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NOAA Science Seminar Series
Past 2021 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

17 December 2021

Title: December 2021 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP/University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 17 December 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Seminar Series
Title: December 2021 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract:
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 December 2021

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Justin Glisan, Iowa State Climatologist
Date & Time: 16 December 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook

Presenter(s): Justin Glisan, Iowa State Climatologist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

December 2021 topics include drought severity and impacts; recent and potential climate/weather impacts, including but not limited to, what La Nia could mean for the region, winter soil moisture update and recharge outlook, recent warmth, Great Lakes & river conditions, mountain, plains and Midwest snow (or lack thereof); and providing the latest trends and outlooks for precipitation, temperature, and snow potential through late fall and winter (2 weeks to 6 months).

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Planning for coastal and marine heritage in a changing climate
Presenter(s): Erin Seekamp, PhD, Professor, North Carolina State University
Date & Time: 16 December 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Erin Seekamp, PhD, Professor, North Carolina State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA National MPA Center and OCTO

Abstract: Description: Heritage sites represent our inherited traditions, objects, monuments, and land and seascapes that provide cultural connections and identities as well as societal benefits. Yet, coastal heritage sites are overwhelmingly at risk from climate change induced threats, such as storm-related flooding and erosion and sea level rise. Coupling climate risks with the political and financial constraints facing heritage management, it becomes clear that damage, destruction or loss of heritage is inevitable. In this webinar you will learn about strategies for adapting and accommodating loss that center planning efforts around heritage values, enable transformation of heritage sites, and enhance transparency when difficult decisions must be made.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here https://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/archive.html

Seminar POC for questions: Zac Cannizzo, zac.cannizzo@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

Title: Harmful Algal Bloom Complexities: Community Dynamics of a Microcystis Bloom (2021 Knauss Fellows Lunch & Learn Series)
Presenter(s): Helena Pound, Knauss Marine Policy Fellow, Department of Energy Wind Energy Technologies Office
Date & Time: 16 December 2021
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Harmful Algal Bloom Complexities: Community Dynamics of a Microcystis Bloom (2021 Knauss Fellows Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Helena Pound, Knauss Marine Policy Fellow, Department of Energy Wind Energy Technologies Office

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Abstract: As harmful algal blooms increase in occurrence, duration, and severity around the world, it is essential to understand conditions leading to bloom formation and why they persist. Harmful algal blooms dominated by the cyanobacterial genus Microcystis occur in bodies of water around the world and provide an ideal system in which to study top-down controls on bloom dynamics.
Keywords: harmful algal blooms, Lake Erie, Microcystis

Bio(s): Helena Pound is a 2021 Knauss Fellow with the Department of Energy Wind Energy Technologies Office, where she works on the offshore wind portfolio. There she splits her time between managing environmental projects and assisting the DOE Offshore Wind lead with a variety of major offshore wind initiatives and strategic planning. She has a masters degree in marine biology from the College of Charleston in South Carolina, and recently completed her PhD in microbiology at the University of Tennessee Knoxville. When she is not thinking about science, Lena can be found rock climbing with her husband or napping on the couch with her cat.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: What Controls Salt Marsh Edge Erosion and Marsh Resilience? (2021 Knauss Fellows Lunch & Learn Series)
Presenter(s): Lucila Bloemendaal, Knauss Interagency Marine Policy Fellow, NOAA Office of Coast Survey
Date & Time: 16 December 2021
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: What Controls Salt Marsh Edge Erosion and Marsh Resilience? (2021 Knauss Fellows Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Lucila Bloemendaal, Knauss Interagency Marine Policy Fellow, NOAA Office of Coast Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Abstract: The survival of salt marshes depends on their ability to maintain vertical elevation and areal extent. In the lateral direction, marsh edges can expand laterally or undergo edge erosion through mass failure or continuous particle erosion through waves and tidal processes. This presentation outlines a study evaluating the possible relationships between marsh shoreline type within the Great Marsh in Massachusetts and major geotechnical parameters along the marsh edge.
Keywords: salt marsh, erosion, sea level rise

Bio(s): Lucila Bloemendaal is a 2021 Knauss fellow working in NOAA Coast Survey and supporting the National Ocean Mapping, Exploration, and Characterization Council as one of the Executive Secretariat. She is a PhD Candidate at Boston University studying coastal geology and salt marsh morphology. She primarily studies East Coast salt marshes, and previously did research in paleoceanography at Duke University where she earned her Bachelors.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: GOES-R Socioeconomic Benefits Study: Phase 1 – Benefits of Improved Hurricane Forecasts to the General Public
Presenter(s): Michael Jamilkowski, Senior Project Scientist for The Aerospace Corporation's Civil Systems Group
Date & Time: 16 December 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: GOES-R Socioeconomic Benefits Study: Phase 1 " Benefits of Improved Hurricane Forecasts to the General Public

Presenter(s): Michael Jamilkowski, Senior Project Scientist for The Aerospace Corporation's Civil Systems Group

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NESDIS GOES-R Program Office, Satellite Book Club (SBC). Please click here if you would like to subscribe to the Satellite Book Club

Point of Contact: Kashaud Bowman (kashaud.bowman@noaa.gov)


Abstract: This presentation summarizes the first phase of a GOES-R Program Office commissioned independent study to employ economist's methods, such as value chain analysis, to monetize the value of benefits accrued by GOES-R using Hurricane forecasts and warnings as an initial Pathfinder example.

Bio(s): Michael retired as a Colonel from a full USAF career as both a Weather and Space Operations Officer in 2002. He then worked several years for Raytheon as their Program Office Manager on the NPOESS, NPP and JPSS ground system programs. He holds bachelor's and master's degrees in Meteorology, is an AMS Fellow and a graduate of the USAF Undergraduate Space Training school.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: 2020 YouTube Session Recordings can be found here. 2021 YouTube Session Recordings can be found here. Recordings posted to VLab can be found here.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Describing changes to life stage specific habitat area and niche overlap between Atlantic cod and haddock on the U.S. northeast shelf
Presenter(s): Ryan Morse, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 16 December 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Describing changes to life stage specific habitat area and niche overlap between Atlantic cod and haddock on the U.S. northeast shelf.

Presenter(s): Ryan Morse, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Using the National Water Model at the Northeast River Forecast Center
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University, and Jason Elliott, NOAA/NWS/Northeast River Forecast Center
Date & Time: 16 December 2021
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Using the National Water Model at the NOAA/NWS/Northeast River Forecast Center

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University,
Jason Elliott, NOAA/NWS/Northeast River Forecast Center


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s):
Ellen Mecray

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of December conditions and Jason Elliott will show the new National Water Model and its use at the NE River Forecast Center.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

15 December 2021

Title: Volcanoes under the sea and exploring the 53% of US waters that remain unmapped
Presenter(s): Dr. Paula Bontempi, Dean, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island; Dr. Adam Soule, Director of OECI, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography; and Coralie Rodriguez, PhD student, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography. Hosted by Dr. Aurora Elmore, Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration
Date & Time: 15 December 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Volcanoes under the sea and exploring the 53% of US waters that remain unmapped (presented LIVE from aboard the E/V Nautilus)
Part of the OECI Webinar Series
.

Presenter(s): Dr. Paula Bontempi (Dean, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island); Dr. Adam Soule (Director of OECI, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography); and Coralie Rodriguez (PhD student, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography). Hosted by Dr. Aurora Elmore (Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration).

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and Ocean Exploration Cooperative Institute (OECI)

Seminar Contacts: Aurora Elmore (Aurora.Elmore@noaa.gov) and Joanne Flanders (Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov)

Closed Captions: https://www.captionedtext.com/client/event.aspx?EventID=4928206&CustomerID=321

Abstract: The U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone in the Central Pacific is dotted with hundreds of volcanic seamounts that are home to important ecosystems and valuable mineral resources. Join us from the Ocean Exploration Trust's E/V Nautilus as we make the first exploration of the Chautauqua Seamounts to uncover their secrets and learn how we explore, why we explore, and where we explore volcanoes under the sea.


Bio(s): Dr. Paula Bontempi (Dean, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island), Dr. Adam Soule (Director of OECI, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography), Coralie Rodriguez (PhD student, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography), and Dr. Aurora Elmore (Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recordings will be available at https://www.youtube.com/c/innerspacecenter/videos after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Environmental DNA and RNA for advanced management and accurate surveillance of aquatic invasive species
Presenter(s): Dr. Subba Rao Chaganti, Assistant Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research, University of Michigan
Date & Time: 15 December 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view this webonar thru Adobe connect here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pmvz5i2ooc4e/

Title: Environmental DNA and RNA for advanced management and accurate surveillance of aquatic invasive species

Presenter(s): Dr. Subba Rao Chaganti, Assistant Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research, University of MichiganWhen: Wednesday, December 15, 12-1pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Omics and NOAA National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Katharine.Egan@noaa.gov, NOAA/OAR 'Omics Coordinator and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, NOAA/NOS Science Seminar CoordinatorAfter registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

Abstract: For successful management of bio-invasions or monitoring threatened or endangered species in the Great Lakes or elsewhere, managers and stakeholders need timely and robust scientific advice. This advice often relies on the measurable parameters by using conventional approaches such as visual surveys. Visual surveys are often expensive and labor intensive, and it is hard to detect rare species via this method. During the last decade, using environmental DNA (eDNA) in aquatic habitats has become a powerful tool to improve management of resources through the assessment of a species' distribution and entire community compositions. eDNA could be used to detect a targeted individual species or multiple species in the ecosystem. Although eDNA methods are rapid and robust, there are some concerns with the methodology. eDNA could hang out in the environment for a long time or sometimes it can be transported within the water column in both lotic and lentic systems, which may result in improper interpretation of a species' spatiotemporal distribution. These drawbacks often raise major concerns for the managers and stakeholders in decision-making. A new methodology, environmental RNA (eRNA) could solve these problems. We used eRNA from non-indigenous Dreissena mussels as a model organism to avoid such drawbacks for eDNA methodology. The concentration of eRNA degrades much faster than the eDNA, providing a predictor for estimating time since genomic material is released into the environment from the organism. The new methodology based on the eDNA and eRNA can accurately detect and distinguish fresh from legacy eDNA, and potentially decrease noise from eDNA transport. By understating how to interpret detection and quantification of markers from varying genomic origins, we undoubtedly enhance environmental genomic monitoring across spatial and temporal scales.

Bio(s): Dr. Subba Rao Chaganti is an Assistant Research Scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research, University of Michigan. He is also a recipient of the Early Career Environmental Research Award from the American Society of Microbiology in 2019. He is currently serving as Editorial Board member for Water and Hydrobiology Journals. His research focuses on understanding the structural and functional diversity of the microbial community (bacteria, archaea, and protists) and how they mutually interact within the aquatic, terrestrial and host associated environments, how they are influenced by biotic and abiotic mechanisms, and how they are altered by aquatic invasive species and other anthropogenic inputs. His hobbies include biking and playing chess.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.Slides and

Recordings: A recording of the webinar and PDF of presentation slides will usually be sent after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject; visit the NOAA Science Seminar website for more information. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

14 December 2021

Title: 2021 NIHHIS-CAPA 2021 Urban Heat Island Mapping Campaign Results
Presenter(s): Cooper Martin, Director, Sustainability and City Solutions, National League of Cities; Joey Williams, Manager, CAPA Strategies; Liv Yoon, Postdoctoral Research Scholar, Columbia University; Janice Barnes, Chief Sustainability Officer, City of Phoenix; Kirstin Dow, Professor, University of South Carolina; Bronte Murrell, Heat Relief Coordinator, Town of Clarksville; Lucy Mellen, Heat Relief Coordinator, City of Richmond; Dana Habeeb, Assistant Professor, Indiana University; Sara Benson, Education Associate, Museum of Science, Boston; Melanie Grate, Climate Resiliency Manager, Mystic River Watershed Association
Date & Time: 14 December 2021
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: 2021 NIHHIS-CAPA Urban Heat Island Mapping Campaign Results

Presenter(s):
Cooper Martin, Director, Sustainability and City Solutions, National League of CitiesJoey Williams, Manager, CAPA Strategies Liv Yoon, Postdoctoral Research Scholar, Columbia University

Janice Barnes, Chief Sustainability Officer, City of Phoenix
Kirstin Dow, Professor, University of South CarolinaBronte Murrell, Heat Relief Coordinator, Town of ClarksvilleLucy Mellen, Heat Relief Coordinator, City of RichmondDana Habeeb, Assistant Professor, Indiana UniversitySara Benson, Education Associate, Museum of Science, BostonMelanie Grate, Climate Resiliency Manager, Mystic River Watershed Association

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Climate Program Office, National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS), CAPA Strategies, National League of Cities

Seminar Contact(s): Morgan Zabow, morgan.zabow@noaa.gov

Abstract: The 2021 Urban Heat Island mapping campaign cycle officially closed in September, and the reports are being released to cities. This 90 minute webinar includes an overview of the 2021 UHI cohort with presentations from four of the campaigns (Charleston, South Carolina; Manhattan/Bronx, New York; Richmond & Clarksville, Indiana; and Mystic River Watershed, Massachusetts) who will discuss their overall experience, what they learned, and how they plan to use their mapping results. After the presentations, there will be a discussion and Q&A between the campaigns, moderated by Cooper Martin of the National League of Cities. This webinar will also serve as a platform to inform cities interested in applying for the 2022 cohort.

Bio(s):

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be shared after the webinar and will be available here: https://nihhis.cpo.noaa.gov/News-Events/ArtMID/7905/ArticleID/2437/NOAA-and-Partners-to-Release-Urban-Heat-Island-Mapping-Results.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: The Maine-New Hampshire inshore trawl survey: We catch more than lobster
Presenter(s): Rebecca Peters, Maine Department of Marine Resources
Date & Time: 14 December 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Maine-New Hampshire inshore trawl survey: We catch more than lobster

Presenter(s): Rebecca Peters, Maine Department of Marine Resources (MEDMR)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA/NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Abstract: The Maine-New Hampshire Inshore Trawl Survey (ME-NH Survey) is a fishery-independent survey run by the Maine Department of Marine Resources in collaboration with commercial fishers that was implemented twenty-one years ago to study shallow coastal zones in Maine and New Hampshire that were inaccessible to federal surveys. Prior to this survey, management strategies for commercially and recreationally important species in ME and NH waters were based on monitoring programs and studies conducted outside of these waters, where fishing pressures and environmental conditions are entirely different. This presentation will cover the success of the ME-NH Survey over the past twenty-one years and explain how this survey has filled a significant data gap and is a platform for research in an area of the Gulf of Maine that could not be surveyed previously.

Bio(s): Rebecca is a marine resource scientist at Maine Department of Marine Resources where she is in charge of leading the Maine " New Hampshire Inshore Trawl Survey (which will be the focus of the talk). Rebecca received her MS from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore in 2016 and her BS From Old Dominion University.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Submerged NC: American Indian Log Boats - Every Tree Tells a Story
Presenter(s): Shannon Ricles, Education and Outreach Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 14 December 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: American Indian Log Boats - Every Tree Tells a Story (Submerged NC Series)

Presenter(s): John Mintz, State Archaeologist and Chris Southerly, Deputy State Archaeologist NC Office of State Archaeology

Sponsor(s): Monitor NMS Submerged NC webinar series. Submerged North Carolina is part of the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series.

Seminar Contact(s): Shannon.Ricles@noaa.gov

Abstract: The Underwater Branch of the North Carolina Office of State Archaeology (OSA) has launched a log boat initiative to inventory, identify, recover, preserve, and exhibit American Indian Log Boats. Partnering with North Carolina American Indian Tribes, OSA staff are collaborating to protect these important but threatened resources that demonstrate North Carolina's Indian population as being first on the land.Past discoveries of dugout canoes from coastal North Carolina provide background for a discussion of recent recoveries and finds from South River near Fayetteville, North Carolina, and Lake Waccamaw in Columbus County, highlighting work with the Waccamaw-Siouan Tribe and Coharie Indian Tribe.To learn more about Monitor National Marine Sanctuary, visit https://monitor.noaa.gov.To learn more about the North Carolina Office of State Archaeology, visit https://archaeology.ncdcr.gov/

Bio(s): John Mintz, State Archaeologist, NC Office of State ArchaeologyA native of Brunswick County, North Carolina, John received his BS in social science with a concentration in anthropology in 1985 from Appalachian State University and his MA in anthropology in 1989 from the University of Arkansas. John joined OSA in 1998 serving in many roles, including site registrar, Assistant State Archaeologist, and Deputy State Archaeologist-Land before becoming the State Archaeologist in 2017.Prior to joining the OSA, John worked for the NC Department of Transportation (NCDOT) as a staff archaeologist. Before joining NCDOT, he was a private sector archaeology project manager with R. Christopher Goodwin and Associates where his responsibilities included directing Phase I, II, and III-level archaeological projects. While at the University of Arkansas, he was a research assistant and project archaeologist for the Arkansas Archaeological Survey.John brings more than 35 years of experience investigating historic, prehistoric, and maritime archaeological sites throughout the Southeast and Middle Atlantic regions. His research interests include economic anthropology and ethnohistory. He has a strong, enthusiastic, and abiding commitment to and engagement in public archaeology field schools and cross-divisional partnerships and collaborations. He is a member of the OSA scientific diving program.Chris Southerly, Deputy State Archaeologist " Underwater, NC Office of State ArchaeologyChris Southerly joined the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the Office of State Archaeology as a staff archaeologist in 2000. As the Deputy State Archaeologist-Underwater, Chris is responsible for supervising professional staff in the identification, inventory, evaluation, and management of terrestrial and submerged archaeological resources throughout the state, and the curation of associated archaeological artifacts and data. He serves as co-principle investigator for the Queen Anne's Revenge Shipwreck Project and as the UAB Diving Safety Officer managing the equipment, logistics, and training of the OSA scientific diving program.Chris did undergraduate work in biochemistry at Virginia Tech before earning his BS in anthropology from James Madison University. He also did graduate work in historical archaeology at the College of William & Mary before turning his focus to underwater archaeology and completing his MA in maritime history with the Program in Maritime Studies at East Carolina University.Chris has worked on and supervised terrestrial and underwater projects from prehistoric to modern times in the mid-Atlantic and southeastern United States, and abroad, conducting contract, research, and regulatory archaeology. Between 2003 and 2010, he directed archaeological fieldwork and diving operations on the Queen Anne's Revenge Shipwreck Project, including serving as lead instructor for the DiveDown program, teaching recreational scuba divers about North Carolina's underwater cultural heritage.Slides, Recordings and Other Materials: You can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at:
https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

To learn more about Monitor National Marine Sanctuary, visit https://monitor.noaa.gov.
To learn more about the NC Office of State Archaeology, visit https://archaeology.ncdcr.gov/

Subscribe to the One NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Greenhouse gas exchange of Phragmites and Spartina species in tidal wetlands with different restoration history
Presenter(s): Karina V.R. Schafer, Ecosystem Ecologist, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ
Date & Time: 14 December 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view this recording thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p0mxfjaypxe0/

Title: Greenhouse gas exchange of Phragmites and Spartina species in tidal wetlands with different restoration history.
A NOAA seminar series - Rethinking the Common Reed Grass - Phragmites

Presenter(s): Karina V.R. Schfer, Ecosystem Ecologist, Dep't of Earth and Environmental Science, Rutgers University, Newark, NJCo-Authors:
- Tomer Duman, Dep't of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
- Rajan Tripathee, Dep't of Earth and Environmental Science, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ
- Kristen Tomasscicio, Dep't of Earth and Environmental Science, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Tracy Gill (NOAA/NOS science seminar coordinator) and Judith Weis,
Professor Emerita, Rutgers University

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Wetlands occupy only a small fraction of terrestrial ecosystems but have an outsized impact in carbon burial and hence carbon sequestration. Albeit, the flood protection, sea level mitigation, carbon burial, and nutrient filtration are ecosystem services to be cherished, the concern for methane emission has been increasing. Management for maximizing carbon sequestration and at the same time minimizing methane emissions are thus sought after in wetland mitigation projects. Here, we present data from the NJ Meadowlands, an extensive area in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary comparing the CO2and CH4 fluxes of a restored and a natural wetland. The restored wetland with Spartina alterniflora emitted more CO2 than the natural wetland with Phragmites and Spartina patens as measured with the eddy covariance system. Likewise, methane emissions were higher in the former than in the latter wetland. However, by comparison Phragmites and S alterniflora had higher CH4 fluxes than S. patens as measured with chambers. Hence in the overall analysis, Phragmites has not only higher CO2sequestration but also higher methane emission, and in contrast S. patens had lower CO2 sequestration but also lower CH4 emission. Other studies in the NJ Meadowlands have found that both species communities are able to keep up with sea level rise and thus provide the ecosystem services needed in this estuary.

Bio(s): Karina Schfer received her master's in science at the University of Bayreuth and her PhD at Duke University. Her primary research centers around global change and its effects on the carbon cycle in terrestrial ecosystems. The research focuses on refining carbon budgets of forest ecosystems through ecophysiological measurements and modeling. While it is extremely important to assess carbon uptake and storage and changes to uptake capacity that might be expected under rising CO2 conditions, it is also important to investigate climate solutions such as afforestation, reforestation, and forest management that are a new endeavor of the research group.In addition to forests, wetlands are storing and sequester carbon dioxide but also emit methane. Therefore, another aspect of her research centers on methane emissions and associated methane budgets in coastal and freshwater wetlands. With the help of eddy-covariance measurements, sampling of vegetation and modeling, the ecosystem functions of wetlands are explored.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides may be shared and the recording will be shared, after the webinar with all who register, and with anyone who requests them from the seminar contacts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + La Niña/ENSO Outlook
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia, Michelle L'Heureux, NOAA/NWS/CPC
Date & Time: 14 December 2021
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Climate Overview: Sandra Rayne | Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur/Todd Hamill | NWS Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox | University of Georgia

Spotlight: La Nia/ENSO Outlook: Michelle L'Heureux | NOAA/NWS/CPC

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NIDIS, (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

The December 14 webinar will also feature a presentation on "La Nia/ENSO Outlook."

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

13 December 2021

Title: U.S. Southwest Drought Briefing
Presenter(s): Jon Mayer, Utah Climate Center and Heidi Kratsch, University of Nevada - Reno
Date & Time: 13 December 2021
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Drought Conditions Update
Jon Mayer | Utah Climate Center

Landscape Water Conservation During Drought
Heidi Kratsch | University of Nevada - Reno

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USDA Southwest Climate Hub

Seminar Contacts: Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The most recent United States Drought Monitor indicates that nearly all of the Southwest is experiencing some level of drought, but summer and early fall precipitation has improved conditions. This short drought briefing will focus on winter drought conditions and forecasts for Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. This will be followed by a presentation on landscape water conservation during drought.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Karin Bumbaco, Office of the WA State Climatologist; Andrea Bair, NOAA NWS Western Regional Office; Heidi Huber-Sterns, Oregon State University Extension; and Chris Goemans, Colorado State University
Date & Time: 13 December 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Climate Recap & Current Conditions
Karin Bumbaco | Office of the WA State Climatologist

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Andrea Bair | NOAA NWS Western Regional Office

Smoke Ready Community
Heidi Huber-Sterns | Oregon State University Extension

An Analysis of the Impact of Drought on Agriculture, Local Economies, Public Health, and Crime Across the Western United States
Chris Goemans | Colorado State University

Seminar Contact(s): Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
According to the November 23, 2021 U.S. Drought Monitor, 89% of the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) is in drought, with over 40% of the region in Extreme/Exceptional Drought (D3/D4). Atmospheric Rivers continue to hit parts of the region and more are on the way, They are improving conditions, but precipitation deficits in some areas are huge. This webinar will feature recent and current conditions, outlooks, as well as presentations on a "Smoke Ready Community" and "An Analysis of the Impact of Drought on Agriculture, Local Economies, Public Health, and Crime Across the Western United States."

These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: How Multisatellite Water Vapor Products Assist Forecasters
Presenter(s): John Forsythe, Senior Research Associate, NOAA Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere - CIRA, Colorado State University
Date & Time: 13 December 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: How Multisatellite Water Vapor Products Assist Forecasters

Presenter(s): John Forsythe, Senior Research Associate, NOAA Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), Colorado State University

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Ten years ago the vision of developing an experimental layered precipitable water product for weather forecasters was to supplement and complement the then newly operational Blended Total Precipitable Water product. Today, the CIRA-developed Advected Layered Precipitable Water (ALPW) is being prepared to become an operational hourly satellite moisture product in early 2023 and is widely used by National Centers and Weather Forecast Offices. In the past ten years applications have been developed for ALPW that span many different hazardous weather events such as heavy precipitation, tropical cyclone environment characterization and severe weather such as tornadoes. ALPW is produced via fusion of passive microwave water vapor retrievals from polar orbiting satellites, including SNPP and NOAA-20. ALPW allows forecasters to see the origins and transport of upper-level moisture, especially when converging and aligned with low level moisture can many times be the difference between an ordinary weather event and an extraordinary one. Recent case studies and applications of ALPW for several different hazardous weather events that have occurred in different parts of the country and at different times of the year will be presented.The path from a research idea at a cooperative institute to a product widely used by forecasters will be described. Lessons learned during this experience will also be discussed.


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10 December 2021

Title: Three Minute Thesis Webinar: NOAA's Uncrewed Systems
Presenter(s): Captain Philip Hall, NOAA Uncrewed Systems Operations Center; Adrienne Sutton, Ph.D., NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab; Greg Foltz, Ph.D., NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory; Kimberly Galvez, Ph.D., NOAA Ocean Exploration; Rob Downs, NOAA Office of Coast Survey; Melissa Wagner, Cooperative Institute for Severe and High-Impact Weather Research and Operations working with the NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory; Katie Sweeney, NOAA Fisheries Alaska Fisheries Science Center; Andrea Vander Woude, Ph.D., NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab; Commander Paul Hemmick, NOAA Aircraft Operations Center
Date & Time: 10 December 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Three Minute Thesis

Remote Access: NOAA's Uncrewed Systems

Presenter(s):
Captain Philip Hall - NOAA Uncrewed Systems Operations CenterAdrienne Sutton, Ph.D. - NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab Greg Foltz, Ph.D. - NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryKimberly Galvez, Ph.D. - NOAA Ocean ExplorationRob Downs - NOAA Office of Coast SurveyMelissa Wagner - Cooperative Institute for Severe and High-Impact Weather Research and Operations working with the NOAA National Severe Storms LaboratoryKatie Sweeney - NOAA Fisheries Alaska Fisheries Science CenterAndrea Vander Woude, Ph.D. - NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research LabCommander Paul Hemmick - NOAA Aircraft Operations Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA Regional Collaboration Network Seminar Contacts: Keli Pirtle, keli.pirtle@noaa.gov and Bethany Perry, bethany.perry@noaa.gov

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided with the recording

Abstract: What's a Three Minute Thesis Webinar? Borrowing from a format used by universities across the country, colleagues from NOAA and partners will each have one slide and three minutes to present on their topic. There will also be time for questions from the audience between each group of speakers. We look forward to your attendance and feedback on the webinar - a way to get to know more about your colleagues, partners, noteworthy projects, unique ideas, and more!

Recordings: Unable to attend in person? A recording of the webinar will be made available at https://www.noaa.gov/regional-collaboration-network/regions-central on Monday after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

9 December 2021

Title: Telling the Story of Springer
Presenter(s): Donna Sandstrom, author, Orca Rescue!, and founder, The Whale Trail; Lynne Barre, recovery coordinator, NOAA Fisheries, Southern Resident killer whales; John Ford, research biologist, Fisheries and Oceans Canada; Lance Barrett-Lennard, Director, Marine Mammal Research Program, Ocean Wise; Robert Lohn, former Regional Administrator, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 9 December 2021
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Telling the Story of Springer

Panelists: Donna Sandstrom, author, Orca Rescue!, and founder, The Whale Trail; Lynne Barre, recovery coordinator, NOAA Fisheries, Southern Resident killer whales; John Ford, research biologist, Fisheries and Oceans Canada; Lance Barrett-Lennard, Director, Marine Mammal Research Program, Ocean Wise; Robert Lohn, former Regional Administrator, NOAA Fisheries

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Abstract: Almost 20 years ago a young killer whale named Springer brought the Northwest together. The young orca first spotted alongside ferries in Puget Sound turned out to be an orphaned Northern Resident killer whale hundreds of miles from home. The new book "Orca Rescue: the True Story of an Orphaned Orca Named Springer," describes how she was rescued, rehabilitated, and returned to her pod on the north end of Vancouver Island. Today she is thriving, with two calves of her own. Hear the inspiring story from the people who lived it, and its lasting lessons for the recovery of Southern Residents.This webinar is co-sponsored by the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and NOAA Fisheries.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at:
https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Model Diagnostics Task Force- A Walkthrough of the Technical Vision and the Diagnostics Package
Presenter(s): Aparna Radhakrishnan, Princeton University/NOAA GFDL and Wenhao Dong, UCAR/GFDL
Date & Time: 9 December 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Model Diagnostics Task Force- A Walkthrough of the Technical Vision and the Diagnostics Packages

Presenter(s): Aparna Radhakrishnan

Co-Author: Wenhao Dong

Sponsor(s): Office of Science and Technology Integration (OSTI) Modeling Division, National Weather Service of NOAA

Webinar Contacts: Stacy Mackell (stacy.mackell@noaa.gov) and Caroline Delgado (caroline.delgado@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Climate and weather model development requires ongoing improvements in the representation of a growing list of physical processes. Process-oriented diagnostics (PODs) seek to give insight into the physical mechanisms needed to guide model development. The Model Diagnostics Task Force package (MDTF Diagnostics) is an open-source Python-based unified framework that runs process-oriented diagnostics (PODs) on weather and climate model data. The software package promotes the development and integration of diagnostics by subject matter experts across government, academia, and the private sector to improve the understanding of underlying processes in models under development by NOAA-GFDL and NCAR.In this talk, we will provide an overview of the MDTF framework, encompassing both the technical and the scientific aspects. The technical overview will lay out the design goals and vision, encompassing key aspects such as Continuous Integration (CI), cloud computing and containerization to further strengthen collaborative development and foster community engagement. A science blurb centered around the Madden"Julian oscillation (MJO) process diagnostics and mesoscale convective systems based on GFDL simulations will be highlighted.

Bio(s): Aparna Radhakrishnan is the data and analytics lead at the Cooperative Institute for Modeling the Earth System (CIMES) at Princeton. Ms. Radhakrishnan is also affiliated with GFDL since 2009 and is presently the technical lead for Model Diagnostics Task Force. Her research interests are to identify and promote usable techniques for climate data access and analysis for a diverse group of users. She also believes that the most challenging problems do not necessarily have the most complicated solutions.Dr. Wenhao Dong is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory and the CPAESS Program at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research working with Drs. Yi Ming and John Krasting. He earned his Ph.D. from Tsinghua University in 2018. He has broad interests in model diagnostic and environmental data analysis. He is also fascinated by different extreme precipitating systems on various spatiotemporal scales, including low-pressure systems, tropical cyclones, mesoscale convective systems, etc.

Recordings: All the PPTs and recordings from the past webinars can be accessed at the UFS webinar web page.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: State Plane 2022: Where Things Stand and the Road Ahead
Presenter(s): Michael Dennis, Geodesist, NOAA/NOS National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 December 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: State Plane 2022: Where Things Stand and the Road Ahead

Presenter(s): Michael Dennis, Geodesist, NOAA/NOS National Geodetic Survey (NGS)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. POC: Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey


Abstract: This webinar provides an overview of the State Plane Coordinate System of 2022 (SPCS2022) is nearing completion. This presentation gives a preview of what to expect for SPCS2022, which is a mix of zones designed by NGS and by state stakeholders. Next steps include finishing the design reviews and getting stakeholder feedback, with a target of finalizing SPCS2022, fittingly, in the year 2022 itself.

Technical Content Rating: Intermediate - Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Reviving Salmon Traps for Selective Commercial Fishing
Presenter(s): Adrian Tuohy, M.S., Biologist, Project Manager Wild Fish Conservancy
Date & Time: 9 December 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Reviving Salmon Traps for Selective Commercial Fishing

Presenter(s): Adrian Tuohy, M.S., Biologist, Project Manager Wild Fish Conservancy

Sponsor(s): NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam series

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: Conventional harvest techniques used in mixed-stock commercial salmon fisheries frequently result in bycatch mortality, thereby constraining fishing opportunities and reducing the effectiveness of wild salmonid recovery efforts in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. To better allow for selective harvesting of hatchery-origin salmonids while reducing commercial fishery mortality of Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed salmonids, Wild Fish Conservancy and local fishers collaborated to engineer, construct, and evaluate the utility of the commercial salmon trap as an alternative to the conventional gill net in lower Columbia River salmon fisheries. As Wild Fish Conservancy's manager of the Columbia River fish trap project, I describe the historical research, engineering, deployment, and operational processes necessary to testing Washington and Oregon's first commercial salmon traps since 1935 and 1948, respectively. Next, I describe engineering advancements from 2016 through 2021 and bycatch post-release survival results of paired release-recapture and net pen holding studies for Chinook Salmon, Coho Salmon, Sockeye Salmon, and Steelhead at trap sites in Washington and Oregon. Findings of this six-year research investigation suggest that salmon traps have considerable potential to allow for selective harvesting of hatchery-origin fishes while reducing bycatch mortality of several ESA-listed salmonid stocks in the Columbia River and elsewhere throughout the region. Salmon traps are now in the process of being legalized within the lower Columbia River, providing commercial fishers an alternative gear to the conventional gill net and a more effective means to release wild salmonids unharmed.

Bio(s): Adrian Tuohy is a biologist and project manager with the nonprofit Wild Fish Conservancy (Duvall, WA). Adrian has managed Wild Fish Conservancy's six-year evaluation of commercial fish traps for selective harvest and bycatch mortality reduction in the lower Columbia River.

Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: ​NOAA's role at the intersection of environmental stewardship and economic development
Presenter(s): Richard W. Spinrad, Ph.D., Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator
Date & Time: 9 December 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA's role at the intersection of environmental stewardship and economic development
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series. These webinars are open to the public and NOAA staff.

Presenter(s): Richard W. Spinrad, Ph.D., Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere & NOAA Administrator

Sponsor(s): This event is part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series with sponsorship from the NOAA Science Council. The NOAA-wide NELS Series provides examples of NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. The NELS Series is part of the NOAA Science Seminar Series. For NELS questions, contact nels@noaa.gov

Abstract: As the Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and the NOAA Administrator, Dr. Spinrad has identified his top three priorities for NOAA:
  1. Establish NOAA as the U.S federal government authoritative source for climate products and services.
  2. Advance economic development without sacrificing environmental stewardship, with
    a particular focus on advancing the New Blue Economy.
  3. Integrate equity into everything we do, including how we build and provide services.
    Within NOAA, we will promote diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility in the workforce. Externally, we will provide equitable access to our products and services.
This seminar will examine the second priority, to clarify the balance of environmental stewardship and economic development. Though striking this balance is a challenge, we have a real opportunity for NOAA to improve its work of providing products and services that can be used by the public and private sectors to help make businesses and communities more climate resilient and effective. There is also an ever increasing number of representatives from commercial, insurance, supply chain and investment sectors acknowledging the value of NOAA's expertise, creating the possibility of whole new economic sectors being built-out based on environmental climate derivative products.
All of our work towards environmental stewardship and economic development will be done through a strong lens of equity, in keeping with the third priority. From this discussion, participants will learn more about the direct relationships between economic development, environmental stewardship, and equity.

Bio(s): https://www.noaa.gov/our-people/leadership/richard-w-spinrad-phd
Recording: To access the video after the webinar visit the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series, under the link for Past Presentations.
Notice: Please note the online service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: GOES-T Road to Launch and Operations
Presenter(s): Pam Sullivan, GOES-R/GeoXO Program Director
Date & Time: 9 December 2021
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: GOES-T Road to Launch and Operations

Presenter(s): Pam Sullivan, GOES-R/GeoXO Program Director

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NESDIS GOES-R Program Office, Satellite Book Club (SBC). Please click here if you would like to subscribe to the Satellite Book Club

Point of Contact: Kashaud Bowman (kashaud.bowman@noaa.gov)


Abstract: It's been a busy four years since the GOES-S launch. In that time, the GOES-R Program redesigned the GOES-T ABI thermal system, delivered the instrument and integrated it to the spacecraft, and took the satellite through environmental testing to ensure it will operate in the space environment. Right now, the program is in the final preparations for the launch on March 1st, 2022. This talk will provide an overview of the plans for launch, transit to geostationary orbit, post-launch checkout, and transition of GOES-T into service as GOES-West.

Bio(s): Pam Sullivan oversees the development, acquisition, integration, installation, and acceptance of major system elements, such as the spacecraft, instruments, launch services and ground systems, for the GOES-R satellites. Pam joined NOAA in May 2018. Previously, she managed the GOES-R Series Flight project for NASA, directing the development of the spacecraft, instruments, and launch services for the four satellites in the GOES-R series. Prior to her career at NASA, Pam served as an officer in the U.S. Air Force, training as a space shuttle flight controller and supporting military space experiments using the shuttle.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: 2020 YouTube Session Recordings can be found here. 2021 YouTube Session Recordings can be found here. Recordings posted to VLab can be found here.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

8 December 2021

Title: Gulf of Mexico Alliance 2021-2025: New Governors’ Action Plan IV and Data Portal (EBM/EBFM)
Presenter(s): Dave Reed, Gulf of Mexico Alliance; Laura Bowie, Gulf of Mexico Alliance
Date & Time: 8 December 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Gulf of Mexico Alliance 2021-2025: New Governors' Action Plan IV and Data Portal (EBM/EBFM)

Presenter(s): Dave Reed, Gulf of Mexico Alliance; Laura Bowie, Gulf of Mexico Alliance

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central LibrarySeminar Contacts: Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The Gulf of Mexico Alliance has released the Governors' Action Plan IV for Healthy and Resilient Coasts, signed by the governors of all five Gulf states: Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. This is the fourth in a series of collaborative work plans that identifies priority issues, focus areas, and actions to enhance the environmental and economic health of the Gulf of Mexico. The new Action Plan includes commitments to strengthening community resilience, increasing regional data sharing, serving underrepresented communities, and improving management of coastal habitats and wildlife species.
Keywords: Gulf of Mexico, Ecosystem, Collaboration

Bio(s): Dave Reed serves as the Program Director for the Gulf of Mexico Alliance, a partnership of the five Gulf States with the goal to significantly increase regional collaboration to enhance the ecological and economic health of the Gulf of Mexico. Dave has been involved with the Gulf of Mexico Alliance since 2005. He has served as a state member for one of the Priority Issue Teams, Co-Chair of the DMAC (Data Management Advisory Committee) and finally as the Co-Chair for the Data and Monitoring Priority Issue Team. Dave holds a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from Middle Tennessee State University.Laura Bowie serves as the Executive Director for the Gulf of Mexico Alliance, a partnership of the five Gulf States with the goal to significantly increase regional collaboration to enhance the ecological and economic health of the Gulf of Mexico. In 2010, Laura was the first employee hired by the Gulf of Mexico Alliance to take the loose network of partners into a formal not-for-profit organization. Laura holds a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Mississippi State University and a master's degree in environmental management from the University of Houston.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Evolution of the Cold Pool in the Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Phyllis Stabeno, PhD, Physical Oceanographer at the NOAA/OAR Pacific Marine Environmental Lab
Date & Time: 8 December 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Evolution of the Cold Pool in the Bering Sea

Presenter(s): Phyllis Stabeno, PhD, Physical Oceanographer at the NOAA/OAR Pacific Marine Environmental Lab

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contacts: EcoFOCI Research Coordinator Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Post Doctoral Researcher Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Evolution of the Cold Pool in the Bering Sea: Integrating moorings, models, and new observing technologies to assess the evolution of the cold pool (https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/feature-story/scientific-teams-set-out-track-unprecedented-changes-eastern-bering-sea).

Bio(s): Dr. Phyllis Stabeno is a physical oceanographer at the NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, Washington. Together with Dr. Janet Duffy-Anderson, she is co-leader of NOAA's Ecosystems and Fisheries Oceanography Coordinated Investigations (EcoFOCI). For the past 30 years, she has worked on physical oceanographic, climate and ecosystem projects focused on Alaska's marine ecosystem including the Gulf of Alaska, Bering Sea, Aleutian Islands and most recently, the Chukchi Sea. She is the lead investigator in maintaining a biophysical mooring array in the Bering Sea, including the M2 mooring now deployed for the 22 year. She recently completed as a Principle Investigator for the North Pacific Research Board sponsored Bering Sea Integrated Ecosystem Research Plan (BSIERP) project and NSF Bering Ecosystem Study (BEST), which won a 2015 NOAA Gold Medal Award. A brief bio can be found here: https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/scientist/dr-phyllis-stabeno

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker at phyllis.stabeno@noaa.gov. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

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7 December 2021

Title: Evaluating the Impact of Hydrologic Alterations on Salt Marsh Sustainability in a Changing Climate
Presenter(s): Amanda Spivak, University of Georgia, aspivak@uga.edu; Tonna-Marie Surgeon Rogers, Waquoit Bay NERR, tonna-marie.surgeon-rogers@mass.gov; Giulio Mariotti, Louisiana State University, giulio.mariotti@gmail.com; Gabrielle Sakolsky, Cape Cod Mosquito Control Project, gsakolsky@ccmcp.net
Date & Time: 7 December 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Evaluating the Impact of Hydrologic Alterations on Salt Marsh Sustainability in a Changing Climate

Presenter(s): Amanda Spivak. University of Georgia, Tonna-Marie Surgeon Rogers, Waquoit Bay NERR, Giulio Mariotti, Louisiana State University, Gabrielle Sakolsky, Cape Cod Mosquito Control Project

Sponsor(s): This webinar is sponsored by the NERRS Science Collaborative

Seminar Contact(s): Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)Abstract
Parallel grid ditches were dug in approximately 90% of mid-Atlantic and New England salt marshes from the 1920s through the 1940s. Today, managers must navigate the effects of these past actions when making decisions about marsh hydrology and drainage that impact human health, ecosystem services, and marsh sustainability. Managers must also consider how stressors such as sea-level rise impact marshes. A team of scientists including staff from the Waquoit Bay Reserve in Massachusetts helped to address this challenge by working iteratively with coastal managers and restoration practitioners to develop a decision support tool for marsh hydrology management strategies that promote sustainability and continued delivery of valuable ecosystem services under future sea level rise scenarios.In this webinar, the project team will share both the collaborative and technical aspects of their approach and the resultant Marsh Sustainability and Hydrology Decision Support Tool. The tool predicts potential outcomes of ditch and runnel maintenance in micro- and macro-tidal salt marshes under different scenarios of suspended sediment input and sea level rise.

Bio(s): Please visit here for more information about the webinar.

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Title: The power of participation and collaboration: An Alaska groundfish success story
Presenter(s): Jane DiCosimo, NOAA/NMFS Office of Science and Technology, retired
Date & Time: 7 December 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The power of participation and collaboration: An Alaska groundfish success story

Presenter(s): Jane DiCosimo, NOAA/NMFS Office of Science and Technology, retired

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Abstract: The Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea are especiallyresource-rich and support some of the largest and most valuable commercialfisheries in the world. The success of Alaska groundfish management is due tothe foresight of numerous US fishermen and government officials that led toadoption of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation Management Act by the USCongress in 1976. The Act requires that regional fishery management councils,along with their scientific experts, fishery stakeholders, council and agency staffs,and the public balance biological, economic, and social concerns to manage USfisheries for the greatest benefit to the Nation.

Bio(s): coming soon

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available after the webinar.

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Title: Thinking About Adaptation: Exploring the Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) Framework
Presenter(s): Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Robin O'Malley, Robin O'Malley LLC; Retired USGS
Date & Time: 7 December 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p66cqrradour/

Title: Thinking About Adaptation: Exploring the Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) Framework

Presenter(s): Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Robin O'Malley, Robn O'Malley LLC; Retired USGS.
Wendy Morrison, Fisheries Ecologist with NOAA/NMFS will co-host this webinar.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, coordinator of NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: Climate change is a complex management problem because it involves persistent change across large areas and is difficult to address locally. Conditions fueled by or worsened by climate change may favor species new to an area over those that have been longtime inhabitants. The result: ecological transformation " although system makeover that can occur when species move due to changes in their surrounding environment.Recognizing the need for coordinated action, representatives of several natural resource management agencies met in 2018 to develop a framework to address ecological transformation. The Resist-Accept-Direct framework allows managers to choose from three management responses:
  • Resist the direction of change, by working to maintain or restore function, structure or composition, based on historical or table current conditions.
  • Accept the direction of change, by allowing the change to occur without intervening.
  • Direct the change, by actively managing processes, function, structure or composition toward a new desired condition.
Managers may need to apply a portfolio of these three options across their area to better manage resources impacted by climate change. Regional portfolios, well-coordinated across multiple systems, can reduce the risk of piloting novel actions at anyone location and ensure that future habitats can maintain associated species at other locations. The RAD framework is one way to weigh the economic, ecological, and sociological costs and benefits of various management strategies that can be applied on landscapes faced with ecological transformation.

Bio(s):
Scott Covington is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Wildlife Refuge System's Senior Ecologist. He has a background in mitigating wildlife impacts from energy development, including wind projects, oil and gas, and coal mining. This lead him to his current role, where he researches designs to improve restoration and adaptation projects to reduce impacts from climate change - and act as a science facilitator communicating these techniques to Fish and Wildlife Service and partners.Robin O'Malley retired from the USGS Climate Adaptation Science Center network in 2020 after a 30 year career in state, federal, and non-profit service. He currently works with the US FWS and NPS on climate adaptation strategy, and is assisting the Rosebud Sioux Tribe's Climate Crisis Working Group as it develops an adaptation plan for the tribe.Slides / Recording: Slides, recording and summary of chat will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar. Or email tracy.gill@noaa.gov if interested. You may view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p66cqrradour/

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

6 December 2021

Title: Life under ice: The rise and fall of Lake Erie’s winter algal bloom
Presenter(s): Michael McKay, University of Windsor
Date & Time: 6 December 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Life under ice: The rise and fall of Lake Erie's winter algal bloom

Presenter(s): Michael McKay " Executive Director and Professor; Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research; University of Windsor


Sponsor(s): NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (NOAA GLERL) and the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR)


Seminar Contact(s): Mary Ogdahl, ogdahlm@umich.edu

Abstract: Ice cover presents a logistical obstacle to our full understanding of function of north temperate ecosystems. Reflecting this, ecosystem models frequently underestimate, or even neglect biological parameters associated with ice cover. Despite the perceived inhospitable environment imposed by cold temperatures and ice cover during winter in Lake Erie, work over the past decade has revealed numerous examples of high biological activity with abundant phytoplankton biomass dominated by psychrophilic, filamentous diatoms. The diatoms are physiologically robust and the diatom bloom persists through early spring, eventually contributing to carbon export in Lake Erie's central basin. During mild winters, the bloom is reduced, likely due to light limitation coincident with deep wind-aided mixing. These surveys have demonstrated that diatom assemblages possess ice nucleating abilities, a characteristic promoting ice formation and which enables the winter diatoms to maintain a favorable position in the photic zone when the lake is ice covered. Our recent efforts have focused on mechanisms of bloom decline where chytrid parasites and other pathogens are implicated. Broadening the impact of this research has been a unique partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard promoting citizen science in support of winter data collection.

Bio(s): In 2019, Mike McKay joined the University of Windsor where he serves as the Executive Director of the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research and Professor in the School of the Environment. Mike received undergraduate- and graduate degrees in Biology from Queen's University at Kingston and McGill University (Montral), respectively. Upon completion of his doctoral work, he held postdoctoral fellowships at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and with the University of Delaware where he served concurrently at the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, NY. It was during this period that Mike became active in research on aquatic nutrient cycling through his involvement with the ecosystem-scale ocean iron fertilization projects being conducted by scientific personnel from Brookhaven at that time. Mike's research expanded to include large lakes on his arrival to Bowling Green State University where he served on the faculty for over 21 years studying the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, phytoplankton and bacterial community dynamics and more recently, winter limnology involving research coordination with icebreaking programs of Canadian- and U.S. Coast Guards.Among Mike's research honors, he was awarded an Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Research Fellowship in 2005 where he was resident at the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (Germany) and in 2013, was named Visiting Scholar at the Large Lakes Observatory of the University of Minnesota. He is the author of over 95 peer-reviewed manuscripts, is a co-recipient of the 2019 John Martin award from ASLO and currently serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Great Lakes Research.

Recordings: Recording will be made available shortly after the seminar at: https://ciglr.seas.umich.edu/event/120621-michael-mckay/


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Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, December 2021: A seasonal probabilistic forecast system for U.S. regional precipitation based on sea surface temperature anomalies, and The development, evaluation and applications of CPC Week 2-4 excessive heat forecast tools and services
Presenter(s): Dongmin Kim, NOAA AOML, and Jon Gottschalck, NOAA CPC
Date & Time: 6 December 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, December 2021: A seasonal probabilistic forecast system for U.S. regional precipitation based on the tropical Pacific and Atlantic SSTAs, and The development, evaluation and applications of CPC Week 2-4 excessive heat forecast tools and services

Presenter(s): Dr. Dongmin Kim, NOAA AOML, and Dr. Jon Gottschalck, NOAA CPC

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Weather Program Office S2S Program and NOAA NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration Modeling Program DivisionSeminar Contacts: Karen Keith, karen.keith@noaa.gov

Abstract: This monthly webinar series was created to share ongoing work within NWS and OAR at the Weeks 3-4 and S2S timescales. We would like to foster a relaxed, informal dialogue among forecasters, modelers and researchers. This month, Dr. Dongmin Kim will speak about "A seasonal probabilistic forecast system for U.S. regional precipitation based on the tropical Pacific and Atlantic SSTAs." Dr. Jon Gottschalck will speak about "The development, evaluation and applications of CPC Week 2-4 excessive heat forecast tools and services."

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available on the Weeks 3-4/S2S Webinar Series website: https://vlab.noaa.gov/web/weeks-3-4-s2s-webinar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

2 December 2021

Title: Cross-comparison study of AD software in the application of population dynamic models
Presenter(s): Andrea Havron, PhD, ECS Federal LLC Contractor in support of NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 2 December 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Cross-comparison study of AD software in the application of population dynamic models (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s): Andrea Havron, PhD, ECS Federal LLC Contractor in support of NOAA Fisheries

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Kristan Blackhart and Library Seminars

Abstract: Motivated by the Fisheries Integrated Modeling Systems initiative, this study aims to compare automatic differentiation software platforms used in population dynamic modeling. Pathways for both frequentist and Bayesian inference are outlined for state-space and explicit spatial models developed and implemented across the following software platforms: ADMB, Julia, Stan, and TMB. Software features of each platform are detailed along with benchmark results on performance and speed from simulations. Features considered include statistical and computational efficiency, accuracy, accessibility to the developer community, and user friendliness.
Keywords: automatic differentiation, state-space population dynamic modeling, software comparison


Bio(s): Andrea earned her Masters from Oregon State University in Marine Resource Management and her PhD in Statistics at the University of Auckland, NZ. As a post-doc under Carey McGilliard at the Alaska Fishery Science Center and Andre Punt at the University of Washington, she developed a new spatio-temporal clustering model in application to fishery catch composition. She started her position this spring with the national stock assessment modeling team working on the Fisheries Integrated Modeling Systems initiative.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Gina k’aadang.nga gii uu tll k’anguudang: Seeking Wise Counsel-Good people working together, drawing on many ways of knowing to govern Haida Gwaii
Presenter(s): Lynn Lee, Ph.D., Marine Ecologist, Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site, Parks Canada and Niisii Guujaww, Program Manager, Marine Planning Program, Council of the Haida Nation
Date & Time: 2 December 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Gina k'aadang.nga gii uu tll k'anguudang: Seeking Wise Counsel-Good people working together, drawing on many ways of knowing to govern Haida Gwaii

Presenter(s): Lynn Lee, Ph.D., Marine Ecologist, Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site, Parks Canada and Niisii Guujaww, Program Manager, Marine Planning Program, Council of the Haida Nation

Sponsor(s): NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam series

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): Dr. Lynn Lee - An ardent fan of all fish' in the sea, Lynn has logged thousands of scientific dives in cold water and is currently the marine ecologist for Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site. She recently finished her doctoral thesis that explores ecological interactions, historical ecology and governance related to northern abalone conservation and sea otter recovery. Lynn lives on a hobby farm in rural Tlell on Haida Gwaii with her spouse, Fred the cat, Fred the sourdough, a garden and a recent unexpected stork delivery, Masu the dog, in place of the now-fledged kid, Taimen. Over 27 years of life and work on the islands have found her engaged in a diversity of marine and land conservation initiatives. A few highlights include marine biologist planner and dive biologist for the Haida Nation, local coordinator for World Wildlife Fund Canada, stream restoration biologist and member of many land and marine use planning tables. When not engaged in things ecological, you might find Lynn making art, playing music, experimenting in the kitchen, biking in the wind, or walking on the beach.Niisii Guujaaw - Niisii is a member of the Ts'aahl Eagle Clan and was born and raised on Haida Gwaii. She received her BSc. in Marine Biology and Indigenous Studies from the University of British Columbia in 2018, and returned home to work at Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site as a field technician. She's recently moved into her new role as marine planning program manager at the Council of the Haida Nation where she works with the marine planning technical team and Haida leadership to develop and implement the various marine plans and initiatives happening on Haida Gwaii. Niisii volunteers as a board member for the Swiilawiid Sustainability Society, Skidegate Education Committee, and Mount Moresby Adventure Camp, and in her spare time enjoys spending time food gathering and exploring with family, learning Haida language, weaving, and being an auntie.

Seminar Recordings
Seminars are public meetings, and these may be recorded if the speaker has agreed to do so. If you missed a current seminar and would like to check if a recording is available, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)


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30 November 2021

Title: Collaborative Research to Manage Stormwater Impacts on Coastal Reserves
Presenter(s): Rachel Noble, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill; and Whitney Jenkins, North Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserve - NERR
Date & Time: 30 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Collaborative Research to Manage Stormwater Impacts on Coastal Reserves

Presenter(s): Rachel Noble, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, rtnoble@email.unc.edu; & Whitney Jenkins, North Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR),
whitney.jenkins@ncdenr.gov

Sponsor(s): This webinar is sponsored by the NERRS Science Collaborative

Seminar Contact(s): Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)

Abstract: Like many older towns along the east coast, Beaufort, North Carolina grew at a faster pace than its stormwater and wastewater infrastructure. Stormwater outfalls that discharge into coastal waters have detrimental impacts on human and ecosystem health, and stormwater runoff often results in elevated levels of pathogens and nutrients, which can lead to fishing and swimming closures, illnesses, and negative impacts on coastal ecosystems. To better understand the effects of stormwater, a project team based at the Rachel Carson component of the North Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserve used a comprehensive sampling regimen to gather quantitative information that helped them assess the effects of precipitation and tidal inundation on stormwater impacts, and identify sources of fecal contamination.In this webinar, members of the project team discuss the technical and collaborative aspects of their approach, including the sampling regimen and how their engagement approach resulted in a decision-maker summit and citizen science app that fosters ongoing community engagement on stormwater issues.

Bio(s): Please visit here for more information about the webinar.Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email by sending an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Seasonal Outlook and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Forecast
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University, and Michelle L'Heureux, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 30 November 2021
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Seasonal Outlook and El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Forecast

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University,
Michelle L'Heureux, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s): Ellen Mecray

Abstract: The webinar will feature a recap of November conditions and Michelle L'Heureux will showcase her work with the El Nino/La Nina forecast for 2021-22 and the CPC seasonal outlook for winter.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

27 November 2021

Title: Changing spring phenology in the Gulf of Alaska and implications for fish and fisheries
Presenter(s): Lauren Rogers, PhD, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 27 November 2021
11:15 pm - 12:15 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Changing spring phenology in the Gulf of Alaska and implications for fish and fisheries

Presenter(s): Lauren Rogers, PhD, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): EcoFOCI Research Coordinator Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Post Doctoral Researcher Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: Changing spring phenology in the Gulf of Alaska and implications for fish and fisheries. How tracking changes in the timing of early life stages of fishes can inform climate-ready fisheries management.

Bio(s): Dr. Lauren Rogers is a quantitative ecologist with a background in fisheries science. I am interested in how fish and their ecosystems are affected by changes in climate, and in determining which features of ecosystems make them resilient to increasing human pressures. Much of my research is focused on understanding the drivers behind short and long-term fluctuations in the abundance of harvested fish species, the role of portfolio effects in ecology, and the causes and consequences of population spatial structure. I use statistical modeling extensively in my research. Prior to joining NOAA, I was a fisheries ecologist at the Natural Capital Project (Stanford University) and a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Oslo. I received a Ph.D. in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences from the University of Washington and a B.S. in Earth Systems Science from Stanford University. A brief bio can be found here, https://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/scientist/dr-lauren-rogers

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker at lauren.rogers@noaa.gov. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

23 November 2021

Title: Building Healthy and Thriving Alaskan Communities, Economies, and Ecosystems in a Changing Climate
Presenter(s): Sarah Trainor et al., ACCAP/ University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 23 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Seminar Series
Title: ACCAP

Remote Access: Building Healthy and Thriving Alaskan Communities, Economies, and Ecosystems in a Changing Climate

Presenter(s): Sarah Trainor, Nathan Kettle, John Walsh, Adelheid Herrmann, LaVerne Dementieff, Rick Thoman, Danielle Meeker, Margaret Rudolf (Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, ACCAP)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team;

Seminar Contact(s): Danielle Meeker (demeeker@alaska.edu, 571-215-7083) or Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov, 301-356-2113).

Abstract: ACCAP's portfolio of interwoven research and engagement in Alaska supports the underlying vision of building healthy and thriving Alaskan communities. Core themes include extreme events and impacts and capacity building in support of Tribal resilience. In the extreme events work, the team will use an integrated approach that brings together social science, climate science, and local expertise to: a) document socio-economic impacts of extreme climate and weather events in Alaska; b) engage practitioners to determine and meet information needs; and c) analyze historical and projected changes in extreme event occurrences to inform policy and decision-making. The work will support Tribal resilience by: a) bridging community-level climate adaptation planning and implementation with workforce and economic development; b) investigating and supporting boundary spanning and knowledge co-production between Alaska Native communities and climate and related researchers; c) innovating evaluation methodology and elevating Indigenous evaluation of climate-related knowledge co-production and climate adaptation. New outreach and engagement activities include assessment products that encompass societal impacts and adaptation, training for students and postdoctoral fellows, online course development, and enhanced convening activities with a focus on serving the needs of policy-makers, Alaska Native Peoples, tribes, and organizations throughout the state. The next 5 years of ACCAP will include a sustained assessment specialist and small-grant competition, which like the core portfolio, aims to fulfill ACCAP's vision of thriving Alaskan communities, economies, and ecosystems. This webinar will provide an overview of ACCAP's proposed activities for the next five years.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides, links shared during the presentation, and a recording may be found after the meeting at the URL listed above.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Drought and Water Monthly Webinar + Evaporative Demand Drought Index Overview
Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District
Date & Time: 23 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar is part of a monthly (twice a month during drought status) webinar series designed to provide stakeholders, water-resource managers, and other interested parties in the ACF region with timely information on current drought status, seasonal forecasts and outlooks, streamflow conditions and forecasts, groundwater conditions, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir conditions.

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

22 November 2021

Title: CA/NV Drought & Climate Update and Outlook
Presenter(s): Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS/CIRES; Jon Gottschalck, NOAA/NWS Climate Prediction Center; and Julie Kalansky, CNAP/CW3E/Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Date & Time: 22 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Drought & Climate Update
Amanda Sheffield | NOAA/NIDIS/CIRES

Drought & Climate Outlook
Jon Gottschalck | NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center

Tools & Resources for your Winter Toolbox
Julie Kalansky | CNAP/CW3E/Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Amanda Sheffield | NOAA/NIDIS/CIRES

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

POC: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Abstract: According to the November 2 U.S. Drought Monitor, 100% of CA/NV is in drought, with 72.4% in Extreme (D3) or Exceptional (D4) Drought. An exceptional atmospheric river (AR5) brought rain, snow, and wind to Northern California and Nevada in late October. This AR and recent storms improved drought conditions but has not come close to ending the drought for the region. The current drought developed over many months to years, leaving soils parched. Greater than normal winter precipitation will still be needed to replenish this soil moisture deficit and deliver normal spring streamflows.

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) November 2021 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia).

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

19 November 2021

Title: NEDTalk: NOAA Satellite Data Panel Discussion
Presenter(s): Jorel Torres, Meteorologist/Research Associate II, NOAA's JPSS Satellite Liaison, CIRA; Dan Lindsey, Program Scientist, NOAA/NESDIS/GOES-R Program; Mike Pavolonis, Ph.D., Physical Scientist, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR; and Carl Jones, Meteorologist, NOAA/National Weather Service
Date & Time: 19 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: NEDTalk: NOAA Satellite Data Panel Discussion
NOAA Environmental Data Talks (NEDTalks), part of the NOAA Datafest Celebration!

Presenter(s): Panelists -
- Jorel Torres, Meteorologist/Research Associate, NOAA's JPSS Satellite Liaison, CIRA
and NOAA's National Weather Service
- Dan Lindsey, PhD, Program Scientist, NOAA/NESDIS/GOES-R Program, and
- Mike Pavolonis, Ph.D., Physical Scientist, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR
- Carl Jones, Meteorologist, NOAA/National Weather Service

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Environmental Satellite and Data Information Service (NESDIS)Seminar Contacts: Rafael.deameller@noaa.gov and Tiffany.Small@noaa.gov

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Previous NEDTalks this month featured Jorel Torres from the JPSS program and Dan Lindsey from the GOES-R program who spoke about the importance of satellite data and the many ways that data from Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) and Geostationary (GEO) satellites are used. This week, they are returning for a panel discussion along with Michael Pavolonis, a physical scientist from the NOAA Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR), along with Carl Jones, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service. Together, they will discuss how data from both LEO and GEO satellites is combined and the many ways they use this valuable information in their own work. They will also be answering questions from the public submitted on Twitter using #AskNOAAsatellites.

Bio(s):
Jorel Torres is a Research Associate II: JPSS Satellite Liaison at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), located in Fort Collins, Colorado. Torres liaisons between NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) user community and the research community focusing on JPSS products, applications, and satellite training development for users.
Dan Lindsey, PhD., is the NOAA/NESDIS GOES-R Program Scientist. He has been with NOAA since 2004 in Ft. Collins, Colorado, and specializes in satellite remote sensing of mesoscale phenomena from the geostationary platform, including thunderstorms, tropical cyclones, and aerosols such as smoke and blowing dust.Mike Pavolonis, PhD, is a physical scientist at the NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) and an Honorary Research Fellow at the NOAA Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies in Madison, WI. He leads the NESDIS Science Team focused on volcanic clouds, severe weather, and fog/low stratus hazards. He earned his Ph.D. in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences from the University of Wisconsin " Madison, where he is stationed as part of the NOAA effort to facilitate collaboration between government and university scientists. He also holds a B.S. degree in Meteorology from Penn State. Dr. Pavolonis is an active member of World Meteorological Organization (WMO) expert panels on volcanic clouds and nowcasting and has authored/co-authored over 40 peer reviewed journal articles. He has been awarded the NOAA Bronze Medal, the NOAA David Johnson Award, and the American Astronautical Society Earth Science and Applications Award for his work on volcanic clouds and severe weather.
Carl Jones is a meteorologist with NOAA's National Weather Service in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Originally from Jacksonville, Florida, he received his B.S. in Meteorology from Florida State University in 2012. In 2014, he made the trek northward trading beaches for blizzards taking a job as a forecaster with a private weather company in Grand Forks, North Dakota. After working at this company for three years, he hung up the private sector hat for a public sector hat by joining NWS Grand Forks. His professional focus remains in operational forecasting and satellite applications, while his personal focus resides with his family, photography, cooking, and getting outdoors.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Previous NEDTalk recordings can be found here.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!

18 November 2021

Title: Marine Debris in Papahānaumokuākea: A Shift in Thinking
Presenter(s): Kevin O'Brien, President/Founder, Papahnaumokukea Marine Debris Project, Hawaii
Date & Time: 18 November 2021
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Marine Debris in Papahnaumokukea: A Shift in Thinking

Presenter(s): Kevin O'Brien, President/Founder, Papahnaumokukea Marine Debris Project, Hawaii

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Abstract: How do you remove over 300,000 pounds of marine debris in one year? Join us as Papahnaumokukea Marine Debris Project President/Founder Kevin OBrien shares about the three large-scale debris removal efforts in Papahnaumokukea over the last year that shifted the way we think about solving the problem of marine debris in the Monument. He will discuss public/private partnerships, grassroots community-building, and prioritizing Monument access to a diverse range of stakeholders as a solution for Monument stewardship. Marine debris is one of the top threats to the habitats and wildlife of Paphnaumokukea with an estimated 52+ tons of debris entering Monument waters every year. This presentation is part of the Third Thursday By the Bay Presentation Series at Mokuppapa Discovery Center, which is the visitor center for Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument in Hilo, Hawaii. This State of the Monument lecture series is also supported by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation through a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: A Tale of Two Ice Floes
Presenter(s): Andy Mahoney & Melinda Webster, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 18 November 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

This seminar was rescheduled from Nov 17 to Nov 18, 2021

Title: A Tale of Two Ice Floes, Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium (VAWS)

Presenter(s): Andy Mahoney & Melinda Webster, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) & Danielle Meeker (demeeker@alaska.edu, 571-215-7083)

Accessibility: Please contact POCs if accommodations needed.

Abstract: During the winter of 2019-2020, two drifting ice floes, thousands of miles apart, formed the temporary homes for two different Arctic operations. In late 2019, the icebreaker Polarstern was frozen into sea ice in the Central Arctic as the centerpiece of the year-long MOSAiC expedition. And, in February 2020, an ice camp was established roughly 150 miles offshore in the Alaska Beaufort Sea as the base of on-ice activity for the U.S. Navy's biennial ICEX exercise. In this webinar, we will discuss the weather and ice conditions at each location and how this impacted the science and logistics. In the process, we will introduce some of the science that was carried on these two ice floes and reflect on how the unexpected weather and ice conditions can create challenges, but also offer new insights.

The Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium (VAWS) is a collaboration between ACCAP, the Geographic Information Network of Alaska, and the NOAA National Weather Service. We present cutting-edge technologies in satellite remote sensing, forecasting, and modeling to a statewide audience through this webinar series..

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Marine Oil Snow, and Other Complications of Organic Matter
Presenter(s): Dr. Uta Passow, Prof., Canada Research Chair-1,Ocean Sciences Centre, Memorial University Newfoundland, Canada
Date & Time: 18 November 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Marine Oil Snow, and Other Complications of Organic Matter

Presenter(s): Dr. Uta Passow, Prof., Canada Research Chair-1,Ocean Sciences Centre, Memorial University Newfoundland, Canada

Sponsor(s): OR&R Lecture Series: You Don't Know What You Don't Know. Welcome to OR&R's online lecture series, You Don't Know What You Don't Know! Each month, an expert presents on a topic related to emergency spill response, environmental protection and sometimes beyond. Topics will range from booms to birds, burning to bacteria, satellites to submarines. The goal of the series is to provide a larger, more diverse audience to presentations and lectures recently given at meetings or conferences.

Point of Contact: youdontknowwhatyoudontknow@noaa.gov

Abstract: What is marine snow? It is definitely not something strap on your boots and board to go ski, it is a little deeper than that, actually way deeper. In fact, look to the oceans, marine snow is mostly an organic matter that is falling from higher layers of the water column to lower layers and eventually settling on the sea floors. Ok, so what does it have to do with oil and spills? Join us as we talk to Dr. Uta Passow, Prof., Canada Research Chair-1, Ocean Sciences Centre, Memorial University Newfoundland, Canada. Where she will talk about the importance of marine snow being used as transport vehicles for oil resulting in the sedimentation of oil to the deep seafloor. Currently her team is focusing on the interactions between oil, dispersants, exopolymers and particles as part of the Multi-Partner Research Initiative under Canada's Ocean Protection Plan.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) 2022 Competitions 1-2 Info Webinar Round 2
Presenter(s): Caitlin Simpson, Ariela Zycherman, Sean Bath, Genie Bey; NOAA Climate Program Office
Date & Time: 18 November 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) 2022 Competitions 1 & 2 Informational Webinar Round 2

Presenter(s): Caitlin Simpson, Ariela Zycherman, Sean Bath, Genie Bey (NOAA Climate Program Office)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Climate Program Office / Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program

Seminar Contact(s): Genie Bey, Genie.Bey@noaa.gov

Accessibility: A transcript will be provided along with the recording. If there are additional requests contact Genie Bey, Genie.Bey@noaa.gov.


Abstract: CPO's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program will host a second webinar for competitions 1 & 2 to dive deeper into proposal questions after reviewing Letters of Intent.
In competitions 1 and 2, the RISA program is soliciting applications to support up to one full RISA team to conduct research and engagement in each of the regions mentioned below. In Competition 1, the program is accepting applications for regions currently covered by the RISA Network"West and Southwest. In competition 2, the program is accepting applications for regions new to the RISA network"U.S. Caribbean and Central Midwest. A maximum of one RISA team will be funded per region. With each team, we are aiming to build on-the-ground expertise, capacity, and trust-building within the specified region. The following are the regions being competed:
  • West: California, Nevada
  • Southwest: Arizona, New Mexico
  • U.S. Caribbean: Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands
  • Central Midwest: Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska
This webinar covers advanced questions in competitions 1 & 2, including the anatomy and structure of a RISA team. Program managers will again be available to answer questions from the attendees. This webinar is for applicants that have already reviewed the resources below. More information: https://cpo.noaa.gov/Funding-Opportunities/RISA-FY2022-Notice-of-Funding-Opportunity Direct links to information sources include:Notice of Funding Opportunity (pdf)Information Sheet (pdf)RISA Competition FAQCommon Characteristics of RISA Teams

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:The webinar will be recorded and posted with a transcript on GoToStage. The recording links and slides will be posted on the Climate Program Office website.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Martha Shulski, Nebraska State Climatologist
Date & Time: 18 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook

Presenter(s): Martha Shulski, Nebraska State Climatologist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

November 2021 topics include recent and potential climate/weather impacts including: drought, fall warmth, the La Nia advisory and what it could mean for the region, fall/winter soil moisture recharge outlook, frost/freeze updates, Great Lakes condition, and providing the latest trends and outlooks for precipitation, temperature, and snow potential through the late fall and winter.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Nitrogen availability as a driver of HABs and toxins: the missing piece for modeling?
Presenter(s): Silvia Newell, Wright State University
Date & Time: 18 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Nitrogen availability as a driver of HABs and toxins: the missing piece for modeling?

Presenter(s): Silvia Newell " Associate Professor, Wright State University


Sponsor(s): NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (NOAA GLERL) and the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR)


Seminar Contact(s): Mary Ogdahl, ogdahlm@umich.edu

Abstract: External nutrient loading (along with temperature and precipitation) is the main driver of annual harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie. These blooms are dominated by the cyanobacteria Microcystis, which produces microcystin toxins, but toxicity and biomass are not always correlated and can vary from year to year and within a season. Microcystis is an excellent scavenger for ammonium and can outcompete other organisms for this preferred ammonium supply. Ammonium is therefore both taken up by cells and recycled rapidly in eutrophic systems, making it difficult to determine availability snapshot concentration measurements. Studies on ammonium turnover rates in the water column of Lake Erie, as well as supply from sediments, suggest that internal loading is a critical component of sustaining bloom biomass. Using ammonium recycling rates in mixed models also results in strong models for concentration of microcystins (R^2 =0.84 or better), suggesting that ammonium availability might be key for modeling and predicting bloom toxicity.

Bio(s): Dr. Silvia Newell is an Associate Professor of Aquatic Biogeochemistry at Wright State University in Dayton, OH. Her research focuses on nitrogen cycling in eutrophic systems around the globe, from the Great Lakes to Lake Okeechobee to Taihu, China. She was the co-chair of the HABs Collaborative from 2018-2020 and currently serves as the President of the Lake Erie Area Research Network. She is currently NSF-funded on projects in Lake Superior, Lake Erie, and the Maumee River. She is also part of the monitoring team assessing the H2Ohio wetlands.

Recordings: Recording will be made available shortly after the seminar at: https://ciglr.seas.umich.edu/event/111821-silvia-newell/


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php
Title: The use of cleanerfish in salmonid farming: why not transfer this environmentally-friendly technology to boost domestic seafood production?
Presenter(s): Elizabeth Fairchild Ph.D. Research Associate Professor University of New Hampshire - Department of Biological Sciences & School of Marine Sciences and Ocean Engineering
Date & Time: 18 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The use of cleanerfish in salmonid farming: why not transfer this environmentally-friendly technology to boost domestic seafood production?

Presenter(s): Elizabeth Fairchild Ph.D. Research Associate Professor University of New Hampshire - Department of Biological Sciences & School of Marine Sciences and Ocean Engineering

Sponsor(s): NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam series

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: Researchers at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) have been working with the New England aquaculture industry (Atlantic salmon farmers in Maine and steelhead trout farmers in NH) to promote the use of cleanerfish in salmonid cage culture as a means to control parasitic sea lice. The sea lice graze on the skin and mucosal tissue of the fish, leaving them open to secondary infections, as well as decreasing their value upon harvest and processing. The result is sea lice mitigation is the single largest and costly issue facing the global salmonid aquaculture industry today. Historically, farms treated their fish with chemotherapeutics, but sea lice have grown resistant to such drugs and, additionally, this practice is not environmentally friendly. Currently fish farms use a variety of tools to combat sea lice infestation but the most promising tool being used in Canada and Europe is stocking a second fish species - a cleanerfish " into the cages to keep sea lice populations under control. Lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus), a species native to the north Atlantic including the Gulf of Maine, is an effective biological delouser and currently raised by the tens of millions each year in Europe for this sole purpose. Dr. Elizabeth Fairchild, a Research Associate Professor at UNH and the co-founder of the US Lumpfish Consortium, will discuss how this cleanerfish process works, provide an overview of cleanerfish research occurring in the US, and explain how using cleanerfish in US Atlantic salmon and steelhead trout farms could lead to a higher economic yield of locally and sustainably grown seafood in New England.

Bio(s): Dr. Elizabeth Fairchild is a Research Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and in the School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering at the University of New Hampshire. She focuses on promoting sustainable domestic seafood by creating exciting, applied marine biology projects to address the needs of fishing and aquaculture communities and trains students to become successful scientists. Some of Elizabeth's most rewarding projects have been born in the wheelhouse, stemming from discussions with collaborative fishing partners as they steam to fishing grounds about what fishermen observe during their normal day. Currently her lab focuses on promoting a technology new to the US - using lumpfish, a native fish species grown in hatcheries, as a natural biological delouser to control sea lice in salmon ocean cages. She also is working with the channeled whelk fishery to make it more sustainable by developing new whelk baits and gear. Elizabeth has 25 years of research experience including extensive collaborations with the fishing and aquaculture industries, coastal communities, and state, tribal, and federal resource managers. She has incorporated strong outreach, community involvement, and education in all her successful past projects.

Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Where in the government are 2021 Knauss Fellows?
Presenter(s): Multiple presenters
Date & Time: 18 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Where in the government are 2021 Knauss Fellows?/2021 Knauss Fellows Lunch & Learn Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Join us for five lightning presentations about 2021 Knauss fellow experiences across different government programs. Hosted by Laura Ingulsrud, Marine Mammal Conservation Fellow, NOAA Fisheries' Office of Protected Resources.Keywords: maritime transportation, Coast Guard, professional development, ecosystem, indicators, policy coordination, interagency, maritime, policy, interdisciplinary, Congress, stakeholder engagement, communications, research-to-applicationBetween two branches: A year seeing NOAA's science inform policy

Abstract: This presentation will provide a brief overview of Kenneth's fellowship experience with NOAA's Office of Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs. The talk will include an introduction to how agencies and Congress interact and examples of the wide-ranging legislative issues that Kenneth worked on as a Fellow.

Presenter(s): Kenneth Erickson, Congressional Affairs Fellow at NOAA Office of Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs

Bio(s): Kenneth Erickson is a 2021 Knauss Fellow working with the NOAA Office of Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs. Kenneth grew up in North Carolina and graduated from North Carolina State University with Bachelor's in Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology. Kenneth is a former NOAA Hollings Scholar and received his Master's from Louisiana State University studying the life history and how climate impacts juvenile recruitment of southern flounder. Kenneth is interested in using science to inform legislation and policy that conserves marine ecosystems and increases our understanding of atmospheric processes.

From Seattle to San Diego: Navigating ports and Coast Guard units toward Knauss mission success


Abstract: Arye recently planned and executed a month-long professional development trip along the US west coast touring Coast Guard units, ports, Army Corps district and NOAA regional offices, and environmental non-profit headquarters. This purpose of this mission was to understand how Coast Guard shoreside infrastructure and the operations they support are vulnerable to climate change effects such as sea-level rise and other natural hazards; and to interface directly with port stakeholders on operations/challenges, community engagement programs, infrastructure resiliency to natural hazards associated with climate change, supply chain logistics/disruptions, and navigation dredging/ecosystem restoration and other environmental mitigation projects. This talk will feature a recap of his Seattle-to-San Diego exodus, the importance of on-the-ground professional development for his fellowship success, and his appreciation for the Service women and men who risk their lives each day to execute the Coast Guard's mission sets.

Presenter(s): Arye Janoff, Knauss Marine Policy Fellow; U.S. House of Representatives Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation

Bio(s): Dr. Arye Janoff is a Knauss Marine Policy Fellow with the US House of Representatives Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation. He recently completed his Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Management at Montclair State University, studying the coupling between geomorphology and economics to understand the drivers of urban coastal evolution. Arye is also involved in local government as the Secretary of the Bradley Beach Environmental Commission, advises members of the Bradley Beach Council on sea-level-rise planning and policy, serves as the Managing Editor of the Knauss Connector Newsletter, and is an avid surfer and cyclist passionate about ocean access and investment in bicycle transportation infrastructure.

Re-Introducing: NOAA National Marine Ecosystem Status Website

Abstract: NOAA's National Marine Ecosystem Status website provides a starting point for educators, outreach specialists, and the interested public to explore the status of seven major U.S. marine ecosystems and the nation at-a-glance. In this presentation, Will will walk through the first major update to the website, including new data and resources available for the first time on the site, and explain how the Knauss Fellowship has allowed him to work on this tool.

Presenter(s): Willem Klajbor, Knauss Ecosystem Indicators Fellow, NOAA's Ecosystem Indicators Working Group

Bio(s): Will Klajbor is a 2021 NOAA Knauss Fellow coordinating the NOAA Ecosystem Indicators Working Group that maintains the National Marine Ecosystem Status website. Prior to the Fellowship, Will completed his Masters in Marine Resource Management with a minor in Risk Quantification in Marine Systems at Oregon State University.
Interagency leadership for a safe, secure and efficient marine transportation system

Abstract: This presentation will be a breif overview of Caleb's fellowship experience at the CMTS.

Presenter(s): Caleb Taylor, Policy Adviser at the US Committee on the Marine Transportation System

Bio(s): Caleb Taylor is a fellow with the CMTS, working with a diverse portfolio within the interagency. Caleb studied marine biology at Southern Miss and renewable natural resources at LSU, with a thesis focused on understanding impacts to blue crab population dynamics from altered hydrology from river diversions in coastal Louisiana. Caleb also has experience as a commercial crabber and deckhand aboard a 72' landing craft in Alaska and as a field biologist in Texas. His interests lie in keeping our oceans healthy by conserving marine resources and fostering a resilient and sustainable marine transportation system.
Creating a strategic outreach plan for NOAA's research-to-commercialization office

Abstract: The Technology Partnerships Office fuels innovation at NOAA by facilitating strategic public-private research partnerships, transitioning NOAA intellectual property to commercial applications, and funding small businesses to develop technologies that support NOAA's mission. This presentation will provide a brief overview of a new outreach strategy that will help TPO to better serve NOAA's innovation community.

Presenter(s): Suzi Webster, Stakeholder Engagement and Communications Specialist, NOAA Technology Partnerships Office

Bio(s): Suzi Webster serves as the Stakeholder Engagement and Communications Specialist in NOAA's Technology Partnerships Office. She recently received her PhD from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, where she researched stakeholder engagement in environmental research and management. Prior to joining NOAA, Suzi worked on a team of science communication professionals at the Integration & Application Network and earned a bachelors degree in Biology and Anthropology from the University of Notre Dame.

17 November 2021

Title: Oyster Aquaculture Gear as Fish Habitat
Presenter(s): Julie Rose, Ph.D., Research Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries NEFSC Milford Laboratory and Renee Mercaldo-Allen, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA Fisheries NEFSC Milford Laboratory
Date & Time: 17 November 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Oyster Aquaculture Gear as Fish Habitat
Part of the NOAA Aquaculture Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Julie Rose, Ph.D., Research Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries NEFSC Milford Laboratory & Renee Mercaldo-Allen, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA Fisheries NEFSC Milford Laboratory

Sponsor(s): NOAA Fisheries Office of Aquaculture

Seminar Contact(s): Randie.Hovatter@noaa.gov, Communications Specialist, NOAA Office of Aquaculture

Accessibility: To request closed captions, please contact Randie Hovatter (randie.hovatter@noaa.gov) at least two days in advance of the webinar.


Abstract: Aquaculture gear may augment natural seafloor as structured habitat for commercially and recreationally important fish species. Underwater video census was used to document fish abundance and community composition over two years of deployments on shelf and bag style oyster aquaculture cages and on boulders within natural structured rock reef habitat in Long Island Sound. Action cameras (GoPro+) were mounted on study cages deployed at active commercial shellfish farms in Milford, Norwalk and Westport, Connecticut, and on single cages on low relief sand and shell seafloor in Milford. Video was similarly collected amongst boulders on a cobble and boulder reef in Milford. Four species of fish (black sea bass, cunner, scup, and tautog) were regularly observed interacting with both oyster cages and boulders during both study years, and 13 additional species were observed more rarely. Higher numbers of fish were associated with cages as compared to boulders. Cunner were the dominant species in boulder habitat while black sea bass were the most abundant species around cages. Observations of fish behavior associated with cages and boulders are ongoing. Our results suggest that multi-tiered oyster aquaculture cages contribute complex structure to seafloor environments that provide quality habitat and ecosystem services for fish.

Bio(s): Coming soon.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:Slides and a recording of the webinar will be shared with all registrants after the webinar.

Recordings: Supply information about availability of seminar recordings, if they are going to be posted.

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Title: AUV Orpheus - Enabling New Exploration and New Questions in the Deep Ocean and Beyond
Presenter(s): Rick Murray, Deputy Director and Vice President for Science and Engineering; Tim Shank, Deep-Sea Biologist; Ken Kostel, Science Writer/Editor; and Casey Machado, Mechanical Engineer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Hosted by Dr. Aurora Elmore, Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration
Date & Time: 17 November 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: AUV Orpheus - Enabling New Exploration and New Questions in the Deep Ocean and Beyond.
Part of the OECI Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Rick Murray (Deputy Director and Vice President for Science & Engineering):
Tim Shank (Deep-Sea Biologist); Ken Kostel (Science Writer/Editor); and Casey Machado (Mechanical Engineer) of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Hosted by Dr. Aurora Elmore (Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration).

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and Ocean Exploration Cooperative Institute (OECI)

Seminar Contacts: Aurora Elmore (Aurora.Elmore@noaa.gov) and Joanne Flanders (Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov)

Accessibility: https://www.captionedtext.com/client/event.aspx?EventID=4928205&CustomerID=321


Abstract: The ocean's hadal zone accounts for only about 2% of the global seafloor, but more than 40% of the ocean's depth range. The new Orpheus class of autonomous underwater vehicles developed at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution offers to greatly reduce the complexity and risk of accessing hadal depth by combining time-tested deep-sea technology with advanced location-tracking software created by NASA to enable sophisticated exploration and study of the deep ocean. WHOI deep-sea biologist Tim Shank and mechanical engineer Casey Machado will review the objectives and results of a spring 2021 tech demo expedition funded by the Ocean Exploration Cooperative Institute aboard the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer to test two Orpheus vehicles, including one on its first open-ocean dives.


Bio(s): Rick Murray (Deputy Director and Vice President for Science and Engineering), Tim Shank (Deep-Sea Biologist), Ken Kostel (Science Writer/Editor) and Casey Machado (Mechanical Engineer) of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and Dr. Aurora Elmore (Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recordings will be available at https://www.youtube.com/c/innerspacecenter/videos after the webinar.

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Title: Using IMPLAN to Create Regional Input-Output models for Recreational and Commercial fisheries
Presenter(s): Sabrina Lovell, Economist, Office of Science and Technology, NOAA/NMFS and Scott Steinback, Economist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, NOAA/NMFS
Date & Time: 17 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Using IMPLAN to Create Regional Input-Output models for Recreational and Commercial fisheries

Presenter(s): Sabrina Lovell, Economist, Office of Science and Technology, NOAA/NMFS and Scott Steinback, Economist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, NOAA/NMFS

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library and Performance, Risks, and Social Science Office (PRSSO)Seminar Contacts: Jennifer Zhuang (jennifer.zhuang@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Understanding and estimating the economic impacts of policies related to commercial and recreational fisheries is required by law under the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. To fulfill this requirement, economists at NOAA Fisheries develop custom regional input-output models for use in analyzing the baseline economic contributions from commercial and recreational fisheries, and the economic impacts resulting from proposed or actual policy changes. In this webinar, NOAA Fisheries economists will describe the process of creating the models using IMPLAN software with examples from both commercial and recreational fisheries.


Bio(s): Dr. Lovell is an economist with the Office of Science and Technology, NMFS, in Silver Spring, MD. Her work focuses on economic analysis of recreational marine fisheries and survey design and implementation. She has been leading NMFS's nationwide recreational angler expenditure surveys since 2008 and is co-author of a number of reports and publications on the economic contributions of angler expenditures as well as analysis of angler preferences.Scott Steinback is an economist with the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA. Scott's research primarily focuses on developing economic impact and benefit/cost modeling approaches for application to commercial and recreational fisheries management issues in the Northeast and across the country. Scott constructed the first regional input-output model employed by NMFS and the approach continues to be used to assess regional shore-side impacts of proposed commercial fishing management policies.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording will be available after the webinar.

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Title: The connection between physiology, ecology, and life histories from a macroecological perspective
Presenter(s): Jennifer Bigman, PhD, National Research Council Postdoctoral Researcher, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 17 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The connection between physiology, ecology, and life histories from a macroecological perspective

Presenter(s): Jennifer Bigman, PhD, National Research Council Postdoctoral Researcher, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): EcoFOCI Research Coordinator Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Post Doctoral Researcher Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Accessibility:

Abstract: An alternative perspective on the relationships among physiology, ecology, and life histories, focusing on the predictions generated by ecological theory and the generality of patterns.

Bio(s): Jennifer is an NRC Postdoctoral Associate and Ecologist with expertise in metabolic ecology and links between physiology, morphology, and life history in fishes. Dr. Bigman conducts research on climate-mediated changes in Pacific cod spawning habitat and phenology in the Bering Sea.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker at jennifer.bigman@noaa.gov. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Lessons learned from changes in nitrogen dioxide pollution during COVID-19
Presenter(s): Gaige Kerr, George Washington University
Date & Time: 17 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science SeminarSeries

Title: Lessons learned from changes in nitrogen dioxide pollution during COVID-19

Presenter(s): Gaige Kerr, George Washington University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.womack@noaa.gov

Abstract: Ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollution poses significant effects on human health, especially in urban areas, and is a tracer for urban activity. As urban activity ground to halt in early 2020 due to the COVID-19 crisis, levels of NO2 plummeted in cities around the globe. Here, we provide two vignettes to show how new insights gained from understanding changes in NO2 pollution during this natural experiment can inform long-term transportation policy and protect public health. The first vignette examines disparities in NO2 pollution among racial and ethnic demographic subgroups in the United States (U.S.), which have persisted for decades even with overall reductions in NO2. To investigate these disparities, we use satellite-derived measurements of NO2 from the TROPospheric Monitoring Instrument for a baseline (spring 2019) and lockdown (spring 2020) period together with demographic data from the U.S. Census Bureau. In the second vignette, we demonstrate how diesel passenger vehicles, which produce considerably more NOx emissions compared with gasoline engines, contribute to urban NO2 pollution. The lessons learned from both vignettes during this natural experiment point to the dirty reality of combustion-based transportation and provide further motivation to address NO2 pollution stemming from the transportation sector and the associated public health damages. Electrifying passenger and heavy-duty vehicles and promoting congestion pricing, low emissions zones, and active transportation (e.g., cycling, walking) are examples of actions that could broadly lower NO2 levels and advance environmental justice by reducing NO2 disparities.

Bio(s): Dr. Gaige Kerr is currently a postdoctoral fellow at George Washington University, working with Susan Anenberg in the Department of Engineering and Occupational Health. He received his bachelor's degree in Atmospheric Science from Cornell University, and his PhD in Earth & Planetary Sciences from Johns Hopkins University. During his graduate work, he was a fellow of the NSF Water, Climate and Health Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) program. He currently serves as an Air Quality Fellow for the US State Department's Greening Diplomacy Initiative. His research interests include chemical transport models and the disparities in O3 and NO2 pollution.

Recordings: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2021/

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Title: Connecting microbes, phytoplankton, and oceanography in the California Current with eDNA and metagenomes
Presenter(s): Dr. Nastassia Patin, Postdoctoral Research, NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Stationed at Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA
Date & Time: 17 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
You may view the recording thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ponlnlhyw9i6/

Title: Connecting microbes, phytoplankton, and oceanography in the California Current with eDNA and metagenomes - Part of the NOAA 'Omics Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Nastassia Patin, Postdoctoral Research, NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS), University of Miami, Miami, FL, Stationed at Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, La Jolla, CA

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Omics and NOAA National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series
Seminar Contacts: Katharine.Egan@noaa.gov, NOAA/OAR 'Omics Coordinator and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, NOAA/NOS Science Seminar Coordinator

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: The California Current is a highly productive ecosystem with several ecologically and economically valuable fisheries. Local oceanographic phenomena like upwelling and basin-scale environmental perturbations like El Nio/La Nia cycles can impact all levels of the food web; however, the propagation of these effects through trophic levels is largely unknown due to a poor understanding of linkages between microbes, plankton, and metazoans. Here, we present data from a multi-year time series of microbial metagenomes, metabarcoding, and ocean chemistry to show how microbiomes correlate with phytoplankton and metazoan community dynamics. We used metagenome-assembled genomes and gene functions to characterize microbial communities and connect them to higher trophic level community composition. Using supervised machine learning methods, we found season- and depth-dependent microbiomes can predict distinct phytoplankton regimes, particularly diatom vs dinoflagellate dominated surface waters. We also found strong correlations between microbes and coccolithophore (E. huxleyi) abundances. This connectivity is driven by microdiverse heterotrophic microbial lineages including SAR324 and Nitrosopumilus. These combined omics approaches provide a holistic overview of marine ecosystems and may improve biological oceanographic modeling of environmental perturbations in the future.

Bio(s): Nastassia Patin got her Ph.D. at Scripps Institution of Oceanography where she studied the chemical ecology of marine sediment bacteria and their bioactive compounds. She then did a postdoc with Frank Stewart and Kostas Konstantinidis at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, where she worked in a variety of marine systems to understand the role of the microbiome in ecosystem health and function. She focused on applying metagenomic and bioinformatic tools to recover high-quality genomes of uncultured marine microbes and link them to biotic and abiotic processes. In 2020,, she joined AOML where she currently works with Kelly Goodwin to leverage eDNA sequence data from the California Current to understand linkages among microbes, plankton, and metazoans while advancing Omics efforts more broadly at NOAA. In her free time Nastassia enjoys surfing, biking, cooking, and hanging out with her two cats.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of the webinar and a PDF of presentation slides are usually sent to all registrants after the webinar. You may view the recording thru Adobe Connect, here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ponlnlhyw9i6/

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject; visit the NOAA Science Seminar website for more information. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: Reef Rover: A Littoral Zone Benthic Crawler
Presenter(s): Ed Williams, Robo Nautica, LLC
Date & Time: 17 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Reef Rover: A Littoral Zone Benthic Crawler

Presenter(s): Ed Williams, CEO, Robo Nautica, LLC

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library and Technology Partnerships Office (TPO)Seminar Contacts: Tiffany House (tiffany.house@noaa.gov)

Abstract: REEF ROVER is a tele-operated, bottom crawling robotic tractor for littoral zone benthic video survey, connected wirelessly to a surface vessel with 1.25km standoff via a Wi-Fi buoy with UTP Ethernet"to-Rover comms for untethered 1080p video, including wide-angle-to-macro capability that can fill the screen with a single coral polyp. Offering both mobility and camera stability, it combines the stability necessary for macro video of benthic organisms.
Keywords: Benthic, Underwater-Robotic, Video, Open-source

Bio(s): During Ed Williams' 13 years at iRobot Corporation's Research and Military and Industrial Robotics Divisions, he helped build robots that have gone inside an inaccessible shaft in the Great Pyramid in Egypt, traveled 10 kilometers down a live oil well in Scotland, disarmed thousands of IEDs in Iraq and Afghanistan, and more. After iRobot, Mr. Williams designed a Development System for Underwater Robotic Vehicles (DSURV, US Patent 9315248) then launched Robo Nautica LLC to commercialize DSURV. Mr. Williams used it to build a proof-of-concept Reef Rover' whose successful sea trials at Gray's Reef led to Robo Nautica's SBIR grants to develop the Gray's reef Rover to a near commercialization-ready prototype.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording will be available after the webinar.

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16 November 2021

Title: Adapting to Climate with NOAA RISA in the Pacific Islands, Mid-Atlantic, and Urban Northeast
Presenter(s): Victoria Keener and Lara Brewington, Co-Lead Investigators, Pacific RISA; Debra Knopman, Senior Principal Researcher and Krista Romita Grocholski, Program Manager, Mid-Atlantic RISA; and Radley Horton, Lead Principal Investigator and Dan Bader, Program Manager, Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast
Date & Time: 16 November 2021
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar see description
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Adapting to Climate with NOAA RISA in the Pacific Islands, Mid-Atlantic, and Urban Northeast


Presenter(s):
Victoria Keener, Co-Lead Investigator, Pacific RISA
Laura Brewington, Co-Lead Investigator, Pacific RISA
Debra Knopman, Senior Principal Researcher, Mid-Atlantic RISA
Krista Romita Grocholski, Program Manager, Mid-Atlantic RISA
Radley Horton, Lead Principal Investigator, Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN)
Dan Bader, Program Manager, Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN)

Sponsor(s): OAR Climate Program Office's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program


Seminar Contact(s): Sean Bath, sean.bath@noaa.gov

Accessibility: A transcript will be generated in the recording. If additional accommodations needed, please contact Sean Bath at sean.bath@noaa.gov


Abstract: The NOAA Climate Program Office's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) program invests in research and engagement that expands regional capacity to adapt to climate change in the U.S. RISA's regional teams build sustained relationships between decision makers and researchers that support collaborative and equitable adaptation to climate risks. In Fiscal Year 2021, the RISA program launched 9 new 5-year RISA teams. This webinar series is a venue to introduce each team, discuss major themes and partners, and preview the projects that will advance climate knowledge and adaptation capacity in their regions.RISA's Pacific Islands region includes Hawai'i, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, Republic of Palau, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Federated States of Micronesia. The RISA team, Pacific RISA, is based at the Arizona State University Global Institute of Sustainability and Innovation, East-West Center, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, NOAA/NCEI's Center for Weather and Climate (CWC), and the NOAA Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (JIMAR). RISA's Mid-Atlantic region includes Virginia, Maryland, the District of Columbia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and parts of West Virginia. The RISA team, Mid-Atlantic RISA (MARISA), is based at the RAND Corporation, Pennsylvania State University, Johns Hopkins University, Cornell University, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Morgan State University, and Carnegie Mellon University. RISA's Urban Northeast region serves the urban corridor from Philadelphia to New York City to Boston, which includes New Jersey, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and some counties of Pennsylvania, New York, New Hampshire, and Maine. The RISA team, Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), is based at Columbia University, Boston University, Rutgers University, Drexel University, Stevens Institute of Technology, and City University of New York - Hunter College.RISA's Great Lakes region serves the Great Lakes basin, including parts of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Ontario. The RISA team, Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments (GLISA), is based at the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, College of the Menominee Nation, and University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
The recording will be sent to those who register and all videos will be posted to https://cpo.noaa.gov/risaSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
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Title: From the Bottom of the Ocean to the Surface of the Sun: Working Across NOAA to Steward the Diversity of NOAA’s Environmental Data
Presenter(s): Monica Youngman, Data Stewardship Division Chief, National Centers for Environmental Information, NCEI,NESDIS, NOAA
Date & Time: 16 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: From the Bottom of the Ocean to the Surface of the Sun: Working Across NOAA to Steward the Diversity of NOAA's Environmental Data - Part of the get to know NCEI seminar series

Presenter(s): Monica Youngman, Data Stewardship Division Chief, National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), NESDIS, NOAA; monica.youngman@noaa.gov


Sponsor(s): NOAA NESDIS National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)

Seminar Contacts: fred.burnett@noaa.gov, jake.crouch@noaa.gov, hernan.garcia@noaa.gov


Abstract: Ever have trouble finding data? Understanding how to use it? Have challenges combining it with other data? Then you understand why stewarding NOAA's environmental data to ensure it is findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable is critical to providing the highest value from NOAA's investment in Earth observations. NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Data (NCEI) works with partners across NOAA and beyond to ensure that NOAA's data are broadly available, independently understandable, and reusable for future generations, supporting NOAA's mission of science, stewardship, and service. Join this seminar to learn more about why this work is important and the challenges, how NCEI partners across the organization to meet these goals, and the foundational stewardship services NCEI offers.


Bio(s): Monica Youngman is the Chief of the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Data Stewardship Division providing archive and access services for NOAA's environmental data. In this role she focuses on making NOAA's data findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable by building relationships with stakeholders to understand needs, improving the data archiving and access processes, and expanding use of Cloud technology. Prior to joining NCEI in 2018, Monica worked for NOAA's National Geodetic Survey in a number of positions, most recently leading the multi-million dollar Gravity Program that includes the Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project. She has a Masters of Environmental Management from Duke University as well as bachelors degrees in political science and physics from Iowa State University.

Slides /

Recordings: Provided after the seminar.

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Title: The REMI Model: An Analysis of Coastal Resilience
Presenter(s): Peter Evangelakis, Ph.D. Vice President of Economics and Consulting Regional Economic Models, Inc. REMI
Date & Time: 16 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The REMI Model: An Analysis of Coastal Resilience

Presenter(s): Peter Evangelakis, Ph.D. Vice President of Economics and Consulting Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI)

Sponsor(s): PRSSO Performance, Risks, and Social Science and NOAA Central LibrarySeminar Contacts: Jennifer Zhuang (jennifer.zhuang@noaa.gov) and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Abstract: REMI client AECOM worked with Broward County, Florida to develop a report analyzing the coastal hazards facing the business community of Dania Beach, Florida. Researchers also evaluated the economic benefits from adaption actions that mitigate future coastal hazards to the City's commercial core. In addition to consideration of the costs and benefits of protective investments to reduce future hazard risks, it is also important to consider the opportunities for advancing economic resilience in communities like Dania Beach. This study illustrates that advancing economic resilience requires action by both the public and private sectors at various geographic scales while explaining that both communities have a shared interest in partnering on this front. During this discussion, Dr. Evangelakis will review the AECOM study Dania Beach: Economic Impacts of Sea Level Rise and Coastal Storms. This presentation will include a live model demonstration that illustrates how the REMI model can forecast the economic costs that could occur from failing to act to protect businesses in places such as Dania Beach from future storm surge and sea-level rise impacts.
REMI is inspired by a single goal: improving public policies. Founded in 1980, REMI has sought to improve public policy through economic modeling software that informs policies impacting our day-to-day lives. The REMI model is the premier software solution for modeling the economic and demographic effects of policy changes. Their experience and development efforts have resulted in a comprehensive model that answers what if? questions about any economy. Decision-makers and analysts rely on the REMI model to validate their economic impact studies in areas such as energy and environment, economic development, transportation, taxation, and many more. Included in this discussion will be an overview of the features and licensing details of the REMI model and more information about how the REMI model can be an asset to your organization. Keywords: Coastal Resilience, economic impact, input-output modeling

Bio(s): Dr. Peter Evangelakis is Vice President of Economics & Consulting at REMI. After joining REMI in September 2017, he manages REMI's team of economists, contributes to economic modeling software development, serves as Principal Investigator on numerous projects, presents multiple presentations on behalf of the company, and leads REMI's consulting practice from our Washington, D.C. office. Prior to starting at REMI, Dr. Evangelakis taught undergraduate Intermediate Microeconomics as a Lecturer at the University of Chicago.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

15 November 2021

Title: Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Vertical Structure Information for Aviation Weather Applications
Presenter(s): Yoo-Jeong Noh, Research Scientist, NOAA Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere CIRA, Colorado State University
Date & Time: 15 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Vertical Structure Information for Aviation Weather Applications

Presenter(s): Yoo-Jeong Noh, Research Scientist, NOAA Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), Colorado State University

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)


Abstract: Thiswork aims to provide satellite based 3-D cloud structure information in a more user-friendly way. Cloud data is critical for many aviation applications and climate studies, but conventional satellite-based cloud information is mostly biased toward cloud top. In support of the JPSS Alaska Cloud Demonstration as part of the JPSS Aviation Initiative, we introduced cloud vertical cross-section products along flight routes to provide more comprehensive satellite cloud data, focusing on the needs of aviation users in this data-sparse region. The products are derived from the NOAA Enterprise Cloud products with supplementary data including PIREPs(icing/turbulence), temperature (NUCAPS or NWP), and terrain data. Building on positive user feedback, we recently launched a new aviation website for custom cross-sections and continue to improve the products interacting with aviation users.

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Title: A paradigm shift: Rethinking Phragmites in the context of ecosystem resilience with insights from a meta-analysis and global change experiments
Presenter(s): Tom Mozdzer, Professor, Bryn Mawr College
Date & Time: 15 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
You may view the recording of this webinar thru adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/procavrqgz5m/

Title: A paradigm shift: Rethinking Phragmites in the context of ecosystem resilience with insights from a meta-analysis and global change experiments
A NOAA science seminar series - Rethinking the Common Reed Grass - Phragmites

Presenter(s): Tom Mozdzer, Professor, Bryn Mawr College

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Tracy Gill (NOAA/NOS science seminar coordinator) and Judith Weis (Professor Emerita, Rutgers)

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Phragmites australis is one of the most common and prolific invasive species in coastal wetlands throughout North America. Despite decades of study, the consequences of Phragmites australis invasion on ecosystem services are poorly understood. To evaluate the degree to which Phragmites australis invasion alters ecosystem services in North American tidal wetlands, we performed a meta-analysis of published studies identified using Web of Science. Our study synthesizes the findings of 69 peer-reviewed publications that contained over 900 paired data points allowing us to evaluate ecosystem services provided by Phragmites australis and native plant communities. Our meta-analysis found no overall effect of Phragmites australis invasion on ecosystem services. In addition, results from an ongoing global change experiment in the Chesapeake Bay also suggest that Phragmites will benefit more from global change than native plant communities. Our meta-analysis, and data from a long-term global change study, suggests the pressing need to reconsider the role that Phragmites australis plays in coastal wetlands, especially with respect to maintaining ecosystem resilience in an era of accelerating global change.

Bio(s): The Mozdzer Ecology lab uses an interdisciplinary approach, combining plant ecophysiology, biogeochemistry, and population genetics to better understand how wetland ecosystems may respond to global change. Currently, Professor Mozdzer is investigating the effects of global change on Phragmites australis invasion in an ecosystem level study at the Smithsonian Global Change Research Wetland. He is interested in understanding how the process of invasion may change with predicted levels of atmospheric CO2 and anthropogenic nitrogen pollution, along with the role of intraspecific genetic diversity in plant invasion. He is also collaborating with colleagues at MBL, the University of Massachusetts-Boston, Boston University, and the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center to understand the effects of chronic nutrient pollution in plant communities in the TIDE project. He has broad interests in plant ecophysiology, biogeochemistry, and is also very interested in understanding the impacts of plant invasion on ecosystem carbon cycling and greenhouse gas emissions.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides may be shared and the recording will be shared, after the webinar with all who register, and with anyone who requests them from the seminar contacts. You may view the recording of this webinar thru adobe connect, here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/procavrqgz5m/

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

12 November 2021

Title: NEDTalk: Geostationary NOAA Satellite Data
Presenter(s): Dan Lindsey, Program Scientist, NOAA/NESDIS/GOES-R Program
Date & Time: 12 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NEDTalk: Geostationary NOAA Satellite Data
NOAA Environmental Data Talks (NEDTalks), part of the NOAA Datafest Celebration!

Presenter(s): Dan Lindsey, Program Scientist, NOAA/NESDIS/GOES-R Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA''s National Environmental Satellite and Data Information Service (NESDIS)

Seminar Contacts:
Rafael.deameller@noaa.gov and Tiffany.Small@noaa.gov

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.


Abstract: NOAA's next geostationary satellite in the GOES-R series, GOES-T, is scheduled to launch in February of 2022. In honor of this event, join GOES-R Program Scientist, Dan Lindsey, who will be discussing the many ways that data from geostationary satellites can be used as well as the role that GOES-T will play.

Bio(s): Dan Lindsey is the NOAA/NESDIS GOES-R Program Scientist. He has been with NOAA since 2004 in Ft. Collins, Colorado, and specializes in satellite remote sensing of mesoscale phenomena from the geostationary platform, including thunderstorms, tropical cyclones, and aerosols such as smoke and blowing dust.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Previous NEDTalk recordings can be found here.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
Title: If you remove Phragmites, does planting native clonal species enhance restoration?
Presenter(s): Dennis Whigham, PhD, Senior Botanist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center and Founding Director, North American Orchid Conservation Center
Date & Time: 12 November 2021
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Adobe Connect Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording for this webinar thru adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pxzf0dhah01b/
This webinar was part two of one series and start about 30 minutes in.

Title: If you remove Phragmites, does planting native clonal species enhance restoration?
Part of the NOAA webinar series - Rethinking the Common Reed Grass - Phragmites
Note: Dr. Whigham will present this 30-minute NOAA seminar talk directly after this 12-12:30pm ET talk: What happens after Phragmites is treated with herbicide " a view over 5 years.

Presenter(s): Dennis Whigham, PhD, Senior Botanist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center and Founding Director, North American Orchid Conservation CenterCo-Authors:
- Sylvia Jacobson, MS Student, University of Maryland
- Andy Baldwin, Professor, University of Maryland
- Melissa McCormick, Ecologist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
- Eric Buehl, Regional Watershed Restoration Specialist, University of Maryland Sea Grant
Extension Program
- Karin Kettenring, Professor of Wetland Ecology, Utah State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Tracy Gill (NOAA/NOS science seminar coordinator) and Judith Weis
(Professor Emerita, Rutgers)

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): The ecology of plants has been Dennis Whigham's primary interest and his research has resulted in journeys through forests, fields and wetlands around the world. Explorations have led to studies of woodland herbs " including orchids, vines, wetland species, invasive species and studies of forests in the tropics, temperate and boreal zones. In recent years, studies of interactions between orchids and fungi have resulted in new and exciting directions. Whigham's current research projects focus on the role of wetlands associated with juvenile salmon habitat in Alaska headwater streams; the rarest terrestrial orchid in eastern North America; and an invasive wetland species that is rapidly expanding across the country. His current passion is to establish the North American Orchid Conservation Center (NAOCC), an initiative of the Smithsonian and the United States Botanic Garden. NAOCC's mission is to secure the genetic diversity of native orchids for future generations. The NAOCC model for orchid conservation is based on public-private collaborations and there are currently more than fifty collaborating organization distributed across the continent from Florida to Alaska. Whigham obtained an undergraduate degree from Wabash College and a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina. He joined the Smithsonian in 1977. Whigham and his collaborators have published more than 250 articles in journals and he has co-edited 10 books.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides may be shared and the recording will be shared, after the webinar with all who register, and with anyone who requests them from the seminar contacts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Adapting to Climate with NOAA RISA in the Great Lakes, South Central, and Pacific Northwest
Presenter(s): Maria Carmen Lemos, GLISA, et al. see description
Date & Time: 12 November 2021
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Adapting to Climate with NOAA RISA in the Great Lakes, South Central, and Pacific Northwest


Presenter(s):
Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments (GLISA): Maria Carmen Lemos, Jenna Jorns

Southern Climate Impacts Planning Program (SCIPP): Rachel Riley, Caylah Cruickshank, Barry Keim, Aimee Franklin, Anthony Levenda

Northwest Climate Resilience Collaborative (NCRC): Jennifer Allen, Jason Vogel


Sponsor(s): OAR Climate Program Office's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program


Seminar Contact(s): Sean Bath, sean.bath@noaa.gov

Accessibility: A transcript will be generated in the recording. If additional accommodations needed, please contact Sean Bath at sean.bath@noaa.gov


Abstract: The NOAA Climate Program Office's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) program invests in research and engagement that expands regional capacity to adapt to climate change in the U.S. RISA's regional teams build sustained relationships between decision makers and researchers that support collaborative and equitable adaptation to climate risks. In Fiscal Year 2021, the RISA program launched 9 new 5-year RISA teams. This webinar series is a venue to introduce each team, discuss major themes and partners, and preview the projects that will advance climate knowledge and adaptation capacity in their regions.RISA's Great Lakes region serves the Great Lakes basin, including parts of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Ontario. The RISA team, Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments (GLISA), is based at the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, College of the Menominee Nation, and University of Wisconsin-Madison.RISA's South Central region includes the states of Oklahoma, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas. The RISA team, Southern Climate Impacts Planning Program (SCIPP), is based at the University of Oklahoma, Louisiana State University, Texas A&M University, and Texas Sea Grant. RISA's Pacific Northwest region includes the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and parts of Montana. The RISA team, Northwest Climate Resilience Collaborative (NCRC), is based at the University of Washington, Portland State University, Washington Sea Grant, Front and Centered, American Farmland Trust, and the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians.

Bio(s): Great LakesSouth CentralPacific Northwest

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: The recording will be sent to those who register and all videos will be posted to https://cpo.noaa.gov/risaSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: What happens after Phragmites is treated with herbicide – a view over 5 years
Presenter(s): Dennis Whigham, PhD, Senior Botanist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center and Founding Director, North American Orchid Conservation Center
Date & Time: 12 November 2021
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Adobe Connect Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording for this webinar thru adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pxzf0dhah01b/

Title: What happens after Phragmites is treated with herbicide " a view over 5 years.
Part of the NOAA webinar series - Rethinking the Common Reed Grass - Phragmites
Note: Dr. Whigham will present the following (second 20-minute) talk right after this one:
If you remove Phragmites, does planting native clonal species enhance restoration?

Presenter(s): Dennis Whigham, PhD, Senior Botanist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center and Founding Director, North American Orchid Conservation CenterCo-Authors:
- Karin Kettenring, Professor of Wetland Ecology, Utah State University
- Christine Rohol, Post-doctoral Fellow, University of Florida
- Eric Hazelton, Ph.D., Independent Ecologist

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Tracy Gill (NOAA/NOS science seminar coordinator) and Judith Weis (Professor Emerita, Rutgers)

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): The ecology of plants has been Dennis Whigham's primary interest and his research has resulted in journeys through forests, fields and wetlands around the world. Explorations have led to studies of woodland herbs " including orchids, vines, wetland species, invasive species and studies of forests in the tropics, temperate and boreal zones. In recent years, studies of interactions between orchids and fungi have resulted in new and exciting directions. Whigham's current research projects focus on the role of wetlands associated with juvenile salmon habitat in Alaska headwater streams; the rarest terrestrial orchid in eastern North America; and an invasive wetland species that is rapidly expanding across the country. His current passion is to establish the North American Orchid Conservation Center (NAOCC), an initiative of the Smithsonian and the United States Botanic Garden. NAOCC's mission is to secure the genetic diversity of native orchids for future generations. The NAOCC model for orchid conservation is based on public-private collaborations and there are currently more than fifty collaborating organization distributed across the continent from Florida to Alaska. Whigham obtained an undergraduate degree from Wabash College and a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina. He joined the Smithsonian in 1977. Whigham and his collaborators have published more than 250 articles in journals and he has co-edited 10 books.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides may be shared and the recording will be shared, after the webinar with all who register, and with anyone who requests them from the seminar contacts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

10 November 2021

Title: Every Calf Counts: Hawaii’s humpback whale mother and calf pairs in a time of changing climate
Presenter(s): Dr. Rachel Cartwright, Lead Researcher, Keiki Kohola Project
Date & Time: 10 November 2021
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Every Calf Counts: Hawaii's humpback whale mother and calf pairs in a time ofchanging climate

Presenter(s): Dr. Rachel Cartwright, Lead Researcher, Keiki Kohola Project

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Abstract: Each winter, humpback whales from across the North Pacific head to Hawaiian waters to breed and raise their young. Within the islands, the nearshore waters along the western shoreline of Maui, Hawai'i are a favored nursery region for mothers and their young calves. Over the past twenty years"the Keiki Kohola Project"a small, grassroots research organization based on Maui, has been working to provide information to help ensure the well-being of mothers and calf pairs during this critical nursery period.Between 2015 and 2017, dramatic increases in water temperatures in the North Pacific severely impacted the region's marine ecosystem. These impacts included the food supplies on which Maui's humpback whales depend. Join Dr. Rachel Cartwright to learn how Maui's mothers and their calves weathered these lean years. We provide up-to-date information on their current status, and finally we focus on how humpback whale mother and calf pairs.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: The National Marine Ecosystem Status Website 2.0 - What It Is and How You Can Get Involved
Presenter(s): Willem Klajbor, M.S., 2021 NOAA Knauss Fellow
Date & Time: 10 November 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The National Marine Ecosystem Status Website 2.0 - What It Is and How You Can Get Involved

Presenter(s): Willem Klajbor, M.S., 2021 NOAA Knauss Fellow

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central LibrarySeminar Contacts: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov), and NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The agency's National Marine Ecosystem Status website provides a starting point for educators, outreach specialists, and the interested public to explore the status of seven major U.S. marine ecosystems and the nation at -a -glance. For the first time in one location, it provides easy access to NOAA's wide range of important coastal and marine ecosystem data. In this presentation, Will will walk through the first major update to the website, including new data and resources available for the first time on the site, and explain how NOAA Programs and interested partners can get involved.
Keywords: Ecosystem, Indicator, Data

Bio(s): Will Klajbor is a 2021 NOAA Knauss Fellow coordinating the NOAA Ecosystem Indicators Working Group that maintains the National Marine Ecosystem Status website. Will is co-hosted by the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program, and the National Center for Environmental Information. Prior to the Fellowship, Will completed his Masters in Marine Resource Management with a minor in Risk Quantification in Marine Systems at Oregon State University.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: ​Top Ten "Gotchas" - an opportunity to improve ​NOAA NWS Impact-Based Decision Support Services (IDSS)
Presenter(s): Kenneth Graham, National Hurricane Center, Director of NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 10 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Gotowebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Top Ten "Gotchas" - an opportunity to improve NOAA NWS Impact-Based Decision Support Services (IDSS) - Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series.
These webinars are open to the public, in or outside of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Presenter(s): Kenneth Graham, Director, National Hurricane Center, NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS)

Sponsor(s): This event is part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series with sponsorship from the NOAA Science Council. The NOAA-wide NELS provides examples of NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. The NELS are presented as part of the NOAA Science Seminar Series For NELS questions, contact nels@noaa.gov

Abstract: The NOAA NWS Impact-Based Decision Support Services (IDSS) is a commitment to science and technology and builds trust through deep relationships with key decision-makers across the nation. They have a high degree of authority for public safety and the capability to amplify NWS messaging to other NWS partners. Words matter. This presentation looks at ten "gotcha" items that can make the difference in being a hurricane victim and a hurricane survivor.

Bio(s): https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/staff/Graham_bio_2021.pdfRecording: To access the video after the webinar visit the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series
Notice: Please note that the online service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Monitoring Ocean Acidification in Alaska's Marine Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Natalie Monacci, MSc, University of Alaska Fairbanks, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Ocean Acidification Research Center | Fairbanks, AK
Date & Time: 10 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Monitoring Ocean Acidification in Alaska's Marine Ecosystems

Presenter(s): Natalie Monacci, MSc, University of Alaska Fairbanks, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Ocean Acidification Research Center

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): EcoFOCI Research Coordinator Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Post Doctoral Researcher Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Accessibility:

Abstract: Ocean Acidification (OA) is an important manifestation of global climate change, a result of anthropogenically increased carbon dioxide in the oceans. OA has the potential to negatively affect Alaska's Blue Economy by changing ocean chemistry, which could have impacts on culturally and commercially important species. Research conducted by the Ocean Acidification Research Center (OARC) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) scales the intensity, duration, and extent of OA events around the state. Projects in the Gulf of Alaska, Bering Sea, Chukchi Sea, and Beaufort Sea will be presented and include observations from long-term autonomous monitoring, repeat hydrographic projects, and modelling efforts. The 10-year collaboration between the UAF's OARC and NOAA's EcoFOCI to outfit the Bering Sea biophysical mooring site 2 (M2) will be highlighted. The OARC outfits NOAA's surface mooring at M2, affectionately known as Peggy, with instrumentation to monitor carbonate system variables. As a result, Peggy, in addition to NOAA's core biophysical observations, is part of a worldwide network to gather long-term data on carbon dioxide in the ocean and how OA is progressing in different regions.

Bio(s): Natalie Monacci is the Deputy Director of the Ocean Acidification Research Center (OARC) at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks where she has been managing all OARC activities since 2010

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker at nmonacci@alaska.edu. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: The effects of non-native marsh grass (Phragmites australis) on coastal nitrogen cycling
Presenter(s): Mollie R. Yacano, PhD Candidate, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Date & Time: 10 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Adobe Connect Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording of this webinar here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p2cnotblwidc/

Title: The effects of non-native marsh grass (Phragmites australis) on coastal nitrogen cycling
Part of the NOAA science seminar series, "Rethinking the Common Reed Grass - Phragmites",
co-hosted by Dr. Judith S. Weis, Professor Emerita, Rutgers University

Presenter(s): Mollie R. Yacano, PhD Candidate, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): Tracy Gill (NOAA/NOS science seminar coordinator) and Judith Weis (Professor Emerita, Rutgers)

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: The European haplotype of Phragmites australis is an aggressive and widespread invader in the United States, capable of growing in fresh, brackish, and fully saline habitats. It is typically considered a nuisance invader and is a common target for eradication, which is rarely successful. Though historically viewed as detrimental, studies have found P. australis performs closely to or outperforms native marsh plants in provision of ecosystems services such as carbon storage, sediment accretion, storm protection, and nitrogen removal. Our previous work established P. australis enhances sediment denitrification relative to native salt marsh habitats, but it is currently unknown if P. australis performs this ecosystem service equally across the wide range of habitats it inhabits in coastal urban areas. In addition, understanding impacts of eradication attempts on denitrification capacity is critical. Though we have not yet observed differences between net denitrification rates in P. australis sediments from most landscape settings or eradication treatments, we have found rates differ significantly between marine and brackish sites. Our work aims to provide context to understand potential impacts of invasion and control measures of P. australis across the coastal landscapes in Eastern North Carolina.

Bio(s): Mollie Yacano received a BA from Boston University and is currently a PhD candidate in the Piehler Lab at University of North Carolina's Institute of Marine Sciences. Her research focuses primarily on the role of invasive species on altering coastal biogeochemistry. She is particularly interested in how her research can be applied to better inform coastal management policies. She is the current North Carolina Sea Grant (NCSG) and North Carolina Coastal Reserve(NCCR) Fellow and was previously the NCSG and Albemarle-Pamlico National Estuary Partnership (APNEP) Fellow. She serves in leadership roles for the Scientific Research and Education Network (SciREN) and Growing Equity in Science & Technology (GEST), both aimed at increasing STEM literacy and visibility in K12 schools. She is also the founding member of the Eastern North Carolina chapter of the Society for Women in Marine Science (SWMS).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides may be shared and the recording will be shared, after the webinar with all who register, and with anyone who requests them from the seminar contacts. You may view the recording of this webinar here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p2cnotblwidc/

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Monitoring Agricultural Water Use and Drought at Field to Global Scales Using Multi-Sensor Satellite Imaging
Presenter(s): Martha Anderson, Research Physical Scientist, USDA-ARS Hydrology and Remote Sensing Laboratory; Yun Yang, Research Physical Scientist, USDA-ARS Hydrology and Remote Sensing Laboratory
Date & Time: 10 November 2021
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Monitoring Agricultural Water Use and Drought at Field to Global Scales Using Multi-Sensor Satellite ImagingThis webinar is part of the Cooperative Institute for Satellite Earth System Studies Science Seminar Series.

Presenter(s):
  • Dr. Martha Anderson, Research Physical Scientist, USDA-ARS Hydrology and Remote Sensing Laboratory;
  • Dr. Yun Yang, Research Physical Scientist, USDA-ARS Hydrology and Remote Sensing Laboratory


Sponsor(s): Cooperative Institute for Satellite Earth System Studies

Seminar Contact(s): Douglas Rao (douglas.rao@noaa.gov) and Tom Maycock (tmaycock@ncics.org).

Accessibility: Live captioning is provided in the WebEx meeting.


Abstract: Across the U.S. and globally there are ever-increasing and competing demands for freshwater resources in support of food production, ecosystems services and human/industrial consumption. Accelerating climate dynamics further compound the need to more closely monitor the timing, severity, and impacts of drought on vegetation stress. To facilitate wise water management, and to develop sustainable agricultural systems that will feed the Earth's growing population into the future, there is a critical need for robust assessments of daily water use, or evapotranspiration (ET), and water stress over a wide range in spatial scales " from field to globe. While Earth Observing (EO) satellites can play a significant role in this endeavor, no single satellite provides the combined spatial, spectral and temporal characteristics required for actionable ET monitoring world-wide. In this presentation we discuss new methods for combining information from the current suite of EO satellites to address issues of water use, agricultural production and forest management. These methods fuse multi-scale diagnostic ET retrievals generated using shortwave and thermal infrared datasets from multiple EO platforms to generate ET datacubes with both high spatial (30-m pixels) and temporal (daily) resolution. We highlight several case studies where such ET datacubes are being mined to investigate changes in water use patterns over agricultural and forested landscapes in response to changing land use, land management, and climate forcings. We also discuss new capabilities for largescale applications provided by the recently launched OpenET platform, generating 30-m maps of daily, monthly and annual ET over the western U.S. using an ensemble modeling approach.

Bio(s): Dr. Martha C. Anderson received a B.A. degree in Physics from Carleton College, Northfield, MN, and a PhD in Astrophysics from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Presently she is a Research Physical Scientist for the USDA Agricultural Research Service in the Hydrology and Remote Sensing Laboratory in Beltsville, MD. Her research interests focus on mapping water, energy, and carbon land-surface fluxes at field to continental scales using thermal remote sensing, with applications in drought monitoring and yield estimation. She is currently a member of the Landsat, ECOSTRESS, and OpenET Science Teams.Dr. Yun Yang received a B.S. degree in Geography from Beijing Normal University, China and a M.S. and Ph.D in Environmental Science from the University of Massachusetts, Boston. She is an assistant research scientist at ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park. Before this, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Hydrology and Remote Sensing Laboratory, USDA-ARS. Her research interests focus on detecting and monitoring drought impact and studying ecosystem sustainability through ET mapping using multi-scale satellite observations at field to regional scales. She is a member of the OpenET team and implemented the ALEXI/DisALEXI model on the Google Earth Engine platform.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recordings will be available after the workshop on https://ncics.org/cisess-science-seminar-series/.
Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

9 November 2021

Title: Gulf Stream variability and trends: From the Florida Current to past Cape Hatteras
Presenter(s): Dr. Christopher L.P. Wolfe, Physical Oceanographer, and Associate Professor of marine science in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University
Date & Time: 9 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Gulf Stream variability and trends: From the Florida Current to past Cape Hatteras


Presenter(s):Dr. Christopher Wolfe, Physical Oceanographer, and Associate Professor of marine science in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University


Sponsor(s): NOAA's Atlantic Oceanic Meteorological Laboratory (AMOL)


Seminar Contact(s): denis.volkov@noaa.gov

Abstract: Previous work linking interannual variations in Florida Current transport (FCT) to changes in atmospheric forcing have focused on the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The NAO is a one-dimensional representation of fluctuations in the strengths and positions of the Icelandic Low and Azores High and considering its components independently has the potential to provide new insights. When considering the full record, FCT is not significantly correlated (i.e., p > 0.05) with the NAO at any lag or any season; however, wintertime FCT is significantly correlated (p < 0.05) with Icelandic Low longitude in the same season. Perturbation experiments with an ocean model reveal that wind perturbations associated with changes in Icelandic Low latitude drive coastal up/downwelling (through longshore winds) and offshore sea level anomalies (through wind stress curl) that are rapidly transmitted to Florida Strait, inducing transport changes by altering the sea level gradient across the Strait. Wintertime FCT is also correlated with latitude variations in both the Icelandic Low and Azores High with a lag of four years, likely due mid-ocean wind stress curl anomalies which excite baroclinic Rossby waves.
Further downstream, climate models have forecast that the Gulf Stream past Cape Hatteras will slow and shift northward as the AMOC weakens under climate change. While several studies have indirectly inferred a slowing Gulf Stream, the picture revealed by in situ and altimetric observations is more mixed. We examine the trends in Gulf Stream latitude, speed, surface transport, and width using along-track altimetry and find very few significant trends in these quantities during the altimetry era. Further, the nature and geographic location of significant trends is very sensitive to the length of the record used in the analysis. These results suggest that any possible trends are too small to be detectable above the Gulf Stream's natural variability. Supposing that the calculated trends are real (even though not currently statistically significant) and continue at the current rate, detection of trends at more than half of the altimetry tracks would require 22"23 additional years of observations for latitude and transport and 44 additional years for speed.


Bio(s): Dr. Christopher L.P. Wolfe is a physical oceanographer and an associate professor of marine science in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University. He received his Ph.D. from Oregon State University in 2006 and was formerly a postdoc (2006"2012) and assistant research oceanographer (2012"2013) at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD.

Recordings: AOML/PHOD YouTube Channel:https://www.youtube.com/user/phodaoml/videos


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Title: Crab reproduction and management implications in the eastern Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Laura Slater, University of Alaska Fairbanks, CFOS
Date & Time: 9 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Crab reproduction and management implications in the eastern Bering Sea

Presenter(s): Laura Slater, University of Alaska Fairbanks, CFOS

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAANMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Abstract: Population renewal processes are important but difficult to ascertain for crab populations in Alaska due to the complicated nature of their reproductive biology and patterns of spatial structure and movement, which are influenced by environmental conditions. We examined snow crab female sperm reserves in the eastern Bering Sea over a ten-year period as a direct measure of mating success between females the harvested (male) portion of the stock. We observed success in mating for most females but, despite the capacity for females to store sperm for use across multiple years, our results suggest females must mate each year to successfully fertilize their eggs. While reproduction is only one aspect of maintaining sustainable populations, our findings underscore the importance of maintaining adequate adult sex ratios within spatial scales that are meaningful for mating of benthic species.

Bio(s): Laura Slater is a PhDcandidate in fisheries at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, College ofFisheries and Ocean Sciences. She is studying the mating dynamics of snow crabto improve understanding of stock renewal processes. She is also a supervisory fisheriesbiologist with experience managing research programs and teams. She worked inthis role at Alaska Department of Fish and Game in Kodiak for 14 years, with a focuson crab research. She recently shifted her focus to stream fish and is workingfor the Russian River Salmon and Steelhead Monitoring Program for CaliforniaSea Grant in Santa Rosa, California. She also serves as co-chair of theDiversity and Inclusion Committee for the Western Division of the AmericanFisheries Society.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Getting a Feel for Your Community's Climate Future
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia, LuAnn Dahlman, NOAA Climate Program Office
Date & Time: 9 November 2021
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Climate Overview: Sandra Rayne | Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur/Todd Hamill | NWS Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox | University of Georgia

Spotlight: Getting a Feel for Your Community's Climate Future: LuAnn Dahlman | NOAA Climate Program Office

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NIDIS, (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

The November 9 webinar will also feature a presentation on "Getting a Feel for Your Community's Climate Future."

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

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5 November 2021

Title: Adapting to Climate with NOAA RISA in the Carolinas and Alaska
Presenter(s): Kathie Dello, C3HE and Sarah Trainor et al., ACCAP
Date & Time: 5 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Adapting to Climate with NOAA RISA in the Carolinas and Alaska

Presenter(s):
Kathie Dello (Carolinas Collaborative on Climate, Health, and Equity, C3HE);

Sarah Trainor, Nathan Kettle, John Walsh, Adelheid Herrmann, Danielle Meeker, Rick Thoman (Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, ACCAP)


Sponsor(s): OAR Climate Program Office's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program


Seminar Contact(s): Sean Bath, sean.bath@noaa.gov

Accessibility: A transcript will be generated in the recording. If additional accommodations needed, please contact Sean Bath at sean.bath@noaa.gov


Abstract: The NOAA Climate Program Office's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) program invests in research and engagement that expands regional capacity to adapt to climate change in the U.S. RISA's regional teams build sustained relationships between decision makers and researchers that support collaborative and equitable adaptation to climate risks. In Fiscal Year 2021, the RISA program launched 9 new 5-year RISA teams. This webinar series is a venue to introduce each team, discuss major themes and partners, and preview the projects that will advance climate knowledge and adaptation capacity in their regions.RISA's Carolinas region includes North Carolina (NC) and South Carolina (SC). The RISA team, Carolinas Collaborative on Climate, Health, and Equity (C3HE), is based at NC State University, the NC State Climate Office, UNC Chapel Hill, Furman University, NC Central University, NC Sea Grant, SC State University, and the NC Museum of Life and Science. C3HE will build upon years of regional work on climate science, tools and assessments to move into a new phase that centers Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (JEDI) principles at the forefront of NOAA-funded climate research and to deliver climate futures to more communities than have been previously served. They will apply a bottom-up participatory action approach to develop a transferable model for end-to-end co-production of actionable and equitable climate resilience solutions in at-risk communities in the Carolinas. The team's aims include: Aim 0. Demonstrate our commitment to address the climate reality in a just and equitable way, while ensuring the inclusivity and diversity of all voices are represented in every aspect of our work in the Carolinas; Aim 1. Build and enhance local partnerships in underserved communities across the Carolinas to identify, test, and refine equitable solutions for climate resilience; Aim 2. Understand and predict how co-occurring and consecutive hazards interact with exposure and vulnerability to shape climate risk; Aim 3. Identify and connect the complex linkages between structures of power, intersecting social positions, and climate-health inequities in vulnerable communities; and Aim 4. Design and implement community-sciences programs to track physical and social science metrics and build community-level climate resiliency literacy. Learn more at https://climate.ncsu.edu/c3he/RISA's Alaska region includes all parts of the vast state of Alaska. The RISA team, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), is based at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.ACCAP's portfolio of interwoven research and engagement in Alaska will support the underlying vision of building healthy and thriving Alaskan communities. Core themes include extreme events and impacts and capacity building in support of Tribal resilience. In the extreme events work, the team will use an integrated scientific approach that brings together social science, climate science, and local expertise to: a) document socio-economic impacts of extreme climate and weather events in Alaska; b) engage practitioners to determine and meet information needs; and c) analyze historical and projected changes in extreme event occurrences to inform policy and decision-making. The work will support Tribal resilience by: a) bridging community-level climate adaptation planning and implementation with workforce and economic development; b) investigating and supporting boundary spanning and knowledge co-production between Alaska Native communities and climate and related researchers; c) innovating evaluation methodology and elevating Indigenous evaluation of climate-related knowledge co-production and climate adaptation. Hallmarks of new outreach and engagement activities in this project include assessment products that encompass societal impacts and adaptation, training for students and postdoctoral fellows, online course development, and enhanced convening activities with a focus on serving the needs of policy-makers, Alaska Native Peoples, tribes, and organizations throughout the state. This team includes a sustained assessment specialist and small-grant competition, which like the core portfolio, aims to fulfill ACCAP's vision of thriving Alaskan communities, economies, and ecosystems. Learn more at https://uaf-accap.org/Additional information provided on the Guide to the RISA Teams.

Bio(s): See bios at here.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: The recording will be sent to those who register and all videos will be posted to https://cpo.noaa.gov/risaSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
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Title: NEDTalk: Low Earth Orbit NOAA Satellite Data
Presenter(s): Jorel Torres, Meteorologist/Research Associate, NOAA's JPSS Satellite Liaison, CIRA and NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 5 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NEDTalk: Low Earth Orbit NOAA Satellite Data
NOAA Environmental Data Talks (NEDTalks), part of the NOAA Datafest Celebration!

Presenter(s): Jorel Torres, Meteorologist/Research Associate, NOAA's JPSS Satellite Liaison, CIRA and NOAA's National Weather Service

Sponsor(s): NOAA''s National Environmental Satellite and Data Information Service (NESDIS)Seminar Contacts: Rafael.deameller@noaa.gov and Tiffany.Small@noaa.gov

Accessibility: Live closed captioning will be provided.


Abstract: With the launch of the next polar-orbiting JPSS satellite slated for Sept. 2022, meteorologist Jorel Torres, NOAA's JPSS Satellite Liaison, will be discussing the many ways that data from these Low Earth Orbiting satellites can be used and the role that JPSS-2 will play when it becomes operational in orbit.

Bio(s): Jorel Torres is a Research Associate II: JPSS Satellite Liaison at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), located in Fort Collins, Colorado. Torres liaisons between the National Weather Service (NWS) user community and the research community focusing on JPSS products, applications, and satellite training development for users.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Previous NEDTalk recordings can be found here.

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4 November 2021

Title: Close-kin genetic methods for estimating census size and effective population size
Presenter(s): Robin Waples, Senior Scientist, NWFSC, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 4 November 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Close-kin genetic methods for estimating census size and effective population size (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s): Robin Waples, Senior Scientist, NWFSC, Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Kristan Blackhart and Library Seminars

Abstract: It is now possible to genetically identify close relatives in wild populations, and this information can be used in a mark-recapture framework (CKMR) to estimate abundance (N). Successful CKMR applications require information about vital rates and other life history traits, and the same genetic and demographic data can be used to estimate effective population size (Ne), the evolutionary analogue to N. I discuss how life history information differently affects CKMR estimates of N and genetic estimates of Ne, and how combined datasets can be leveraged to better understand both the ecological and evolutionary correlates of abundance.
Waples, R. S., & Feutry, P. (2021). Close-kin methods to estimate census size and effective population size. Fish and Fisheries, 00, 1" 21. https://doi.org/10.1111/faf.12615


Bio(s): For over a decade, Robin led a group charged with developing the scientific basis for listing determinations and recovery planning for Pacific salmon under the federal Endangered Species Act. A major theme of his research has been to apply evolutionary and ecological principles to real-world problems in conservation and management. Often this involves adapting standard population genetics models to better comport with life histories of actual species.

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Title: Using modern and traditional aquaculture technology as a tool in restoration aquaculture within coastal communities of the Pacific Basin: Fishponds, Clam Gardens and Kelp Lines
Presenter(s): Mark Tagal & Ikaika Rogerson, Aquaculturist IBSS Corp/Waimanalo Limu Hui
Date & Time: 4 November 2021
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Using modern and traditional aquaculture technology as a tool in restoration aquaculture within coastal communities of the Pacific Basin: Fishponds, Clam Gardens and Kelp Lines

Presenter(s): Mark Tagal & Ikaika Rogerson, Aquaculturist IBSS Corp/Waimanalo Limu Hui

Sponsor(s): NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam series

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: Altering the habitat to make it favorable for growing fish and other marine life has been practiced by coastal dwelling people for a very long time. From simple stone and wooden fish traps found in Southeast Asia and Polynesia to large but primitive Hawaiian fishponds have been a form of aquaculture practiced for centuries. Current aquaculture practices used in tandem with traditional understanding of fishponds can be used in restoration efforts. Acting as a valuable nursery habitat, fishponds can offset productive areas lost to modern development. Additionally, modern hatchery methods can be used with some species to boost populations that have been negatively affected by overfishing.

Bio(s): Over his career, Mark Tagal has been contracted to multiple State and Federal Agencies where he has worked in both research and commercial aquaculture, providing finfish, shellfish and algae for a multitude of research projects and human consumption. A civil service worker at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard for the last 15 years, Ikaika Rogerson graduated from both Kamehameha Kaplama and the University of Hawai'i with a bachelor of Hawaiian Studies currently pursuing his Master's Degree. Ikaika is the owner of Rocky Farms, LLC specializing in Hawaiian L'au Lapa'au. He is a graduate of the UHM GoFarm Program as well as an established aquaponics farmer. Aside from his own businesses, Ikaika serves on the board of directors for O'ahu Hawaiian Canoe Racing Association and as a board member for both the Waimnalo Market Co-Op board and the Hawaiian Canoe Racing Association board.

Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)

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Title: Showcasing Leading Practices in Climate Adaptation: Experiences from the Water Sector to Empower Other Sectors and Communities - Session 1: Leading Practices
Presenter(s): Laurna Kaatz, Denver Water and Julie Vano, Aspen Global Change Institute
Date & Time: 4 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Showcasing Leading Practices in Climate Adaptation: Experiences from the Water Sector to Empower Other Sectors and Communities - Session 1: Leading PracticesPart of the NOAA, EPA, WUCA, and WRF webinar series " Showcasing Leading Practices in Climate Adaptation: Experiences from the Water Sector to Empower Other Sectors and Communities"

Presenter(s):
Laurna Kaatz, Denver WaterJulie Vano, Aspen Global Change Institute

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Climate Program Office (CPO), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), The Water Research Foundation (WRF), and the Water Utility Climate Alliance (WUCA)Seminar Contacts: Nancy Beller-Simms, nancy.beller-simms@noaa.gov (NOAA CPO); Amanda Speciale, amanda.speciale@noaa.gov (NOAA CPO); Maureen Hodgins, mhodgins@waterrf.org (WRF); Steve Fries, fries.steve@epa.gov (EPA); Klara Zimmerman, zimmerman.klara@epa.gov (EPA); Laurna Kaatz, Laurna.Kaatz@denverwater.org (WUCA)

Accessibility: TBD


Abstract: The Water Utility Climate Alliance (WUCA) is a group of 12 utilities working to collaboratively advance climate adaptation. WUCA's latest work, Leading Practices in Climate Adaptation, includes a report and website summarizing a range of actions that have been tested on the ground by WUCA agencies. The Leading Practices were developed by practitioners for practitioners and are accessible to utilities of all sizes, locations, and levels of climate adaptation experience, as well as other sectors seeking to adapt to changing conditions. Each practice is supported with concrete examples and many include supporting resources. In this webinar, participants will learn about the five essential climate action areas, review the Leading Practices, and hear a range of supporting examples. Participants will also engage in an exercise to begin thinking about which practices would be a good fit for their organization.

Bio(s): Learn more about the speakers

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available online after the webinar.

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Title: OSTP - NMNH Windows to the Deep: Live Conversations from the Blake Plateau
Presenter(s): Dr. Eric S. Lander, President's Science Advisor and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy; Dr. Kirk Johnson, Sant Director, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History; Dr. Richard W. Spinrad, Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator; and Symone Barkley, Educator, NOAA National Ocean Service
Date & Time: 4 November 2021
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Windows to the Deep: Live Conversations from the Blake Plateau

Presenter(s): Dr. Eric S. Lander (President's Science Advisor and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy), Dr. Kirk Johnson (Sant Director, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History), Dr. Richard W. Spinrad (Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator), and Symone Barkley (Educator, NOAA National Ocean Service).

Sponsor(s): White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, and NOAA Ocean Exploration.

Seminar Contact(s): Rachel.Gulbraa@noaa.gov

For closed captions: https://www.captionedtext.com/client/event.aspx?EventID=4930500&CustomerID=321

Date & Time: 4 November 2021 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm ET

Abstract: Join the President's Science Advisor and ocean explorers as they investigate 10,000 feet deep in an area of the seafloor that's never been explored before. The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) invite you to join a virtual event highlighting the importance and value of the ocean during a live conversation with explorers onboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, America's ship for ocean exploration. Presidential Science Advisor and OSTP Director Dr. Eric Lander will co-host the livestreamed event with NOAA National Ocean Service Exhibits Manager and Education Specialist Symone Barkley. The live interaction will bring the excitement of discovery directly to the public as ocean explorers image areas of the seafloor that people have never explored before and share their real-time discoveries through a live-streamed video feed. The event will stoke curiosity about the diverse and largely unknown ecosystems and organisms of the deep sea and highlight the importance of the ocean for addressing the climate crisis, rebuilding the economy, and advancing environmental justice.

Bio(s): Dr. Eric S. Lander (President's Science Advisor, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy), Dr. Kirk Johnson (Sant Director, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History), Dr. Richard W. Spinrad (Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator), and Symone Barkley (Educator, NOAA National Ocean Service).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Check this site for posting.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: NOAA Diving and Small Boat Operations Safety Tool (DASBOS Tool): Safer and efficient operational planning through GIS Applications
Presenter(s): Joshua Fredrick, LTJG, NOAA Corps, DASBOS Tool Creator & Project Manager and Karen Kavanaugh, Oceanographer, NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services - CO-OPS - and DASBOS Tool Lead GIS Developer & Key Contributor
Date & Time: 4 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Adobe Connect Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Diving and Small Boat Operations Safety Tool (DASBOS Tool):
Safer and efficient operational planning through GIS Applications

Presenter(s): Joshua Fredrick, LTJG/NOAA Corps, DASBOS Tool Creator & Project Manager and
Karen Kavanaugh, Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS/Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) & DASBOS Tool Lead GIS Developer & Key Contributor
When: Thursday, November 4, 2021, 12-1pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, coordinator of NOAA/NOS science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: NOAA has over 100 dive units with over 330 divers, including 15 NOAA Ships and over 430 NOAA Small Boats across the nation. These dive units are responsible for maintaining water level stations, ship husbandry, services critical to safe navigation, and much more. NOAA Divers operate in diverse environments across the country, but is the water safe to dive in?NOAA Divers face a number of risks each time they enter the water, including contamination that can pose acute or chronic risks to diver health. NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic Products & Services (CO-OPS) developed the web-based NOAA Diving and Small Boat Operations Safety GIS application (DASBOS Tool) to support pre-dive and small boat risk assessments through analysis of recent and historical water quality data. In addition, the DASBOS Tool provides water level stations (with basic meteorological data), hyperbaric chambers, hospitals, boat ramps, and marinas. This decision support tool allows divers and boaters to efficiently complete in-depth desktop reconnaissance with a single map that integrates both recent and historical data sets from a variety of sources. Equally important to the map itself is the digital backbone supporting it. The tool is an ArcGIS Online application hosted by the NOAA GeoPlatform, enabling cross-agency collaboration. Several CO-OPS data layers are updated directly from the Google Sheets maintained by operational units themselves, making data management easy and transparent. Python-based web-scraping optimizes external datasets, like those of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that provide critical water quality information.The NOAA DASBOS Tool has already demonstrated its value. Last fall, after consulting the tool, CO-OPS averted a dive mission near Lake Charles, Louisiana because of potential water contamination in the aftermath of Hurricane Laura. In the larger NOAA community, the tool is being incorporated into existing planning procedures that support the maintenance and operations of NOAA's fleet of ships and small boats. The DASBOS Tool is now publicly available and utilized by the US Navy and EPA Divers. We encourage you to utilize the DASBOS Tool for your own operations and safety planning. This new application is a powerful example of the capabilities GIS has to inform critical decisions and mitigate health risks.

Bio(s): Josh Fredrick: DASBOS Tool Creator & Project Manager. LTJG Fredrick is a NOAA Corps Officer, currently serving as the NOAA Small Boat Program Executive Officer in Seattle, WA. In six years with the NOAA Corps, he served in dive leadership roles at every duty station. While at NOAA's Center for Operational Products and Services (CO-OPS) in Chesapeake, VA, he was the Hydrographic Support Officer and Unit Dive Supervisor (UDS). Aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Elton Sette in Honolulu, HI, he served as the Navigation Officer and Ship Dive Officer. The DASBOS Tool was born while LTJG Fredrick served at CO-OPS with incredible support from the CO-OPS GIS Team and Field Operations Division. Karen Kavanaugh: DASBOS Tool Lead GIS Developer & Key Contributor. Kavanaugh is an Oceanographer at NOAA's Center for Operational Products and Services (CO-OPS). She worked for 10 years as the product coordinator for NOAA's operational harmful algal bloom forecasts and has recently transitioned to working on other coastal hazards, including hurricanes, tsunamis, and high tide flooding. She is also a member of the CO-OPS GIS team.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar. You may view this recording via Adobe Connect, here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pc0p5a4r6kb3/

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.
NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps 101
Presenter(s): LCDR Douglas Pawlishen, OMAO; LT Conor Maginn, OMAO
Date & Time: 4 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps 101

Presenter(s): LT Dustin Picard, Field Recruiting Officer, NOAA Corps Recruiting & LT Conor Maginn, OMAO, Pilot

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library Seminar Contacts: Library.Seminars@noaa.gov; LCDR Douglas Pawlishen (chief.noaacorps.recruiting@noaa.gov)Summary: What exactly is the NOAA Corps? How does this uniformed service work? What is it like being an new junior officer and progressing through the ranks?
Keywords: Honor, Respect, Commitment

Bio(s): LT Conor Maginn has proudly served in the NOAA Corps for 8 years and is currently a pilot for the NOAA Aircraft Operations Center (AOC). He specializes in operating "low and slow" aboard the diverse Twin Otter aircraft. He will present on how NOAA Corps Officers assist in the many operations of AOC, from 600 feet over the ocean conducting marine mammal observations for NMFS to 45,000 ft above a storm conducting hurricane surveillance missions for NWS.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

3 November 2021

Title: Insights into humpback whale use of entire ocean basins gained through two large, international studies
Presenter(s): David Mattila, Secretariat to the International Whaling Commission and Center for Coastal Studies
Date & Time: 3 November 2021
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Insights into humpback whale use of entire ocean basins gained through two large, international studies

Presenter(s): David Mattila, Secretariat to the International Whaling Commission and Center for Coastal Studies

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Abstract: Long-term studies of humpback whales in two key habitats within the United States EEZ, were essential to the establishment of two National Marine Sanctuaries (Stellwagen Banks and the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuaries). These studies also provided the foundation and inspiration for two unprecedented, ocean-basin studies of humpback whales in the North Atlantic Ocean (YONAH project) and the North Pacific Ocean (SPLASH project). The results of the two projects have provided new insights into the complex lives of humpback whales and their use of entire ocean basins. In addition, the two areas have become focal points for understanding how humans impact whales throughout all oceans, and have stimulated actions to reduce those impacts. This discussion will focus on the similarities and differences in humpback whales in the Hawaii and the Atlantic. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Improving Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Experimental S2S Sea Ice Predictions with a UFS-based System
Presenter(s): Wanqiu Wang, Yanyun Liu, Jieshun Zhu, Weiyu Yang, Aun Kumar, and David DeWitt; NOAA NWS Climate Prediction Center; Wanqiu.Wang@noaa.gov
Date & Time: 3 November 2021
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic seminar series 2021 as part of the public-access NOAA Science Seminar Series. The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee and sponsored by the NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region.

Title: Improving Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Experimental S2S Sea Ice Predictions with a UFS-based System

Presenter(s): Wanqiu Wang; Wanqiu.Wang@noaa.gov; Yanyun Liu, Jieshun Zhu, Weiyu Yang, Aun Kumar, and David DeWitt (NOAA NWS Climate Prediction Center)

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI and NOS Seminar Series
Seminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Sea ice predictions at subseasonal to seasonal (S2S) time scales have become important products for stakeholders. For example, the NWS Alaska Region requires sea-ice forecasts for the next few weeks to seasons. The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) has been providing sea ice predictions for week-2 to 9-month target periods based on an experimental sea ice prediction system (CFSm5) consisting of the Climate Forecast System (CFS) atmospheric component and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Modular Ocean Model version 5 (MOM5). Sea ice in CFSm5 is initialized from a MOM5-based CPC sea ice initialization system (CSIS). Sea ice forecasts from CFSm5 are significantly better than that from the operational CFS. The NWS Alaska Region uses these CPC sea ice predictions to provide guidance to the DOI, USCG and other partners. CPC's sea ice predictions are also regularly used by Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) in Alaska Region Climate Outlooks. The recent successful development and improvement of the coupled Unified Forecast System (UFS) by the Dynamics and Coupled Modeling Group of the Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) provided an opportunity for CPC to upgrade the CFSm5 to a UFS-based model for the S2S sea ice predictions. In this talk, we report our progress in the use of UFS in sea ice predictions. The final goal is to provide improved real-time week-3/4 and seasonal sea ice outlooks. We will present two major efforts with the UFS: (1) Experiments to adjust cloud parameterizations to reduce model errors in sea surface temperature and sea ice coverage and (2) An evaluation of sea ice predictions based on hindcasts completed with the UFS and comparisons with operational CFS, CFSm5, and observations. The potential of using a multi-model ensemble based on UFS, CFS, and CFSm5 will also be discussed.

Bio(s): Dr. Wanqiu Wang's principal interests are improving predictions of climate anomalies in the earth atmosphere-ocean-ice-land system at subseasonal to seasonal (S2S) time scales, and diagnosing predictability of S2S climate variability and understanding of systematic biases in coupled atmosphere-ocean dynamic forecast models. Dr. Wang received a PhD. degree in atmospheric sciences from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1996. From 1997-2004, Dr. Wang worked at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) environmental modeling center (EMC). Dr. Wang joined the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) in May 2004. The focus of his work is understanding predictability and improving predictions of Tropical intraseasonal and interannual variability, and Arctic sea ice. Dr. Wang has been serving as the chief of the CPC Operational Monitoring Branch of CPC since August 2019. Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Slides available after the seminar by contacting the presenter(s) directly
Recording: Seminars recorded for later viewing in mp4 format

Accessibility: If NOAA staff would like to request an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Office of Human Capital Services' Sign Language Interpreting Services Program or the Relay Conference Captioning service.Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Blue-Green Biological Sensing in the Marine Environment: Mechanisms, Regulation, and Evolution.
Presenter(s): Dr. David Kehoe, Indiana University
Date & Time: 3 November 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Blue-Green Biological Sensing in the Marine Environment: Mechanisms, Regulation, and Evolution.

Presenter(s): David Kehoe, PhD, Indiana University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Abstract: The marine phytoplankton Synechococcus thrives in various light niches in part due to its varied photosynthetic light harvesting pigments. Synechococcus cells use a form of color vision that maximally senses blue and green light to control a process called Type 4 chromatic acclimation (CA4). Cells use the process of CA4 to tune the ratio of two chromophores, green-light absorbing phycoerythrobilin (PEB) and blue-light absorbing phycourobilin (PUB), in their light harvesting complexes or phycobilisomes. We are using molecular tools to study how Synechococcus cells adjust their PEB to PUB ratio within the phycobilisomes in response to changes in the ratio of blue to green light during CA4 and how this system is regulated. We are also investigating the prevalence of CA4 in the marine environment, its ecological role, and its evolution.

Speaker

Bio(s): Dr. Kehoe has earned post-baccalaureate degrees from the University of Washington and his PhD from UCLA, and he performed a post-doctoral study with Stanford University/Carnegie. He joined University of Indiana in 1998 rising to the rank of full professor in 2008. In 2018 he was elected a Fellow at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, in 2017 a Research Fellow with the Richard G. Lugar Center for Renewable Energy, in 2015 a Fellow in the American Academy of Microbiology and the American Society for Microbiology; and in 2010 he became the HHMI/U.S. National Academies Education Fellow in the Life Sciences 2007-2008.
Slides, Recordings Other Materials: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php

Title: Developing and Assessing Storminess Indices for Monitoring and Predicting Subseasonal Variations in Storminess near Alaska
Presenter(s): Edmund Chang, Stony Brook University, kar.chang@stonybrook.edu; Wanqiu Wang, NOAA/CPC, wanqiu.wang@noaa.gov; Di Chen, Stony Brook University, di.chen.1@stonybrook.edu; Yutong Pan, NOAA/CPC, yutong.pan@noaa.gov
Date & Time: 3 November 2021
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic seminar series 2021 as part of the public-access NOAA Science Seminar Series. The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee and sponsored by the NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region.

Title: Developing and Assessing Storminess Indices for Monitoring and Predicting Subseasonal Variations in Storminess near Alaska

Presenter(s): Edmund Chang, Stony Brook University, kar.chang@stonybrook.edu; Wanqiu Wang, NOAA/CPC, wanqiu.wang@noaa.gov; Di Chen, Stony Brook University, di.chen.1@stonybrook.edu; Yutong Pan, NOAA/CPC, yutong.pan@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI and NOS Seminar Series
Seminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Extratropical cyclones give rise to most of the high impact weather near Alaska, including heavy precipitation and strong winds. Thus it is important for many stakeholders to be warned of approaching periods of increased or decreased potential of storm activities. While individual cyclone tracks can be predicted out to about a week or so, from week 2 on, statistics summarizing cyclone activity, or storminess, are more useful. Storminess can be defined based on Lagrangian cyclone tracking or by Eulerian variance statistics. The outlook includes a combination of both methods. Lagrangian cyclone tracks provide information about where cyclones pass through and are more intuitive to users, while Eulerian variance statistics are expected to be more predictable and have been shown to be highly correlated with cyclone related weather. The outlook uses 6-hrly sub-seasonal forecasts from GEFSv12 and CFSv2. Hindcasts and operational forecasts from 1999-2016 have been used to assess the prediction skill. Our results show that the combined ensemble has higher skill than either individual ensemble. The combined ensemble shows good skill in predicting cyclone amplitude and frequency for week 2, and some skill in predicting these metrics for weeks 3-4. Models also show some skill in predicting the statistics of deep cyclones for week 2. For both week 2 and weeks 3-4, the prediction skills for an Eulerian sea level pressure variance storminess metric is significantly higher than those for Lagrangian track statistics. We expect that the skills for real time forecasts should be higher than those in the hindcasts since the operational ensembles are much larger than the hindcast ensembles. A publicly accessible web page will be developed to display the subseasonal predictions in real time. The web page will also contain information on climatology and forecast verification to enable users to make more informed use of the outlook.


Bio(s): http://www.msrc.sunysb.edu/~chang/personal/Vita_brief.htm Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Slides available here or by contacting the presenter(s) directly
Recording: Seminars recorded for later viewing in mp4 format

Accessibility: If NOAA staff would like to request an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Office of Human Capital Services' Sign Language Interpreting Services Program or the Relay Conference Captioning service.Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Global signals of population stability and trophic control in the fraction of feeding predators
Presenter(s): Mark Novak, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 3 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Global signals of population stability and trophic control in the fraction of feeding predators

Presenter(s): Dr. Mark Novak, Associate Professor, Oregon State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology DivisionSeminar contact: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov.

Abstract: The attributes of predator-prey interactions and their environment that enable species coexistence, inhibit population cycles, and promote resilient responses to environmental perturbations have undergone intense scrutiny. The need for insight across the varied temporal and spatial scales of ecology is only growing as the effects of environmental change compound. We here employ a simple metric to identify factors driving predator-prey interaction strengths at local to global scales: the fraction of predator individuals who, in the course of a diet survey, are found to have 'non-empty stomachs'. By compiling published diet surveys of predator species spanning the tree of life, the globe, and eight decades, we document heretofore unrecognized taxonomic, ecological, biogeographic, and temporal patterns in this metric. These patterns include a markedly bimodal latitudinal gradient and a decadal-scale temporal dynamic attributable to climate change. Paired with mathematical theory relating the fraction of feeding individuals to the strength of trophic control and the stability of predator-prey interactions, these empirical patterns present new insights for several additional patterns which ecologists have long sought to understand, including the latitudinal gradient in population cycles, the functioning of aquatic versus terrestrial ecosystems, and the effects of generalist versus specialist predators. To corroborate these insights, we provide empirical support for a novel prediction of a latitude-resilience relationship using independent analyses of population time-series obtained from the Global Population Dynamics database.

Bio(s): Mark Novak, Associate Professor in Integrative Biology, Oregon State University, studies how the interactions between species affect the structure and dynamics of ecological communities. His work combines mathematical theory with observational and experimental field approaches (in marine intertidal, kelp forests, and freshwater streams) in an effort to advance the understanding of species-rich systems. Primary topics of research include (i) developing methods for characterizing the strength and functional forms of species interactions, (ii) understanding the influence of direct and indirect effects in complex interaction networks, and (iii) quantifying patterns of individual diet specialization within populations of generalist predators to understand its consequences at the population and community level. Mark received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago (with Tim Wootton) and did his postdoctoral at UC Santa Cruz (with Jon Moore, Tim Tinker, and Mark Carr).

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; link to recording available upon request.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Ecosystem based fishery management benefits in forage fish fisheries
Presenter(s): James N. Sanchirico, Professor, Dept. of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, Davis and Timothy E. Essington, Quantitative Ecologist, School of Fishery Science, University of Washington
Date & Time: 3 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pl7w7bm75180/

Title: Ecosystem-based fishery management benefits in forage fish fisheries

Presenter(s): James N. Sanchirico, Professor, Dept. of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, Davis and Timothy E. Essington, Quantitative Ecologist, School of Fishery Science, University of WashingtonWhen: Wednesday, November 3, 2021, 12-1pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, coordinators of NOAA's National Ocean Service science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: The ecosystem science underpinning ecosystem-based approaches to decision making needs to account for the complexity of multiple interacting components within and across coupled natural-human systems. In this research, we investigate the potential economic and ecological gains from adopting ecosystem-based approaches for the sardine and anchovy fisheries off of the coast of California. Research has shown that while predators in this system are likely substituting one forage species for another, the assemblage of sardine and anchovy can be a significant driver of predator populations. Currently, the harvest control rules for sardine and anchovy fisheries align more with traditional single species framework. We ask: what are the economic and ecological gains when jointly determining the harvest control rules for both forage fish stocks and their predators relative to the status quo? What are the implications of synchronous and anti-synchronous environmental recruitment variation between the anchovy and sardine stocks on optimal food-web management? To investigate these questions, we develop an economic-ecological model for sardine, anchovy, a harvested predator (halibut), and an endangered predator (brown pelican) that includes recruitment variability over time driven by changing environmental conditions. We find significant gains in moving to integrated catch control rules both in terms of the economic gains of the fished stocks, and in terms of the impacts on the brown pelican populations. We also compare the relative performance of current stylized catch control rules to optimal single species and optimal EBFM across ecological and economic dimensions, where the former trade-off considerable economic value for ecological goals. More generally, we demonstrate how EBFM approaches introduce and integrate additional management levers for policymakers to achieve non-fishery objectives at lowest costs to the fishing sectors.

Bio(s):
James N. Sanchirico is a professor of natural resource economics and policy in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy at UC Davis. His main research interests are the economic analysis of policy design, implementation, and evaluation for marine and terrestrial species conservation, and the development of economic-ecological models for forecasting the effects of resource management policies. He received the Rosenstiel Award for Oceanographic Sciences in 2012and the UC Davis Distinguished Scholarly Public Service Award in 2014. He is currently a member of the U.S. NASEM Ocean Studies Board, and PI on the NSF-funded Sustainable Oceans National Research Training program at UC Davis. Past professional service includes the Lenfest Fishery Ecosystem Task Force, a National Research Council (NRC) committee evaluating the effectiveness of stock rebuilding plans of the 2006 Fishery Conservation and Management Reauthorization, and six years on NOAA's Science Advisory Board.

Tim Essington is a quantitative ecologist with broad interests in applying ecological principles to fisheries, fisheries management, and conservation. From 2013 to 2021 he was the director of the University of Washington's Center for Quantitative Sciences, which houses the Quantitative Ecology and Resource Management Graduate Program. His recent book, "Introduction to Quantitative Ecology: Mathematical and statistical modeling for beginners aims to make quantitative ecology accessible to individuals with all levels of experience, expertise, and confidence in their quantitative abilities. Slides / Recording: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar. You may view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pl7w7bm75180/

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Influence of aerosol uptake of HO2 on surface O3 concentrations
Presenter(s): Mat Evans, University of York
Date & Time: 3 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Influence of aerosol uptake of HO2 on surface O3 concentrations

Presenter(s): Mat Evans, University of York

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): caroline.womack@noaa.gov

Abstract: Tropospheric ozone is a significant health pollutant in many parts of it the world. It is produced through chemical chain reactions where volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbon monoxide, and methane are oxidised in the presence of oxides of nitrogen. The controlling chain termination step has been used for many years to separate areas into either 'NOx limited' (peroxyl radical self-reactions dominates) or 'VOC limited' (OH+NO2 reaction dominates). This controlling regime would then guide policies for reducing emissions of NOx or VOCs, and so reduce O3 concentrations. Using a chemical transport model, we show that a third aerosol inhibited' regime can exist, where reactive uptake of HO2 radicals onto particles dominates chain termination. In the preindustrial this regime is of negligible importance other than in biomass burning plumes, however, in 1970 2% of the Northern Hemisphere population lived in this aerosol-inhibited regime. By 2014 this had increased to 21% predominantly in Asia. This is 60% more than lived in a VOC-limited regime in the Northern Hemisphere. Aerosol-inhibited chemistry significantly suppressed surface O3 concentrations in North America and Europe in the 1970s but due to air quality policy this influence has reduced. It is currently suppressing surface O3 over large areas of Asia. This third photochemical O3 regime leads to potential trade-off tensions between reducing particle pollution in Asia (a key current health policy and priority) and increasing surface O3 should O3 precursors emissions not be reduced in tandem.

Bio(s): Dr. Mat Evans is a Professor of Chemistry in the Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories at the University of York and the National Centre for Atmospheric Science. He earned his PhD in Chemistry from the University of Cambridge, and then did his postdoctoral work at MIT and Harvard University. He joined the University of Leeds as a NERC Fellow and then a Lecturer before joining the University of York in 2011. His research focuses on numerical modeling of atmospheric chemistry using GEOS-Chem, with particular interest in the chemistry of halogens and nitrogen oxides, and the role of clouds and ocean surfaces.

Recordings: csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2021

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. For more, visit the NOAA Science SeminarSeries website.

2 November 2021

Title: Arctic larval fish community changes in relation to recent trends in warming and advection
Presenter(s): Kelia Axler, NOAA NMFS AFSC; kelia.axler@noaa.gov
Date & Time: 2 November 2021
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic seminar series 2021 as part of the public-access NOAA Science Seminar Series. The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee and sponsored by the NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region.

Title: Arctic larval fish community changes in relation to recent trends in warming and advection

Presenter(s): Kelia Axler, NOAA NMFS AFSC; kelia.axler@noaa.govCo-authors: Esther Goldstein,Jens Nielsen, Alison Deary, Janet Duffy-Anderson; NOAA NMFS AFSC

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI and NOS Seminar Series
Seminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: The Pacific Arctic is rapidly changing due to ocean warming, sea ice loss, and increased advection via the Bering Strait. These physical changes have been linked to climate-mediated range shifts of juvenile and adult subarctic and Arctic fish populations, though less is known about how the earliest life stages (larvae) will respond. In this study, we analyzed time series(2010-2019) data of larval fish distributions sampled in the late summer relative to ocean conditions in the northern Bering (NBS) and Chukchi Sea region (>60N). Multivariate analyses revealed the presence of 3 distinct multi-species assemblages across all years: 1) a warmer-water (7.4C), lower latitude assemblage dominated by yellowfin sole (Limanda aspera); 2) a colder-water (<4.6C), higher latitude assemblage dominated by Arctic cod (Boreogadussaida), Bering flounder (Hippoglossoidesrobustus), and other common Arctic species; and 3) a mixed assemblage(4.6x<7.4C) comprised of the dominant species from the other two assemblages. Partial least squares models found that the areal coverage of the warmer-water assemblage expanded further into the Chukchi Sea in years with higher NBS sea surface temperature (SST), strong Bering Strait northward advection, and increased southerly winds, while the colder-water assemblage retracted its areal coverage in those years. Conversely, the colder-water assemblage expanded in years with lower Chukchi Sea SST and greater sea ice area and extent. Additionally, we observed a general northward latitudinal shift of all three assemblages in recent warm years (2018-2019) characterized by strong northward winds and advection. The patterns observed over the past decade in the NBS-Chukchi Sea region document how quickly larval fish communities track environmental change and provide further evidence of climate warming contributing to a borealization of the Arctic fish community.

Bio(s): Kelia Axler is a research fisheries biologist at the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center where she studies climate-mediated shifts in distribution, community structure, and ecology of larval and juvenile Northeast Pacific and Arctic fishes. Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Slides available after the seminar by contacting the presenter(s) directly
Recording: Seminars recorded for later viewing in mp4 format

Accessibility: If NOAA staff would like to request an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Office of Human Capital Services' Sign Language Interpreting Services Program or the Relay Conference Captioning service.Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Spatial variability in West Coast groundfish reproduction
Presenter(s): Melissa Head, NOAA NWFSC
Date & Time: 2 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Spatial variability in West Coast groundfish reproduction

Presenter(s): Melissa Head

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAANMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Abstract: Size and age at maturity estimates are essential parameters for population dynamic models used in stock assessments. The NWFSC implemented a reproductive program in 2011 to ensure west coast assessments could accurately capture variability in spawning capacity. Over the last decade, we have sampled across the entire west coast range of over 40 groundfish species. This extensive data set allows for evaluation of spatio-temporal trends in reproduction, and understanding more about the drivers of observed variability, i.e. environment, fishing pressure, and/or genetics.


Bio(s): Melissa Head is a fisheries research scientist at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA. She works in the Fisheries Resource Analysis and Monitoring Division as part of the Fisheries Research Survey Team. She received her Bachelor's in Marine Biology from the College of Charleston ,completed a graduate certificate in fisheries management, and is currently working on a Master's in Science at Oregon State University. She started her fisheries career as a NE Pacific Fisheries Observer and observed for five years. Over the last decade she has helped to develop a reproductive biology program at the NWFSC.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Thinking About Adaptation: Exploring the Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) Framework
Presenter(s): Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Robin O'Malley, Robin O'Malley LLC; Retired USGS
Date & Time: 2 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Thinking About Adaptation: Exploring the Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) Framework

Presenter(s): Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Robin O'Malley, Robin O'Malley LLC; Retired USGS

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, coordinator of NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: Climate change is a complex management problem because it involves persistent change across large areas and is difficult to address locally. Conditions fueled by or worsened by climate change may favor species new to an area over those that have been longtime inhabitants. The result: ecological transformation " although system makeover that can occur when species move due to changes in their surrounding environment.Recognizing the need for coordinated action, representatives of several natural resource management agencies met in 2018 to develop a framework to address ecological transformation. The Resist-Accept-Direct framework allows managers to choose from three management responses:
  • Resist the direction of change, by working to maintain or restore function, structure or composition, based on historical or table current conditions.
  • Accept the direction of change, by allowing the change to occur without intervening.
  • Direct the change, by actively managing processes, function, structure or composition toward a new desired condition.
Managers may need to apply a portfolio of these three options across their area to better manage resources impacted by climate change. Regional portfolios, well-coordinated across multiple systems, can reduce the risk of piloting novel actions at anyone location and ensure that future habitats can maintain associated species at other locations. The RAD framework is one way to weigh the economic, ecological, and sociological costs and benefits of various management strategies that can be applied on landscapes faced with ecological transformation.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides / Recording:
Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Moving to impact based forecasts: Tools for heat and wind hazards
Presenter(s): Joanne Robbins, Science Manager - Weather Impacts Team, UK Met Office
Date & Time: 2 November 2021
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Moving to impact based forecasts: Tools for heat and wind hazards

Presenter(s): Joanne Robbins, Science Manager - UK Met Office

Sponsor(s): ECCC & NOAA

Seminar Contact(s): Kimberly McMahon, kimberly.mcmahon@noaa.gov

Abstract: An active area of research in the Met Office Weather Impacts Team is the development of tools (or applications) that can support operational meteorologists. The team has a particular focus on supporting the issuance of impact based warnings. Using some examples of our recent heat and wind research, this presentation will highlight some of the approaches we are trialling to improve the assessment and communication of future potential risks associated with forecast hazards. The talk will also highlight some of the on-going challenges around impact-based evaluation and developing a robust baseline for risk forecasting, and outline some of the approaches we're testing to address these challenges.

Bio(s): Joanne manages the Weather Impacts Team at the Met Office and has 13 years' experience working on risk and impact modelling for improved forecasting and warning of hydro-meteorological hazards. Her research is focused on 3 themes: developing impact models for hydrometeorological hazards and investigating methods to integrate metrological data with vulnerability and exposure datasets; impact-based evaluation using novel, non-standard observations (e.g. using social sensing methods); landslide forecasting and warning. She is currently leading the Risk-based forecasting and High-Impact weather/Seasonal events' work package of the Weather and Climate Science for Service Partnership India (WCSSP India). Joanne is an active member of several working groups, including the Subseasonal to Seasonal Prediction Project, where she leads the S2S Real Time Pilot Initiative, the HiWeather Project, the UK's Natural Hazards Partnership (NHP) and the international network LandAware.

Recording: A recording will be made available on the NWS YouTube Channel.

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1 November 2021

Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, November 2021: Precipitation Forecasts in the Unified Forecast System (UFS) Through Tropical Nudging and Explainable Machine Learning, and A Machine Learning Framework for Predicting Indian Monsoon Onset
Presenter(s): Eric Maloney, Colorado State University, and Nachiketa Acharya, Pennsylvania State University
Date & Time: 1 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, November 2021: Precipitation Forecasts in the Unified Forecast System (UFS) Through Tropical Nudging and Explainable Machine Learning, and A Machine Learning Framework for Predicting Indian Monsoon Onset

Presenter(s): Dr. Eric Maloney, Colorado State University, and Dr. Nachiketa Acharya, Pennsylvania State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Weather Program Office S2S Program and NOAA NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration Modeling Program DivisionSeminar Contacts: Karen Keith, karen.keith@noaa.gov

Abstract: This monthly webinar series was created to share ongoing work within NWS and OAR at the Weeks 3-4 and S2S timescales. We would like to foster a relaxed, informal dialogue among forecasters, modelers and researchers. This month, Dr. Eric Maloney will speak about "Improving S2S Precipitation Forecasts in UFS Through Tropical Nudging and Explainable Machine Learning." Dr. Nachiketa Acharya will speak about "Predicting Indian Monsoon onset in S2S scale: A Machine Learning Framework."

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available on the Weeks 3-4/S2S Webinar Series website: https://vlab.noaa.gov/web/weeks-3-4-s2s-webinar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

29 October 2021

Title: Fishing for DNA: how much water to catch and other questions
Presenter(s): Jesse Ausubel, Director, and Mark Stoeckle, Senior Research Associate, both with the Program for the Human Environment, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY
Date & Time: 29 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording of this webinar via Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pnnos0mcsh3z/

Title: Fishing for DNA: how much water to catch and other questions
Part of the NOAA Omics Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jesse Ausubel, Director, and Mark Stoeckle, Senior Research Associate, both with the Program for the Human Environment, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY
When: Friday, October 29, 12-1pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Katharine.Egan@noaa.gov, NOAA/OAR Oceans Portfolio 'Omics Coordinator and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, NOAA/NOS Science Seminar coordinator. Links to Omics recordings are here.

Abstract: Measuring quantities of eDNA is fast becoming a preferred method of learning the presence and abundance of fish and other aquatic species. But how much water need one filter and how much DNA need one process to obtain a reasonably complete and reproducible answer? Tests of an eDNA metabarcoding protocol for marine bony fish show more water, more species of fish up to levels tested. Amplifying decreasing amounts of extracted DNA yields progressively fewer species. Species represented by more copies (reads) of their DNA are detected more reproducibly and with less variation than lower-read species. Findings are consistent with Poisson distribution of rarer eDNA. We also vary PCR cycles, sequencing depth, primer concentrations, and primers. Our findings have multiple practical implications, including for survey strategies for both common and rare species, and identify some limits of knowledge and research directions for aquatic eDNA science.

Bio(s): Dr. Mark Stoeckle's research interests include environmental genomics, DNA barcoding, and visual representation of information. Dr. Stoeckle helped organize the early meetings that laid the foundation for DNA barcoding, a standardized method for rapid identification of animal and plant species. His DNA barcoding work with high school students has attracted wide attention including front-page articles in New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal. Since 2017 he has been helping develop environmental DNA as a technology for monitoring marine fish and other sea life. He published the first time-series eDNA study of the lower Hudson River estuary in 2017, and helped organize the first National Conference on Marine eDNA, held at Rockefeller University in 2018. He recently led the largest eDNA-bottom trawl study to date in collaboration with colleagues at Monmouth University and New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Dr. Jesse Ausubel directs The Rockefeller University's Program for the Human Environment, which aims to elaborate the technical vision of a large, prosperous society that emits little harmful and spares large amounts of land and sea for nature. Mr. Ausubel initiated and helped lead the Census of Marine Life, Barcode of Life Initiative, and International Quiet Ocean Experiment. In 2000 President Clinton appointed him to the President's Panel on Ocean Exploration. An adjunct scientist of WHOI, he delivered the US Naval Academy's 2015 Michelson Lecture and hosted the 2016 National Ocean Exploration Forum. Mr. Ausubel serves on the Clean Ocean international Expert Group of the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development and on NOAA's Science Advisory Board.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of the webinar, a PDF of presentation slides, and a summary of the chat are usually sent to all who register after the webinar. Links to Omics recordings are here. You may view the recording of this webinar via Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pnnos0mcsh3z/

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

28 October 2021

Title: Frequency of extreme temperature events in the Arctic, Alaska, and Northeast America
Presenter(s): Muyin Wang, Research Scientist, NOAA/OAR/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
Date & Time: 28 October 2021
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesNOAA in Alaska and the Arctic Seminar Series 2021
This series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee.

Title: Frequency of extreme temperature events in the Arctic, Alaska, and Northeast America

Presenter(s): Muyin Wang, Research Scientist, NOAA/OAR Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)When: Thursday, October 28, 2021, 3:30-4:00pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region and the NOS Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: With rapidly warming temperatures, diminishing sea ice cover and loss of glacial mass, the Arctic can be viewed as a bellwether of global climate change. While Arctic change has been documented and projected in terms of changes in mean temperature, changes in extreme events have received less attention. Extreme temperature often causes serious impacts on natural and societal systems. In this study we investigate the frequency of extreme daily temperatures, defined as departures of more than 2 standard deviation from the historical mean(1981-2020), and the projected changes of these events in the future assimilated by the phase 6 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6).Three study areas are of particular interest: the Arctic, the Alaska, and the Eastern North America. The projected changes vary regionally and show a strong dependence on the selected forcing scenario, i.e. Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs). We also examine the correspondence between changes in the mean and changes in the frequency of extreme temperature events.

Bio(s): Dr. Muyin Wang is a research scientist at PMEL and the Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies (CICOES), University of Washington. She received her B.S and M.S. degrees from Peking University, China, and PhD. from University of Utah. She worked as a research associate at Dalhousie University in Canada before joining PMEL in 2000.Dr. Wang's research has been focused on climate change in the Arctic and northern mid-to-high latitudes, impact of Arctic change on ecosystem, and physical processes that are associated with climate change in middle and high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. She has done extensive model assessments and tried to provide climate projections with reduced uncertainty by applying observational constraints in model simulated results. She introduced the threshold of ice-free summer Arctic to be 1-million square kilometers in 2009. She published more than 80 journal papers with >9600 citations according to Google Scholar as of Oct. 17, 2021.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Urban Heat Island Community of Practice Webinar Series, Session 7: Prioritize and Integrate Heat Planning
Presenter(s): Ladd Keith, Assistant Professor in Planning, The University of Arizona; Sara Meerow, Assistant Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State; Kizzy Charles-Guzman, Deputy Director, NYC Mayor's Office; Mark Hartman, Chief Sustainability Officer, City of Phoenix; Jane Gilbert, Interim Chief Heat Officer and Resilience Consultant, Miami-Dade County
Date & Time: 28 October 2021
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Prioritize and Integrate Heat Planning
Part of NOAA's National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS) Urban Heat Island Community of Practice Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Ladd Keith, Assistant Professor in Planning, The University of ArizonaSara Meerow, Assistant Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State Kizzy Charles-Guzman, Deputy Director, NYC Mayor's Office

Mark Hartman, Chief Sustainability Officer, City of Phoenix
Jane Gilbert, Interim Chief Heat Officer and Resilience Consultant, Miami-Dade County

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Climate Program Office, National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS)

Seminar Contact(s): Noura Randle, noura.randle@noaa.gov

Abstract: While many communities are developing strategies to mitigate and manage heat, these efforts are often siloed, lack coordination, and have unclear evaluation criteria. To better address increasing heat risk, communities must prioritize and integrate heat across their network of plans which includes comprehensive plans, climate action plans, hazard mitigation plans, heat response plans, and emergency management plans. This session will provide examples of innovative cities that have worked to address chronic and acute heat risk across their network of plans, better connecting traditionally siloed disciplines to improve their heat planning efforts..

Bio(s): Learn more about the speakers

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be shared after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Introducing Seascape Alaska: A Regional Mapping Campaign in Support of the National Strategy for Ocean Mapping, Exploring, and Characterizing the U.S. EEZ
Presenter(s): Meredith Westington, Geographer, NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping IOCM Program
Date & Time: 28 October 2021
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesNOAA in Alaska and the Arctic Seminar Series 2021
The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee.

Title: Introducing Seascape Alaska: A Regional Mapping Campaign in Support of the National Strategy for Ocean Mapping, Exploring, and Characterizing the U.S. EEZ

Presenter(s): Meredith Westington, Geographer, NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Program.

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region and the NOS Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided

Abstract: Seascape Alaska is a regional campaign supporting the 2020 National Strategy for Mapping, Exploring, and Characterizing the United States Exclusive Economic Zone (NOMEC). Working toward a common goal to fully map the U.S. waters off Alaska, the campaign is a collaboration among federal, tribal, state, and non-governmental partners with a wide range of interests.

Bio(s): Meredith Westington is a geographer with NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping Program. She has worked at NOAA's Office of Coast Survey for over 20 years. Meredith has a bachelor's degree in geology from Virginia Tech and a masters degree in GIS Management from Salisbury University.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Carbon cycling and storage in tropical and temperate seagrass meadows
Presenter(s): Alyssa Griffin, Ph.D., Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, Davis, Bodega Marine Laboratory & Earth and Planetary Sciences Department
Date & Time: 28 October 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Carbon cycling and storage in tropical and temperate seagrass meadows

Presenter(s): Alyssa Griffin, Ph.D., Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, Davis, Bodega Marine Laboratory & Earth and Planetary Sciences Department

Sponsor(s): NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam series

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: Seagrasses are one of the most widespread coastal ecosystems on Earth. Seagrasses provide many coastal communities with food security, livelihoods, and cultural benefits. They also provide nursing grounds for important fisheries and habitat for many other marine organisms. Seagrasses are important components of both local and global carbon cycles and could play a significant role in various climate change mitigation strategies. These strategies include, but are not limited to, 1) acting as a blue carbon sink by sequestering and storing organic carbon and 2) providing ocean acidification refugia by modifying surrounding seawater carbonate chemistry. Currently, the full potential of these strategies is not well known due to an incomplete understanding of carbon dynamics in seagrass meadows. In particular, the role sedimentary inorganic carbon fluxes play in seagrass carbon cycling remains unclear. In this talk, I will explore the spatial and temporal variability of carbonate chemistry in both tropical and temperate seagrass meadows and implications for the aforementioned mitigation strategies. I will also explain how in addition to storing organic carbon, other biogeochemical processes within sediments may provide a largely unaccounted for blue carbon sink in seagrass ecosystems. Improving our understanding of seagrass carbon dynamics is critical to supporting conservation, management, and restoration efforts of these valuable, but vulnerable ecosystems.BIOGRAPHY: Dr. Alyssa J. Griffin is a Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Davis, Bodega Marine Laboratory & Earth and Planetary Sciences Department. Her research focuses on the biogeochemical cycling of carbon in nearshore marine environments, particularly within sediments. She uses numerous geochemical tools to understand how carbon storage and cycling in these important ecosystems are influenced by both natural and human-induced stressors across various spatial and temporal scales. Dr. Griffin also continues to initiate, develop, and support efforts that advance justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI) within both the geoscience and greater scientific communities and has received multiple awards for this work.
Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Evaluating the Performance of Northeast Groundfish Fisheries Management in a Changing Ocean
Presenter(s): Mackenzie Mazur and Lisa Kerr, both with Gulf of Maine Research Institute
Date & Time: 28 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Evaluating the Performance of Northeast Groundfish Fisheries Management in a Changing Ocean.

Presenter(s): Mackenzie Mazur and Lisa Kerr, both with the Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) Curves for the Chesapeake and Virginia area
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University, and Art DeGaetano, Director of NOAA's Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University
Date & Time: 28 October 2021
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/ Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) Curves for the Chesapeake and Virginia Area

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University,
Art DeGaetano, Director, NOAA's Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s):
Ellen Mecray

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of October conditions and Art DeGaetano will speak on the new report produced on Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves and projections for the Chesapeake region and Virginia.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

27 October 2021

Title: Supporting the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks (SAON) Roadmap for Arctic Observing & Data Systems and US AON: The RNA CoObs Project
Presenter(s): Hajo Eicken, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, heicken@alaska.edu and Craig Chythlook, Indigenous Liaison, Food Security Working Group, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, cchythlo@alaska.edu
Date & Time: 27 October 2021
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic seminar series 2021 as part of the public-access NOAA Science Seminar Series. The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee and sponsored by the NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region.

Title: Supporting the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks (SAON) Roadmap for Arctic Observing & Data Systems and US AON: The RNA CoObs Project

Presenter(s): Hajo Eicken, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, heicken@alaska.edu and Craig Chythlook, Indigenous Liaison, Food Security Working Group, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, cchythlo@alaska.edu

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI and NOS Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: The Research Network Activities for Sustained Coordinated Observations of Arctic Change (RNA CoObs) project seeks to support the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks (SAON) Roadmap for Arctic Observing & Data Systems (ROADS). Through meetings, collaborations, and partnership with the Arctic Observing Summit (AOS) Food Security Working Group (FSWG) and other partners, the project will step through the elements of ROADS, including the identification of Shared Arctic Variables tied to societal benefits as defined by the FSWG, the capture of requirements for observing activities aimed at SAVs, and the design and adaption of information infrastructure. With a focus on the Pacific Arctic the project is meant to help explore and demonstrate how an internationally coordinated roadmap for Arctic observing can be put into action. A number of NOAA Alaska/Arctic activities are of relevance in this context, including NOAA's leadership in regional ocean observing, the U.S. Arctic Observing Network, and the Distributed Biological Observatory. The food security observing roadmap will guide observing activities in the Pacific Arctic and inform the ROADS process at the pan-Arctic scale. ROADS will then better serve operators, the research community, and decision-makers in their own efforts.

Bio(s): Hajo Eicken is Professor of Geophysics and Director of the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. His research focuses on sea ice geophysics, Arctic coastal processes, and their importance for human activities and ecosystems. In Alaska he has helped lead efforts to advance collaborative research with Indigenous knowledge holders and to enhance use of scientific data by Arctic communities and government agencies. He worked with a number of colleagues to establish a sea-ice observatory at Utqiavik/Pt. Barrow. Other collaborative efforts include his involvement in helping launch the Arctic Sea Ice Outlook and Sea Ice Prediction Network, co-leadership of the Arctic Observing Summit, and member of the Science Advisory Board for the 3rd Arctic Science Ministerial. Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Slides available here or by contacting the presenter(s) directly
Recording: Seminars recorded for later viewing in mp4 format

Accessibility: If NOAA staff would like to request an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Office of Human Capital Services' Sign Language Interpreting Services Program or the Relay Conference Captioning service.Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Long term trends in aerosol chemical and optical properties measured at the Barrow Atmospheric Baseline Observatory northeast of Utqiaġvik
Presenter(s): Trish Quinn, NOAA PMEL
Date & Time: 27 October 2021
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic seminar series 2021 as part of the public-access NOAA Science Seminar Series. The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee and sponsored by the NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region.

Title: Long term trends in aerosol chemical and optical properties measured at the Barrow Atmospheric Baseline Observatory northeast of Utqiavik

Presenter(s): Trish Quinn1, NOAA PMEL; patricia.k.quinn@noaa.gov; Allison Moon2,
Lucia Upchurch3,1, Derek Coffman1, Jim Johnson3,1, Tim Bates3,1, and Betsy Andrews4,51NOAA PMEL
2University of Washington, Department of Atmospheric Sciences
3University of Washington, CICOES
4Univeristy of Colorado, CIRES
5NOAA GML

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI and NOS Seminar Series
Seminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Measurements of aerosol chemical composition at the Barrow Atmospheric Baseline Observatory northeast of Utqiavik, Alaska have been conducted since 1997 to assess the impacts of the transport of pollutants from lower latitudes on Arctic atmospheric chemistry and climate. These measurements have been conducted alongside NOAA GML's observations of aerosol optical properties. Here we report on trends in Arctic haze aerosols in terms of composition, optical properties, and transport pathways. Between 1998 and 2013, haze season submicron non-sea salt sulfate and nitrate decreased by 2 and 1% per year, respectively. Supermicron nitrate decreased by 3% per year. Between 1998 and 2020, haze season submicron aerosol light scattering decreased by 1.6% per year and total scattering (particles less than 10 microns in diameter) decreased by 1.1% per year. Aerosol light absorption has also decreased during the haze season. Based on trajectories calculated with HYSPLIT, these decreasing trends appear to be due, at least in part, to a decrease in transport from the European sector to the Arctic. Summertime trends will also be discussed.

Bio(s): Trish Quinn (patricia.k.quinn@noaa.gov) is the Atmospheric Chemistry Group (ACG) Lead at NOAA PMEL. The Atmospheric Chemistry Group has been making shipboard measurements of aerosol chemical, microphysical, optical, and cloud-nucleating properties for over 30 years. The resulting global ocean database can be found at https://saga.pmel.noaa.gov/data/. ACG has also made long-term measurements of aerosol composition at NOAA's northern hemisphere monitoring sites including Barrow. These data can be found at
https://saga.pmel.noaa.gov/data/stations/Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Slides available after the seminar by contacting the presenter(s) directly.
Recording: Seminars recorded for later viewing in mp4 format

Accessibility: If NOAA staff would like to request an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Office of Human Capital Services' Sign Language Interpreting Services Program or the Relay Conference Captioning service.Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Salvaging Solutions to Abandoned and Derelict Vessels: ADV Policies and InfoHub Reflections
Presenter(s): Katie Register, Executive Director of Clean Virginia Waterways and co-founder of Virginia Plastic Pollution Prevention Network; Jefferson Flood, Coastal Planner for Virginia Coastal Zone Management Program
Date & Time: 27 October 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Salvaging Solutions to Abandoned and Derelict Vessels: ADV Policies and InfoHub Reflections

Presenter(s): Katie Register, Executive Director of Clean Virginia Waterways and co-founder of Virginia Plastic Pollution Prevention NetworkJefferson Flood, Coastal Planner for Virginia Coastal Zone Management Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA Marine Debris Program
Points of Contact: Sarah Latshaw (Sarah.Latshaw@noaa.gov) and the Salvaging Solutions team (SalvagingSolutions@noaa.gov)

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be available.

Abstract: Every fourth Wednesday since February, the webinar has featured experts on a topic related to abandoned and derelict vessels (ADVs). The goal of the series was to help communities through sharing perspectives from across the country on common ADV issues and solutions. Our speakers were specialists from federal, state, and local governments, nongovernmental organizations, universities, and industry, and discussed topics about communications, funding, policy, and successes and challenges under blue skies and storm conditions. This month is the final webinar in the series. Our October speakers will focus on discussing a policy white paper developed while establishing a new ADV program in Virginia. In addition, the NOAA Marine Debris Program will provide a brief overview of their ADV InfoHub and look for suggestions to further develop this tool to better serve you.

Recordings: Recordings of previous Salvaging Solutions webinars have been posted on our website. Links to the recordings are available in the "Resources - Links" box or under "Past Salvaging Solutions Webinars" at the bottom of the page.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Common reed (Phragmites australis) habitat functions in the eastern U.S.
Presenter(s): Erik Kiviat, PhD, Executive Director, Hudsonia
Date & Time: 27 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

You may view the recording of this webinar thru adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ptmay30aieww/

Title: Common reed (Phragmites australis) habitat functions in the eastern U.S.
Part of the NOAA science seminar series, "Rethinking the Common Reed Grass - Phragmites",
co-hosted by Dr. Judith S. Weis, Professor Emerita, Rutgers University and Tracy Gill,
NOAA/NOS science seminar coordinator


Presenter(s): Erik Kiviat, PhD, Executive Director, Hudsonia

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Tracy Gill, NOAA/NOS science seminar coordinator, and Judith Weis, Professor Emerita, Rutgers

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Phragmites reedbeds provide habitat functions and non-habitat services; the latter include carbon sequestration, protection of coasts from sea level rise, and amelioration of water quality. Non-habitat services are roughly proportional to Phragmites biomass and productivity, whereas habitat functions for other organisms vary depending on reedbed architecture and the organism in question.Most of the research on habitat functions has addressed nekton, birds, and insects, with less attention to other invertebrates, herpetofauna, mammals, higher plants, and cryptogams. Key questions are: What organisms are associated with reedbeds? Does Phragmites serve as food, shelter, foraging habitat, display perch, basking site, overwintering habitat? How do the habitat functions vary with environmental conditions, characteristics of the reedbed, and its management? Which uses of the habitat stand out as important for biodiversity conservation?
A few examples are songbirds roosting in reedbeds, herons nesting in reedbeds, muskrat use of Phragmites for food and lodge construction, Phragmites as butterfly larval food, reedbeds supporting vines, and bryophytes in the shelter of reeds.

Bio(s): Erik Kiviat has studied Phragmites habitats since observing a song sparrow in a reedbed fifty years ago. During that time, he has worked on freshwater tidal wetlands, biota associated with other nonnative weeds, and human interactions with wetlands, in urban, rural, and wildland environments. He has particularly observed reedbeds in New York and New Jersey, with forays in many other U.S. states and Canadian provinces, as well as Europe and Africa. Erik is the executive director and a co-founder of Hudsonia, and formerly taught natural history and environmental studies at Bard College in Annandale, New York. He holds a B.S. in natural sciences from Bard College, an M.A. in biology State University of New York at New Paltz, and a Ph.D. in ecology from Union Institute. More information is at www.hudsonia.org

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides may be shared and the recording will be shared, after the webinar with all who register, and with anyone who requests them from the seminar contacts. You may view the recording of this webinar thru adobe connect, here:https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ptmay30aieww/

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

26 October 2021

Title: Discover Spectacular: Celebrating 50 Years of Ocean Conservation and Stewardship
Presenter(s): Claire Fackler, National Education Liaison, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 26 October 2021
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Discover Spectacular: Celebrating 50 Years of Ocean Conservation and Stewardship

Presenter(s): Claire Fackler, National Education Liaison, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Abstract: 50 years ago, the U.S. ushered in a new era of ocean conservation by creating the National Marine Sanctuary System. Since then, we've grown into a nationwide network of 15 national marine sanctuaries and two marine national monuments that conserve more than 620,000 square miles of spectacular ocean and Great Lakes waters, an area nearly the size of Alaska. Your national marine sanctuaries and monuments support coastal communities and drive local economies by providing jobs and opportunities for people to discover, recreate, and form life-long connections with these spectacular places. Sanctuaries connect people and communities through science, education, and stewardship. We rely on these networks to inspire community-based solutions that help us understand and protect our nation's most spectacular habitats, marine life, archaeological wonders, and cultural seascapes.Learn more about how we look to the future to continue saving these spectacular places and ensure the National Marine Sanctuary System remains a source of pride and enjoyment for all Americans.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Climate-driven changes in abundance, distribution, and composition of the pelagic fish community in the Chukchi Sea
Presenter(s): Robert Levine, PhD Candidate, University of Washington School of Oceanography
Date & Time: 26 October 2021
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
You may view the recording from this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p9wc6z08k259/
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic Seminar Series 2021
The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee.

Title: Climate-driven changes in abundance, distribution, and composition of the pelagic fish community in the Chukchi Sea

Presenter(s): Robert Levine, PhD Candidate, University of Washington School of OceanographyWhen: Tuesday, October 26, 3:30-4:00pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, both coordinators of NOAA's Alaska and the Arctic webinar series and the NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: Acoustic-trawl (AT) surveys of the Chukchi Sea during summers 2012 and 2013 determined that pelagic fishes were dominated by age-0 Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), with few adults present in the region. This suggests that either survivorship of age-0 fish is very low or that they emigrate to other areas as they grow. To evaluate the role of the region as a nursery for these age-0 fish, we conducted AT surveys in 2017 and 2019 and repeat acoustic surveys from autonomous surface vehicles in 2018. Throughout this period, bottom-moored echo sounders continuously measured fish abundance and movement at several locations. These observations indicate that the abundance and species composition of midwater fishes on the Chukchi Sea shelf is highly variable over seasonal and interannual time scales. Seasonally, abundance was very low in winter, increased in May, and reached peak abundance in late summer. In all years, the highest abundance in summer was observed in the northern Chukchi. The distribution of age-0 gadids is predominantly driven by transport, and an increase in age-0 pollock abundance in 2017 and 2019 suggests that environmental conditions now enable species from the south to colonize the Chukchi Sea, at least on a seasonal basis.

Bio(s): Robert Levine is a PhD Candidate in the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington. His research uses acoustic methods to investigate the changing pelagic fish community of the Alaska Arctic over large spatial and temporal scales, with a focus on the role of transport in shaping species distributions. His PhD work is being done in collaboration with the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center as part of the North Pacific Research Board's Arctic Integrated Ecosystem Research Program. Previously, Robert worked as a contractor for the Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering program at AFSC where he began working with the autonomous acoustic systems he utilizes in his current research.Slides / Recording: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar. You may view the recording from this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p9wc6z08k259/

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: An Overview of NOAA National Weather Alaska Region
Presenter(s): Eugene -Gene- Petrescu, NOAA NWS Alaska Region, Environmental and Scientific Services Division, Regional Scientist and Arctic Testbed and Proving Ground Director; eugene.m.petrescu@noaa.gov
Date & Time: 26 October 2021
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic seminar series 2021 as part of the public-access NOAA Science Seminar Series. The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee and sponsored by the NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region.

Title: An Overview of NOAA National Weather Alaska Region

Presenter(s): Eugene (Gene) Petrescu, NOAA NWS Alaska Region, Environmental and Scientific Services Division, Regional Scientist and Arctic Testbed and Proving Ground Director; eugene.m.petrescu@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI and NOS Seminar Series
Seminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: The National Weather Service Alaska Region provides environmental decision support services covering the state of Alaska and the adjacent oceanic regions from the Arctic to the Bering Sea, and North Pacific. Our services cover a broad range of activities including, Marine, Aviation, Public, Tsunami, and Hydrologic for the present time out to 2 years. An overview of Alaska Region NWS offices, operations, and specific service examples will be presented.

Bio(s): Eugene Petrescu - Gene is the Regional Scientist for NOAA NWS Alaska Region, and the Director of the Arctic Testbed and Proving. After being a weather forecaster in the US Air Force, Gene joined the National Weather Service in Anchorage in 1990. Since that time, he worked for the NWS at the Glasgow and Seattle Offices as a Forecaster, then at the Glasgow and Missoula NWS Offices as the Science and Operations Officer. In 2008, Gene came back to Alaska as the Science and Operations Officer of the Alaska Aviation Weather Unit. In 2010, he came to Alaska Region Headquarters as a Techniques Development Meteorologist, and became the Regional Scientist in 2012. Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Slides available here or by contacting the presenter(s) directly
Recording: Seminars recorded for later viewing in mp4 format

Accessibility: If NOAA staff would like to request an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Office of Human Capital Services' Sign Language Interpreting Services Program or the Relay Conference Captioning service.Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Phytoplankton dynamics in the Bering-Chukchi Sea region: combined information from surveys, moorings and ocean color data
Presenter(s): Dr. Jens Nielsen, NOAA NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering Division
Date & Time: 26 October 2021
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
You may view the recording from this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p9wc6z08k259/NOAA's Alaska and the Arctic Seminar Series 2021
The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee.

Title: Phytoplankton dynamics in the Bering-Chukchi Sea region: combined information from surveys, moorings and ocean color data

Presenter(s): Dr. Jens Nielsen, NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Resource Assessment & Conservation Engineering Division (RACE)When: Tuesday, October, 26, 2021, 3:00-3:30pm EDTSeminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, both coordinators of NOAA's Alaska and the Arctic webinar series and the NOAA science seminar series.

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region and the
NOS Science Seminar Series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): Jens M. Nielsen is a CICOES Research Scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean and Ecosystem Studies, University of Washington and NOAA/NMFS/AFSC. He is a biological oceanographer, working primarily with plankton dynamics, long-term data sets, and marine ecosystem ecology. Much of his current research focuses on assessing climate-mediated influences on phytoplankton and primary production in the Bering Sea, Northern Bering Sea, and US Arctic. He works with range of data such as satellite, survey, and in situ ocean monitoring arrays to examine phytoplankton ecology. Slides / Recording: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar. You may view the recording from this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p9wc6z08k259/

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Emerging Science and Technology for Hydrology in Alaska
Presenter(s): Jessica Cherry, NOAA NWS
Date & Time: 26 October 2021
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic seminar series 2021 as part of the public-access NOAA Science Seminar Series. The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee and sponsored by the NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region.

Title: Emerging Science and Technology for Hydrology in Alaska

Presenter(s): Jessica Cherry NOAA NWS; jessica.cherry@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI and NOS Seminar Series
Seminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Hydrologic forecasting in Alaska is challenging due largely to the sparse observational network of year-round, accurate precipitation and discharge gages. This problem is being addressed by creative new work in remote sensing and alternative gage technologies. Community-based monitoring is filling other important gaps. This talk will discuss these and possible future approaches to monitoring and forecasting hydrologic responses to temperature and precipitation on a spectrum of temporal and spatial scales.
Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Slides available after the seminar by contacting the presenter(s) directly
Recording: Seminars recorded for later viewing in mp4 format

Accessibility: If NOAA staff would like to request an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Office of Human Capital Services' Sign Language Interpreting Services Program or the Relay Conference Captioning service.Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Southwest Drought Briefing
Presenter(s): Dave DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist; and Anna Weinberg, CCAST Research Specialist, University of Arizona
Date & Time: 26 October 2021
2:30 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Drought Conditions Update
Dave DuBois | New Mexico State Climatologist

Case Studies of Effective Management Practices
Anna Weinberg | CCAST Research Specialist, University of Arizona

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USDA Southwest Climate Hub

Seminar Contacts: Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The most recent U.S. Drought Monitor indicates that nearly all of the Southwest is experiencing some level of drought, but recent rain is improving conditions. This short drought briefing will focus on autumn drought conditions and forecasts for Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Nevada. This will be followed by some case studies of effective management practices.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: The Yukon Flats Changing Environment: an overview of observed and measured landscape change
Presenter(s): Mark Bertram, Supervisory Wildlife Biologist, Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge
Date & Time: 26 October 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series


Title: The Yukon Flats Changing Environment: an overview of observed and measured landscape change

Presenter(s): Mark Bertram, Supervisory Wildlife Biologist, Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team.

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract: Mark Bertram, supervisory wildlife biologist for the Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge will guide you through the impacts of climatic change on resources in the Yukon Flats Basin. Extending 220 miles east-west along the Arctic Circle, the Basin lies between the Brooks Range to the north and the limestone peaks of the White Mountains to the south. The Yukon River bisects the Basin and contributes to the vast floodplain of lakes, ponds, and streams that dominate the landscape. The Basin, encompassed by the 11.1-million-acre Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge, provides critical habitat to world-renowned breeding populations of waterfowl, salmon and whitefish fisheries, and other important subsistence resources for over 1,200 local residents.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Global Navigation Satellite System Radio Occultation (GNSS-RO) on Aerial Platforms with Commercial Off-the-Shelf Receivers
Presenter(s): Bryan Chan, Night Crew Labs
Date & Time: 26 October 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Global Navigation Satellite System Radio Occultation (GNSS-RO) on Aerial Platforms with Commercial Off-the-Shelf Receivers

Presenter(s): Bryan Chan, Night Crew Labs, CEO

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library and Technology Program OfficeSeminar Contacts: Tiffany House (tiffany.house@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Global Navigation Satellite System radio occultation (GNSS-RO) is a remote sensing technique that uses GPS signals to monitor Earth's atmosphere in a scalable and cost-effective manner. A key driver of this technology is to better characterize severe weather events, such as forecasting hurricane intensities and hurricane trajectories. This presentation discusses Night Crew Labs' approach to using this remote sensing technique combined with existing aerial platforms.


Bio(s): Bryan Chan is the CEO of Night Crew Labs. Mr. Chan has over 10 years of experience in the aerospace industry, supporting a wide range of engineering projects ranging from geosynchronous satellites to lunar rovers and Mars landers. Mr. Chan received his Master's of Science degree from Stanford University.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Building a cooperative rockfish survey in the Gulf of Alaska
Presenter(s): Madison Hall, NOAA/NMFS/AFSC
Date & Time: 26 October 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Building a cooperative rockfish survey in the Gulf of Alaska

Presenter(s): Madison Hall, NOAA/NMFS/AFSC/APU

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Abstract: Together, the AFSC and our partners in the Alaskan fishing industry just completed the first summer of data collection in a cooperative rockfish survey. Our project, the Science - Industry Rockfish Research Collaboration in Alaska (SIRRCA), aims to improve rockfish assessment models through data collection in "untrawlable" areas. Come learn more about what SIRRCA has accomplished thus far and the bigger promise of government " industry cooperative research.


Bio(s): Madison Hall started in research during her undergrad at Georgia Tech where she studied nitrogen fixation in a biochemical oceanography lab.Madison obtained a Master's degree from Rhodes University in South Africa where she studied invasion biology and competition in bivalves in a Coastal Ecology lab.She received her PhD in 2019 from the University of Central Florida studying seascape genetics and veterinary rehabilitation efficiency in Florida manatees.Started at AFSC in 2020 as a National Research Council postdoc with a dual appointment at the APU Fisheries, Aquatic Science and Technology lab. Madison now runs a government / industry cooperative research program developing an industry-based supplemental survey for rockfish. Madison spent 60 days at sea last summer leading a pilot project for cooperative data collection for GOA rockfishes, which is what she is going to tell us about today.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Thinking About Adaptation: Exploring the Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) Framework
Presenter(s): Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Robin O'Malley, Robin O'Malley LLC; Retired USGS
Date & Time: 26 October 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Thinking About Adaptation: Exploring the Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) Framework

Presenter(s): Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Robin O'Malley, Robin O'Malley LLC; Retired USGS

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, coordinator of NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: Climate change is a complex management problem because it involves persistent change across large areas and is difficult to address locally. Conditions fueled by or worsened by climate change may favor species new to an area over those that have been longtime inhabitants. The result: ecological transformation " although system makeover that can occur when species move due to changes in their surrounding environment.Recognizing the need for coordinated action, representatives of several natural resource management agencies met in 2018 to develop a framework to address ecological transformation. The Resist-Accept-Direct framework allows managers to choose from three management responses:
  • Resist the direction of change, by working to maintain or restore function, structure or composition, based on historical or table current conditions.
  • Accept the direction of change, by allowing the change to occur without intervening.
  • Direct the change, by actively managing processes, function, structure or composition toward a new desired condition.
Managers may need to apply a portfolio of these three options across their area to better manage resources impacted by climate change. Regional portfolios, well-coordinated across multiple systems, can reduce the risk of piloting novel actions at anyone location and ensure that future habitats can maintain associated species at other locations. The RAD framework is one way to weigh the economic, ecological, and sociological costs and benefits of various management strategies that can be applied on landscapes faced with ecological transformation.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides / Recording:
Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

25 October 2021

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Joe Boomgard-Zagrodnik, Washington State University; Dave DeWitt, NOAA NWS Climate Prediction Center; Jonny Armstrong, Oregon State University; and Katherine Hegewisch, University of California - Merced
Date & Time: 25 October 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Climate Recap & Current Conditions
Joe Boomgard-Zagrodnik | Washington State University

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Dave DeWitt | NOAA NWS Climate Prediction Center

The Importance of Warm Habitat to the Growth Regime of Coldwater Fishes
Jonny Armstrong | Oregon State University

Climate Toolbox Historical Drought Stripes Tool
Katherine Hegewisch | University of California - Merced

Seminar Contact(s): Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Abstract: According to the October 12, 2021 U.S. Drought Monitor, 91% of the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) is in drought. Conditions have improved a bit and more precipitation may be coming. But, almost 23% of the region is still in Exceptional Drought (D4). This webinar will feature recent and current conditions, outlooks, as well as presentations on "The Importance of Warm Habitat to the Growth Regime of Coldwater Fishes" and the "Climate Toolbox Historical Drought Stripes Tool."

These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

22 October 2021

Title: October 2021 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP/University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 22 October 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: October 2021 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/NOAAScienceSeminars.php

21 October 2021

Title: Diving into the barf! New insights into ʻAoʻū (Christmas Shearwater) foraging ecology from Hōlanikū (Kure Atoll)
Presenter(s): Ilana Nimz, Ecologist at Oikonos Ecosystem Knowledge
Date & Time: 21 October 2021
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Diving into the barf! New insights into Ao (Christmas Shearwater) foraging ecology from Hlanik (Kure Atoll)

Presenter(s): Ilana Nimz, Ecologist at Oikonos Ecosystem Knowledge

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Abstract: Ten years of active management on Hlanik (Kure Atoll) have yielded numerous successes. Primary restoration objectives for Hlanik included invasive species management, establishing native plants, removing marine debris and monitoring ecosystem changes. While a challenging location to conduct work, the successes achieved from the decade of habitat restoration on the island are undeniable. Join ecologist Ilana Nimz as she shares ten years of conservation efforts at Hlanik before focusing on the cryptic and understudied Ao (Christmas/Chocolate shearwater; Puffinus nativitatis), one of the US Fish & Wildlife Service's 2021 Birds of Conservation Concern. The protected waters of Papahnaumokukea MNM are critical for Ao, as foraging grounds abundant with larval fish and protected from fisheries facilitates the recovery of the shearwater populations in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.This presentation is part of the Third Thursday By the Bay Presentation Series at Mokuppapa Discovery Center, which is the visitor center for Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument in Hilo, Hawaii. This State of the Monument lecture series is also supported by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation through a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Fisheries and Protected Species Science in A New Era of Wind Energy Development in the U.S.
Presenter(s): Mr. Andrew Lipsky Fisheries & Offshore Wind Lead, Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 21 October 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Fisheries and Protected Species Science in A New Era of Wind Energy Development in the U.S.

Presenter(s): Mr. Andrew Lipsky Fisheries & Offshore Wind Lead, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): OR&R Lecture Series: You Don't Know What You Don't Know. Welcome to OR&R's online lecture series, You Don't Know What You Don't Know! Each month, an expert presents on a topic related to emergency spill response, environmental protection and sometimes beyond. Topics will range from booms to birds, burning to bacteria, satellites to submarines. The goal of the series is to provide a larger, more diverse audience to presentations and lectures recently given at meetings or conferences.

Point of Contact: youdontknowwhatyoudontknow@noaa.gov

Abstract: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Laura Edwards, South Dakota State Climatologist, Brad Rippey, Climatologist, USDA, Office of the Chief Economist
Date & Time: 21 October 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook

Presenter(s): Laura Edwards | South Dakota State Climatologist,
Brad Rippey | Climatologist, USDA, Office of the Chief Economist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

October 2021 topics include a recap of the 2021 growing season for the region; discussion of warmth & drought issues and impacts; recent and potential climate/weather impacts, including but not limited to, heavy rainfall events & flooding, wildfire/smoke updates and outlooks, La Nia and what it could mean for us, fall soil moisture recharge outlook, frost/freeze potentials, and providing the latest trends and outlooks for precipitation, temperature through the fall (2 weeks to 6 months)

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Out with the New And In With the Old: Reviving a Traditional Makah Halibut Hook for Modern Fisheries Management Challenges
Presenter(s): Jon Scordino, M.S., Marine Mammal Biologist, Makah Fisheries Management
Date & Time: 21 October 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Out with the New And In With the Old: Reviving a Traditional Makah Halibut Hook for Modern Fisheries Management Challenges

Presenter(s): Jon Scordino, M.S., Marine Mammal Biologist, Makah Fisheries Management

Sponsor(s): NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam series

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: Although fisheries challenges evolve rapidly, historical approaches may provide new tools for managers. In the state of Washington, the Makah Tribe have used ibud, their traditional fishhook, to target Pacific halibut long before the advent of modern fisheries. We describe our experience in rediscovering this historical harvesting method, testing the species selectivity, refining the approach, and producing a tool ready for application in modern fisheries management. Over nearly a decade, we were able to uncover substantial traditional knowledge in the community. Turning this knowledge into a reproducible and consistent product for testing proved difficult. Initial attempts to deploy the gear using commercial longlines encountered a range of challenges, but suggested refinements for further research. Subsequent experiments in recreational fisheries were successful due to the lessons learned during initial work. Our experience may be of value to others hoping to investigate historical methods with potential for addressing modern problems.
BIOs: Jonathan Jon Scordino has worked as the Marine Mammal Biologist for the Makah Tribe since 2007. Most of Jon's research focuses on marine mammals, but occasionally he is able to lead or assist co-workers on research of other species. One project that was extra special was the opportunity to study the Makah Tribe's halibut hook, the cibud. The Parker family of the Makah Tribe recognized Jon's many years of conducting research and helping to protect Makah treaty rights by giving him the name Cibuqsas, which translates to All about halibut hooks. It is rare for the Tribe to give a non-Makah tribal member a name and is a great honor.

Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)


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Title: Assessing Efforts to Mitigate Fishing Gear Impacts on Shipwreck Sites in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Clea Harrelson, Ocean Sciences Policy Fellow, Division of Ocean Sciences, National Science Foundation
Date & Time: 21 October 2021
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Assessing Efforts to Mitigate Fishing Gear Impacts on Shipwreck Sites in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (2021 Knauss Fellows Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Clea Harrelson, Ocean Sciences Policy Fellow, Division of Ocean Sciences, National Science Foundation

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Abstract: Growing interest in the maritime heritage resources of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (the sanctuary), such as shipwrecks, has raised important questions about how to best safeguard these artifacts and facilitate access for non-consumptive users. Fishing gear impacts have been identified as the primary threat to shipwrecks in the sanctuary (ONMS 2010, 2020). This study uses semi-structured interviews to assess the effectiveness of methods used to communicate about shipwreck guidelines, the impact of location disclosures on fishing practices, and general perceptions of shipwreck protection efforts.


Bio(s): Clea Harrelson serves as the 2021-2022 Knauss Policy Fellow in the NSF Division of Ocean Sciences, Office of the Division Director. She completed her undergraduate work at Colby College in 2016 and earned a Masters in Marine Affairs from the University of Rhode Island in 2020. Throughout her studies, Clea's work has focused on how people use and think about marine spaces, with emphasis on coastal fisheries and marine protected areas.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Adapting to Climate with NOAA RISA in the Intermountain West (CO,WY,UT)
Presenter(s): Benet Duncan and Ben Livneh, Western Water Assessment
Date & Time: 21 October 2021
12:15 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Adapting to Climate with NOAA RISA in the Intermountain West (CO,WY,UT)

Presenter(s):
Bent Duncan, Managing Director and Principal Investigator, Western Water Assessment; Ben Livneh, Director and Principal Investigator, Western Water Assessment

Sponsor(s): OAR Climate Program Office's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program


Seminar Contact(s): Sean Bath, sean.bath@noaa.gov

Accessibility: A transcript will be generated in the recording. If additional accommodations needed, please contact Sean Bath at sean.bath@noaa.gov


Abstract: The NOAA Climate Program Office's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) program invests in research and engagement that expands regional capacity to adapt to climate change in the U.S. RISA's regional teams build sustained relationships between decision makers and researchers that support collaborative and equitable adaptation to climate risks. In Fiscal Year 2021, the RISA program launched 9 new 5-year RISA teams. This webinar series is a venue to introduce each team, discuss major themes and partners, and preview the projects that will advance climate knowledge and adaptation capacity in their regions.RISA's Intermountain West region includes the states of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. The RISA team, Western Water Assessment (WWA), is based at University of Colorado Boulder, the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), the University of Wyoming, and the University of Utah. This RISA team's vision is to build water sector and community resilience to compound hazards in the Intermountain West, with a particular focus on underserved Indigenous and small rural communities and utilities. By carefully constructing their activities, WWA will also advance resilience science from theory to practice. The team has developed an integrative set of 10 projects and other research and integration activities that draw on their 20-year history of climate adaptation research and activities in the region, and the deep interdisciplinary social and natural science expertise in their team. Their research projects fit within two themes: resilient water systems and resilient communities, and they will integrate tracking of resilience metrics to identify needs and opportunities and evaluate their success in building resilience. The team will also conduct a small-grant competition to develop a network in Wyoming to build resilience of underserved communities and leverage successes to inspire other communities to engage in climate adaptation actions. For more information see https://wwa.colorado.edu/

Bio(s):
Dr. Bent Duncan is Western Water Assessment's Managing Director and is responsible for directing and managing the daily and long-term activities of the operations, setting strategic direction for the program in consultation with the PI team, and interfacing with sponsors and stakeholders. She also conducts research at the intersection of science and society, with a focus on sustained climate assessment and better connecting scientific information related to weather and climate with decision-makers. Prior to assuming the Managing Director role, Bent was Western Water Assessment's Climate Assessment Specialist, one of a small network of scientists at RISAs across the country working to advance sustained climate assessment.Prior to joining WWA, Bent worked at the science-policy interface with the California Ocean Science Trust. There, she collaborated with scientists, managers, and stakeholders to develop usable science around California's coast and ocean, with a particular focus on marine protected areas and climate change. Prior to that, as a postdoctoral fellow in UCAR's Postdocs Applying Climate Expertise (PACE) program, Bent led development of ocean climate change indicators for Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. The project brought together over 50 researchers and managers, and it led to the first set of climate change indicators specifically developed for a national marine sanctuary. Bent received her MS and PhD in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences from the University of Colorado, and her BS in Atmospheric Science from the University of California Davis.

Dr. Ben Livneh grew up in Ontario Canada. He earned his first two Civil Engineering degrees at the University of Western Ontario. He earned his Ph.D. degree at the University of Washington under the guidance of Dennis P. Lettenmaier, where he worked on a wide range of problems related to large-scale computational hydrology. His dissertation focused on the development of the Unified Land Model (ULM)--a merger of two operational models: the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting Model and the Noah Land Surface Model. During his time in Seattle, Ben also taught several courses at Seattle University. He now leads a research group in the department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering and he is also a Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) fellow. Professor Livneh's research group addresses physical hydrology problems across multiple scales. Major research themes include physically-based hydrologic model development, land-cover/land-use change, snow hydrology, and hydroclimatology. The group is focused on applying models in innovative ways that integrate remote sensing and in situ observations to understand how changes in climate and land cover will affect water availability at the land surface. Professor Livneh frequently interacts with scientists at the Western Water Assessment, with the departments of Geography, INSTAAR, and ATOC.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: The recording will be sent to those who register and all videos will be posted to https://cpo.noaa.gov/risaSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Pebble Mine, Environmental Impact Statements, and Implications for Ocean Management
Presenter(s): Rin Ball, Social Science and Stakeholder Engagement Specialist, Department of Energy Wind Energy Technologies Office
Date & Time: 21 October 2021
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Pebble Mine, Environmental Impact Statements, and Implications for Ocean Management (2021 Knauss Fellows Lunch & Learn Series)

Presenter(s): Rin Ball, Social Science and Stakeholder Engagement Specialist, Department of Energy Wind Energy Technologies Office

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Abstract: Pebble Mine is a proposed gold and copper mine in southwestern Alaska that has been contested over potential impacts to Bristol Bay. The sites environmental impact statement has been a key point of tension over ocean representation and analysis. In this talk I discuss how the ocean was included within EIS analysis about a land-based site and highlight lessons Pebble Mine can provide about larger shifts in ocean governance practices.

Bio(s): Rin Ball serves as a Knauss Policy Fellow in DOEs Wind Energy Technologies Office. After receiving a B.S. in Oceanography from the University of Washington in 2016 she pursued graduate school in science policy and currently studies Arctic and sub-arctic ocean governance practices as a PhD student in Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology at Arizona State University. She is motivated to study and work in government to improve public access and engagement with ocean decision making.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Phragmites: The Case for the Defense - Rethinking the Common Reed Grass, Phragmites
Presenter(s): Judith S. Weis, Professor Emerita, Rutgers University
Date & Time: 21 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

You may view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pldziw3qy69h/

Title: Phragmites: The Case for the Defense
A new NOAA science seminar series - Rethinking the Common Reed Grass - Phragmites; Dr. Judith Weis is co-hosting this series and will kick it off.

Presenter(s): Judith S. Weis, Professor Emerita, Rutgers UniversityWhen: October 21, 2021, 12-1pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Tracy Gill (NOAA/NOS science seminar coordinator) and Judith Weis (Professor Emerita, Rutgers)

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Phragmites is generally disliked and often removed in restoration projects in the mid-Atlantic and New England. However, this plant performs many useful services that are unappreciated" (1) it provides habitat for many fishes in tidal marsh creeks (though perhaps somewhat inferior to native species). (2) It provides habitat for many benthic invertebrates in and on the substrate of tidal marshes, (3) It reduces pollution by sequestering toxic metals, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide (i.e. blue carbon) more effectively than native marsh plants. (4) It protects nearby towns and communities from storm surge and flooding more effectively than native marsh communities, since it tends to grow denser and taller. (5) Marshes are facing an existential threat from sea level rise. Most importantly, therefore, in this era of sea level rise, Phragmites enables a marsh to elevate faster by producing more litter and trapping more sediments, thus giving the marsh an increased chance of elevating fast enough to keep up with sea level rise. Most of these services have been known for up to two decades, yet little if anything has changed in management of this plant.

Bio(s): Dr. Judith Weis received a BA from Cornell, and an MS and PhD from NYU. Her research is on estuarine ecology and ecotoxicology, and she has published over 250 scientific papers, plus general books on salt marshes, fish, crabs, and marine pollution, and co-edited a book on Biological Invasions and Animal Behavior. She is interested in stresses and their effects on organisms, populations and communities. She is on the editorial board of BioScience, is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and a Fulbright Senior Specialist. She served on advisory committees for EPA, NOAA and the National Academy of Sciences, and chairs the Science Advisory Board of NJ Dept. of Environmental Protection, co-chairs the Science/Technical Advisory Committee of NY/NJ Harbor Estuary Program and is on the NYC Waterfront Management Advisory Board. She chaired the Biology Section of AAAS, served on boards of Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Association for Women in Science, and American Institute of Biological Sciences, of which she was the President, 2001. She received the Merit Award from the Society of Wetland Scientists 2016.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides may be shared and the recording will be shared, after the webinar with all who register, and with anyone who requests them from the seminar contacts. You may view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pldziw3qy69h/ and if it does not open, select
"Continue in Browser".

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

20 October 2021

Title: Mapping and Exploring the Ocean with the Next Generation of Uncrewed Surface Vessels
Presenter(s): Dr. Larry Mayer, Director of the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping, University of New Hampshire; Val Schmidt, Research Project Engineer, Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping, Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Laboratory, University of New Hampshire. Hosted by Dr. Aurora Elmore, Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration
Date & Time: 20 October 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Mapping and Exploring the Ocean with the Next Generation of Uncrewed Surface Vessels
Part of the OECI Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Larry Mayer (University of New Hampshire), Val Schmidt (University of New Hampshire)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and Ocean Exploration Cooperative Institute

Seminar Contacts: Aurora Elmore (Aurora.Elmore@noaa.gov) and Joanne Flanders (Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov)

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided. https://www.captionedtext.com/client/event.aspx?EventID=4918188&CustomerID=321

Abstract: The NOAA Ocean Exploration Cooperative Institute (OECI) invites you to attend its monthly OECI presentations as part of the NOAA Science Seminar Series. This fourth presentation in the series will focus on OECI partner University of New Hampshire. The presentation will be hosted by Dr. Aurora Elmore (Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration). Dynamic production and visual effects will be featured by the University of Rhode Island's Inner Space Center.

Bio(s): Dr. Larry Mayer (Director, Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping, University of New Hampshire), Val Schmidt (Research Project Engineer, Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping, University of New Hampshire), and Dr. Aurora Elmore (Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recordings will be available at: https://www.youtube.com/c/innerspacecenter/videos after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Evaluation of the role of inversion polymorphisms in the evolution of sympatric intraspecific diversity: a theoretical and empirical study
Presenter(s): Sara Schaal, PhD Candidate, Northeastern University
Date & Time: 20 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Evaluation of the role of inversion polymorphisms in the evolution of sympatric intraspecific diversity: a theoretical and empirical study, Part of the NOAA 'Omics Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Sara Schaal, PhD Candidate, Northeastern University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and NOAA National Ocean Service Science Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Katharine.Egan@noaa.gov, NOAA/OAR Oceans Portfolio 'Omics Coordinator and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, NOAA/NOS Science Seminar coordinator.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: Understanding why intraspecific diversity arises and how populations adapt to spatial variation in environmental conditions continues to be a major focus of evolutionary biology. Recently, inversion polymorphisms have become an active area of research focused on understanding how sympatric local adaptation occurs especially when adaptation occurs at microgeographic scales (i.e., below the scale of gene flow). However, we are still lacking a comprehensive understanding of the conditions needed for an inversion to aid in adaptation and how well we can detect them empirically. To address these gaps, we analyzed empirical whole-genome-sequencing data and morphometric data of ecotypes of a highly-mobile marine fish, Atlantic cod, from the US Gulf of Maine (GOM) and Iceland and compared results to theoretical expectations for the role of inversions in adaptation with forward-time simulations. By using simulations that both incorporate flexible inversion characteristics and combine quantitative and population genetic mathematical frameworks, our simulation set unites these two fields and provides a unique, more realistic perspective on the way inversion polymorphisms influence genome architecture and local adaptation. Empirically, we show GOM cod are more closely related to coastal Iceland cod and our sampling lacks evidence for a true migratory cod ecotype in the GOM. We show that in Iceland four major inversion polymorphisms underlie adaptation within our two sampled populations within Iceland. Theoretically, we show that inversions facilitate adaptation under high gene flow within a narrow range of conditions: 1) when a trait is polygenic (i.e., high mutation rate and small mutation effect sizes on the trait) and 2) when the evolving trait was under strong selection. By testing a wide range of parameters and comparing with empirical data, our results give us a more robust understanding of the genomic architecture of local adaptation and the specific conditions needed for inversions to play a role in adaptation under gene flow.

Bio(s): Sara Schaal's dissertation research focuses on the genomics of ecotype evolution, with a focus on the economically and ecologically important species Atlantic cod. Broadly, her research interest is in applying molecular techniques and computer simulations to understand the underlying genomic architecture of within-species adaptation. Sara will be joining Dr. Ingrid Spies in Seattle to start a postdoctoral fellowship for NOAA this coming spring where she will be co-advised by Dr. Spies and Dr. Wes Larson at NOAA in Alaska. Once there, she will be helping to create a GT-seq panel for Pacific cod and evaluate population structure in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea using both genomics and otolith microchemistry. Slides / Recording: Slides & recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

19 October 2021

Title: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) Arctic Research
Presenter(s): Jia Wang, NOAA OAR GLERL; jia.wang@noaa.gov
Date & Time: 19 October 2021
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic seminar series 2021 as part of the public-access NOAA Science Seminar Series. The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee and sponsored by the NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region.

Title: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) Arctic Research

Presenter(s): Jia Wang, NOAA OAR GLERL; jia.wang@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI and NOS Seminar Series
Seminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GELRL) Ice and Climate Team are working on the following Arctic research and transitioning research and models to nowcast/forecast systems for Arctic sea route region:
1. The interannual and decadal variability of summer Arctic seaice is analyzed, using the longest reconstruction (1850-2017) of Arctic sea ice available, and its relationship with the dominant internal variabilities of the climate system is further investigated quantitatively.The relationship between summer sea ice and atmospheric teleconnections (AO,DA, NAO, ENSO, PDO, and AMO) are investigated to understand what cause the accelerating decline in summer sea ice.2. Develop multi-variable, non-linear regression model tohindcast summer sea ice using only the teleconnection indices. This statistical model has potential to project summer sea ice using these projected indicesonly.3. Develop GLERL-CIGLR Arctic-sea route nowcast/forecast System(GCAS) to provide 5-day forecast using a coupled ice-ocean model driven by predicted atmospheric forcing in the Arctic with coarse resolution and the Northeast Passage area with 4-km resolution4. Develop 3-km CICE6 in the Bering Sea for the Alaska Coastal Ocean Forecast System (ALCOFS) led by University of Notre Dame to predict conditions for ocean circulation, ice, waves, and storm surges and their interactions in the Western Alaska.

Bio(s): Jia Wang is an ice climatologist at NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL). He received Ph.D. in physical oceanography at Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1987, and in meteorology at McGill University in 1993. He joined GLERL in July 2007 while he was a research professor at University of Alaska Fairbanks from 1998 to 2007. His research interests include coupled ice-ocean modeling from coastal to basin scales, Great Lakes, polar and subpolar climate change and lake/sea variability, oceanography, and numerical modeling of coupled biological-physical system. He holds several professional memberships: AGU and IAGR. He received several awards and certificates, including NOAA GLERL Director's Award for Scientific Productivity of 2007, Outstanding Productivity and Excellence in Science of the Year 2000, JAMSTEC, Japan, 2000. He actively involves public services, as a reviewer and panelist for the US and international journals and the funding agency. He has also served as a chair more than 10 sessions at national and international conferences/meetings and organizer for several workshops/conferences. He was often the invited speaker and keynote speaker in conferences/meeting. He has published 141 refereed journal articles with H-index of 38, 7 refereed book chapters, 11 proceedings papers, and 27 internal reports. Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Slides available here (PDF) or by contacting the presenter(s) directly
Recording: Seminars recorded for later viewing in mp4 format

Accessibility: If NOAA staff would like to request an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Office of Human Capital Services' Sign Language Interpreting Services Program or the Relay Conference Captioning service.Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Heritage in the Eye of the Storm (Submerged NC)
Presenter(s): Shannon Ricles, Education and Outreach Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 19 October 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Heritage in the Eye of the Storm - A Systematic Effort to Document Cultural Resources Damaged and Threatened by Hurricanes in Coastal North Carolina (Submerged NC Series)

Presenter(s): Mary Beth Fitts, Assistant State Archaeologist and Allyson Ropp, Historic Preservation Archaeologist Specialist - North Carolina Office of State Archaeology

Sponsor(s): Monitor NMS Submerged NC webinar series. Submerged North Carolina is part of the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series.

Seminar Contact(s): Shannon.Ricles@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The hurricanes of 2018 devastated coastal North Carolina. Not only did they cause significant damage to property and infrastructure, Florence and Michael also impacted coastal cultural resources, including archaeological sites and cemeteries. In response to these storms, the National Park Service is providing emergency supplemental funds to support preservation efforts, including surveys to assist in planning for future storms. The North Carolina Office of State Archaeology (OSA) received funding for two projects that will document and assess cultural resources in the coastal counties of North Carolina. Join OSA archaeologists Mary Beth Fitts and Allyson Ropp to see how OSA's Shore scape and Coastal Historic Cemetery Survey Projects have been designed to document important places in counties impacted by Hurricanes Florence and Michael in 2018. Unlike most surveys of coastal resources, these projects are adopting a holistic approach to the archaeology of maritime lifeways by simultaneously investigating resources on the shoreline, within the littoral zone, and submerged in adjacent waterways. This approach will not only provide a baseline for understanding differential climate change and storm effects on dry and waterlogged sites; it will broaden our understandings of coastal communities' political economies and experiential realms. In addition to identifying the context and goals of these projects, this talk will discuss the prioritization models OSA is using to implement these surveys, which have been designed to identify at-risk sites associated with North Carolina's maritime industries and African American communities, and the role of these efforts to build upon the Office of State Archaeology's Sea Level Rise Project.

Bio(s): Mary Beth Fitts: Mary Beth Fitts is an Assistant State Archaeologist with the Office of State Archaeology in North Carolina's Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. She obtained her PhD in Anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, focusing on the historical archaeology of the Catawba Indian Nation. Before her time in North Carolina, Mary Beth pursued an MA in Applied Anthropology from the University of South Florida and worked on archaeology projects throughout the state. Growing up among outdoor educators on Long Island, New York, she learned that nature and culture are always intertwined. In supervising OSA's hurricane grant programs, she hopes to elevate stories and places overlooked in basic accounts of North Carolina's coastal history.Allyson Ropp: Allyson Ropp is the Historic Preservation Archaeological Specialist for the Emergency Supplemental Historic Preservation Fund Grants Program with the North Carolina Office of State Archaeology. A native North Carolinian, Allyson developed a love of maritime history and archaeology on the Outer Banks. She pursued a BA in History and Classics from the University of North Carolina-Asheville and an MA in maritime studies from East Carolina University. Her archaeological career has taken her across the globe researching maritime history and archaeology and exposed her to the breadth of environmental impacts on different types of sites. As such, she joined OSA to assist with their hurricane-related projects and is currently pursuing her doctorate in Integrated Coastal Studies at East Carolina University, where she is examining the relationship between climate change and wooden shipwreck degradation.For more information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.htmlSlides, Recordings and Other Materials: You can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at:
https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html
To learn more about Monitor National Marine Sanctuary, visit https://monitor.noaa.gov.To learn more about the NC Office of State Archaeology, visit https://archaeology.ncdcr.gov/

Subscribe to the One NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Filling science gaps in response to an unprecedented increase in redfish (Sebastes mentella and S. fasciatus) biomass in the Gulf of St. Lawrence
Presenter(s): Caroline Senay, DFO, CANADA
Date & Time: 19 October 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Filling science gaps in response to an unprecedented increase in redfish(Sebastes mentella and S. fasciatus) biomass in the Gulf of St. Lawrence

Presenter(s): Caroline Senay

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAANMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Abstract: The Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada, redfish supported substantial landings in the mid-1950s until a sudden drop in landings and the absence of strong recruitment led to a moratorium in 1995.According to DFO surveys, the biomass is now the highest value of the time series starting in 1984. How can we conduct sustainable harvests without repeating the mistakes from the past?


Bio(s): CarolineSenay completed a Master's degree in Fish Ecology in 2009. After working inriver systems for many years, she started as a redfish stock assessmentbiologist in 2017 for the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. Her job is toassess the quantity of fish available, to better understand the biology ofredfish, and the consequences they may have on the ecosystem. Her present researchaims to provide recommendations on exploitation rates and management measuresto regulate fishing in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Thinking About Adaptation: Exploring the Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) Framework
Presenter(s): Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Robin O'Malley, Robin O'Malley LLC; Retired USGS
Date & Time: 19 October 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Thinking About Adaptation: Exploring the Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) Framework

Presenter(s): Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Robin O'Malley, Robin O'Malley LLC; Retired USGS

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, coordinator of NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: Climate change is a complex management problem because it involves persistent change across large areas and is difficult to address locally. Conditions fueled by or worsened by climate change may favor species new to an area over those that have been longtime inhabitants. The result: ecological transformation " although system makeover that can occur when species move due to changes in their surrounding environment.Recognizing the need for coordinated action, representatives of several natural resource management agencies met in 2018 to develop a framework to address ecological transformation. The Resist-Accept-Direct framework allows managers to choose from three management responses:
  • Resist the direction of change, by working to maintain or restore function, structure or composition, based on historical or table current conditions.
  • Accept the direction of change, by allowing the change to occur without intervening.
  • Direct the change, by actively managing processes, function, structure or composition toward a new desired condition.
Managers may need to apply a portfolio of these three options across their area to better manage resources impacted by climate change. Regional portfolios, well-coordinated across multiple systems, can reduce the risk of piloting novel actions at anyone location and ensure that future habitats can maintain associated species at other locations. The RAD framework is one way to weigh the economic, ecological, and sociological costs and benefits of various management strategies that can be applied on landscapes faced with ecological transformation.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides / Recording:
Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

18 October 2021

Title: The climate-driven decline of an ice-dependent seabird in the Western Arctic: insights and alarms from a half-century of observations
Presenter(s): Dr. George Divoky, Director, Cooper Island Arctic Research
Date & Time: 18 October 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic Seminar Series 2021
The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee.

Title: The climate-driven decline of an ice-dependent seabird in the Western Arctic: insights and alarms from a half-century of observations

Presenter(s): Dr. George Divoky, Director, Cooper Island Arctic Research

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, both coordinators of NOAA's Alaska and the Arctic webinar series and the NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: A half-century of study of a Beaufort Sea colony of Mandt's Black Guillemot (Cepphus grylle mandtii)has documented the growth, demographics and trophics of a sea-ice dependent seabird during a period of rapid Arctic warming and sea ice loss. Provision of supplemental nest boxes on Cooper Island facilitated an initial period of rapid colony growth, from 20breeding birds in 1972 to over 400 in 1990, but this was followed by an episodic decline to only 100 in 2021. Recent observations, analyses, and modeling have increased our understanding of the environmental and demographic factors responsible for the high temporal variation in numbers at the colony and include a predicted extinction of the colony by the mid-21st Century. Sea ice extent in summer and fall was the primary environmental factor, and immigration rate the primary demographic factor, affecting colony growth. Beginning in 1990 both underwent declines coinciding with an extreme phase-shift in the Arctic Oscillation that modified ocean circulation and resulted in a still ongoing decrease in the extent and thickness of sea ice in the western Arctic and increases in SST. Resulting changes in the biological oceanography near the colony have led to decreased breeding success and increased breeding effort due to reduced availability of Arctic Cod (Boreogadus saida), the primary forage fish in the Arctic Basin and the preferred prey of Mandt's Black Guillemot. Similar decreases in numbers and breeding productivity are known or suspected at other colonies in the regional metapopulation. Recent decreased overwinter survival of adults has also contributed to the decline and is likely associated with changes in ice extent and trophic pathways at the staging and wintering areas in the Chukchi and Bering seas. As an upper-trophic level predator, Mandt's Black Guillemot is a sentinel of the status of the cryopelagic ecosystem and its recent population trajectory and potential for local extinction provide a sobering message about the state of the sea ice ecosystem.

Bio(s): George Divoky has studied seabirds in arctic Alaska since 1970, initially participating in studies and assessments related to oil and gas development before beginning to monitor regional climate change. Since 1975 he has maintained a continuing study of a colony of Mandt's Black Guillemots on Cooper Island, Alaska, in the western Beaufort Sea. The study is one of the longest longitudinal bird studies in the Arctic and its findings on the consequences of decadal-scale reductions in snow and sea ice provide some of the best examples of the biological consequences of climate change. His work was featured in a cover story in the New York Times Magazine, Scientific American Frontiers on PBS, ABC News and Late Night with David Letterman and was included in a play about climate change presented at the Royal National Theatre in London. Slides / Recording: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Lighting the dark: insights of fire combustion efficiency and smoke transport at night from VIIRS
Presenter(s): Dr Jun Wang, University of Iowa, Assistant Director Iowa Technology Institute, Director Atmospheric and Environmental Research Lab
Date & Time: 18 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Lighting the dark: insights of fire combustion efficiency and smoke transport at night from VIIRS

Presenter(s): Dr. Jun Wang, University of Iowa, Assistant Director Iowa Technology Institute, Director Atmospheric and Environmental Research Lab

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Abstract: In this presentation, I will highlight the progress and insights we've made of using the Day-Night- Band (DNB) of Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard Suomi-NPP and JPSS-1 to improve fire detection, characterize the fire combustion efficiency, and retrieve smoke aerosol optical depth at night. A Fire Light Detection Algorithm (FILDA) that combines VIIRS DNB and infrared band to quantify the visible energy fraction (VEF) as an indicator of fire burning phase will be presented. The advantage of VEF products for describing fire emission and fire life cycle will be illustrated at both global and local (fire event) scale. An algorithm to derive smoke aerosol optical depth at night by using backscattered moonlight measured by VIIRS DNB will be shown; the results highlight the emergent need and high promise of VIIRS for tracking smoke layer movement at night. In the end of the presentation, I will share some thoughts that the community can work together to further advance the nighttime quantitative optical sensing of aerosols and fires.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

15 October 2021

Title: Seabirds as a sentinel to change in global marine ecosystems
Presenter(s): Brian Hoover, PhD, Seabird Ecologist, Farallon Institute
Date & Time: 15 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Adobe Connect webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view this recording via Adobe Connect here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p69193jvfhli/

Title: Seabirds as a sentinel to change in global marine ecosystems

Presenter(s): Brian Hoover, PhD, Seabird Ecologist, Farallon InstituteWhen: Friday, October 15, 12-1pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series


Seminar Contact(s): Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: Climate change and other human activities are causing profound effects on marine ecosystem productivity. We show that the breeding success of seabirds is tracking hemispheric differences in ocean warming and human impacts, with the strongest effects on fish-eating, surface-foraging species in the north. Hemispheric asymmetry suggests the need for ocean management at hemispheric scales. For the north, tactical, climate-based recovery plans for forage fish resources are needed to recover seabird breeding productivity. In the south, lower-magnitude change in seabird productivity presents opportunities for strategic management approaches such as large marine protected areas to sustain food webs and maintain predator productivity. Global monitoring of seabird productivity enables the detection of ecosystem change in remote regions and contributes to our understanding of marine climate impacts on ecosystems.

Bio(s): Following the completion of his Farallon Institute post-doc research, Brian Hoover is now a Grand Challenges Initiative Fellow at Chapman University. In this position, he splits teaching and mentorship responsibilities with his continuing research on animal behavior and marine ecosystem function. Brian grew up in Colorado and is a Ph.D. graduate of U.C. Davis, with an interdisciplinary background in behavior, genetics, sensory biology, oceanography and seabird ecology.

Slides / Recording:
Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

14 October 2021

Title: Bon Voyage Leatherback Turtles, until we meet again next year!
Presenter(s): Scott Benson, NOAA Fisheries and Lisa Uttal, NOAA Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 14 October 2021
10:00 pm - 11:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Bon Voyage Leatherback Turtles, until we meet again next year!

Presenter(s): Scott Benson, NOAA Fisheries and Lisa Uttal, NOAA Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4606192176704986124

Abstract: Leatherback turtles are a NOAA's Species in the Spotlight and the Pacific population is critically endangered. Join us for a collaborative presentation with Tanzle, Inc. to celebrate and learn about Pacific Leatherback sea turtles"one of the largest living reptiles in the world. It is during this time that Scott Benson is out on the west coast of the Pacific Ocean researching these enigmatic animals, who will soon leave only to return in June or July next year.

While they have been making this journey for hundreds of thousands of years, very few people will ever see one of these turtles in the wild. Join Scott and Lisa in the same room with a life size, virtual augmented reality Leatherback turtle, as well as other visuals created by Tanzle, Inc, a data management and visualization tech startup. Take a deep dive with us to better understand the turtle's adaptations, lifestyle and its journey to Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Changes in Arctic mercury levels: emissions sources, pathways and accumulation
Presenter(s): Robert Mason, Professor, Dep't Marine Sciences & Chemistry, University of Connecticut
Date & Time: 14 October 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
You may view this recording thru adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pisyt2n03vfw/NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic Seminar Series 2021
The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee.

Title: Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) Reports: Changes in Arctic mercury levels: emissions sources, pathways and accumulation

Presenter(s): Robert Mason, Professor, Dep't Marine Sciences & Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region and the
NOS Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, both coordinators of NOAA's Alaska and the Arctic webinar series and the NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: Mercury (Hg) levels in Arctic ecosystems have risen markedly due to global anthropogenic Hg emissions since industrialization, and are now also being altered as the region warms, with as-yet uncertain ecological consequences. This presentation will highlight the key findings of the recent AMAP mercury report as well as discuss the resultant comprehensive assessment of the present-day abiotic Hg mass balance in the Arctic that was recently submitted for publication. Atmospheric Hg in the Arctic is primarily emitted outside the region and is delivered to the Arctic Ocean through atmospheric deposition, riverine inputs, ice melt and coastal erosion. While external Hg inputs are overall decreasing, concentrations in biota are still increasing in some locations. The overall findings of the AMAP report and the Hg mass balance will be discussed and the presentation will highlight the uncertainties in understanding that exist or are poorly constrained by measurements.

Bio(s): Robert Mason is a professor in the Department of Marine Sciences at the University of Connecticut and has been working on aspects of the global mercury cycle for more than 30 years. He is, and has been, involved in synthesis efforts on mercury for AMAP and for UNEP, as part of the efforts related to the Minamata Convention on Mercury. He has been involved in recent mercury studies in the Arctic and the adjacent waters, and in the atmosphere, in addition to studies in other coastal and offshore ocean regions.

Slides / Recording:
Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: The Common Community Physics Page and its role as an enabler of Hierarchical System Development
Presenter(s): Ligia Bernardet; NOAA/GSL and Michael Ek; NCAR/RAL/JNT, DTC
Date & Time: 14 October 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Common Community Physics Page and its role as an enabler of Hierarchical System Development

Presenter(s): Ligia Bernardet; NOAA/GSL and Michael Ek; NCAR/RAL/JNT,DTC

Sponsor(s): Office of Science and Technology Integration (OSTI) Modeling Division, National Weather Service of NOAA

Seminar Contacts: Stacy Mackell (stacy.mackell@noaa.gov) and Karen Keith (karen.keith@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The Common Community Physics Package (CCPP) is a collection of physical parameterizations and a framework that enables their use by host Earth System Models. The CCPP is now an integral part of the Unified Forecast System (UFS) and is used in developmental versions of its Subseasonal-to-Seasonal, Medium-Range Weather (MRW), Short-Range Weather (SRW), Hurricane, and Atmospheric Composition applications. The CCPP is designed to lower the bar for community involvement in physics testing and development through increased interoperability, improved documentation, and continuous support to the developers and the users.
The CCPP is used with a variety of host models, which increases the breadth of innovations that can benefit the UFS. The CCPP has been adopted in developmental versions of NCAR and Navy models, and is distributed with the CCPP Single Column Model (SCM), which offers a simpler and computationally inexpensive avenue for testing and developing atmospheric physics compared to a full three-dimensional model. Given its capabilities to be initialized and forced both by observational field campaign data and previous UFS simulations, the CCPP SCM is a key element in Hierarchical System Development (HSD), which includes testing small elements (e.g. physics schemes) of an Earth System Model (ESM) first in isolation and then with progressive coupling, all the way up to fully-coupled global system. Scientists can utilize the CCPP package to rapidly develop and test prototype code, as well as to tune and explore the parameter space of their schemes.The CCPP has been developed as open source code, with public releases and support provided by the Developmental Testbed Center (DTC). It is also embedded in public releases of the CCPP SCM and of the UFS MRW and SRW applications. Other resources for CCPP users and developers are an online tutorial, archived materials from UFS training sessions, scientific and technical documentations, a catalog of case studies that highlights UFS MRW biases, and a community forum. In this seminar, we will provide an update of the CCPP and SCM latest developments, and review the plans for CCPP future development and transition to operations.

Bio(s): Dr. Ligia Bernardet started her career in Brazil and later got her Ph.D. at Colorado State University. Today she is the deputy chief of the NOAA Global Systems Laboratory Earth Prediction Advancement Division, where she contributes to planning and supporting model development. She is passionate about creating mechanisms that facilitate synergistic interactions between the research and operational numerical weather prediction communities. For that reason, she works on projects of the Developmental Testbed Center that aim at engaging the academic community in the development of NOAA models. Over the last five years, she has been the NOAA co-lead for the development of the Common Community Physics Package (CCPP).

Bio(s): Michael Ek joined NCAR in 2018 as Director of the Joint Numerical Testbed which supports transitioning Earth system model innovations as part of the research-to-operations process at the Developmental Testbed Center. Before NCAR, Mike was Deputy Director and Land Team Lead at the Environmental Modeling Center of NOAA/NWS/NCEP. Previously he worked at Oregon State University on land and boundary-layer model development. He is a former AMS Hydrology Committee chair, and is involved with a number of national and international activities in Earth system model development. He received his Ph.D. from Wageningen University (The Netherlands) in 2005.

Recordings: All the PPTs and recordings from the past webinars can be accessed at the UFS webinar web page.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: National Geodetic Survey (NGS) Geospatial Resources
Presenter(s): Brian Shaw, Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 October 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: National Geodetic Survey (NGS) Geospatial Resources

Presenter(s): Brian Shaw, Rocky Mountain Regional Advisor

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. POC: Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey


Abstract: This webinar will highlight many of the geospatial resources available for viewing, analyzing and downloading data from the National Geodetic Survey. This webinar will highlight several NGS web maps, including the NGS Data Explorer, OPUS Share Map, and GPS on Bench Marks web map. It will also highlight data files and web services that feed these maps and how to access them. Many of these services are available in ArcGIS Online (AGOL), which allows users and other organizations to add this data to their own web maps for discovery and analysis.

Technical Content Rating: Intermediate = Some prior knowledge of the topic is helpful.

Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Feeling blue? Prevalence and correlates of blue-colored flesh in lingcod (Ophiodon elongatus)
Presenter(s): Aaron Galloway & Laurel Lam Ph.D./M.S. Associate Professor/Fishery Biologist Oregon State University/NWFSC
Date & Time: 14 October 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Feeling blue? Prevalence and correlates of blue-colored flesh in lingcod (Ophiodon elongatus)

Presenter(s): Aaron Galloway & Laurel Lam Ph.D./M.S. Associate Professor/Fishery Biologist Oregon State University/NWFSC

Sponsor(s): NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam series

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: Blue-colored flesh in fishes is relatively rare, but has been documented in some species of the sculpin, greenling, and perch families and may have ecological and evolutionary implications. We explored the prevalence and drivers of blue color variants in lingcod, a demersal fish species widely distributed along the west coast of North America. People have long surmised that the occasional bright (almost fluorescent) blue-colored flesh in lingcod is connected to the diet of these fish, but this phenomenon has not yet been formally studied, despite the wide interest in this issue by both fishers and biologists. To unravel this mystery, we sampled >2,000 lingcod from 24 fishing ports in seven regions throughout the geographic range of lingcod, from Southeast Alaska to Southern California. We evaluated the relative importance of biological and spatial factors that could explain blue colored flesh. We found that the probability of having blue flesh was highest for fish that were female, caught in shallower water, and smaller in body size. The incidence of blue flesh in lingcod across all regions ranged from 4-25%, and >80% of blue fish were female. To investigate the hypothesis that diet played a role in blueness, we also analyzed the fatty acids of 175 fish, evenly distributed across the sampling range and among sexes. Fatty acid composition differed between blue and non-blue fish, but these trophic markers were not strong predictors of blueness relative to sex, depth captured, and size.

Bio(s): Aaron Galloway's Coastal Trophic Ecology Lab (CTELab) is generally focused on trophic inferences in aquatic food webs, with an emphasis on algae-invertebrate interactions. To do this work we often use fatty acids as trophic biomarkers, paired with underwater natural history, experimentation, and modeling. CTELab research questions are currently focused on kelp forest ecology, the role of seaweeds and detritus as a subsidizing energy source for subtidal food webs, the effects of coastal ocean acidification of juvenile Dungeness crabs, marine invertebrate trophic ecology (urchins, abalones, sea stars, isopods), and how host/parasite relationships affect trophic relationships. This work is taking place in projects throughout the NE Pacific (Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon) and the Antarctic Peninsula.

Laurel Lam is a fishery biologist with the FRAM Groundfish Survey team and works on the Southern California Hook & Line Survey. Her research interests include investigating spatial variability in groundfish life history and distribution, and the factors driving these differences.

Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: The Atlantic Warm Pool and summer extreme heat events in the US
Presenter(s): Hosmay Lopez, PhD, Oceanographer, NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory
Date & Time: 14 October 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Atlantic Warm Pool and summer extreme heat events in the US

Presenter(s): Hosmay Lopez, NOAA/AOML/PHOD

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Atlantic Oceanic Meteorological Laboratory (AMOL)

Seminar Contact(s): Hosmay Lopez (hosmay.lopez@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Heat waves are among the deadliest natural hazards affecting the United States (US). Therefore, understanding the physical mechanisms modulating their occurrence is essential for improving their predictions and future projections. This study uses observational data as well as model simulations and found that interannual variability of the tropical Atlantic warm pool (AWP, measured as the area enclosed by the 28.5C sea surface temperature isotherm), modulates heat wave occurrence over the Great Plains of the US during boreal summer. For example, a larger than normal AWP enhances atmospheric convection over the Caribbean Sea, driving a low-level cyclonic anomaly over the Gulf of Mexico, weakening the western edge of the Atlantic Subtropical High. This circulation anomaly thus weakens the Great Plain low-level jet (GPLLJ) and associated moisture transport into the Great Plains, eventually leading to drought conditions and increased heat wave occurrence for most of the U.S east of the Rockies.

Bio(s): Dr. Lopez is an oceanographer at the NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. He is currently engaged in several research projects, which aim at studying the ocean atmosphere interaction, climate variability and change, the occurrence of extreme weather events. One of Dr. Lopez recent studies involves assessing the relative role of anthropogenic (i.e., climate change) forcing versus natural variability in the occurrence of heat wave events in the U.S. He is also investigating how climate change will impact El Nio Southern Oscillation occurrence. Dr. Lopez is currently a member of several research communities, such as the NOAA-OAR-CPO-MAPP CMIP6- Trask-Force Team, the US-AMOC Science team for US CLIVAR, and the NOAA MAPP Subseasonal-to-Seasonal (S2S) Prediction Task Force. He has a BS in Meteorology and Mathematics from Florida State University and a Ph.D. in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography from the University of Miami.

Recordings: AOML/PHOD YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/phodaoml/videos

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Promoting the Use of the 1.38 Micron Channel from ABI & VIIRS
Presenter(s): Dr. Andrew Heidinger, NESDIS GEO Senior Scientist
Date & Time: 14 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Promoting the Use of the 1.38 Micron Channel from ABI & VIIRS

Presenter(s): Dr. Andrew Heidinger, NESDIS GEO Senior Scientist

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NESDIS GOES-R Program Office, Satellite Book Club (SBC). Please click here if you would like to subscribe to the Satellite Book Club

Point of Contact: Kashaud Bowman (kashaud.bowman@noaa.gov)


Abstract: The 1.38 micron channel on ABI is one of the least used channels as indicated by a recent study reported on by Jordan Gerth. This channel offers the unique ability to view the solar reflectance off of very optically thin features in the upper atmosphere without interference from the surface. This talk will highlight some of the capabilities of this channel for both single-band imagery, RGBs and L2 products. Examples from VIIRS will also be shown.

Bio(s): Dr. Andrew Heidinger is the current NESDIS GEO Senior Scientist and is working mainly in support of GeoXO. He previously worked at NESDIS STAR and led the Cloud Science Team. His research has included algorithm development, radiative transfer modeling, sensor calibration and satellite climate analysis.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: 2020 YouTube Session Recordings can be found here. 2021 YouTube Session Recordings can be found here. Recordings posted to VLab can be found here.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Ocean acidification effects on Eastern oysters, surfclams, and Atlantic sea scallops: Commonalities and differences?
Presenter(s): Shannon Meseck, NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 14 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Ocean acidification effects on Eastern oysters, surf clams, and Atlantic sea scallops: Commonalities and differences?

Presenter(s): Shannon Meseck, NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: New insights into cloud processes: biology, bacteria and beyond
Presenter(s): Barbara Ervens, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique CNRS
Date & Time: 14 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science SeminarSeries

Title: New insights into cloud processes: biology, bacteria and beyond

Presenter(s): Barbara Ervens, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory Seminar Series

Seminar Contact(s): jan.kazil@noaa.gov

Abstract: Current cloud models often include very detailed descriptions of microphysical and chemical cloud processes. Yet, these models represent an incomplete view of the atmospheric multiphase system. The atmosphere is a habitat of diverse populations of microorganisms that undergo biological processes, which may lead to the modification of aerosol and cloud properties.My presentation will give an overview on recent model studies that focus on bacterial processes in clouds: The role of bacteria as ice nuclei in mixed-phase clouds has been recognized for a long time. However, current model parameterizations are based on empirical expressions. I will share new ideas how biochemical information could be used to refine ice nucleation parameterization for bacteria.Even less explored are processes of bacteria cells in cloud droplets; they include cell generation and biodegradation of organic cloud water constituents. I will present results of model studies exploring the potential importance of these processes.Detailed model sensitivity studies were performed to identify the conditions, under which biodegradation may contribute significantly to the loss of organic compounds, in addition to chemical processes. Unlike chemical oxidation processes " that likely occur in all cloud droplets " only a small number fraction of cloud droplets contain bacteria cells. The consequences and challenges of implementing such "highly reactive droplets" in process models will be discussed, also in the broader context of cloud chemistry applications.Ongoing lab and field experiments in our group will be also discussed that are used to constrain our atmospheric biophysicochemical multiphase models. An outlook will be given on further aspects of the effects of microorganisms on atmospheric processes and vice versa.

Bio(s): Dr. Barbara Ervens received her PhD from the University in Leipzig, Germany, in 2001. She worked as a Postdoc and Research Scientist with the NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division and Colorado State University from 2002 to 2008, and as a Research Scientist with CIRES/NOAA from 2008 to 2018. As a laureate of the French-German Initiative Make Our Planet Great Again, she became a research scientist in 2018 in the Institute of Chemistry, University Clermont Auvergne. Since October 2021, she is a CNRS senior scientist in the same institute. She serves as an Executive Editor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics and as the Chair of the Publications Committee of the European Geosciences Union.

Recordings: https://csl.noaa.gov/seminars/2021/

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13 October 2021

Title: The Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO): Regional Ocean Planning in the Mid-Atlantic Region
Presenter(s): Avalon Bristow, Program Director at MARCO; Mike Snyder, Ocean and Great Lakes Program Manager at the New York State Department of State; Karl Vilacoba, Urban Coast Institute's Communications Director and communications lead/project manager for the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal
Date & Time: 13 October 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO): Regional Ocean Planning in the Mid-Atlantic

Presenter(s): Avalon Bristow, Program Director at MARCO; Mike Snyder, Ocean and Great Lakes Program Manager at the New York State Department of State; Karl Vilacoba, Urban Coast Institute's Communications Director and communications lead/project manager for the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. Seminar Contacts: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov), NOAA Central Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO) is the Regional Ocean Partnership for the Mid-Atlantic. MARCO has been coordinating across geographies and agencies around shared ocean priorities since 2009 when it was established by the governors of the five coastal Mid-Atlantic states " VA, MD, DE, NJ, and NY. In 2018, MARCO established the Mid-Atlantic Committee on the Ocean (MACO) to foster collaboration among states, federal agencies, the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC), and federally recognized tribes, and to engage stakeholders. We will provide an update about ocean planning activities in the Mid-Atlantic, with a special focus on the region's five topic-specific working groups and the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal.
Keywords: Mid-Atlantic Regional Ocean Planning

Bio(s): Avalon Bristow is Program Director at MARCO, where she works closely with the Board to develop and implement actions that advance MARCO's priorities. She is staff support to MARCO's collaborative work groups, is Co-Coordinator of the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Acidification Network in partnership with MARACOOS, and is Coordinator for the Regional Wildlife Science Entity in partnership with the Northeast Regional Ocean Council. Prior to joining MARCO, Avalon worked as a Program Manager for National Wildlife Federation's Mid-Atlantic office, where she coordinated their coastal resilience and conservation education programs.Mike Snyder is the Ocean and Great Lakes Program Manager at the New York State Department of State. He is currently a MARCO Management Board member and the Steering Committee Chair for the Mid-Atlantic Committee on the Ocean (MACO). Since joining the Department in 2008, Mike has been actively involved in advancing New York's Ocean and Great Lakes policy agenda, including contributing to regulatory reviews of energy projects in the Offshore Atlantic, helping to create the Five-State Mid Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO), and coordinating State agency participation in the BOEM-New York Offshore Renewable Energy Task Force.Karl Vilacoba is the Urban Coast Institute's Communications Director and the communications lead/project manager for the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal. Prior to joining the UCI, Karl worked for the North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority, where he oversaw a variety of public outreach efforts and served as managing editor of InTransition, a national transportation magazine published in partnership with the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Karl previously spent a decade as a news reporter and editor for newspapers in the Jersey Shore area and at USA Today's Manhattan Bureau. A lifelong Shore resident, Karl also served for several years as a member of the Lake Como Unified Planning & Zoning Board and the borough's Environmental Commission.

Recordings: Recordings will be shared 24 hours after the event on the NOAA Central Library YouTube channel.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: A Kriging-Based Quantitative Precipitation Estimate for the Alaska Region With Confidence Bounds
Presenter(s): Brett Hoover, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Date & Time: 13 October 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series


Title: A Kriging-Based Quantitative Precipitation Estimate for the Alaska Region With Confidence Bounds

Presenter(s): Brett Hoover, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team. The Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium (VAWS) is a collaboration between ACCAP, the Geographic Information Network of Alaska, and the NOAA National Weather Service. We present cutting-edge technologies in satellite remote sensing, forecasting, and modeling to a statewide audience through this webinar series.

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract: In collaboration with NWS Alaska and the Alaska-Pacific River Forecast Center, we have developed a quantitative precipitation estimate (QPE) for 6-hour accumulated precipitation over the Alaska region by merging rain gauge data with high-resolution numerical weather prediction forecast data. Merging is achieved through kriging, a geostatistical interpolation technique that interpolates corrections at rain gauge sites to the QPE grid as well as an estimate of interpolation error. This error estimate is then refined by cross-validation to provide 5% and 95% confidence bounds on the QPE, providing uncertainty information as a potential range of QPE values at each grid point. The resulting QPE product can be utilized for probabilistic or ensemble-based forecasting products of precipitation hazards including fire-weather risk and hydrological model forecasts of flooding.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: An Internally Consistent Data Product for Discrete Inorganic Carbon, Oxygen, and Nutrients on the North American Ocean Margins
Presenter(s): Liqing Jiang, Associate Research Scientist, University of Maryland
Date & Time: 13 October 2021
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: An Internally Consistent Data Product for Discrete Inorganic Carbon, Oxygen, and Nutrients on the North American Ocean MarginsThis webinar is part of the Cooperative Institute for Satellite Earth System Studies Science Seminar Series.

Presenter(s): Dr. Liqing Jiang, Associate Research Scientist, University of Maryland, College Park.


Sponsor(s): Cooperative Institute for Satellite Earth System Studies

Seminar Contact(s): Douglas Rao (douglas.rao@noaa.gov) and Tom Maycock (tmaycock@ncics.org).

Accessibility: Live captioning is provided in the WebEx meeting.


Abstract: Internally-consistent, quality-controlled data products play a very important role in promoting regional to global research efforts to understand societal vulnerabilities to ocean acidification (OA). However, there are currently no such data products for the coastal ocean where most of the OA-susceptible commercial and recreational fisheries and aquaculture industries are located. In this collaborative effort, we compiled, quality controlled (QC), and synthesized two decades of discrete measurements of inorganic carbon system parameters, oxygen, and nutrient chemistry data from the North American continental shelves, to generate a data product called the Coastal Ocean Data Analysis Product for North America (CODAP-NA). New applications for consistency checks and outlier detections were used to QC the data. This version (v2021) of the CODAP-NA comprises 3,391 oceanographic profiles from 61 research cruises covering all continental shelves of North America, from Alaska to Mexico in the west and from Canada to the Caribbean in the east. Data for 14 variables (temperature; salinity; dissolved oxygen content; dissolved inorganic carbon content; total alkalinity; pH on the Total Scale; carbonate ion content; fugacity of carbon dioxide; and substance contents of silicate, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, nitrate plus nitrite, and ammonium) have been subjected to extensive QC. CODAP-NA is available as a merged data product (Excel, CSV, MATLAB, and NetCDF, doi:10.25921/531n-c230) The original cruise data have also been updated with data providers' consent and summarized in a table with links to NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) archives (https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/access/ocean-acidification-data-stewardship-oads/synthesis/NAcruises.html).

Bio(s): Dr. Liqing Jiang is a chemical oceanographer specializing in the study of inorganic carbon cycling and ocean acidification in coastal and global oceans. He received his Ph.D. in Oceanography from the University of Georgia in 2009 and did his postdoctoral research at Yale University. Dr. Jiang has been working at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) since 2011. He is currently the lead PI of UMD's Ocean Carbon and Acidification Data System (OCADS) project, which is partially funded by NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program (OAP). In addition to data management, he has been leading the North American coastal synthesis project. Dr. Jiang is the lead author for two major global studies about the distribution of pH and calcium carbonate mineral saturation states, two of the main indices for ocean acidification. (Website: http://essic.umd.edu/joom2/index.php/faculty-and-staff?layout=user&user_id=671)

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recordings and slides will be shared after the webinar with all who attended.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

12 October 2021

Title: Urban Heat Island Community of Practice Webinar Series, Session 6: Investigate Options 4 - Community Engagement, Outreach, Education
Presenter(s): Vivek Shandas, Professor and Owner of CAPA, CAPA Strategies; Marc Coudert, Environmental Program Manager, City of Austin Office of Sustainability; Oliver Kroner, Sustainability Manager, City of Cincinnati; and Lara Whitley-Binder, Climate Preparedness Program Manager, King County
Date & Time: 12 October 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Investigate Options 4 - Community Engagement, Outreach, Education
Part of NOAA's National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS) Urban Heat Island Community of Practice Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Vivek Shandas (Moderator), Professor and Owner of CAPA, CAPA Strategies

Marc Coudert, Environmental Program Manager, City of Austin Office of Sustainability

Oliver Kroner, Sustainability Manager, City of Cincinnati

Lara Whitley-Binder, Climate Preparedness Program Manager, King County

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Climate Program Office, National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS)Seminar Contacts: Noura Randle, noura.randle@noaa.gov

Abstract: Essential to our ability to advance heat mitigation actions is effective engagement of communities, institutions, politicians, and the press. Such inter-sectoral networks offer a means for socializing the concept of urban heat specifically, and also advancing a collaborative governance model for climate adaptation more generally. Though what are promising and effective practices for developing collaborative networks in urban heat planning? How might municipal agencies partner with community-based organizations, universities, and other regional institutions to increase the likelihood of heat mitigation planning? Join us for an insightful discussion with three municipal managers who are engaging in collaborative approaches to urban heat planning, and identify ways that may be helpful for your climate outreach efforts.

Bio(s): Learn more about the speakers

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be shared after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Evaluation of the role of inversion polymorphisms in the evolution of sympatric intraspecific diversity: a theoretical and empirical study
Presenter(s): Sara Schaal, PhD Candidate, Northeastern University
Date & Time: 12 October 2021
2:30 pm - 4:15 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Evaluation of the role of inversion polymorphisms in the evolution of sympatric intraspecific diversity: a theoretical and empirical study,
Part of the NOAA 'Omics Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Sara Schaal, PhD Candidate, Northeastern University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and NOAA National Ocean Service Science Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Katharine.Egan@noaa.gov, NOAA/OAR Oceans Portfolio 'Omics Coordinator and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, NOAA/NOS Science Seminar coordinator.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: Understanding why intraspecific diversity arises and how populations adapt to spatial variation in environmental conditions continues to be a major focus of evolutionary biology. Recently, inversion polymorphisms have become an active area of research focused on understanding how sympatric local adaptation occurs especially when adaptation occurs at microgeographic scales (i.e., below the scale of gene flow). However, we are still lacking a comprehensive understanding of the conditions needed for an inversion to aid in adaptation and how well we can detect them empirically. To address these gaps, we analyzed empirical whole-genome-sequencing data and morphometric data of ecotypes of a highly-mobile marine fish, Atlantic cod, from the US Gulf of Maine (GOM) and Iceland and compared results to theoretical expectations for the role of inversions in adaptation with forward-time simulations. By using simulations that both incorporate flexible inversion characteristics and combine quantitative and population genetic mathematical frameworks, our simulation set unites these two fields and provides a unique, more realistic perspective on the way inversion polymorphisms influence genome architecture and local adaptation. Empirically, we show GOM cod are more closely related to coastal Iceland cod and our sampling lacks evidence for a true migratory cod ecotype in the GOM. We show that in Iceland four major inversion polymorphisms underlie adaptation within our two sampled populations within Iceland. Theoretically, we show that inversions facilitate adaptation under high gene flow within a narrow range of conditions: 1) when a trait is polygenic (i.e., high mutation rate and small mutation effect sizes on the trait) and 2) when the evolving trait was under strong selection. By testing a wide range of parameters and comparing with empirical data, our results give us a more robust understanding of the genomic architecture of local adaptation and the specific conditions needed for inversions to play a role in adaptation under gene flow.

Bio(s): Sara Schaal's dissertation research focuses on the genomics of ecotype evolution, with a focus on the economically and ecologically important species Atlantic cod. Broadly, her research interest is in applying molecular techniques and computer simulations to understand the underlying genomic architecture of within-species adaptation. Sara will be joining Dr. Ingrid Spies in Seattle to start a postdoctoral fellowship for NOAA this coming spring where she will be co-advised by Dr. Spies and Dr. Wes Larson at NOAA in Alaska. Once there, she will be helping to create a GT-seq panel for Pacific cod and evaluate population structure in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea using both genomics and otolith microchemistry. Slides / Recording: Slides & recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: NOAA Assistant Administrators Look at the Year Ahead 2022; First Annual Panel Discussion
Presenter(s): Panel of NOAA Assistant Administrators: Mr. Craig McLean, OAR; Dr. Louis Uccellini, NWS; RDML Nancy Hann, OMAO; Ms. Nicole LeBoeuf, NOS; Dr. Steve Volz, NESDIS; Ms Janet Coit, NMFS; Moderator: Ms Louisa Koch, NOAA Education Director
Date & Time: 12 October 2021
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Adobe Connect Webinar and Google Live Stream
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Assistant Administrators Look at the Year Ahead 2022: First Annual NOAA Environmental Leadership Panel Discussion
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series. These webinars are open to the public, in or outside of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Presenter(s): Panel of NOAA Assistant Administrators (AA): Mr. Craig McLean, OAR; Dr. Louis Uccellini, NWS; RDML Nancy Hann, OMAO; Ms. Nicole LeBoeuf, NOS; Dr. Steve Volz, NESDIS;
Ms Janet Coit, NMFS. Moderator: Ms. Louisa Koch (NOAA Education Director)

Sponsor(s): This event is part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar (NELS) Series with sponsorship from the NOAA Science Council. The NOAA-wide NELS provides examples of NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. The NELS are presented as part of the NOAA Science Seminar Series For NELS questions, contact Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov, Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov, or lindsey.kraatz@noaa.gov. Also contributing to this webinar are Mike Shelby, Rob Levy, Fabio Buffa (FBuffa@emergent360.com), and Shannan Lewinski.

Abstract: This 90-min panel is an opportunity for the NOAA Assistant Administrators (AA) leadership to come together to share, to inform, and to engage with the NOAA staff and the public. This year's panel framing questions: 1. All AA are invited to provide brief introductions to their NOAA line offices and selected highlights for work priorities in the year ahead 2022
2. How is NOAA collaboration relevant to NOAA staff across the Nation? And the American people?
3. What are the most impactful future mission challenges best served by crossline NOAA collaboration?Note: There will not be time for addressing questions from the audience the day of the event.
Recording: To access the video visit the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series under the tab for Past Presentations or directly here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/c.php?g=978979&p=7105239&t=85575 Notice: Please note that the online service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Our Changing Precipitation: Peer Examples: Evaluating Changing Precipitation Trends for Managing Water Infrastructure
Presenter(s): Maureen Hodgins, The Water Research Foundation; Jim Angel, CEO, Illinois State Water Survey; John Bolduc, Cambridge, MA; Indrani Ghosh, Weston & Sampson; Peter Nimmrichter, Wood PLC; James Stitt, Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority; Curt Baronowski, US Environmental Protection Agency; Debra Knopman, RAND Corporation and Mid-Atlantic Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessment MARISA
Date & Time: 12 October 2021
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Our Changing Precipitation: Peer Examples: Evaluating Changing Precipitation Trends for Managing Water Infrastructure
Part of the NOAA and Water Research Foundation webinar series "Our Changing Precipitation: A Conversation on the Science of Precipitation and Planning for the Future"

Presenter(s):
Maureen Hodgins, The Water Research FoundationJim Angel, CEO, Illinois State Water Survey, John Bolduc, Cambridge, MA
Indrani Ghosh, Weston & SampsonPeter Nimmrichter, Wood PLCJames Stitt, Pittsburgh Water and Sewer AuthorityCurt Baronowski, US Environmental Protection AgencyDebra Knopman, RAND Corporation and Mid-Atlantic Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessment (MARISA)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Climate Program Office (CPO), NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), and the Water Research Foundation (WRF) Seminar Contacts: Nancy Beller-Simms, nancy.beller-simms@noaa.gov (NOAA CPO); Amanda Speciale, amanda.speciale@noaa.gov (NOAA CPO); Maureen Hodgins, mhodgins@waterrf.org (WRF); Karen Metchis, karen.metchis@gmail.com (weADAPT); and Ellen Mecray, ellen.l.mecray@noaa.gov (NCEI)

Accessibility: TBD


Abstract: This five-session webinar series hosted by NOAA and the Water Research Foundation will contribute to the conversation on the science of precipitation and planning for the future for local planners. The webinars will convey in lay terms, and advance the conversation about, our current ability to project precipitation at temporal and spatial scales relevant for local water infrastructure decision making. They will also discuss some practical ways to take action to build resilience to climate change. This session will provide examples of how some communities are moving forward, using future precipitation considerations for local decision making

Bio(s): Learn more about the speakers

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available online after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Grand challenge for habitat science: Synthesis of fishing effects, stage-structured dynamics and movement (with a few toy demos)
Presenter(s): James Thorson, Research Marine Biologist, NOAA NMFS AFSC HEPR
Date & Time: 12 October 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Grand challenge for habitat science: Synthesis of fishing effects, stage-structured dynamics and movement (with a few toy demos)

Presenter(s): James Thorson, Research Marine Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/AFSC

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Abstract: The AFSC conducts habitat assessments by tracking depletion and recovery of benthic infauna/epifaunain occupied habitat. I propose a Grand Habitat Challenge (GHC) to improve these assessments by combining habitat and stock assessment tools. Two real-world examples will address components of the GHC including how to (1) estimate fine-scale movement from tags and surveys, and (2) estimate diet using a simple generalized linear model (GLM).


Bio(s): James Thorson leads the Habitat and Ecological Processes Research Program at AFSC, which involves envisioning future research and partnerships regarding Essential Fish Habitat and Loss of Sea Ice. He hopes to encourage further synthesis of direct and impacts of fishing on population status and productivity. He also collaborates with researchers in all AFSC divisions to integrate monitoring, process research, and modelling efforts to respond to ongoing changes in climate and resulting habitat.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Thinking About Adaptation: Exploring the Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) Framework
Presenter(s): Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Robin O'Malley, Robin O'Malley LLC; Retired USGS
Date & Time: 12 October 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Thinking About Adaptation: Exploring the Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) Framework

Presenter(s): Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Robin O'Malley, Robin O'Malley LLC; Retired USGS

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, coordinator of NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: Climate change is a complex management problem because it involves persistent change across large areas and is difficult to address locally. Conditions fueled by or worsened by climate change may favor species new to an area over those that have been longtime inhabitants. The result: ecological transformation " although system makeover that can occur when species move due to changes in their surrounding environment.Recognizing the need for coordinated action, representatives of several natural resource management agencies met in 2018 to develop a framework to address ecological transformation. The Resist-Accept-Direct framework allows managers to choose from three management responses:
  • Resist the direction of change, by working to maintain or restore function, structure or composition, based on historical or table current conditions.
  • Accept the direction of change, by allowing the change to occur without intervening.
  • Direct the change, by actively managing processes, function, structure or composition toward a new desired condition.
Managers may need to apply a portfolio of these three options across their area to better manage resources impacted by climate change. Regional portfolios, well-coordinated across multiple systems, can reduce the risk of piloting novel actions at anyone location and ensure that future habitats can maintain associated species at other locations. The RAD framework is one way to weigh the economic, ecological, and sociological costs and benefits of various management strategies that can be applied on landscapes faced with ecological transformation.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides / Recording:
Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: U.S. Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Getting a Feel for Your Community's Climate Future
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia, LuAnn Dahlman, NOAA Climate Program Office
Date & Time: 12 October 2021
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Climate Overview: Sandra Rayne | Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur/Todd Hamill | NWS Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox | University of Georgia

Spotlight: Getting a Feel for Your Community's Climate Future: LuAnn Dahlman | NOAA Climate Program Office

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NIDIS, (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

The October 12 webinar will also feature a presentation on "Getting a Feel for Your Community's Climate Future."

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

11 October 2021

Title: Siren: Using Sound and Imagery to Highlight Humpback Whale Songs and Entanglement
Presenter(s): Annie Lewandowski; Cornell University; Senior Lecturer, Department of Music & Kyle McDonald, Code Artist
Date & Time: 11 October 2021
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Siren: Using Sound and Imagery to Highlight Humpback Whale Songs and Entanglement

Presenter(s): Annie Lewandowski; Cornell University; Senior Lecturer, Department of Music & Kyle McDonald, Code Artist

Sponsor(s): NMFS and NOAA Central Library

Seminar contact: Lee Benaka (lee.benaka@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Working collaboratively, artist and coder Kyle McDonald, set designer Amy Rubin, and musician Annie Lewandowski have created a large multimedia installation focusing on the interior and exterior worlds of the humpback whale in "Siren." Lewandowski recorded humpback whale songs in 2019 with Katy Payne and the Hawaii Marine Mammal Consortium off of Hawaii's Big Island, and her collaborators have used lighting changes in color, duration, and contour to visualize the whale songs via analyses employing machine learning. "Siren" also focuses on marine entanglement through derelict fishing gear used to build the "Siren" sculpture.

Bio(s): Annie Lewandowski is a composer, performer, and senior lecturer in the Department of Music at Cornell University. Lewandowski's 2018 composition, Cetus: Life After Life, for humpback whale song and chimes, explores the evolution of Hawaiian humpback song from 1977-1981. She has collaborated with Google Creative Lab to create the broadly adopted public web tool Pattern Radio: Whale Song for teaching AI to recognize patterns in humpback whale song.

Kyle McDonald is an artist working with code who crafts interactive installations, sneaky interventions, playful websites, workshops, and toolkits for other artists working with code. McDonald works with with machine learning, computer vision, and social and surveillance tech to explore possibilities of new technologies and understand how they affect society.

Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

7 October 2021

Title: Maritime Archaeology - Exploring & Discovering Shipwrecks (Submerged NC)
Presenter(s): Shannon Ricles, Education and Outreach Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 7 October 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Maritime Archaeology - Exploring and Discovering Shipwrecks (Submerged NC Series)

Presenter(s): Shannon Ricles, Education and Outreach Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s): Monitor NMS Submerged NC webinar series. Submerged North Carolina is part of the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series.

Seminar Contact(s): Shannon.Ricles@noaa.gov

Abstract: America's greatest museum of our past as a seafaring nation lies on the bottom of our nation's ocean, seas, lakes, and rivers. That heritage is a legacy of thousands of years of settlement, exploration, immigration, harvesting the bounty of the sea, and creating coastal communities and maritime traditions. Shipwrecks offer an exciting window into the study and preservation of our past. They are a random sampling of voyages and a record of past trade and communication. It's almost as if they are frozen in time, giving a fresh perspective on history and acting as valuable classrooms. Archaeology is the study of the ancient and recent past, and maritime archaeology offers a rare glimpse into these submerged historical resources and the landscape that surrounds them. Join Shannon Ricles, Education and Outreach Coordinator for Monitor National Marine Sanctuary to dive into maritime archaeology. Explore its early beginnings, and learn about maritime archaeology as a career. Discover how technology has changed the tools used to explore shipwrecks, while you dive into the waters off North Carolina. Learn how NOAA and partners work to conserve and protect submerged historical resources and grasp the significance of a World War II battlefield located just off the North Carolina coast. Hear how maritime archaeologists and technology discovered three shipwrecks that give us greater insight into World War II's Battle of the Atlantic. Preview a free STEM curriculum guide designed to help students understand maritime archaeology. Activities in the guide explore ships through time, the people of maritime archeology, the tools they use, and shipwreck ethics and conservation. This free curriculum guide, Maritime Archaeology " Discovering and Exploring Shipwrecks is designed for grades 6-12. Although this webinar is aimed at educators, anyone interested in attending is welcomed to join us!

Bio(s): Shannon Ricles: Shannon Ricles serves as the education and outreach coordinator for Monitor National Marine Sanctuary. Shannon dedicates her time and energy to educating teachers, students, and the public about the USS Monitor and other North Carolina shipwrecks. Formerly, Shannon was the director for STARBASE-Atlantis, a U.S. Navy educational outreach STEM program. Shannon also served as the program manager and coordinating producer for NASA's educational broadcast program, the NASA SCI Files. The 60-minute Emmy award-winning STEM program focused on women in science and aired nationwide on PBS and cable access channels. Shannon wrote and coordinated production of 24 programs with accompanying educator guides and web activities. With over 30 years in education and 15 years of classroom experience as an educator at multiple grade levels, Shannon brings a wealth of knowledge and resources to educating teachers, students, and the public. For more information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.htmlSlides, Recordings and Other Materials: You can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at:
https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

To learn more about Monitor National Marine Sanctuary, visit https://monitor.noaa.gov.
To learn more about the NC Office of State Archaeology, visit https://archaeology.ncdcr.gov/

Subscribe to the One NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: A Year of Surface Energy Budget Measurement in the Ice: Advancing sea ice forecast capabilities with the 2019-2020 MOSAiC Expedition
Presenter(s): Christopher Cox, Physical Scientist, NOAA OAR/ESRL/Physical Science Lab, Boulder, CO
Date & Time: 7 October 2021
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
You may view the recording of this webinar thru adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pfq1chkaw4dg/
The webinar below occurred during the last 28 minutes of the talk.
You may view the recording of this webinar thru adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pfq1chkaw4dg/NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic Seminar Series 2021
The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee.

Title: A Year of Surface Energy Budget Measurement in the Ice: Advancing sea ice forecast capabilities with the 2019-2020 MOSAiC Expedition

Presenter(s): Christopher Cox, Physical Scientist, NOAA OAR/ESRL/Physical Science Lab, Boulder

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region and the
NOS Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, both coordinators of NOAA's Alaska and the Arctic webinar series and the NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: The Multidisciplinary Drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate (MOSAiC) froze the R/V Polarstern icebreaker in to the Central Arctic Ocean north of the Laptev Sea in October 2019. The vessel, along with research teams supported by 20 nations, followed the Transpolar Drift to the ice edge in the Greenland Sea in July 2020. The expedition then repositioned at a new ice floe near the North Pole for the freeze-up period from August through September 2020. NOAA and CIRES scientists from the NOAA Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) and collaborators contributed the core meteorological and surface energy budget measurements to MOSAiC from four on-ice flux stations, an 11-m micrometeorological tower positioned at the Central Observatory near Polarstern and three Atmospheric Surface Flux Stations (ASFS). Collectively, more than 933 days of in situ measurements were obtained that document the thermodynamic and dynamic processes modulating young (1st and 2nd year) sea ice. In conjunction with PSL's a fully-coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere forecast model, the Coupled Arctic Forecast System (CAFS), MOSAiC observations are being used to evaluate model physics pertaining to ice growth and melt. CAFS provided model guidance for decision making on-board Polarstern and its supply vessels and the expedition provided data for a Near Real-Time verification of the model. Post-expedition efforts are focused on developing process-oriented diagnostics for sea ice forecast model evaluation.

Bio(s): Chris Cox completed his PhD in Environmental Sciences at the University of Idaho in 2013 and then worked as a researcher with the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), in Boulder, Colorado, which is affiliated with NOAA's Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL). In 2019, he joined PSL as a NOAA scientist. Chris specializes in observing the surface energy budget at high latitudes and has conducted fieldwork throughout the Arctic, including Greenland, northern Canada, Alaska, and the Central Arctic Ocean.

Slides / Recording:
Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Riverwatch - Working with rural and tribal communities to predict and assess breakup flood severity
Presenter(s): Celine van Breukelen, P.E., Senior Service Hydrologist, NOAA NWS, Weather Forecast Office, Anchorage, AK
Date & Time: 7 October 2021
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
You may view the recording of this webinar thru adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pfq1chkaw4dg/
The webinar below occurred during the first 32 minutes of the talk.NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic Seminar Series 2021
The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee.

Title: Riverwatch - Working with rural and tribal communities to predict and assess breakup flood severity

Presenter(s): Celine van Breukelen, P.E., Senior Service Hydrologist, NOAA NWS, Weather Forecast Office, Anchorage, AK

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region and the
NOS Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, both coordinators of NOAA's Alaska and the Arctic webinar series and the NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: River ice breakup happens quickly in interior Alaska. Every spring, and entire winter's worth of ice growth washes downstream in a matter of hours or days. With this speed comes flood risk, as there is the potential for ice jams to form and flood neighboring communities. "Riverwatch" was created to support communities during spring breakup -- informing rural communities about their flood risk and empowering them to prepare. It is a decades-long collaboration between the National Weather Service and the State of Alaska Department of Emergency Management. Celine has been the Riverwatch hydrologist for the past 10 breakup seasons, supporting communities along the Kuskokwim River in Western Alaska.

This presentation will be about her experiences working these flood events, with a focus on how to build effective partnerships with rural and tribal communities.

Bio(s): Celine van Breukelen, P.E. is the Senior Service Hydrologist at the NWS Weather Forecast Office (WFO) in Anchorage, Alaska. Prior to this position she was a hydrologist at the Alaska-Pacific River Forecast Center. She has a Master's Degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a Bachelor's Degree in Industrial Engineering from Ohio State University. She was fortunate enough to harvest a moose this September and looks forward to skiing across Finland this coming spring. She enjoys time outside, time with friends and family, and good food.

Slides / Recording:
Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: SSMSE: A Tool for Management Strategy Evaluation Using Stock Synthesis Operating Models
Presenter(s): Dr. Nathan Vaughan, Vaughan Analytics in support of Southeast Fisheries Science Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Miami, FL; Kathryn Doering, Caelum Research Corporation in support of Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 7 October 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: SSMSE: A Tool for Management Strategy Evaluation Using Stock Synthesis Operating Models (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s): Dr. Nathan Vaughan, Vaughan Analytics in support of Southeast Fisheries Science Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Miami, FL; Kathryn Doering, Caelum Research Corporation in support of Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Kristan Blackhart and Library Seminars

Abstract: While Management Strategy Evaluation (MSE) is becoming a routine task, creating realistic operating models (OMs) for use in MSE and running MSE analyses relatively quickly is a challenge. We will describe and demonstrate SSMSE, an R package for direct use of Stock Synthesis (SS) models as OMs in MSE. We will discuss the features of the package and demonstrate its capabilities using a worked example.


Bio(s): Nathan is a research scientist working in collaboration with SEFSC. His research focuses on improving fisheries management success through the development of more accurate forecasting approaches and associated software tools. Kathryn is a scientific programmer with Caelum working in support of NWFSC. She is involved in maintaining Stock Synthesis, a generalized modeling framework for stock assessment, and Stock Synthesis' associated R packages. Her interests include developing software tools to improve the process of conducting stock assessments.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Search for the smoking gun: Identifying and addressing the causes of post-release morbidity and mortality of hatchery-reared Snake River sockeye salmon smolts
Presenter(s): Jesse Trushenski, PhD, Chief Science Officer, Riverence Holdings LLC
Date & Time: 7 October 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Search for the smoking gun: Identifying and addressing the causes of post-release morbidity and mortality of hatchery-reared Snake River sockeye salmon smolts

Presenter(s): Jesse Trushenski, PhD, Chief Science Officer, Riverence Holdings LLC

Sponsor(s): NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam series

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Abstract: As part of the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Oncorhynchus nerka recovery effort, a dedicated smolt rearing facility was constructed in 2013 near Springfield, Idaho. In-hatchery performance and survival were typical for the species, but unexpectedly high mortality rates were observed in the first cohorts of Springfield-reared smolts upon release into Redfish Lake Creek (RFLC) and during out-migration. In response, a series of iterative experiments was conducted to identify the cause of the morbidity and mortality observed and to test a range of strategies to mitigate effects on post release survival. In the search for possible contributing factors, a difference in water chemistry was noted: whereas Springfield Hatchery's water source is hard and has high calcium concentrations, water at the RFLC release site is soft and has very low calcium concentrations. In both manipulative experiments and field evaluations, we demonstrated that juvenile Snake River Sockeye Salmon are profoundly affected by instantaneous transitions from high- to low-hardness water. Furthermore, we established a causal link between differences in water chemistry, the associated physiological stress, and morbidity/mortality observed during smolt releases and subsequent out-migration. A variety of mitigation strategies, including water mixing and water softening, was tested, but stepwise acclimation from high- to medium-hardness water and then from medium- to low-hardness water proved to be the most biologically and logistically effective means of addressing the identified water chemistry differences. Estimates of post release survival to Lower Granite Dam (~430 river kilometers downstream) indicated significantly higher survival for acclimated groups (68.7"75.5%) compared to smolts directly released into RFLC (18.1%). Although Snake River Sockeye Salmon smolt survival rates will undoubtedly fluctuate annually with environmental conditions, it is clear that the elevated morbidity and mortality observed in previous years can be addressed through proper acclimation of smolts prior to release. This presentation will tell the story of the search for the smoking gun' and the value of physiological problem-solving in fisheries science.

Bio(s): Jesse Trushenski is a fisheries scientist with specific interests in conservation and commercial aquaculture. She is the Chief Science Officer and Vice President for Animal Welfare for Riverence, the largest producer of farmed Rainbow Trout and Steelhead in the Americas with operations based in Washington and Idaho. Riverence also produces premium Rainbow Trout genetics and is the only commercial supplier of Atlantic Salmon and Coho Salmon eggs located in the USA. Jesse manages Riverence's R&D portfolio and provides executive-level science leadership across the company's operations. In short, she is responsible for helping Riverence find better ways to put fish on the table"to produce a better fish, to raise it sustainably and ethically, and to put wholesome seafood within everyone's reach. Jesse also leads North American R&D initiatives for STIM, a Norwegian company providing fish health products, veterinary and environmental services to the Atlantic Salmon aquaculture industry worldwide. Whether it's fish nutrition, physiology, or health, Jesse has always been driven by the practical applications of science, going from data to information and information to action. Before joining the private sector, Jesse was a tenured Associate Professor at Southern Illinois University and Fish Pathologist Supervisor for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Jesse has also fulfilled numerous leadership roles within the fisheries and aquaculture communities. She has chaired or served on multiple advisory panels and other committees addressing aquaculture research, regulation, and policy on a national scale. Jesse is a Past-President and Fellow of the American Fisheries Society, and was recently appointed to serve as a member of the National Fish Habitat Board.Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Monthly Weather Review at 150 Years: Its History, Impact, and Legacy
Presenter(s): David M. Schultz, Chief Editor of Monthly Weather Review, and University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom & Sean Potter, AMS History Committee, Washington, D.C.
Date & Time: 7 October 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Monthly Weather Review at 150 Years: Its History, Impact, and Legacy

Presenter(s): David M. Schultz, Chief Editor of Monthly Weather Review, and University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom & Sean Potter, AMS History Committee, Washington, D.C.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s): Library Seminars

Abstract: Monthly Weather Review, the oldest continuously published meteorological journal in the world, publishes its 150th volume in 2022. In January 1873, the U.S. War Department's Army Signal Service began producing a monthly report summarizing weather across the United States. In 1891, Monthly Weather Review was transferred from the military to the newly established Weather Bureau. Over time and sometimes erratically, it grew into a scientific journal. In 1974, Monthly Weather Review was transferred to the American Meteorological Society, who continues to publish it to this day (although a 2003 proposal might have ended it). This review discusses some of its history and impact, as well as giving the audience an opportunity to test their knowledge with a quiz.


Bio(s): Prof David Schultz is the Monthly Weather Review Chief Editor. Born in Pittsburgh, with degrees from MIT, University of Washington, and SUNY Albany, he has been at the University of Manchester since 2009. He wrote Eloquent Science: A Practical Guide to Becoming a Better Writer, Speaker, and Atmospheric Scientist. Sean Potter is a meteorologist and weather historian whose career includes work for ABC News, Weatherwise, and NWS. He holds AMS certifications in both consulting and broadcast meteorology and is the author of Too Near for Dreams: The Story of Cleveland Abbe, America's First Weather Forecaster.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Radar Down, Severe Risk Up
Presenter(s): Patrick Ayd, Science and Operations Officer from the NWS WFO in Duluth, MN, and Joe Moore, Warning Coordination Meteorologist from the NWS WFO in Duluth, MN
Date & Time: 7 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Radar Down, Severe Risk Up

Presenter(s): Patrick Ayd, Science and Operations Officer from the NWS WFO in Duluth, MN, and Joe Moore, Warning Coordination Meteorologist from the NWS WFO in Duluth, MN

Sponsor(s): NOAA/NESDIS GOES-R Program Office, Satellite Book Club (SBC). Please click here if you would like to subscribe to the Satellite Book Club

Point of Contact: Kashaud Bowman (kashaud.bowman@noaa.gov)


Abstract: A review of the 7/26/2021 severe weather event across northeast Minnesota and northwest Wisconsin while the KDLH radar was down. Satellite best practices, operational philosophies and mesoanalysis strategies will be presented.

Bio(s): Patrick has been the SOO at NWS Duluth, MN, since January 2020. Previously, he worked for nearly 12 years at NWS Bismarck, ND, and was a SCEP at NWS Grand Forks, ND. Patrick has developed multiple reference guides and given several presentations at workshops, conferences and training webinars on GOES-16/17 topics.Joe Moore is the Warning Coordination Meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Duluth, MN. Joe has interests in data visualization, GIS, and leveraging emerging technology in NWS forecast and warning operations. Joe has been with the National Weather Service since 2011, previously working at Meteorological Development Lab in Silver Spring, MD and at WFO Goodland, KS before coming to Duluth in 2014.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: 2020 YouTube Session Recordings can be found here. 2021 YouTube Session Recordings can be found here. Recordings posted to VLab can be found here.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: National Tidal Datum Epoch Update: New Tidal Datums Are Coming
Presenter(s): Michael Michalski, Oceanographer and Datums team lead, NOAA National Ocean Service Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services
Date & Time: 7 October 2021
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Webinar, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: National Tidal Datum Epoch
Part of the NOAA Gulf of Mexico Forum Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Michael Michalski, Oceanographer and Datums Team Lead, National Ocean Service (NOS) Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO- OPS)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaboration Team, a part of NOAA's Regional Collaboration NetworkSeminar Contacts: Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov (NOAA Fisheries and Regional Collaboration Network)

Abstract: Vertical datums provide references for determining elevations. Over the next several years, NOAA will be updating the National Tidal Datum Epoch (NTDE). Established by the National Ocean Service and maintained by the Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, NTDE is the reference period used to collect and calculate tidal datum values such as Mean Sea Level and Mean Lower Low Water. Tidal datums and their data are used to inform products and services necessary for safe navigation, coastal hazard mitigation, ecosystem research, and marine boundary determination. The reference period, or Epoch, needs to be updated regularly to account for long-term effects of land movement, sea level rise, and changes in tidal constituents. NOAA currently utilizes the 1983-2001 National Tidal Datum Epoch. It will be replaced by the fifth iteration of the NTDE. Measurements for the update will be based on water level data spanning the years 2002-2020. The currently planned release date for the new NTDE is 2025.


Bio(s): Michael Michalski is the Datums team lead for the Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services. Michael is presently involved in tidal datum computation and multiple studies of tidal and geodetic relationships throughout the 50 United States and its territories. He has also been involved with the development and review of NOAA's Vertical Datum Transformation software tool.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Please contact Kristen.R.Laursen@noaa.gov for the recording and/or PDF.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

6 October 2021

Title: A Coalition Around Heat Research in Charleston, South Carolina
Presenter(s): Dr. Janice Barnes, Climate Adaptation Partners; Dr. Kirstin Dow, Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina; Dr. Jennifer Runkle, NC State's North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies - NCICS & the Cooperative Institute for Satellite Earth System Studies - CISESS; Dr. Maggie Sugg, Appalachian State University; and Dr. Charles Konrad, Southeast Regional Climate Center - SERCC
Date & Time: 6 October 2021
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A Coalition Around Heat Research in Charleston, South Carolina / Green Infrastructure, Climate, and Cities Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Janice Barnes, Climate Adaptation Partners; Dr. Kirstin Dow, Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina; Dr. Jennifer Runkle, NC State's North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies (NCICS) & the Cooperative Institute for Satellite Earth System Studies (CISESS); Dr. Maggie Sugg, Appalachian State University; Dr. Charles Konrad, Southeast Regional Climate Center (SERCC)

Sponsor(s): Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar Contact(s): Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov) or Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu)

Accessibility: Contact Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu) if needed.


Abstract: In 2020, the Charleston Medical District (CMD), Climate Adaptation Partners (CAP), and the Carolinas Integrated Sciences Assessment (CISA) team began collaborating on an integrated heat research program. In a city where chronic flooding plagues neighborhoods, drawing attention to extreme heat and its health implications is a relatively new effort, and one that requires new types of collaborations in order to be effective. The City of Charleston, the CMD, The Citadel, and CISA with USC, UNC, NC State and Appalachian State alongside CAP and many local partners developed a new approach to raising awareness to extreme heat at a timely moment when over $2B of planned projects were proceeding without heat considerations. Striking in its absence, particularly given the expected tripling of extreme heat days in the area, the situation warranted further attention, and required a significant lift from many parties. With a growing network of collaborators, the team sampled data to draw attention to the problem, worked with local physicians to contextualize patient impacts and hosted a series of events in which the issues, the approach and the research program coalesced. Early results include alteration of the City Comprehensive Plan to be inclusive of Extreme Heat, integration of extreme heat in campus plans for all involved institutions, designation of Heat Awareness Month' by the Medical University of South Carolina, a significant increase in local interest in the issue, inclusive of the medical community as well as interfaith groups, tourism organizations and the technical community that previously focused only on water.This session's speakers introduce the ramp up to the collaboration, the work in developing a coalition of partners, the heat/health relationship and importance of the research, the process behind the three types of parallel research programs and their interrelations, samples of initial data and early outcomes from the combined efforts.

Bio(s): Bios on http://www.ccrun.org/seminar-abstracts/

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: All sessions are recorded and archived on the CCRUN website.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Nearshore Erosion along the Beaufort Sea Coast
Presenter(s): Mark Zimmerman, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/AFSC/ Resource Assessment & Conservation Engineering Division, mark.zimmermann@noaa.gov
Date & Time: 6 October 2021
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic Seminar Series 2021
The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee.

Title: Nearshore Erosion along the Beaufort Sea Coast

Presenter(s): Mark Zimmerman, Research Fishery Biologist with the NOAA/NMFS/AFSC/ Resource Assessment & Conservation Engineering Division, mark.zimmermann@noaa.govWhen: Wednesday, Oct 6, 3:30-4:00pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region and the NOS Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, both coordinators of NOAA's Alaska and the Arctic webinar series and the NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: Erosion rates along Alaska's Beaufort Sea coast, among the highest in the world, are negatively impacting communities, industry, military infrastructure, and wildlife habitat. Previous studies of Beaufort Sea coastal change have been limited to subaerial analyses of the shoreline. Here we describe nearshore seafloor change by comparing post-World War II (1945-53) bathymetry data to recently acquired (1985-2018) bathymetry data and relate the observed seafloor change to adjacent shoreline change near Utqiagvik, within Stefansson Sound, and immediately west of Barter Island and Kaktovik. We also investigated possible processes responsible for the depth changes we quantified.

Bio(s): Mark Zimmerman has worked in the Groundfish Assessment Program at NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center since 1991. Initially, he utilized the spatial component of Groundfish data for analyses in Geographic Information System (GIS) software. For the second half of Mark's career, he has focused on using GIS software to make accurate and detailed seafloor maps of Alaska. He works with GEBCO, the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans, contributing to new seafloor maps of the Arctic, North Pacific, and the world for the Seabed 2030 project.Slides / Recording: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Leveraging environmental DNA to monitor biological diversity in a changing Arctic
Presenter(s): Matt Galaska, PhD, Research Scientist, University of Washington, CICOES and NOAA/OAR Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Genetics and Genomics Group
Date & Time: 6 October 2021
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic Seminar Series 2021
The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee.

Title: Leveraging environmental DNA to monitor biological diversity in a changing Arctic

Presenter(s): Matt Galaska, PhD, Research Scientist, University of Washington, CICOES (pronounced See Koes) and NOAA/OAR Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Genetics and Genomics GroupWhen: Wednesday, October 6, 2021, 3:00-3:30pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region and the NOS Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, both coordinators of NOAA's Alaska and the Arctic webinar series and the NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: Alaska and the Arctic marine ecosystems are rapidly transforming due to impacts of climate change. Understanding and quantifying these rapid changes are critical to both commercial and subsistence fisheries, along with food stability of the nation. The Omics group at the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory and the Genetics Program at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center are actively collaborating on a cross line office effort to leverage environmental DNA (eDNA) samples from existing cruises and by introducing automated sampling equipment to the region to answer complimentary research goals. Please join us to learn more about our work and how eDNA can advance our understanding of these critical ecosystems.

Bio(s): Matt Galaska is a geneticist working with the Omics group at the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory. Matt's work mainly revolves around questions of biodiversity and connectivity of marine fauna using environmental DNA (eDNA), whole genome resequencing and transcriptomics. He received his PhD from Auburn University and did his postdoc at Lehigh University prior to joining the lab.

Slides / Recording:
Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Coastal Salinity Index: Expansion Across the Gulf of Mexico and Eastern Seaboard
Presenter(s): Matthew Petkewich, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center; Andrew Tweel, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources; Simeon Yurek, USGS Wetland and Aquatic Research Center; Christopher Swarzenski, USGS Lower Mississippi - Gulf Water Science Center
Date & Time: 6 October 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Matthew Petkewich, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center; Andrew Tweel, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources; Simeon Yurek, USGS Wetland and Aquatic Research Center; Christopher Swarzenski, USGS Lower Mississippi - Gulf Water Science Center

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USGS

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The Coastal Salinity Index (CSI) is a long-term monitoring tool developed in 2017 through a USGS and NIDIS partnership to help users characterize and assess fluctuating salinity conditions in coastal areas due to events such as drought and floods. The index can be used for different estuary types (for example: brackish, oligohaline, or mesohaline), for regional comparison between estuaries, and as an index of wet conditions (high freshwater inflow) in addition to drought (saline) conditions.

In 2019, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) published a website to disseminate real-time CSI results for 17 USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center salinity gages. Funding provided from the USGS Community for Data Integration in 2020 allowed the CSI team to expand this network to 103 gages located from Maine to Texas and Puerto Rico, by including additional real-time salinity gages from the USGS, Everglades National Park, and the National Estuarine Research Reserve System. This webinar will describe the motivation for and development of the CSI, the expanded CSI website, and applications of the CSI to existing field investigations.

Recordings:
Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

5 October 2021

Title: Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) in the Arctic - The Strength of Regional Partnerships
Presenter(s): Catie Tobin, 2021 Sea Grant John J. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow, and Ocean Science and Technology Partnership Fellow for NOAA's Integrated Ocean Observing System -IOOS- Office
Date & Time: 5 October 2021
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic Seminar Series 2021
The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee.

Title: Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) in the Arctic - The Strength of Regional Partnerships

Presenter(s): Catie Tobin, 2021 Sea Grant John J. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow, and the Ocean Science and Technology Partnership Fellow for NOAA's Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) Office. When: Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021, 3:30-4:00pm ET

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region and the NOS Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, both coordinators of NOAA's Alaska and the Arctic webinar series and the NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: The U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) is a national-regional partnership working to provide new tools and forecasts to improve safety, enhance the economy, and protect our environment. Integrated coastal, ocean, and Great Lakes information is available in near real time as well as retrospectively. Easier and better access to this information is improving our ability to understand and predict coastal events such as severe storms, wave heights, and sea level change. All of this supports forecasting and decision making for everything from retail to development planning to defense. A key component of the U.S. IOOS are the 11 regional associations (RAs) which guide development of and stakeholder input to regional observing activities. Regional partners collaborate with the national IOOS Office and are essential to building and supporting U.S. IOOS. They provide increased observations, distinctive knowledge, and critical technological abilities and apply these towards the development of products to meet regional and local needs. This presentation will explore the relationships IOOS has with its regions and how that works helps in advancing research in the Arctic.

Bio(s): Catie Tobin is a 2021 Sea Grant John J. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow. She is serving as the Ocean Science and Technology Partnership Fellow for the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) Office. Within her role, Catie supports data management certification for IOOS Regional Associations. Additionally, she supports IOOS' Blue Economy portfolio, positioning IOOS to best support NOAA's Blue Economy priorities, working across sectors, from regional to national levels. Concurrently, Catie is pursuing her doctorate in Environmental Science from the University of Massachusetts Boston. Her research focuses on a transdisciplinary approach to assessing the impacts of microfibers on oysters environmentally and socially.Slides / Recording: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Trophic Transfer of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in Alaskan Fish & Invertebrates
Presenter(s): Steve Kibler, Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS Harmful Algal Bloom Forecasting Branch, Beaufort Laboratory
Date & Time: 5 October 2021
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA's Alaska and the Arctic Seminar Series 2021
The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee.

Title: Trophic Transfer of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in Alaskan Fish & Invertebrates

Presenter(s): Steve Kibler, Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Forecasting Branch, Beaufort LaboratoryWhen: Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021, 3:00-3:30pm EDT

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region and the NOS Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, both coordinators of NOAA's Alaska and the Arctic webinar series and the NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: : In Alaska, paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) is caused by ingestion of seafood products containing saxitoxins, potent neurotoxins produced by the dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella. PSP is usually caused by consumption of toxin-containing bivalves (mussels, clams, etc.), but there is growing evidence that toxins can also be transferred to other biota during Alexandrium blooms, including species that do not feed directly on shellfish. Here, were port preliminary results from two concurrent projects examining the occurrence of PSP toxins in marine fish and invertebrates across south central and southwest Alaska. Samples were collected during 2014-2020 at sites in Lower Cook Inlet, Prince William Sound, the Kodiak Archipelago, the Alaska Peninsula ,the Aleutians and the Pribilof Islands. Resulting data indicate toxin concentrations in forage fishes reached the highest levels in Pacific Sand Lance (Ammodytes), Pacific Herring (Clupea) and Dolly Varden (Salvelinas), with concentrations several times the U.S. regulatory limit of 80 g STX Eq. 100 g-1 in some specimens. Toxins were also present in tissues of predatory fishes, including salmon and halibut, with maximum concentrations in organs (kidney, liver, digestive tract) and much lower toxin levels in muscle tissue and roe. Among invertebrates, the highest toxin concentrations occurred in species preying in bivalves(crabs, sea stars, predatory snails), but with appreciable levels in amphipods, urchins, tunicates and other species. The presence of these toxins in keystone forage fishes and commercially important predatory fishes illustrate trophic transfer routes to marine mammals and seabirds, and potential risks to the Alaskan seafood industry and human health.

Bio(s): Steve Kibler has been working on the ecology, toxicity and forecasting of harmful algal blooms since coming to the Beaufort Lab in 2000. He hails from western New York with undergraduate work at Long Island University-Southampton and graduate work at Old Dominion University.Slides / Recording: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Evaluation of the role of inversion polymorphisms in the evolution of sympatric intraspecific diversity: a theoretical and empirical study
Presenter(s): Sara Schaal, PhD Candidate, Northeastern University
Date & Time: 5 October 2021
2:30 pm - 4:15 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Evaluation of the role of inversion polymorphisms in the evolution of sympatric intraspecific diversity: a theoretical and empirical study,
Part of the NOAA 'Omics Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Sara Schaal, PhD Candidate, Northeastern University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and NOAA National Ocean Service Science Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Katharine.Egan@noaa.gov, NOAA/OAR Oceans Portfolio 'Omics Coordinator and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, NOAA/NOS Science Seminar coordinator.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: Understanding why intraspecific diversity arises and how populations adapt to spatial variation in environmental conditions continues to be a major focus of evolutionary biology. Recently, inversion polymorphisms have become an active area of research focused on understanding how sympatric local adaptation occurs especially when adaptation occurs at microgeographic scales (i.e., below the scale of gene flow). However, we are still lacking a comprehensive understanding of the conditions needed for an inversion to aid in adaptation and how well we can detect them empirically. To address these gaps, we analyzed empirical whole-genome-sequencing data and morphometric data of ecotypes of a highly-mobile marine fish, Atlantic cod, from the US Gulf of Maine (GOM) and Iceland and compared results to theoretical expectations for the role of inversions in adaptation with forward-time simulations. By using simulations that both incorporate flexible inversion characteristics and combine quantitative and population genetic mathematical frameworks, our simulation set unites these two fields and provides a unique, more realistic perspective on the way inversion polymorphisms influence genome architecture and local adaptation. Empirically, we show GOM cod are more closely related to coastal Iceland cod and our sampling lacks evidence for a true migratory cod ecotype in the GOM. We show that in Iceland four major inversion polymorphisms underlie adaptation within our two sampled populations within Iceland. Theoretically, we show that inversions facilitate adaptation under high gene flow within a narrow range of conditions: 1) when a trait is polygenic (i.e., high mutation rate and small mutation effect sizes on the trait) and 2) when the evolving trait was under strong selection. By testing a wide range of parameters and comparing with empirical data, our results give us a more robust understanding of the genomic architecture of local adaptation and the specific conditions needed for inversions to play a role in adaptation under gene flow.

Bio(s): Sara Schaal's dissertation research focuses on the genomics of ecotype evolution, with a focus on the economically and ecologically important species Atlantic cod. Broadly, her research interest is in applying molecular techniques and computer simulations to understand the underlying genomic architecture of within-species adaptation. Sara will be joining Dr. Ingrid Spies in Seattle to start a postdoctoral fellowship for NOAA this coming spring where she will be co-advised by Dr. Spies and Dr. Wes Larson at NOAA in Alaska. Once there, she will be helping to create a GT-seq panel for Pacific cod and evaluate population structure in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea using both genomics and otolith microchemistry. Slides / Recording: Slides & recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Co-producing Understanding of Drivers & Consequences of Environmental Arctic Change
Presenter(s): Brendan Kelly, SEARCH/University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 5 October 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series


Title: Co-producing Understanding of Drivers & Consequences of Environmental Arctic Change

Presenter(s): Brendan Kelly, Director, Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract: The rapid pace of environmental change in the Arctic demands timely and well-informed policy responses. The Study of Environmental Arctic Change is beginning a new phase in which we are facilitating co-produced syntheses across disciplines and knowledge systems. We will make those syntheses available in formats tailored to diverse decision makers. In this webinar, we will introduce our team leaders, describe our approach, and seek participation of Indigenous, scientific, and decision-making experts.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Title: Our Changing Precipitation: What’s on the Horizon for Science and Application of Climate Change Information for Water Infrastructure Managers?
Presenter(s): Maureen Hodgins, The Water Research Foundation; Peter Grevatt, CEO, The Water Research Foundation; Wayne Higgins, NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research/Climate Program Office; Claudio Ternieden, Water Environment Federation; Zach Schafer, US EPA Office of Water; Mark Glaudemans, NOAA, National Weather Service Office of Water Prediction, Geo-Intelligence Division; Daniel Sharar-Salgado, US Department of Transportation, Federal Highways Administration
Date & Time: 5 October 2021
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Our Changing Precipitation: What's on the Horizon for Science and Application of Climate Change Information for Water Infrastructure Managers?
Part of the NOAA and Water Research Foundation webinar series "Our Changing Precipitation: A Conversation on the Science of Precipitation and Planning for the Future"

Presenter(s):
Maureen Hodgins, The Water Research Foundation
Peter Grevatt, CEO, The Water Research Foundation
Wayne Higgins, NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research/Climate Program Office
Claudio Ternieden, Water Environment Federation
Zach Schafer, US EPA Office of Water
Mark Glaudemans, NOAA, National Weather Service Office of Water Prediction, Geo-Intelligence Division
Daniel Sharar-Salgado, US Department of Transportation, Federal Highways Administration

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Climate Program Office (CPO), NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), and the Water Research Foundation (WRF) Seminar Contacts: Nancy Beller-Simms, nancy.beller-simms@noaa.gov (NOAA CPO); Amanda Speciale, amanda.speciale@noaa.gov (NOAA CPO); Maureen Hodgins, mhodgins@waterrf.org (WRF); Karen Metchis, karen.metchis@gmail.com (weADAPT); and Ellen Mecray, ellen.l.mecray@noaa.gov (NCEI)

Accessibility: TBD


Abstract: This five-session webinar series hosted by NOAA and the Water Research Foundation will contribute to the conversation on the science of precipitation and planning for the future for local planners. The webinars will convey in lay terms, and advance the conversation about, our current ability to project precipitation at temporal and spatial scales relevant for local water infrastructure decision making. They will also discuss some practical ways to take action to build resilience to climate change. This session will host an interdisciplinary conversation among thought leaders to provide participants an idea of what is on the horizon for helping communities build resilience of water management infrastructure and how we can move forward as a nation.

Bio(s): Learn more about the speakers

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available online after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Stress physiology in the smalltooth sawfish: Effects of ontogeny, capture method, and habitat loss
Presenter(s): Bianca Prohaska, AFSC
Date & Time: 5 October 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Stress physiology in the smalltoothsawfish: Effectsofontogeny, capture method, and habitat loss

Presenter(s): Bianca Prohaska

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Ground fish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Abstract: What does a gigantic fish with a hedge trimmer for a snout have to be stressed about? Come learn about the physiology of smalltooth sawfish, Pristis pectinata, one of the world's most endangered species of marine fishes. Specifically, we investigated how stress in this species changes over ontogeny, with varying capture methods, and how habitat loss may be affecting juveniles.


Bio(s): Dr. Bianca Prohaska is currently a Research FishBiologist at NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA, where sheworks on Alaskan groundfish surveys. In 2019 Bianca served as a Sea GrantKnauss Marine Policy Fellow in NOAA's OAR International Activities office. Shereceived a BS in biology/marine biology from Florida Institute of Technology, aMS in marine science from the University of New England, and a Ph.D. in ecologyand evolution from Florida State University where she studied physiologicalecology of sharks and rays. Bianca's general research interests center aroundusing physiological ecology to enhance fisheries management andconservation.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Thinking About Adaptation: Exploring the Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) Framework
Presenter(s): Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Robin O'Malley, Robin O'Malley LLC; Retired USGS
Date & Time: 5 October 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Thinking About Adaptation: Exploring the Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) Framework

Presenter(s): Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Robin O'Malley, Robin O'Malley LLC; Retired USGS

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, coordinator of NOAA science seminar series.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided


Abstract: Climate change is a complex management problem because it involves persistent change across large areas and is difficult to address locally. Conditions fueled by or worsened by climate change may favor species new to an area over those that have been longtime inhabitants. The result: ecological transformation " although system makeover that can occur when species move due to changes in their surrounding environment.Recognizing the need for coordinated action, representatives of several natural resource management agencies met in 2018 to develop a framework to address ecological transformation. The Resist-Accept-Direct framework allows managers to choose from three management responses:
  • Resist the direction of change, by working to maintain or restore function, structure or composition, based on historical or table current conditions.
  • Accept the direction of change, by allowing the change to occur without intervening.
  • Direct the change, by actively managing processes, function, structure or composition toward a new desired condition.
Managers may need to apply a portfolio of these three options across their area to better manage resources impacted by climate change. Regional portfolios, well-coordinated across multiple systems, can reduce the risk of piloting novel actions at anyone location and ensure that future habitats can maintain associated species at other locations. The RAD framework is one way to weigh the economic, ecological, and sociological costs and benefits of various management strategies that can be applied on landscapes faced with ecological transformation.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides / Recording:
Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Ocean Exploration Through the Eyes of a Robot!
Presenter(s): Amy Kukulya, WHOI
Date & Time: 5 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series


Title: Ocean Exploration Through the Eyes of a Robot!


Presenter(s): Amy Kukulya, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute


Sponsor(s): NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science CenterSeminar Contacts: Christin Khan christin.khan@noaa.gov

Abstract: TBD


Bio(s): Amy Kukulya is a Research Engineer and Principal Investigator of the Scibotics Lab at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Amy develops and operates underwater robots such as the famous SharkCam'. She's been on nearly 100 expeditions from the Arctic to Antarctica studying everything from krill to basking sharks. Her true passion lies in developing new ways to experience and understand the ocean with smart robots.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

4 October 2021

Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, October 2021: Neural Networks for Madden-Julian Oscillation Prediction, and The CPC Global Tropics Hazards Outlook: Background and Products
Presenter(s): Dr. Zane Martin, Colorado State University, and Dr. Jon Gottschalck, NOAA/NWS/CPC
Date & Time: 4 October 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, October 2021: Neural Networks for Madden-Julian Oscillation Prediction, and The CPC Global Tropics Hazards Outlook: Background and Products

Presenter(s): Dr. Zane Martin, Colorado State University, and Dr. Jon Gottschalck, NOAA/NWS/CPC

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Weather Program Office S2S Program and NOAA NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration Modeling Program Division

Seminar Contact(s): Karen Keith, karen.keith@noaa.gov

Abstract: This monthly webinar series was created to share ongoing work within NWS and OAR at the Weeks 3-4 and S2S timescales. We would like to foster a relaxed, informal dialogue among forecasters, modelers and researchers. This month, Dr. Zane Martin will speak about "Using Simple, Explainable Neural Networks to Predict the Madden-Julian Oscillation." Dr. Jon Gottschalck will speak about "The CPC Global Tropics Hazards Outlook: Background, Current Operational Products and Work to Transition to a Probabilistic Format Targeting the Week 2-3 Period."

Recordings: Available on the Weeks 3-4/S2S Webinar Series website: https://vlab.ncep.noaa.gov/web/weeks-3-4-s2s-webinar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

30 September 2021

Title: Urban Heat Island Community of Practice Webinar Series, Session 5: Investigate Options 3 - Green Cooling Infrastructure
Presenter(s): Eric Greenfield, Acting Urban and Community Forestry Program Coordinator Northeast States, USDA Forest Service State and Private Forestry Eastern Region; Erica Smith Fichman, Community Forestry Manager, City of Philadelphia Parks and Recreation; Cheyenne Flores, Community Climate Resilience Specialist, City of Philadelphia - Office of Sustainability; Maura Jarvis, Community Outreach Specialist, Public Affairs, City of Philadelphia Water Department; Leandro Castro, Program Coordinator, Groundwork Rhode Island; and Amelia Rose, Executive Director, Groundwork Rhode Island
Date & Time: 30 September 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Investigate Options 3 - Green Cooling Infrastructure
Part of NOAA's National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS) Urban Heat Island Community of Practice Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Eric Greenfield (Moderator), Acting Urban and Community Forestry Program Coordinator Northeast States, USDA Forest Service State and Private Forestry Eastern Region

Erica Smith Fichman, Community Forestry Manager, City of Philadelphia Parks and Recreation

Cheyenne Flores, Community Climate Resilience Specialist, City of Philadelphia - Office of Sustainability

Maura Jarvis, Community Outreach Specialist, Public Affairs, City of Philadelphia Water Department

Leandro Castro, Program Coordinator, Groundwork Rhode Island
Amelia Rose, Executive Director, Groundwork Rhode Island

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Climate Program Office, National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS)Seminar Contacts: Noura Randle, noura.randle@noaa.gov

Accessibility: TBD

Abstract: One of the most popular interventions is planting trees, and creating accessible green spaces and water features to mitigate heat, long term. This session will cover tree canopy assessment, planting and cooling strategies, combined with strengthening community cohesion and resiliency. Threaded throughout is the intersection with environmental justice, public health, crime reduction, and equitable approaches to improvements that benefit current residents.

Bio(s): Learn more about the speakers

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be shared after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Control Technologies Incubator Funding Opportunity
Presenter(s): Felix Martinez, Program Manager for Prevention, Control, and Mitigation of HABs -PCMHABS; and Jennifer Hinden, Acting Grants Teams Lead, both with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 30 September 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Control Technologies Incubator Funding Opportunity

Presenter(s): Felix Martinez, Program Manager for Prevention, Control, and Mitigation of HABs (PCMHABS); and Jennifer Hinden, Acting Grants Teams Lead, both with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS)

Sponsor(s): NOAA National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series and NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS)Seminar Contacts: Felix.Martinez@noaa.gov (NOAA NCCOS Program Manager) or Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, NOAA/NOS Science Seminar coordinator.

Abstract: During this webinar, we will present a quick overview of the NOAA Prevention, Control and Mitigation of Harmful Algal Blooms (PCMHAB) program. This overview of PCMHAB will provide context to our description of the new NOAA notice of funding opportunity (NOFO) available to institutions affiliated with Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units in which NOAA is a member partner. NOAA expects to fund through this NOFO the development and implementation of an idea incubator that will solicit and support the assessment of novel technologies that can be used to control the formation and spread of harmful algal blooms (HABs).The incubator will also be expected to create a clearinghouse of accepted methodologies and the related regulatory requirements to help resource managers addressing HABs identify and expedite the implementation of those technologies that would be most effective for the respective HABs. After the PCMHAB overview and the description of the NOFO, we will be available to answer questions from participants that may be interested in applying to this funding announcement.

Bio(s): Felix Martinez is a Program Manager with the NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) Competitive Research Program (CRP). In this capacity he oversees the implementation of the PCMHAB program at CRP. Jennifer Hinden is the Acting Grants Lead at the Business Management Division of the Business Support Branch of NCCOS.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: The slides and the recording will be shared after the webinar with all who register.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) 2022 Competitions 3 & 4 Informational Webinar
Presenter(s): Caitlin Simpson, Ariela Zycherman, Sean Bath, Genie Bey; NOAA Climate Program Office
Date & Time: 30 September 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) 2022 Competitions 3 & 4 Informational Webinar

Presenter(s): Caitlin Simpson, Ariela Zycherman, Sean Bath, Genie Bey (NOAA Climate Program Office)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Climate Program Office / Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program

Seminar Contact(s): Sean Bath, Sean.Bath@noaa.gov

Accessibility: A transcript will be provided along with the recording. If there are additional requests contact Sean Bath, sean.bath@noaa.gov.


Abstract: CPO's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program will host two webinars to facilitate improved understanding of the RISA Program and the 2022 Funding Opportunity. The webinars will review the basics of the four competitions and answer live questions from attendees.Through this funding opportunity, the RISA program is expanding to new locations that will help build regional capacity to adapt to climate change. RISA's regional teams build sustained relationships between decision makers and researchers that support collaborative and equitable adaptation to climate risks.This webinar covers the basics of competitions 3 & 4 (details listed below). Program managers will again be available to answer questions from the attendees. [3] Collaborative Planning Activities in two sub-regions not fully covered by the RISA program:
  • Upper Northeast: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, western Massachusetts, Upstate New York
  • Appalachia: West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, eastern Tennessee, and mountainous areas of western North Carolina and western Virginia
[4] Research on Complex Fiscal Pathways for Climate Adaptation in Rural Areas Across the United States. This competition is in partnership with CPO's Adaptation Sciences (AdSci) Program.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:The webinar will be recorded and posted with a transcript on GoToStage. The recording links and slides will be posted on the Climate Program Office website.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Title: U.S. Eastern Region Heat Health/Convergence
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University, and Sandra Rayne, NOAA's Southeast Regional Climate Center
Date & Time: 30 September 2021
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Heat Health Convergence

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University,
Sandra Rayne, NOAA's Southeast Regional Climate Center, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s):
Ellen Mecray

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of September conditions and Sandra Rayne will show the Convergence tool and the heat health work of the SERCC.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

29 September 2021

Title: Improved Understanding of Sediment Dynamics for the Coos Estuary
Presenter(s): David Sutherland, University of Oregon, dsuth@uoregon.edu; Emily Eidam, University of North Carolina, efe@unc.edu; Jenni Schmitt, South Slough NERR, jenni.schmitt@dsl.state.or.us
Date & Time: 29 September 2021
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Improved Understanding of Sediment Dynamics for the Coos Estuary

Presenter(s): David Sutherland, University of Oregon; Emily Eidam, University of North Carolina; Jenni Schmitt, South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve

Sponsor(s): This webinar is sponsored by the NERRS Science Collaborative

Seminar Contact(s): Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)

Abstract: Designated one of Oregon's three deep draft development estuaries, the Coos estuary has many diverse users who share a need for better information about water and sediment flows through the estuary under current and future conditions. Working closely with the South Slough NERR and the Partnership for Coastal Watersheds, a local stakeholder group, researchers from the University of Oregon and the University of North Carolina helped to address some of these informational needs. The team collected new data, including the first bathymetric dataset to cover the entire Coos estuary, and developed a hydrodynamic model to better understand and predict estuarine water and sediment flows. They then worked with end users to develop data and modeling products of interest, including two perturbation experiments analyzing a proposed deepening and widening of the estuary's main navigation channel. In this webinar, members of the project team will discuss the end-user engagement approach used in their collaborative research project, present highlights from the model experiments, and share observations from an examination of historic estuary conditions prior to human impacts.

Bio(s): Please visit here for more information about the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: With our powers combined: Innovative Multi-Vehicle Conops
Presenter(s): Megan Cook, Director, Education & Outreach, Ocean Exploration Trust; Jason Fahy, Cooperative Institute Assistant Director, University of Rhode Island; Andrew Bowen, Principal Engineer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; and Casey Machado, Research Engineer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Hosted by Dr. Aurora Elmore, Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration
Date & Time: 29 September 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: With our powers combined: Innovative Multi-Vehicle Conops
Part of the OECI Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Megan Cook (Director, Education & Outreach, Ocean Exploration Trust); Jason Fahy (Ocean Exploration Cooperative Institute Assistant Director, University of Rhode Island); Andrew Bowen (Principal Engineer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); and Casey Machado (Research Engineer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution). Hosted by Dr. Aurora Elmore (Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration).

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and Ocean Exploration Cooperative Institute (OECI)

Seminar Contacts: Aurora Elmore (Aurora.Elmore@noaa.gov) and Joanne Flanders (Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov)

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Live from the E/V Nautilus, technology demonstrations and concept of operations trials at sea with the HROV Nereid Under-Ice (NUI) and ROV Argus will be presented. Dynamic production and visual effects will be featured by the University of Rhode Island's Inner Space Center.

Bio(s): Megan Cook (Director, Education & Outreach, Ocean Exploration Trust), Jason Fahy (Ocean Exploration Cooperative Institute Assistant Director), Andrew Bowen (Principal Engineer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution), Casey Machado (Research Engineer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution), and Dr. Aurora Elmore (Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recordings will be available at https://www.youtub