Presenter(s): TBD

Sponsor(s): Grab your VIP' pass to go backstage at NOAA's Virtual Open House https://www.noaa.gov/heritage/stories/grab-your-vip-pass-to-go-backstage-at-noaa-s-virtual-open-house

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1831607564202355984

Abstract: Dive into kelp forests, explore the deep sea, come up close with a leatherback sea turtle, and listen to the sounds of animals underwater, all virtually while touring the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Exploration Center in Santa Cruz, CA. This NOAA Live! Webinar is part of our NOAA Open House Series during which we will "travel" (virtually) across the country to showcase some of the amazing places our NOAA scientists, engineers, educators, technicians, and interns work. (Live ASL interpretation).
Resources to access at home: NOAA National Marine Sanctuary Video: The Pacific Leatherback Sea Turtle (~8 minutes long)
NOAA Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS) Virtual Dive Gallery: Sea lions swim through the kelp, sea of orange cucumbers, and more.
MBNMSS Virtual Dive Scavenger Hunt: This is a fun activity for kids.
Learn More About Deep-Sea Habitats on the West Coast
MBARI Listening Room: Access to a live stream and library of recorded underwater sounds
Davidson Seamount: Oasis in the Deep: Explore an Octopus garden and whale fall in this story and accompanying videos
Dive in and find the National Marine Sanctuary closest to you

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

18 March 2021

Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Hernan Garcia, NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI; Lori K. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS
Date & Time: 18 March 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series, for NOAA Seminar Coordinators
We will be offering this webinar later this year and a recording will be available.

Presenter(s):
NOAA Science Seminar team: Lori Brown, NESDIS, Hernan Garcia, NESDIS and Tracy Gill, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Science Seminar Team, NESDIS and NOSSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Lori.Brown@noaa.gov, & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here:
You must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT Admin folks may need to do it, so please do it well ahead of time. To download and test your ability to use Adobe Connect, go to:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, please register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandbolts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar;
this link works only if you have downloaded the adobe connect software.
Attendees are muted and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google (Chrome), IE or Edge in Windows or Safari or Chrome if using a Mac.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have live captioning.

Abstract:
We will be presenting an overview of the NOAA Science Seminar Series, along with how-tos for submitting events to the seminar calendar, best practices, accessibility, and a general opportunity for contributors to ask questions and discuss how we manage and promote the Science Seminar Series. We are interested in learning suggestions and tips from you! We will be running this meeting at least one more time this year to give all contributors who can't make the first meeting an opportunity to attend, and, the session will be recorded.

Slides:
PDF of slides will be available from contacts.

Recordings:
An mp4 recording will be available from contacts.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas
Title: Knauss Fellows 2021 - Elle Wibisono & Sean Mullin
Presenter(s): Sean Mullin, Environment and Energy Fellow, Office of Rep. John Garamendi; Elle Wibisono, U.S. Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee; Oceans, Fisheries, Climate Change, and Manufacturing Subcommittee
Date & Time: 18 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Knauss Fellows 2021 features presentations from two Knauss Fellows, Elle Wibisono & Sean Mullin.

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: This webinar is over. Knauss Fellows present on the third Thursday of every month. Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

12:00 - 12:30 PM

Title: Characteristics and potential management of the Indonesian deep-slope demersal fishery

Presenter(s): Elle Wibisono, U.S. Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee; Oceans, Fisheries, Climate Change, and Manufacturing Subcommittee (majority)

Abstract: Indonesia is the second-largest global snapper exporter. However, the fishery is data-poor and unmanaged. Together with The Nature Conservancy, we deployed a collaborative data collection system where fishers take photographs of their entire catch on a measuring board. Using the catch data, we conducted preliminary fishery stock assessments and identified juvenile hotspots where Marine Protected Areas might benefit this fishery.

Bio(s): Elle Wibisono grew up in Indonesia and received her Bachelor's degree from Wellesley College. After graduating, she worked for The Nature Conservancy Indonesia on the sustainable management of the snapper-grouper fishery. She received her Ph.D. also on the snapper-grouper fishery from the University of Rhode Island. She also makes fish comics online.

12:30 - 1:00 PM

Title: Correlating the microbial and megafaunal communities with biogeochemistry at a cold methane seep in the Costa Rica Pacific Margin

Presenter(s): Sean Mullin, Environment and Energy Fellow, Office of Rep. John Garamendi (D-CA-03)

Abstract: Marine methane seeps are globally distributed, highly dynamic hotspots for chemosynthetic communities and geochemical activity on the seafloor. We describe the porewater geochemistry, microbial diversity, and megafauna distribution of 324 carbonate and sediment core samples retrieved from Mound 12, a seep west of Costa Rica. We demonstrate that the sediment microbial community that forms the basis of the chemosynthetic food web is more narrowly distributed than megafaunal populations, but that carbonates may host active methanotrophs even when removed from active seep areas, with implications for the impacts of seabed mining and hydrocarbon extraction.

Bio(s): Sean Mullin received his Bachelor's degree in Microbiology from UC Berkeley and his Ph.D. in Geobiology from Caltech with Victoria Orphan. His research focused on the microbial ecology of the deep places of the world, from the continental deep biosphere to the deep oceans.

Accessibility: If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.
Title: Deep-Sea Exploration From Home: How students, scientists, and people anywhere can become ocean explorers
Presenter(s): Nicole Raineault, Chief Scientist, Ocean Exploration Trust
Date & Time: 18 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the webinar recording thru Adobe Connect, at the link below. To see closed captions, once you hit Play, select classic view when given the option.
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/plxxoo0fhwls/

Title: Deep-Sea Exploration From Home: how students, scientists, and learners anywhere can become ocean explorers

Presenter(s): Nicole Raineault, Chief Scientist, Ocean Exploration Trust

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar at
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have closed captioning.

Slides and Recording: The slides and the recording will most likely be available after the webinar; contact Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov if interested.

Abstract: Access to the ocean used to be limited to seafarers, willing and able, to board a ship and goto sea. Today however, telepresence, the ability to transport a person anywhere to another location, can connect people globally to the deep-sea without ever leaving home. Ocean Exploration Trust explores the world's ocean using the E/V Nautilus and invites everyone to participate in exploration in real-time. Scientists can join our Scientist Ashore network to work with sailing team members to build expeditions, lend their expertise to dives, and access data and samples.Teachers can utilize the resources on our website to teach STEM principles.Members of the public can make discoveries alongside professionals as they watch and engage with the team over our Nautilus Live website. This talk will provide an introduction to the technologies that help make anyone an explorer, an overview of the 2021 expedition season, and information on how to become a member of our Corps of Exploration.

Bio(s): Nicole Raineault is the Chief Scientist and Vice President of Exploration and Science Operations with the Ocean Exploration Trust, the non-profit organization that owns and operates the ocean exploration vessel (E/V) Nautilus. She received her PhD from the University of Delaware in geological sciences, earned a Master of Science in Oceanography from Rutgers University and a Bachelor of Science in Marine Science from the University of Maine. In the last decade, Nicole has lead or been involved in over 40 expeditions at sea.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: Managing Harmful Algal Blooms in Tribal Waters, a Three-part Series
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 18 March 2021
1:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Managing Harmful Algal Blooms in Tribal Waters: a Three-part Seminar Series on the impacts of marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their toxins. These three free seminars are on March 10, 16, & 18, 2021 at 1:00-3:30 pm ET or
10:00 am -12:30 pm PT.

Presenter(s): TBD

Sponsor(s): US EPA, in collaboration with the NOAA and the Sitka Tribe of Alaska, is hosting this three-part webinar series.

Seminar Contact(s): EPACyanoHABs@epa.gov; NOAA contact is Steve.Morton@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: In this this three-part webinar series on the impacts of marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their toxins, attendees will have the opportunity to:
  • Listen to and talk with Tribes from across the country about their experiences addressing the impacts of HABs and their toxins in fresh and marine waters.
  • Learn about strategies to build tribal capacity for effectively collecting baseline data on HABs.
  • Ask national experts about data collection, funding, outreach, and other HABs management needs.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. For more, visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website.
Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Pat Guinan, Missouri State Climatologist
Date & Time: 18 March 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook

Presenter(s):
Pat Guinan, Missouri State Climatologist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

March 2021 topics include the aftermath impacts and warm rebound of the February cold snap, La Nia (Advisory) Update, the continuing high water levels in the Great Lakes, recent and potential climate/weather impacts (e.g., river and lake ice, drought persistence and potential future issues, mountain snow pack, wildfire potential), and the latest precipitation, temperature, and drought outlooks. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Aliens in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument: Some are Green, but None are Friendly
Presenter(s): Brian Hauk, JIMAR/PMNM Resource Protection Specialist
Date & Time: 18 March 2021
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Brian Hauk, JIMAR/PMNM Resource Protection Specialist

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: Alien and invasive species represent one of the top three threats to the marine and terrestrial ecosystems of Papahnaumokukea. Over 400 species of marine, non-indigenous/alien species are recorded in the Hawaiian Archipelago, but only 10-15% are known to be established in the Monument. Join Brian Hauk, the Resource Protection Specialist for NOAA's Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument, as he shares information on alien and invasive species in Hawaii and efforts to manage and prevent them from entering into the habitats of the Monument.This presentation is part of the Third Thursday By the Bay Presentation Series at Mokuppapa Discovery Center that is the visitor center for Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument in Hilo, Hawai'i. This lecture series is also supported by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation through a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded?
Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/OneNOAASeminars.php
Title: North Pacific warming shifts the range of White Sharks
Presenter(s): Kisei Tanaka, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 18 March 2021
8:00 pm - 9:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Pacific warming shifts the range of juvenile White Sharks

Presenter(s): Kisei Tanaka, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA Inouye Regional Center (IRC) Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): kate.taylor@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.Meeting number: 199 102 3238 Meeting password: noaa
Join via phone, Dial1-415-527-5035 Passcode: 1991023238

Abstract: During the 2014"2016 North Pacific marine heatwave, unprecedented sightings of juvenile white sharks occurred in central California that created potential conflicts with commercial fisheries, protected species conservation, and public safety concerns. These sightings contradicted the species established life history, where juveniles typically remain in warmer waters of the southern California Current. To understand this phenomenon, we integrated community science, white shark tagging data, and climate information. In addition to a shift in the species range, we observed a decline in the amount of thermally suitable habitat for juvenile sharks, which has implications for the adaptive management of this apex marine predator. We will also discuss this opportunity to engage the public on climate change through marine megafauna.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. For more, visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website.

19 March 2021

Title: March 2021 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP/University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 19 March 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

22 March 2021

Title: CA/NV at a Crossroads: Drought & Climate Update and Outlook
Presenter(s): Dan McEvoy, Western Regional Climate Center/DRI/CNAP-RISA; Nathan Patrick, NOAA NWS California-Nevada River Forecast Center; Lauren Parker, USDA California Climate Hub; Gary McCuin, UNR Eureka County Nevada Extension Educator, University of California Cooperative Extension
Date & Time: 22 March 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dan McEvoy, Western Regional Climate Center/DRI/CNAP-RISA; Nathan Patrick, NOAA NWS California-Nevada River Forecast Center; Lauren Parker, USDA California Climate Hub; Gary McCuin, UNR Eureka County Nevada Extension Educator, University of California Cooperative Extension

Drought & Climate Update
Dan McEvoy | Western Regional Climate Center/DRI/CNAP (a NOAA RISA team)

Drought & Climate Outlook
Nathan Patrick | NOAA NWS California-Nevada River Forecast Center

California & Nevada Rangeland Conditions
Lauren Parker | USDA California Climate Hub
Gary McCuin | UNR Eureka County Nevada Extension Educator,
University of California Cooperative Extension

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), NWS California-Nevada River Forecast Center, Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Desert Research Institute, USDA California Climate Hub, University of Nevada, Reno, University of California Cooperative Extension

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

POC: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Abstract:
According to the March 2 U.S. Drought Monitor, 90.9% of CA and 100% of NV are in drought. The winter wet season is almost over and there's little chance for snowpack to reach normal levels. Worse, this is the second year in a row with below-normal snowpack. This webinar will discuss current conditions and outlook as well as an overview of California and Nevada rangeland conditions.

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) March 2021 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia).

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

23 March 2021

Title: 2020 Fire Weather Review: The current role of NOAA, and the National Weather Service, including the Incident Meteorologist program
Presenter(s): Kari Fleegel NOAA-NWS-Aberdeen, SD; Patrick Gilchrist NOAA/NWS/Glasgow, MT WCM
Date & Time: 23 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kari Fleegel NOAA-NWS-Aberdeen, SD; Patrick Gilchrist NOAA/NWS/Glasgow, MT WCM

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library

Seminar contact: library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: National Weather Service Incident Meteorologists Kari Fleegel and Patrick Gilchrist give a recap of the historic 2020 fire weather year. They explain how different NOAA programs come together to support large wildfires, the role of the Incident Meteorology program, and their experiences at wildfires.

Keywords: Wildfire, Fire, Incident Meteorologist

Bio(s): Kari Fleegel is a Meteorologist with NOAA's National Weather Service in Aberdeen, South Dakota. She entered the Incident Meteorologist program in 2002 and has since been on over 20 deployments to wildfires, oil spills, as well as large national events across the country. They have both had the opportunity to assist the Australian Bureau of Meteorology with onsite support during a couple of their larger fire seasons.

Patrick Gilchrist is a Warning Coordination Meteorologist for the National Weather Service Office in Glasgow, MT. He has served as an Incident Meteorologist since 2006, supporting 25 large wildfires in the western U.S.. They have both had the opportunity to assist the Australian Bureau of Meteorology with onsite support during a couple of their larger fire seasons.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/seminars

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php
Title: Shifting MPAs for conservation and fisheries under a changing climate
Presenter(s): Talya ten Brink, NOAA; Tu Nguyen, Ocean Nexus Center; Anne Mook, Nazarbayev University; Sarah Roberts, Duke University; Juliano Palacios-Abrantes, University of British Columbia
Date & Time: 23 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Shifting MPAs for conservation and fisheries under a changing climate

Presenter(s): Talya ten Brink of NOAA
Tu Nguyen of Ocean Nexus Center
Anne Mook of Nazarbayev University
Sarah Roberts of Duke University
Juliano Palacios-Abrantes of University of British Columbia

Sponsor(s): NOAA National MPA Center and OCTO (MPA News, OpenChannels, EBM Tools Network)

Seminar contact: zac.cannizzo@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: Marine species are shifting their distribution towards colder waters because of climate change, potentially compromising the benefits and management objectives of currently established Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Therefore, it remains unclear what the long-term effectiveness of MPAs for conservation, fisheries, and reliant communities is under a changing climate. The team developed six MPA designs of equal size in an Ecopath with Ecosim model: four static MPAs (Square, Narrow Vertical, Narrow Horizontal, and Network) which stayed in place and two dynamic MPA designs (Square Shifting and Network Shifting) which moved 20 km poleward every 20 years to take into account the shifting nature of marine species affected by climate change. The model differentiated between the Static Horizontal and Static Vertical MPAs because of the expectation that vertically oriented MPAs will be more likely to benefit marine species as they shift poleward due to climate change. The Square Shifting MPA outperformed the Square Static MPA on all aggregate measures and outperformed all MPA orientations in terms of revenue. However, the results suggest that there is no one optimal solution in the face of climate change, and different MPA designs could potentially bring about regional benefits in terms of increased amount of fish and catch. The webinar will discuss our findings, including revenue, biomass, fisheries, and species-specific results.

More information on the Marine Protected Areas Center Webinar Series:
https://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives at: https://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/archive.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Science of Conservation
Presenter(s): Kimberly Kenyon, Senior Conservator for the Queen Anne's Revenge Shipwreck Project, has worked as a conservator and archaeologist for several shipwreck and terrestrial excavations in North Carolina, Texas, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, and Turkey. Prior to joining the North Carolina Office of State Archaeology, she was the head conservator for the Institute of Nautical Archaeology in Bodrum, Turkey, and oversaw the conservation of materials from shipwrecks ranging in date from the Late Bronze Age to the Ottoman period
Date & Time: 23 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Science of Conservation

Presenter(s): Kimberly Kenyon, Senior Conservator for the Queen Anne's Revenge Shipwreck Project

Sponsor(s): Submerged North Carolina - NOAA's Monitor National Marine Sanctuary

Seminar contact: Shannon.Ricles@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4332067430224902926

Abstract: Join Kimberly Kenyon, senior conservator for the Queen Anne's Revenge Shipwreck Project, as she shares why conservation is so critical to archaeology and some of the processes involved. Discover that archaeology does not end once an artifact is unearthed. Learn how following excavation, an object may require months or years of conservation before it is stable enough for further research or exhibit. See why this is particularly true of artifacts from a marine environment, such as those submerged in the waters off North Carolina's coast. Partnering since 1975, NOAA and the state of North Carolina work to research, honor, and protect the hallmarks of North Carolina's underwater cultural heritage: shipwrecks. From violent storms and dangerous shoals to world wars, the waters off North Carolina have claimed thousands of ships and lives over hundreds of years. These shipwrecks hold information about the ever changing technologies and cultural and physical landscapes. They serve as a uniquely accessible underwater museum and a memorial to generations of mariners who lived, died, worked and fought off our shores.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Drought and Water Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District
Date & Time: 23 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract:
The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar is part of a monthly (twice a month during drought status) webinar series designed to provide stakeholders, water-resource managers, and other interested parties in the ACF region with timely information on current drought status, seasonal forecasts and outlooks, streamflow conditions and forecasts, groundwater conditions, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir conditions.

Recordings:
Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: What does drought look like in Northwest Alaska
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 23 March 2021
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, a NOAA RISA Team (https://uaf-accap.org/research-activities/alaska-drought-webinar-series/).

Seminar contact: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Register: This webinar is over.

Presenter(s): TBD

Abstract: Join a listening session to share your story, experiences or data and hear from others in the region. These two-hour listening sessions will start with four, short presentations from people who live and work in the region with time for questions. Then small group discussions to hear from participants on what they have or are experiencing in terms of unusual dryness in the region and how they have prepared for future drought.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

24 March 2021

Title: Upper Ocean Carbon Cycle Dynamics: a look at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) and Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Station (BATS)
Presenter(s): Mariela Brooks, Research Chemist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center | Juneau, AK
Date & Time: 24 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Upper Ocean Carbon Cycle Dynamics: a look at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) and Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Station (BATS) / EcoFOCI Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Mariela Brooks, Research Chemist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center | Juneau, AK

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Abstract: Examining changes, over three decades, using stable isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon of surface seawater at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) and Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Station (BATS).

Bio(s): Mariela Brooks works in the Recruitment, Energetics and Coastal Assessment (RECA) program focusing on stable isotope analysis and examining biogeochemical drivers of marine fisheries and trophic ecology, as well as exploring new analysis techniques and method development. Prior to joining AFSC, Mariela's doctoral research focused on open-ocean time-series measurements from the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) and Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Station (BATS) using inorganic carbon chemistry and stable carbon isotopes to better understand upper ocean carbon cycle dynamics. She received a B.S. in Physics from Portland State University, and studied marine chemistry at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD where she received both her M.S. in Earth Sciences and Ph.D. in Oceanography. Throughout her career, she has worked on research that includes exploring atmospheric chemistry in the Pacific Northwest, methyl halides in the Florida Everglades, and open-ocean time-series measurements of inorganic carbon chemistry and stable carbon isotopes.

Slides: Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker.

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science seminar website for more.
Title: GEO IR Sounder case study, multi-band retrieval simulation and forecast OSSE results
Presenter(s): Vijay Natraj and Derek Posselt NASA/JPL
Date & Time: 24 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: GEO IR Sounder case study, multi-band retrieval simulation and forecast OSSE results

Note: This seminar will be presented online only.

Presenter(s): Vijay Natraj and Derek Posselt (NASA/JPL)

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

Abstract: In response to the 2020 NOAA Geostationary Orbit Concept Exploration Broad Agency Announcement, JPL's Panchromatic imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (PanFTS) team conducted an infrared sounder study, GEO IR Sounder. By integrating retrievals for thermal emission and reflected solar bands in a single instrument, GEO IR Sounder improves the sensitivity to the lower troposphere and near surface. Consequently, the additional retrieval degrees of freedom improve storm intensity, structure and track forecast accuracy, as well as air quality and climate research. We will present our multi-band retrieval simulation and forecast OSSE results.

Bio(s):
Vijay Natraj is a Research Scientist in the Aerosols and Clouds group at JPL. He has 15 years of experience in radiative transfer modeling with application to remote sensing of Earth and (exo)planetary atmospheres. He leads several projects on using innovative radiative transfer techniques to retrieve surface reflectance, understand aerosol vertical distribution, profile temperature and water vapor in the planetary boundary layer and improve diagnosis of clouds in climate models. These efforts are directly related to important missions recommended by the 2017 Earth Science Decadal Survey. In addition, he leads a project to utilize measurements of Earth's sunlit disk from Lagrangian orbit to model the Earth as a proxy exoplanet.Derek Posselt is a research scientist with the Atmospheric Physics and Weather group in the Earth Science Section at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology (Caltech). He is also a visiting Associate Researcher at the Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering (JIFRESSE) at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).Dr. Posselt has 18 years of experience working on satellite data applications and the development of satellite missions, and 19 years of experience confronting numerical models with remote sensing and in-situ observations. He served as CYGNSS Deputy Principal Investigator from 2012 - 2016, and currently coordinates extended science team activities for the mission. He is actively involved in the quantitative analysis of satellite information, including the use of uncertainty quantification (UQ) algorithms and observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs). He is also actively engaged in the development of new data assimilation and retrieval algorithms, particularly in a Bayesian probabilistic context.His research interests include: remote sensing of cloud and precipitation properties, numerical modeling of cloud systems, and the use of Bayesian algorithms in the development of new data assimilation methodologies and remote sensing techniques. He has experience as a user and developer of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) model, the NASA Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model, the NCAR Cloud Model (CM1), and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model.Dr. Posselt is currently a member of the science teams for the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS), Aerosols Clouds Ecosystems (ACE), and CloudSat missions.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more.
Title: Cephalopods of Hawai`i
Presenter(s): Heather Ylitalo-Ward, PhD, Aquatic Biologist, State of Hawai'i, Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Aquatic Resources
Date & Time: 24 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Heather Ylitalo-Ward, PhD, Aquatic Biologist, State of Hawai'i, Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Aquatic Resources

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: Join Heather Ylitalo-Ward, PhD, in her talk about cephalopods and why they are important in Hawai'i and beyond. Having studied octopus sexual selection in graduate school, Dr. Ylitalo-Ward now works for the State of Hawai'i Dept. of Land and Natural Resources Division of Aquatic Resources monitoring coral reef ecosystem health and populations. For this talk, she will discuss her experience working with these fascinating creatures and why she continues to be enamored with them to this day.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Modeling global ocean biogeochemistry in support of field and satellite missions
Presenter(s): Cecile Rousseaux, NASA
Date & Time: 24 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

NOCCG Seminar cross-listed with OneNOAA and STAR Seminars

Title: Modeling global ocean biogeochemistry in support of field and satellite missions

Presenter(s): Dr. Cecile Rousseaux, NASA-Goddard

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
This webinar is over.

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (312) 757-3121
Access Code: 803-588-261


Abstract: Oceans play an important role in the Earth's carbon cycle. Within the oceans, the intensity of carbon fixation and export is strongly dependent on the concentration and composition of various water constituents including phytoplankton. Yet, the ocean color satellites have so far been largely used to derive the total phytoplankton concentration regardless of its composition. Different phytoplankton groups have however disparate impacts on ocean ecology, nutrient cycling, and the carbon cycle.Therefore, total chlorophyll as currently measured by ocean color is no longer sufficient to describe the full complexity of the ocean carbon cycle. As a direct result of this gap in knowledge, satellite and field sampling missions, such as the NASA Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) satellite mission and the EXport Processes in the Ocean from Remote Sensing (EXPORTS) field campaign, have been developed to improve our understanding of these processes and how likely they are to respond to climate variability and change. Earth System Models on the other hand have become more complex and now include a variety of mechanisms and variables that are not always measured directly from satellites or in the field. The use of models combined with data assimilation allows for the integration of existing satellite data and provide global continuous data in the oceans, land and in the atmosphere. Here we show how the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) has been used in various projects to prepare for field and satellite missions and improve our understanding of how to best use these satellite and field campaign data, and the potential limitations of the field sampling design and/or satellite mission.Speaker Biography: https://science.gsfc.nasa.gov/sed/bio/cecile.s.rousseaux

Slides: When available after the seminar they can be found here: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: NOAA Science Report Seminar: A Robust and Effective Research, Development, and Transition Enterprise
Presenter(s): Multiple Presenters - see webinar description
Date & Time: 24 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Science Report Seminar: Four projects presented about robust and effective research, development, and transition enterprise

Register: This webinar is over. When you register for one webinar, you are signing up for the entire NOAA Science Report Seminar series.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Research and Development Enterprise Committee. Points of contact: Gina Digiantonio (gina.digiantonio@noaa.gov) & NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Developing next-generation models for seasonal to decadal prediction, launching satellite-based products to monitor coral bleaching, innovating with the Geostationary Lightning Mapper, and updating geomagnetism models - these are just a few of NOAA's scientific accomplishments that are highlighted in the 2020 NOAA Science Report. The NOAA Science Report celebrates NOAA's R&D by showcasing science highlights, bibliometrics, NOAA's scientific workforce, and more. This seminar features 4 projects from the 2020 NOAA Science Report (to be released soon) related to models and satellite sensors and products.

Keywords: NOAA Science Report, Satellite, Model

NOAA Launches Next-Generation Satellite-Based Products that Monitor Coral Bleaching and Heat Stress

Presenter(s):
Dr. Gang Liu, Associate Research Scientist, The Cooperative Institute for Satellite Earth System Studies (CISESS), Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) at the University of Maryland

Bio(s): Dr. Gang Liu has more than 30 years of experience in physical oceanography, satellite oceanography, and biophysical interactions in marine ecosystems. In 2000, he helped established Coral Reef Watch (CRW) as an official NOAA program. For 20 years, Dr. Liu has served in a key role as NOAA CRW's Lead Senior Scientist, Oceanographer, and Product Developer, helping to build, expand, and enhance the program and its world-renowned decision support system for coral reef management.

NOAA Releases Updates to Geomagnetism Models



Presenter(s): Dr. Arnaud Chulliat, Senior Research Scientist, NOAA NCEI, University of Colorado, Boulder

Bio(s): Dr. Arnaud Chulliat is a Senior Research Scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), University of Colorado Boulder. He leads the World Magnetic Model team at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Dr. Chulliat's research interests include geomagnetic field modeling, data analysis and observation techniques. Prior to joining CIRES in 2014, Dr. Chulliat was the Director of Magnetic Observatories at Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, where he led the installation of new observatories in Asia and the Pacific Ocean.

Innovations with the Geostationary Lightning Mapper

Presenter(s): Dr. Kristin Calhoun, Research Scientist, NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory

Bio(s): Dr. Calhoun has a PhD from the School of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma focusing on the evolution of the electrical charge structure and lightning relative to meteorological features of severe thunderstorms. Her current work focuses on the transition of lightning research and algorithms to National Weather Service operations. Dr. Calhoun has been the principal investigator on numerous projects within the NOAA Hazardous Weather Testbed including the development and testing of multiple lightning-integrated and data assimilation algorithms such as the lightning jump detection algorithm, the evaluation of Earth Networks' dangerous thunderstorm alerts, high-resolution 3DVAR analyses, Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor development, and most recently, storm-based probabilistic cloud-to-ground lightning guidance and forecasts integrating machine learning.

Development of the Next Generation Model for Seasonal to Decadal Prediction

Presenter(s): Dr. Thomas Delworth, Senior Scientist, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL)

Bio(s): Dr. Thomas Delworth is a Senior Scientist at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) and the Division Leader for Seasonal to Decadal Variability and Predictability. Dr. Delworth's research focuses on climate variability, predictability and change on time scales from seasonal to multi-decadal. His research foci include the role of the oceans in climate, decadal scale changes in regional hydroclimate and extremes, including drought, and predictability of the ocean-atmosphere-land system on seasonal to decadal scales. He has led efforts at GFDL to build a succession of state of the art climate models. Dr. Delworth has served on numerous national and international scientific research committees, has authored over 160 papers for scientific journals and books, and is a Highly Cited Researcher (top 1% most cited in Geosciences) as identified by Web of Science.



Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:

Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php
Title: NOAA’s Virtual Open House - NOAA's Nose Knows: A day in the life of a Seafood Inspector with NOAA's Seafood Inspection Facility in Long Beach, CA (Geared toward Grades 2-8)
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 24 March 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA's Virtual Open House - NOAA's Nose Knows: A day in the life of a Seafood Inspector with NOAA's Seafood Inspection Facility in Long Beach, CA (Geared toward Grades 2-8)

Presenter(s): TBD

Sponsor(s): Grab your VIP' pass to go backstage at NOAA's Virtual Open House https://www.noaa.gov/heritage/stories/grab-your-vip-pass-to-go-backstage-at-noaa-s-virtual-open-house

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: What does fresh, high-quality, safe-to-eat fish smell like? How does it make its way from the ocean to your dinner plate? Come with us as we follow some of your favorite seafood off a fishing boat, into a processing facility, and through the hands of a NOAA Seafood Inspector. Help us inspect seafood live from NOAA's inspection laboratory in Long Beach, California, and learn some tips and tricks for inspecting your dinner, too! This NOAA Live! Webinar is part of our NOAA Open House Series during which we will "travel" (virtually) across the country to showcase some of the amazing places our NOAA scientists, engineers, educators, technicians, and interns work. (Live ASL interpretation)
Resources to access at home: Contact Your Local Seafood Inspection Office
Fishwatch.gov: Find out what makes U.S. seafood sustainable and get up-to-date information on the status of some of the fish harvested and farmed in the U.S.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

25 March 2021

Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Hernan Garcia, NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI; Lori K. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS
Date & Time: 25 March 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series, for NOAA Seminar Coordinators
We will be offering this webinar later this year and a recording will be available.

Presenter(s):
NOAA Science Seminar team: Lori Brown, NESDIS, Hernan Garcia, NESDIS and Tracy Gill, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Science Seminar Team, NESDIS and NOSSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Lori.Brown@noaa.gov, & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here:
You must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT Admin folks may need to do it, so please do it well ahead of time. To download and test your ability to use Adobe Connect, go to:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, please register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandbolts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar;
this link works only if you have downloaded the adobe connect software.
Attendees are muted and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google (Chrome), IE or Edge in Windows or Safari or Chrome if using a Mac.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have live captioning.

Abstract:
We will be presenting an overview of the NOAA Science Seminar Series, along with how-tos for submitting events to the seminar calendar, best practices, accessibility, and a general opportunity for contributors to ask questions and discuss how we manage and promote the Science Seminar Series. We are interested in learning suggestions and tips from you! We will be running this meeting at least one more time this year to give all contributors who can't make the first meeting an opportunity to attend, and, the session will be recorded.

Slides:
PDF of slides will be available from contacts.

Recordings:
An mp4 recording will be available from contacts.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas
Title: Seasonal Prediction of Bottom Temperature on the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf
Presenter(s): Zhuomin Chen, Post-Doctoral Research Associate, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute
Date & Time: 25 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Seasonal Prediction of Bottom Temperature on the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf

Presenter(s): Zhuomin Chen, Post-Doctoral Research Associate, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: An Overview of Hurricane History, Hazards, and Forecasting
Presenter(s): John Cangialosi, Senior Hurricane Specialist, National Hurricane Center
Date & Time: 25 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: An Overview of Hurricane History, Hazards, and Forecasting

Presenter(s): John Cangialosi, Senior Hurricane Specialist, National Hurricane Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov) Register: This webinar is over.

Abstract: The presentation will show some highlights from the past few hurricane seasons and provide a broader view of tropical cyclone climatology. In addition, the presentation will also provide an overview of how tropical cyclone forecasts are made and the recent progress in the predictions.

Bio(s): John Cangialosi is a senior hurricane specialist at the National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami, Florida. He has been employed at NHC since 2005 and is an expert in tropical cyclone forecasting, marine forecasting, and tropical cyclone applied research.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: Navigating USAJobs Announcements: A Hiring Manager's Perspective
Presenter(s): Amanda McCarty, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Fishery Monitoring and Research Division Chief
Date & Time: 25 March 2021
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Amanda McCarty, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Fishery Monitoring and Research Division Chief

Sponsor(s): NOAA Pride ERG; NOAA Central Library

Seminar contact: library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: Applying for federal positions can be confusing and cumbersome, which can keep great candidates from getting Federal positions. This webinar provides a hiring manager's perspective on how to successfully interpret an announcement in the USAJobs system. You will learn how to search for job vacancy announcements and compare your experience against the requirements of the announcement. We will talk through different types of job postings as examples. You will walk away with a better understanding of how to interpret an announcement and craft your resume/CV in response.

Keywords: hiring, USAJobs, resumes

Bio(s): Amanda serves as the Fishery Monitoring and Research Division Chief at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center. She oversees the Division's full portfolio, which includes fisheries observing and monitoring programs, cooperative research, and collaborative agreements with academia and research organizations to conduct scientific research in support of sustainable fishery management. She has been lucky to hire over 2 dozen Federal employees in the past 5 years.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/seminars

Recorded presentation: here is a link to the recording

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: FV3 Applications on GPU/GPU Acceleration of FV3 and the UFS: History, Progress, and Prospects
Presenter(s): Mark Govet, NOAA/OAR Global Systems Division & Lucas Harris, NOAA/GFDL
Date & Time: 25 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): Office of Science and Technology Integration (OSTI) Modeling Division, National Weather Service of NOAA

Seminar Contacts: Yan Xue, Ph.D. (Yan.Xue@noaa.gov) and Stacy Mackell (stacy.mackell@noaa.gov)

Access: This webinar is over.
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Seminar 1: FV3 Applications on GPU (Mark Govet, NOAA/OAR Global Systems Division)

Abstract: Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) have become the dominant type of processor on the TOP500 list of most powerful HPC systems. NOAA's Global Systems Laboratory has been exploring GPUs since 2010. As part of the work, GSL developed the Non-hydrostatic Icosahedral Model (NIM) and demonstrated performance-portability of the model on CPUs, GPUs and MIC processors with a single source code. Performance results reported in 2015 showed GPUs to be about 3 times faster than CPUs with minimal changes to the code. The design and parallelization strategy was successfully adopted by the MPAS model, achieving similar performance characteristics. The successful work with the NIM led the GSL team to apply the same approach to the FV3 dynamical core used in the UFS today. The two year effort (2016 - 2018) to port the FV3 to GPUs was not ultimately successful however. This presentation will describe and compare the NIM and FV3 parallelization efforts, and share lessons learned in developing performance-portable codes.
SPEAKER

Bio(s): Mark leads the Advanced Technologies Division in NOAA's Global Systems Laboratory. The division explores and applies new technologies and methodologies in computing, modeling, visualization, software engineering, and data access and delivery to advance NOAA's earth system prediction and decision support capabilities. Technologies being explored include cloud computing, machine learning, high performance computing with CPU, GPU and ARM processors, informatics and visualization, and virtual services. During his 30+ year career at NOAA, Mark led the high-performance computing group supporting model development including model parallelization, performance and scaling optimizations and development of tools to improve portability across CPU, GPU and hybrid systems. During this time, Mark developed two Fortran directive-based compilers: the Scalable Modeling System (SMS) for MPI based parallelization, and the F2C-ACC compiler for GPU programming. Over his career, Mark has built strong collaborations with research laboratories, and partnerships with leading HPC companies including Cray, IBM, NVIDIA, Intel, and others.

Seminar 2: GPU Acceleration of FV3 and the UFS: History, Progress, and Prospects (Lucas Harris, NOAA/GFDL, Co authors: Rusty Benson and Oli Fuhrer)

Abstract: One of the major strengths of the GFDL Finite-Volume Cubed-Sphere Dynamical Core (FV3) is its efficiency and scalability on traditional CPUs. FV3 was designed to fit the MPI-OpenMP paradigm which has served HPC well for three decades. But this may be changing as emerging exascale systems are using manycore processors, especially GPUs. Even newer architectures like ARMs and FPGAs are on the horizon.
Previous results to re-write FV3 for GPUs have shown 10x or more speedups in the entire core. More recent results have shown 50x GPU speedups to some modules within FV3. However, each new architecture requires re-writing of scientific codes for best performance. We are collaborating with Vulcan Inc, NASA Goddard, and university partners to port FV3 and the UFS into the GT4py Domain-Specific Language. By doing so the model can be re-compiled for target processors in a way so the code and data can be laid out for optimum performance. Progress and prospects for both traditional and DSL ports will be discussed.

SPEAKER

Bio(s): Lucas Harris has a PhD in Atmospheric Sciences and an MS in Applied Mathematics from the University of Washington. After a short postdoc at Princeton University he joined the federal workforce at GFDL in Princeton, NJ, where he is now Deputy Lead of the Weather and Climate Dynamics Division and the head of the FV3 Team. His research interests are in atmospheric dynamics, numerical methods for fluid dynamics, and mesoscale meteorology.

Recordings: All the PPTs and recordings from the past webinars can be accessed at the UFS webinar web page.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php
Title: Three Miles from Safety - USS Conestoga 100th Anniversary
Presenter(s): Robert Schwemmer, West Coast Regional Maritime Heritage Coordinator for NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries; and special guests Peter Hess, family descendant of George Franklin Kaler, Chief Machinist's Mate USS Conestoga; and Alexis Catsambis, Archaeologist for Naval History and Heritage Command
Date & Time: 25 March 2021
7:00 pm - 8:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Robert Schwemmer, West Coast Regional Maritime Heritage Coordinator for NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries; and special guests Peter Hess, family descendant of George Franklin Kaler, Chief Machinist's Mate USS Conestoga; and Alexis Catsambis, Archaeologist for Naval History and Heritage Command

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: On March 25, 1921, USS Conestoga departed San Francisco Bay's Mare Island en route to Pearl Harbor and vanished with 56 sailors. One of the top unsolved maritime mysteries in U.S Navy history, Conestoga's final resting place was unknown for 95 years. During a NOAA Maritime Heritage cruise in Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary in September 2014, a previously undocumented multibeam sonar target thought to be a shipwreck was investigated. Utilizing a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) launched from the R/V Fulmar, three survey dives were conducted to characterize the target, which proved to be a 170-foot-long steel-hulled steam-powered ocean-going tug of late 19th or early 20th century vintage.On March 23, 2016, after additional investigation and research, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the U.S. Navy announced the discovery of the wreck of USS Conestoga within the sanctuary waters, closing the ship's final chapter and honoring the lost sailors. Relive Conestoga's history, final voyage and discovery. Learn about the technology and detective work that goes into shipwreck identification. Find out about NOAA maritime heritage resources and before the webinar, watch "Three Miles from Safety: The Story of the USS Conestoga," a Blue Ocean Film Festival finalist.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded?
Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/OneNOAASeminars.php

30 March 2021

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: Spring Flood Outlook
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, Rob Shedd NOAA/NWS/Mid-Atlantic River Forecast Center, Jason Elliott and Ron Horwood NOAA/NWS/Northeast River Forecast Center
Date & Time: 30 March 2021
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Spring Flood Outlook

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center,
Rob Shedd, NOAA/NWS/Mid-Atlantic River Forecast Center, and
Jason Elliott/Ron Horwood, NOAA/NWS/Northeast River Forecast Center.


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:
This webinar is over. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of March conditions and a discussion with the NWS/River Forecast Centers on the spring flood outlook.

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: “100 Years Later: Women Shattering Glass Ceilings” One-on-One Conversation with U.S. Department of Commerce Secretary Gina M. Raimondo
Presenter(s): U.S. Department of Commerce Secretary Gina M. Raimondo
Date & Time: 30 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: 100 Years Later: Women Shattering Glass Ceilings One-on-one conversation with U.S. Department of Commerce Secretary Gina M. Raimondo

Presenter(s): U.S. Department of Commerce Secretary Gina M. Raimondo


Sponsor(s): U.S. Department of Commerce

Remote Access: This webinar is over. Closed Captions will be available.

Abstract: The Department of Commerce is proud to join the nation in recognizing National Women's History Month (NWHM). Observed annually in March, NWHM is a time to commemorate and encourage the celebration of the remarkable role of women in our nation's history. The theme for 2021 is: 100 Years Later: Women Shattering Glass Ceilings in honor of the brave women who fought, then and now, for voting rights and the women who are making a difference and shattering the glass ceilings they face in their personal and professional lives. Secretary Raimondo will be interviewed by Acting Deputy Secretary Wynn Coggins.

Bio(s): https://www.commerce.gov/about/leadership/gina-m-raimondo

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php
Title: NOAA’s Virtual Open House - A Dive Into Daily Life at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Kodiak Lab in Kodiak, AK (Geared toward Grades 2-8)
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 30 March 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA's Virtual Open House - A Dive Into Daily Life at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Kodiak Lab in Kodiak, AK (Geared toward Grades 2-8)

Presenter(s): TBD

Sponsor(s): Grab your VIP' pass to go backstage at NOAA's Virtual Open House https://www.noaa.gov/heritage/stories/grab-your-vip-pass-to-go-backstage-at-noaa-s-virtual-open-house

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1899369365981551117The webinar will also be live-streamed on Facebook Live on the NOAA Fisheries Alaska Facebook page - @NOAAFisheriesAK

Abstract: Come along for a virtual tour of the NOAA Fisheries Alaska Fisheries Science Center's lab in Kodiak, Alaska! Visit our touch tank and meet our resident critters. Dive into Alaska waters with our dive operations research team! Take a look at juvenile red king crab as we investigate the impacts of ocean acidification. This NOAA Live! Alaska Webinar is part of our NOAA Open House Series during which we will "travel" (virtually) across the country to showcase some of the amazing places our NOAA scientists, engineers, educators, technicians, and interns work. (Live ASL interpretation)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

31 March 2021

Title: Earth’s Ice Imbalance
Presenter(s): Tom Slater, PhD, Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling, University of Leeds
Date & Time: 31 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view this webinar recording thru adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p3pxxd82g953/

Title: Earth's Ice Imbalance

Presenter(s): Tom Slater, PhD, Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling, University of Leeds
When: Wednesday, March 31 2021, 12-1pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar, here. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: We combine satellite observations and numerical models to show that Earth lost 28 trillion tonnes of ice between 1994 and 2017. Arctic sea ice (7.6 trillion tonnes),Antarctic ice shelves (6.5 trillion tonnes), mountain glaciers (6.1 trillion tonnes), the Greenland ice sheet (3.8 trillion tonnes), the Antarctic ice sheet(2.5 trillion tonnes), and Southern Ocean sea ice (0.9 trillion tonnes) haveall decreased in mass. Just over half (58 %) of the ice loss was from the northern hemisphere, and the remainder (42 %) was from the southern hemisphere. The rate of ice loss has risen by 57 % since the 1990s - from 0.8 to 1.2 trillion tonnes per year - owing to increased losses from mountain glaciers, Antarctica,Greenland, and from Antarctic ice shelves. During the same period, the loss of grounded ice from the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets and mountain glaciers raised the global sea level by 34.6 3.1 mm. The majority of all ice losses were driven by atmospheric melting (68 % from Arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers ice shelf calving and ice sheet surface mass balance), with the remaining losses (32 % from ice sheet discharge and ice shelf thinning) being driven by oceanic melting. Altogether, these elements of the cryosphere have taken up 3.2% of the global energy imbalance.

Bio(s): Thomas Slater studied for an undergraduate and masters degree in Physics at the University of Leeds between 2010 and 2015. After that he moved departments within the University to the School of Earth and Environment, where he started a PhD in Remote Sensing supervised by Andy Shepherd and Mal McMillan at the Centre for Polar Observation. After completing his PhD in 2019, he stayed on at the Centre as a postdoctoral research fellow, and has been working there since as land icealtimetry expert.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning is provided.Slides and

Recordings: WIll likely be available a few days after the webinar; contact Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: #SafePlaceSelfie...saving lives one post at a time
Presenter(s): Douglas Hilderbrand, National Weather Service, Preparedness & Resilience Program Lead
Date & Time: 31 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library; library.seminars@noaa.gov

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Presenter(s): Douglas Hilderbrand, National Weather Service, Preparedness & Resilience Program Lead

Abstract: #SafePlaceSelfie is a social media campaign led by the National Weather Service to encourage everyone across the country/globe to know what natural hazards are in your area, identify your safe location(s) and post a "SafePlaceSelfie" over social media. Knowing where to go is one of the most important preparedness actions, and practicing by physically going to your safe place can help save lives, whether that be from a tornado, lightning, rip currents, or any other natural hazard.

Keywords: social media, safe place, preparedness

Bio(s): Doug Hilderbrand is a meteorologist at NWS headquarters who leads the Weather-Ready Nation Ambassador and StormReady programs, and leads an NWS-wide external engagement strategy team. Doug is approaching 20 years with the NWS, with stints as a forecaster, R2O team lead, NOAA policy adviser, and communications specialist.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/seminars

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php
Title: Understanding the Role Coastal Marshes Play in Protecting Communities from Storm Surge and Flooding
Presenter(s): Y. Peter Sheng, University of Florida, pete.pp@gmail.com; Sarah Fernald, Hudson River NERR, sarah.fernald@dec.ny.gov
Date & Time: 31 March 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Understanding the Role Coastal Marshes Play in Protecting Communities from Storm Surge and Flooding

Presenter(s): Peter Sheng, Professor Emeritus and Adjunct Professor, University of Florida; Sarah Fernald, Research Coordinator, Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve

Sponsor(s): This seminar is sponsored by the NERRS Science Collaborative

Seminar Contact(s): Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: As coastal communities strive to safeguard themselves from increasing storm risks, they are looking for ways to maximize the protective powers of their natural features such as coastal wetlands. This project closely examined one marsh complex that lies adjacent to Piermont Village along the Hudson River Estuary in New York. Village residents wanted to better understand how Piermont Marsh would buffer their village from storm-induced flooding and waves, and whether a proposed plan to restore native cattails within a small area of the Phragmites-dominated marsh would lessen its buffering capacity.In this webinar, two members of the project team will explain how the team used state of the art modeling methods to simulate marsh vegetation and storm impacts produced by a series of past and future storm scenarios. By looking back at Superstorm Sandy in 2012 and projecting how much worse the damage could have been without the marsh, the research team was able to put a dollar value on Piermont Marsh's buffering services. They will share key takeaways from the research and explain how the findings are informing planning for the marsh and shoreline infrastructure.

Bio(s): Please visit here for biographical information about our speakers.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Ocean, Ice and Atmosphere in the Changing Arctic: Science and technology development in the Office of Naval Research Arctic Program
Presenter(s): Craig M. Lee, Senior Principal Oceanographer at the University of Washington Applied Physics Lab| Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 31 March 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - PMEL - EcoFOCI Virtual Seminar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Ocean, Ice and Atmosphere in the Changing Arctic: Science and technology development in the Office of Naval Research Arctic Program / EcoFOCI Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Craig M. Lee, Senior Principal Oceanographer at the University of Washington Applied Physics Lab| Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: This webinar is over.

Abstract: An overview of recent science results and technological developments stemming from a sequence of ONR-supported research efforts focused on changes in atmosphere-ice-ocean dynamics in the Beaufort Sea.

Bio(s): Dr. Lee is a physical oceanographer specializing in observations and instrument development. His primary interests include: (1) upper ocean dynamics, especially mesoscale and submesocale fronts and eddies, (2) interactions between biology, biogeochemistry and ocean physics and (3) high-latitude oceanography.

Slides: Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker.

Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: NOAA’s Virtual Open House - Science in the Sky: How NOAA's Aircraft Operations Center supports research from 500 to 45,000ft in Lakeland, FL (Geared toward Grades 2-8)
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 31 March 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA's Virtual Open House - Science in the Sky: How NOAA's Aircraft Operations Center supports research from 500 to 45,000ft in Lakeland, FL (Geared toward Grades 2-8)

Presenter(s): TBD

Sponsor(s): Grab your VIP' pass to go backstage at NOAA's Virtual Open House https://www.noaa.gov/heritage/stories/grab-your-vip-pass-to-go-backstage-at-noaa-s-virtual-open-house

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/793340933116444944

Abstract: Want to fly with NOAA? NOAA aircraft are used to measure conditions in a hurricane, count marine mammals, map our coastline, and even measure water content in snow. NOAA's Aircraft Operations Center manages, operates, and maintains 10 specialized aircraft to support NOAA research. Come and learn about our team of NOAA Corps officers and federal employees who fly, instrument, repair, and support our crewed and uncrewed aircraft. Walk along the hangar floor, visit our calibration lab and metal shop, and see our aircraft up-close. This NOAA Live! Webinar is part of our NOAA Open House Series during which we will "travel" (virtually) across the country to showcase some of the amazing places our NOAA scientists, engineers, educators, technicians, and interns work. (Live ASL interpretation)
Resources to access at home:NOAA Marine and Aviation Operations captioned tours of aircraft: P-3, G-IV, Twin Otter, and King Air (each is 10-15 minutes long)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

1 April 2021

Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Hernan Garcia, NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI; Lori K. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS
Date & Time: 1 April 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series, for NOAA Seminar Coordinators
We will be offering this webinar later this year and a recording will be available.

Presenter(s):
NOAA Science Seminar team: Lori Brown, NESDIS, Hernan Garcia, NESDIS and Tracy Gill, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Science Seminar Team, NESDIS and NOSSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Lori.Brown@noaa.gov, & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here:
You must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT Admin folks may need to do it, so please do it well ahead of time. To download and test your ability to use Adobe Connect, go to:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, please register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandbolts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar;
this link works only if you have downloaded the adobe connect software.
Attendees are muted and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google (Chrome), IE or Edge in Windows or Safari or Chrome if using a Mac.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have live captioning.

Abstract:
We will be presenting an overview of the NOAA Science Seminar Series, along with how-tos for submitting events to the seminar calendar, best practices, accessibility, and a general opportunity for contributors to ask questions and discuss how we manage and promote the Science Seminar Series. We are interested in learning suggestions and tips from you! We will be running this meeting at least one more time this year to give all contributors who can't make the first meeting an opportunity to attend, and, the session will be recorded.

Slides:
PDF of slides will be available from contacts.

Recordings:
An mp4 recording will be available from contacts.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas
Title: Strategies for Successful Research to Application Projects: A Case Study of the National Sea Grant College Program
Presenter(s): Hollis Jones, Graduate Student, University of California Davis
Date & Time: 1 April 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Strategies for Successful Research to Application Projects: A Case Study of the National Sea Grant College Program

Presenter(s): Hollis Jones, Graduate Student, University of California Davis. At time of publication, a Louisiana Sea Grant Knauss fellow with the National Sea Grant Office.

Co-Authors: Rebecca Briggs, Alison Krepp, Elizabeth Rohring, both with the National Sea Grant College Program, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, NOAA.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/hollisjones/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: As coastal landscapes change, management professionals are working hard to transition research results into actions that support scientifically informed decisions impacting coastal communities. This type of research faces many challenges due to competing priorities, but boundary spanning organizations can help mediate these conflicts by forming transdisciplinary collaborations. The National Sea Grant College Program (Sea Grant), a NOAA-based agency, is a networked organization of 34 university-based state programs that uses a three pronged approach of research, extension, and education to move academic research into the hands of stakeholders and decisionmakers. The objective of this study is to better understand strategies for successful research to application (R2A) projects that address complex environmental problems occurring in a socio-economic context. Specifically, this work examines R2A projects from the Sea Grant network to better understand the drivers for project development and common deliverables produced through the R2A process. We identify five common facilitating factors that enabled successful' R2A across all projects: platforms for partnerships, iterative communication, transparent planning, clear examples of R2A, and graduate student involvement. By providing examples of successful frameworks, we hope to encourage more organizations to engage in the R2A process. And here is a link to the publication.

Bio(s): Hollis Jones is a PhD student at the University of California Davis where her research focuses on improving the resilience of coastal ecosystems and communities. Prior to joining the UC Davis community she was a 2019 Knauss Marine Policy Fellow with the National Sea Grant Office where she worked to understand the challenges facing research-to-application transitions. She also holds a MS from Louisiana State University where she studied the impacts of combined stressors on eastern oysters in the Gulf of Mexico.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning is provided.Slides and

Recordings: WIll likely be available a few days after the webinar; contact Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Science to Support Management of a Fishery with Competing Interests: the Atlantic Menhaden Story
Presenter(s): Dr. Amy Schueller, Research Fish Biologist, Southeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 1 April 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Science to Support Management of a Fishery with Competing Interests: the Atlantic Menhaden Story

Presenter(s): Dr. Amy Schueller, Research Fish Biologist, Southeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): National Stock Assessment Science Seminars. Kristan Blackhart, NMFS, kristan.blackhart@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/520430053487944716

Abstract: The Atlantic menhaden fishery is the largest, by volume, on the Atlantic Coast of the United States, and Atlantic menhaden are an important forage species for predators such as striped bass and bluefish. Driven by the competing interests for this stock, the last assessment process included both single and multi-species models, which allowed for addressing multiple management objectives and for development of ecological reference points.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: CSI Oyster: a community science initiative on environment-oyster interaction in Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Emily Rivest, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Bart Merrick, NOAA Environmental Science Training Center
Date & Time: 1 April 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: CSI Oyster: a community science initiative on environment-oyster interaction in Chesapeake Bay

Presenter(s): Emily Rivest, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Bart Merrick, NOAA Environmental Science Training Center

Sponsor(s): Sharing Ocean Acidification Resources for Communicators and Educators (SOARCE)
jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/286926768641395470
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Abstract: High school students around Chesapeake Bay are helping to solve the mystery of how water chemistry and oysters interact. In this webinar, Emily Rivest, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, and Bart Merrick, NOAA Environmental Science Training Center, will introduce the CSI: Oyster project, a community science initiative focused on understanding how water chemistry and other aspects of water quality affect oyster survival and growth. Where, with two high schools in Virginia and Maryland, they collected oyster and water data for one year. The speakers will share the results uncovered with their high school partners and also share the benefits of participating in this project for the students.

Bio(s): Dr. Emily Rivest is an Assistant Professor at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, William& Mary. Her research focuses on understanding how ecologically and economically important species, like oysters, hard clams, and American lobster, will respond to climate change. She is an expert in ocean acidification research, conducting experiments in the laboratory to simulate future water conditions and using oceanographic instruments to characterize the dynamics coastal environments of her study species. Emily is passionate about doing science that matters, often collaborating directly with members of the aquaculture industry. She is also an avid science communicator, aiming to share the importance of her work with policy, industry, and public audiences.Bart Merrick has been an environmental educator for 25 years, working with teachers and students from Massachusetts to Virginia, promoting environmental literacy and fostering understanding, awareness and respect for the natural world. Upon receiving a Masters in Environmental Science, Bart worked with MD-DNR as the Education Coordinator for CBNERRs. Currently, Bart Merrick is the Education Coordinator for NCBO's Environmental Science Training Center focusing his on integrating the use of environmental science and technology with field-based learning experiences.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning is provided.Slides and

Recordings: Will be available a few days after the webinar to all registrants via Google Drive

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

5 April 2021

Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, April 2021: Progress in S2S Prediction
Presenter(s): Dr. Lucas Harris, NOAA GFDL, and Dr. Ben Green, University of Colorado/CIRES
Date & Time: 5 April 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, April 2021 Webinar

Presenter(s): Dr. Lucas Harris, NOAA GFDL, and Dr. Benjamin Green, University of Colorado/CIRES

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Weather Program Office S2S Program and NOAA NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration Modeling Program Division

Seminar Contact(s): Karen Keith, karen.keith@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/403016501181344267

Abstract: This monthly webinar series was created to share ongoing work within NWS and OAR at the Weeks 3-4 and S2S timescales. We would like to foster a relaxed, informal dialogue among forecasters, modelers and researchers. This month, Lucas Harris will speak about "Seamless S2S Prediction at GFDL: coupled and convective-scale prediction". Ben Green will speak about "Accelerating Progress in Subseasonal to Seasonal Prediction Capabilities by Improving Subgrid-Scale Parameterizations in the Unified Forecast System."

Recordings: Available on the Weeks 3-4/S2S Webinar Series website: https://vlab.ncep.noaa.gov/web/weeks-3-4-s2s-webinar-series

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

6 April 2021

Title: Acoustic and camera-based methods to observe fish and fish behavior: Applications at spawning aggregations and in fishing gear
Presenter(s): Dr. K.C. Wilson, Physical Scientist, NOAA/NMFS/Alaska Fisheries Science Center, MACE
Date & Time: 6 April 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Acoustic and camera-based methods to observe fish and fish behavior: Applications at spawning aggregations and in fishing gear.

Presenter(s): Dr. K.C. Wilson, Physical Scientist, NOAA/NMFS/Alaska Fisheries Science Center, MACE

Sponsor(s): Alaska Fisheries Science Center Seminar Series. Mike Levine and Pearl Rojas, AFSC; mike.levine@noaa.gov, pearl.rojas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mcc18c76bd7dda6407df660fc58b8a65bWebex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 949 6661
Meeting Password: fishOr by phone:
+1-415-527-5035 Access code: 199 949 6661

Abstract: Both acoustics and underwater cameras enable the observation of marine fish and fish behavior in-situ. Active acoustics are widely used to characterize fish and/or invertebrate distributions, and provide biomass estimates for stock assessments. Other acoustic methods, such as acoustic tagging and passive acoustics, are also important for science and management. Cameras are frequently used to make in-situ observations at fixed locations, and can also be used to conduct video transects and census and length measurements. Together, acoustics and cameras provide a powerful combination to observe fish and fish behavior. I will present studies from two projects that have combined acoustic and camera-based methods to address research questions related to fish spawning aggregations and commercial fishing bycatch reduction devices.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: It's All Relative: Examining Heat Severity Using the United States Climate Reference Network
Presenter(s): Jared Rennie, NOAA NESDIS NCEI NCICS
Date & Time: 6 April 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: It's All Relative: Examining Heat Severity Using the United States Climate Reference Network

Presenter(s): Jared Rennie, NOAA NESDIS NCEI NCICS

Sponsor(s): NOAA NESDIS NCEI Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Jake.Crouch@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register for NCEI Seminar Series at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8000258119885413643,
after registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.
If you are joining from a telephone, dial: 562-247-8321, Access code: 559-160-771

Abstract: Extreme heat is one of the most pressing human health climate risks in the United States, exacerbated by an aging population, warming climate, and suburban sprawl. Much work in heat health has focused on temperature-only thresholds, which do not measure the physiological impact of heat stress on the human body. The National Weather Service incorporates Heat Index (HI) in its warning criteria. While the HI metric incorporates both temperature and relative humidity, it is calculated in the shade, and does not take into account factors such as wind and solar radiation. For human health applications, wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) is a more comprehensive measure of how heat affects humans, and is currently used in operational settings by industry, military, and athletic organizations. In this study, observations from the United States Climate Reference Network (USCRN) will provide the critical weather elements required to estimate WBGT. A data set including WBGT has been developed for the114 USCRN sites in the contiguous 48 states for the period 2009-2020. Using this derived heat exposure product, two separate analyses of heat are conducted. The first analysis is based on standardized anomalies, which places current heat state in the context of a long-term climate record. Traditional approaches require a lengthy record (usually 30 years) in order to generate a climatology. In this study, a method will be described that generates robust climatologies from shorter time series such as those of the USCRN. In the second analysis approach, heat events will be classified and organized by severity and duration. There is no consensus as to what defines a heat event, so a comparison of absolute thresholds (>= 90F >= 100F, etc.) and relative thresholds (>= 95th percentile, >= 98th percentile, etc.) based on several heat measures will be examined. The scale of WBGT tends to be in a lower range than other heat measures. Within this context, the issues of communicating WBGT to the general public will be discussed.

Bio(s): Jared Rennie is a research meteorologist at NCICS, which is co-located with NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) in Asheville, NC. He joined NCICS in 2010 and currently supports maintenance and expansion of major land surface datasets, including NCEI's Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) and United States Climate Reference Network (USCRN). These products are essential to addressing climate data needs on a national and international scale. Mr. Rennie is also interested in data visualization and is constantly working on new ways to convey weather and climate data to the public. In 2019, he received a certificate in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), from NC State. He has also completed scientific research using various weather datasets, working with organizations such as FEMA, CDC, the Society of Actuaries, and the Department of Defense.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

7 April 2021

Title: NOAA Science Report Seminar: Science and Technology Highlights
Presenter(s): Emily A. Smith, Ph.D., Program Manager, Argo, Glider, and Sea Level /Global Ocean Monitoring and Observing Program, OAR, NOAA; Carey Kuhn, Ph.D., Ecologist, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, NOAA; Katie Lohr, Heritage Coordinator, National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, NOS, NOAA; Julia Powell, Chief, Navigation Services Division, NOAA/NOS Office of Coast Survey
Date & Time: 7 April 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Science Report Seminar Series: Four projects presented about science and technology highlights

Presenter(s): Multiple NOAA Presenters - see below.

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3687206059398171659 (when you register for one webinar, you are signing up for the entire NOAA Science Report Seminar series)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Research and Development Enterprise Committee. Points of contact: Emma Kelley (emma.kelley@noaa.gov) & NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Using uncrewed surface vehicles to track marine mammals, precision marine navigation dissemination, expansion of the Argo Program, and telepresence science missions in National Marine Sanctuaries - these are just a few of NOAA's scientific accomplishments that are included in the 2020 NOAA Science Report. The NOAA Science Report celebrates NOAA's R&D by showcasing science highlights, bibliometrics, NOAA's scientific workforce, and more. This seminar features 4 science and technology highlights from the 2020 NOAA Science Report (to be released soon).Keywords: Argo, Uncrewed Systems, Telepresence, National Marine Sanctuaries, Marine Navigation, Marine MammalsThe Argo Program Expands to Reach More of the Ocean Than Ever Before

Presenter(s):
Emily A. Smith, Ph.D., Program Manager, Argo, Glider, and Sea Level /Global Ocean Monitoring and Observing Program, OAR, NOAA

Bio(s):
Emily is the Program Manager of the US Argo Program, the Global Sea Level Observing System (GLOSS) network, gliders in boundary currents and ocean heat content products. This includes strategic planning for the observing systems and managing budgets. Emily also coordinates the Adopt a Drifter program, which facilitates partnerships with schools in the US and abroad so they can track drifting buoys and use the data in real time in their classrooms. Before coming to NOAA, Emily spent several years teaching middle school students and this program helps keep her connected to the education world.For the past few years, she has led the development of a series of workshops focused on women in the sciences and training for leadership skills. She partnered with the Earth Science Women's Network to help get these workshops off the ground and plans to continue these workshops into the future.Emily has a B.S in Biology, a B.S. in Biology Education (both from University of Southern Mississippi), an M.Ed. in Secondary Education with an emphasis in Environmental Science from University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and a PhD in Oceanography from Louisiana State University.Using Uncrewed Surface Vehicles to Track Marine Mammals on Extended Foraging Trips for the First Time



Presenter(s):
Carey Kuhn, Ph.D., Ecologist, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, NOAA

Bio(s):
Dr. Carey Kuhn received her B.S. in Zoology from Arizona State University and a Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolution from the University of California Santa Cruz. She completed a National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center where she is currently an ecologist for the Marine Mammal Laboratory. Dr. Kuhn's research focuses on understanding predator-prey relationships for the depleted northern fur seal population in Alaska. She uses bio-logging technology to characterize fur seal foraging habitat and examine how fur seals respond to variation in prey availability. This research provides essential information that can be used to develop ecosystem-based approaches for northern fur seal and fisheries management.

Telepresence Science Missions in National Marine Sanctuaries

Presenter(s):
Katie Lohr, Heritage Coordinator, National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, NOS, NOAA

Bio(s):
Katie Lohr is the Science and Heritage Coordinator with the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation in support of NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. Her work focuses on enhancing opportunities for research in national marine sanctuaries and communicating sanctuary science. She previously spent a year with the sanctuary program as a 2019 John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow. Katie holds a Ph.D. in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences from the University of Florida, where her research focused on restoration aquaculture.

Precision Marine Navigation Dissemination



Presenter(s):
Julia Powell, Chief, Navigation Services Division, NOAA/NOS Office of Coast Survey

Bio(s):
Julia Powell is the Chief of the Office of Coast Survey Navigation Services Division. NSD provides a focal point for customer requests on charting issues, short-term (fast response) hydrographic surveys, and Nautical Publications, such as Coast Pilot. The division coordinates and represents OCS at constituent events such as harbor safety meetings, waterways management meetings, cooperative workshops, conferences, and trade shows, as well as standing up NOAA's Precision Marine Navigation Program. Julia graduated with a degree in Geological Sciences from Cornell University and has a Masters in Information Systems from the University of Maryland.
She is chair of the IHO's S-100 working group that is working on the framework standard that underpins the next generation navigation products, such as underkeel clearance management, high-resolution bathymetry and other integrated products.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Into the Great Wide Open: A riverscape approach to understanding how Atlantic salmon colonize new habitat
Presenter(s): Danielle Frechette, Maine Department of Marine Resources
Date & Time: 7 April 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: Into the Great Wide Open: A riverscape approach to understanding how Atlantic salmon colonize new habitat

Presenter(s): Dr. Danielle Frechette, Maine Department of Marine Resources

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division; coordinator: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m1057b1e24ab938d4f6b7801fbe053454; Password (if needed): p8WXqHE3rf4. Join by video system by dialing 1996016027@noaanmfs-meets.webex.com; Join by phone by dialing +1-415-527-5035 US Toll, Access code: 199 6016027. The talk will be recorded; link to recording available upon request.

Abstract: Allowing reproductive individuals to colonize novel habitat or recolonize previously occupied habitat is increasingly being considered as a tool for salmon recovery. Successful application of these techniques to salmonid restoration require thorough understanding of how adult salmon use space during colonization to ensure that programs achieve desired outcomes. We used acoustic telemetry to examine movements and habitat use by Atlantic salmon during colonization of novel habitat in a Canadian river in relation to environmental conditions, habitat characteristics, and intrinsic fish characteristics. Returning adults were captured and transported by truck upstream of an impassible waterfall and released into habitat previously unoccupied by Atlantic salmon. Habitat characteristics and environmental data were obtained from a unique combination of remote sensing, ground surveys, and continuous records of river temperature and discharge. Our findings provide a generalized picture of how Atlantic salmon use the riverscape during colonization and can be used to optimize future reintroduction programs.

Bio(s): Danielle Frechette is a Marine Resource Scientist for the Maine Department of Marine Resources, Division of Sea Run Fisheries and Habitat. She received her master's degree at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, and earned her PhD at INRS in Quebec, Canada, studying Atlantic salmon movement patterns and habitat use during colonization of novel habitat. She is now the lead biologist for the Salmon for Maine's Rivers program, an exciting new endeavor designed to help jumpstart recovery for federally endangered Atlantic salmon in Maine. She also serves as the DMR liaison for anew citizen science effort that will track presence and absence of sea run fish in Maine's coastal streams and rivers to inform restoration and management actions. She is especially interested in how Maine's Atlantic salmon and other sea run fishes use river habitats during spawning migrations and how well they will adapt to climate change.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Environmental-Health Warning Systems, the Case of Cold for Quebec
Presenter(s): Fateh Chebana, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique
Date & Time: 7 April 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Environmental-Health Warning Systems, the Case of Cold for Quebec

Presenter(s): Fateh Chebana, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique

Sponsor(s): NOAA National Weather Service, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Seminar Contact(s): michelle.hawkins@noaa.gov, kimberly.mcmahon@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/866620085105683983
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract: For several years, the effects of climate and the environment on human health have been increasingly observed in several geographic regions through certain health outcomes (mortality, hospitalization). In a prevention perspective, warning systems are implemented by the public health authorities to intervene during episodes of extreme environmental events. In Quebec, the SUPREME system (Surveillance and Prevention of the Impacts of Extreme Meteorological Events on Public Health System) has been used for a decade. SUPREMME is a source of information that affords regional and departmental interveners in the public health network access, at a single site through a secure portal, to health and meteorological information concerning the health impacts of extreme weather events. On the other hand, health alerts are only about heat and all-cause mortality, as well as with basic statistical approaches in general. It is therefore important to adapt to the specific health impacts that may be linked to other extremes such as extreme cold or air pollution, using appropriate methodologies (statistics and machine learning). In this talk, we focus on cold-mortality/hospitalisation system in Quebec and we briefly present a number of methodological developments and perspectives.

Bio(s): Fateh Chebana is a professor at Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) and he has a PhD in Statistics from University of Paris. His main research focuses on statistical hydrology as well as environmental health with statistical approaches. In particular, he is interested in hydrological risk assessment with advanced approaches and more complex situations, as well as in developing environmental health-warning systems based on recent machine learning techniques.

Recordings: A recording of this presentation will be available on the National Weather Service YouTube channel. Please check https://www.youtube.com/user/usweathergov for updates.

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Title: Environmental Justice Research and Action: Examples from a Community-University Relationship in Massachusetts
Presenter(s): Patricia Fabian and Madeleine Scammell, Boston University School of Public Health, and Roseann Bongiovanni, GreenRoots
Date & Time: 7 April 2021
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title:
Environmental Justice Research and Action: Examples from a Community-University Relationship in Massachusetts

Presenter(s):
Dr. Patricia Fabian and Dr. Madeleine Scammell of Boston University School of Public Health and Roseann Bongiovanni, Executive Director of GreenRoots, a Chelsea-based environmental justice organization

Sponsor(s):
Green Infrastructure, Climate, and Cities Seminar by the Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar Contact(s):
Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov) or Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu)

Remote Access:
The webinar is hosted on Zoom. You must register to attend at https://drexel.zoom.us/webinar/register/7916165290025/WN_jYEiqzxfQDi2AG_svihSnQ

Accessibility:
Contact Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu) if needed.

Abstract:
Dr. Patricia Fabian and Dr. Madeleine Scammell of the Boston University School of Public Health, and Roseann Bongiovanni, Executive Director of GreenRoots, a Chelsea-based environmental justice organization, will share examples of climate justice projects including the ongoing C-HEAT: a collaborative study of heat exposure in Chelsea and East Boston, Massachusetts.

Bio(s):
Patricia Fabian is an Associate Professor in the Environmental Health Department at Boston University School of Public Health. Her research spans the fields of environmental health and engineering, respiratory infectious disease transmission, system sciences and geographical information systems (GIS), with a focus on asthma, indoor air, housing and other aspects of the built environment. She co-directs this project with Dr. Madeleine Scammell, and is interested in understanding the role housing plays in exposure to heat in order to design equitable adaptation strategies.
Madeleine Scammell is an Associate Professor of Environmental Health at the Boston University School of Public Health and a resident of Chelsea, MA. She studies exposure to heat, metals and pesticides among workers in Central America and leads the Mesoamerican Nephropathy Occupational Study (MANOS). Her research is community-based with a focus on developing research methods that incorporate community perspectives using the tools of epidemiology and risk analysis.Roseann Bongiovanni is the executive director of GreenRoots, the Chelsea-based environmental justice organization and collaborator on the C-HEAT project. She has her master's in public health from Boston University.

Recordings:
All sessions are recorded and archived on the CCRUN website.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body

8 April 2021

Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series
Presenter(s): Hernan Garcia, NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI; Lori K. Brown, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS
Date & Time: 8 April 2021
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:



Title: Contributing to the NOAA Science Seminar Series, for NOAA Seminar Coordinators
We will be offering this webinar later this year and a recording will be available.

Presenter(s):
NOAA Science Seminar team: Lori Brown, NESDIS, Hernan Garcia, NESDIS and Tracy Gill, NOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Science Seminar Team, NESDIS and NOSSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Lori.Brown@noaa.gov, & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register here:
You must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT Admin folks may need to do it, so please do it well ahead of time. To download and test your ability to use Adobe Connect, go to:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, please register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nutsandbolts/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar;
this link works only if you have downloaded the adobe connect software.
Attendees are muted and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google (Chrome), IE or Edge in Windows or Safari or Chrome if using a Mac.


Accessibility:
This webinar will have live captioning.

Abstract:
We will be presenting an overview of the NOAA Science Seminar Series, along with how-tos for submitting events to the seminar calendar, best practices, accessibility, and a general opportunity for contributors to ask questions and discuss how we manage and promote the Science Seminar Series. We are interested in learning suggestions and tips from you! We will be running this meeting at least one more time this year to give all contributors who can't make the first meeting an opportunity to attend, and, the session will be recorded.

Slides:
PDF of slides will be available from contacts.

Recordings:
An mp4 recording will be available from contacts.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas
Title: Monitoring marine sanctuary usage with National Marine Sanctuary Visitor Counting Process (NMS-COUNT)
Presenter(s): Robert Burns, West Virginia University; Ross Andrew, West Virginia University
Date & Time: 8 April 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Tittle: Monitoring marine sanctuary usage with NMS-COUNT

Presenter(s): Robert Burns and Ross Andrew of West Virginia University

Sponsor(s): NOAA National MPA Center and OCTO (MPA News, OpenChannels, EBM Tools Network)

Seminar contact: zac.cannizzo@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6528615684946965007

Abstract: Visitor use drives change in both ecological and economic conditions in marine areas. The National Marine Sanctuary Visitor Counting Process (NMS-COUNT) was developed and conceptualized to address the needs of NMS managers for visitor counting and assessment. NMSs sites function as underwater parks in the US, and are federally protected for their diverse and exceptional biological and cultural resources. In open water areas, many NMS sites are accessible through almost infinite locations, so a rigorous set of methods to count those visitors, assess their activities, and evaluate their expenditures related to NMS site visitation is needed. The NMS-COUNT process considers the local context of sites and builds off the strength of each site using local expert panels to identify the most feasible visitor monitoring solutions. Pilot studies at Gray's Reef NMS and Florida Keys NMS have produced thousands of visitor observations through wide arrays of sampling techniques. Traditional observation and counting methods are supplemented with specific survey questions and non-traditional techniques for visitor counting (e.g., acoustic signals, social media data, satellite imagery classification, vessel ID tracking data). The methods best suited to a specific site are pulled from the myriad of potential tools, producing a customized counting process that is tailored to the unique attributes of a specific protected area. The NMS-COUNT process can be customized to different marine contexts and holds great potential for learning about visitors in marine settings that are challenging to sample.

More information on the Marine Protected Areas Center Webinar Series:
https://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives at: https://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/archive.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Environmental structuring of pelagic predator behavior at the macro- and microscale: understanding the diversification and fishery susceptibility of molas and thresher sharks
Presenter(s): Martin Arostegui, Ph.D., University of Washington, Applied Physics Laboratory, Air-Sea Interaction & Remote Sensing Department
Date & Time: 8 April 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Tittle: Environmental structuring of pelagic predator behavior at the macro- and microscale: understanding the diversification and fishery susceptibility of molas and thresher sharks

Presenter(s): Martin Arostegui, Ph.D., University of Washington, Applied Physics Laboratory, Air-Sea Interaction & Remote Sensing Department

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam. POC: email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:

JOIN VIA WEBINAR
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Meeting number: 907 420 216
Meeting password: rWpTQ2yrh33

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Abstract: Pelagic predator behavior is structured by biotic and abiotic factors at multiple scales that influence when and where such species are likely to be found in the world's oceans. Environmental variation in these factors, from the macroscale among regions to the microscale among depth strata, sustains ecological diversification and determines susceptibility to anthropogenic activity. With two case studies, each at a different scale, my colleagues and I examine what drives pelagic predator behavior and how that knowledge can benefit their conservation. Using observer data from a commercial fishery spanning > 50- in longitude, and > 45- in latitude, we show the macroscale, spatiotemporal segregation of three ocean sunfish species in the eastern North Pacific. Next, we investigate the modulation of behavior by microscale environmental forcing using high-resolution telemetry data from a pelagic thresher shark in the Red Sea, in concert with oxygen measurements from an autonomous ocean glider and light-based estimations of scattering layer distribution. Together, these case studies highlight how a holistic understanding of animal behavior requires cross-disciplinary research at multiple scales, some of which are only now becoming quantifiable with the advent of new technologies and analytical methods.

BIOGRAPHY: Dr. Martin Martini Arostegui is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Air-Sea Interaction and Remote Sensing Department of the University of Washington Applied Physics Laboratory. His research focuses on the behavior and ecology of marine and aquatic fishes, particularly in the context of physiology, movement, and trophic interactions. Focal species include those of recreational or commercial fishery interest, as well as those that are understudied and underappreciated.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: A Preliminary Report Out on the 2021 Developmental Testbed Center (DTC) Unified Forecast System (UFS) Evaluation Metrics Workshop
Presenter(s): Tara Jensen, NCAR/RAL and DTC & Geoffrey Manikin, NOAA/EMC
Date & Time: 8 April 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A Preliminary Report Out on the 2021 DTC UFS Evaluation Metrics Workshop

Presenter(s): Tara Jensen, NCAR/RAL and DTC
Co-Author: Geoff Manikin, NOAA/EMC

Sponsor(s): Office of Science and Technology Integration (OSTI) Modeling Division, National Weather Service of NOAA

Seminar Contacts: Yan Xue, Ph.D. (Yan.Xue@noaa.gov) and Stacy Mackell (stacy.mackell@noaa.gov)

Access: Please register for this webinar in order to participate:https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/4459256733598232588After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract: The Developmental Testbed Center (DTC), in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Unified Forecast System's Verification and Validation Cross-Cutting Team (UFS-V&V), a three-day workshop to identify key verification and validation metrics for UFS applications. The workshop was held remotely 22-24 February, 2021. Approximately 300 participants registered for this event from across the research and operational community. The goal of this workshop was to identify and prioritize key metrics to apply during the evaluation of UFS research products and guiding their transition from research-to-operations (R2O). Because all UFS evaluation decisions affect a diverse set of users, workshop organizers encouraged members from government, academic, and private-sector organizations to participate in the workshop. The organizing committee used the outcome of the 2018 DTC Community Unified Forecast System Test Plan and Metrics Workshop to form the foundation of the workshop and to prepare and disseminate a series of three pre-workshop surveys to interested parties. The results of the surveys were used to prepare the discussion points of the breakout groups to streamline the metrics prioritization process. During the workshop, the opening plenary was focused on providing background information to the participants. The participants then joined breakout groups to discuss how to apply the prioritized metrics to the full R2O development stages and gates. The breakout groups were stratified by time scales (Short Range, Medium Range, Sub-Seasonal and Seasonal). There was also a break-out group focused on how to define the research-to-operation gates and assign metrics to them. This presentation will provide a preliminary report out of the findings from the workshop and discuss what the committee perceives are the next steps.
Speaker

Bio(s): Tara Jensen is a Project Manager at NCAR/RAL and the METplus Task Lead within the DTC. Geoff Manikin is a member of the Verification, Post-Processing, and Product Generation Group at NOAA/EMC and the lead of the EMC Model Evaluation Group. Both are Co-Chairs of the UFS Verification and Validation Working Group and led the planning committee for the workshop.

Recordings: All the PPTs and recordings from the past webinars can be accessed at the UFS webinar web page.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas! Please fill out our short OneNOAA Science Seminar survey.
Title: Towards Predicting the Fate of Reef Corals
Presenter(s): Anderson Mayfield, NOAA/University of Miami Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Science
Date & Time: 8 April 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Towards Predicting the Fate of Reef Corals

Presenter(s):

Anderson Mayfield, NOAA/University of Miami Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Science

Sponsor(s):

Coral Collaboration Webinar Series - NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program

Seminar Contact(s):
Robin Garcia, robin.garcia@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Adobe Connect information:
1. To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/
2. Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio.

Abstract:
Corals reefs are threatened the world over by the rapidly rising temperatures associated with global climate change (GCC), as well as other insults of predominantly anthropogenic origin. In this presentation, I will first summarize work myself and my colleagues have been undertaking in recent years that address 1) charting and characterizing previously unstudied reefs (so that we know exactly what stands to be lost) and 2) the physiological implications of GCC on coral health. Then, I will discuss how I have been using the data from such field and laboratory studies, respectively, to develop artificial intelligence-driven models that enable us to identify resilient coral colonies (refugia). Although it may be too late to save many reefs, this novel capacity will allow us to enact coral reef triage, in which coral colonies and their respective habitats are scored along a physiological resilience spectrum (from highly stress susceptible to markedly resilient).

Bio(s):

Anderson Mayfield, PhD is a scientist with the NOAA/University of Miami Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Science

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

13 April 2021

Title: Coastal Blue Carbon- What is it and how is NOAA engaged?
Presenter(s): Zachary Cannizzo, Visiting Climate Scientist and Climate Coordinator, National Marine Sanctuary Foundation in support of NOAA NOS Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and NOAA OAR Climate Program Office; Carolyn Currin, Research Ecologist, NOAA NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science; Janine Harris, Marine Habitat Resource Specialist, NOAA NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation Restoration Center; Chris Kinkade, NERRS Research Lead, NOAA NOS Office for Coastal Management; Gina Mason, Policy Analyst, NOAA NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation Restoration Center; Joanna Peth, Policy Analyst, NOAA NOS Policy and Constituent Affairs Division; Kelly Samek, Restoration Lead, NOAA OAR National Sea Grant Office; Alec Shub, Knauss Sea Grant Fellow, NOAA OAR Climate Program Office; Susan-Marie Stedman, Wetland Policy Lead, NOAA NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation; Lisa Vaughan, Program Manager, International Research and Applications Project, NOAA OAR Climate Program Office; Lauren Wenzel, Director, National Marine Protected Areas Center, NOAA NOS National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 13 April 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Coastal Blue Carbon - What is it and how is NOAA engaged?

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/9094897815675128079

Abstract: Salt marshes, mangroves, and seagrass beds are incredibly efficient at capturing and storing large quantities of carbon -- which is referred to as coastal blue carbon. The National Ocean Service (NOS), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) work together to identify synergies and opportunities for collaboration, and to leverage knowledge and resources on coastal blue carbon. This webinar will feature the cross line office Coastal Blue Carbon clarifying what coastal blue carbon is, describing NOAA's unique role in science, measurement, national and international policy, and management associated with carbon storage and sequestration in coastal blue carbon habitats.

Presenter(s): The NOAA Coastal Blue Carbon Team, which includes: Zachary Cannizzo, Visiting Climate Scientist and Climate Coordinator, National Marine Sanctuary Foundation in support of NOAA NOS Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and NOAA OAR Climate Program OfficeCarolyn Currin, Research Ecologist, NOAA NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean ScienceJanine Harris, Marine Habitat Resource Specialist, NOAA NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation Restoration CenterChris Kinkade, NERRS Research Lead, NOAA NOS Office for Coastal ManagementGina Mason, Policy Analyst, NOAA NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation Restoration Center Joanna Peth, Policy Analyst, NOAA NOS Policy and Constituent Affairs DivisionKelly Samek, Restoration Lead, NOAA OAR National Sea Grant OfficeAlec Shub, Knauss Sea Grant Fellow, NOAA OAR Climate Program OfficeSusan-Marie Stedman, Wetland Policy Lead, NOAA NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation Lisa Vaughan, Program Manager, International Research and Applications Project, NOAA OAR Climate Program OfficeLauren Wenzel, Director, National Marine Protected Areas Center, NOAA NOS National Marine Sanctuaries

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: One fish, two fish, small fish, big fish! Northern fur seal consumption of walleye pollock and considerations for ecosystem-based fisheries management in the eastern Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Dr. Elizabeth McHuron, University of Washington, CICOES
Date & Time: 13 April 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: One fish, two fish, small fish, big fish! Northern fur seal consumption of walleye pollock and considerations for ecosystem-based fisheries management in the eastern Bering Sea

Presenter(s): Dr. Elizabeth McHuron, University of Washington, CICOES

Sponsor(s): Alaska Fisheries Science Center Seminar Series. Mike Levine and Pearl Rojas, AFSC; mike.levine@noaa.gov, pearl.rojas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mcc18c76bd7dda6407df660fc58b8a65bWebex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 949 6661
Meeting Password: fishOr by phone:
+1-415-527-5035 Access code: 199 949 6661

Abstract: Marine mammals are significant consumers of prey populations, and as such, should be considered in ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) when they prey on commercially valuable species. The Eastern Pacific stock of northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus), which has been declining since the late 1990s, overlaps spatially and temporally with the eastern Bering Sea walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) fishery during the summer and fall. There have been few recent attempts to quantify fur seal pollock consumption despite the ongoing decline, which is an important first step in understanding the role of food availability in the decline and in determining the need to incorporate them into EBFM of pollock. To remedy this, we developed age- and sex- specific bioenergetic models and combined these with empirical diet estimates of fur seals from the Pribilof Islands. The resulting size-specific estimates of pollock consumption were compared with that of the three fish predators (pollock, cod, and arrowtooth flounder) currently included in the multi-species stock assessment model CEATTLE. Fur seal consumption of pollock rivaled that of individual fish predators. I will discuss interannual variation in size-specific pollock consumption by fur seals, why previous attempts likely underestimated fur seal consumption of walleye pollock, and ongoing efforts to incorporate fur seals into the CEATTLE model.

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