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NOAA Science Seminar Series
Past 2019 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

20 December 2019

Title: December 2019 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy - ACCAP, a NOAA RISA Team
Date & Time: 20 December 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) - A NOAA RISA Team and National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (rthoman@alaska.edu)

Abstract: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for January (2020!) and the remaining winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)
Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS), NOAA's Proving Ground Initiative on Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) Impact Studies and Critical Weather Applications
Presenter(s): Nazmi Chowdhury, Support Scientist/Systems Engineer, JPSS Program Science and Laura Dunlap, JPSS Algorithm Manager
Date & Time: 20 December 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20706, Conference Room S650
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Nazmi Chowdhury, Support Scientist/Systems Engineer, JPSS Program Science and Laura Dunlap, JPSS Algorithm Manager

Abstract: TheJPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction (PGRR) program supports userdemonstration by stimulating interactions between technical experts from theJPSS Program, university partners, and key user stakeholders. The PGRRprogram's primary objective is maximizing the benefits and performance of S-NPPand JPSS data, algorithms, and products for downstream operational and researchusers. The PGRR Program projects are grouped into initiatives, one of which isthe NWP Impact Studies and Critical Weather Application initiative. The mainpurpose of this initiative is to further the scientific advancement of the useof JPSS satellite data to support critical weather forecasting and numericalmodeling efforts in NOAA and beyond. Improved use of JPSS sounder data in NWPmodels will include instrument performance, improved data assimilation methods,impacts of data latency and improved error characterization. Projects in thisinitiative aim to exploit the benefits of the 50 minute separation between theSuomi NPP and NOAA-20 orbits. Studies on the impact of improved CrIS and ATMSdata assimilation in operational Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models,such as the Global Forecast System (GFS) and the High Resolution Rapid Refresh(HRRR), enable performance evaluation. This provides feedback on instrumentcapabilities, helping determine the impact of additional polar-orbiting sounderdata on NWP. This presentation introduces seven projects that are funded under"NWP Impact Studies and Critical Weather Application" initiative,their research importance, goals, rationale behind the projects and the desiredoutcomes from the research works. It will also include their research updates,primary users, key accomplishments, collaboration to bridge research operationto development of products, user engagement and future plan. The participatingproject's research area includes enhancement of direct broadcast satelliteradiance assimilation capabilities for regional and global rapid-update models,improvement of NearCasts of geostationary moisture and temperature retrievalsusing JPSS moisture and temperature, advanced EFSO-based QC methods foroperational use and agile implementation of new observing systems, ATMS/CrIScalibration, validation and assimilation improving correlated error, clouds,and the surface, improving the assimilation of CrIS radiances in operationalNWP models by using collocated high resolution VIIRS data etc.

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19 December 2019

Title: From Hiking the Trout Trails of Yosemite to Mapping Alaska’s Seafloor and Seabed 2030
Presenter(s): Mark Zimmermann, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/Alaska Fisheries Science Center. Presenting from Seattle
Date & Time: 19 December 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room 8348
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
From Hiking the Trout Trails of Yosemite to Mapping Alaska's Seafloor and Seabed 2030

MP4 Recording can be viewed at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pizwnijrrhvv/
You will be prompted to log into Adobe Connect as a guest; once you do that, the recording should load.

Presenter(s):
Mark Zimmermann, Research Fishery Biologist , NOAA/NMFS/Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Presenting from Seattle

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Bathymetry is the most important explanatory variable for understanding the abundance and distribution of fish and invertebrates in Alaskan waters, but our seafloor maps are often inadequate. Many areas in Alaska were only surveyed as recently as the 1930s or 1940s, and some areas have never been mapped with formal hydrographic surveys. Therefore we have been combining various available datasets, including non-hydrographic data, and publishing large regional bathymetry compilations for use in fisheries, geological and oceanographic research. This seminar will explain how, as a fishery biologist, I ended up working almost exclusively on bathymetry.

Bio(s):
I work in a NOAA group that conducts stock assessment bottom trawl surveys in the Aleutian Islands and the Gulf of Alaska during the summer. In the fall, I host an annual Groundfish seminar series to provide better communication for the widely dispersed groundfish community. During the rest of the year, a GIS expert and I proof, edit, digitize, and combine bathymetry data sets to make detailed Alaska seafloor maps for use in fisheries, geological and oceanographic research (https://www.afsc.noaa.gov/RACE/groundfish/bathymetry/). As the geographic extent of our mapped areas has expanded, we have begun collaborating with the international seafloor mapping community at GEBCO (General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans).Last year I was able to learn about some of GEBCO's mapping expertise during a NMFS Science and Technology Fellowship at Stockholm University. The geomorphological seafloor features of our recent western Gulf of Alaska bathymetry map were interpreted by a geologist to show the ice extent of the Last Glacial Maximum and published at Geosciences (https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9100409). This project was also described in a NOAA Feature Story (https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/feature-story/new-seafloor-maps-reveal-habitat-sculpted-ancient-glaciers).
.

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Title: Conservation in a full world: exploring the relationships among land-use policy, human communities, and ecological integrity in the Northern Forest
Presenter(s): Kathryn Frens, NMFS Office of Sustainable Fisheries
Date & Time: 19 December 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kathryn Frens, Fishery Policy Analyst, NMFS Office of Sustainable Fisheries

Sponsor(s): Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Christine Hirt (christine.hirt@noaa.gov )

Abstract: Proponents of land-use regulations say we need then to conserve biodiversity. But are the regulations we have effective? Opponents say those same regulations have destroyed rural economies and make it hard for communities to survive. But are people in more heavily-regulated landscapes really worse off? This research, which is part of my doctoral dissertation, examines the effects of two different approaches to conservation policy on human and ecological communities on mixed-use landscapes in the northern US.

About the speaker: Kathryn Frens is a PhD student at Michigan State University and a Knauss Fellow at NOAA. Her professional interests include figuring out how policy works in social-ecological systems, stealing social science methods to apply to natural science questions, and talking about narrative structure in science writing. When she's not writing her dissertation, you can find her at old-time music jams or under a tree with a book.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

18 December 2019

Title: Sea Grant Spotlight: Alaska Sea Grant Coastal Community Resilience Specialist Liaison Webinar
Presenter(s): Davin Holen, Sea Grant Liaison
Date & Time: 18 December 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): National Sea Grant and the NOAA Central Library POC: Hollis Jones (hollis.jones@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s): Davin Holen, PhD, Coastal Community Resilience Specialist & Assistant Professor Alaska Sea Grant, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences & Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Abstract: Davin will be discussing the adaptation planning he conducts with communities through Adapt Alaska (adaptalaska.org).
  • Adapt Alaska Development: From 2015 to 2017 Holen worked with collaborators from State, Federal, and Tribal entities to conduct a series of workshops with over 200 participants to assess climate change impacts to communities in Northwest Alaska and the Bering Sea Region. In addition, Dr. Holen and colleagues at the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska and the Sitka Tribe of Alaska organized the Southeast Alaska Climate Change Summit for Tribes to review climate impacts to cultural resources and discuss monitoring, mitigation, and adaptation planning in 2016. A second workshop to continue efforts in Southeast Alaska is planned for 2019. The outcome of both efforts is a new effort called Adapt Alaska. This includes a website, adaptalaska.org which describes current climate stressors for coastal communities in Alaska, pairs them with innovative adaptation solutions, provides a portal of useful websites and databases, and tells stories of successful adaptation strategies.
  • Adapt Alaska Workshops: Continuing the Adapt Alaska effort, Davin is currently working with partners on a climate adaptation scenario planning exercise in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta region of Alaska called Adapt Y-K, the Alaska Peninsula Community of Port Heiden, is in the planning stage to develop a workshop in Kodiak called Adapt Kodiak to expand efforts into adapting economies to changes, and is working with smaller communities such as Klukwan and Haines in Southeast Alaska to plan adaptation workshops in those communities to be led by Tribes.
  • Coastal Vulnerability Tools: Besides working directly with communities in resilience and adaptation planning, Davin also developed a human-dimensions spatial layers for the Alaska Ocean Observing System data portal for planning and responding to potential technological disasters. This tool shows areas of harvest and use of wild resources in Cook Inlet by rural communities and can be used by responders to oil spills as well as in planning exploration activities.
  • Oil Spill Impacts to Communities: Davin recently coordinated a National Academy of Science Gulf Research Program funded workshop on oil spill impacts to human health, and social and economic disruption to be held February 2019. This brought together stakeholders from across Alaska to discuss challenges and vulnerabilities related to oil spills in the extremes of Alaska.


Bio(s): Dr. Davin Holen is a coastal community resilience specialist for Alaska Sea Grant in the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences and works collaboratively with the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. Davin facilitates workshops and other activities related to coastal resilience addressing monitoring, mitigation, and adaptation to local stressors from climatic and ocean changes.

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Title: Into the Great Wide Open: Colonization of Novel Habitat by Atlantic Salmon
Presenter(s): Danielle M. Frechette, PhD Marine Resource Scientist, Maine Department of Marine Resources, Augusta, ME
Date & Time: 18 December 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL Oceanographer Room (Building 3 Room #2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Danielle M. Frechette, PhD Marine Resource Scientist, Maine Department of Marine Resources

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, https://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Abstract: This talk will provide a bird's eye view of a colonization program implemented for Atlantic salmon population enhancement in a Quebec river.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov & jens.nielsen@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Climate Change Vulnerability of Lobster Fishing Communities in Atlantic Canada
Presenter(s): Blair Greenan and Nancy Shackell, both Research Scientists with Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Date & Time: 18 December 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar for for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

MP4 recording can be viewed thru Adobe Connect here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/py0nj37yq3zx/

Title:
Climate Change Vulnerability of Lobster Fishing Communities in Atlantic Canada

Presenter(s):
Blair Greenan, Research Scientist, Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Nancy Shackell, Research Scientist, Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Climate change impacts on fisheries will undoubtedly have socio-economic impacts on coastal communities and the seafood market. However, it is a challenge to integrate climate change information in a form that can be used efficiently by adaptation planners, policy makers and fishery managers. In this study, we frame a climate change impact assessment using a geographical perspective based on the management units of the dominant fishery, in this case, American lobster in Nova Scotia, Canada. The information considered here includes economic dependence on the fishery, population size, diversity of the fishery revenue, status of harbour infrastructure, total replacement cost of each harbour, increased relative sea level and flooding, and the vulnerability of offshore lobster to ocean warming and changes in zooplankton composition and anticipatory changes in fishery productivity across management borders. Using two ocean models to provide multi-decadal scale projections of bottom temperature, changes in offshore lobster distribution are projected to have a neutral, or positive impact on the region as a whole. However, when lobster vulnerability is combined with climate change related vulnerabilities of coastal fishing communities, it is evident that adaptation planning is needed for long-term sustainability. This impact assessment provides both a framework and information for further in-depth analyses by climate change adaptation planners and fishery managers.

Bio(s):
Drs. Blair Greenan and Nancy Shackell are research scientists at Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in Nova Scotia, Canada. In 2012, Nancy and Blair co-managed a large research group to assess the vulnerabilities, opportunities and impacts of climate change throughout the Atlantic Basin. Recently, their research has focused on developing climate change adaptation tools to provide science advice to DFO on issues related to coastal infrastructure and fisheries management.

Blair manages a diverse group of researchers that focus on ocean stressors ranging from marine oil spills to climate change effects such as ocean acidification. He is the Scientific Director for the Argo Canada program which contributes to the International Argo program in advancing global real-time observations of the ocean with autonomous instruments. Blair received his Ph.D. from the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto.

Nancy's research focuses on fisheries ecology in support of Ecosystem Approach to Management. Nancy has published on biodiversity, important habitat of commercial species, marine protected areas, trophic balance, integrated ecological assessments, impacts of climate change, Atlantic halibut spatial ecology, and climate change adaptation. Nancy received a B.Sc. in Biology from McGill University, Montreal and a Ph.D. in Biology from Dalhousie University, Halifax.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

16 December 2019

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Meghan Dalton, Climate Impacts Research Consortium; Britt Parker, National Integrated Drought Information System, Karin Bumbacco, Office of the Washington State Climatologist, Andrea Bair, NWS Western Region, Erich Seamon, University of Idaho, Jason Kesling, Upper Snake River Tribe Foundation
Date & Time: 16 December 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Meghan Dalton, Climate Impacts Research Consortium; Britt Parker, National Integrated Drought Information System, Karin Bumbacco, Office of the Washington State Climatologist, Andrea Bair, NWS Western Region, Erich Seamon, University of Idaho, Jason Kesling, Upper Snake River Tribe Foundation

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System, Climate Impacts Research Consortium, USDA Northwest Climate Hub, National Weather Service

POC: Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Abstract: These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

13 December 2019

Title: NOAA: A 50-Year, Personal Perspective
Presenter(s): Dr. Jawed Hameedi, Lead Physical Scientist, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 13 December 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA: A 50-Year, Personal Perspective

Webinar recording: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pkol3ytlaglg/

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jawed Hameedi, Lead Physical Scientist, NOAA/NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Some pioneering research at the University of Washington coincided with the stated intent of creating the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in 1970, which included a realization that the oceans and the atmosphere are interacting parts of the global environment upon which we depend for the quality of our lives.Further, there was an immediate and compelling need for better knowledge of the total environment to more effectively monitor and predict its actions, and ultimately to exercise some degree of control over it. Since its inception andusing new observational technologies, computer-based analyses and models, and greater insight into interconnections and complexity in the environment, NOAA has continually advanced science-based management of natural resources. The Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program and the Marine Ecosystems Analysis Program are two early examples of such endeavors that firmly established NOAA's expertise in conceptualizing and implementing multi-year,multi-disciplinary research programs, whose success could be measured by the quality of information and tools, and benefits to the American public. In the Arctic, NOAA also played a key role in implementing the international Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy and provided scientific leadership in realizing its goals. The relationship between water quality and NOAA has remained both authentic and contradictory; it is indeed paradoxical. For more than two decades, NOAA was engaged in studies to assess impacts of sewage disposal at sea, developing measures of unreasonable degradation of the marine environment, and determining economic, environmental and public health costs of different waste disposal alternatives. Ocean dumping of sewage sludge ceased in 1988. On the other hand, NOAA was not successful in implementing the National Coastal Monitoring Act or its part of the National Water Quality Monitoring Network, which included linkage with the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System. Successful future endeavors on coastal water quality would require not only within-NOAA collaboration but also more effective interagency partnerships for more parsimonious and effective approaches.

Bio(s):
Dr. Jawed Hameedi is Lead Research Scientist at NOAA/NOS NCCOS Headquarters in Silver Spring, MD. His current responsibilities involve strategic planning, review of research and development programs, evaluation of innovative research and applications, and information synthesis in light of Federal legislation and agency priorities. Dr. Hameedi served as Manager of NOAA's National Status and Trends Program for marine environmental quality. Before that, he was Director of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program, a multi-year, multi-disciplinary program of environmental research, assessment, and information synthesis, to help guide safe and prudent development of oil and gas resources in Alaska offshore waters. He was also Director of the NOAA's Arctic Environmental Assessment Center in Anchorage, Alaska. He has nearly 100 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters on basic and applied research, applying scientific information and research data to resolve resource use conflicts related to energy production and transportation, radionuclide contamination, ecological indicators and biomarkers, and environmental monitoring and assessment. He received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Oceanography from the University of Washington, Seattle.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

12 December 2019

Title: Putting the Best “Foot” Forward: Ending the Era of the U.S. Survey Foot
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Dennis, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 December 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Putting the Best Foot Forward: Ending the Era of the U.S. Survey Foot

Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Dennis, National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. POC: Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey

Abstract: An era will soon end. In 1959, the name U.S. survey foot was given to an existing definition so that its use could temporarily continue alongside the new international foot. After December 31, 2022, only the international foot definition will be used in the United States: 1 foot = 0.3048 meter exactly (but simply called the foot). That will stop the simultaneous use of two nearly identical foot versions that differ by only 0.01 foot per mile.

NGS and the National Institute of Standards and Technology have collaborated to resolve the problem of two feet, as described in this webinar by:
  • Giving an overview of the history
  • Providing examples of problems encountered
  • Summarizing public comments received
  • Charting a path forward as part of modernizing the National Spatial Reference System
The intent is to provide national uniformity of length measurement in an orderly fashion with minimum disruption. It will end a dilemma that has persisted for over 60 years.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge is helpful.

Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: https://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

Title: Cloud Migration and Machine Learning for Operational Weather
Presenter(s): Emily Greene; Scott Kern, and Shawn Miller, Raytheon Company
Date & Time: 12 December 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2554-2555
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Emily Greene; Scott Kern, and Shawn Miller of Raytheon Company

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 909 305 426

Presentation Files:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20191212_Greene.pdf
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20191212_Greene.pptx

Abstract:
In this presentation, we explore continued modernization of the weather value chain in two key ways. First, we discuss the latest successes and lessons learned for migration of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS) Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS) to the cloud. We also present future thoughts for taking greater advantage of Cloud Services to increase the velocity and responsiveness to the weather community. Second, we discuss various places in the weather value chain where Machine Learning (ML) can be applied, and we show some sample use cases toward that end.

Presenter(s):

Emily Greene is the Deputy Program Manager for the JPSS CGS Program. Prior to her current assignment, she was the IPT Lead for IDPS. During her career with Raytheon, she has specialized in science data processing, archive and distribution for many NASA spacecraft including EOS, Mars, Astrophysics and Heliospheric missions. She received her PhD in Heliospheric Physics from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Scott Kern is the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS) Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS) IPT Lead and prior to that was the IDPS Chief Engineer. He has over 14 years of experience on the JPSS Program supporting both IDPS and C3S with most of those working on the Data Processing side. Scott has an extensive knowledge of the CGS program. He has also worked on other Command and control programs with Raytheon since 1998.

Shawn Miller is an Engineering Fellow and Certified Architect with Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services (IIS). He is currently the Technical Director for Civil Space and Weather. Prior to his current assignment, Shawn was the Chief Architect on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS). He has been working in various aspects of satellite remote sensing for 26 years. He obtained a PhD in Aerospace Engineering Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, in 1995.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

11 December 2019

Title: Regional Research Needs for Coastal Marine EBM: Messages from the Practitioners
Presenter(s): Amie West, U. of Maryland
Date & Time: 11 December 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Amie West, Chesapeake Biological Lab, University of Maryland

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Coastal regions of the US have unique ecosystem challenges and management complexities that need to be considered when planning and implementing ecosystem-based management (EBM). Researchers at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are investigating the status and opportunities for EBM in coastal regions of the US. Amie will discuss the results of an online survey and semi-structured interviews conducted with coastal scientists and managers to describe practitioners' perspectives on EBM. She will also describe how a variety of additional information sources are being used to suggest emerging research opportunities to support EBM implementation.

Bio(s): Amie West is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science focusing on coastal ecosystem-based management strategies and implementation. Previously, Amie worked as TMDL developer at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. Amie earned her Ph.D. from the University of Arkansas Environmental Dynamics program in 2016. Her dissertation work focused on freshwater ecology and human perceptions of the environment.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: There is no I in EAFM: Adapting Integrated Ecosystem Assessment for Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas NMFS/NEFSC
Date & Time: 11 December 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas, Biologist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Resource managers worldwide are being asked to consider the ecosystem while making management decisions. However, it can be difficult to change management systems accustomed to evaluating a constrained set of objectives, often on a species-by-species basis. Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) provides a flexible framework for addressing ecosystem considerations in decision making. IEA was adapted to address species, fleet, habitat, and climate interactions by the US Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) as part of their Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management (EAFM) in 2016. The Council's EAFM framework uses risk assessment as a first step to prioritize combinations of managed species, fleets, and ecosystem interactions for consideration. Second, a conceptual model is developed identifying key environmental, ecological, social, economic, and management linkages for a high-priority fishery. Third, quantitative modeling addressing Council-specified questions and based on interactions identified in the conceptual model is applied to evaluate alternative management strategies that best balance management objectives. As strategies are implemented, outcomes are monitored and the process is adjusted, and/or another priority identified in risk assessment can be addressed. The Council completed an initial EAFM risk assessment in 2017. First, the Council identified a range of ecological, social, and management objectives or risk elements. All objectives/risk elements were evaluated with ecosystem indicators using risk assessment criteria developed by the Council. In 2018, the Council identified summer flounder as a high risk fishery and is now finalizing an EAFM conceptual model. Annual ecosystem reporting updates ecosystem indicators and the risk assessment. The Council's rapid progress in implementing EAFM resulted from positive collaboration between managers, stakeholders, and scientists. Collaboration is essential to IEA and to the success of EAFM.

Bio(s): Dr. Sarah Gaichas has been a Research Fishery Biologist with the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch at the NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA since September 2011. She is a member of the Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee, has been active in ecosystem reporting and management strategy evaluation for both the Mid-Atlantic and New England Fishery Management Councils. Sarah's primary research is on integrated ecosystem assessment, management strategy evaluation, and ecosystem modeling. Her duties include developing, testing, and using ecosystem data, indicators, and models in natural resource management, and simulation testing management strategies (including analytical tools) that address the needs of diverse ecosystem users. Sarah previously worked at the NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA from 1997-2011 as an observer program analyst, a stock assessment scientist, and an ecosystem modeler. Sarah earned her Ph.D. from the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science in 2006, her M.S from the College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 1997, and her B.A. in English Literature from Swarthmore College in 1991.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Bottoms Up: King County Phytoplankton and Zooplankton Monitoring in the Puget Sound
Presenter(s): Kimberle Stark Senior Water Quality Planner, King County, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 11 December 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL Oceanographer Room (Building 3 Room #2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kimberle Stark Senior Water Quality Planner, King County, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, https://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Abstract: King County methods for monitoring phytoplankton and zooplankton in the Puget Sound, changes we've observedt, and factors that influence dynamics will be presented.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov & jens.nielsen@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

10 December 2019

Title: The Art of Knowledge Exchange – Lessons from World Bank Experience and Applications for Marine Conservation
Presenter(s): Phil Karp Principal Knowledge Management Officer with the World Bank's Social/Urban/Rural Development and Resilience Global Practice
Date & Time: 10 December 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (See below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Art of Knowledge Exchange " Lessons from World Bank Experience and Applications for Marine Conservation

Presenter(s):
Phil Karp, Principal Knowledge Management Officer with the World Bank's Social/Urban/Rural Development and Resilience Global Practice

Co-

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National MPA Center and OCTO (MPA News, OpenChannels, EBM Tools Network)

contact: zac.cannizzo@noaa.gov and lauren.wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Knowledge exchange, or peer-to-peer learning, is a powerful way to share, replicate, and scale up practical solutions to challenges and transform ideas into action. But designing and executing knowledge exchange to achieve intended results and integrating it as part of larger change processes remains challenging. Using its extensive experience in knowledge exchange, the World Bank has developed a systematic framework and guide to help practitioners be more effective knowledge providers, brokers, and recipients. This webinar will present the five-step framework, introduce a range of knowledge exchange instruments and activities, and discuss how this approach can be applied to marine ecosystem conservation. It will also look at the impact and implications of social media and citizen science.

Bio(s):
Philip Karp is a Lead Knowledge Management Specialist at the World Bank where he leads design and implementation of various components of the World Bank's knowledge, learning and innovation work, including South-South knowledge exchange, Communities of Practice, and knowledge networks and partnerships. He has more than 20 years of experience in the fields of knowledge, learning, and advisory services, with particular emphasis on practitioner-to-practitioner and South-South knowledge exchange. He is also an avid Scuba diver and ocean advocate and is actively involved in conservation of coral reef ecosystems, with particular focus on the interface between conservation and livelihoods. Mr. Karp holds a graduate degree in economics and public policy from the University of California, Berkeley.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: Diverse applications of spatiotemporal analyses for monitoring demersal communities in the eastern North Pacific
Presenter(s): Lewis Barnett, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Groundfish Assessment Program
Date & Time: 10 December 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2076 (Traynor Room)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Lewis Barnett, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Groundfish Assessment Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Abstract: TBD

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5 December 2019

Title: Sinkholes to Stars: Exploring Microbial Ecosystems in Lake Huron’s Sinkholes
Presenter(s): Bopi Biddanda, Annis Water Resources Institute at Grand Valley State University
Date & Time: 5 December 2019
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Bopi Biddanda, Annis Water Resources Institute at Grand Valley State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Abstract: Join Professor Bopi Biddanda as he shares the excitement of over a decade of exploration of life in Lake Huron's sinkholes carried out in collaboration with NOAA's Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary. He will ponder the relevance of these findings to major issues of both scientific and societal interest such as Earth's current biologic and physiologic diversity, oxygenation of early Earth in the distant past, and humanity's ongoing search for extraterrestrial life. For an introduction to life in Lake Huron's sinkholes, see this overview educational article: https://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/rock-water-microbes-underwater-sinkholes-in-lake-25851285

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Leveraging NERRS System-Wide Monitoring Program Data for Wetland Research and Management
Presenter(s): Kim Cressman, Grand Bay NERR, David Burdick, University of New Hampshire, Dwayne Porter, NERRS Centralized Data Management Office, Chris Kinkade, NOAA Office for Coastal Management
Date & Time: 5 December 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Title: Leveraging NERRS System-Wide Monitoring Program Data for Wetland Research and Management

Presenter(s): Kim Cressman, Grand Bay NERR; David Burdick, University of New Hampshire; Dwayne Porter, NERRS Centralized Data Management Office; Chris Kinkade, NOAA Office for Coastal Management

Sponsor(s): NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html.

Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

Abstract: Long-term monitoring data can be a tremendous asset for coastal research and management, but processing and analyzing the data and extracting key findings can be challenging. The National Estuarine Research Reserve System's System-wide Monitoring Program (SWMP) has been collecting physical and biological data at estuaries across the country for many years. This webinar will feature two projects that have been analyzing these monitoring data from multiple sites to understand better trends in marsh surface elevation and vegetation in relation to sea levels. Project leads will share a few examples of their findings that can inform marsh resilience efforts, and provide tips for others considering SWMP synthesis projects. The webinar will wrap up with a discussion of opportunities and strategies for using SWMP data for future research and management applications.

Bio(s):
KimCressman from Grand Bay NERR will provide an overview of her catalyst project: Is Marsh Surface Tracking Sea Level Change? Developing Tools and Visualizations for Sentinel Site Data. This project is developing data analysis and visualization tools for a relatively new element within the reserve monitoring program - Surface Elevation Table (SET) data. SET measurements enable reserves to track changes in marsh surface height overtime. The data are critical for monitoring marsh resilience in the face of rising seas, but SET data require specialized protocols for processing, quality checking and analyzing the data in a consistent way across sites.
DavidBurdick from the University of New Hampshire and Chris Peters from Great BayNERR will provide an overview of their project: Synthesizing Monitoring Data to Improve Coastal Wetland Management Across New England. This project is analyzing Sentinel Site data from four New England reserves, which have individually been monitoring salt marsh vegetation and elevation changes since at least 2011. The team is developing data packages linking vegetation change with surface elevation and other data,including output from an inundation tool. In addition to providing an initial summary of patterns, the project is developing analysis protocols that can be utilized by other reserves and coastal managers nationwide.The webinar will also include comments and discussion from ChrisKinkade andDwayne Porter.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weeklyemail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminarsrequest@list.woc.noaa.gov with the work 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA ScienceSeminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Central Valley Chinook Salmon Smolt Outmigration Mortality in Freshwater and Estuarine Habitats
Presenter(s): Mark Henderson, US Geological Survey
Date & Time: 5 December 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Mark Henderson, US Geological Survey

ABSTRACT
Low survival rates of Chinook salmon smolts in California's Central Valley have been attributed to multiple biological and physical factors, but it is not clear which factors have the largest impact. In a series of recent studies, my colleagues and I have used a combination of technologies to identify the primary factors contributing to the mortality of juvenile Chinook salmon during their emigration. To identify the habitat and predation related covariates influencing mortality in the most upstream portion of their migration corridor, we used acoustic telemetry and mark recapture models. We found that the most important covariate affecting fish survival was flow. Once juvenile salmon entered the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the Delta), they faced a completely new set of stressors, including predators. Juvenile chinook salmon migrating through the Delta have high mortality rates and it is assumed that predation is the proximate cause of this mortality. The Delta is one of the most invaded estuaries in the world, and multiple non-native predators are known to consume outmigrating Chinook salmon. To assess predator populations and predation impacts on juvenile Chinook salmon migrating through the Delta, we used a combination of hydroacoustic surveys and a mobile fish tethering device called a predation event recorder (PER). Results from these studies show that predator populations in the Delta are most strongly related to the number of patches of submerged aquatic vegetation and that the risk of predation increases proportional to habitat complexity, water temperature, time to night, and predator density. Results from these studies have provided guidance to fisheries and water managers throughout California on how to improve juvenile salmon survival, and reduce salmonid predator abundances, to aid in the recovery of Central Valley Chinook salmon populations.

BIO Mark Henderson is the Acting Unit Leader for the USGS California Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at Humboldt State University. He received a BS in Biology from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Geneseo, an M.Sc. in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences from the University of Washington, and a PhD in Marine Science from the College of William and Mary. Prior to his current position, he was a postdoctoral scholar at NOAAs Southwest Fisheries Science Center. His research interests have been extremely diverse throughout his career. He has studied the acoustic signature of Pacific hake, summer flounder population dynamics, associations between deep-sea coral and fishes, and the importance of freshwater, estuarine, and ocean life-history stages to salmon survival. In general, he is most interested in understanding how the physical and biological environment influences fish behavior, growth, and survival.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

Title: NCEP 101: What I Wish I'd Known When I Worked at Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) (Originally scheduled for Oct 30 and Nov 13)
Presenter(s): Jim Yoe, NWS/NCEP
Date & Time: 5 December 2019
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Vis webinar or at NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

The seminar was originally scheduled on October 30, 2019 and November 13, 2019. We apologize for any inconvenience.

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jim Yoe, NWS/NCEP

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio: +1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 900 946 681

Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20191205_Yoe.pptx
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20191205_Yoe.pdf

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): James G. (Jim) Yoe serves in the Office of the Director of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction as NCEP's Research Transition Manager. In this capacity he coordinates NCEP's activities for the Science and Technology Integration portfolio and the Observations portfolio, and he serves as the Chief Administrative Officer of the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCDSA.) Prior to joining NCEP, he spent 14 years with the National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service, as a member of the NPOESS Data Exploitation Project, after working in STAR and serving as Deputy Director of the JCSDA, and developing applications for space-based remote sensors including Doppler Wind lidar and GPS Radio Occultation. He earned BS and PhD degrees in physics from the University of the South and Clemson University, respectively, and conducted post-doctoral research investigating winds, waves, and turbulence using MST Doppler radar and UV lidar at the Max Planck Institute for Aeronomy in Germany. His hobbies include gardening, playing the guitar, and archery. Dogs love him.

POC: Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

4 December 2019

Title: Energy Technology in Buildings
Presenter(s): Dr. Tianzhen Hong, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Dr. Janet Reyna, National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Date & Time: 4 December 2019
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Drexel University / remote access / will be recorded
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Tianzhen Hong (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) and Dr. Janet Reyna (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)Seminar sponsor: OAR / CPO / RISA / CCRUN Team at Drexel University

Abstract:
December's Green Infrastructure, Climate and Cities seminar topic is Energy Technology in Buildings. Featuring Dr. Tianzhen Hong of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Dr. Janet Reyna of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).Buildings in U.S. cities consume 30% to 70% of primary energy and are facing growing challenges of balancing demand and supply to optimize performance to reduce energy use, utility cost and GHG emissions. Furthermore, as cost and emissions intensities vary on the electric grid by time of day and season, the building sector could play a cooperative role in emissions reduction, system reliability improvements, and cost moderation. Both speakers will discuss their research and modeling of clean energy and energy demand reduction in buildings.This event is FREE to attend and refreshments will be served! The seminar is livecast for those that cannot attend in person can attend online.Dr. Hong's talk is titled Pathway to 100% Clean Energy for Buildings in Cities and will introduce urban systems research at the Building Technology and Urban Systems Division, focusing on modeling and simulation of urban buildings to explore pathways to 100% clean energy, leveraging emerging opportunities in big data, artificial intelligence, and exascale computing. Dr. Tianzhen Hong is a Staff Scientist and Deputy Head of the Building Technologies Department of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He leads the Urban Systems Group and a research team working on data analytics, modeling, simulation, and policy for design and operation of low energy buildings and sustainable urban systems. He is an IBPSA Fellow, LEED AP, and registered mechanical engineer in California. He received B.Eng. and Ph.D. from Tsinghua University, China.Dr. Reyna's talk is titled The role of building energy demand in our low-carbon future: modeling opportunities with NREL's ResStock and ComStock tools. In this talk, Dr. Reyna will discuss on-going efforts at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to model the residential and commercial building sectors with increased disaggregation by time, location, building type, and technology type. ResStock and ComStock, NREL's physics-based models of the building sector, have the capability to model the residential and commercial sectors at national, regional, and city-scales. Dr. Reyna will discuss applications of the models in a major project for the City of Los Angeles modeling the potential for 100% Renewable Energy by 2045. She will also discuss the on-going project utilizing the models to develop end-use load profiles for the U.S., including regional coverage of the northeast corridor. Dr. Janet L. Reyna is a research engineer at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in the Buildings and Thermal Systems Center. She works on several large projects applying building energy stock modeling for national and local scenarios. Prior to joining NREL, she was an ORISE Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies. During her Ph.D., she received a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship to support her research on changes to building energy demand under climate change. Dr. Reyna's research focuses on environmental impacts of urban systems, and she aims to provide information for policy decision-making with her work. She has expertise in life cycle assessment, environmental analysis, building energy modeling, vehicle emissions simulation, and spatial analysis.Seminar POC for questions: Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov) or Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu)

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Title: Ice, water, and people – a look into how glacial lake outburst floods impact Alaskan communities
Presenter(s): Dina Abdel-Fattah, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 4 December 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dina Abdel-Fattah, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract:
Glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) are a natural phenomenon that result in the release of a significant amount of water via a glacial system, which has the potential to negatively and severely impact downstream communities.

This webinar will look into two GLOF glaciers in Alaska " Suicide Basin in Juneau and Snow Glacier in the Kenai Peninsula. Both glaciers have recurring GLOFs that affect the downstream areas in Juneau and the Kenai Peninsula in a variety of ways. From homeowners, to tour operators, to electric companies, to emergency responders, these are but a few of the impacted stakeholder groups impacted by GLOFs.

During the webinar, you'll learn about how GLOFs happen, their presence in Alaska, how stakeholders have been affected by these events, what are the available resources to understand and monitor these events, and what is the potential outlook for continued GLOFs in Alaska in the years to come.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Working with species occurrence data from citizen science: lessons from a review of analysis approaches
Presenter(s): Caitlin Mandeville, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 4 December 2019
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NOAA Fisheries and the NOAA Central Library; POC: Laura Oremland (laura.oremland@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s): Caitlin Mandeville, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, PhD student

Abstract: Citizen science programs that ask volunteers to report species observations to online databases have become popular, resulting in an enormous amount of openly available biodiversity data. But analyzing these data can be challenging, due to the lack of structured sampling design. We used a systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature to describe trends in the analysis of citizen science species occurrence data, with lessons for researchers seeking to use citizen science data as well as managers of programs that collect biodiversity data from volunteers.

Bio(s): Caitlin Mandeville is currently conducting her PhD research on analysis approaches and conservation applications of citizen science species observation data at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. She is part of an interdisciplinary research team approaching this topic from many angles, including data quality, modeling methods, social science, and more. Originally from the US, she completed her MS degree at the University of Wyoming and worked in citizen science for New Hampshire Sea Grant before beginning her PhD research.

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Title: Trophic cascades, climate change, and the fate of a kelp forest ecosystem
Presenter(s): Douglas Rasher, PhD Marine Community Ecologist, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Science, East Boothbay, ME
Date & Time: 4 December 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL Oceanographer Room (Building 3 Room #2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Douglas Rasher, PhD Marine Community Ecologist, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Science

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, https://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Abstract: In this talk, Dr. Rasher will discuss how the emergent effects of climate change and megafaunal loss are reshaping an iconic kelp forest ecosystem.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov & jens.nielsen@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Major sources of urban methane emissions along the east coast: A case study for using commercial aircraft to monitor greenhouse gases
Presenter(s): Colm Sweeney, Global Monitoring Division, OAR, NOAA
Date & Time: 4 December 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Colm Sweeney, Global Monitoring Division, Lead Scientist Carbon Cycle Aircraft Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library (POC: Outreach Librarian Erin Cheever, erin.cheever@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The East Coast Outflow (ECO) experiment is an ongoing intensive airborne campaign whose first phase ran from April 10 through May 15, 2018 measuring the outflow of CO2, CH4, C2H6, O3 and CO from 5 major cities along the NE corridor of the US (Baltimore, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Providence and Washington, D.C.). Significant correlations exist between these measurements, in particular, CO, CO2, CH4 and C2H6 show very significant correlations with one another, indicating a large fraction of the CH4 emissions are co-located with CO and CO2 emissions at the urban-scale. Methane and ethane relationships also suggest that a majority of these CH4 emissions originate from leakage of natural gas from distribution network of these cities. Using CO2 as a tracer and a variety of CO2 inventories we estimate magnitude of these emissions and the likelihood that leakage of fossil CH4 from the urban distribution network is a large source of CH4 which is largely ignored by recent updates in bottom up methane inventories. Technology now exists to be able to deploy some of the same instrumentation used during ECO on commercial aircraft providing daily measurements of urban centers throughout the world. As demonstrated by the first ECO campaign, these measurements can provide critical feedback to policy and bottom up analysis of urban emissions for greenhouse gases and other trace gases affecting air quality and public health.

Bio(s): Colm Sweeney leads the aircraft program for the NOAA Global Monitoring Division Carbon Cycle Group. Colm has lead or co-authored more than 170 peer-reviewed articles spanning a wide range of topics including air-sea gas and greenhouse gas emissions in the Arctic, urban and oil and gas regions as well as new technologies for sampling the atmosphere and ocean. Colm is currently serving as Acting Deputy Director of the Ocean Observing and Monitoring Division at NOAA.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: eSDM: Creating ensembles of predictions from species distribution models
Presenter(s): Samuel Woodman, NOAA/NMFS/SWFSC Marine Mammal and Turtle Division, contracted by Ocean Associates, Inc.
Date & Time: 4 December 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4 Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
eSDM: Creating ensembles of predictions from species distribution models

The recording of the presentation can be watched at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pno3rtw93oqi/

Presenter(s):
Samuel Woodman (Sam.Woodman@noaa.gov), NOAA/NMFS/SWFSC Marine Mammal and Turtle Division, contracted by Ocean Associates, Inc.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Species distribution modeling (SDM) in dynamic marine environments has enhanced our ecological understanding and ability to assess potential impacts to species of conservation concern at finer spatial scales than traditional methods. However,different data sets or analytical approaches often yield different modeled results, creating uncertainty and challenges in the decision-making process.For example, there are currently multiple SDMs for blue whales off the U.S.West Coast, and assessing spatial distribution shifts using these models is challenging because they predict absolute density, relative density, or probability of occurrence at varying spatial resolutions. One solution isensemble averaging', where the outputs of multiple models are combined using a weighted or unweighted average. Such ensemble models are often more robust than individual models. We present eSDM, an R package with a built-in graphical user interface, and as well as an example analysis using eSDM to create an ensemble of the three blue whale models. eSDM allows users to create ensembles of SDM predictions made at different spatial scales, using different data sources, and with different numerical scales to better evaluate spatial uncertainties and make informed conservation and management decisions.

Bio(s):
Sam Woodman is a contractor working with the NOAA/NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center's (SWFSC) Marine Mammal and Turtle Division. Since graduating from Harvey Mudd College with a degree in Mathematical and Computational Biology, he has worked on a variety of projects at the SWFSC. These projects have consisted of fieldwork monitoring pinnipeds and seabirds in the Antarctic, as well as developing R code and packages for assessing the risk of cetaceans becoming entangled in fishing gear.Sam hopes to continue to be able to use both his fieldwork and computational experience to collect data and develop tools to help inform management efforts.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

3 December 2019

Title: Rapid Change: 2019 in Northwest Alaska’s Oceans and Impacts to Ecosystems and People
Presenter(s): Gay Sheffield, Sea Grant; Donna Hauser, IARC; Rick Thoman, ACCAP
Date & Time: 3 December 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Gay Sheffield (Sea Grant), Donna Hauser (IARC), Rick Thoman (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract:
Summer 2019 was another remarkable year for the Bering and Chukchi Sea regions, with record early sea ice loss in the spring, very warm oceans and late freeze-up producing wide ranging impacts, from the ocean food web to individual and community activities. This webinar will provide an overview of the climate and ocean extremes, the biological ramifications and societal repercussions of another unusual summer around northwest Alaska.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Implications of changes in the optical environment for groundfish stock assessment in the eastern Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Sean Rohan, University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences
Date & Time: 3 December 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2076 (Traynor Room)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sean Rohan, University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Abstract: Changes in the optical environment can affect the productivity andcatchability of fish stocks. However, the optical environment is rarelymonitored in habitat used by deep-dwelling fishes in coastal marine ecosystems.In this talk, I will describe a novel method of obtaining apparent opticalproperties from light data collected during NOAA's annual summer bottom-trawl surveys of the easternBering Sea. The apparent optical properties, optical depth and the vertical attenuation coefficient, characterize relative darkness andwater clarity. Using a virtualspecies simulation, I will then evaluate whether changes in the opticalenvironment of the eastern Bering Sea during 2004"2018 could affect thereliability of bottom-trawl survey density estimates of demersal stocks due to vision-dependent changes in catchability.

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Guiding International Food Security Assessments Using Subseasonal to Seasonal Predictions and Predictability
Presenter(s): Andrew Hoell, OAR/ESRL
Date & Time: 3 December 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 E W Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library (POC: Outreach Librarian Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov))

Presenter(s): Andrew Hoell, Research Meteorologist, NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory Physical Sciences Division

Abstract: Early warning of food insecurity requires skillful forecasts of environmental conditions relevant to agriculture at many time horizons and the clear communication of forecast information to the social scientists, who also consider markets, trade nutrition and health when they produce food security outlooks. The food security outlooks are ultimately used to inform the programming of limited aid resources for the times and places where they will be most needed. I will discuss how research on the predictability of regional weather and climate is used to prepare predictions used in food security assessments over Africa, western Asia and Central America.

Bio(s): I research the predictability of weather and climate at regional to continental scales, including assessments of individual extreme events like droughts and floods and their generality. I guide food security forecasts in Africa, western Asia and Central America based on the lessons learned via research.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

27 November 2019

Title: Tundra be dammed: Beaver colonization of the Arctic
Presenter(s): Ken Tape, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 27 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ken Tape, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract:
Using time series of satellite images, we have observed hundreds of new beaver ponds in tundra regions of western and northern Alaska. This talk will describe beaver movement into arctic tundra regions and some predicted implications for tundra ecosystems.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Onramps and offramps: Three proposed uses for spatio-temporal models in connecting ecosystem surveys to fisheries management
Presenter(s): Jim Thorson, PhD Quantitative Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 27 November 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL Oceanographer Room (Building 3 Room #2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jim Thorson, PhD Quantitative Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, https://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Abstract: three examples using spatio-temporal models to investigate processes driving shifts in spatial distribution, secondary production, and recruitment in the eastern Bering Sea.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov & jens.nielsen@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

25 November 2019

Title: Preparing Your Winter Toolbox: Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar for California-Nevada
Presenter(s): Dan McEvoy, CNAP/WRCC/DRI,Julie Kalansky, CNAP/SIO
Date & Time: 25 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Drought & Climate Update: Dan McEvoy, PhD, California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Desert Research Institute
Drought & Climate Outlook: Julie Kalansky, PhD, California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Scripps Institution of Oceanography

POC: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Fall in California and Nevada can bring dry weather, but this year has been especially so, with many areas receiving hardly any or no precipitation the last couple months. Is this dryness a trend that will continue into winter, or just typical fall weather? When will the wildfire risk die down? Will the Pacific Blob (marine heatwave) influence the weather? This webinar will provide an overview of the current conditions and outlook for the rest of a fall into winter as well as tools you can use to prepare for, monitor, and respond to the climate conditions this winter.

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) November 2019 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia).

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

22 November 2019

Title: November 2019 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy - ACCAP, a NOAA RISA Team
Date & Time: 22 November 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) - A NOAA RISA Team and National Weather Service

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (rthoman@alaska.edu)

Abstract: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for December and the winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

21 November 2019

Title: Introducing Mallows Bay-Potomac River National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Paul Orlando, Chesapeake Bay Regional Coordinator for the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 21 November 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Paul Orlando, Chesapeake Bay Regional Coordinator for the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Abstract: The NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries announces that a new national marine sanctuary has been designated for the first time in nearly 20 years. We introduce to you Mallows Bay-Potomac River National Marine Sanctuary in Maryland. Mallows Bay is most renowned for its "Ghost Fleet," the partially submerged remains of more than 100 wooden steamships that were built in response to threats from World War I-era German U-boats that were sinking ships in the Atlantic. Although the ships never saw action during the war, their construction at more than 40 shipyards in 17 states reflected the massive national wartime effort that drove the expansion and economic development of communities and related maritime service industries.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Pat Guinan, Missouri State Climatologist
Date & Time: 21 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Pat Guinan, Missouri State Climatologist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

POCs: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Nearshore and Vertical Distribution of Salmon off the Coast of Washington
Presenter(s): Bill Matsubu, National Research Council
Date & Time: 21 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Bill Matsubu, National Research Council

ABSTRACT
The costs and challenges with sampling in the ocean have limited the research conducted on the vertical and nearshore distributions of salmon. We need a mechanistic understanding of how fish respond to environmental variables for effective management and conservation. To address these needs, we are using modified recreational fishing gear deployed at 5-m intervals from a small fishing vessel (microtrolling), which allows us to determine the latitude, longitude, and depth of capture in nearshore and offshore marine environments. Additionally, we measured temperature, light intensity, dissolved oxygen, salinity, and bottom depth. Our microtrolling data revealed that the vertical distribution of salmon is influenced by temperature and varies by species and genetic stock identification. These results will inform species distribution models and is an essential step in understanding the spatiotemporal overlap of salmon with Southern Resident Killer Whales in the ocean.

BIO
Bill Matsubu is a National Research Council Postdoctoral Research Associate stationed at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center in the Fish Ecology Division. Bill received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences in 2019. Bill grew up in California and earned his B.S. in Fisheries Biology from Humboldt State University.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

Title: A study on disaster insurance for fisheries
Presenter(s): Gualtiero Jaeger, Policy Fellow, NOAA HQ
Date & Time: 21 November 2019
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Gualtiero Jaeger, Policy Fellow, NOAA HQ

Sponsor(s): Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Katie Lohr, (kathryn.lohr@noaa.gov )

Abstract: Hurricanes devastating fishing communities, warm water and parasites decimating salmon runs, red tides shutting down crab & shellfish fisheries. Since 1990 the federal government has provided $1.5 Bn in assistance for such fishery disasters, yet over the past decade, fishermen have had to wait an average of 3 years for disaster aid to arrive. Could an insurance-type solution provide speedier relief?

About the speaker: Gualtiero Jaeger recently completed a PhD in physical oceanography in the MT-WHOI Joint Program, where he studied the ocean's response to and influence on monsoon rainfall in the Bay of Bengal. He previously worked for an acclaimed photographer in So Paulo before studying physics at the University of California Santa Barbara.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Gone Fishin': Trip Satisfaction in the South Carolina For-Hire Fishing Industry
Presenter(s): Stacey Weinstock, NOAA Office of Law Enforcement
Date & Time: 21 November 2019
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Stacey Weinstock, International Policy Fellow, NOAA Office of Law Enforcement

Sponsor(s): Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Katie Lohr, (kathryn.lohr@noaa.gov )

Abstract: The charter fishing industry is an economically important recreational activity that thrives in tourist destinations in coastal areas. While there has been much research on factors contributing to trip satisfaction on freshwater angling, little has been done on marine charter and head boat anglers. To address this data gap, I utilized recent management changes on black sea bass, an economically and popular recreational species in South Carolina, to evaluate what determines trip satisfaction in the marine charter/headboat industry.

About the speaker: Stacey Weinstock recently completed a M.S. from the Environmental Studies Program at the College of Charleston in June 2018. For her graduate thesis, she focused on social science in recreational fisheries management, but ever the multi-tasker, she simultaneously worked at South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium and The Nature Conservancy focusing on projects concerning coastal issues such as oyster management and climate change. Prior to graduate school, she gained diverse experience working in marine and wildlife conservation in the Florida Keys and Virginia. Stacey originates from Virginia and graduated from Virginia Tech in 2012 with two Bachelor of Sciences in Fisheries and Wildlife.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

20 November 2019

Title: A Climatology of Snow to Liquid Ratios in Alaska
Presenter(s): David Levin, NOAA National Weather Service, Juneau Alaska
Date & Time: 20 November 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s): David Levin, NOAA National Weather Service, Juneau Alaska

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) - A NOAA RISA Team and National Weather Service

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract: Snow to liquid ratios (SLR) continue to be a large source of error for forecasters in the prediction of snow amounts during the winter months. Current methods of predicting SLR in Alaska range from an empirical method based solely on surface temperatures, to model-derived SLR. Both of these methods have limitations. Thus an SLR climatology was developed yielding a robust data set of snowfall observations. The mean SLR for all Alaska Weather Forecast Offices was found to be much higher than the method based on surface temperatures. Considerable variability was noted in both mean and median SLR values between sites located along the Gulf coast and those in the interior. It is hypothesized that the frequency of events where warmer marine air over- runs cold, dry arctic air from northwest Canada modulates these variations in snow to liquid ratio. An observed sounding climatology was also developed for various low level thermal fields and was matched to observations of SLR at each site. For Southeast Alaska, it was found that the 1000-850mb thickness was a good predictor of SLR with mid level thickness (850-700mb) being the best predictor in general for other areas of Alaska. Finally, the results were then analyzed on a grid using the National Weather Service Graphical Forecast Editor (GFE) and a smart tool was developed which would allow operational forecasters to use this climatology as a starting point when making a prediction of snow to liquid ratio. This presentation will details the work described above.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Are age-0 Arctic cod retained over the Chukchi Sea shelf during summer?
Presenter(s): Robert Levine, PhD Candidate Biological Oceanography Graduate Student, UW School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 20 November 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL Oceanographer Room (Building 3 Room #2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Robert Levine, PhD Candidate Biological Oceanography Graduate Student, UW School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, https://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Abstract: Using repeat summer acoustic surveys in the northeast Chukchi Sea to observe changes in the age-0 Arctic cod population, we are investigating what drives interannual changes in distribution and the fate of these fish as they grow.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov & jens.nielsen@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Occurrence of antibiotics, estrogenic hormones, and UV-filters in water, sediment, and oyster tissue from the Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Dr. Lee Blaney, Associate Professor, University of Maryland Baltimore County, and Dr. Ke He, Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Maryland Baltimore County
Date & Time: 20 November 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or for NOAA SIlver Spring staff, SSMC4, Rm 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Occurrence of antibiotics, estrogenic hormones, and UV-filters in water, sediment, and oyster tissue from the Chesapeake Bay

Webinar recording is here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/porjc9b8aeql/

Presenter(s):
Dr. Lee Blaney, Associate Professor, and Dr. Ke He, Postdoctoral Research Associate,
both at the University of Maryland Baltimore County
Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Globally, the occurrence of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in the environment has raised critical questions for ecological and human health impacts, but few efforts have focused on the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States. To address this lack of data, we measured antibiotics, hormones, and ultraviolet-filters (UV-filters), which are active ingredients in a variety of personal care products, in water, sediment, and oyster tissue from multiple sites in the Chesapeake Bay. Fluoroquinolone, macrolide, and sulfonamide antibiotics were detected in water samples. As both human- and animal-labeled antibiotics were found, wastewater effluent and agricultural runoff were identified as potential sources. Some of the highest aqueous-phase concentrations were recorded for norfloxacin (94 ng/L), enrofloxacin (17 ng/L), sulfamethoxazole (15 ng/L), and clarithromycin (10 ng/L). Estrone and four UV-filters, namely 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate, benzophenone-3, homosalate, and octocrylene, were frequently detected in Chesapeake Bay water (93-100%), sediment (100%), and oyster tissue (79-100%). High sediment-phase concentrations of estrone (58 ng/g) and 17beta-estradiol (12 ng/g) were detected at the mouth of the Manokin River. Homosalate and benzophenone-3 were present at concentrations as high as 188 and 114 ng/L in water, 74 and 11 ng/g in sediment, and 158 and 118 ng/g in oyster tissue, respectively. These results demonstrate the ubiquitous presence of CECs in the Chesapeake Bay, confirm UV-filter bioaccumulation in oysters, and suggest the need for improved CEC removal during municipal wastewater treatment and agricultural waste management within the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

Bio(s):
Dr. Lee Blaney is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical, Biochemical, and Environmental Engineering at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), where he also serves as the Associate Director of Sustainability Engineering. At UMBC, Lee has established a research program focused on (1) the occurrence, fate, transport, and toxicity of contaminants of emerging concern in natural and engineered systems and (2) development of innovative technologies for resource recovery from agricultural and municipal waste. He is the recipient of the Maryland Outstanding Young Engineer Award, the NSF Career Award, and the AEESP Award for Outstanding Teaching in Environmental Engineering and Science.

Dr. Ke He is currently a postdoctoral research associate at UMBC. He received his PhD degree in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering from UMBC in 2017, and then he worked as a postdoctoral fellow for a year at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. His research interests focus on the development of advanced analytical and bioanalytical methods to understand the occurrence, fate, and ecotoxicity of prioritized contaminants of emerging concern (e.g., antibiotics, hormones, UV-filters, and PFAS) in different environmental compartments. He has co-authored more than 10 peer-reviewed publications in this research field.
.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: NOAA CoastWatch/OceanWatch/PolarWatch Program: Connecting ocean and coastal satellite data with users and applications
Presenter(s): Veronica Lance, University of Maryland
Date & Time: 20 November 2019
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Veronica Lance, University of Maryland

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 903 024 824

Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20191120_LanceV.pdf
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20191120_LanceV.pptx

Abstract:
The purpose of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) CoastWatch/OceanWatch/PolarWatch Program (a.k.a. CoastWatch, https://coastwatch.noaa.gov) is to improve decision outcomes by facilitating the use of ocean satellite data in applications and research. NOAA CoastWatch provides free and open access to global and regional satellite data products for use in understanding, managing and protecting ocean and coastal resources and for assessing impacts of environmental change in ecosystems, weather, and climate. The seed for what later was to become CoastWatch was an unusual algal bloom off the coast of North Carolina in 1987. Dr. Pat Tester, of the NOAA Beaufort Laboratory, used satellite sea surface temperature imagery to investigate the cause (Tester et al., 1991). The printed images were delivered to her by mail. With time and in response to the continual development of ocean observations from space, the CoastWatch scope has expanded to include multiple environmental parameters such as sea surface temperature, ocean color (chlorophyll, etc.), sea surface height (altimetry), ocean winds, surface roughness (synthetic aperture radar), salinity and sea ice. These products have global and regional coverage and near real-time as well as delayed-mode, higher quality and longer term time series datasets. CoastWatch customizes, serves, monitors, and provides user training for ocean and coastal remote sensing data products from NOAA and non-NOAA satellite missions to several audiences who use those products in research and in operational oceanographic applications. The program is organized as a hub and spokes. The hub has the primary processing responsibilities and is co-located with the NOAA ocean satellite environmental data record (EDR; i.e., Level 2) science team producers. The spokes are regional Nodes that are distributed geographically and across NOAA mission line offices. With this arrangement, CoastWatch is well-positioned to bridge upstream ocean EDR producers with downstream user needs. This presentation will give an overview of the data, tools, and services provided by CoastWatch, and show some examples of user applications.

Bio(s):
Trained as a biological oceanographer, Veronica Lance spent much of her early research career at sea studying phytoplankton assemblages, phytoplankton photophysiology and primary productivity in relation to geo-physico-chemical environments, especially in regions where iron is a regulating micro-nutrient. After earning her PhD from Duke University and a PostDoc at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University, her interests expanded to using satellite remote sensing of ocean color to understand spatial and temporal patterns of ocean productivity as researcher working with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Lance began working with the NOAA Ocean Color Science team in 2014. Currently, in her position as a research scientist with the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, Cooperative Institute for Satellite Earth System Studies at the University of Maryland, she serves as Program Scientist for NOAACoastWatch/OceanWatch/PolarWatch and works closely with the Center for Satellite Applications and Research, Satellite Oceanography and Climatology Division at NOAA/NESDIS in several functions.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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19 November 2019

Title: Fragile ecosystem, robust assessments? (What I did on my summer vacation) 
Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Ecosystems Dynamics & Assessment Branch
Date & Time: 19 November 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Ecosystems Dynamics & Assessment Branch

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Abstract: As a cooperative project between the NEFSC, NWFSC, NOAA's S&T, and Norway's IMR, we tested the performance of stock assessment modeling approaches under simulated climate scenarios for the California Current and Nordic/Barents Seas ecosystems, both of which are experiencing rapid global climate change. We demonstrate methods for using ecosystem models as simulators to provide both a true system state for skill assessment, and datasets for input into fisheries stock assessment models with realistic observation and process uncertainty. We will evaluate stock assessment performance by quantifying the bias and precision of derived quantities related to population size, fishing intensity, and depletion, and by evaluating management performance on forward projections in which fishing rates were set based on reference points estimated in the assessment.

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Title: Sea Grant Spotlight: Sea Grant and GLERL Great Lakes
Presenter(s): Chiara Zuccarino-Crowe, Sea Grant Liaison
Date & Time: 19 November 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): National Sea Grant and the NOAA Central Library POC: Hollis Jones (hollis.jones@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s): Chiara Zuccarino-Crowe, M.S. Great Lakes outreach specialist & Extension Educator, Michigan Sea Grant; Michigan State University Extension - Community, Food and Environment Institute; Sea Grant Liaison, Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, NOAA

Abstract: The presentation will describe the regional approach to serving as a NOAA " Sea Grant Partnership Extension Liaison. Instead of driving collaboration on a specific topic or area of inquiry, this role focuses on partnership development and coordination across a variety of priority areas within the Great Lakes region that are of importance to NOAA and multiple state Sea Grant programs. In the short term, this has involved identification of and familiarization with the communities of practice already operating within the broader Sea Grant and NOAA regional networks. This allows the liaison to better facilitate cross-cutting communication and engagement while developing the relationships necessary to achieve longer term goals related to research coordination and building expert capacity for emerging key areas. In some cases, this can take the form of compiling technical resources and outreach products on an issue facing communities across the region, such as high water levels, and serving it on a shared platform that is easily accessible to all Sea Grant and NOAA partners. This coordination can also require a more active role, such as convening a working group through NOAA's Great Lakes Regional Collaboration Team to address needs related to evaluating and enriching the Great Lakes Blue Economy.

Bio(s): As a Sea Grant Liaison to NOAA in the Great Lakes, Chiara works collaboratively to enhance partnerships among NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab, the eight Sea Grant programs in the Great Lakes, and Michigan Sea Grant / Michigan State University (MSU) Extension. Prior to joining Michigan Sea Grant, Chiara served NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation for several years on issues related to sustainable coastal tourism and outdoor recreation in marine protected areas. She also completed a Sea Grant Knauss Fellowship after achieving an M.S. in Fisheries and Wildlife from MSU. In other roles, Chiara has worked as a naturalist, conducted ecosystem health assessments with U.S. EPA's Great Lakes National Program Office, and surveyed fisheries along the southern California coast.

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Title: A global spatial analysis reveals where marine aquaculture can benefit nature and people
Presenter(s): Seth Theuerkauf, PhD, Aquaculture Scientist, The Nature Conservancy
Date & Time: 19 November 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
A global spatial analysis reveals where marine aquaculture can benefit nature and people

Presenter(s):
Seth Theuerkauf, PhD, Aquaculture Scientist, The Nature Conservancy

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Aquaculture of bivalve shellfish and seaweed represents a global opportunity to simultaneously advance coastal ecosystem recovery and provide substantive benefits to humanity. To identify marine ecoregions with the greatest potential for development of shellfish and seaweed aquaculture to meet this opportunity, we conducted a global spatial analysis using key environmental (e.g., nutrient pollution status), socioeconomic (e.g., governance quality), and human health factors (e.g., wastewater treatment prevalence). We identify a substantial opportunity for strategic sector development, with the highest opportunity marine ecoregions for shellfish aquaculture centered on Oceania, North America, and portions of Asia, and the highest opportunity for seaweed aquaculture distributed throughout Europe, Asia, Oceania, and North and South America. This study provides insights into specific areas where governments, international development organizations, and investors should prioritize new efforts to drive changes in public policy, capacity-building, and business planning to realize the ecosystem and societal benefits of shellfish and seaweed aquaculture.

Bio(s):
Dr. Seth Theuerkauf is an Aquaculture Scientist with The Nature Conservancy where he leads global-scale synthesis science efforts to better understand and optimize aquaculture's ecosystem services, as well as multiple efforts around the world to support national governments in improving capacity for aquaculture siting and management. Before joining The Nature Conservancy in April 2019, Seth worked in a joint position with the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and The Nature Conservancy where he supported efforts to improve siting of aquaculture operations. Seth has over a decade of marine science research experience, holds a Ph.D. in marine conservation ecology from North Carolina State University, and a B.S. in biology and environmental policy from the College of William and Mary.

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18 November 2019

Title: “Dust Rising” Documentary on the Link between Dust and Valley Fever in the Southwestern US
Presenter(s): Dr. Daniel Tong, Associate Professor at George Mason University, Emission Scientist NOAA Air Resources Lab
Date & Time: 18 November 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20706, Conference Room S650
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Dr. Daniel Tong, Associate Professor at George Mason University, Emission Scientist NOAA Air Resources Lab

Abstract:
Valley fever is an infection caused by fungi living in soil. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 10,000 cases are reported each year in the US, primarily in Arizona and California. The incidence of valley fever in the southwestern US has increased in recent years, likely associated with blowing dust. An overview of the link between dust and valley fever will be presented, followed by a screening of the 25-minute 2018 documentary Dust Rising. This film was created by Lauren Schwartzman as part of her work in the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism and features research from NOAA and NASA scientists. Daniel Tong and Hongbin Yu provide commentary on dust transport, and the documentary includes GOES-16 dust color imagery, NASA global aerosol simulations, and GFDL model output.

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14 November 2019

Title: Geoid Change in Alaska
Presenter(s): Dr. Ryan Hardy, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Geoid Change in Alaska

Presenter(s): Dr. Ryan Hardy, National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.

POC: Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey

Abstract: NGS's upcoming geopotential datum will require a dynamic geoid model to maintain centimeter-height accuracy. Geoid change is especially challenging to model in Alaska. Geophysical processes in Alaska, including rapid ice mass loss from mountain glaciers, contribute to geoid change rates of more than 2 centimeters per decade. This webinar presents research modeling geoid change in Alaska, past and present. This work combines satellite gravity data with airborne and satellite measurements of glacier elevation change to predict geoid rates with improved fidelity and spatial resolution. The wealth of existing geodetic and geophysical observations in Alaska also enables us to examine how the geoid has changed across the 20th century.
Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge is helpful.

Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: https://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

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Title: Sablefish and Siscowet Lake Trout: Common Strategies for Living Deep in Oceans and Lakes
Presenter(s): Rick Goetz, NWFSC
Date & Time: 14 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Rick Goetz, NWFSC

Abstract:

Studies that we have been conducting over the past decade on a deep-water marine species, the sablefish, as well as a deep-water freshwater species, the siscowet lake trout, suggest that there are common strategies in dealing with some of the constraints imposed by deep-water habitats. The most striking strategy is the ability of these fish to undergo extensive vertical migrations in the water column, at times on a 24-hour periodicity (i.e., diel vertical migration). In looking at the diets of these fish, it appears likely that the vertical migrations are involved in foraging and these vertical movements appear to be facilitated by some common physiological adaptations including elevated lipid levels.

BIO
Rick Goetz leads the program in Aquaculture and Marine Finfish and Shellfish Biology located at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center. He received a BA from Colgate University in Biology and German and a PhD in Zoology and Physiology from the University of Wyoming. He was a Professor in the Biological Sciences Department at the University of Notre Dame from 1978-2000. He then headed the Program in Scientific Aquaculture at the Marine Biological Laboratory (Woods Hole, MA) from 2000-2004. Before coming to NOAA in 2012, he was a Professor in the School of Freshwater Sciences (Great Lakes WATER Institute) at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (2004-2011). He has conducted research on reproduction, growth, and immunology in various fish species including rainbow trout, brook trout, lake trout, yellow perch, zebrafish, goldfish and sablefish. More recently he has been developing and characterizing captive finfish broodstocks for genetic selection in aquaculture and studying phenotypic diversity and speciation in lake trout and sablefish.

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Title: Resist, Accept, or Direct? A decision framework for navigating climate-driven ecological transformations
Presenter(s): Gregor Schuurman of the US National Park Service, Wendy Morrison of NOAA, Carrie Kappel of the University of California Santa Barbara
Date & Time: 14 November 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Resist, Adapt, or Direct? A decision framework for navigating climate-driven ecological transformations

Presenter(s):
Gregor Schuurman, US National Park Service
Wendy Morrison, NOAA
Carrie Kappel, the University of California Santa Barbara

Co-

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National MPA Center and OCTO (MPA News, OpenChannels, EBM Tools Network)

contact: zac.cannizzo@noaa.gov and lauren.wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
In this world of rapid global change, managers often have limited ability to control the ultimate drivers of this change or resist or reverse ecological responses to it. Managers in this brave new world' face difficult choices as well as important opportunities to influence ecological trajectories at local, regional, and continental scales, as they work along a management spectrum from resisting, to accepting, to actively directing ecological change. Managers need clear concepts and training in navigating ecological transformation (NET) and mechanisms to coordinate transformation management across agencies and management units. The FedNET working group (composed of representatives from federal land management agencies, USGS, and NOAA) is working to help US federal land managers understand, plan for, and respond to ecological transformation to maximize conservation of species, ecosystems, and ecosystem services. The group will develop concepts, frameworks, and training opportunities to help managers navigate the who, why, where, when, how, and what of NET and coordinate transformation stewardship across scales. The webinar will: 1) discuss how FedNET is using the decision framework Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD), 2) present related case studies to help federal land managers understand, plan for, and respond to ecological transformation, and 3) facilitate discussion with NOAA colleagues and an Ocean Tipping Points representative on how the RAD framework might be applied to marine fisheries.

Bio(s):
Gregor Schuurman is an ecologist with the NPS CCRP, where he works with national parks and partners to understand and adapt to a wide range of climate change impacts. His work focuses on 1) incorporating climate projections into management and planning, 2) analyzing climate adaption options in the context of policy, 3) tracking ongoing adaptation in the NPS, and 4) developing and synthesizing management-relevant science.

Wendy Morrison is a fisheries ecologist with NMFS Office of Sustainable Fisheries at NOAA HQ in Silver Spring. She is looking at options for adapting fisheries management for a changing climate and has recently joined the FEDNET group.

Dr. Carrie Kappel is a Research Scientist and Senior Fellow at UC Santa Barbara's National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. In her research, Dr. Kappel uses collaborative synthesis science to develop conservation solutions that protect marine ecosystems and enhance human wellbeing. Dr. Kappel recently led the Ocean Tipping Points project, a large, multi-institution collaboration which sought to integrate our growing scientific understanding of tipping points in marine ecosystems into ocean management through practical tools and approaches.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: The Impact of Hurricane María on Puerto Rico's Environment
Presenter(s): Dr. Soderberg, Executive Director, Puerto Rico Chapter, Inter American Association of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering
Date & Time: 14 November 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 E W Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Join us in the NOAA Central Library, SSMC3, 2nd Floor!

Presenter(s): Carl-Axel P. Soderberg, Executive Director, Puerto Rico Chapter, Inter-American Association of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering (AIDIS, by its Spanish acronym)

Abstract: The presentation will describe Hurricane Mara's impact on the island's environment, including the impacts on forests, coral reefs, endangered species, beaches, fisheries, water quality, air quality, landfills and potable water supply. The presentation will also delve into long term impacts such as significant reduction in water storage capacity at reservoirs, drastically diminished capacity at landfills and increased coral reef mortality.

Bio(s): Mr. Soderberg has 50 years of experience in the environmental protection field. He was the Director of EPA's Caribbean Division for 20 years. He is currently a member of the Board of Directors of the San Juan Bay Estuary Program and a member of the Advisory Council of AIDIS-International. He has been very active in assisting countries in Latin America and the Caribbean in the establishment of environmental control programs and capacity development.

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13 November 2019

Title: Dynamic ocean management approaches to support sustainable ocean activities
Presenter(s): Dr. Elliott Hazen & Heather Welch, NMFS/SWFSC
Date & Time: 13 November 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Elliott Hazen and Heather Welch, Southwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Heather and Elliott will discuss the latest research on implementing dynamic applications to address spatio-temporal management problems. Dynamic ocean management (DOM) is emerging as one potential solution to the challenge of spatially managing species and human activities that are dynamic in space and time. DOM strategies use real-time data on environmental conditions to inform management boundaries that can in turn rapidly adjust in response to the shifting nature of the ocean, its biodiversity, and the stakeholders that use it. This webinar introduces the field of DOM, provides the latest on the fisheries sustainability tool EcoCast, and discusses the process of building, validating, operationalizing, maintaining, and forecasting a dynamic ocean management tool. Join this webinar to learn about some of the challenges, solutions, and under-the-hood details of applied dynamic ocean management.

Bio(s):
Heather Welch
UCSC Project Specialist
Heather's research focuses on quantifying and planning for the spatial and temporal dynamics of large-scale marine processes. In a research position at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Heather modeled and projected species seasonal movements in the Mid-Atlantic. In her current position at UCSC / NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Heather works on developing and evaluating dynamic ocean management tools to aid the sustainable usages of ocean resources.Heather received her B.A. from Whitman College in 2010 and her M.Sc. from James Cook University in 2014.

Elliott Hazen
NOAA Research Ecologist / UCSC Adjunct Researcher
Dr. Hazen is part of NOAA's Climate and Ecosystems Group within the Environmental Research Division, applying statistical approaches to understanding ecological to ecosystem interactions. His general research interests fall in the realm of ecology and
ecological modeling with an added interest in using multiple data types to inform novel applied
management approaches. He received his Master's of Science in 2003 from the University of
Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and his Ph.D. from Duke University in 2008.

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Title: There is no I in EAFM: Adapting Integrated Ecosystem Assessment for Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas NMFS/NEFSC
Date & Time: 13 November 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas, Biologist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Resource managers worldwide are being asked to consider the ecosystem while making management decisions. However, it can be difficult to change management systems accustomed to evaluating a constrained set of objectives, often on a species-by-species basis. Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) provides a flexible framework for addressing ecosystem considerations in decision making. IEA was adapted to address species, fleet, habitat, and climate interactions by the US Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) as part of their Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management (EAFM) in 2016. The Council's EAFM framework uses risk assessment as a first step to prioritize combinations of managed species, fleets, and ecosystem interactions for consideration. Second, a conceptual model is developed identifying key environmental, ecological, social, economic, and management linkages for a high-priority fishery. Third, quantitative modeling addressing Council-specified questions and based on interactions identified in the conceptual model is applied to evaluate alternative management strategies that best balance management objectives. As strategies are implemented, outcomes are monitored and the process is adjusted, and/or another priority identified in risk assessment can be addressed. The Council completed an initial EAFM risk assessment in 2017. First, the Council identified a range of ecological, social, and management objectives or risk elements. All objectives/risk elements were evaluated with ecosystem indicators using risk assessment criteria developed by the Council. In 2018, the Council identified summer flounder as a high risk fishery and is now finalizing an EAFM conceptual model. Annual ecosystem reporting updates ecosystem indicators and the risk assessment. The Council's rapid progress in implementing EAFM resulted from positive collaboration between managers, stakeholders, and scientists. Collaboration is essential to IEA and to the success of EAFM.

Bio(s): Dr. Sarah Gaichas has been a Research Fishery Biologist with the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch at the NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA since September 2011. She is a member of the Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee, has been active in ecosystem reporting and management strategy evaluation for both the Mid-Atlantic and New England Fishery Management Councils. Sarah's primary research is on integrated ecosystem assessment, management strategy evaluation, and ecosystem modeling. Her duties include developing, testing, and using ecosystem data, indicators, and models in natural resource management, and simulation testing management strategies (including analytical tools) that address the needs of diverse ecosystem users. Sarah previously worked at the NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA from 1997-2011 as an observer program analyst, a stock assessment scientist, and an ecosystem modeler. Sarah earned her Ph.D. from the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science in 2006, her M.S from the College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 1997, and her B.A. in English Literature from Swarthmore College in 1991.

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12 November 2019

Title: Carcinogens in US drinking water: a cumulative risk analysis
Presenter(s): Sydney Evans, MPH, Science Analyst and Olga Naidenko, PhD, Vice President of Science Investigations, both with Environmental Working Group. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: 12 November 2019
12:00 pm - 12:45 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below), or for NOAA Silver Spring staff: SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Carcinogens in US drinking water: a cumulative risk analysis

Link to MP4 recording: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pbe4md2yxpr9/

Presenter(s):
Sydney Evans, MPH, Science Analyst, Environmental Working Group. and
Olga Naidenko, PhD, Vice President of Science Investigations, Environmental Working Group.
Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Since the 1990s, researchers and health agencies worldwide have been calling for a shift towards aggregate and cumulative assessment of chemical contaminants from the prior framework that focused on assessing contaminants one at a time. Cumulative cancer- and non-cancer risk assessment has become a standard approach for common air quality evaluations, yet no comprehensive assessment has been published for drinking water contaminants on a national level. This approach, which indicates that over 100,000 lifetime cancer cases could be due to carcinogenic contaminants in drinking water, offers a deeper insight into national drinking water quality. Overall, national attributable risk due to tap water contaminants is approximately 4 x 10-4, which is two orders of magnitude higher than the de minimus cancer risk of one-in-a-million. The majority of this risk is due to the presence of arsenic, disinfection byproducts, and radioactive contaminants. Decreasing the levels of chemical contaminants in drinking water represents an important opportunity for protecting public health.

Bio(s):
Sydney Evans: Before joining EWG's research team in 2018, Sydney worked as an environmental health specialist at a local health department in Indiana. While there, she was awarded the Indiana Environmental Health Association's Rookie of the Year award for her work in her community. She has co-authored a number of peer-reviewed journal articles in the areas of public health and environmental health and has served as a guest lecturer for Indiana University's School of Public Health. She holds a B.A. in chemistry from the University of Virginia and an M.P.H. in environmental health from Indiana University Bloomington. Her work at EWG primarily focuses on tap water contaminants, exposure analysis, and children's health.

Olga Naidenko: After graduating as a valedictorian from Colgate University in 1995, Olga started her Ph.D. training at the University of California at Los Angeles. Her doctoral studies focused on the molecular basis of immune defense against infectious disease and cancer. During her graduate and postdoctoral research, Olga co-authored and published over two dozen peer-reviewed papers. From 2007 to 2012, Olga served as a senior scientist at EWG, working to advance public policies to reduce Americans' exposures to toxic chemicals. At EWG, Olga conducted groundbreaking studies and testified at federal and California legislative hearings about EWG's research on electromagnetic radiation and children's health. From 2014 to 2016, Olga held a prestigious American Association for the Advancement of Science policy fellowship. As a AAAS Science & Technology Policy fellow, Olga worked at the Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water, focusing on climate change and water quality standards. In 2016, Olga returned to EWG as a Senior Science Advisor, spearheading EWG's research efforts on children's environmental health under the Jonas Initiative.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

7 November 2019

Title: Steelhead at the Surface: Impacts of the Hood Canal Floating Bridge on Migrating Steelhead Smolts
Presenter(s): Megan Moore, NWFSC
Date & Time: 7 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Megan Moore, NWFSC

ABSTRACT
The Hood Canal Bridge (HCB) spans the northern outlet of Hood Canal in the Salish Sea and extends 4.6 meters (15 ft) underwater, and forms a partial barrier for steelhead migrating from Hood Canal to the Pacific Ocean. Capture-recapture models indicate that only 51% (2017) and 56% (2018) of the steelhead smolts encountering the HCB survive past the bridge to the next array. We studied fine-scale movements of more than 300 steelhead smolts to understand how migration behavior was affected across the entire length of the HCB and to quantify spatial and temporal patterns of mortality. Individually coded acoustic telemetry transmitters implanted in juvenile steelhead were used in conjunction with an extensive array of acoustic receivers (Vemco VPS system) surrounding the HCB to obtain close approximations of the path each steelhead took as they encountered the bridge structure. Steelhead migration at the HCB appeared unaffected by tidal stage, population-of-origin, approach location, current velocity, or time of day, but were influenced by date of bridge encounter. Behavioral data from transmitters with temperature and depth sensors ingested by predators are consistent with high levels of marine mammal predation. This study confirms the considerable impact of the HCB on ESA-listed steelhead smolt survival, and provides detailed information on the behavior of steelhead smolts and their predators at the HCB.

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Title: Making Marine and Coastal Protected Areas Climate Savvy
Presenter(s): Eric Mielbrecht of EcoAdapt, and Sara Hutto of the Greater Farallones Association
Date & Time: 7 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar (see below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Making Marine and Coastal Protected Areas Climate Savvy

Presenter(s):
Eric Mielbrecht, EcoAdapt
Sara Hutto, the Greater Farallones Association

Co-

Sponsor(s):
Parks Canada, NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, Comisin Nacional de reas Naturales Protegidas (CONANP), EcoAdapt, the Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange (CAKE), the Greater Farallones Association, and the Commission for Environmental Cooperation, and OCTO (MPA News, OpenChannels, EBM Tools Network)

Abstract:
Making climate change adaptation planning simple and feasible for managers, The Climate Adaptation Toolkit for Marine and Coastal Protected Areas is a new resource consisting of a complement of tools that support climate vulnerability assessment, adaptation planning, and implementation. Users are supported by essential tools including a library of over 100 curated adaptation actions organized by habitat type and climate impact, each supported by case studies and documents from CAKEx.org, and the North American Marine Protected Area Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool. The toolkit is particularly effective as it was co-created with MPA managers and experts from Canada, Mexico and the U.S., working in concert with EcoAdapt, the Greater Farallones Association, and the Commission for Environmental Cooperation. View the toolkit at https://www.cakex.org/MPAToolkit.

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Title: Southeast Drought Update
Presenter(s): Charles Konrad, Director of the Southeast Regional Climate Center
Date & Time: 7 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Charles Konrad | Director of the Southeast Regional Climate Center (SERCC)
Jeff Dobur | Senior Hydrologist, Southeast River Forecast Center, NOAA/NWS
Todd Hamill | Service Coordination Hydrologist, Southeast River Forecast Center, NOAA/NWS
Pam Knox | Agricultural Climatologist, University of Georgia

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists, University of Georgia, Auburn University

POC: Meredith Muth (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
By October 15, after weeks of dryness accompanied by record heat, 65% of the Southeast region was in drought, with nearly 35% in severe drought. Hardest hit areas were in Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina. Since then, most of the region has seen beneficial precipitation. Is the current drought over? What's the outlook for this winter? This Drought Update Webinar will provide a comprehensive overview of Southeast drought conditions and outlook, hydrological impacts, and an update on agricultural impacts since the October Webinar.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Meredith Muth (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Machine Learning for Forecasting and Data Assimilation (rescheduled from 10/17)
Presenter(s): Brian Hunt, University of Maryland
Date & Time: 7 November 2019
11:30 am - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 4552-4553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

This seminar is rescheduled from its original date of 10/17. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Presenter(s): Brian Hunt, University of Maryland

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 900 990 334

Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20191107_Hunt.pdf

Abstract: Brian will present recent work using machine learning to analyze time series data from chaotic systems. Most of the results concern learning the systems dynamics to facilitate forecasting and climate simulation, but I will also discuss potential applications in data assimilation. First I will show successful application of a particular form of machine learning called reservoir computing to data from relatively low-dimensional systems, and discuss a partial theory for how the method works. Then I will present extensions of the method to handle high-dimensional, spatially-extended systems using parallel computing, and to a hybrid approach using machine learning to improve an imperfect physics-based model.

Bio(s): Brian R. Hunt received a master's degree in mathematics from the University of Maryland in 1983. He went on to study applied mathematics at Stanford University, receiving a Ph.D. in 1989 for research in fluid dynamics and geometric optics. He has since returned to the University of Maryland to pursue research in dynamical systems and fractal geometry, where he is currently a Professor of Mathematics with a joint appointment in the Institute for Physical Science and Technology.

POC: Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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6 November 2019

Title: Designing for Climate Change: Indigenous Tactics
Presenter(s): Shachi Pandey, Columbia University et al
Date & Time: 6 November 2019
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Shachi Pandey (Columbia University & MUD Workshop), Jerome Haferd (Columbia University & BRANDT : HAFERD) and Brandt Knapp (University of Pennsylvania & BRANDT : HAFERD)

Seminar sponsor: Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (a NOAA RISA program)

Session will be recorded at https://youtu.be/XbTVCMZV_Q8

Abstract:

This month's Green Infrastructure, Climate and Cities seminar topic is part of a three-part series called Designing for Climate Change.

Shachi Pandey, Jerome Haferd and Brandt Knapp who are practitioners and academics based out of NYC, will be curating a discussion around Climate Change, especially in relationship to how small practices and academics engage non-architects and others to build actionable insights. The discussion is conceived as a three-part series organized around:

Indigenous Tactics (November 06, 2019)
Contemporary Tactics (date to be announced) and
Implementation (date to be announced)
Join us for the first session in this series on Wednesday November 6th at 4pm!

The seminar is held in the Hill Conference Room in the Lebow Engineering Center on Drexel University's campus in Philadelphia (see registration page for directions to the conference room). Registration is FREE and refreshments will be provided! The sessions will be broadcast live so those that cannot attend in person can attend online.

About the series:
CCRUN hosts a monthly series featuring researchers and practitioners from around the region and country all of whom have new ideas on how to promote resilient, livable, and sustainable cities. The talks focus on urban solutions to global problems associated with increasing temperature and sea level rise, precipitation variability and greenhouse gas emissions. We are interested in spurring dialogue on the implications of such changes on the complex infrastructure of intensely developed landscapes, and on the health, well-being, and vulnerability of the people who live in them.

All seminars are free, and held at 4:00 PM on the first Wednesday of every month in the Hill Conference Room at Drexel University. The sessions are be broadcast live via webcast, recorded, and archived. To see previous sessions, visit the seminar page on the CCRUN website.

Seminar POC for questions: Franco Montalto, fam26@drexel.edu or Sean Bath, sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Additional presenters field:
Title: Data Janitor: Integrating environmental and fishery data feeds for easier access by managers & stakeholders
Presenter(s): Jordan Watson, Mathematical Statistician, NOAA Fisheries, Juneau, AK
Date & Time: 6 November 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL Oceanographer Room (Building 3 Room #2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jordan Watson, Ph.D., Mathematical Statistician, NOAA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, https://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Abstract: A talk on the integration of fishery and environmental data that facilitates a framework for connecting that data more easily for management

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov & jens.nielsen@noaa.gov

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5 November 2019

Title: Impact of Ocean Conditions on Hurricane Forecast during the 2017 and 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season
Presenter(s): Dr. Matthieu Le Hnaff, Assistant Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 5 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Matthieu Le Hnaff, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Seminars are uploaded on AOML PhOD's website and YouTube page.

Abstract:
A coupled ocean-hurricane model, based on the HYCOM and HWRF models, was used to investigate the impact of the observed ocean conditions on the intensification of major hurricanes in 2017 and 2018. In particular, the coupled model was used to estimate the impact of individual ocean observing platforms (through data-assimilation in HYCOM), on the intensity forecast for several storms. One key finding is that the assimilation of ocean observations contributed to improved ocean representation, and consequently to improved hurricane forecast, which will be shown for Hurricanes Maria (2017) and Michael (2018). More specifically, satellite altimetry allows identifying ocean features such as currents and mesoscale eddies, Argo floats allow for correcting model temperature and salinity large scale biases, and glider data provide continuous temperature and salinity profiles in areas of intense mesoscale activity. In the case of Maria, gliders deployed in the Caribbean Sea helped improve the wind intensity forecast just before the hurricane made landfall in Puerto Rico. Specific results from Hurricane Michael revealed that the storm rapidly intensified as it travelled over specific ocean features in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Title: Trials and tribulations of developing a statistically sound method for estimating rockfish and greenling abundance in Puget Sound
Presenter(s): Dayv Lowry and Bob Pacunski, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Date & Time: 5 November 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dayv Lowry and Bob Pacunski, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Abstract: Rockfish populations in the Southern Salish Sea (a.k.a., Puget Sound) underwent drastic declines related to overfishing during the 1970s and 1980s, and have shown few signs of recovery. Since early-1990s, the WDFW has experimented with a variety of tools and survey designs aimed at providing accurate assessments of rockfish and greenling abundance in their complex, high-relief substrates. The evolution of these efforts have provided tremendous insights in our understanding of Puget Sound bottomfish, and the ROV survey results will be used to establish a baseline for evaluating rockfish recovery and ecosystem diversity well into the future.

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
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Title: Declining CO2 Price Paths
Presenter(s): Gernot Wagner, Clinical Associate Professor, New York University. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 5 November 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Declining CO2 Price Paths

View the mp4 recording thro Adobe Connect here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p6clz5di4eig/

Presenter(s):
Gernot Wagner, Clinical Associate Professor, New York University. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Pricing greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions involves making tradeoffs between consumption today and unknown damages in the (distant) future. While decision making under risk and uncertainty is the forte of financial economics, important insights from pricing financial assets do not typically inform standard climate"economy models. Here, we introduce EZ-Climate, a simple recursive dynamic asset pricing model that allows for a calibration of the carbon dioxide (CO2) price path based on probabilistic assumptions around climate damages. Atmospheric CO2 is the asset with a negative expected return. The economic model focuses on society's willingness to substitute consumption across time and across uncertain states of nature, enabled by an Epstein-Zin (EZ) specification that delinks preferences over risk from intertemporal substitution. In contrast to most modeled CO2 price paths, EZ-Climate suggests a high price today that is expected to decline over time as the insurance value of mitigation declines and technological change makes emissions cuts cheaper. Second, higher risk aversion increases both the CO2 price and the risk premium relative to expected damages. Lastly, our model suggests large costs associated with delays in pricing CO2 emissions. In our base case, delaying implementation by 1 y leads to annual consumption losses of over 2%, a cost that roughly increases with the square of time per additional year of delay. The model also makes clear how sensitive results are to key inputs.

Bio(s):
Gernot* Wagner is a clinical associate professor at New York University's Department of Environmental Studies and associated clinical professor at the NYU Wagner School of Public Service. He wrote Climate Shock, joint with Harvard's Martin Weitzman and published by Princeton University Press (2015, paperback 2016), among others, a Top 15 Financial Times McKinsey Business Book of the Year 2015.
* It's pronounced like juggernaut without the jug.

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4 November 2019

Title: Community Collaboration: A Locally Driven Approach to Estuarine Management
Presenter(s): Jenni Schmitt, South Slough NERR, OR, and Jill Rolfe, Coos County Planning Department, OR
Date & Time: 4 November 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Title: Community Collaboration: A Locally Driven Approach to Estuarine Management

Presenter(s): Jenni Schmitt, South Slough NERR, OR, and Jill Rolfe, Coos County Planning Department, OR.

Sponsor(s): NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html).

Seminar POCs for questions:
Dwight.Trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

Abstract:
Modern management of Oregon's estuaries and surrounding shorelands is based on the economic and social drivers of the 1970s era within which local land use plans were developed. So how do we modernize land use planning in a way that balances responsible economic development, social interests, and the protection of natural resources? A diverse group of local stakeholders is collaborating to answer this question for one Oregon estuary through: 1) compiling existing data to show current conditions and uses within the estuary; 2) gathering stakeholder input and land use and planning recommendations from a diversity of interest groups; and 3) developing management options and detailed roadmaps for officials to use to update their land use plans. This webinar will highlight the collaborative stakeholder engagement process that is driving this work, and provide a snapshot of the products and recommendations developed through this process.

Learn more about the The Coos Estuary Land Use Analysis

Bio(s):
Jenni Schmitt leads the planning and implementation of wetlands-related projects at the South Slough NERR. As part of her work, Jenni has been coordinating collaborative projects with a community-based group of concerned citizens called the Partnership for Coastal Watersheds. Members of this group collaborate to understand local watershed conditions and address their capacity and resiliency to serve ecological, economic, and social needs for present and future generations.

Jill Rolfe has worked for the Coos County Planning Department for 18 years and has been the director since 2012. Ms. Rolfe regularly coordinates research and updates to the County Comprehensive plan with local, state and federal agencies. Ms. Rolfe has been a member of the Partnership for Coastal Watersheds for six years and played a large advisory role for environmental and socio-economic aspects of multiple projects. Ms. Rolfe is also coordinating updates to several Estuary Management Plans.

Title: Sensitivity of Hurricane Intensity Forecasts to Ocean Initial Conditions: Results from Idealized Experiments and OSEs
Presenter(s): Dr. George Halliwell, Oceanographer, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 4 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. George Halliwell (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Seminars are uploaded on AOML PhOD's website and YouTube page.

Abstract:
The sensitivity of coupled hurricane intensity forecasts to ocean model initialization is explored using a combination of idealized experiments and Observing System Experiments (OSEs). Earlier results demonstrated that the accuracy of the ocean response to hurricane forcing is very sensitive to the accuracy of ocean model initialization. This earlier work has now been extended by developing the capability to initialize the HYCOM-HWRF prediction model with ocean analyses generated by the HYCOM-based in-house ocean data assimilation system at AOML. This presentation will emphasize the set of idealized ocean experiments conducted to quantitatively assess the impact of anomalously warm ocean conditions present during the 2017 and 2018 hurricane seasons, and also the impact of barrier layers resulting from the Amazon-Orinoco river runoff. It will also emphasize ocean OSEs conducted during the same years to quantitatively assess the impact of individual components of the ocean observing system. Results from some initial HYCOM-HWRF intensity forecasts that were initialized by analyses generated from these ocean experiments will be presented; however, a comprehensive summary of the HYCOM-HWRF experiments will be presented by Matthieu Le Henaff at his seminar scheduled on the following day (Tuesday, Nov. 5 at 2 pm).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

31 October 2019

Title: Research in Support of Green Sturgeon Recovery: Devices and Desires
Presenter(s): Mary Moser, Fisheries Biologist, NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 31 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Mary Moser, Fisheries Biologist, NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center

ABSTRACT
Listing of species under the Endangered Species Act requires assessment of status using best available information. Often very basic data on a species are limiting or non-existent, making listing decisions and subsequent recovery planning difficult. A decade ago, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed the southern distinct population segment (DPS) of green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. At that time, there was scant information on population status, distribution, migration patterns, basic biology, and habitat requirements. However, recent delineation of critical habitats, documentation of migration patterns, assessment of spawning stock size, and identification of fisheries impacts has provided managers with information in support of recovery planning. Much of this information has come as a direct result of using new technologies and gadgets, including: 1) DIDSON (dual frequency identification sonar) acoustic cameras to count animals and describe feeding habitats, 2) extensive acoustic receiver networks to document coastal movement patterns of sturgeon tagged with transmitters, 3) autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with an acoustic receiver for identification of coastal aggregation areas, and 4) inertial sensors, pop-up satellite tagging, and machine learning to document the effects of sub-lethal green sturgeon bycatch in gillnet and trawl fisheries. Armed with information from this research, the NMFS recently released a recovery plan for green sturgeon and is in a better position to update status of the northern DPS, which is currently considered a Species of Concern.

BIO
Mary Moser is a research fisheries biologist at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center in the Fish Ecology Division. She received her PhD from North Carolina State University, taught ichthyology and fisheries biology at the University of North Carolina-Wilmington, and then moved to the NWFSC in 1999. Mary's research has focused on use of telemetry to document fish migration behavior and energetics. She is particularly keen on use of cutting-edge tagging technologies to further our understanding of where and when fish move; but, also to get at the how and why. She has applied a variety of telemetry techniques to answer management questions relating to dam passage (Pacific lamprey, salmonids, white sturgeon), marine distributions (English sole, green sturgeon), and even fine-scale physiological ecology (Pacific lamprey, steelhead trout). Watching fish is among her favorite activities and has been both a personal and professional source of inspiration.

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Title: Benefits of Chesapeake Bay Oysters Beyond the Raw Bar
Presenter(s): Melanie Jackson, NOAA HQ Office of Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs
Date & Time: 31 October 2019
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Melanie Jackson, Congressional Affairs Fellow, NOAA HQ Office of Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs

Sponsor(s): Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Sam Chin, (sam.chin@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The oyster industry has long been an important and iconic component of the Chesapeake Bay. Sustainability efforts to increase oysters in the Bay are of particular interest because oysters provide ecosystem services that may reduce nitrogen inputs, which are the primary cause of eutrophication. This presentation will discuss the state of aquaculture in the Bay and reveal how oysters fit into our current toolbox for improving water quality and mitigating nitrogen in coastal areas.

About the speaker: Jackson recently completed her doctorate at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) Horn Point Laboratory in Cambridge, Maryland specializing in how oyster restoration and aquaculture remove nitrogen pollution. Prior to her Ph.D. work, she completed her master's degree at UMCES on algae blooms and nitrogen pollution. Jackson received her undergraduate degree in marine science and biology from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science in 2012.

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Title: Brake for Blues: Incentives, corporate partnerships, and the future of the Channel Islands VSR program
Presenter(s): Madi Harris, NOAA Fisheries Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection
Date & Time: 31 October 2019
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Madi Harris, Foreign Affairs Fellow, NOAA Fisheries Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection

Sponsor(s): Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Sam Chin, (sam.chin@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Since its trial season in 2014, the Channel Islands Vessel Speed Reduction (VSR) program has expanded in geographic scope and in participation. The voluntary, incentive-based program, which offers financial rewards to shipping companies for slowing their speeds to prevent ship strikes with endangered whales and reduce harmful air emissions, now boasts coverage of almost 90% of all large vessel traffic passing through the region. Yet, as the California national marine sanctuaries look toward the future of their successful, non-regulatory program, no consistent funding source has been identified. Through semi-structured interviews with shipping industry and corporate business representatives, this research explores the potential for better-aligned, non-financial incentives that support sustainable continuation of the program and long-term behavior change.

About the speaker: Madi Harris recently earned a Master's in Environmental Science and Management from the Bren School at UC Santa Barbara. There, she focused on marine spatial planning, community stakeholder engagement in environmental solutions, and science communication. Her work included supporting planning and research efforts with the NOAA Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and the West Regional Planning Body. Madi also has a B.S. in Environmental Studies from the University of Southern California and is an avid diver.

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Title: Prioritizing Areas for Future Seafloor Mapping, Research, and Exploration Offshore of California, Oregon, and Washington
Presenter(s): Bryan Costa, Marine Ecologist, NOAA's National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch, USA. Presenting from California
Date & Time: 31 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Prioritizing Areas for Future Seafloor Mapping, Research, and Exploration Offshore of California, Oregon, and Washington

Link to mp4 recording viewing on Adobe Connect: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/peozk6uqg16z/

Presenter(s):
Bryan Costa, Marine Ecologist, NOAA's National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch, USA. Presenting from California.

Co-Authors:
Ken Buja, Matt Kendall and Jen Kraus, all with NOAA's National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch, USA, and
Bethany Williams, on contract to Consolidated Safety Services, Inc., USA, in support of NOAA's National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Biogeography Branch, USA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Spatial information about the seafloor is critical for decision-making by marine science, management and tribal organizations. While this type of information is important, its collection is expensive, time consuming and logistically intensive. Developing a network of partners and coordinating data needs can help overcome these challenges by leveraging collective resources to meet shared goals. To help promote coordination across organizations, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) developed a spatial framework, process and online application to identify common data collection priorities across space. This application was used by organizations participating in NOAA's West Coast Deep Sea Coral Initiative (WCDSCI) and Expanding Pacific Research and Exploration of Submerged Systems (EXPRESS) Campaign to identify overlapping, high priority areas for seafloor mapping, sampling and visual surveys offshore of U.S. West CONUS Coast (WCC). Ten high priority locations were broadly identified for future mapping, sampling and visual surveys based on the results of the prioritization. These locations were distributed throughout the WCC, primarily in depths less than 1,000 m. Participants consistently selected (1) Exploration, (2) Biota/Important Natural Area and (3) Research as their top reasons (i.e., justifications) for prioritizing locations. Participants also consistently selected (1) Benthic Habitat Map and (2) Bathymetry and Backscatter as their top data or product needs in high priority grid cells. The map layers developed here were published in NOAA's U.S. Mapping Coordination website to allow participants (and other users) to collectively track their overall progress towards addressing key priorities areas identified in this effort. Combined, these tools and this information will enable NOAA WCDSCI, EXPRESS and other organizations to more efficiently leverage resources and coordinate their mapping of high priority locations along the WCC.

Bio(s):
Bryan Costa graduated from Middlebury College with a joint degree in Biology and Environmental Studies and from the University of Maryland, College Park with an MPS in Geospatial Sciences. He joined the NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) in 2005 as a marine ecologist. Since joining NOAA NCCOS, he has worked as a principal investigator on a variety of projects, characterizing, monitoring and modeling marine ecosystems in the United States. His research interests include novel applications of state-of-the-art remote sensing and geospatial technologies. He currently is co-located with the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary in Santa Barbara, CA.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

30 October 2019

Title: 2019 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Science Review
Presenter(s): Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory -GFDL- Scientists
Date & Time: 30 October 2019
8:15 am - 5:30 pm ET
Location: Frick Chemistry Laboratory in Princeton, NJ and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Scientists " see agenda for specifics

Description: (all of the below "sub-items")

Sponsor(s): Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL)

Remote Access: https://mediacentrallive.princeton.edu/ (no registration required). This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.

Abstract: Please see https://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/2019review/. Laboratory scientific reviews are conducted periodically to evaluate the quality, performance and importance of research conducted in OAR laboratories relative to both internal and external interests, and to help strategically position the laboratory in its planning of future science. These reviews are intended to ensure that OAR laboratory research is linked to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Strategic Plan, relevant to NOAA's research mission and priorities, and consistent with NOAA planning, programming, and budgeting. This review will cover Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory research with a focus on the five years since the 2014 Review. The research themes are: (1) Modeling the Earth System, (2) Advancing the Understanding of the Earth System, and (3) Earth System Predictions and Projections.

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29 October 2019

Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar
Presenter(s): Meredith Muth, NIDIS
Date & Time: 29 October 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): TBD

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

POC: Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The webinar will provide updated information on the climate, water, and drought status of the ACF River Basin. Input will be provided by the Florida State Climatologist, USGS, Southeast River Forecast Center, The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Mobile District), and others.

Are our seminars recorded? No

Seminar POC for questions: Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Prevention, Control, Mitigation, and Socioeconomics of Harmful Algal Blooms: FY 2020 Federal Funding Opportunity Overview and Q&A
Presenter(s): Felix Martinez, PCMHAB Program Manager, NCCOS/Competitive Research Program, NOAA
Date & Time: 29 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Changed to SSMC4, Room 9415
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Prevention, Control, Mitigation, and Socioeconomics of Harmful Algal Blooms: FY 2020 Federal Funding Opportunity Overview and Q&A

The MP4 recording can be viewed here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pzj5ncniasin/

Presenter(s):
Felix Martinez, PCMHAB Program Manager, NCCOS/Competitive Research Program, NOAA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Since the authorization of the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act, NOAA has made available competitive funding for research on how and why harmful algal blooms (HABs) form and persist, as well as addressing the effects of the blooms through bloom prevention, control of their spread, or mitigation of their impacts. Through this webinar we will provide those interested in HABs research with information and answer questions about NCCOS/CRP's FY 20 Federal Funding Opportunity focused on prevention, control, mitigation, and socioeconomics of HABs.

Bio(s):
Felix Martinez has over 15 years of experience as a Federal Program Officer in NOAA. Since coming to NOAA, Felix has developed and implemented research programs that have funded projects focused on coral reefs, mesophotic coral ecosystems, invasive species, hypoxia, valuation of ecosystem services, harmful algal blooms, and ecosystem based management. As part of the NCCOS/CRP HABs Team, he manages the Prevention, Control, and Mitigation of HABs Program or PCMHAB.

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Title: Spatiotemporal dynamics of groundfish availability to eastern Bering Sea bottom trawl surveys
Presenter(s): Cecilia O'Leary, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Groundfish Assessment Program
Date & Time: 29 October 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2076 (Traynor Room)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Cecilia O'Leary, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Groundfish Assessment Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Abstract: The proportion of groundfish species' population availability to the eastern Bering Sea shelf survey can change from year to year in response to environmentally-mediated trends affecting movement and distribution. We estimated the spatial availability and variation among groundfish species to the eastern Bering Sea across years by combining multiple fishery-independent bottom trawl surveys conducted throughout the Bering Sea. Based on these combined data sets from the Alaska Fisheries Science Center and the Russian TINRO-Centre, we calculated three different index estimators to determine the availability of groundfish: conventional design-based, k-nearest neighbor design-based, and VAST model-based.

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Title: Community-based participatory research to build extreme heat resilience
Presenter(s): Dr. Jeremy Hoffman of the Science Museum of Virginia
Date & Time: 29 October 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar, or for NOAA staff in Silver Spring, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Dr. Jeremy Hoffman of the Science Museum of Virginia

Sponsor(s): NOAA NESDIS NCEI

Abstract: How can community-based participatory research campaigns, known as "citizen science," aid in the creation of maps of urban heat as well as prime volunteers and stakeholders to take sustained action to ameliorate it? Here, I will discuss the impacts of campaigns in Richmond, VA, Baltimore, MD, Washington, D.C., and Boston, MA as case studies.

Jeremy Hoffman is the Chief Scientist at the Science Museum of Virginia and Affiliate Faculty in the Center for Environmental Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is interested in how communities can co-produce actionable climate science data related to heat, stormwater, and air quality, and how best to communicate those findings to stakeholders.

If you would like to present on a topic, speak to your Branch Chief and Sara Veasey (sara.veasey@noaa.gov).

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Title: Improving Microplastics Research
Presenter(s): Judith S. Weis, Professor Emerita, Rutgers University
Date & Time: 29 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below), or for NOAA staff in Silver Spring, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Note: The MP4 recording for this webinar can he viewed here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p2vz0cut7fjv/

Title:
Improving Microplastics Research

Presenter(s):
Judith S. Weis, Professor Emerita, Rutgers University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
There has been a virtual explosion of research on microplastics (MPs). Every week new articles are published, but not all are original or important. Dozens of papers report the number of microplastic particles found in some water body, but they cannot be compared because there are no standardized methods for collection or analysis. However, it has become clear that collecting with nets misses most of the MPs, since microfibers, which are by far the most abundant type when whole water samples are analyzed, pass through nets. These microfibers are derived primarily from synthetic clothing via wastewater from washing machines. Counting under a microscope is not as accurate as using sophisticated technology such as Raman or FTIR which can identify different plastic polymers. Another common study documents that some species consumes MPs. It seems that every animal studied eats them; it would be of greater interest to learn why they do or find one that does not ingest them. Although animals consume them, few studies have examined how soon and how many are egested. Most may pass through the gut without causing any noticeable effects; this needs to be studied. MPs are considered vectors for transferring contaminants to animals and up the food chain, but few studies demonstrate this with realistic scenarios such as providing the animals some real food and time to egest. Effects attributed to MPs may be symptoms of inadequate nutrition or a clogged digestive tract. It is also important to learn how much of the adsorbed contaminants the gut can desorb during the time that MPs are passing through. Future feeding studies should not use spherical MPs which are rare in aquatic environments but should use primarily microfibers which are the predominant shape found, provide real food, and allow time for egestion. Other research needs include examining respiration as a mode of intake in aquatic as well as in terrestrial biota, and developing ways to modify the manufacture of textiles to shed fewer microfibers.

Bio(s):
Dr. Judith S. Weis is a Professor Emerita of Biological Sciences at Rutgers University, Newark. Her research is on estuarine ecology and ecotoxicology, and she has published over 200 refereed scientific papers, as well as books for the general public on salt marshes, fish, crabs, and marine pollution, a technical book on marine pollution and one on biological invasions and animal behavior. She is interested in stresses in estuaries and their effects on organisms, populations and communities. She is on the editorial board for BioScience, is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and was a Fulbright Fellow in Indonesia. She has been on advisory committees for EPA, NOAA and NAS and chairs the Science Advisory Board of NJ DEP. She chaired the Biology Section of AAAS, and was president of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) in 2001. She received the Merit Award from the Society of Wetland Scientists in 2016.

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Title: 2019 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Science Review
Presenter(s): Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory -GFDL- Scientists
Date & Time: 29 October 2019
8:15 am - 5:30 pm ET
Location: Frick Chemistry Laboratory in Princeton, NJ and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Scientists " see agenda for specifics

Description: (all of the below "sub-items")

Sponsor(s): Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL)

Remote Access: https://mediacentrallive.princeton.edu/ (no registration required). This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.

Abstract: Please see https://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/2019review/. Laboratory scientific reviews are conducted periodically to evaluate the quality, performance and importance of research conducted in OAR laboratories relative to both internal and external interests, and to help strategically position the laboratory in its planning of future science. These reviews are intended to ensure that OAR laboratory research is linked to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Strategic Plan, relevant to NOAA's research mission and priorities, and consistent with NOAA planning, programming, and budgeting. This review will cover Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory research with a focus on the five years since the 2014 Review. The research themes are: (1) Modeling the Earth System, (2) Advancing the Understanding of the Earth System, and (3) Earth System Predictions and Projections.

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28 October 2019

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Meghan Dalton, Climate Impacts Research Consortium; Britt Parker, National Integrated Drought Information System
Date & Time: 28 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Meghan Dalton, Climate Impacts Research Consortium; Britt Parker, National Integrated Drought Information System

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System, Climate Impacts Research Consortium, USDA Northwest Climate Hub, National Weather Service

POC: Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Abstract: These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

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Title: Tools for Interpreting how and what neural networks learn, and their applications for climate and weather
Presenter(s): Imme Ebert-Uphoff, CIRA, Elizabeth Barnes, CSU, Ben Toms, CSU
Date & Time: 28 October 2019
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2554-2555
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Imme Ebert-Uphoff of CIRA and Elizabeth Barnes and Ben Toms of Colorado State University (presenting remotely)

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 904 841 535

Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20191028_Ebert-Uphoff.pdf

Abstract:
Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have emerged as an important tool for many environmental science applications. However, ANNs are not naturally transparent and are thus often used as a black box, i.e. without detailed understanding of their reasoning. Fortunately, new tools for the interpretation of ANN models are becoming available from the field of explainable AI. Such tools can provide great benefits for earth science researchers. In this tutorial we first provide a general overview, including methods for both ANN visualization and ANN attribution. Then we focus on one method in detail, namely layer-wise relevance propagation (LRP; sometimes known as Deep Taylor decomposition), and show how it can be used to identify the specific elements of the input that were most important for the ANN's prediction. Thus, this method helps "open the black box" and attribute specific predictions to specific predictands. We find LRP methods to be particularly useful, yet few in the earth science community seem to have discovered them. We demonstrate the use of LRP methods for a variety of applications related to weather and climate, and show their use for tasks ranging from debugging and designing ANN networks to gaining new scientific insights for atmospheric science applications.

Bio(s):
Imme Ebert-Uphoff received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mathematics from the Technical University of Karlsruhe (known today as Karlsruhe Institute of Technology or KIT). She received M.S and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. She was a faculty member in Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech for over 10 years, before joining the Electrical & Computer Engineering department at Colorado State in 2011 as research professor. Her research interests are in applying data science methods to climate applications. She is also very involved in activities to build bridges between the AI community and the earth science community, including serving on the steering committee of the annual Climate Informatics workshop, and of the NSF sponsored research coordination network (RCN) on Intelligent Systems for the Geosciences. Starting July 1, 2019, she is spending 50% of her time with CIRA to support their machine learning activities.

Dr. Elizabeth (Libby) Barnes is an associate professor of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University. She joined the CSU faculty in 2013 after obtaining dual B.S. degrees (Honors) in Physics and Mathematics from the University of Minnesota, obtaining her Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from the University of Washington, and spending a year as a NOAA Climate & Global Change Fellow at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Professor Barnes' research is focused on large scale atmospheric variability and the data analysis tools used to understand its dynamics. Topics of interest include jet-stream dynamics, Arctic-midlatitude connections, subseasonal-to-seasonal (S2S) prediction of extreme weather events (she is currently Task Force Lead for the NOAA MAPP Subseasonal-to-Seasonal (S2S) Prediction Task Force), health-related climate impacts, and data science methods for climate research (e.g. machine learning, causal discovery). She teaches graduate courses on fundamental atmospheric dynamics and data science and statistical analysis methods.

Ben Toms is a fourth year PhD student in the Barnes research group in the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University. His PhD research focuses on using neural networks to improve our understanding of decadal predictability within the climate system. This research requires a fundamental understanding of neural networks and techniques for their interpretation, so he enjoys testing which methods proposed by the computer science community are transferrable to atmospheric science.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

24 October 2019

Title: Selective Consumption of Sockeye Salmon by Brown Bears
Presenter(s): Alex Lincoln, King County Water and Land Resources Division
Date & Time: 24 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Alex Lincoln, King County Water and Land Resources Division

ABSTRACT
Animal foraging requires a series of complex decisions that ultimately ends with consumption of resources. The extent of consumption varies among consumers, including in predator-prey systems; some predators always consume prey completely, others may partially consume prey too large to be entirely consumed, and still others may partially consume prey even if that prey is small enough to be consumed in its entirety. Partial consumption of prey may allow predators to maximize energy intake through selectively feeding on energy-rich tissue, as is observed in bears (Ursus spp.) selectively feeding on Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.). Here, we examined selective and partial consumption of sockeye salmon (O. nerka) by brown bears (U. arctos) in western Alaska. We tested a series of hypotheses to determine what factors best explain why some salmon are killed and abandoned without tissue consumption, why bears choose to scavenge rather than predate salmon, and what tissues are consumed from the salmon that are fed upon. We also documented empirical relationships between salmon availability and consumption by bears to evaluate whether current salmon management in Bristol Bay, Alaska limits salmon intake by bears foraging in small streams. Through exploring the intricacies of selective and partial consumption of salmon by bears, this work aims to increase understanding of the bear-salmon predator-prey relationship and the flow of salmon-derived nutrients through aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems.

BIO
Alex Lincoln is a Senior Ecologist with the King County Water and Land Resources Division's River and Floodplain Management Section where she works on multi-benefit capital projects to reduce flood risk and promote salmon recovery. Alex completed her M.S. from the University of Washington's School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences in 2019, where she researched predator-prey interactions and wildlife behavior in Alaska, and impacts of restoration on salmonids in Washington. Alex grew up in California and earned her B.A. in Biology from Pomona College.

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Title: Using Science Operations Tools and Methods from NASA for Remote Presence Ocean Exploration on Earth: A case study from E/V Nautilus Cruise NA108
Presenter(s): David Lees, NASA Ames Research Center, Intelligent Robotics Group
Date & Time: 24 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA SIlver Spring Folks, SSMC4, Room 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Using Science Operations Tools and Methods from NASA for Remote Presence Ocean Exploration on Earth: A case study from E/V Nautilus Cruise NA108

Link to MP4 recording of webinar: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pbicuydcipjs/

Presenter(s):
David Lees, PhD, Senior Research Scientist, NASA Ames Research Center, Intelligent Robotics Group/Carnegie Mellon University

Project Partners:
Tamar Cohen, MS, Senior Computer Scientist, NASA Ames Research Center, Intelligent Robotics Group/SGT Inc.
Matthew Deans, PhD, Deputy Group Lead, NASA Ames Research Center, Intelligent Robotics Group

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators for this seminar are Christa.Rabenold@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
As part of the NASA/NOAA Systematic Underwater Biogeochemical Science and Exploration Analog (SUBSEA) project, NASA's Exploration Ground Data Systems (xGDS) software supported science operations at the Inner Space Center at University of Rhode Island for a recent E/V Nautilus Cruise to the Gorda Ridge. xGDS is designed to help scientists plan and monitor remote robotic or human science operations and organize the data they return. We will discuss the features of xGDS, how the team used it, our accomplishments, what we observed, and the impact xGDS had on the Ocean Exploration Trust's* (OET) operations, especially around support for active participation and engagement of a remotely located science team.
*OET is a NOAA partner, part of the new Ocean Exploration Cooperative Institute, and owner of E/V Nautilus

Bio(s):
David Lees is a research scientist in the Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) at NASA Ames Research Center. His current work is focused on the development and assessment of IRG's Exploration Ground Data Systems (xGDS). xGDS is a set of web-based software tools that has been used in multiple NASA mission analogs (including BASALT, PLRP, NEEMO, and D-RATS), and is intended as a testbed/prototype for new ground control tools concepts for future NASA missions. Dr. Lees was also responsible for the integration of portions of IRG's xGDS tools into the flight data systems of the MER and Phoenix missions to support 3-D visualization for science analysis and is currently supporting the MSL mission. He previously helped to develop IRG's 3-D visualization and simulation software (Viz/VERVE), which is used for scientific analysis and rover control in both IRG's Analog field tests and on the MER and Phoenix missions. David's overall research interests center on user interfaces, automated analysis and organization of field science data and 3-D visualization.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Product Evaluation and Highlights of My Research at the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites (CICS)
Presenter(s): Ryo Yoshida, Japan Meteorological Agency
Date & Time: 24 October 2019
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC1 Room 8331
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ryo Yoshida, Satellite Program Division, Observation Department, Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA)

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 908 461 130

Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20191024_Yoshida.pdf

https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20191024_Yoshida.pptx

Abstract:
I am completing a 1-year research visit program sponsored by the Japanese Government at the NOAA Satellite and Information Service (NESDIS) Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites (CICS), which is now the Cooperative Institute for Satellite Earth System Studies (CISESS). My research at CICS has primarily focused on evaluating the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Level 2 product. In this study, the GLM Level 2 product was validated using ground-based lightning observations, in terms of flash geographical distribution and flash detection efficiency, as well as group timing and geolocation accuracy. The presentation will provide an overview of JMA's Himawari satellites, results of the GLM product validation, and highlights of other studies I have conducted at CICS, such as cost benefit analysis of weather satellites.

Bio(s):
Mr. Yoshida's is a Scientific Officer at the Satellite Program Division, Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). His work at JMA has been concerned with the Himawari series satellites. He developed Himawari-8/9 image navigation and registration processing operating on the ground system. He was also responsible for development and implementation of Himawari-8/9 level 2 products at the Meteorological Satellite Center of JMA. Mr. Yoshida received B.S. and M.S. degrees in geophysics from Tohoku University, in 2007 and 2009, respectively.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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Title: Quantifying Observation Impacts in Ocean Data Assimilation Systems
Presenter(s): Andy Moore, PhD, Professor of Oceanography, University of California Santa Cruz
Date & Time: 24 October 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or for NOAA SIlver Spring Folks, SSMC4 - Medium Conference Room - 8348
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Quantifying Observation Impacts in Ocean Data Assimilation Systems

Presenter(s): Andy Moore, PhD, Professor of Oceanography, University of California Santa Cruz

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series and the NOAA/NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS); coordinators for this event are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Aijun.Zhang@noaa.gov.

Abstract:
Observations are a critical component of ocean analysis and forecast system. They are costly to acquire and maintaining current observing systems is a constant challenge in the face of rising costs and shrinking budgets. It therefore behooves the ocean modeling community to demonstrate the value of existing observing systems, and if possible, demonstrate ways in which a constellation of instruments can perhaps be optimized. In this talk Andy will present some state-of-the-art methods for monitoring the impact of observations within real-time ocean analysis-forecast systems run in support of U.S. IOOS, and which demonstrate the sometimes complex interplay between different observation types. The talk will end with a discussion about how these same methods could be used to augment and/or optimize existing observing systems.

Bio(s):
Andy obtained a PhD in Physical Oceanography from the University of Oxford, more years ago than he cares to remember, and since then has held research and academic positions at the CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, the Nova Oceanographic Center and the University of Colorado. He is currently a Professor of Oceanography at the University of California Santa Cruz. During his career he has worked on ocean data assimilation, adjoint methods, and coupled ocean-atmosphere modeling. He is one of the co-developers of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4-Dimensional Variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

23 October 2019

Title: Introduction to the Voices Oral History Archives
Presenter(s): Molly Graham, Voices Oral History Archives
Date & Time: 23 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library & Voices Oral History Archives

Speaker is remote, to join the webinar register here

Presenter(s): Molly Graham, Voices Oral History Archives, Program Manager

Abstract: Since 2003, the Voices Oral History Archives has been collecting and preserving eyewitness accounts to the changing environment. Today's presentation will introduce VOHA's mission, history, scope and various oral history collections. Also, we will talk about the value of oral history as a research and educational tool. Finally, we will spotlight current and upcoming projects, such as the NOAA 50th Anniversary Oral History Project, which seeks to document and celebrate NOAA's growth as an organization and its impact on environmental science, service and stewardship.

Bio(s): Molly Graham is a professional oral historian and documentarian. She trained at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine where she produced the award- winning radio documentary, Besides Life Here, which has been licensed by several National Public Radio affiliates. She has her master's degree in Library Science and Archives Management from Simmons College in Boston. Molly is the former director of the oral history program at the Wisconsin Veterans Museum and Assistant Director of the Rutgers Oral History Archives.

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Title: Microwave Soundings - How We Got Here
Presenter(s): Edward Kim, NASA/GSFC, ATMS Instrument Scientist
Date & Time: 23 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20706, Conference Room N440-460
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Sponsor(s): Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Edward Kim
NASA/GSFC
ATMS Instrument Scientist

Abstract
This talk will summarize the history of satellite microwave sounding, from its beginnings on early research satellites through its transition to operational satellites, to today's central role in numerical weather prediction and climate studies. Along the way, microwave sounders have flown on many of the major NASA/NOAA/DOD satellite series: Nimbus (1970s); DMSP (1979-present); TIROS-N and NOAA 6-14 (1980s-2000s); EOS & NOAA 15-20 (1990s-present). Sounders have also flown on Earth observing satellites from several other countries; we will touch on these briefly, including some stories from the early days. And, we will conclude with a peek at the future of microwave sounding.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Chesapeake DolphinWatch: Dolphins in the Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Helen Bailey, Ph.D., Research Associate Professor, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
Date & Time: 23 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or for NOAA SIlver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Chesapeake DolphinWatch: Dolphins in the Chesapeake Bay

The mp4 recording of the webinar is here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ppfgz6u2gozm/

Presenter(s):
Helen Bailey, Ph.D., Research Associate Professor, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Although documented sightings of bottlenose dolphins in the Chesapeake Bay date back to the 1800s, there is very little information on where they go, how long they spend there and what they are doing. Through our Chesapeake DolphinWatch app and website (www.chesapeakedolphinwatch.org) we have been able to raise public awareness about bottlenose dolphins in the Bay. As well allowing users to view and report dolphin sightings, we provide responsible viewing guidelines to encourage safe and respectful encounters with these wild animals. This sighting information has helped to guide where we have conducted passive acoustic monitoring to learn more about the dolphins' movements and behaviors within the Chesapeake Bay, and characterize the underwater soundscape. Through analysis of dolphin signature whistles we have identified individual calls allowing us to record the number and identity of individual bottlenose dolphins. These data provide an important baseline on the distribution and seasonal occurrence of bottlenose dolphins in the Chesapeake Bay.

Bio(s):
Helen Bailey is a Research Associate Professor at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. She has published over 50 journal articles, specializing in marine mammals and sea turtles. She received her B.A. (Hons) in Biological Sciences from the University of Oxford, UK, and her M.Sc. in Oceanography from the University of Southampton, UK. Dr. Bailey was awarded her Ph.D. at the University of Aberdeen (UK) for her work on the habitat use of bottlenose dolphins. She subsequently studied the underwater sound levels and environmental impacts of offshore wind turbines on marine mammals. Dr. Bailey then received a National Research Council postdoctoral award to study migration pathways and hot spots of marine predators at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) as part of the Census of Marine Life's Tagging of Pacific Predators project. She joined the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science in 2010 where her research focuses on studying movement ecology, patterns of habitat use and behavior of marine species, and its application to management and conservation.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

22 October 2019

Title: Working together to adapt to a rapidly changing North
Presenter(s): Leanna Heffner, Northwest Boreal LCC; Aaron Poe, Aleutian and Bering Sea Initiative; Danielle Stickman, Western Alaska LCC
Date & Time: 22 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Leanna Heffner (Northwest Boreal LCC), Aaron Poe (Aleutian and Bering Sea Initiative), Danielle Stickman (Western Alaska LCC)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract: Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) bring partners together to work on conservation solutions that help communities and decision makers adapt to and thrive in a rapidly changing north. Alaskans face many challenges as the climate warms, erosion accelerates, storms and flooding intensify, sea ice and river ice changes, wildfires increase, and subsistence resources shift. These challenges are too complex for any one entity to address alone. By working together we are better able to preserve the natural and cultural heritage of current and future generations of Alaskans. Despite recent changes in federal funding, and with new help from private funders, four of the five original Alaskan LCCs are still active:

Aleutian and Bering Sea Initiative
Northwest Boreal LCC
North Pacific LCC
Western Alaska LCC
Currently the LCCs are helping to lead projects focused around climate resilience and adaptation, coordinated and community-led monitoring, and collaborative, climate-smart approaches to land use planning. This presentation will give an overview of the four Alaska LCCs.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Gulf Watch Alaska: Long-term ecosystem monitoring (and data for you?) in the northern Gulf of Alaska
Presenter(s): Kris Holderied, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 22 October 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2076 (Traynor Room)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kris Holderied, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Abstract: Gulf Watch Alaska is the long-term ecosystem monitoring program of the Exxon Valdez oil spill Trustee Council. The program provides scientific data on nearshore and pelagic ecosystems to support management and public understanding of species injured by the spill and the environmental conditions that affect them. Multi-disciplinary data collected and compiled under the GWA program are provided for public and research use at www.gulfwatchalaska.org.

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Decoding a Decade of Detections: Acoustic Telemetry and Connectivity of Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary with the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Ocean
Presenter(s): Bethany Williams, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/MSE/Biogeography Branch and CSS Inc., and Matt Kendall, Marine Biologist, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/MSE/Biogeography Branch
Date & Time: 22 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar, or for folks at NOAA Silver Spring, SSMC4, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Decoding a Decade of Detections: Acoustic Telemetry and Connectivity of Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary with the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Ocean

Link to mp4 recordIng on Adobe Connect: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p7hzmi7t7kj3/

Presenter(s):
Bethany Williams, Marine Ecologist, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/MSE/Biogeography Branch and CSS Inc., and Matt Kendall, Marine Biologist, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/MSE/Biogeography Branch

Co-Authors:
Kimberly Roberson, Research Coordinator, NOAA/NOS/ONMS/GRNMS and
Joy Young, Fish and Wildlife Biologist, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy Gill. Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Gray's Reef national Marine Sanctuary is a protected natural area off the coast of Georgia that provides critical habitat for a wide range of fish and invertebrate species. In this study, we demonstrate the importance of Gray's Reef in supporting broader animal movements in the U.S. Atlantic coastal ocean, using ten years of acoustic telemetry data. Over 160 transient individuals of eighteen species have been detected at Gray's Reef since 2008, including a variety of sharks, fish, and sea turtles. Individuals traveled up to 2400 km to reach Gray's Reef, crossing both state and international boundaries. Detections of transient species at Gray's Reef suggest it may be a hub of migratory activity or known landmark on the migratory pathway of some individuals. With increasing use of acoustic telemetry technology, continued monitoring of Gray's Reef is critical to further understanding of the importance of this sanctuary.

Bio(s):
Bethany Williams has been working with NCCOS since February 2018. She initially began as a Sea Grant Knauss Fellow and has since transitioned to a contractor position with CSS Inc, supporting the Biogeography Branch. Bethany supports a variety of work in the BioGeo portfolio including acoustic telemetry, biogeographic assessments, and the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program. Prior to joining NCCOS/CSS, Bethany received a Master's in Marine Science from Virginia Institute of Marine Science.

Dr. Matt Kendall is a salty sailor who enjoys eel-wrangling, legos, sending Bethany off the boat during field missions, and letting her write his Bio for this seminar. He has been with the Biogeography Branch since his Knauss Fellowship 100 years ago.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

Title: Quantifying Upstream and Downstream Emissions from Oil and Natural Gas
Presenter(s): Dr. Brian McDonald, CIRES
Date & Time: 22 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library

Speaker is remote, webinar ONLY.

Presenter(s): Dr. Brian McDonald, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder and NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division

Abstract: The average US person consumes ~10 kilograms of products derived from oil and natural gas per day. In this talk, the emissions of methane and ozone and aerosol precursors will be discussed for three key sectors: (1) upstream oil and natural gas production, (2) transportation, and (3) volatile chemical products.

Bio(s): Dr. McDonald is a research scientist at the Cooperative Institute of Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado working at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, CO. Prior to arriving in Colorado, he received his Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering and Master's in Public Policy from the University of California, Berkeley. His expertise is on constructing emission inventories, assessments of long-term air quality trends, and regional weather-chemistry modeling.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

21 October 2019

Title: Sea Grant Spotlight: Sea Grant and PMEL Ocean Acidification Liaison
Presenter(s): Meg Chadsey, PMEL/OA Sea Grant
Date & Time: 21 October 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): Join the National Sea Grant Office as they highlight 5 of their liaisons in this webinar series. Hosted by the NOAA Central Library.

POC: elizabeth.rohring@noaa.gov and mchadsey@uw.edu

Presenter(s): Meg Chadsey, Pacific Marine Environmental Lab Sea Grant Ocean Acidification Liaison, Washington Sea Grant

Abstract: Each Sea Grant Liaison position is a unique reflection of the relationships and capacities of its respective host Sea Grant and NOAA programs, and the circumstances that led to its creation. In my case, the PMEL Ocean Acidification Liaison position has been profoundly shaped by Washington's leadership on Ocean Acidification, starting with the 2012 recommendations of Blue Ribbon Panel and the ensuing responses of state, tribal, local federal entities and NGOs inspired by these recommendations. Both Washington Sea Grant and NOAA PMEL have been key players since the beginning; the strength of the Liaison position has been the synergy it has brought to these efforts (something we like to refer to around WSG as the Sea Grant Glue').

Bio(s): A microbiologist by training, Meg discovered her true calling when she read Elizabeth Kolbert's seminal article about ocean acidification, The Darkening Sea. Initially contracted by Washington Sea Grant (WSG) to staff the Washington State Blue Ribbon Panel on Ocean Acidification in 2012, Meg was hired as WSG's first Ocean Acidification Specialist in 2013, and shortly thereafter appointed NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab Liaison (a joint position currently shared by WSG's Coastal Hazards Specialist Carrie Garrison-Laney). Meg has a bachelor's degree in Genetics from Cornell University, a Ph.D in Microbiology from the University of Washington, and worked as a molecular biologist before returning to marine science (her first love).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Lake Erie Modeling and Data Assimilation to Improve Operational Forecast
Presenter(s): Dr. Yi Chao, Remote Sensing Solutions, Inc.
Date & Time: 21 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): Join the NOAA Central Library and the Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) for the new NOAA Innovators Series! This series will be facilitated by Tiffany House, SBIR Commercialization Specialist.

Presenter(s): Dr. Yi Chao, Principal Scientist, Remote Sensing Solutions, Inc.

Abstract: A computationally-efficient data assimilation module is described using an open-source and non-proprietary programming language. Demonstration of this data assimilation module in the Lake Erie Operational Forecast System is presented. Advantages and disadvantages of this data assimilation method will be discussed.

Bio(s): Dr. Yi Chao joined Remote Sensing Solutions since 2012 after 20 years working at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. Dr. Chao was the Project Scientist at JPL and contributed to the first NASA satellite known as Aquarius to measure ocean salinity from space. He has a Ph.D. degree from Princeton University and has more than 100 peer-reviewed publications.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

18 October 2019

Title: October 2019 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy - ACCAP, a NOAA RISA Team
Date & Time: 18 October 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) - A NOAA RISA Team and National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (rthoman@alaska.edu)

Abstract: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for November and the winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Introduction to the Global/Regional Analysis and Prediction System (GRAPES) global system
Presenter(s): JianDong Gong, CMA
Date & Time: 18 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP 2554
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): JianDong Gong, CMA

Sponsor(s): ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER SEMINAR for more information visit https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

Abstract:
The Global/Regional Analysis and Prediction System (GRAPES) is an operational numerical weather prediction system developed by China with the supports of the Ministry of Science and Technology and the China Meteorological Administration. By end of 2019, a series of GRAPES sub-systems have been established to follow up the GRAPES_GFS, such as GRAPES_GEPS (global ensemble prediction system), GRAPE_MESO (3km regional system, 10km regional rapid update assimilation system, 10 km regional ensemble prediction system) and GRAPES-Typhoon (the northwest Pacific-Indian Ocean typhoon prediction system).

Recently, there are many upgrades of GRAPES-GFS around dynamics, physics and data assimilation. The upgraded system introduced 1) The three-dimensional reference profile, predictor-corrector semi-implicit semi-Lagrangian (SISL) scheme, high-resolution spectral filtering terrain, which effectively improves the accuracy of the model dynamics; 2) The improved boundary layer scheme and two-moment microphysics scheme under Charney-phillips vertical grid, and the optimization of surface layer to match Charney-phillips vertical grid, the modification of convection scheme which effectively mitigation humidity bias; 3) The improvement from global 3DVar to 4DVar analysis, and the influence of linearization of moisture physical process on the analysis; 4) The tangent linear model and adjoint model developed in 4DVar system which is also applied to the global ensemble prediction system for singular vector initial perturbation.

The verification statistics have demonstrated the improvement of GFS from each upgrade. Meanwhile, increasing the model vertical levels from 60 to 87 and ensemble of 4DVar based En4DVar have been investigated as well. Finally, CMA NWP center's model development plan (out to 2025) will be presented.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

17 October 2019

Title: Using Pelagic Predators to Understand Biophysical Interactions at the Oceanic (Sub)Mesoscale
Presenter(s): Camrin Braun, University of Washington
Date & Time: 17 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Camrin Braun, University of Washington

Abstract: A central challenge to the understanding and management of ocean seascapes is the dynamic spatial and temporal nature of marine ecosystems. Yet, the knowledge of the physical processes structuring these environments is in its infancy but is critical for any mechanistic and predictive understanding of the distribution and population dynamics of oceanic predators. The talk will use several model apex predators to explore a primary biophysical mechanism influencing pelagic ecosystems and the communities they support. These results motivate a case study to investigate the ubiquity of and potential motivations for top marine predators to frequent the deep ocean. By integrating across multiple levels of organization, from physiology to ecosystems, we can elucidate underlying mechanisms that govern complex, multifaceted traits such as behavior of top predators. This has important implications for formulating effective management strategies for these commercially-important species that account for ocean dynamics and is integral to anticipating how marine predators will respond to a changing ocean.

Bio(s): Camrin Braun is a marine ecologist and Assistant Professor at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington. Camrin's research at the interface of top predator ecology and oceanography seeks to unite physical-biological interactions with the challenges of managing living marine resources in a dynamic ocean. He is particularly passionate about applying computational, lab and field-based approaches to emerging ocean challenges. For example, his work in predator-environment relationships has demonstrated the significance of the ocean twilight zone for top predators, a deep region of the marine realm that remains largely unexplored. He received his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology-Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Oceanography and recently completed a NASA-funded postdoc at the Applied Physics Laboratory (UW) studying the influence of (sub)mesoscale oceanography on pelagic ecosystems. Dr. Braun received his MSc from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (Thuwal, Saudi Arabia) and is a National Geographic Explorer and member of the Explorer's Club.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Laura Edwards, South Dakota State Climatologist and Brad Rippey, USDA Office of the Chief Economist
Date & Time: 17 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Laura Edwards, South Dakota State Climatologist and Brad Rippey, USDA Office of the Chief Economist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

POCs: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Engaging Diverse Audiences in Marine and Coastal Protection
Presenter(s): Josie Spearman of Guana Tolomato Matanzas NERR, Ellen M. Leroy-Reed of Friends of Guana Tolomato Matanzas NERR , Dave Feliz of Elkhorn Slough NERR , Jay Haigler of Diving with a Purpose, and Lauren Swaddell of NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program
Date & Time: 17 October 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Engaging Diverse Audiences in Marine and Coastal Protection

Presenter(s):
Josie Spearman, Guana Tolomato Matanzas NERR
Ellen M. Leroy-Reed, Friends of Guana Tolomato Matanzas NERR
Dave Feliz, Elkhorn Slough NERR
Jay Haigler, Diving with a Purpose
Lauren Swaddell NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program

Co-

Sponsor(s):
NOAA National MPA Center and OCTO (MPA News, OpenChannels, EBM Tools Network). Webinar points of contact: zac.cannizzo@noaa.gov and lauren.wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Managers of coastal and marine protected areas are responsible for places that are important for a wide range of audiences, yet we often come up short in engaging meaningfully with diverse audiences. This webinar will present brief case studies about coastal and marine protected areas and non-profit partners that are working with people from diverse backgrounds to provide opportunities to understand and enjoy our ocean and coasts. Educational initiatives from two national estuarine research reserves (NERRS) -- Guana Tolomato Matanzas (GTM) in Florida and Elkhorn Slough in California -- will be presented. GTM NERR's educational programs have recently increased their ability to accommodate students and potential visitors with physical, emotional, and intellectual challenges and communities with little or no access to transportation. Elkhorn Slough NERR conducts after school and science mentoring programs, regular school field trips, and subsidized school transportation programs, including for several predominantly Hispanic communities. Diving with a Purpose (DWP) is working with partners to engage and educate the community-at-large on cultural heritage resources that exist in marine protected areas throughout the US with a focus on the African Diaspora. Finally, the first Knauss (Sea Grant) Fellow from Guam will speak about her experiences.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: Developing habitat suitability criteria to protect streamflow for desert fishes
Presenter(s): Larissa Lee, Office of Habitat Conservation
Date & Time: 17 October 2019
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Larissa Lee, Restoration and Ecosystem Services Fellow, NOAA NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation, Restoration Center

Sponsor(s): Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Christine Hirt, (christine.hirt@noaa.gov)

Abstract: As demand for water resources in the desert Southwest grows, managers have an increased need for information on the habitat requirements of desert fish species. This presentation will discuss results of habitat suitability criteria developed for fish species in four Arizona streams, and how these results can be used to protect instream flows.

About the speaker: Larissa Lee recently earned an M.S. in Natural Resources at the University of Arizona, where she studied habitat use and streamflow requirements of desert fishes. Prior to completing her masters and becoming a Knauss Sea Grant Fellow in the Restoration Center, Larissa worked on fisheries management issues throughout the Rocky Mountains, holding positions with the National Park Service in Yellowstone, Trout Unlimited in Montana, Idaho Fish and Game, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Salt Lake City, UT.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Understanding coral phenotypic variation to support reef restoration
Presenter(s): Katie Lohr, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 17 October 2019
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Katie Lohr, Conservation Science Fellow, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s): Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Christine Hirt, (christine.hirt@noaa.gov)

Abstract: As awareness of and capacity for coral restoration increase globally, practitioners are increasingly interested in identifying and culturing coral genotypes with key traits that could enhance survival under changing ocean conditions. As a step toward this goal, we assessed phenotypic variation in situ for an established nursery population of staghorn coral (Acropora cervicornis). Next, we applied untargeted metabolomic profiling to a subset of phenotypically-diverse corals to determine whether unique metabolite fingerprints could be discerned. Our results suggest that significant phenotypic variation exists in coral nurseries, and that future metabolomics work could assist with phenotypic assessments to inform future restoration efforts.

About the speaker: Katie recently completed a Ph.D. in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences at the University of Florida. Her studies focused on strategies for increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of acroporid coral restoration. Prior to completing her Ph.D., Katie spent several years working on coral reef conservation and restoration projects at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute in Little Cayman, Cayman Islands. She previously earned an M.P.S. in Marine Biology and Fisheries at the University of Miami/RSMAS and a B.S. in Biology from the University of Michigan.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 October 2019

Title: Conceptualizing and Designing Collaborative Science Projects
Presenter(s): Alison Watts, University of New Hampshire; Jennifer West, Narragansett Bay NERR; Nikki Dix, Guana Tolomat Matanzas NERR; and Julia Wondolleck, University of Michigan
Date & Time: 16 October 2019
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminars

Title: Conceptualizing and Designing Collaborative Science Projects

Presenter(s): Alison Watts, University of New Hampshire; Jennifer West, Narragansett Bay NERR; Nikki Dix, Guana Tolomat Matanzas NERR; and Julia Wondolleck, University of Michigan

Sponsor(s): NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html).

Seminar POCs for questions: Dwight.Trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

Abstract:
Planning a collaborative research project can be challenging " it requires integrating researchers and the intended users of the science in a collaborative process that is unlike most traditional research approaches.

Join us for a panel discussion webinar highlighting the collective advice of three panelists who have helped design and manage collaborative science projects addressing a range of coastal management issues. This webinar will help participants understand the key factors to consider in designing collaborative research projects. The panel discussion will explore lessons learned about:
  • Conceptualizing research to ensure it addresses natural resource management needs; and
  • Designing a collaborative research process to ensure that it succeeds.


Bio(s):
Alison Watts, PhD, Research Assistant Professor, University of New Hampshire. Learn more about her project.

Jennifer West, Coastal Training Program Coordinator, Narragansett Bay NERR. Learn more about her involvement in a recent project, and a regional initiative to advance marsh resilience.

Nikki Dix, PhD, Research Director, Guana Tolomato Matanzas NERR. Learn about her work in recent projects about living shorelines and oyster management.

Julia Wondolleck, PhD, NERRS Science Collaborative. Learn more about Julia's research and her Science Collaborative work developing training and tools to help teams manage their collaborative processes.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the work 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Publons: Author Data Made Better
Presenter(s): Tom Zamocjin & Don Sechler, Clarivate Analytics
Date & Time: 16 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 E W Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Join us in the NOAA Central Library for a workshop training on Clarivate Analytics new platform Publons.

Presenter(s): Tom Zamocjin & Don Sechler, Clarivate Analytics

Topic: Overview of the new Author Search capabilities in Web of Science, designed to help researchers locate their papers using Web of Science, and then claim them to their Publons ResearcherID profile.

Objective: Publons integration with unique author identifiers like ResearcherID and ORCiD can help you bring all your publications, citation metrics, peer reviews and journal editing work together in one place. We will spend most of the hour familiarizing you with the user experience, and will demonstrate how a NOAA researcher can get started using a live example!

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Usage of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Sensor and Instruments from Other Satellites in Disaster Response and Monitoring
Presenter(s): William Straka, Researcher University of Wisconsin - Madison, Space Science and Engineering Center, SSEC, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, CIMSS
Date & Time: 16 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webex Only no in-person conference room will be used
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Sponsor(s): Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Presenter(s): William Straka, Researcher. University of Wisconsin - Madison, Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS)

Abstract
In the last several years, next generation of weather satellites, such as GOES-16 and NOAA-20, have operational, providing higher temporal and higher spatial resolution products. In addition, the next generation of United States polar satellites have unique channels, such as the Day Night Band (DNB) as well as other instruments which can provide a variety of measurements that can aid in the monitoring of unfolding disasters as they occur as well as post disaster monitoring. This began in 2013 when the JPSS Program first tested a response to the Galena AK flooding along the Yukon River in May 2013, providing the flood maps derived from the VIIRS instrument to the National Weather Service (NWS) River Forecast Centers (RFCs). This effort began to expand during the extraordinary tropical cyclone season of 2017, where the VIIRS Flood Map product was provided to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) as well as other federal agencies, along with Day Night Band imagery showing the power outages after both Irma and Maria that same year. Since then, JPSS personnel are considered standing members of FEMA's core of technical experts providing critical products to support their response to such events as tropical cyclones, wildfires, and volcanic eruptions. This has included the support of the JPSS Program in the FEMA-lead National Level Exercise (NLE) 2018, which was a simulated Category 4 hurricane hitting Hampton Roads VA, where simulated products were provided to help exercise various parts of the simulated response.

Along with the response on the federal level the JPSS Program has critical to Federal, State, and local agencies as they have responded to natural disasters. In additional, products from the JPSS program have been used internationally via the International Charter, which is effort to make satellite data and products available to countries without their own satellite capability for disaster response.

The JPSS Program has created a new role to assist in coordinate the response these various incidents. This presentation will provide an overview of how JPSS Program has responded to disasters over the years along with how it plans to respond as the products and data become more widely known.

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15 October 2019

Title: Spatiotemporal variation in the vertical distribution of eastern Bering Sea walleye pollock and implications for gear availability
Presenter(s): Cole Monnahan, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences
Date & Time: 15 October 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2076 (Traynor Room)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Cole Monnahan, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Abstract: Accurate estimates of distributions of semi-pelagic species requires accounting for changes in vertical distribution because acoustic (AT) and bottom trawl (BT) gears both have vertical blind zones. We resolve this issue by explicitly modeling vertical distribution of eastern Bering Sea walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) in an index standardization, using both BT and AT data simultaneously, with a feature we added to the VAST software. Annual availability was variable for AT (35-93%) and BT (49-92%) from 2007-2018 and indicated that both survey types provide distinct, but overlapping, information about the spatiotemporal vertical distribution of semi-pelagic fishes.

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Title: Building the Field Guide of the Future: New Approaches to Identification of Deep-sea Corals in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Dr. Erin E. Easton, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. Presenting remotely from Charleston, SC
Date & Time: 15 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar OR for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Building the field guide of the future: new approaches to identification of deep-sea corals in the Gulf of Mexico

Presenter(s):
Dr. Erin E. Easton, Biological Oceanographer, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. Presenting remotely from Charleston, SC.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator for this event is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Link to poster is here; feel free to download and post in your office,

Bio(s):
Dr. Erin E. Easton is a biological oceanographer specializing in the ecology and genetics of benthic fauna. She is postdoctoral fellow at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley with the NOAA Center for Coastal and Marine Ecosystems, funded by the NOAA Educational Partnership Program with Minority-Serving Institutions Cooperative Agreement Award #NA16SEC4810009. For the last six months, she has been working in collaboration with National Center for Coastal Ocean Science researchers Dr. Peter Etnoyer and Dr. Thomas Greig on mesophotic octocoral genetics. She is working towards developing a field guide for the mesophotic octocorals in the Gulf of Mexico and identifying new genetic markers that will improve our understanding of the diversity of these vulnerable ecosystems. These data will provide critical data to inform management, conservation, and restoration decisions.

Abstract:
The continental shelf of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is muddy expanse punctuated by a few protruding reefs at mesophotic depths (30-150 m). These reefs provide essential habitat for abundant and diverse marine communities, including octocorals. Octocorals are difficult to identify from images, and the morphological variations are not well understood for many taxa. In addition, traditional octocoral barcoding regions often reveal few to no genetic differences within or among species, and most GOM mesophotic octocorals lack reference barcodes. Therefore, our understanding of the octocoral diversity on these reefs is limited. My goals are thus to identify new mitochondrial barcode regions for diversity assessments, obtain DNA barcodes for each species, to obtain complete mitochondrial genomes for representative species, and to produce a field guide for species assignments based on in-situ images, microscope images, and genetic data. Results to date show that field identifications are often inaccurate. Some morphotypes consist of multiple distinct lineages or putative species. Also, some new mitogenome regions may better resolve interspecific differences than the standard barcoding regions. These data will be critical for updating habitat suitability maps and informing restoration and management decisions.

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10 October 2019

Title: Life and Death of Big Chinook Salmon in the Ocean
Presenter(s): Andrew Seltz, University of Alaska-Fairbanks
Date & Time: 10 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Andrew Seltz, University of Alaska-Fairbanks

Map and directions to NWFSC: https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/contact/map.cfm

ABSTRACT
While Chinook salmon is widely distributed in offshore waters of the North Pacific Ocean, and of great importance, little is known about this species' oceanic ecology. To address this knowledge gap, we used pop-up satellite archival tags to examine the life of large individuals in the ocean, including movement, diving behavior, and thermal environment. An unexpected and darker finding was about the death of many of the tagged fish, which may help understand life history changes observed over the past few decades.

BIO
Andy Seitz is an Associate Professor of Fisheries at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. After growing up in Maine, he completed his undergraduate degree at Cornell University. Needing a break from studying, he worked as a tuna research technician for five years at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Wanting a change from traffic jams in California, he moved to Fairbanks, Alaska for graduate school and ultimately his current position in the Fisheries Department.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

Title: Be a Part of the Change: A Guide to Customizing State Plane for 2022
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Dennis, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 10 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Be a Part of the Change: A Guide to Customizing State Plane for 2022

Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Dennis, National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. POC: Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey

Abstract: We hope you already know about the State Plane Coordinate System of 2022 (SPCS2022). But you may not know how (or whether) you can provide input on the design of SPCS2022 zones. If you want to be a part of the change in SPCS2022, then this webinar will provide useful information"even if you are already acquainted with the request, proposal, and design submittal process.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge is helpful.

Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: https://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

Title: Southeast Drought Update Webinar
Presenter(s): Victor Murphy, National Weather Service
Date & Time: 10 October 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Victor Murphy, Climate Services Program Manager at the National Weather Service (NWS) Southern Region Headquarters

Pam Knox, Agricultural Climatologist at the University of Georgia

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, American Association of State Climatologists, University of Georgia, Auburn University

POC: Meredith Muth (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Drought has developed rapidly in the Southeast. Record-breaking late summer and early fall heat and persistent short-term dryness have led to a sharp increase in drought intensity and coverage across the region. This Drought Update Webinar will provide a comprehensive overview of current drought conditions in the Southeast and the outlook for the rest of the year. Impacts on agriculture sector will be highlighted.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Meredith Muth (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

9 October 2019

Title: There is no I in EAFM: Adapting Integrated Ecosystem Assessment for Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas NMFS/NEFSC
Date & Time: 9 October 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas, Biologist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Resource managers worldwide are being asked to consider the ecosystem while making management decisions. However, it can be difficult to change management systems accustomed to evaluating a constrained set of objectives, often on a species-by-species basis. Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) provides a flexible framework for addressing ecosystem considerations in decision making. IEA was adapted to address species, fleet, habitat, and climate interactions by the US Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) as part of their Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management (EAFM) in 2016. The Council's EAFM framework uses risk assessment as a first step to prioritize combinations of managed species, fleets, and ecosystem interactions for consideration. Second, a conceptual model is developed identifying key environmental, ecological, social, economic, and management linkages for a high-priority fishery. Third, quantitative modeling addressing Council-specified questions and based on interactions identified in the conceptual model is applied to evaluate alternative management strategies that best balance management objectives. As strategies are implemented, outcomes are monitored and the process is adjusted, and/or another priority identified in risk assessment can be addressed. The Council completed an initial EAFM risk assessment in 2017. First, the Council identified a range of ecological, social, and management objectives or risk elements. All objectives/risk elements were evaluated with ecosystem indicators using risk assessment criteria developed by the Council. In 2018, the Council identified summer flounder as a high risk fishery and is now finalizing an EAFM conceptual model. Annual ecosystem reporting updates ecosystem indicators and the risk assessment. The Council's rapid progress in implementing EAFM resulted from positive collaboration between managers, stakeholders, and scientists. Collaboration is essential to IEA and to the success of EAFM.

Bio(s): Dr. Sarah Gaichas has been a Research Fishery Biologist with the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch at the NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA since September 2011. She is a member of the Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee, has been active in ecosystem reporting and management strategy evaluation for both the Mid-Atlantic and New England Fishery Management Councils. Sarah's primary research is on integrated ecosystem assessment, management strategy evaluation, and ecosystem modeling. Her duties include developing, testing, and using ecosystem data, indicators, and models in natural resource management, and simulation testing management strategies (including analytical tools) that address the needs of diverse ecosystem users. Sarah previously worked at the NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA from 1997-2011 as an observer program analyst, a stock assessment scientist, and an ecosystem modeler. Sarah earned her Ph.D. from the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science in 2006, her M.S from the College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 1997, and her B.A. in English Literature from Swarthmore College in 1991.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: An ecosystem-based risk assessment for California fisheries co-developed by scientists, managers, and stakeholders
Presenter(s): Jameal Samhour, NMFS/NWFSC
Date & Time: 9 October 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jameal Samhouri, NWFSC

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract: The intensive harvest of wild populations for food can pose a risk to food security and to conservation goals. While ecosystem approaches to management are a potential means to balance those risks, they require a method of assessment that is commensurate across multiple objectives. A major challenge is conducting these assessments in a way that considers the priorities and knowledge of stakeholders. In this study, we co-developed an ecological risk assessment (ERA) for fisheries in California (USA) with scientists, managers, and stakeholders. This ERA was intended to meet the requirements of existing policy mandates in the state of California and provide a systematic, efficient, and transparent approach to prioritize fisheries for additional management actions, including the development of fisheries management plans fully compliant with California laws. We assessed the relative risk posed to target species, bycatch, and habitats from nine state-managed fisheries and found risk to target species was not necessarily similar to risks to bycatch and habitat groups. In addition, no single fishery consistently presented the greatest risk for all bycatch or habitat groups. However, considered in combination, the greatest risk for target species, bycatch groups, and habitats emerged from two commercial fisheries for California halibut. The participatory process used to generate these results offers the potential to increase stakeholders' trust in the assessment and therefore its application in management. We suggest that adopting similar processes in other management contexts and jurisdictions will advance progress toward eco- system-based fisheries management that simultaneously satisfies fisheries, conservation, and relationship-building objectives.

Bio(s): Jameal Samhouri leads the Ecosystem Science Program at the NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA. His research focuses on adapting ecological principles to inform ocean management and conservation, using a combination of theory, quantitative analysis, and fieldwork. Jameal serves as a member of the California Current Integrated Ecosystem Assessment team, as a core team member for the Pacific Fisheries Management Council Climate and Communities Initiative, and on the Implementation Team for the Western Regional Action Plan associated with the National Climate Science Strategy at NOAA Fisheries. He completed both of his degrees in ecology and evolutionary biology (PhD, UCLA, 2007; AB, Princeton University, 2000).

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Decision and Information System for the Coastal waters of Oman (DISCO) An integrative tool for managing coastal resources under changing climate
Presenter(s): Joaquim Goes, Lamont Doherty
Date & Time: 9 October 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA College Park folks, NCWCP, Rm 3555
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

NOCCG Seminar crosslisted with OneNOAA and STAR Seminars

Presenter(s): Joaquim I. Goes, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University

Seminar

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG). This seminar will not be recorded. Slides may be shared upon request (send email to the POC listed below).

Abstract: Of the many anthropogenic and climate-driven changes being reported in oceanic ecosystems worldwide, the recent advent of the green Noctiluca scintillans (herein after Noctiluca) as the dominant bloom forming organism represents the most dramatic and extreme of all. Large widespread and intense blooms of Noctiluca have now become a common feature in the Arabian Sea and in many other tropical coastal ecosystems of southeast Asia that come under the influence of the Indian monsoons. In the Arabian Sea outbreaks of Noctiluca blooms have been attributed to the seasonal shoaling of hypoxic and low pH waters. It recent rapid range expansion has been attributed to ocean stratification and warming Because Noctiluca is not a preferred food for zooplankton, its emergence at the base of the food chain represents a threat to many countries where coastal marine resources are of great economic and cultural significance.

This presentation will highlight new results from a satellite and coupled physical biological modeling effort called DISCO aimed at 1) investigating the origins of Noctiluca and its unique ecophysiological characteristics and, 2) developing Noctiluca specific ocean color algorithms and 3) developing based decision support tools specifically geared towards mitigating large socio-economic losses being caused by massive Noctiluca blooms along the coast of the Sultanate of Oman.

Bio(s):
Fields of interest: a) Marine phytoplankton physiologyand productivity b) Climate change and its impact on ocean biota andbiogeochemical processes c) Development of ocean color and other remote sensingalgorithms and methods for studying ocean carbon cycling and air-sJoaquim I. Goesbio: https://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/user/jig
Seminar POC for questions or access to slides: Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

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Title: Postponed: Prevention, Control, Mitigation, and Socioeconomics of Harmful Algal Blooms: FY 2020 Federal Funding Opportunity Overview and Q&A
Presenter(s): Felix Martinez, PCMHAB Program Manager, NCCOS/Competitive Research Program, NOAA
Date & Time: 9 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar, or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Note: This 10/9 seminar is subject to Federal Funding Opportunity getting posted in Federal Register by 10/9/19.

Title:
Prevention, Control, Mitigation, and Socioeconomics of Harmful Algal Blooms: FY 2020 Federal Funding Opportunity Overview and Q&A

Presenter(s): Felix Martinez, PCMHAB Program Manager, NCCOS/Competitive Research Program, NOAA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) and National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Since the authorization of the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act, NOAA has made available competitive funding for research on how and why harmful algal blooms (HABs) form and persist, as well as addressing the effects of the blooms through bloom prevention, control of their spread, or mitigation of their impacts. Through this webinar we will provide those interested in HABs research with information and answer questions about NCCOS/CRP's FY 20 Federal Funding Opportunity focused on prevention, control, mitigation, and socioeconomics of HABs.

Bio(s):
Felix Martinez has over 15 years of experience as a Federal Program Officer in NOAA. Since coming to NOAA, Felix has developed and implemented research programs that have funded projects focused on coral reefs, mesophotic coral ecosystems, invasive species, hypoxia, valuation of ecosystem services, harmful algal blooms, and ecosystem based management. As part of the NCCOS/CRP HABs Team, he manages the Prevention, Control, and Mitigation of HABs Program or PCMHAB.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

8 October 2019

Title: OceanReports: The first intelligent web application for marine spatial analysis of the entire U.S. EEZ
Presenter(s): Dr. James A. Morris, Jr., Marine Ecologist at NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 8 October 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. James A. Morris, Jr., Marine Ecologist at NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Abstract: OceanReports (https://coast.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/tools/ort.html) is the most comprehensive web-based spatial assessment tool for the ocean in the U.S., designed to improve decision-making and increase transparency for ocean and coastal users, and resource managers. The tool contains approximately 100 distinct data layers capable of analyzing energy and minerals, natural resources (including species and habitats), transportation and infrastructure, oceanographic and biophysical conditions, and the local ocean economy for any area of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). Learn more about OceanReports from Dr. Morris and help NOAA determine how formal and informal educators can utilize this robust online product.

OceanReports was developed through a partnership between the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, NOAA, and the Department of Energy, and utilizes new and authoritative data from MarineCadastre.gov and other trusted sources.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: HabCam: The benefits and uses of a towed-camera system for fisheries ecosystem monitoring
Presenter(s): Tasha O'Hara, Coonamessett Farm Foundation and Nicole Charriere, Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 8 October 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2076 (Traynor Room)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Tasha O'Hara, Coonamessett Farm Foundation and Nicole Charriere, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Abstract: HabCam, or Habitat Mapping Camera, is an underwater towed-camera system that collects continuous, high-resolution benthic images, in addition to a suite of oceanographic data. Since the vehicle's first inception in 2002, the system has grown to include six distinctive versions, demonstrating its success as a non-invasive and low-impact surveying tool. Two of these system versions, HabCamV3 and V4, are respectively in use by the Coonamessett Farm Foundation and the Northeast Fisheries Science Center, and aid in tracking fisheries populations and behaviors, as well as overall ecosystem monitoring and other applications.

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar
Presenter(s): Meredith Muth, NIDIS
Date & Time: 8 October 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): TBD

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

POC: Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar is part of a monthly (twice a month during drought status) webinar series designed to provide stakeholders, water-resource managers, and other interested parties in the ACF region with timely information on current drought status, seasonal forecasts and outlooks, streamflow conditions and forecasts, groundwater conditions, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir conditions.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: SMALL SONAR USV Maps Safe Passage for Shipping in Marsh Harbor Post Hurricane Dorian
Presenter(s): Anthony Mulligan, Hydronalix
Date & Time: 8 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): Join the NOAA Central Library and the Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) for the new NOAA Innovators Series! This series will be facilitated by Derek Parks, Technology Transfer Program Manager, NOAA Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) (derek.parks@noaa.gov)

Speaker is remote, webinar ONLY

Presenter(s): Anthony Mulligan, CEO/President, Hydronalix

Abstract: Team of initial disaster responders deployed with a small 37 pound unmanned surface vehicle (USV) equipped with side scan sonar to map clear passage and open shipping lane immediately after Hurricane Dorian passed Abaco Island, Bahamas.

Bio(s): Anthony Mulligan founded Hydronalix to develop advanced surface robots in 2009 after he sold his successful UAV company to Defense Prime BAE Systems. He has been active in developing and using robotic systems for earth science, disaster response, law enforcement, and defense missions since 2001. He has managed over $120 million in funding for R&D, acquisition, and deployment in this field since 2000.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information: https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Estimation of Turbulent Heat Fluxes and Gross Primary Productivity via Variational Assimilation of Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature and Leaf Area Index
Presenter(s): Sayed Bateni, University of Hawai'i
Date & Time: 8 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP Room 2155, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sayed Bateni, University of Hawai'i

Sponsor(s): ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER SEMINAR for more information visit https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

Abstract:
Assimilation of land surface temperature (LST) observations into variational data assimilation (VDA) frameworks to estimate turbulent heat ?uxes has been the subject of several studies. However, current VDAs neglect the role of leaf area index (LAI) in the simulation of vegetation dynamics and gross primary productivity (GPP). In this study, remotely sensed LST and LAI measurements are assimilated into a coupled surface energy balance-vegetation dynamic model (SEB-VDM) within a VDA system to estimate both turbulent heat fluxes and GPP. The SEB and VDM are coupled by relating photosynthesis in the VDM to transpiration in the SEB equation. The unknown parameters of the VDA system are neutral bulk heat transfer coefficient (CHN), soil evaporative fraction (EFS), canopy evaporative fraction (EFC), and specific leaf area (SLA). The performance of the VDA approach is tested over the Heihe River Basin (HRB) in northwest China, which covers an area of approximately 1.43 - 106 km2. The spatio-temporal patterns in the EFS estimates are consistent with those of SMAP soil moisture data. The estimated turbulent heat fluxes and GPP agree well with the corresponding eddy covariance measurements at eight sites in the HRB. The specific leaf area (SLA) retrievals show a physically reasonable response to changes in rainfall and irradiance. Overall, the results show that the developed VDA approach can extract the implicit information in the sequences of space-borne LAI and LST measurements to estimate sensible and latent heat fluxes, and GPP.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information: https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Adventures in Forecasting the Cyanobacterial Bloom in Lake Erie
Presenter(s): Rick Stumpf, Ph.D., Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science - NCCOS
Date & Time: 8 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Adventures in Forecasting the Cyanobacterial Bloom in Lake Erie

Presenter(s):
Rick Stumpf, Ph.D., Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science - NCCOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Link to mp4 recording: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pzxrhe3f1lq5/

Must have AdobeConnect installed to access recordings.

Abstract:
In 2012, we started the first seasonal forecast of the cyanobacterial bloom in western Lake Erie. Over the 8 years of forecasting, we have learned a few things about the bloom and models, and may have made some progress in understanding the blooms by reviewing the forecasts.

Bio(s):
Rick Stumpf is located at NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). He has been working on harmful algal blooms since Gulf of Mexico red tide showed up in North Carolina, and on Lake Erie (and cyanobacteria) for about 15 years. He is responsible within NOAA for trying to transition forecasts of harmful algal blooms into routine and useful products. He uses satellites as a tool in his work, which has included wetlands, seagrass, coral, water quality, as well as harmful algal blooms.

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Title: Towards Heterogeneous Process, Scale, and Model Coupling in Simulating the Hydrodynamics of the Coastal Ocean
Presenter(s): Joannes Westerink, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering & Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame
Date & Time: 8 October 2019
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Towards Heterogeneous Process, Scale, and Model Coupling in Simulating the Hydrodynamics of the Coastal Ocean

Presenter(s):
Joannes Westerink, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering & Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory and the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research, contact Mary Ogdahl at ogdahlm@umich.edu.

More information and webinar recordings (when available) can be found at: https://ciglr.seas.umich.edu/events/

Abstract:
Hurricane wind wave, storm surge, and current environments in the coastal ocean and adjacent coastal floodplain are characterized by their high energy and by their spatial variability. These processes impact offshore energy assets, navigation, ports and harbors, deltas, wetlands, and coastal communities. The potential for an enormous catastrophic impact in terms of loss of life and economic losses is substantial.

Computational models for wind waves and storm driven currents and surge must provide a high level of grid resolution, fully couple the wind wave and long wave processes, and perform quickly for risk assessment, flood mitigation system design, and forecasting purposes. In order to accomplish this, high performance scalable codes are essential. To this end, we have developed an MPI based domain decomposed unstructured grid framework that minimizes global communications, efficiently handles localized sub-domain to sub-domain communication, applies a local inter-model paradigm with all model to model communications being kept on identical cores for sub-domains, and carefully manages output by assigning specialized cores for this purpose. Continuous Galerkin (CG) and Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) implementations are examined. Performance of explicit and implicit implementations of the wave-current coupled system on up to 32,000 cores for various platforms is evaluated.

The system has been extensively validated with an ever increasing amount of wave, water level and current data that has being collected for recent storms including Hurricanes Katrina (2005), Rita (2005), Gustav (2008), Ike (2008), and Sandy (2012). The modeling system helps understand the physics of hurricane storm surges including processes such as geostrophically driven forerunner, shelf waves that propagate far away from the storm, wind wave " surge interaction, surge capture and propagation by protruding deltaic river systems, the influence of storm size and forward speed, and frictionally controlled inland penetration.

These models are being applied by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) in the development of the recently completed hurricane risk reduction system in Southern Louisiana as well as for the development of FEMA Digital Flood Insurance Rate Maps (DFIRMS) for Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and other Gulf and Atlantic coast states. NOAA applies the models in extra-tropical and tropical storm surge forecasting.

Current development is focused on incorporating a wider range of physics affecting coastal and inland water levels as well as forces on infrastructure including large scale baroclinically driven processes, rainfall runoff in upland areas and on the coastal floodplain, and wave run-up. This is accomplished with an interleafing framework in which heterogeneous models focused on a select range of processes are coupled over the same domain and/or specific targeted equations that are dynamically assigned to changing portions of the domain as appropriate to the prevailing flow conditions. This is all done in a dynamically load balanced framework. Algorithmic development is focused on DG solvers, ideally suited for the associated strongly advective flows, allow super-parametric elements for p=1 and p=2 and iso-parametric elements for p=3 in order to achieve improved convergence rates and overall runtime efficiency, and allow for the selection of localized physics on the elemental level.

About the speaker:
Joannes Westerink is the Joseph and Nona Ahearn Professor of Computational Science and Engineering and the Henry J. Massman Chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences at the University of Notre Dame. He obtained his B.S. (1979) and M.S. (1981) degrees in Civil Engineering at the State University of New York at Buffalo and Ph.D. (1984) degree in Civil Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Dr. Austin is a Professor at the Large Lakes Observatory and in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Minnesota, Duluth. He is a Physical Limnologist with broad interests, studying a wide range of phenomenology on large lakes around the world. His interests include, but are not limited to, thermal structure, the role of ice, climate change impacts, acoustics, and convective processes. He is primarily an observationalist, utilizing moorings, autonomous gliders and autonomous profilers as well as historical data to study lake processes. He also utilizes numerical modeling techniques, largely to study the sensitivity of lake systems to climate change. He is also interested in pedagogy and outreach. Dr. Austin's undergraduate degrees in Physics and Math are from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, and his PhD (1999) is from the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Physical Oceanography. He has been at UMD since 2005.

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3 October 2019

Title: NOAA GIS seminar with ESRI (training resource available to NOAA staff only)
Presenter(s): Andrew Sharer, Esri's training consultant for NOAA
Date & Time: 3 October 2019
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Note this is a Training resource available to NOAA staff

Presenter(s): Andrew Sharer, Esri's training consultant for NOAA, will be leading the discussion and presentation on these resources. This webinar will be recorded for those that can't make it.

Abstract: Mark your calendars for an upcoming Esri webinar specifically for NOAA. This webinar will focus on Esri Training resources available to NOAA staff. Esri's training website contains a wide range of resources including curriculum development, a dashboard to manage classes of interest and schedules. Esri also provides opportunities to procure training in a number of ways, whether for individual classes, group training, and a training pass program to procure levels of training in advance that can cover upcoming training requirements.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0PYu832rYBocXI2NDZ5XzJaNGxvSmlUWXo3WE1XYWFNWlFV

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Title: Growing Reefs in a Changing Ocean: What Isotopes and Metals Can Teach Us about the Adaptability of Coral Skeletal Growth to Climate Change
Presenter(s): Alex Gagnon, University of Washington
Date & Time: 3 October 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Alex Gagnon, University of Washington

Abstract: From the pace of the ice ages to how the carbon cycle has changed through time, much of what we know about past climate is based on chemical signatures locked within minerals. Recorded as trace element anomalies or as isotopic shifts, these chemical signatures reflect how mass and energy move across the planet, as well as the response of biological systems to these changes. When viewed at the sub-micron to nano-scale however, chemical composition rarely follows a simple relationship with environmental conditions. This is especially true for the preserved CaCO3 skeletons of marine organisms, which often exhibit systematic patterns of high magnitude chemical variability at the sub-micron scale. While this biologically-driven variability can complicate the interpretation of climate records, it also represents a rich and largely untapped signal. Major advances in our understanding of both how organisms grow their skeletons and paleoproxies hinge on new techniques that can isolate small signals from this complexity. To probe the mechanisms controlling biomineralization and sub-micron compositional variability, we use a suite of high spatial resolution tools: laser ablation mass spectrometry, NanoSIMS, ToF-SIMS, and Atom Probe Tomography (APT), together with stable isotope labels and biomineral culture. I will share examples of how we use these tools to understand the connection between environmental change and skeletal growth in a diverse set of organisms, from cold-water coral to subtropical plankton. Ultimately it is through a mechanistic understanding of biomineralization that we best predict the sensitivity of organisms like coral to environmental change.

Bio(s): Alex Gagnon is an assistant professor in the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington. He uses tools from chemistry and geology to study how ocean acidification impacts calcifying marine organisms like corals and foraminifera. This mechanistic understanding of biomineralization can help predict how changing ocean conditions will affect coral reefs and can unlock the climate records within fossil marine skeleton. The field component of his research includes regular expeditions to Tetiaroa in French Polynesia and has taken him to the bottom of the ocean in the submersible Alvin while searching of deep-sea reefs. He also leads the TraceLab at UW, an analytical facility for the measurement of trace elements in environmental materials- everything from otoliths to volcanoes (http://depts.washington.edu/tracelab/). He earned his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the California Institute of Technology, as well as a B.S and B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley. Lab website: https://faculty.washington.edu/gagnon/


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2 October 2019

Title: The Evolution of Resilience Planning
Presenter(s): Dr. Donovan Finn, Stony Brook University
Date & Time: 2 October 2019
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar - Whoozin
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Donovan Finn (Stony Brook University)

Seminar sponsor: OAR/CPO/RISA-supported Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN)

Recordings will be posted to https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqxnekXINtMARnkWCEgeSKA

Abstract: This month's Green Infrastructure, Climate, and Cities Seminar series will be on Wednesday October 2nd, 2019 from 4 to 6pm. Our seminar this month is on the "Evolution of Resilience Planning" and features Dr. Donovan Finn of Stony Brook University.

Dr. Finn is an assistant professor in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University and director of the Sustainability Studies Program's undergraduate major in Environmental Design, Policy and Planning. Trained as an urban planner, he has worked on issues of sustainable, resilient and equitable development in East St. Louis, IL and in the Chicago and New York City regions. His current research focuses primarily on long-term recovery from disasters, planning for coastal resilience and public participation in the planning process. He is currently a member of the inaugural two-year cohort of Early Career Faculty Innovators at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, CO, where he will work to advance the integration of cutting edge climate science into urban planning. Dr. Finn will be presenting on the recovery process of the NYC region after Hurricane Sandy, illustrating how New York City, New York State, Hoboken, Long Beach and the federal government used the recovery as a process to advance goals of resiliency and sustainability, while New Jersey, by contrast, did not. Dr. Finn will also touch on his research of the evolution of Dutch approaches to resilience planning based on interviews with Dutch urban planners, water managers, and others. The seminar is held in the Hill Conference Room in the Lebow Engineering Center on Drexel University's campus in Philadelphia (see registration page for directions to the conference room). Registration is FREE and refreshments will be provided! The sessions will be broadcast live so those that cannot attend in person can attend online.

About the series: CCRUN, a NOAA RISA program, hosts a monthly series featuring researchers and practitioners from around the region and country all of whom have new ideas on how to promote resilient, livable, and sustainable cities. The talks focus on urban solutions to global problems associated with increasing temperature and sea level rise, precipitation variability and greenhouse gas emissions. We are interested in spurring dialogue on the implications of such changes on the complex infrastructure of intensely developed landscapes, and on the health, well-being, and vulnerability of the people who live in them.

All seminars are free, and held at 4:00 PM on the first Wednesday of every month in the Hill Conference Room at Drexel University. The sessions are be broadcast live via webcast, recorded, and archived. To see previous sessions, visit the seminar page on the CCRUN website or the CCRUN YouTube Channel.

Please direct all inquiries to Dr. Franco Montalto, fam26@drexel.edu.

We look forward to seeing you on October 2nd!

Seminar POC for questions: Dr. Franco Montalto (fam26@drexel.edu) or Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov)

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Additional presenters field:
Title: Spatio-temporal models connecting across line offices; regional ocean models, biogeographic assessments, and modes of variability in fish spatial distribution
Presenter(s): James Thorson, Program lead, Habitat and Ecosystem Process Research program, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, NOAA. Presenting remotely from Seattle.
Date & Time: 2 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar, or for NOAA staff in Silver Spring, SSMC4, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Spatio-temporal models connecting across line offices; regional ocean models, biogeographic assessments, and modes of variability in fish spatial distribution

Presenter(s):
James Thorson, Program lead, Habitat and Ecosystem Process Research program, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, NOAA. Presenting remotely from Seattle.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator for this event is Tracy Gill.

Abstract:
NOAA Line Offices conduct research on a tremendous variety of topics, including hurricane tracking, harmful algal bloom forecasts, support for marine sanctuaries, and information for fishery harvest advice. Research communities addressing these different topics often develop different analytic methods, using various standards of model evaluation, and communicating results differently. In response to differences between habitat, ecosystem, and stock-assessment methods within the National Marine Fisheries Service, colleagues have been developing spatio-temporal methods that estimate variation in population density across space for multiple species and its evolution over time; these models can then be summarized to identify key habitats, summarize community dynamics, or estimate regional population abundance. In this talk, I speculate about how spatio-temporal models could also address important topics for other NOAA line offices; for illustration I focus on regional ocean models, biogeographic assessments, and identifying modes of variability in ocean and atmospheric dynamics that drive biological processes. I hope to start a conversation this powerful new class of statistical methods that can be adapted NOAA-wide.

Bio(s):
James Thorson worked as a stock-assessment scientist at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center, before accepting a new position as lead of Loss of Sea Ice and Essential Fish Habitat programs at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center. He plans and conducts research regarding physical and biological processes that can inform ecosystem-based fisheries management.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: CHIKRisk App: Global Mapping and Prediction of Chikungunya Risk
Presenter(s): Dr. Assaf Anyamba, Research Scientist, Goddard Earth Sciences Technology and Research, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Date & Time: 2 October 2019
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Via webinar or to attend in Silver Spring, SSMC3, Room 12836 (if not with NOAA, contact Lisa, below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: CHIKRisk App: Global Mapping and Prediction of Chikungunya Risk

Presenter(s): Dr. Assaf Anyamba, Research Scientist with Goddard Earth Sciences Technology and Research (GESTAR/USRA) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's International Research and Applications Project (IRAP) and the Department of Defense (DOD) demonstrates the potential applications of climate data and information - including forecasts - to reduce risk in the public health sector. The NOAA National Weather Service is a partner in this effort.

In Person and Remote Participation:
The seminar will be held in Room 12836 (the large conference room) in SSMC3 (1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD). If you are not with NOAA, and would like to be cleared into the building, please let us know ahead of time by contacting Lisa.Vaughan@noaa.gov so that we can make arrangements.

Abstract:
Emerging and re-emerging diseases of global public health concern are recognized to be closely associated with variations in global climate regime. Recent chikungunya epidemics in the Americas (2013-2016), Africa, Indian Ocean and Asia (2005-20067 and have been associated with extreme departures in climate parameters including rainfall and temperature. Chikungunya in particular has illustrated the potential for global spread as demonstrated with epidemics in the Americas, Mediterranean Europe and by the limited local transmission in Florida and Texas. Under the umbrella of the Department of Defense (DoD) " Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) " Biosurveillance Ecosystem (BSVE) and NOAA International Research and Applications Project (IRAP) programs, we have developed a global chikungunya mapping and forecasting application system to map areas at risk for chikungunya concurrently and 1 to 3 months ahead. Using this model, we are producing monthly risk maps based on climate observations and forecast risk maps based on NOAA's North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME) temperature and rainfall seasonal forecasts. This effort is aimed at supporting DoD Force Health Protection (FHP) mission, regions of the US at risk (Texas and Florida) and international public health agencies (including World Health Organization, PAHO). This nascent effort illustrates how massive amounts of climate datasets combined with publicly available outbreak information using machine learning methods, can be brought to address an issue of public health concern. This effort demonstrates and provides a template that can be employed in the immediate and near future to develop applications relevant to other vector-borne and ecologically coupled diseases.

Bio(s):
Dr. Assaf Anyamba is a Research Scientist with Goddard Earth Sciences Technology and Research (GESTAR/USRA) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. He received his undergraduate degree from Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya in Geography and Economics (1989) and a Masters degree in Geography from Ohio University, Athens (1992). He received his Ph.D. (1997) in Geography with a focus on Remote Sensing of Land Surface Patterns of ENSO from Clark University, Worcester, MA. His research interests are in the extraction of interannual climate variability signals from remotely sensed vegetation measurements, drought pattern analysis, applications of remotely sensed data in agricultural monitoring, drought & famine early warning and the links between climate and disease outbreaks. His current work supports research and development for USDA/FAS-PECAD and USAID/FEWNET, DoD-GEIS, USDA/CMAVE and FDA Programs.

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1 October 2019

Title: The effect of trawl survey frequency and intensity on U.S. West Coast groundfish stock assessments
Presenter(s): Owen Hamel, Supervisory Research Fish Biologist, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring Division
Date & Time: 1 October 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-866-762-1812 (PP:5367175) AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2076 (Traynor Room)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Owen Hamel, Supervisory Research Fish Biologist, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring Division

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Abstract: We conducted a retrospective analysis of the impact of 50% sampling reduction in intensity or frequency of the U.S. West Coast GroundfishBottom Trawl survey. The influence of the survey reductions on assessment outputs and catch limits for 11 species depends upon species life-history, frequency of occurrence in the survey, and the data-richness of each assessment. All approaches to reducing survey sampling led to increased uncertainty in stock assessment results, especially for rarer species, for species which have not been heavily exploited, and for data-moderate assessments, which rely more heavily on survey data.

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Title: Designing Port Infrastructure for Sea Level Change: A Survey of Engineers
Presenter(s): Ben Sweeney, NOAA Coastal Management Fellow, New Hampshire Coastal Program
Date & Time: 1 October 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below), or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Designing Port Infrastructure for Sea Level Change: A Survey of Engineers

Presenter(s):
Ben Sweeney, NOAA Coastal Management Fellow, New Hampshire Coastal Program

Co-Author:
Austin Becker, Associate Professor, University of Rhode Island Department of Marine Affairs

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators for this seminar are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Nic.Kinsman@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Seaports are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change due to their coastal location. Engineers play a pivotal role in improving the resilience of ports, as they are responsible for designing port infrastructure that will be adequately prepared for future sea level change (SLC). However, incorporating SLC is a challenging task due to the uncertainty of SLC projections and the long service lives of port infrastructure. Through an online survey of 85 U.S. port and marine infrastructure engineers, this research explores the engineering community's attitude and approach to planning for SLC for large-scale maritime infrastructure projects. Survey findings highlight that only 29% of respondents indicated that their organization had an internal policy or planning document that communicates how to design for SLC. Furthermore, results show the lack of regulatory design standards in this area leads to engineers and their clients disregarding SLC more frequently. There is a clear need for collaboration among engineers, port authorities, and policy makers to develop practical design methods for designing resilient port infrastructure.

Bio(s):
Ben Sweeney recently graduated with his master's degree in marine affairs from the University of Rhode Island (URI). For his thesis, Ben researched how port and marine infrastructure engineers are incorporating sea level change (SLC) into the design specifications of piers, terminals, wharves, and other marine civil works. He is primarily interested in how regional uncertainty of SLC, differing guidelines and recommendations for managing SLC, and the long working lifespans of these structures affect the engineering community's attitude and approach to planning for SLC for large-scale port engineering projects. Ben has also had the opportunity to contribute to several other major research projects during his time as a graduate student. For example, Ben has assisted with developing a GIS inventory of critical coastal infrastructure land use in Caribbean Island Small Island Developing States. After graduating from URI, Ben was selected as a NOAA Coastal Management Fellow to work with the New Hampshire Coastal Program (NHCP). He has been with NHCP since August, and primarily works on coastal hazard adaptation and resiliency planning. Prior to attending URI, he received a B.S. in Environmental Engineering from the University of New Hampshire.

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Title: Deep Dive: IPCC Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate
Presenter(s): multiple speakers
Date & Time: 1 October 2019
9:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Wilson Center Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, Flom Auditorium, 6th floor (One Woodrow Wilson Plaza 1300 Pennsylvania, Ave., NW Washington, D.C. 20004)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): multiple speakers

Sponsor(s): Wilson Center Polar Institute (https://www.wilsoncenter.org/program/polar-institute)

Abstract: The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is the leading global body on climate science. On September 25, it will release its first-ever Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate. More than 100 scientists from 80 countries assessed the latest scientific knowledge about how climate change is impacting the ocean, coastal, polar, and mountain ecosystems, and the communities that depend on them.

Join us to hear Ko Barrett, Vice Chair of the IPCC, present the key findings of the report. Following her remarks, speakers will explore the future of sea-level rise and its cascading impacts, and how the international policy community can meaningfully respond to the Special Report.

Additional information: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/deep-dive-ipcc-special-report-the-ocean-and-cryosphere-changing-climate

Wilson Center
Ronald Reagan Building and
International Trade Center
One Woodrow Wilson Plaza
1300 Pennsylvania, Ave., NW
Washington, D.C. 20004

Phone: 202.691.4000

polar@wilsoncenter.org

Welcome Remarks
Ambassador David Balton
Wilson Center

Pete Ogden
United Nations Foundation

Keynote Presentation: Ko Barrett, IPCC Vice Chair

Speakers
Ambassador Kre R. Aas, Ambassador to the United States, Norway

Robert DeConto, Professor of Climatology and Glaciology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; IPCC Report Author

Mark Eakin, IPCC Report Author

Sherri Goodman, Senior Fellow, Wilson Center

Honorable Gumundur Ingi Gubrandsson (invited), Minister for the Environment and Natural Resources, Iceland

Paula Lehtomki (invited), Secretary General, Nordic Council of Ministers

Michael Oppenheimer, Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School and the Department of Geosciences, Princeton University; IPCC Report Author

Honorable Simonetta Sommaruga (invited), Vice President of the Federal Council, Switzerland

Honorable Carolina Schmidt (invited), Minister for the Environment, Chile; President of COP 25

Concluding Remarks:

Ambassador David Balton, Wilson Center
Rafe Pomerance, Arctic 21

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 September 2019

Title: September 2019 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy - ACCAP
Date & Time: 26 September 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s): OAR/CPO/RISA/Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service Alaska

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (rthoman@alaska.edu)

Abstract: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for October and the early winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/list/?tribe_event_display=past)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

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Title: Salmon in the Central Valley (CA) and Seattle (WA): Improving Habitat Function in Compromised Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Stuart Munsch, Ph.D., Fish Ecology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 26 September 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Presenter(s): Stuart Munsch, Ph.D., Fish Ecology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Abstract: The applied ecologist's job is often to understand how ecosystem changes impact habitat function. From this understanding we may develop solutions to ecological challenges or place the role of ecosystem components in the greater context of management realms, especially when total restoration is impractical. Two systems where this is the case are salmon in the Central Valley (CA) and Elliott Bay (WA). The Central Valley is a transformed, seasonally-arid landscape that is increasingly susceptible to drought. It also supports human activities that divert water and salmon fisheries increasingly reliant on hatcheries. Elliott Bay in downtown Seattle is an urban waterfront that aggregates human activities along its highly modified shoreline. Despite these stressors, both systems are inhabited by federally listed salmon. In this talk, I will discuss how (1) in the Central Valley, (a) annual rearing windows of juvenile salmon are constrained by its climate and engineered water supply system and (b) fisheries management, flow regulation, and habitat restoration may coordinate to increase productivity of naturally spawned salmon and (2) in Elliott Bay, (a) armoring and overwater structures impair juvenile salmon habitats and (b) the City of Seattle rebuilt its downtown waterfront with science-informed habitat features that attempt to repair these lost habitat functions. By appreciating how ecosystem modifications impact habitat function, we may work within constraints of human activities to improve salmon outcomes.

BIO
Stuart Munsch earned a B.S. in Biology from Gonzaga University in 2010 and a Ph.D. in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences from the University of Washington in 2016. He is currently in the Watershed Program at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

Title: Serving Coral Connections in the US Virgin Islands
Presenter(s): Dan Dorfman, Senior Marine Spatial Ecologist, NOAA/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science; Leslie Henderson, Coral Reef Initiative Coordinator, USVI Dept of Planning and Natural Resources; Pedro Nieves, Project Coordinator, USVI Dept of Planning and Natural Resources. Dan presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring and Leslie and Pedro presenting remotely from USVI
Date & Time: 26 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Serving Coral Connections in the US Virgin Islands

Presenter(s):
Dan Dorfman, Senior Marine Spatial Ecologist, NOAA/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science;
Leslie Henderson, Coral Reef Initiative Coordinator, USVI Dept of Planning and Natural Resources;
Pedro Nieves, Project Coordinator, USVI Dept of Planning and Natural Resources.
Dan presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring and Leslie and Pedro presenting remotely from USVI.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, the Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the NOS Science Seminar Series; Coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
NCCOS and the USVI Department of Planning and Natural Resources have partnered to develop an on-line tool and mapping services in support of coral ecosystem planning and management. The tool provides a wide range of information associated with coral reef ecosystems. The information provided includes locations of coral and distributions of benthic habitats. Data from in water surveys, ecosystem characterization, and human uses. By providing the information as public map services and an on-line tool, we enable local planners and managers to readily and reliably integrate information on coral ecosystems into management decisions. The tool can be applied by the USVI DPNR to provide ecosystem context to permitting and land use decisions. Additionally, this on-line capacity can support a wide range of needs including promoting public awareness, advancing scientific research, and communicating management decision.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

25 September 2019

Title: Weather and social media: the good, the bad, and the viral
Presenter(s): Dave Snider, Alaska Weather TV Program Leader, NOAA NWS Alaska Region
Date & Time: 25 September 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s): Dave Snider, Alaska Weather TV Program Leader, NOAA NWS Alaska Region

Sponsor(s): OAR/CPO/RISA/Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service Alaska

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract: Dave will talk about the challenges of communicating with a social media audience, and share tips and considerations for crafting an understandable, eye-catching message, and shareable message for your audience.

If you would like to submit examples of successful social media posts for Dave to highlight, please email them to tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/list/?tribe_event_display=past)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: We’ve Got Chemistry! Leveraging Partnerships and the Ocean Acidification Information Exchange to Advance Ocean Acidification and MPA Science
Presenter(s): Julianna Mullen of NERACOOS and the OAInfoExchange.org, Jenny Waddell of the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, and Francis Chan of Oregon State University
Date & Time: 25 September 2019
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar only; Please note this webinar will last 1.5 hours.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
We've Got Chemistry! Leveraging Partnerships and the Ocean Acidification Information Exchange to Advance Ocean Acidification and MPA Science

Presenter(s):
Julianna Mullen, Marine Scientist & Communications Specialist and Site Manager of the New England Regional Association of Coastal and Ocean Observation Systems (NERACOOS) and the OAInfoExchange.org,
Jenny Waddell, Research Coordinator, at the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, and
Francis Chan, Associate Faculty, Senior Researcher in the Department of Integrative Biology, Oregon State University

Co-

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas (MPA) Center and the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program with OCTO (MPA News, OpenChannels, EBM Tools Network). Webinar points of contact: Zac Cannizzo and Meg Chadsey.

Abstract:
Marine protected areas (MPAs), sanctuaries, and reserves offer refuge to a wide variety of marine species, but can they also protect vulnerable organisms from the effects of ocean acidification (OA) and other climate-related stressors? Increasingly, OA scientists and MPA managers are working together to explore questions of adaptability in marine protected areas to explore this question and sharing their ideas on a dynamic new online platform called the OA Information Exchange (OAIE). In this webinar, we will: 1) provide an orientation to the OAIE to the MPA community and other new users, 2) describe how innovative collaborations between researchers and volunteer scientists are advancing both OA and MPA science in Oregon Marine Reserves, and 3) provide examples of efforts to document changing ocean conditions and understand potential impacts of ecosystem change in Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, including how the development of a sentinel site for ocean acidification on the Olympic Coast supports OA coordination and collaboration in Washington.
[Please note this webinar will last 1.5 hours.]

Bio(s):

Julianna Mullen: Julianna is the Community Manager for the Ocean Acidification Information Exchange, a collaborative online platform for professionals working or interested in ocean and coastal acidification. Through her role as manager, Julianna works to increase engagement among members, maintain an online environment where users feel empowered to share, and improve the site interface. The OA Information Exchange is a program of NERACOOS, the regional ocean observation network for New England, and Julianna also oversees NERACOOS' communications programs, focusing on raising awareness of the organization's activities and successes.

Jenny Waddell joined the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary team as sanctuary research coordinator in the summer of 2016, after several years of international work as a team lead at the Office for Coastal Management's Coral Reef Conservation Program. Jenny enjoys being able to focus on more 'place-based' conservation efforts as part of the OCNMS team, helping to protect the wild and wonderful outer coast of Washington state.

Francis Chan is an Associate Faculty, Senior Researcher in the Department of Integrative Biology at OSU. Dr. Chan leads much of the coastal oceanography work in Oregon for PISCO (Partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans), which is teaming up with marine reserve community groups up and down the coast, to not only fill geographic gaps in ocean acidification monitoring, but to also engage citizens in addressing this complex issue.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: A Long Endurance Fixed Wing Vertical Takeoff and Landing Drone for Shipboard Operations
Presenter(s): Dr. Ben Cameron, Creare LLC
Date & Time: 25 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): Join the NOAA Central Library and the Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) for the new NOAA Innovators Series! This series will be facilitated by Tiffany House, SBIR Commercialization Specialist.

Presenter(s): Dr. Ben Cameron, Creare LLC

Abstract: Creare is developing a fixed wing Vertical Takeoff and Landing (VTOL) drone for shipboard operations to eliminate the complex launch and recovery procedures typical of non-VTOL drones. Creare's drone utilizes a biplane configuration to achieve lower flight speeds and higher endurance than existing monoplane with the same wingspan. The drone employs a novel control method that eliminates the added cost, weight and complexity of traditional control surfaces (e.g., elevators and ailerons) and also reduces weight by using a single propulsion system for vertical and horizontal flight.

Bio(s): Ben Cameron is the Principal Investigator of this NOAA SBIR Phase II effort. At Creare, Dr. Cameron leads the Unmanned Aircraft Systems research group and oversees development of complete drone systems and airborne sensor packages for specialized scientific missions.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

24 September 2019

Title: Where are all the fish going? Identifying patterns of genetic connectivity across the Hawaiian Archipelago
Presenter(s): Dr. Richard Coleman, former Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology
Date & Time: 24 September 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Richard Coleman, former Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar at Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Abstract: Understanding connectivity and dispersal pathways, as well as identifying the underlying mechanisms influencing these patterns are essential to properly understand how biodiversity is generated in the sea and to inform management strategies. Since direct observation of larvae is impractical, a variety of genetic methods have been developed to characterize connectivity and dispersal patterns in marine organisms. Join Dr. Richard Coleman as he explains how he incorporated several genetic-based approaches to assess connectivity of two recreationally important reef fishes across the Hawaiian Archipelago to assess connectivity between the Main Hawaiian Islands and the Paphanaumokukea Marine National Monument.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Computer Vision for Conservation
Presenter(s): Christin Khan, Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 24 September 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Christin Khan, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NEDTalk NOAA Environmental Data Talks - Speaker Series (https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/nesdis-datafest/nedtalks). POC: tiffany.small@noaa.gov

NOAA DataFest is a month-long effort throughout September to educate the public and inspire our colleagues at NOAA to learn more about NOAA data while celebrating its value, reliability, and accessibility. NOAA data covers a robust collection of scientific earth and environmental observations available to the scientific community and the public.

Abstract: Motivated by recent developments in image recognition, we hosted a data science challenge on the crowdsourcing platform Kaggle to automate the identification of endangered North Atlantic right whales. The winning solution automatically identified individual whales with 87% accuracy with a series of convolutional neural networks to identify the region of interest on an image, rotate, crop, and create standardized photographs of uniform size and orientation and then identify the correct individual whale from these passport-like photographs. Recent advances in deep learning coupled with this fully automated workflow have yielded impressive results and have the potential to revolutionize traditional methods for the collection of data on the abundance and distribution of wild populations.

Bio(s): Christin Khan is a Fishery Biologist in the Protected Species Branch at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole. She is an aerial survey observer and data manager of the North Atlantic Right Whale Sighting Survey which conducts aerial surveys to monitor right whale abundance and distribution from New Jersey to Canada. When not in the air, Christin also works on right whale social behavior, automated image recognition, right whale outreach signs, the Right Whale Sighting Advisory System, interactive Google map, and the Whale Alert app.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: How to Make a Tornado: Ideas emerging from decades of theory, simulation, and field observations, plus challenges for operational NWP
Presenter(s): Paul Markowski, Penn State
Date & Time: 24 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Paul Markowski, Penn State

Sponsor(s): ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER SEMINAR for more information visit https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

Abstract:
I will discuss how scientific "storm chasing," computer simulations, and theory have helped meteorologists better understand and predict tornadoes, and some of the challenges that remain, particularly with respect to operational NWP.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

23 September 2019

Title: Preparing for the Next Water Year: Drought & Climate Outlook for California-Nevada
Presenter(s): Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS
Date & Time: 23 September 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Drought & Climate Update, Dr. Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS
Drought & Climate Outlook, Eric Boldt, NOAA NWS, Los Angeles/Oxnard
Precipitation Regime Change in Western North America: The Role of Atmospheric Rivers, Dr. Sasha Gershunov, CNAP, Scripps Institution of Oceanography/UC San Diego

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP)

POC: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Another record hot summer is coming to a close in California and Nevada. However, both states have avoided drought for some time, with the exception of a small slice on the California/Arizona border. The region is now looking ahead to prepare for the next water year. This webinar will provide an overview of the current conditions and outlook for the fall into winter as well as the role of atmospheric rivers in Western North America.

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) September 2019 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia).

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

20 September 2019

Title: What does it really mean for a lake to "turn over"? Radiatively driven convection in a deep lake.
Presenter(s): Jay Austin, Large Lakes Observatory/Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Duluth
Date & Time: 20 September 2019
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA or via webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7427155266631505164
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
What does it really mean for a lake to "turn over"? Radiatively driven convection in a deep lake.

Presenter(s):
Jay Austin, Large Lakes Observatory/Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Duluth

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory and the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research, contact Mary Ogdahl at ogdahlm@umich.edu.

Abstract:
Due to the existence of the temperature of maximum density for freshwater (3.98C), springtime heating of a freshwater lake from incident sunlight can result in a process called radiatively-driven convection, where heating at the surface of the lake makes surface waters denser, resulting in full water-column convection. In a deep lake like Lake Superior, this process can dominate the circulation of the lake for two to three months every year, and controls the vertical redistribution of physical, biological, and geochemical properties in the lake during this period. Characteristic features of the convection cells produced are discerned from a set of observations made in Lake Superior over the last several years, from autonomous underwater gliders, turbulence profilers, and moorings, including a large, two-point mooring that consisted of a two-dimensional array of thermistors 180m on a side. Glider data suggests that warm water produced near the surface convect into the lake in chimney-like structures with lateral scales on the order of 10m, and the cells themselves have lateral scales on the order of 100m. Observed vertical velocities on the order of 1cm/s. Temperature anomalies on the order of 0.1K build up during the day, and the water column tends to fully homogenize each night. Developing a better understanding of the dynamics of this convective process is essential to our understanding of the annual development of deep, dimictic lakes.

About the speaker:
Dr. Austin is a Professor at the Large Lakes Observatory and in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Minnesota, Duluth. He is a Physical Limnologist with broad interests, studying a wide range of phenomenology on large lakes around the world. His interests include, but are not limited to, thermal structure, the role of ice, climate change impacts, acoustics, and convective processes. He is primarily an observationalist, utilizing moorings, autonomous gliders and autonomous profilers as well as historical data to study lake processes. He also utilizes numerical modeling techniques, largely to study the sensitivity of lake systems to climate change. He is also interested in pedagogy and outreach. Dr. Austin's undergraduate degrees in Physics and Math are from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, and his PhD (1999) is from the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Physical Oceanography. He has been at UMD since 2005.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

19 September 2019

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Kelsey Jencso, Montana Climate Office
Date & Time: 19 September 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kelsey Jencso | Montana Climate Office

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

POC: Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Splashing in Puddles: Rising nuisance flooding in Norfolk VA
Presenter(s): Ali Burgos, NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 19 September 2019
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ali Burgos, Knauss Coastal Resiliency Science Fellow, NOAA NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

Sponsor(s): Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow K.C. Wilson, (katherine.wilson@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Nuisance flooding, or sunny day flooding, is an increasing issue throughout the United States due to sea level rise. The Hampton roads area in southeast Virginia hosts the world's largest navy base, houses more than 1.5 million people, and is threatened by a large rise in nuisance flooding from rising seas, which could be exacerbated in the future due to internal climate variability. This project analyzes future nuisance flooding events in Norfolk due to tides and internal climate variability out to 2050.

About the speaker: Ali Burgos received her undergraduate in meteorology from Rutgers University where she was on track to become a broadcaster. Her senior year she switched gears to attend graduate school at Old Dominion University to study sea level rise. Now into her fellowship she's working on congressional outreach for coastal resiliency.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: How will climate change impact asexual reproduction in reef-building corals?
Presenter(s): Andie Chan, NMFS Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 19 September 2019
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Andie Chan, Fisheries Science Coordinator, National Stock Assessment Program and National Observer Program, NMFS Office of Science and Technology

Sponsor(s): Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow K.C. Wilson, (katherine.wilson@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Corals provide the foundation of reefs, and may reproduce sexually or asexually, often via fragmentation. Increased asexual reproduction reduces the genotypic diversity of a coral population, potentially making that population more vulnerable to stressors. While previous work has examined the effects of heat and acidification on coral sexual processes, less focus has been directed towards the possible effects of climate change on coral asexual reproduction. I will discuss this issue using two case studies of coral populations along natural acidification gradients in the Galapagos and Palau.

About the speaker: Andie recently graduated from Penn State with a Ph.D. in Ecology where she studied the effects of climate change on coral symbioses. The ongoing decline of corals motivated her to work on projects with strong management implications to help improve resource conservation. Currently, Andie is a Knauss Marine Policy Fellow working on bycatch-related issues and incorporating socioeconomic information in fisheries stock assessments.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Human Consumption of Microplastics: An Initial Estimate
Presenter(s): Kieran D. Cox, Dept of Biology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, and Hakai Institute, Calvert Island, British Columbia, Canada
Date & Time: 19 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or for NOAA folks in Silver Spring, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Human Consumption of Microplastics: An Initial Estimate

Link to mp4 recording (AdobeConnect installation required): https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p4krzg5ge1eg/
PDF available upon request; contact Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Kieran D. Cox, Dept of Biology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, and Hakai Institute, Calvert Island, British Columbia, Canada

Co-Authors:
Garth A. Covernton, Hailey L. Davies, John F. Dower, Francis Juanes, Sarah E. Dudas

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Microplastics are ubiquitous across ecosystems, yet the exposure risk to humans is unresolved. Focusing on the American diet, we evaluated the number of microplastic particles in commonly consumed foods in relation to their recommended daily intake. The potential for microplastic inhalation and how the source of drinking water may affect microplastic consumption were also explored. Our analysis used 402 data points from 26 studies, which represents over 3600 processed samples. Evaluating approximately 15% of Americans' caloric intake, we estimate that annual microplastics consumption ranges from 39000 to 52000 particles depending on age and sex. These estimates increase to 74000 and 121000 when inhalation is considered. Additionally, individuals who meet their recommended water intake through only bottled sources may be ingesting an additional 90000 microplastics annually, compared to 4000 microplastics for those who consume only tap water. These estimates are subject to large amounts of variation; however, given methodological and data limitations, these values are likely underestimates.

Bio(s):
Kieran Cox is a Ph.D. Candidate and Hakai Scholar at the University of Victoria, co-supervised by Dr. Francis Juanes and Dr. Sarah Dudas. Broadly, his research focuses on how ecological communities respond to alterations to abiotic and biotic conditions, especially those driven by anthropogenic activities. Primarily focusing on nearshore marine biodiversity, Kieran has recently expanded to include the study of microplastics, and their movement through food webs.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

18 September 2019

Title: Subseasonal to Seasonal Scale Ocean Forecasting for Chesapeake Bay and the NE United States
Presenter(s): Andrew C. Ross, PhD, Princeton University and NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory - GFDL, Princeton, NJ
Date & Time: 18 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below), or for NOAA SIlver Spring staff, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Subseasonal to seasonal scale ocean forecasting for Chesapeake Bay and the Northeast United States

Presenter(s):
Andrew C. Ross, PhD (Princeton University and NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), Princeton, NJ.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy Gill

Abstract:
We present advances in subseasonal to seasonal scale forecasting of water temperature, salinity, and oxygen in Chesapeake Bay and the broader Northeast United States and discuss potential ecological applications of these forecasts. First, we use a machine learning model trained on observations from the Chesapeake Bay Program dataset to show that dissolved oxygen concentrations (DO) in Chesapeake Bay are primarily controlled by density stratification and temperature. With this model, DO can be skillfully predicted in most regions of the bay if the current stratification and temperature are known. However, forecasting DO in advance with this model, when stratification and temperature must also be forecast, is more challenging. To attempt to solve this challenge, we next produce and assess forecasts using a dynamical model of Chesapeake Bay based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ChesROMS). We use ChesROMS, along with an ensemble of 35-day atmospheric forecasts produced by NOAA's GEFS model as part of the Subseasonal Experiment (SubX), to run a series of 35-day reforecast simulations for Chesapeake Bay that forecast temperature, salinity, stratification, and oxygen. When compared to both an ocean model hindcast and to observations, forecasts for sea surface temperature and stratification are skillful out to about two weeks of lead time, and forecasts for surface salinity are skillful for the majority of the forecast period. Dissolved oxygen remains challenging to forecast, and we suggest that improvements to the oxygen model, which was based on a simple parameterization, may be necessary to obtain reliable forecast skill for oxygen. We also examine the performance of the forecasts for two high-impact events, a heat wave and a hurricane, that may be predictable at the subseasonal to seasonal scale. Finally, we present some early results from ongoing work to expand the scale of our forecast experiments to cover the entire Northeast U.S. marine ecosystem, and we discuss potential applications of our models to ecological forecasting.

Bio(s):
Dr. Andrew Ross is a postdoctoral research associate at Princeton University and was previously a PhD student at Penn State. His research focuses on predicting the impacts of atmospheric variability on estuarine and coastal oceans and fisheries, from short-term weather scales to longer-term climate changes.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Assimilation of Satellite Microwave Observations in the Rainband of Hurricanes using a Novel Bayesian Monte Carlo Technique
Presenter(s): Isaac Moradi, NASA
Date & Time: 18 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s): Isaac Moradi, NASA

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number: 905 458 573
Password: STARSeminar

Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=m9876a81238d7e49c4b1dc3d202e9d614

Audio:
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll

Access code: 905 458 573

Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190918_Moradi.pdf

Abstract: We propose a novel Bayesian Monte Carlo Integration (BMCI) technique to retrieve the profiles of temperature, water vapor, and cloud liquid/ice water content from microwave cloudy measurements in the rainbands of tropical cyclones (TC). These retrievals then can either be directly used by meteorologists to analyze the structure of TCs or be assimilated into numerical models to provide accurate initial conditions for the NWP models. The BMCI technique is applied to the data from the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) onboard Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) and Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI).

Bio(s): Dr. Isaac Moradi is a remote sensing scientist with over fifteen years of experience specializing in radiative transfer modeling; Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE); data assimilation; satellite data analysis and bias correction; atmospheric humidity and ice clouds; inverse methods and retrieving geophysical variables from satellite observations; solar radiation resource assessment; quality assurance of solar radiation and in-situ radiosonde measurements; and developing new instrument concepts especially for measuring tropospheric humidity. Please also see https://science.gsfc.nasa.gov/sed/bio/isaac.moradi

POC: Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: The Power of the Dark Side: Visible Applications in Dark Environments, Revisited (VADER)
Presenter(s): Steve Miller, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Fort Collins, CO USA
Date & Time: 18 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive, Lanham MD 20706, Conference Room S561
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s): Steve Miller, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Fort Collins, CO USA

Sponsor(s): JPSS Science Seminar, JPSS Program. POC: Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Visible satellite imagery is a longstanding staple of daytime operational weather forecasting for situational awareness. The lack of visible imagery at night has ingrained within the forecaster a mentality of infrared (IR) exclusivity, which has many limitations in terms of aerosol, low-cloud, and surface property detection. The Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) and the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1; a.k.a. NOAA-20) have introduced a formidable new First Order' to nighttime environmental characterization. Nocturnal awareness of parameters key to commerce and transportation (surface/aviation/maritime), infrastructure (e.g., power consumption), and major components of the climate system (clouds, cryosphere, aerosol, land, and ocean), are now capable via the DNB's unique sensitivity to artificial (ships, cities, gas flares) and natural (e.g., lunar reflection, active fires, airglow) sources of nocturnal light.

Unfortunately, the coarse temporal resolution at low latitudes inherent to polar-orbiting satellites, has relegated the greatest operational impacts of the DNB to the high latitudes. Mostly for this reason, but also for the unique benefit of low-light sensitivity to the high latitude winter season, the DNB imagery (represented by Near-Constant Contrast; NCC) Key Performance Parameter is currently relegated to latitudes poleward of 60 N, despit its unique and complementary capabilities to other VIIRS bands at all latitudes. With the launch of the first Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS-1) in late 2017, this resolution has improved for the mid- and low-latitudes. JPSS-1, inserted -orbit ahead of S-NPP in the same orbital plane, now enables a ~50 min sampling about the nominal local crossing time of 0130. The revisit offers new opportunities to characterize features through motion/change and dual viewing perspective.

Here, we present selected results from a JPSS-sponsored research project: Visible Applications in Dark Environments, Revisited"VADER. The project aims to socialize and capitalize on the potential of the expanded dual-VIIRS/DNB observing system for the benefit of the research and operational communities. One constancy during these early years of DNB evaluation has been the growing list of capabilities. Leveraging the novel DNB capabilities to resolve the diverse signals of the night, VADER pursues diverse cross section of science and discovery, while also providing practical operational utility to forecasters in achieving societal benefits

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

17 September 2019

Title: Artificial Intelligence for Earth Science
Presenter(s): David Hall, NVIDIA
Date & Time: 17 September 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): David Hall, NVIDIA

Sponsor(s): NEDTalk NOAA Environmental Data Talks - Speaker Series (https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/nesdis-datafest/nedtalks). POC: tiffany.small@noaa.gov

NOAA DataFest is a month-long effort throughout September to educate the public and inspire our colleagues at NOAA to learn more about NOAA data while celebrating its value, reliability, and accessibility. NOAA data covers a robust collection of scientific earth and environmental observations available to the scientific community and the public.

Abstract: TBD

Bio
David Hall joined NVIDIA in January 2018, after working as an Assistant Professor of Research in Computer Science at CU Boulder. Dr. Hall has technical expertise in theoretical physics, numerical methods, computational fluid dynamics, and artificial intelligence. David spent the previous decade developing non-hydrostatic atmospheric models for high resolution climate modeling in HPC environments. As a solution architect at NVIDIA, Dr. Hall's primary role is to help scientist and engineers understand and translate the latest breakthroughs in artificial intelligence into practical solutions in the areas of weather, climate, and space. Dr. Hall earned his PhD in Physics from the University of Santa Barbara, CA and a BA in physics from CU Boulder.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Climate change could reduce estuarine habitat for oysters in California
Presenter(s): Edwin Grosholz, Professor and Swantz Specialist in Cooperative Extension, University of California, Davis
Date & Time: 17 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Climate change could reduce estuarine habitat for oysters in California

Presenter(s):
Edwin Grosholz, Professor and the Alexander and Elizabeth Specialist in Cooperative Extension, University of California, Davis. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Ocean acidification is bad news for shellfish, as it makes it harder for them to form their calcium-based shells. But climate change could also have multiple other impacts that make California bays less hospitable to shelled organisms like oysters, which are a key part of the food web. Changes to water temperature and chemistry resulting from human-caused climate change could shrink the prime habitat and farming locations for oysters in California bays, according to a new study from the University of California, Davis. The study recently published in the journal Limnology and Oceanography, shows that changes to dissolved oxygen levels, water temperature, and salinity could have an even greater impact than ocean acidification on oyster growth in estuaries and bays. In California, climate change is expected to lead to increased variability in precipitation, higher water temperatures, and increased upwelling. The study suggests that this combination of effects would lead to greater stress on oysters, particular at the edges of bays that connect to rivers and the ocean. In the estuaries and bays where oysters grow, acidification is a much more complicated process than in the open ocean. Estuarine organisms have evolved with this variable pH regime, which could make them more resilient to ocean acidification. But other factors important to oyster health, such as temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen, are also projected to change with climate change. The study provides insight for oyster restoration projects as well as commercial oyster farmers. For example, projections for suitable oyster habitat could help determine where to site projects and farms for the best chance of success.

Bio(s):
Ted Grosholz is a Professor and the Alexander and Elizabeth Swantz Specialist in Cooperative Extension in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy at the University of California, Davis. He is a benthic marine ecologist whose works at the community and ecosystem level examining the effects of climate change and other human impacts in coastal ecosystems. Much of his work concerns climate impacts and non-native species in California estuaries where he is also involved in the restoration of coastal habitats including native Olympia oysters.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

16 September 2019

Title: Measuring Atmospheric and Surface Features using Microwave Radiometers
Presenter(s): Dr. Norman C. Grody, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Date & Time: 16 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: ESSIC Conference Room 4102, 5825 University Research Ct, College Park, MD 20740
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Norman C. Grody, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Sponsor(s): ESSIC Seminar Series, crosslisted to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: Ralph Ferraro, ralph.r.ferraro@noaa.gov

Abstract:
After retiring from NOAA in 2005 I considered building microwave radiometers using information and components available through the Internet. My project became a reality when I realized how cheap the components could be. In fact the most expensive part was the test equipment needed to measure the radiometer performance. However, I was able to construct a 4, 12 and 20.5 GHz Dicke radiometer from parts costing about $100 each. The construction, measurements and analysis is summarized in an 88 page report that is available on the internet. This talk briefly outlines some main findings in the report.

Unlike infrared, the microwave emissivity over land is highly variable. Emissivity measurement is important for two reasons. It provides information on surface properties and is needed to properly derive atmospheric variables such as precipitation and water vapor over land using satellite viewing radiometers. I shall therefore also describe the anomalous emissivity found over deserts and snow/ice covered surfaces from satellite microwave radiometer measurements that have yet to be resolved. For example, deserts are found to have different emissivity and penetration depths depending on frequency, grain size and impurities. Also, compared to new snow, aged or metamorphosed snow is found to have distinct microwave signatures at high frequencies. Finally, ice on the snow and within the snow pack displays inverted microwave spectra that is yet to be fully understood.

Bio(s): Beginning in the 1960's NASA solicited scientists and engineers to develop satellite infrared and microwave radiometers for observing and measuring the atmospheric and surface properties of our solar system. After completing my PhD in Electrophysics at NYU doing plasma research, I began my government career working at NASA in 1971 at a time when the US first began carrying experimental microwave radiometers aboard satellites to view Earth from space. I then joined NOAA in 1972 working on more advanced radiometers by the Air Force, Navy, NASA and NOAA. Throughout the years, these instruments measured the low level thermal radiation (~10-12 watts) emanating from the Earth's surface and intervening atmosphere at frequencies between 1.4 and 183 GHz. At NOAA I was mainly involved in developing algorithms to derive surface and atmospheric parameters from the radiometric measurements. These parameters are used by various organizations to help monitor, analyze and forecast the weather and climate.

Are our seminars recorded?
Yes. Video is available from the ESSIC YouTube site.
ESSIC seminar site: http://essic.umd.edu/joom2/index.php/calendar/essic-events/range.listevents/-
ESSIC Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ESSICUMD

Seminar POC:
Norm can be reached out by ngantique@hotmail.com Further contact can be directed to the host of the seminar, Ralph Ferraro, ralph.r.ferraro@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

12 September 2019

Title: Datapalooza chat and answer questions about Fire Weather
Presenter(s): Experts will be available to chat and answer questions pertaining to the specific topics
Date & Time: 12 September 2019
3:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Via twitter
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Experts will be available to chat and answer questions pertaining to the specific topics

Sponsor(s): NOAA's NESDIS https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/datapalooza

Access: https://twitter.com/NOAASatellites

Abstract: On Thursday, September 12, @NOAASatellites will be holding its second annual #Datapalooza " a Twitter relay that aims to celebrate NOAA data while also making it more accessible. We'll specifically look at data as it pertains to tropical, space, and fire weather. Look out for unique data visualizations which highlight how we can use Earth and atmospheric observational data to measure our dynamic planet. Share and follow along with the hashtag #Datapalooza.

This year we will be hosting conversations on three different topics throughout the day.

Tropical Weather (9:00 a.m. ET " 12:00 p.m. ET)
Space Weather (12:00 p.m. ET " 3:00 p.m. ET)
Fire Weather (3:00 p.m. " 6:00 p.m. ET)

Experts will be available to chat and answer questions pertaining to the specific topics during the given time frames.

We'd love it if you would join us! We also encourage you to share a data visualization, graphic, or anything that shows how excited you are about data using the #Datapalooza hashtag.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information - https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Fellowship of the Rain (Gauge Network)
Presenter(s): Douglas Miller, UNC Asheville
Date & Time: 12 September 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Douglas Miller, UNC Asheville

Co-Author:
Ana Barros, Duke University

Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll, Access code: 908 336 124

Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190912_MillerD.pdf
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190912_MillerD.pptx

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

Abstract:
A high elevation rain gauge network, known as the Duke Great Smoky Mountains Rain Gauge Network (Duke GSMRGN), has been collecting rainfall observations since 2007 in the Pigeon River Basin located in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. The presentation will focus on the founding, funding, findings, and future of the Duke GSMRGN and their associated fellowships. The findings portion will examine the influence of atmospheric rivers on extreme rainfall events observed by the Duke GSMRGN over an eight-year period commencing 1 July 2009.

Bio(s):
Douglas Miller is a professor at the University of North Carolina, Asheville. He received his Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from Purdue University. His research expertise is in mesoscale and synoptic meteorology, mountain meteorology, coastal meteorology, boundary layer meteorology, and numerical weather prediction/forecasting. He has been involved with a collaborative project extending the Great Smoky Mountain rain gauge mesonet and exploring the origins of extreme precipitation events in the southern Appalachian Mountains and their signatures as observed by the GOES-R satellite.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: Datapalooza chat and answer questions about Space Weather
Presenter(s): Experts will be available to chat and answer questions pertaining to the specific topics
Date & Time: 12 September 2019
12:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via twitter
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Experts will be available to chat and answer questions pertaining to the specific topics

Sponsor(s): NOAA's NESDIS https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/datapalooza

Access: https://twitter.com/NOAASatellites

Abstract: On Thursday, September 12, @NOAASatellites will be holding its second annual #Datapalooza " a Twitter relay that aims to celebrate NOAA data while also making it more accessible. We'll specifically look at data as it pertains to tropical, space, and fire weather. Look out for unique data visualizations which highlight how we can use Earth and atmospheric observational data to measure our dynamic planet. Share and follow along with the hashtag #Datapalooza.

This year we will be hosting conversations on three different topics throughout the day.

Tropical Weather (9:00 a.m. ET " 12:00 p.m. ET)
Space Weather (12:00 p.m. ET " 3:00 p.m. ET)
Fire Weather (3:00 p.m. " 6:00 p.m. ET)

Experts will be available to chat and answer questions pertaining to the specific topics during the given time frames.

We'd love it if you would join us! We also encourage you to share a data visualization, graphic, or anything that shows how excited you are about data using the #Datapalooza hashtag.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information - https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Shifting Phenology in South Africa: Climate Change Implications from Emerging Records
Presenter(s): Jennifer M. Fitchett: School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa
Date & Time: 12 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below), or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Shifting Phenology in South Africa: Climate Change Implications from Emerging Records

If you missed this seminar, you can view the recording here (AdobeConnect installation required): https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pxv1bxc5tnkp/

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jennifer M. Fitchett, School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/phenology/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Phenology refers to the timing of annually recurrent biological events. These events are argued to be one of the most sensitive bioindicators of climate change. Shifts in the timing of plant and animal phenological events have been recorded across the globe. These records have indicated the highly species- and location-specific nature of phenological response, requiring comprehensive local studies to be conducted. For South Africa, phenological records are sparse " we do not benefit from long traditions of naturalists, nor the deliberate phenology gardens planted in the United States and Europe. Research has therefore been slow in emerging. In this talk I cover the studies on phenology and climate change that have been conducted, including apple and pear flowering dates, jacaranda flowering dates, and changes in the timing of the sardine run.

Bio(s):
Dr. Jennifer Fitchett is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. She completed her PhD split-site through the University of the Witwatersrand and University College London. Her research explores climate change at long (~24,000 years) and short (~50 years) timescales, and the impacts on plants, animals and people, through the subdisciplines of phenology, climatology and tourism and climate change.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information - https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Datapalooza chat and answer questions about Tropical Weather
Presenter(s): Experts will be available to chat and answer questions pertaining to Tropical Weather
Date & Time: 12 September 2019
9:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Via twitter
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Experts will be available to chat and answer questions pertaining to the specific topics

Sponsor(s): NOAA's NESDIS https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/datapalooza

Access: https://twitter.com/NOAASatellites

Abstract: On Thursday, September 12, @NOAASatellites will be holding its second annual #Datapalooza " a Twitter relay that aims to celebrate NOAA data while also making it more accessible. We'll specifically look at data as it pertains to tropical, space, and fire weather. Look out for unique data visualizations which highlight how we can use Earth and atmospheric observational data to measure our dynamic planet. Share and follow along with the hashtag #Datapalooza.

This year we will be hosting conversations on three different topics throughout the day.

Tropical Weather (9:00 a.m. ET " 12:00 p.m. ET)
Space Weather (12:00 p.m. ET " 3:00 p.m. ET)
Fire Weather (3:00 p.m. " 6:00 p.m. ET)

Experts will be available to chat and answer questions pertaining to the specific topics during the given time frames.

We'd love it if you would join us! We also encourage you to share a data visualization, graphic, or anything that shows how excited you are about data using the #Datapalooza hashtag.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information - https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

11 September 2019

Title: There is no I in EAFM: Adapting Integrated Ecosystem Assessment for Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas NMFS/NEFSC
Date & Time: 11 September 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas, Biologist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Resource managers worldwide are being asked to consider the ecosystem while making management decisions. However, it can be difficult to change management systems accustomed to evaluating a constrained set of objectives, often on a species-by-species basis. Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) provides a flexible framework for addressing ecosystem considerations in decision making. IEA was adapted to address species, fleet, habitat, and climate interactions by the US Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) as part of their Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management (EAFM) in 2016. The Council's EAFM framework uses risk assessment as a first step to prioritize combinations of managed species, fleets, and ecosystem interactions for consideration. Second, a conceptual model is developed identifying key environmental, ecological, social, economic, and management linkages for a high-priority fishery. Third, quantitative modeling addressing Council-specified questions and based on interactions identified in the conceptual model is applied to evaluate alternative management strategies that best balance management objectives. As strategies are implemented, outcomes are monitored and the process is adjusted, and/or another priority identified in risk assessment can be addressed. The Council completed an initial EAFM risk assessment in 2017. First, the Council identified a range of ecological, social, and management objectives or risk elements. All objectives/risk elements were evaluated with ecosystem indicators using risk assessment criteria developed by the Council. In 2018, the Council identified summer flounder as a high risk fishery and is now finalizing an EAFM conceptual model. Annual ecosystem reporting updates ecosystem indicators and the risk assessment. The Council's rapid progress in implementing EAFM resulted from positive collaboration between managers, stakeholders, and scientists. Collaboration is essential to IEA and to the success of EAFM.

Bio(s):

Dr. Sarah Gaichas has been a Research Fishery Biologist with the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch at the NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA since September 2011. She is a member of the Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee, has been active in ecosystem reporting and management strategy evaluation for both the Mid-Atlantic and New England Fishery Management Councils. Sarah's primary research is on integrated ecosystem assessment, management strategy evaluation, and ecosystem modeling. Her duties include developing, testing, and using ecosystem data, indicators, and models in natural resource management, and simulation testing management strategies (including analytical tools) that address the needs of diverse ecosystem users. Sarah previously worked at the NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA from 1997-2011 as an observer program analyst, a stock assessment scientist, and an ecosystem modeler. Sarah earned her Ph.D. from the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science in 2006, her M.S from the College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 1997, and her B.A. in English Literature from Swarthmore College in 1991.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Southern African Initiatives Empowering Marine-related Decision-makers Through Earth Observation
Presenter(s): Marie Smith, Postdoc CSIR South Africa
Date & Time: 11 September 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA College Park folks, NCWCP, Rm 3555
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

NOCCG Seminar crosslisted with OneNOAA and STAR Seminars

Presenter(s): Mari Smith, Natural Resources & Environment Unit, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Cape Town, South Africa
Seminar

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG). This seminar will not be recorded. Slides may be shared upon request (send email to the POC listed below).

Remote Access:
Join Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/103820156

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Meeting ID: 103 820 156
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Abstract: This seminar aims to highlight some of the research and development taking place as part of two projects: 1) the South African Oceans and Coasts Information Management System (OCIMS) project, and 2) the Marine and Coastal Service Development for Southern Africa (MarCoSouth) project, i.e. the southern African consortium of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) Africa Grant. OCIMS is an innovative web-based platform offering a variety of decision support tools intended to empower decision-makers and support effective governance and growth of South Africa's blue economy. OCIMS has consolidated South African observational and forecasting expertise through the development of a range of services that are very similar in scope to those proposed for GMES & Africa. The MarCoSouth project is strongly aligned with (and will effectively provide a platform for the regional expansion of) the services developed through OCIMS. Within GMES & Africa the MarCoSouth project will maintain, further develop and provide a sustainable platform for local, institutional, human and technical capabilities in the African partner countries (i.e. Namibia, Mozambique, Tanzania, Kenya and South Africa) through the development of services focused on sustainable socio-economic development, empowering a wide range of users in the public and private sectors through the application of regionally-optimized satellite observations and model based forecasts in the South and East African Marine and Coastal domains

Bio(s): Dr. Mari Smith is a Postdoc (soon to be senior researcher) in the Marine Earth Observation Unit of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) in Cape Town, South Africa. She has a PhD in physical oceanography from the University of Cape Town and has specialized in marine remote sensing for 11 years. Her main areas of interest are optical water type classification and ocean color algorithm development, particularly for coastal marine applications. She is the lead on operational earth observation product development for harmful algal bloom (HAB) detection, aquaculture, fisheries and water quality decision support for the OCIMS and MarCoSouth projects. She is also actively involved in post-graduate student supervision and training in Africa.

Seminar POC for questions or access to slides: Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Towards Operational Ecosystem-based Fisheries Management on Georges Bank
Presenter(s): Michael Fogarty, NMFS/NEFSC
Date & Time: 11 September 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Michael Fogarty, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The New England Fishery Management Council is currently evaluating options for implementation of Ecosystem-based Management (EBFM) on Georges Bank. The mixed-species fishery on the Bank has presented seemingly intractable problems for conventional single-species management. Michael Fogarty will describe potential avenues under consideration for the transition to place-based management of species complexes on the Bank. The approach attempts to account for the strong technical and biological interactions that are at the heart of the management challenges in this region. It focuses on management of Fishery Functional Groups defined as species that are caught together by specified fleet sectors, play similar roles in the ecosystem with respect to energy transfer, and have similar life history characteristics. Michael Fogarty will describe proposed harvest control rules for this system and initial performance simulation tests made as a prelude to a full multispecies management strategy evaluation.

Bio(s):

Dr. Michael. J. Fogarty is a Senior Scientist at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, MA where he has been employed since 1980. He received his doctorate from the University of Rhode Island. He currently holds adjunct appointments at the Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island and the School of Marine Science and Technology, University of Massachusetts. He is a Visiting Scientist in the Marine Policy Center of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He has served on numerous national and international panels and committees including the Science Committee of the Global Ocean Observing System Program, the Coastal Ocean Observation Panel of the Global Ocean Observing System, the Scientific Steering Committee of the U.S. Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) Program (Chair 1997-2002), the Science Board of the Comparative Analysis of Marine Ecosystem Organization Program. His research interests center on the ecosystem effects of fishing, the role of climate change in marine ecosystem dynamics and strategies for implementing marine Ecosystem-Based Management.

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Title: Advances in Satellite and Airborne Altimetry over Arctic Sea Ice – Towards Improved Prediction
Presenter(s): Sinad L. Farrell, University of Maryland
Date & Time: 11 September 2019
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sinad L. Farrell, University of Maryland

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 908 239 193

Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190911_SFarrell.pdf

Abstract:

One of the most striking, and widely publicized, environmental changes underway in the Earth system is the disappearance of the Arctic sea ice cover. Since sea ice is a key component of the climate system, its ongoing loss has serious, and wide-ranging, socio-economic implications. Increasing year-to-year variability in the geographic location, concentration and thickness of Arctic ice will pose both challenges and opportunities. Advancing our understanding of how the sea ice cover varies, and why, is key to characterizing the physical processes governing change, and for advancing model predictions. An emerging need is short-time-critical sea ice data products to support safety and security for maritime operations in ice-infested waters. Altimeter instruments on satellite and aircraft platforms have revolutionized our understanding of Arctic sea ice mass balance over the last two decades. Satellite laser and radar altimeters on NASA's ICESat and ICESat-2 satellites, and ESA's CryoSat-2, provide unique measurements of sea ice elevation, from which ice thickness may be derived, across basin scales. Meanwhile altimeters deployed on aircraft such as the Operation IceBridge Mission, together with coincident digital imagery, provide a range of novel, high-resolution observations that describe key features of the ice cover including its snow cover, surface morphology and deformation characteristics, and summer melt features. We will explore the novel sea ice data products developed at the NOAA Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry that describe changes in the Arctic ice cover during the last two decades. We will also discuss efforts to advance access to polar ocean remote sensing observations and improve communication with Arctic stakeholders through the NOAA PolarWatch initiative, which is designed to deliver data products that best address societal needs (polarwatch.noaa.gov).

Bio(s): Sinad Louise Farrell is an associate professor with the Department of Geographical Sciences at the University of Maryland, and a visiting scientist at the NOAA / NESDIS / STAR / SOCD Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry, College Park, Maryland. Dr. Farrell received her Ph.D. in Space and Climate Physics from University College London in 2007. Her primary fields of study are cryospheric sciences and remote sensing. She is a principal investigator on the NASA ICESat-2 Science Team and a member of the Mission Advisory Group for the EU Copernicus Polar Ice and Snow Topography Altimeter. Prior to joining the Department of Geographical Sciences, Dr. Farrell was with the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC), at the University of Maryland.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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10 September 2019

Title: Visualizing Uncertainty
Presenter(s): Max Schneider, PhD student in Statistics at the University of Washington, Seattle
Date & Time: 10 September 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Max Schneider, PhD student in Statistics at the University of Washington, Seattle.

Sponsor(s): NEDTalk NOAA Environmental Data Talks - Speaker Series (https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/nesdis-datafest/nedtalks). POC: tiffany.small@noaa.gov

NOAA DataFest is a month-long effort throughout September to educate the public and inspire our colleagues at NOAA to learn more about NOAA data while celebrating its value, reliability, and accessibility. NOAA data covers a robust collection of scientific earth and environmental observations available to the scientific community and the public.

Abstract: Every day, thousands of forecast maps are produced by NOAA and related agencies. All forecasts come with error but how can we best visualize uncertainty on a forecast map? Max Schneider, PhD student in Statistics and NCEP intern, says the effectiveness of different approaches towards visualizing this uncertainty can be carefully studied in user experiments. In this talk, he presents a human subjects experiment where three common visualization techniques go head-to-head, to see which one enables effective map-reading and judgments using the forecasts.

Bio
Max Schneider is a PhD student in Statistics at the University of Washington, Seattle. This summer, he is interning at the Environmental Modeling Center within NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Prediction in College Park, MD. In his dissertation work, Max builds spatiotemporal models to forecast earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest. He focuses on quantifying various sources of error in these models and how to visualize them to diverse audiences. He collaborates with cognitive psychologists to directly study the effect visualizations have on how people use forecasts. In his work at NOAA, Max quantifies the uncertainty within coupled numerical models of hurricane impacts, for the US COASTAL Act. His motivation is to improve operational forecasting with a statistical approach to uncertainty quantification and visualization.

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Title: The Unusual Sensitivity of Northern Sand Lance, a Keystone Forage Fish, to Acidification and Warming
Presenter(s): Hannes Baumann, PhD., University of Connecticut
Date & Time: 10 September 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Hannes Baumann, PhD., University of Connecticut

Sponsor(s): NECAN Sea Grant Webinar Series. The purpose of this webinar series is to highlight four projects funded through NOAA Sea Grant (http://necan.org/seagrantwebinars)

Abstract: Sand lance species play a key ecological role in most temperate to polar shelf ecosystems of the northern hemisphere, where they channel planktonic productivity upwards to higher trophic piscivores such as whales, seabirds, cod, and tuna. However, they have remained unstudied with respect to their sensitivity to predicted future CO2 levels in the ocean. For the past three years (2016 - 2018), we have sampled and spawned with northern sand lance (Ammodytes dubius) from Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary and subsequently reared their embryos under factorial CO2 x temperature conditions to hatch and early larval stages. Our results were striking, in all years, high CO2 conditioned severely reduced embryo survival up to 20-fold over controls, with strong synergistic reductions under combined high CO2 and temperature conditions. High CO2 also delayed hatching, reduced remaining endogenous energy reserves at hatch, and in combination with higher temperatures, reduced embryonic growth. Indeed, given the observed effects in size, northern sand lance might be the most CO2 sensitive fish species to date. This webinar will give a first-hand account of our work on sand lance, its results and implications for temperature to polar ecosystems, which may be among the most vulnerable to marine climate change.

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9 September 2019

Title: Accelerating Collective Learning and Action for Enhanced Resilience
Presenter(s): Lisa Auermuller, Jacques Cousteau NERR, Syverine Bentz, Kachemak Bay NERR, Philip Orton, Stevens Institute of Technology, Stuart Siegel, San Francisco Bay NERR, and Susi Moser, NERRS Science Collaborative
Date & Time: 9 September 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Title: Accelerating Collective Learning and Action for Enhanced Resilience

Presenter(s): Lisa Auermuller, Jacques Cousteau NERR; Syverine Bentz, Kachemak Bay NERR; Philip Orton, Stevens Institute of Technology; Stuart Siegel, San Francisco Bay NERR; and Susi Moser, NERRS Science Collaborative

Sponsor(s): NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html).

Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

Abstract: As the pace of climate change accelerates, there is a need to also accelerate collective learning about how best to prepare and adapt to changing environmental conditions. The National Estuarine Research Reserve System is working on the frontlines of climate change, learning important lessons about communicating with and engaging communities in climate change adaptation; reserves are producing critical scientific insights; and they work with local and state partners to strategically advance action on the ground. This webinar is designed to draw out broader lessons from the work in which the reserves and their partners are engaged in order to help accelerate learning and the transfer of ideas across the NERRS and the broader coastal management and adaptation community. With support from NOAA and the Science Collaborative, reserves have been engaging communities in resilience building for years. Join us for a lively panel discussion among four project leads that have been testing different approaches for helping communities anticipate and prepare for climate impacts.

Bio(s):
Lisa Auermuller, Assistant Manager and Coastal Training Program Coordinator, Jacques Cousteau NERR. Learn more about Lisa and her Science Collaborative projects on risk communication and planning tools.

Syverine Bentz, Coastal Training Program Coordinator, Kachemak Bay NERR. Learn more about Syverine and her Science Collaborative projects on scenario planning and fisheries.

Philip Orton, Research Assistant Professor, Stevens Institute of Technology. Learn more about Philip and his Science Collaborative project.

Stuart Siegel, Resilience Specialist, San Francisco Bay NERR. Learn more about Stuart and his Science Collaborative project.

Susi Moser, NERRS Science Collaborative. Learn more about Susi and her Science Collaborative work.

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6 September 2019

Title: Did Southeast Alaska drought conditions improve or worsen during the summer of 2019 and what will autumn/winter bring?
Presenter(s): Aaron Jacobs NWS, Rick Thoman ACCAP, Holly Prendeville USDA
Date & Time: 6 September 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Aaron Jacobs NWS, Rick Thoman ACCAP, Holly Prendeville USDA

Sponsor(s): OAR/CPO/RISA/Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract: This talk will look at how the summer of 2019 turned out from a climate and drought perspective across the temperate rainforest of Southeast Alaska and look into if the region will see a wet autumn and snowy winter. We will also go over what type of impacts were recorded throughout the summer along with a progress report on follow-up work from the Southeast Alaska Drought workshop held this past spring.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/list/?tribe_event_display=past)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

4 September 2019

Title: Social and Behavioral Science Research to Operations Workshop
Presenter(s): Various speakers
Date & Time: 4 September 2019
2:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ Science Auditorium
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Social and Behavioral Science Research to Operations Workshop Kickoff Event
Additional workshop days on Sep 5 and 6 - see link above.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of Weather and Air Quality (OWAQ; https://owaq.noaa.gov/)
POC: for questions about this workshop, please contact:
Micki Olson (OWAQ Social Science Program Coordinator; michele.olson@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Social and behavioral science (SBS) integration into the weather enterprise has a long and meaningful history. However, there have traditionally been barriers to transitioning SBS research, including a lack of shared understanding between the social and physical scientists, cultural differences between research and operations, and a lack of shared language.

The goal of this workshop is to nurture and help understand the roles, goals, and capacities of people and organizations comprising the SBS and weather communities by building shared languages, terminologies, theories, concepts and methodologies to enhance the research to operations (R2O) process.

Join us in person or remotely via webinar to help kickoff this workshop! All sessions will have an interactive Q&A.

Agenda:

2:00 - 3:00pm: Fireside Chat: A Historical Overview and Round Table Discussion on NOAA R2O policies with Dr. Gary Matlock and Mary Erickson
- This session features a discussion with Dr. Gary Matlock and Mary Erickson about the Research to Operations (R2O) process from the perspective of two different NOAA Line Offices (Oceanic and Atmospheric Research - OAR and the National Weather Service - NWS) and how they work together. Here, we will discuss the history of R2O and the social science transition process more specifically.

3:00 - 3:45pm: What Guides NOAA Weather Funding, Policy, Priorities, and Process
-In this session, we will hear from Dr. Hendrik Tolman, Dr. Bill LaPenta, Dr. Gina Eosco, and Jen Sprauge about how R2O fits into their respective offices and relevant grant policies.

3:45 - 5:00pm: Perspectives on the R2O Transition Process
- This panel will dig into the meaning of the R2O and transitions from the perspective of research (Dr. Julie Demuth and Castle Williams), operations (Dr. Dave Myrick and Robbie Berg), and OAR (Dr. Pam Heinselman).

Bio(s): For more information about our speakers, click here

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Title: A Next-Gen Monitoring and Forecasting System for Environmental Suitability of Aedes-borne Disease Transmission
Presenter(s): Dr. ngel G. Muoz, IRI and Ana Riviere-Cinnamond, PAHO
Date & Time: 4 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Silver Spring: SSMC3 - Rm 12836 (12th Floor Large Conference Room)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. ngel G. Muoz, Associate Research Scientist of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), and Ana Riviere-Cinnamond of the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO)

Seminar sponsor: OAR / CPO / IRAP

Abstract: Aedes-borne diseases, such as dengue and chikungunya, are responsible for more than 50-100 million infections worldwide every year, and are considered a national and global security issue. In the US, the vast majority of Aedes-borne infections are imported from endemic regions by travelers, who can become new sources of transmission once they are back in the country if the mosquitoes and suitable environmental conditions are present. In this seminar, we'll discuss a new monitoring and forecasting system that is being implemented in a partnership with several institutions to provide useful information for decision makers in the health sector. This work is supported through a grant from NOAA's International Research and Applications Project (IRAP), and involves collaboration with one of the NOAA-supported RISA teams " the Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN).

Additional Information about the NOAA International Research and Applications Project (IRAP):

Within NOAA's Climate and Societal Interactions Program (CSI), the International Research and Applications Project (IRAP) supports interdisciplinary research focused on countries and regions where weather and climate impacts may affect U.S. economic, development, scientific and security interests. The IRAP seeks to create practical knowledge, bridges and partnerships among the scientific community's multi-disciplinary research and services activities, and the needs and capabilities of decision makers and resource managers around the world with a stake in risk management, adaptation and development.

Climate and weather events such as heavy rains, flooding, heatwaves, droughts and severe storms have substantial implications for human health and well-being around the world. In an increasingly global society, these impacts can have cascading consequences for communities and states within U.S. borders as well as our investments in the private sector, international development, and national safety and well-being. Understanding how climate and weather events abroad affect U.S. interests in the health, international development and national security sectors is a critical step in the use of knowledge, products and early warning, and the development of integrated information systems - including those supported by NOAA and our international partners - to address practical challenges of risk management, economic growth, and bolster the stability and security of the U.S. In FY 19, IRAP launched 6 new projects focused on climate and health, several of which include a partnership with NOAA's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessment (RISA) teams. For additional information about IRAP, please click here: https://cpo.noaa.gov/Meet-the-Divisions/Climate-and-Societal-Interactions/IRAP/Funded-Projects

Seminar POC for questions: lisa.vaughan@noaa.gov

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Additional presenters field:
Title: Decision Making under Uncertainty: Case Studies & Experimental Research
Presenter(s): Dr. Susan Joslyn, Cognitive Psychology Professor, University of Washington
Date & Time: 4 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Decision Making under Uncertainty: Case Studies from the Weather Community & Experimental Research

Presenter(s):
Dr. Susan Joslyn, Cognitive Psychology Professor, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of Atmospheric Research (OAR), National Weather Service (NWS) and National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinators for this event are Micki Olson and Tracy Gill

Abstract:
People are often called upon to make important decisions involving uncertainty in domains in which they are not experts, such as medical treatment, financial planning and precautions for severe weather. The mission of the Decision Making with Uncertainty lab is to uncover the psychological factors that impact such decisions in order to determine how best to support them. This presentation will focus on lab research conducted with forecasters and emergency managers with respect to a changing probabilistic forecast.

Bio(s):
Dr. Susan Joslyn is a cognitive psychology professor at the University of Washington where she leads the Decision Making with Uncertainty Laboratory. She has numerous publications and grants focused on how probabilistic information and/or time pressure impacts decision making. She has an M.S and Ph.D. from the University of Washington in psychology.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

3 September 2019

Title: Visualization Research and Facilities at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
Presenter(s): Don Engel, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Date & Time: 3 September 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Don Engel (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)

Sponsor(s): NEDTalk NOAA Environmental Data Talks - Speaker Series (https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/nesdis-datafest/nedtalks). POC: tiffany.small@noaa.gov

NOAA DataFest is a month-long effort throughout September to educate the public and inspire our colleagues at NOAA to learn more about NOAA data while celebrating its value, reliability, and accessibility. NOAA data covers a robust collection of scientific earth and environmental observations available to the scientific community and the public.

Abstract: A discussion of UMBC's visualization research and related facilities, including spherical displays, VR/AR head mounted devices, 3D scanning, an immersive VR wall, and glasses-free 3D display. The presentation includes work taking place in UMBC's Imaging Research Center (IRC) and the IRC-affiliated Assistive Visualization and Artificial Intelligence Lab (AVAIL).

Bio
Dr. Don Engel is a professor and the Assistant Vice President for Research at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). As AVPR, Don leads UMBC's Office of Research Development. Don's research is on the applications of visualization and artificial intelligence (esp. image processing and computational linguistics) to data-driven discovery (esp. in the physical and life sciences). After completing a Ph.D. in physics and master's in computer science, Don spent several years working for Congress and executive branch agencies as a science and technology policy advisor. Don's background also includes clinical experience as a resident in radiation oncology medical physics.

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Title: Actions to Reduce Risks in a Changing Climate: Findings from the Fourth National Climate Assessment
Presenter(s): Roger Pulwarty, Director, National Integrated Drought Information System, NOAA and Jeremy Martinich, Climate Scientist, EPA
Date & Time: 3 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) and for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Actions to Reduce Risks in a Changing Climate: Findings from the Fourth National Climate Assessment
Seminar #11, the last in the NCA4/NOAA11-part Seminar Series: The Fourth National Climate Assessment: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States

MP4 and PDF of the slides are here:
https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars#OneNOAA%20NCA4

Presenter(s):
Roger Pulwarty, Senior Scientist, Earth System Research Laboratory, NOAA and
Jeremy Martinich, Climate Scientist, EPA

Sponsor(s):
US Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Katie Reeves. <kreeves@usgcrp.gov>

Abstract:
The Nation's authoritative assessment of climate impacts, the Fourth National Climate Assessment Vol. II: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States (NCA4 Vol. II) was released in November 2018. This presentation will address the potential for reduction or avoidance of future risk through adaptation efforts and emissions mitigation.

Bio(s):
Roger S. Pulwarty is Senior Scientist at NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado. Roger's publications focus on weather, water, climate extremes and risk management in the US, Latin America and the Caribbean. He also helped develop and lead programs linking science and services, including the National Integrated Drought Information System, the Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments, and the World Meteorological Organization Climate Services Information System. Roger has been a convening lead author on the UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction and the IPCC Working Group II on Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability. He is the co-editor of Hurricanes: Climate and Socio-economic Impacts (Springer, reissued in paperback 2012), and Drought and Water Crises (CRC Press, 2017).

Jeremy Martinich is a climate scientist with EPA's Climate Change Division. He coordinates the Climate Change Impacts and Risk Analysis (CIRA) project, a multi-team modeling project to estimate and monetize the risks of climate change to U.S. sectors.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information - https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

29 August 2019

Title: Suffering after Harvey, Irma, and Maria: An Analysis of the Emotional and Socio-political Impact of the 2017 Hurricane Season
Presenter(s): Cassandra Jean, NWS/COO/OPS
Date & Time: 29 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Cassandra Jean, MA, NERTO (EPP) Summer Intern under Vankita Brown and Cindy Woods

Abstract: In 2017, Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Maria, collectively brought about billions of dollars in
infrastructure and property damage, political unrest, high casualties, massive mental health
issues, and more. This study focuses on the disaster victims from Houston, Puerto Rico, and the
U.S. Virgin Islands who personally experienced the storms to a) investigate their hurricane
preparedness and communication usage, b) examine their levels of suffering on a micro and
macro-level, and c) how their recovery efforts and levels of suffering affect their social and
economic position. The information garnered from this study aims to advance scientific
knowledge regarding people's perception and susceptibility, and the emotional and psychological
toll of natural disasters.

Bio(s): Cassandra Jean, MA is a third-year Ph.D. student with the NOAA Center for Atmospheric and Meteorology (NCAS-M) at Howard University in the Department of Sociology and Criminology. As an NOAA Experiential Research and Training Opportunity (NERTO) intern,
she is working at the National Weather Service in the Operations Division for the Office of the
Chief Operating Officer assisting with social science research. Her research interests include the
Sociology of poverty, Sociology of suffering, social and global stratification, and decision
sciences.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/.

Title: The NOAA PolarWatch Program
Presenter(s): Jennifer Sevadjian, NOAA/NMFS
Date & Time: 29 August 2019
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - Med Conf Rm - 3555
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jennifer Sevadjian of NOAA/NMFS (presenting remotely)

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 907 468 427

Abstract: NOAA PolarWatch is the newest satellite data distribution portal of NOAA's CoastWatch program. The portal offers a single location for federal agencies, research groups, and private industry to obtain the most recent and historical satellite observations of Arctic and Antarctic waters, including measurements of sea ice cover, ocean temperature, and winds. We will provide an overview of the data and services provided by PolarWatch with examples that demonstrate supporting safety at sea, navigation, fishing, transportation, tourism, and recreation. We will also highlight user training materials and training courses that are designed to encourage broad usage of polar satellite data.

Bio(s): Jennifer Sevadjian is the Operations Manager for PolarWatch a regional node of NOAA's CoastWatch. She has a background in ocean data management, data integration and web development. She began her career at NOAA CO-OPS Ocean System Test and Evaluation Program, in 2002, collecting in-situ data and performing data analysis, and has gone on to work in many different sectors including the military, academia, private industry and non-profit communities. She joined NOAA PolarWatch in 2017, after serving as the information manager for CeNCOOS (a U.S. IOOS regional association). She is particularly passionate about data discovery, data integration and increasing the use of ocean data and is currently enjoying building solutions to address the challenges associated with polar ocean data.

POC: Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

28 August 2019

Title: POPS: A Portable Optical Particle Spectrometer for atmospheric research
Presenter(s): Dr. Ru-Shan Gao, NOAA/ESRL/CSD
Date & Time: 28 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): Join the NOAA Central Library and the Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) for the new NOAA Innovators Series! This series will be facilitated by Derek Parks, Technology Transfer Program Manager.

Presenter(s): Dr. Ru-Shan Gao, NOAA/ESRL/CSD (Earth System Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division)

Abstract: POPS (the Portable Optical Particle Spectrometer) is a small and light research-grade aerosol instrument. It has been used for aerosol measurements from the Earth's surface to the stratosphere. Robust and relatively inexpensive, it is particularly suitable for UAV and balloon applications.

Bio(s): Ru-Shan is a research physicist in the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, where he has worked since 1992. He leads the Atmospheric Composition and Chemical Processes group in the Chemical Sciences Division and specializes in instrument development and field measurements related to air quality and climate.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

27 August 2019

Title: Assessing coral health in an era of changing global climate
Presenter(s): Dr. Anderson Mayfield, CIMAS
Date & Time: 27 August 2019
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Online and at OAR - AOML - 1st Flr Conf Room, OAR - AOML - 1st Flr Conf Room
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Anderson Mayfield (CIMAS)

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: chris.kelble@noaa.gov

Are our seminars recorded?
Yes

Abstract: Coral reef ecosystems across the globe are threatened by a number of anthropogenic impacts, most notably the rising ocean temperatures associated with climate change. This is namely due to the thermo- sensitivity of the coral-dinoflagellate endosymbioses that are responsible for building these high-biodiversity habitats reefs. That being said, some corals, including those of certain reefs in the Florida Keys, Taiwan, and elsewhere, are resistant to dramatic changes in their external milieu. Over the past 15 years I have been working at attempting to understand what underlies coral resilience (or lack thereof) at the sub-cellular level, with the goal of then using such knowledge to develop models aimed at predicting which corals will persist over the coming decades and which will instead succumb to bleaching or disease. After uncovering that gene expression data cannot be used to make physiological inferences in corals or their in hospite algal populations (the focus of my research for over a decade), I have recently switched to instead characterizing the proteins that allow corals to thrive in extreme environments. Meanwhile, I am also looking at those macromolecules (namely proteins and small metabolites) involved in the stress response of those corals that are unable to acclimatize to (non-exclusively) high temperatures; the ensuing data would allow for the creation of a "coral stress test" that could aid managers interested in conserving particularly threatened reefs.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 August 2019

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Meghan Dalton, Climate Impacts Research Consortium; Britt Parker, National Integrated Drought Information System; Nick Bond, Office of the Washington State Climatologist; Jeremy Wolf, National Weather Service Spokane; Katherine Hegewisch, University of Idaho
Date & Time: 26 August 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Meghan Dalton, Climate Impacts Research Consortium (CIRC) and Britt Parker, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)
Climate Recap & Current Conditions: Nick Bond, Office of the Washington State Climatologist
Seasonal Conditions/Climate Outlook: Jeremy Wolf, NWS Spokane
The US Water Watcher: Katherine Hegewisch, University of Idaho/CIRC
Irrigation Demands for Specialty Crops, Lauren Parker, University of California-Davis/USDA California Climate Hub

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System, Climate Impacts Research Consortium, USDA Northwest Climate Hub, National Weather Service

POC: Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Abstract: These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Overview of JMA's Himawari Satellites and Validation of NOAA's GLM Product
Presenter(s): Ryo Yoshida, Japan Meteorological Agency
Date & Time: 26 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: ESSIC Conference Room 4102, 5825 University Research Ct, College Park, MD 20740
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Ryo Yoshida, Japan Meteorological Agency

Sponsor(s): ESSIC Seminar Series, crosslisted to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Abstract:
For over the last 40 years, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) has been operating Himawari series geostationary weather satellites covering the Asia-Pacific region. The latest generation of the series is Himawari-8 and -9 launched in 2014 and 2016, respectively. Equipped with the Advanced Himawari Imager, Himawari-8/9 enhances JMA's weather monitoring and prediction. Himawari-8/9 data are distributed internationally to national meteorological and hydrological services, and the data are also open to academic and nonprofit users.

JMA has undertaken feasibility studies of Himawari-8/9 follow-on satellites. Lightning mappers on geostationary satellites are expected to provide continuous total (intra-cloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning observation. The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) aboard GOES-R Series satellites is the first operational lightning mapper in geostationary orbit. To assess the GLM performance, this study validates the GOES-16 GLM level 2 product, using ground-based lightning observation data. In this talk, I will provide the GLM product validation results as well as an overview of Himawari-8/9.

Bio(s):
Mr. Yoshida is a Scientific Officer at the Satellite Program Division at the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in geophysics from Tohoku University, Japan, and began to work for JMA in 2009. His work at JMA has been concerned with Himawari series weather satellites. He developed Himawari-8/9 image navigation and registration processing operating on the ground system. He was also responsible for development and implementation of Himawari-8/9 level 2 products. Since November 2018, he has been a 1-year visiting scientist at ESSIC to research NOAA's advanced efforts for weather satellites including the Geostationary Lightning Mapper.

Are our seminars recorded?
Yes, and video is available from the ESSIC YouTube site.
ESSIC seminar site: http://go.umd.edu/essicseminarsite
ESSIC Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ESSICUMD

Seminar POC:
John Xun Yang, jxyang@umd.edu

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

22 August 2019

Title: A home away from home: The beneficial role of artificial structures in the adaptation of climate-displaced species
Presenter(s): Zac Cannizzo, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 22 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Zac Cannizzo, MPA Climate Specialist and Interagency Coordinator, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries - National Marine Protected Areas Center

Sponsor(s): Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Sam Chew Chin, (sam.chin@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Artificial structures such as buildings, telephone poles, and boat docks are ubiquitous in the modern environment and are often thought of as having negative impacts on wildlife. However, the role that artificial structures can play in mitigating the impacts of stressors, including climate change, on affected species is increasingly being recognized. In addition to a discussion of this topic, this presentation will highlight a case study which examines the role of boat docks in facilitating the climate-mediated range expansion of a crab into a suboptimal novel ecosystem.

About the speaker: Zac Cannizzo recently cearned his Ph.D. in Marine Science at the University of South Carolina. His research interests broadly involve climate change ecology and his graduate work focused on the factors governing the climate-mediated range expansion of the mangrove tree crab into the novel salt marsh ecosystem. Prior to his graduate work, Zac received a B.S. in Biology and Biological Aspects of Conservation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and spent time between degrees working in conservation.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Easy data access and visualization using the ERDDAP data server
Presenter(s): Cara Wilson, NOAA/NMFS
Date & Time: 22 August 2019
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Cara Wilson of NOAA/NMFS (presenting remotely)

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
USA participants: 866-832-9297

Passcode: 6070416

Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190822_Wilson.pptx
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190822_Wilson.pdf

Abstract: Distributing large global or regional datasets to a targeted user community is challenging, particularly if the users require data from many data providers and are interested in discrete geographical and temporal ranges. The ERDDAP data server addresses these challenges, acting as middleman between disparate remote data servers, to provide a single unified pathway for data access that offers 1) a simple, consistent way to download data, 2) subsetting by user-defined areas and time periods, and 3) downloads in over 30 data, image, and metadata formats that are compatible with analysis tools such as R, MATLAB, and Python. The ERDDAP GUI allows users to visualize data and refine download requests. Download requests are completely defined within a URL, allowing machine-to-machine data exchange, bringing data directly into analysis tools, and using ERDDAP as a backend to drive customized online interfaces. ERDDAP was developed by Bob Simons at the NMFS/SWFSC Environmental Research Division and has been installed by over 80 organizations worldwide. The ERDDAP servers at CoastWatch Regional Nodes and other NOAA offices provide access to thousands of satellite data, model output, and climatology products, as well as ocean-related ancillary datasets (e.g. buoy, shipboard oceanographic, animal track, and in situ data). NOAA's Data Access Procedural Directive includes ERDDAP in its list of recommended data servers for use by groups within NOAA. In this seminar we will describe the features of ERDDAP, including subsetting and downloading data, creating mapped images, visualizing wind vector fields, and generating timeseries and Hovmller diagrams. A live demonstration of these capabilities will be given. A tutorial explaining how to use ERDDAP is also available on the website of the West Coast Regional node of CoastWatch at https://coastwatch.pfeg.noaa.gov/projects/erddap/

Bio(s): Cara Wilson is a satellite oceanographer for the Environmental Research Division (ERD) at NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center in Monterey CA and is the PI of two regional nodes of NOAA's CoastWatch program - the West Coast Regional Node and PolarWatch, which are both housed at ERD. Her research interests are in using satellite data to examine bio-physical coupling in the surface ocean, with a particular focus on determining the biological and physical causes of the large chlorophyll blooms that often develop in late summer in the oligotrophic Pacific near 30N. She received a Ph.D. in oceanography from Oregon State University in 1997, where she examined the physical dynamics of hydrothermal plumes. After getting her PhD she worked as the InterRidge Coordinator at the University Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, France. Her introduction to remote sensing came with a post-doc at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center which involved analyzing TOPEX and SeaWiFS data. She joined NOAA in 2002 and has been active in increasing the satellite usage within the National Marine Fisheries Service. She is also the treasurer for PORSEC (Pan Ocean Remote Sensing Conference) and the current chair of the IOCCG (International Ocean Colour Coordinating Group).

POC: Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

21 August 2019

Title: What is an Atmospheric River and how do Alaska National Weather Service forecasters monitor these impactful events on communities and the hydrologic cycle?
Presenter(s): Aaron Jacobs, NWS Juneau and Martin Ralph, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Date & Time: 21 August 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Aaron Jacobs, NWS Juneau & Martin Ralph, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Sponsor(s): OAR/CPO/RISA Program's Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) or Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Atmospheric rivers (ARs) have the ability to transport large amounts of water vapor from the tropics poleward into the upper latitudes that can have positive and negative affects on the environment and society. For example, ARs events can cause dangerous flooding, debris flows and large amounts of snowfall but at the same time can be beneficial to the environment especially areas that are in a drought. 20+ years of research have increased our understanding of the dynamics of ARs. At the same time the improved remote sensing and better numerical weather prediction has given forecasters increased ability to monitor atmospheric rivers, although forecast challenges associated with ARs remain. This talk will review what we know of ARs, how forecasters monitor these events, what type of impacts they can have on communities of Alaska and ongoing research particular to Alaska.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/list/?tribe_event_display=past)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Introducing METImage: EUMETSAT's next generation polar imager on METOP-SG
Presenter(s): Changyong Cao, NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 21 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s): Changyong Cao, NESDIS/STAR

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 906 217 066

Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190821_Cao.pptx
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190821_Cao.pdf

Abstract:
The Low Earth Orbit (LEO) sun-synchronous operational constellation missions have been evolving rapidly in recent years. The Visible-Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) has replaced the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) in the afternoon orbit on the Joint Polar-Satellite System (JPSS) satellites, which will provide sustained earth observations till 2031 and beyond. Meanwhile, the last AVHRR, launched on MetOp-C in late 2018, will be replaced by the METimage around 2022, to provide continued observations of the earth in the morning orbit.

This seminar provides an overview of METimage, including its major instrument capabilities, and expected radiometric, spatial, and spectral performance. While VIIRS and METimage have similar characteristics, significant differences exist as well. For example, METimage includes water vapor channels, while VIIRS supports ocean color product generation with dual gain capabilities, and low light imaging with the Day/Night Band. The potential impacts of these differences on product generation will be discussed. Characteristics of the METImage datasets simulated and provided by EUMETSAT will be introduced. The goals are to support the Metop-SG product development at NOAA, facilitate advanced planning and user readiness, as well as collaboration between NOAA and EUMETSAT teams to provide sustained support to the operational global earth observations with a variety of land, ocean, and atmosphere products.


Bio(s): Dr. Changyong Cao specializes in the calibration and validation of radiometers onboard NOAA's Operational environmental Satellites. He initially joined NOAA in 1999 as the infrared sounder instrument scientist, became the VIIRS sensor team lead since 2011, and the branch chief for the Satellite Calibration and Data Assimilation Branch (SCDAB) of NESDIS/STAR/SMCD in 2018. In addition, he is actively involved in the Metop-SG (METImage), small satellite data exploitation, and GNSS radio occultation.

In addition to the operational pre&post instrument calibration support, Changyong is responsible for developing and refining the methodology for inter-satellite calibration using the Simultaneous Nadir Overpass (SNO) method, which has been used for the performance monitoring of satellite radiometers, and for developing long-term time series. He has made significant contributions to the international and inter-agency satellite instrument calibration/validation community, including the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Working Group on Calibration/Validation, and World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System (GSICS).

Before joining NOAA in 1999, Changyong was a senior scientist with five years of aerospace industry experience supporting NASA small satellite technology initiative and commercial remote sensing program. He was the recipient of two gold and one silver medals honored by the U.S. Department of Commerce for his scientific and professional achievements. He has served as the reviewer and editor for professional journals, published many peer-reviewed papers, as well as a book on the calibration and validation of visible infrared imaging radiometers. Changyong received his Ph.D., and B.S. degrees in geography from Louisiana State University and Peking University respectively.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Fisheries in a New Era of Offshore Wind Development
Presenter(s): Dr. Jon Hare, Science and Research Director, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center and Andy Lipsky, Acting Chief of Staff, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 21 August 2019
11:30 am - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) and in person at URI Bay Campus, Coastal Institutes Auditorium, Narragansett, RI
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Jon Hare, Science and Research Director, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center and Andy Lipsky, Acting Chief of Staff, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Seminar

Sponsor(s): NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC).
Seminar POC for questions: Andy Lipsky

Abstract: Offshore wind energy development is proceeding rapidly on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf. Wind energy development will soon enter the construction phase within New England and the Mid-Atlantic and efforts are also underway to develop wind energy along the west coast of the U.S. To date, 15 commercial offshore wind leases are active in the Northwest Atlantic shelf from North Carolina to Massachusetts and additional lease areas are under consideration. We will provide an overview of the development process, review the potential interactions with NOAA fisheries mission; including the impacts on our scientific enterprise; and discuss the major challenges and opportunities to achieving coexistence between sustainable fisheries and offshore renewable energy.

Bio(s):
Jon Hare is the Science and Research Director of the Northeast Fisheries Science Center. He oversees science activities related to NOAA Fisheries mission in the Northeast region including fisheries, aquaculture, protected species, habitat, and ecosystem science. Jon received a PhD in Coastal Oceanography from SUNY Stony Brook. He was awarded a National Research Council Research Associateship in 1994 to work at the NOAA Beaufort Laboratory and was hired by NOAA in 1997. Jon moved to the NOAA Narragansett Laboratory in 2005, was appointed Oceanography Branch Chief in 2008 and Lab Director in 2012. He started as Northeast Fisheries Science Center Director in 2016 and is now located at the NOAA Woods Hole Laboratory. His research has focused on fisheries oceanography: understanding the interactions between the ocean environment and fisheries populations with a goal of contributing to assessments and management. He is also an expert on the effect of climate change on marine fisheries and the implications to coastal communities.

Andy Lipsky: With over 25 years of fisheries experience, Andy has worked at the NGO, private industry, State, Tribal, and Federal levels. Andy joined NOAA and the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in 2016 and currently serves as Center's Acting Chief of Staff and Planning Officer in the Office of the Directorate. In this role he leads strategic and annual scientific and research budget planning across the Center's scientific enterprise. In addition, he serves as the Center's offshore energy and fisheries science team leader and co-chairs the NMFS Regional Wind Team. Prior to joining NOAA, Andy served as a managing partner for SeaPlan-a private resource planning startup, where he led efforts to design and execute collaborative fisheries studies to study the impacts of the Block Island Wind Farm on groundfish and lobster resources. From 2009-2011, Andy was appointed by USDA to serve as an Ocean Policy Advisor to the White House Council on Environmental Quality. From 2001-2009 Andy served as a State and Regional Fish and Wildlife Biologist for USDA's Natural Resource Conservation Service to advance watershed and aquatic conservation programs, including fish passage, seagrass, and coastal wetland restoration; and developed conservation programs with the aquaculture industry. Andy began his fisheries career working on endangered desert fishes in the Southwestern United States back in 1992.

Available in-person at: NOAA Fisheries NEFSC, 28 Tarzwell Drive, Narragansett, RI

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website.

20 August 2019

Title: Science Communication Finale for the Summer NOAA Library Challenge
Presenter(s): Monica Allen, Brooke Carney, OAR; Jamie Roberts, LAC Group
Date & Time: 20 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library

POC: Erin Cheever, Librarian (erin.cheever@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s): Monica Allen, Acting Director of Communications for NOAA Research;
Brooke Carney, Chief of Staff and National Communications Coordinator, NOAA Sea Grant;
Jamie Roberts, Librarian, LAC Group at NOAA Central Library

Abstract:
This event celebrates the end of the Summer Library Challenge. If you've participated in the Challenge, you've sampled the library's range of premier services for researchers. From access to research databases and the bibliometrics program to NOAA's Institutional Repository, the library supports NOAA scientists throughout the research cycle. We will have a series of three flash talks on science communication including a librarian and two special guests. Librarian Jamie Roberts will be covering the library's role in science communication vis-a-vis bibliometrics. Monica Allen of OAR Communications will be speaking on how to get the media interested in science stories. Brooke Carney of SeaGrant will discuss the use of social media to communicate science.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: International Effects and Complex Systems in a Changing Climate: Findings from the Fourth National Climate Assessment
Presenter(s): Meredith Muth, International Program Manager, Climate Program Office, NOAA, and Leon Clarke, Team Lead, Integrated Earth Systems Science Program, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Date & Time: 20 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar (see access below) or for NOAA staff, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
International Effects and Complex Systems in a Changing Climate: Findings from the Fourth National Climate Assessment
Seminar No. 10 in the NCA4/NOAA 11-part Seminar Series: The Fourth National Climate Assessment: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States

MP4 and PDF of the slides are here:
https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars#OneNOAA%20NCA4

Presenter(s):
Meredith Muth, International Program Manager, Climate Program Office, NOAA, and
Leon Clarke, Team Lead, Integrated Earth Systems Science Program, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
US Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Katie Reeves. <kreeves@usgcrp.gov>

Abstract:
The Nation's authoritative assessment of climate impacts, the Fourth National Climate Assessment Vol. II: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States (NCA4 Vol. II) was released in November 2018. This presentation will address the international effects and complex systems in a changing climate in the United States.

Bio(s):
Meredith Muth currently serves as a Regional Drought Information Coordinator with the U.S. National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) program, where she is working to improve the nation's capacity to manage drought-related risks. Prior to joining NIDIS, Dr. Muth worked for ten years as an International Program Manager in NOAA's Climate Program Office. Her responsibilities included leading several international partnerships and activities related to the development of climate information for decision-making with a strong emphasis on partnership development, coordination and policy.

Dr. Leon Clarke is an expert in energy and environmental issues, with a focus on climate change, climate change mitigation strategies, energy technology options, and integrated multi-sector modeling. He is currently the Research Director at the Center for Global Sustainability and a Research Professor in the School of Public Policy at the University of Maryland. He formerly led the Integrated Human Earth System Science Group and directed a range of integrated assessment modeling activities at the Joint Global Change Research Institute. Dr. Clarke has served as an author and coordinating lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the National Climate Assessment, and the National Research Council. He has also led a number of multi-institution studies on climate response options.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information - https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Upper and lower Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) variability at 34.5S.
Presenter(s): Dr. Marion Kersal, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 20 August 2019
10:00 am - 11:15 am ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Marion Kersal, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you will be able to find the link here: https://www.aoml.noaa.gov/phod/videos/index.php

Abstract: TBA

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

19 August 2019

Title: A Brief History of US Ocean Remote Sensing, or Crossing the Dead Sea, the Long Journey to Operational Satellite Oceanography
Presenter(s): Cara Wilson, NOAA/SWFSC/ESD
Date & Time: 19 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive, Lanham MD, 20706, Conference Room - S600
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Sponsor(s): JPSS Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Cara Wilson
NOAA/Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC)/Environmental Research Division (ERD)
Principal Investigator, West Coast node of CoastWatch and PolarWatch

Abstract: This talk will summarize the history of ocean remote sensing, which started in the 1970s (considerably after the launch of TIROS-1, the first weather satellite in 1960) with some sensors aboard the manned Skylab spacecraft. In 1978 the unfortunately short-lived SeaSat was launched, as well as Nimbus-7, which carried the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (the CSCZ) which flew until 1986 and completely changed our understanding of the dynamics of ocean biology. Similarly, the Topex/Poseidon altimetry mission, launched in 1982, revolutionized our understanding of ocean currents and circulation. However compared to that of weather satellites, the history of ocean remote sensing has had more setbacks, and these will also be discussed

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 August 2019

Title: August 2019 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy - ACCAP
Date & Time: 16 August 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (rthoman@alaska.edu)

Abstract: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for September and the remaining fall season and early winter. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/list/?tribe_event_display=past)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

15 August 2019

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Aaron Wilson, State Climate Office of Ohio
Date & Time: 15 August 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Aaron Wilson, State Climate Office of Ohio

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

POC: Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Seminar POC for questions: Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

14 August 2019

Title: There is no I in EAFM: Adapting Integrated Ecosystem Assessment for Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management
Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas NMFS/NEFSC
Date & Time: 14 August 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sarah Gaichas, Biologist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Abstract: Resource managers worldwide are being asked to consider the ecosystem while making management decisions. However, it can be difficult to change management systems accustomed to evaluating a constrained set of objectives, often on a species-by-species basis. Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) provides a flexible framework for addressing ecosystem considerations in decision making. IEA was adapted to address species, fleet, habitat, and climate interactions by the US Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) as part of their Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management (EAFM) in 2016. The Council's EAFM framework uses risk assessment as a first step to prioritize combinations of managed species, fleets, and ecosystem interactions for consideration. Second, a conceptual model is developed identifying key environmental, ecological, social, economic, and management linkages for a high-priority fishery. Third, quantitative modeling addressing Council-specified questions and based on interactions identified in the conceptual model is applied to evaluate alternative management strategies that best balance management objectives. As strategies are implemented, outcomes are monitored and the process is adjusted, and/or another priority identified in risk assessment can be addressed. The Council completed an initial EAFM risk assessment in 2017. First, the Council identified a range of ecological, social, and management objectives or risk elements. All objectives/risk elements were evaluated with ecosystem indicators using risk assessment criteria developed by the Council. In 2018, the Council identified summer flounder as a high risk fishery and is now finalizing an EAFM conceptual model. Annual ecosystem reporting updates ecosystem indicators and the risk assessment. The Council's rapid progress in implementing EAFM resulted from positive collaboration between managers, stakeholders, and scientists. Collaboration is essential to IEA and to the success of EAFM.

Bio(s): Dr. Sarah Gaichas has been a Research Fishery Biologist with the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch at the NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA since September 2011. She is a member of the Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee, has been active in ecosystem reporting and management strategy evaluation for both the Mid-Atlantic and New England Fishery Management Councils. Sarah's primary research is on integrated ecosystem assessment, management strategy evaluation, and ecosystem modeling. Her duties include developing, testing, and using ecosystem data, indicators, and models in natural resource management, and simulation testing management strategies (including analytical tools) that address the needs of diverse ecosystem users. Sarah previously worked at the NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA from 1997-2011 as an observer program analyst, a stock assessment scientist, and an ecosystem modeler. Sarah earned her Ph.D. from the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science in 2006, her M.S from the College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science in 1997, and her B.A. in English Literature from Swarthmore College in 1991.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Ocean Color Products for Water Quality and User Interactions for Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands and West Maui, HI
Presenter(s): William Hernandez, Executive Director of Environmental Mapping Consultants
Date & Time: 14 August 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA College Park folks, NCWCP, Rm 3555
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminars

NOCCG Seminar crosslisted with OneNOAA and STAR Seminars

Presenter(s): William Hernandez, Executive Director of Environmental Mapping Consultants and faculty at University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez
Seminar

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG). This seminar will not be recorded. Slides may be shared upon request.

Abstract: In this presentation we highlight some examples of the integration of scientific research by Academia, NOAA, and local NGO's to support current ocean color research from satellite and field instrumentation for sites and Puerto Rico and West Maui, HI. Also, we will discuss the development of data portals and workshops to provide easier access to managers from Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands and Hawaii to the remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) data. We will also present the integration of drones for supporting observations and address new threats, like Sargassum accumulations and sea level rise. Examples and results from this work will be presented.

Bio(s): Dr. Hernndez is currently working as a private consultant and as an Adjunct Professor of the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez. He was previously appointed as a Post-Doctoral Researcher for the NOAA CREST City College City University of New York and has more than 12 years of experience in the analysis and processing of remotely sensed data and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). His education consists of a Bachelor's degree in Biology, a Master's degree in Environmental Science (Water Resources) and a Ph.D. in Marine Sciences (Biological Oceanography) from the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez. His doctoral dissertation was entitled: Benthic Habitat Mapping and Bio-Optical Characterization La Parguera Marine Reserve using Passive and Active Remote Sensing Data. He has worked in multiple industries including academia, government and private sector, performing duties as an environmental consultant, research scientist, fish and wildlife biologist in government agencies dedicated to conservation, and developer of information systems technology in environmental science and infrastructure management. Dr. Hernndez is currently a collaborator of the NOAA NESDIS STAR Coral Reef Watch Ocean Color Projects and the US Coral Reef Task Force Guanica watershed management. He has also been collecting bio-optical and water quality data in La Parguera and the Gunica area for the past 8 years

Seminar POC for questions: Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Florida Keys Iver AUV: Surveying Reefs, Wrecks, and Debris
Presenter(s): Jon Fajans, Xylem Analytics, St. Petersburg, FL.
Date & Time: 14 August 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) AND, for NOAA Silver Spring staff, SSMC4, Rm 11153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Florida Keys Iver AUV: Surveying Reefs, Wrecks, and Debris
Discussion at 12pm EDT
Presentation at 1pm EDT

Presenter(s): Jon Fajans, Xylem Analytics, St. Petersburg, FL. Presenting at NOAA, Silver Spring, SSMC4, Rm 11153.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries; point of contacts are Kathy Broughton and Katy Lohr

Abstract:
You are invited to attend a presentation by Orca Marine, L3Harris, and Xylem covering data products collected by the IVER3 and I3EXO Ecomapper AUVs in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and other locations. These data products are examples of how an AUV can support NOAA missions as collected by an end user and brought into a GIS platform:
Coral health and monitoring
Damage assessment - coral reef
Damage assessment - seagrass
Water quality and harmful algal blooms
Dredging operation monitoring
Cultural resource and marine archaeology (ID, documentation, monitoring)
Marine debris and ghost trap location and identification
Tagged animal location and tracking
Post storm navigation channel survey
Invasive species monitoring
Search and recovery

Bio(s):
Jon Fajans earned a Bachelor's degree in Health Sciences and served 11 years in the U.S Coast Guard as a Flight Surgeon's Assistant, specializing in aviation and dive medicine before going back to school at the University of Florida. There he earned additional Bachelor's degrees in Zoology, and Wildlife Ecology, and a Master's degree in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences studying marine invasive species. Since then Jon has been the manager of the SEAKEYS Monitoring Program in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary as a scientist for the Florida Institute of Oceanography, Dive Safety Officer for the University of Belize, and President of a small marine research consulting company. He served as a scientific support coordinator for the NOAA Subsurface Monitoring Unit for the MC-252 incident response, and has installed ICON buoys throughout the Caribbean on a joint 5C's-AOML project. Jon came to Xylem in 2015 and served as a Field Service Engineer until January of this year when he accepted his current position as a Technical Sales Application Specialist for the Ocean and Coastal segment of Xylem Analytics, covering the Americas and Caribbean. Jon likes to teach scientific diving in his spare time and is an avid underwater photographer.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Connectivity processes in the Gulf of Mexico due to ocean circulation: impact on coastal ecosystems and their management
Presenter(s): Dr. Matthieu Le Hnaff, Assistant Scientist, University of Miami, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, or CIMAS
Date & Time: 14 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: VIa webinar (see access below) or for NOAA folks, SSMC4, Rm 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Connectivity processes in the Gulf of Mexico due to ocean circulation: impact on coastal ecosystems and their management

Presenter(s):
Dr. Matthieu Le Hnaff, Assistant Scientist, University of Miami (UM)/Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS), based at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML).

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Restore Science Program and National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Kassy Ernst and Tracy Gill

Abstract:
The Gulf of Mexico hosts rich and productive coastal marine ecosystems, which are influenced by the specific Gulf oceanic processes. In particular, the Loop Current is a large-scale current whose effects on local ecosystems are poorly known. I will present results based on both observations and modeling, which illustrate some of the connectivity processes in the Gulf of Mexico and their impacts on coastal ecosystems. I will then discuss how these processes can be taken into account from an ecosystem management perspective, with examples in the Florida Keys and the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuaries.

Bio(s):
Dr. Matthieu Le Hnaff received his Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography at the Paul Sabatier University in Toulouse, France, in 2008, with a focus on regional and coastal oceanography. In 2009, he joined the University of Miami (UM) as a Post-doc, where he started studying the Gulf of Mexico circulation, through modeling and observations. He has since worked on several important aspects related to the Gulf dynamics, including mesoscale circulation, the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, or the interactions of the Gulf circulation with the Mississippi River plume. He has been Assistant Scientist at UM since 2012, and since 2015 he is based at NOAA/AOML through the Cooperative Institute CIMAS.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

13 August 2019

Title: The Emerging Risk of Algal Toxins in Western Alaska
Presenter(s): Vera Trainer, NOAA Fisheries and Rick Thoman, ACCAP
Date & Time: 13 August 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Vera Trainer, NOAA Fisheries & Rick Thoman, ACCAP

Sponsor(s): OAR/CPO/RISA Program's Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) or Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Algal blooms are not uncommon in the oceans around Alaska, but only rarely are they harmful to people. Along the shores of the Gulf of Alaska, harmful algal blooms are a known hazard. However, in western Alaska, the oceans have historically experienced fewer impacts from the kinds of algae that produce paralytic shellfish and domoic acid poisoning. This presentation will provide an overview of algal toxins and their impacts and a review of the recent changes in ocean climate that now make this a potential hazard for the coasts of western Alaska.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: RESCHEDULED: There and Back Again: a Parasites Tale
Presenter(s): Christopher Paight, PhD, NRC postdoctoral research associate, NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 13 August 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/276263173
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Christopher Paight, PhD, NRC postdoctoral research associate, NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory. This seminar will not be recorded. Slides may be shared upon request.


Abstract: TBD

Seminar POC: adi.hanein@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Tourism and Recreation in a Changing Climate: Findings from the Fourth National Climate Assessment
Presenter(s): Dr. Victoria Keener, Research Fellow, East-West Center
Date & Time: 13 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA staff, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Tourism and Recreation in a Changing Climate: Findings from the Fourth National Climate Assessment
Seminar No. 9 in the NCA4/NOAA 11-part Seminar Series: The Fourth National Climate Assessment: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States

MP4 and PDF of the slides are here:
https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars#OneNOAA%20NCA4

Presenter(s): Dr. Victoria Keener, Research Fellow, East-West Center, Honolulu, Hawaii

Sponsor(s): US Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Katie Reeves. <kreeves@usgcrp.gov>

Abstract: The Nation's authoritative assessment of climate impacts, the Fourth National Climate Assessment Vol. II: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States (NCA4 Vol. II) was released in November 2018. This presentation will address the impacts of climate change on tourism and recreation in the United States.

Bio(s):
Dr. Victoria Keener is a Research Fellow at the East-West Center, the Lead Principal Investigator of the NOAA Pacific Regional Integrated Sciences & Assessments (Pacific RISA) program, and is the Lead Author of the Hawaii and US-Affiliated Pacific Islands chapter of the 4th US National Climate Assessment. Dr. Keener also serves as one of five members of the City and County of Honolulu Climate Commission, which provides science-based recommendations to the Mayor and City Council. She earned a PhD in Agricultural & Biological Engineering from the University of Florida, specializing in hydro-climatological research. Dr. Keener leads an interdisciplinary team of social and physical scientists that aims to reduce Pacific Islands' vulnerability to climate change by translating research into actionable knowledge for a variety of stakeholders at the local, state, and regional level.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Enhancing Marine Weather Awareness using Crowd-Sourced Observations from Mobile Devices
Presenter(s): Jerry Bieszczad and Marc Shapiro, Creare
Date & Time: 13 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library and the NOAA Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) as part of the NOAA Innovators Series.

POC: Tiffany House, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Commercialization Specialist, (tiffany.house@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s): Jerry Bieszczad and Marc Shapiro, Creare

Abstract: Creare has developed an Android/iOS smartphone app (WeatherCitizen) for collecting and distributing crowd-sourced environmental observations in a marine environment. In collaboration with Stony Brook University, we recently performed a field trial of WeatherCitizen on Long Island Sound collecting observations from 10+ geospatially distributed mobile devices and disseminating data-driven insights in real-time. This presentation will provide an overview of the development and deployment of WeatherCitizen, an overview of the Long Island Sound field trial, and the roadmap of WeatherCitizen into the future.

Bio(s): Jerry Bieszczad is the Principal Investigator of this NOAA SBIR Phase II effort. At Creare, Dr. Bieszczad leads a wide range of projects investigating the use of mobile devices as crowd-sourced observational platforms; serverless cloud computing for earth science data analytics; and scientific and geospatial software design and development.

Marc Shapiro is the lead software architect for this NOAA SBIR Phase II effort. At Creare, Mr. Shapiro is the lead software developer on multiple projects aimed at providing mobile-based tools for data collection, aggregation and distribution. These efforts include a flexible, cross-platform mobile framework for administering hearing assessments and training and an Android based platform for crowd sourcing local environmental conditions based on mobile device sensors.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

12 August 2019

Title: Incorporating Drought Information into Wildland Fire Management Applications: Recent Research and Tool Development in California and Nevada
Presenter(s): Dan McEvoy, Desert Research Institute and Western Regional Climate Center
Date & Time: 12 August 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dan McEvoy, Desert Research Institute and Western Regional Climate Center

Sponsor(s): OAR/CPO/RISA Program's Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and Alaska Fire Science Consortium

POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812), Alison York (ayork@alaska.edu), or Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Webinar is jointly sponsored with the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and using their webinar platform.

Despite a clear link between drought and wildfire, there is currently a lack of information for stakeholders at the regional and local levels for improved wildfire risk management using drought early warning information. Fire managers and other specialized fire professionals, such as Incident Meteorologists, will increasingly need to effectively use drought information in forecasts of fire behavior at fire incidents, and in long-term planning (i.e., seasonal fire potential outlooks) as the climate continues to warm along with shifts in the timing and duration of fire seasons. This presentation will highlight recent efforts to incorporate drought-wildfire linkages into the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System. Our research finds that drought indices which are both multi-scalar and incorporate evaporative demand are most strongly correlated to fuel moisture and key results will be presented. Testing of the Evaporative Demand Drought Index (EDDI) was conducted by Predictive Services in Northern California during the 2018 fire season and feedback will be summarized. Finally, Dan will summarize web tools that have been developed (and some that are still in development) to access EDDI, other drought indices, and remote sensing data (often with global coverage) that can potentially benefit wildland fire management in Alaska. This will focus on EDDI tools developed at NOAA's Physical Science Division and Climate Engine (app.climateengine.org) developed jointly between the Desert Research Institute and University of Idaho.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/list/?tribe_event_display=past)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Reform
Presenter(s): Monique Baskin, OIA
Date & Time: 12 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 E W Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Accessibility: This presentation will be recorded and available on our YouTube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxK2oekvetMp6zPSTWN63_g

Presenter(s): Monique Baskin, Management and Program Analyst, Office of International Activities (OIA), NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Summary: The UNs foremost authoritative voice on the state and behavior of the Earth's atmosphere, oceans and climate. Here's how it's reacting to the dynamic and constantly changing landscape.

Bio(s): Monique Baskin is an International Activities analyst with OARs International Activities office. She brings varied and unique experiences to the international activities office from her experience as a Political Military officer for the Far East Asia region and former Knauss Fellow working Arctic Research issues, among which was to plan the the 1st White House Arctic Science Ministerial.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

9 August 2019

Title: Recent progress on assimilation methods at Meteo France
Presenter(s): Y. Michel, O. Guillet, M. Destouches, CNRM, Meteo-France and CNRS
Date & Time: 9 August 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar and at UCAR's FL2-1022 Large Auditorium, Boulder, Colorado 80307
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Y. Michel, O. Guillet, M. Destouches, CNRM, Meteo-France and CNRS

Sponsor(s): JCSDA Seminar (https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/index.php)

Questions? Email kshan@ucar.edu

Abstract:
Meteo France as a NWP center is facing common problem in advancing data assimilation methods. In particular, Meteo-France is on the way of transitioning its global and limited area systems towards ensemble variational scheme, with traditional issues such as the localization or the sensitivity to ensemble size and resolution. In this talk, I will cover two different subjects that have been tackled by PhD students recently and that address two challenges of modern data assimilation. The first subject is the representation of correlated observation errors. Today, the assimilation of dense observations is hampered by the fact that, for algorithmic reasons, we take the associated covariance matrix to be diagonal. We propose a method that aims to model directly the inverse covariance matrix by using the diffusion equation. To account for the lack of spatial structure of certain observations, the discretization uses the finite elements method. The scheme is able to efficiently represent correlation of the Matrn family. Numerical experiments illustrate the potential and limitations of the method on cloud cleared MSG SEVIRI data, with operational implementation envisioned in the future years. The second subject investigates whether hydrometeor initialization can substantially improve short-term forecasting at convective scale. As regards the 3D fields of rain, cloud water, ice crystals, rain and graupel (hydrometeor fields), several barriers make their initialization a sensitive issue: strong non-linearity of observation operators, strong non-Gaussianity of model errors, spatial discontinuity and positivity of the variables. We start our investigations by comparing experiments by the convective-scale model AROME-France in a 3DEnVar framework with and without hydrometeor initialization. The improvement in forecast skill for precipitation and cloud cover is then respectively assessed by comparisons with ground based precipitation observations as well as by the SEVIRI imager onboard the MSG geostationary satellite. Further improvement could be expected from variable-dependent localization or non-linear change of variables.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

8 August 2019

Title: 2018 State of U.S. High Tide Flooding with a 2019 Outlook
Presenter(s): William Sweet, PhD, Oceanographer, NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services
Date & Time: 8 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA staff, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
2018 State of U.S. High Tide Flooding with a 2019 Outlook

Presenter(s):
William Sweet, PhD, Oceanographer, NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). Presenting at NOAA in SIlver Spring, SSMC4, Room 8150.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov; Mike Shelby will be hosting this seminar.

Abstract:
High tide flooding (HTF) is increasingly common due to years of relative sea level increases. In fact, last year (2018/2019), the rate of HTF broke or tied numerous local and national records and busied NOAA Weather Forecast Offices, which issued record numbers of coastal flood advisories. More of the same is expected next year (2019/2020). Impacts are typically more disruptive than out-right damaging, but responding to HTF requires time and resources is becoming a serious concern in many coastal communities. Impacts are mounting, and in response, NOAA's National Ocean Service has been tracking changes in flood risk and issuing annual reports providing predictions to help communities plan and prepare accordingly. This talk will dig into the most recent report and new NOAA products that focus on tracking the rapid uptick in HTF trends, identifying the coastal regions at risk and providing next-year and next-decade projections for about 100 U.S. coastal locations.

Bio(s):
William Sweet is a NOAA CO-OPS oceanographer researching and developing products about how sea level rise affects coastal flood risk. He helped the U.S. Department of Defense assess coastal flood risk across their global installations and was a lead author for the 4th U.S. National Climate Assessment. He enjoys sailing the Chesapeake Bay and teaching his kids about the signs of sea level rise from his home in Annapolis.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Machine Learning Specific to Climate and Weather Applications
Presenter(s): Imme Ebert-Uphoff, CIRA and Christina Kumler, CIRES
Date & Time: 8 August 2019
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar

Note: This is the same presentation that was given on July 18 to accommodate those that were unable to dial in.

Presenter(s):
Imme Ebert-Uphoff of CIRA and Christina Kumler of CIRES (presenting remotely)

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 907 355 804

Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190718_Kumler_and_Ebert-Uphoff.pptx
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190718_Kumler_and_Ebert-Uphoff.pdf

Abstract: Machine learning is becoming more and more accessible to the scientific community, with high performance computing capabilities, data collection, and increasing availability of free and highly efficient software packages. Part 1 of this talk discusses machine learning projects that are currently ongoing within NOAA ESRL's Global System Division (GSD). GSD has several active projects applying different methods of ML to satellite data that will be covered briefly in this talk. One project in particular, a Regions of Interest (ROI) project that uses deep learning to detect cyclonic ROI from water vapor satellite data, will be highlighted at the end. Part 2 then discusses the great potential as well as some challenges of using machine learning for climate and weather applications. Challenges include the perceived lack of transparency and the potential for incorrect generalization of these methods. We then discuss strategies for overcoming these challenges, including i) leveraging physics in the AI approach and ii) utilizing visualization tools to help understand the reasoning of these algorithms.

Bio(s): Imme Ebert-Uphoff received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mathematics from the Technical University of Karlsruhe (known today as Karlsruhe Institute of Technology or KIT). She received M.S and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. She was a faculty member in Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech for over 10 years, before joining the Electrical & Computer Engineering department at Colorado State in 2011 as research professor. Her research interests are in applying data science methods to climate applications. She is also very involved in activities to build bridges between the AI community and the earth science community, including serving on the steering committee of the annual Climate Informatics workshop, and of the NSF sponsored research coordination network (RCN) on Intelligent Systems for the Geosciences. Starting July 1, 2019, she is spending 50% of her time with CIRA to support their machine learning activities.

Christina Kumler comes from an applied mathematics, meteorology, and oceanic science background. She completed her B.S. degree at CU Boulder in applied mathematics in 2013 and then completed her M.S. at University of Miami Florida RSMAS in meteorology and physical oceanography in 2015. She is currently a CIRES scientist and specializes in computational aspects of weather modeling. Over the last two years, her time has been dedicated to applying machine learning techniques to big data problems in the field of weather and climate. In her spare time, she races triathlons, hikes, does semi-professional photography, and loves to cook/bake/eat with friends, family, husband, and dog.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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7 August 2019

Title: A joint analysis of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) at 26.5°N based on two observations-based time series
Presenter(s): Dr. Claudia Schmid, Oceanographer, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 7 August 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Claudia Schmid (NOAA/AOML/PhOD)

Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML
POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Are our seminars recorded?
Yes, you will be able to find the link here: https://www.aoml.noaa.gov/phod/videos/index.php

Abstract: TBA

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Title: Is my seafood safe to eat?
Presenter(s): Vera Trainer, NMFS/NWFSC
Date & Time: 7 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): Join the NOAA Central Library and the Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) for the new NOAA Innovators Series! This series will be facilitated by Derek Parks, Technology Transfer Program Manager.

Presenter(s): Vera Trainer, NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Research Oceanographer

Abstract: SoundToxins is a diverse partnership of aquaculture businesses, federal, tribal, state, and local governments, education institutions, and Puget Sound residents that monitor for harmful algae to alert health and natural resource agencies of their abundance. The complimentary online database allows for near-real time viewing of traffic-light maps. This partnership has helped to minimize the risks to human health and reducing the economic losses to Puget Sound fisheries since its formation in 2006.

Bio(s): Vera Trainer is a supervisory oceanographer at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, Washington, USA. Her current research on harmful algal blooms focuses on the assessment of climatic factors that influence toxic bloom development and understanding susceptibility of shellfish and marine mammals to toxins in their environment. Her work has led a comprehensive ecological forecast to alert tribal, state and federal managers to toxic events that threaten coastal shellfish harvest.

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6 August 2019

Title: Climate Change and Tribes and Indigenous Peoples: Findings from the Fourth National Climate Assessment
Presenter(s): Rachael Novak, Science Advisor, Tribal Resilience Coordinator, Bureau of Indian Affairs
Date & Time: 6 August 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA staff, SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Climate Change and Tribes and Indigenous Peoples: Findings from the Fourth National Climate Assessment
Seminar No. 8 in the NCA4/NOAA 11-part Seminar Series: The Fourth National Climate Assessment: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States

MP4 and PDF of the slides are here:
https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars#OneNOAA%20NCA4

Presenter(s):
Rachael Novak, Science Advisor, Tribal Resilience Coordinator, Bureau of Indian Affairs

Sponsor(s):
US Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Katie Reeves. <kreeves@usgcrp.gov>

Abstract:
The Nation's authoritative assessment of climate impacts, the Fourth National Climate Assessment Vol. II: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States (NCA4 Vol. II) was released in November 2018. This presentation will address the impacts of climate change on tribes and indigenous peoples in the United States.

Bio(s):
Rachael Novak, Navajo (Din) is Coordinator of the Bureau of Indian Affairs' (BIA) Tribal Resilience Program (Acting) and also serves as the Tribal Resilience Science Coordinator. Her first clan is Tse' Deeshgizhnii (Gap in the Rock Clan) and her maternal grandfather's clan is Kinyaa'anii (Towering House Clan). At BIA, she leads efforts to support tribal resilience including the annual competitive funding opportunity for tribal adaptation planning and the development of the Tribes and Indigenous Peoples Chapter of the 4th National Climate Assessment (as Coordinating Federal Lead Author). From 2008-2015, she worked on the development of water quality standards through the Clean Water Act at the Office of Water at the U.S. EPA in Washington, DC. She has an M.S. in geosciences from the University of Arizona and a B.S./B.A. in Environmental Science (geoscience track)/International Studies in Environmental Science from Oregon State University. She currently resides in Albuquerque, NM with her husband and toddler.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

2 August 2019

Title: Covariance Localization in Strongly Coupled Data Assimilation
Presenter(s): Takuma Yoshida, UMD
Date & Time: 2 August 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP Auditorium (NCWCP, 5830 University Research Court, College Park,MD 20740)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): EMC, ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CENTER Seminar (https://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html)

Presenter(s): Takuma Yoshida, UMD

Abstract: Coupled models of the Earth system have now enabled numerical prediction from weather time scales to climate projections. Strongly coupled data assimilation (DA) based on an ensemble of forecasts is a promising approach for providing initial conditions for these coupled models due to their ability to estimate flow-dependent coupled error covariance. Because the coupling strength between subsystems of the Earth is not a simple function of a distance, we need a better localization strategy than the current distance-dependent localization. We first propose the correlation-cutoff method, where localization of strongly coupled DA is guided by ensemble correlations of an offline DA cycle, so that, for example, an atmospheric observation will be assimilated into an ocean location only if the variables at the two locations have been determined to have significantly correlated errors. The method improves the analysis accuracy when tested with a simple coupled model of atmosphere and ocean. We then extend the correlation-cutoff method to a global atmosphere-ocean strongly coupled DA with neural networks. The combination of static information provided by the neural networks and flow-dependent error covariance estimated by the ensemble improves the atmospheric analysis in our observation system simulation experiment. The neural networks can reproduce the global error statistics reasonably well, and their computational cost in a DA system is reasonable. As a related topic, error growth and predictability of a coupled dynamical system with multiple timescales are explored with a simple coupled atmosphere-ocean model. The attractor is found to have a discontinuous response to the strength of the coupling.

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31 July 2019

Title: VALUABLES - societal and economic benefits of satellite products
Presenter(s): Yusuke Kuwayama, Fellow at Resources for the Future
Date & Time: 31 July 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA College Park folks, NCWCP, Rm 3555
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Yusuke Kuwayama, Fellow at Resources for the Future, and VALUABLES Consortium Director

Seminar

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG). This seminar will not be recorded. Slides may be shared upon request.

Abstract: National and international organizations are placing greater emphasis on the societal and economic benefits that are derived from applications of satellite data, yet improvements are needed to connect the decision processes that produce actions with direct societal benefits. Quantifying the socioeconomic benefits of Earth observations can (a) demonstrate return on investment in satellites and data products, (b) help satellite programs make informed choices about how to invest limited resources, (c) give Earth scientists an effective tool for communicating the value of the their work in socioeconomically meaningful terms, and (d) increase the likelihood that a satellite or satellite data application produces socioeconomic benefits by requiring Earth scientist to think about how project outcomes will be evaluated. To encourage the use of impact assessments to quantify the value of Earth science information energy and environmental economists at Resources for the Future (RFF) are collaborating with NASA Scientists through the VALUABLES Consortium (Consortium for the Valuation of Applications Benefits Linked with Earth Science). I will summarize the consortium's ongoing impact assessments, which quantify the value of using satellite data to enforce air quality standards, regulate air emissions from oil and gas development, detect harmful algal blooms, inform post-wildfire response, and predict ice sheet decline.

Bio(s): Yusuke Kuwayama is a Fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF). Kuwayama's research focuses on the economics of water resource management and the societal value of Earth science information. Kuwayama is also the Director of the Consortium for the Valuation of Applications Benefits Linked with Earth Science (VALUABLES). Kuwayama's research is often interdisciplinary in nature, involving collaboration with hydrologists, ecologists, and engineers. He has been PI or co-PI on grants supported by a variety of funders including NASA, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. His work has been published in outlets such as the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Land Economics, Environmental and Resource Economics, the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Regional Environmental Change, and Hydrogeology Journal. He received his Ph.D. in Agricultural and Applied Economics and M.S. in Economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and an A.B. in Economics from Amherst College.

Seminar POC for questions: Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

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30 July 2019

Title: Air Quality and Human Health in a Changing Climate: Findings from the Fourth National Climate Assessment
Presenter(s): Chris Nolte, Physical Scientist, National Exposure Research Laboratory, EPA, and Kristie Ebi, Professor, Global Health, University of Washington
Date & Time: 30 July 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see access below) or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4, Rm 8150, SSMC4\, Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Air Quality and Human Health in a Changing Climate: Findings from the Fourth National Climate Assessment
Seminar No. 7 in the NCA4/NOAA 11-part Seminar Series: The Fourth National Climate Assessment: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States

MP4 and PDF of the slides are here:
https://www.globalchange.gov/engage/webinars#OneNOAA%20NCA4

Presenter(s):
Chris Nolte, Physical Scientist, National Exposure Research Laboratory, EPA, and
Kristie Ebi, Professor, Global Health, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
US Global Change Research Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Tracy Gill and Katie Reeves.

Abstract:
The Nation's authoritative assessment of climate impacts, the Fourth National Climate Assessment Vol. II: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States (NCA4 Vol. II) was released in November 2018. This presentation will address the impacts of climate change on air quality and human health in the United States.

Bio(s):
Chris Nolte is a research physical scientist in EPA's Office of Research and Development in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, with expertise in regional scale modeling of climate and air quality. He was the coordinating lead author for the air quality chapter of the U.S. Global Change Research Program's fourth National Climate Assessment and a contributing author of the air quality chapter of the USGCRP Climate and Health Assessment, which came out in 2016. Chris is also co-lead of ORD's GLIMPSE project, which is developing a decision support tool to help state and regional planning organizations conduct long-term air quality management, simultaneously considering state and regional climate and energy objectives. He holds a BS in physics from Stanford University and MS and PhD degrees in environmental engineering science from the California Institute of Technology.

Kristie L. Ebi is has been conducting research and practice on the health risks of climate variability and change for more than twenty years, including on extreme events, thermal stress, foodborne safety and security, and vectorborne diseases. She focuses on understanding sources of vulnerability, estimating current and future health risks of climate change, and designing adaptation policies and measures to reduce the risks of climate change in multi-stressor environments. She was a lead author for the IPCC special report on warming of 1.5C, and of the 4th US National Climate Assessment.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

25 July 2019

Title: Blueprint for 2022, Part III: Working in the Modernized National Spatial Reference System (NSRS)
Presenter(s): Dr. Dru Smith, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 25 July 2019
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker Dr. Dru Smith, National Geodetic Survey

Abstract: In 2022, the National Spatial Reference System will be modernized. This presentation addresses how geospatial professionals can expect to work within the newly modernized NSRS.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of the topic is helpful.

Presenter(s): Dr. Dru Smith, National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. POC: Steve Vogel (steve.vogel@noaa.gov@noaa.gov), National Geodetic Survey

Visit the NGS Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

Title: Aviation Initiative
Presenter(s): Jeff Weinrich, JPSS Program, Aviation Initiative Facilitator
Date & Time: 25 July 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive, Lanham MD, 20706, Conference Room - S751
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Sponsor(s): JPSS Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Jeff Weinrich, JPSS Program
Aviation Initiative Facilitator

Abstract: The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Proving Ground and Risk Reduction (PGRR) program facilitates initiatives to increase or improve the use and value of JPSS data products in user products, services, and application or service areas. Building on the success of the Fire and Smoke, River Ice and Flooding, Hydrology, Sounding, and Arctic Initiative, the JPSS Aviation Initiative is the latest endeavor of the JPSS PGRR program. The aviation initiative was created in 2017 as a solution to the need of satellite products in the aviation community. It is establishing and building relationships with pilots and forecasters in the Alaska region and connect JPSS capabilities with the user needs. The initiative demonstrates JPSS/VIIRS cloud products to the pilots and forecasters in AK based on user interest and current season. It is also investigating the value of quantitate products to the pilots and forecasters. the initiative is determining how polar satellite data improves diagnosis and forecast of aviation hazards. The major participants in the Aviation Initiative to date are the JPSS program office, Alaska Aviation Weather Unit (AAWU), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Alaska Flight Service Stations, the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR), National Weather Service (NWS) Center Weather Service Units (CWSUs), NWS Arctic Test Bed, and The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA). Another goal is to highlight experimental products for future applications. The next step is to Expand utility in the Continental United States and internationally and to collaborate with other satellite programs.

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Title: Lidar measured wind profiles from space
Presenter(s): Sara Tucker, Ball Aerospace
Date & Time: 25 July 2019
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sara Tucker, Ball Aerospace

Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series

Audio:
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode: 6070416

Slides, Recordings Other Materials:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190726_Tucker.pptx
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2019/20190726_Tucker.pdf

Abstract: After more than four decades of international research and development in Doppler Wind Lidar, the Atmospheric LAser Doppler INstrument (ALADIN) on ESA's Aeolus mission is the first system to demonstrate direct measurement of vertically resolved wind profiles from space. While international studies are already demonstrating the positive impact of Aeolus lidar observations on weather forecasts, the ALADIN mission life is limited to a maximum of three years. The same year as the Aeolus launch, the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture (NSOSA) study listed 3D-Winds as one of the top observational objectives for future weather architectures and the National Academies Earth Science Decadal Survey (ESDS) listed Atmospheric Winds as one of the top targeted observables. The Optical Autocovariance Wind Lidar (OAWL) approach developed at Ball Aerospace, with funding support from NASA, provides a validated, high-TRL, and reduced-risk U.S. option for an Aeolus follow-on. This seminar will discuss the characteristics of Doppler wind lidar observations, compare wind lidar to other wind-observing methods used in numerical weather prediction, describe what the OAWL approach offers relative to Aeolus, and provide a roadmap for achieving a U.S. space-based wind lidar as part of a future operational weather architecture.

Bio(s): Sara Tucker is technical lead of Operational Weather in Civil Space and Technologies at Ball Aerospace where she focuses on development of advanced remote-sensing techniques and system architectures to meet next-generation operational weather requirements and Earth science objectives. She also serves as the Principal Investigator for the Optical Autocovariance Wind Lidar (OAWL) system. At Ball, and previously at NOAA/CIRES, Sara has managed Doppler lidar development and participation in several ground, ship- and aircraft-based field campaigns to study atmospheric winds. She has written and contributed to publications on Doppler lidar instrument and data product development, planetary boundary layer dynamics, cloud processes, and dust/pollution transport and mixing processes. Sara graduated from the University of Colorado with M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering with a focus on digital signal processing and optics.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

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24 July 2019

Title: 2018 Marine Debris Removal and Assessment in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands within Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument
Presenter(s): James Morioka, Operations Manager, NOAA NMFS Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Ecosystem Sciences Division. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: 24 July 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online only or SSMC4, Rm 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
2018 Marine Debris Removal and Assessment in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands within Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument

The recording, audio transcript and presentation for this webinar is here: NWHI Webinar

Presenter(s):
James Morioka, Operations Manager, NOAA NMFS Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Ecosystem Sciences Division (ESD). Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Marine Debris Program and NOAA's NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar coordinators are MaryLee Haughwout and Tracy Gill

Abstract:
In September 2018, a team of scientists and divers led by the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center conducted a large-scale mission to survey and remove marine debris from the islands and atolls of the Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument. Over the course of 41 days, 2 ships, and a shore-based mission, the team was able to successfully remove over 74 metric tons (164,000 lbs) of derelict fishing gear, plastic, and other marine debris from the shallow (<30 ft) coral reef and shoreline environments. This presentation will provide an overview of the project's history, survey and removal methods, recent research, and future missions.

Bio(s):
James Morioka is the Operations Manager for the Ecosystem Sciences Division (ESD) at NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC). He specializes in project planning, logistics, and field operations. He has been with NOAA PIFSC since 2011 and has managed large-scale marine debris removal operations in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands since 2015.

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23 July 2019

Title: Apollo 50: The role of intellectual property in space commerce
Presenter(s): Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, ASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director of the USPTO Andrei Iancu, Director of the Office of Space Commerce Kevin O'Connell, Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Deputy Director of the USPTO Laura Peter, Former Associate Director, Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office, NASA and National Inventors Hall of Fame inductee Frank Cepollina, Astronaut Kathryn Sullivan, Astronaut Paul Richards, VP and General Manager of Strategic Operations of Ball Aerospace Debra Facktor, CEO of NanoRacks Jeffrey Manber, Founder and Chief Strategy Officer of Slingshot Aerospace Melanie Stricklan
Date & Time: 23 July 2019
2:00 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Via webinar or 600 Dulany Street Alexandria, VA 22314
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, ASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director of the USPTO Andrei Iancu, Director of the Office of Space Commerce Kevin O'Connell, Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Deputy Director of the USPTO Laura Peter, Former Associate Director, Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office, NASA and National Inventors Hall of Fame inductee Frank Cepollina, Astronaut Kathryn Sullivan, Astronaut Paul Richards, VP