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NOAA Science Seminar Series
Past 2020 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

18 December 2020

Title: December 2020 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP/University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 18 December 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: http://accap.adobeconnect.com/december2020/event/registration.html

Abstract:
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

17 December 2020

Title: Knauss Fellows 2020: Connor Fagan & Irvin Huang
Presenter(s): Connor Fagan, Knauss Fellow, Science & Policy Analyst, Marine Mammal Commission
Date & Time: 17 December 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Join us online at 12PM ET for our next Knauss 2020 presentations!

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7856999450908763661 Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

12:00 - 12:30 PM EST

Presenter(s): Connor Fagan, Knauss Fellow, Science & Policy Analyst, Marine Mammal Commission

Title: Potential Transboundary Solutions to Stormwater Management: the 2016 and 2019 Louisiana Floods as a Case Study

Abstract: Climate change has and continues to cause increasingly severe and frequent tropical storms and rainfall events. Due to Louisiana's flat topography and increased urban development, flood risk has caused immense damage in recent years. Comprehensive, regional floodplain management may be necessary in order to prevent existing and future development projects from impacting adjacent and downstream communities and assets. This presentation provides an overview of stormwater management, the Louisiana floods, and potential solutions to stormwater management issues on a wider scale.

Bio(s): Connor Fagan is a 2020 Knauss Fellow with the Marine Mammal Commission. He graduated with his J.D. from Louisiana State University's Paul M. Hebert Law Center. His research and work at Louisiana Sea Grant during law school focused on stormwater management, coastal resilience, freshwater impacts to marine mammals, and more.

12:30 - 1:00 PM EST

Presenter(s): Irvin Huang, Ocean Policy Analyst, National Ocean Service, Policy and Constituent Affairs Division


Title: Using 'omics approaches to identify a toxic mechanism of psychiatric pharmaceuticals in developing fish

Abstract: Continuing developments in 'omics methodologies are allowing scientists to probe biological questions at increasingly small scales. This enhanced resolution has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of how organisms respond to chemical and environmental stressors at the tissue and cell level, which is key to improving our understanding of their biological and ecological impacts. Here, we show how single-cell sequencing techniques can be used to identify the potential toxic mechanisms of psychiatric pharmaceuticals, which are increasingly detected in aquatic ecosystems around the world, in developing fish.

Bio(s): Irvin Huang is a 2020 Knauss Fellow in NOAA National Ocean Service, placed in the Policy and Constituent Affairs Division as a policy analyst. Irvin holds a BS from UC Davis and recently obtained his Ph.D. from Stony Brook University's School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences. Irvin's background is in molecular ecology and his dissertation research focused on the biological effects of chemical contaminants found in wastewater effluent, specifically pharmaceutical compounds, on developing fish.

POC: 2020 Knauss Fellow POC: Michael Acquafredda (michael.acquafredda@noaa.gov), Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov)

Accessibility: If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 24: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 3
Presenter(s): Sarvesh Garimella - ACME AtronOmatic, Hugh Runyan - SIO/UCSD, Mark Veillette - MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Jiali Wang - Argonne National Laboratory
Date & Time: 17 December 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 24: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 3 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):

A Deep Learning Approach for Intelligent Thinning of Satellite Data - Sarvesh Garimella (ACME AtronOmatic)

Automation-assisted segmentation to expedite 3D coral mapping - Hugh Runyan (SIO/UCSD)

A Storm Event Imagery Dataset for Deep Learning Applications in Radar and Satellite Meteorology - Mark Veillette (MIT Lincoln Laboratory)

Precipitation downscaling using conditional super-resolution based deep neural network - Jiali Wang (Argonne National Laboratory)

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4245790948914123788

Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

16 December 2020

Title: Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium (VAWS) - Understanding the Alaska Regional Operations Center (ROC) of the National Weather Service
Presenter(s): David Kramer,, NWS Alaska
Date & Time: 16 December 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): David Kramer, Emergency Response Specialist
Alaska Environmental Science and Services Integration Center
National Weather Service

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar POC for questions: Sean Bath sean.bath@noaa.gov or Tina Buxbaum tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/vaws-december2020/

Abstract:
Weather plays a significant role for people's lives, livelihoods, and property in Alaska. The ROC stands at the crossroads of weather and communication for the National Weather Service's Alaska Region and we must remain vigilant of the ever changing weather. We will discuss the National Weather Service's structure in Alaska and the ROC's role in supporting National Weather Service operations and partners at all levels.
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Putting 2020 in the Rear View: Understanding the Impact of COVID-19 on Collaborative Research
Presenter(s): James Arnott, Aspen Global Change Institute, jamesa@agci.org; Sybil Seitzinger, Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, picsdir@uvic.ca; Ariela Zycherman, NOAA Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments Program, ariela.zycherman@noaa.gov; Charlotte Hudson, Lenfest Ocean Program at the Pew Charitable Trusts, chudson@pewtrusts.org; Leah Fisher, California Strategic Growth Council, leah.fisher@sgc.ca.gov; Jen Read, NERRS Science Collaborative, jenread@umich.edu
Date & Time: 16 December 2020
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series



Title: Putting 2020 in the Rear View: Understanding the Impact of COVID-19 on Collaborative Research



Presenter(s): James Arnott, Aspen Global Change Institute; Leah Fisher, California Strategic Growth Council; Charlotte Hudson, Lenfest Ocean Program at the Pew Charitable Trusts; Jen Read, NERRS Science Collaborative; Sybil Seitzinger, Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions; Ariela Zycherman, NOAA Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments Program

Moderator: Doug George, NOAA Office for Coastal Management



Sponsor(s): This seminar is sponsored by the NERRS Science Collaborative



Seminar Contact(s): Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)



Remote Access: Please register through GoToWebinar (https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7109947272106898446)



Abstract: What a year 2020 has been! COVID-19 has reshaped how we understand and practice collaborative research, not to mention nearly every other aspect of how we live and work. By year's end, all of us are now on a similar journey to take stock of what we have learned through these challenges.

This webinar brings together the perspectives of five funders working across North America that sponsor collaborative research on environmental topics. Earlier this fall, each of them polled their grantees about how COVID-19 has affected their active projects and asked them to make sense of the benefits and constraints of doing collaborative research virtually. In this webinar, panelists representing the organizations involved in the study will share and discuss preliminary findings and their implications for future programs. Participating funders will include: California Strategic Growth Council, NERRS Science Collaborative, NOAA's Regional Integrated Sciences & Assessment, Lenfest Ocean Program at the Pew Charitable Trust, and the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions.



Bio(s): Please visit here for biographical information about our speakers.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Effects of Climate Change on Zooplankton Communities
Presenter(s): Deana Crouser, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 16 December 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Effects of Climate Change on Zooplankton Communities

Presenter(s): Deana Crouser, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: An overview and comparison of changing marine environments in Puget Sound and the Bering Sea. Warming waters and anthropogenic contributions have led to increasing incidences of coastal hypoxia world wide, as well as, early sea ice retreat observed in the Arctic. Copepods are an important tropic link between marine primary production and upper trophic levels, and how they respond to climate change will greatly affect the future of our oceans. This research seeks to contribute to implications that hypoxia causes a disruption to copepods diel-vertical migration patterns and early sea ice retreat is prompting a shift in bloom timing relative to zooplankton abundance on the Eastern Bering Sea Shelf.

Bio(s): See Deana's story at Be Boundless: https://www.washington.edu/boundless/oceanography-research/

Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).


Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Sea Grant’s Practical Approach to Economic Valuation: building a toolbox for non-economists
Presenter(s): Margaret Chory, John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow, Socioeconomic Specialist, National Sea Grant Office; and Alison Krepp, Program Officer and Social Science and Economics Lead, National Sea Grant Office
Date & Time: 16 December 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science SeminarYou may view the recording for this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pxc0iltizjj8/

Title: Sea Grant's Practical Approach to Economic Valuation: building a toolbox for non-economists

Presenter(s):
Margaret Chory, John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow, Socioeconomic Specialist, and
Alison Krepp, Program Officer and Social Science and Economics Lead, both with with NOAA's National Sea Grant Office

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/economicvaluation/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: Chances are you've been asked, or are at least curious about, your program's economic benefits. Do you have an economist on staff to answer these questions? If you're like most of the 34 state Sea Grant programs, the answer is likely no. Since 2017, the National Sea Grant College Program, Sea Grant, has engaged in a deliberate strategy to enhance the capacity of its non-economists to perform basic valuations that support their program's economic stories and meet NOAA's performance measure requirements. Over the last three years, the National Sea Grant Office has worked under contract with economists at ERG and in coordination with the state Sea Grant programs to produce 11 economic valuation resources for non-economists. To promote the adoption and implementation of these tools, Sea Grant has coupled these products with community support strategies that enhance their use. The initial results are promising, with an increasing number of state programs reporting their economic benefits to the national office over the same time period. This presentation will outline Sea Grant's end-user driven approach and practical strategy for increasing its internal capacity for economic valuation and provide insights (and caveats) for others with an interest in doing the same within their programs. Sea Grant is a national network made up of 34 university-based programs established by Congress to enhance the practical use and conservation of coastal, marine and Great Lakes resources to create a sustainable economy and environment.

Bio(s): Margaret Chory is a 2020 John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in NOAA's National Sea Grant Office where she serves as the program's socioeconomic specialist. In this role, she has supported the contract to create new valuation resources and worked to build economic valuation capacity throughout the Sea Grant network. Prior to Sea Grant, Margaret earned a Masters in Coastal Environmental Management from the Duke Nicholas School of the Environment where her research focused on the values associated with fishing for food' in coastal North Carolina, and the benefits that fishers derive from access to public fishing infrastructure.

Alison Krepp leads the social science and economics portfolios for the National Sea Grant Office and serves as the program officer to the Maine, New Hampshire, MIT, Woods Hole, and Rhode Island Sea Grant programs. Prior to joining Sea Grant, Alison worked with NOAA's National Estuarine Research Reserve System where her roles included national strategic planning lead, social scientist, and regional coordinator to the northeast research reserves. Alison also worked as a planner with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources where she focused on community engagement in river conservation. Alison holds a master's degree in resource policy and behavior from the University of Michigan. Her research examined the influences of organizational behavior on sustaining partner involvement in network initiatives.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

15 December 2020

Title: The 2020 NOAA Arctic Report Card: Overview and Chapter Highlights in the Alaska Context
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alison York, Ben Jones, Tom Ballinger, University of Alaska Fairbanks; Gabe Wolken University of Alaska Fairbanks & State of Alaska; Gerald "JJ" Frost, ABR, Inc.
Date & Time: 15 December 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
Tom Ballinger, International Arctic Research Center (IARC) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
Alison York, Alaska Fire Science Consortium (AFSC) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
Gabe Wolken, International Arctic Research Center (IARC) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks & Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, Department of Natural Resources
Ben Jones, Institute of Northern Engineering (INE) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
Gerald JJ Frost, ABR, Inc."Environmental Research & Services

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar POC for questions: Sean Bath sean.bath@noaa.gov or Tina Buxbaum tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/2020-arctic-report-card/

Abstract:
Issued annually since 2006, the Arctic Report Card is a timely and peer-reviewed source for clear, reliable and concise observational information on the current state of different components of the Arctic environmental system relative to historical records. The Report Card is intended for a wide audience, including scientists, teachers, students, decision-makers and the general public interested in the Arctic environment and science. This webinar will give a broad overview of the 2020 Arctic Report Card followed by Alaska-focused highlights on the following topics:Air temperature
Wildfires
Glaciers
Coastal permafrost
Greening of the tundraThe full report card will be released shortly before this webinar on December 8th. Please check out the full Arctic Report Card (available December 8th onward) and then tune into this webinar to learn more focused on the Alaska context.Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Spatial Priorities Study Results: NOAA Mapping Priorities
Presenter(s): Karen Gouws, GIS Specialist, NOAA's National Ocean Service, NOAA's Office of Coast Survey, Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 15 December 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

You may view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p1yex0ephftm/

Title: Spatial Priorities Study Results: NOAA Mapping Priorities
Part of NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Karen Gouws, GIS Specialist, NOAA's National Ocean Service, NOAA's Office of Coast Survey, Silver Spring, MDWhen: Tuesday, December 15, 2020, 2-3pm EST

Sponsor(s): NOAA's IOCM Webinar Series and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Seminar coordinators are Amber.Butler@noaa.gov and Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/iocm/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: This seminar will discuss the preliminary analysis of results from the NOAA 2020 Spatial Priorities Study. The Spatial Priorities Study was conducted across NOAA offices and programs to gather information about where different offices have mapping priorities. This study allows users to indicate for their programs which regions of ocean (nearshore and offshore) and Great Lakes have the most mapping needs in near or longer term. When aggregated, the results can help us allocate resources efficiently, provide a means to reach out to other partners for coordination, and leverage funding assistance where there is a shared mapping need between organizations, among other benefits. Participants entered office mapping priorities in the spring and summer of 2020 with an easy-to-use online tool developed by NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). Building from other studies using the NCCOS tool, these results were combined and analyzed using geospatial tools to identify areas of greatest mapping priority, areas of overlapping requirements, and justifications for why mapping data is needed. The results include offices that submitted priorities through October of 2020; other NOAA offices will be incorporated as they finalize their submissions.The study is now rolling out to other federal agencies in the Interagency Working Group for Ocean and Coastal Mapping as a milestone activity under the National Ocean Mapping, Exploration and Characterization Strategy (NOMEC). In the coming months, it will expand to non-federal partners such as local governments and private sector stakeholders, in order to increase non-federal engagement on mapping coordination, also a NOMEC goal.

Bio(s): Karen Gouws works as a GIS Specialist in NOAA's Office of Coast Survey. Karen ran and managed the NOAA 2020 Nationwide Spatial Priorities Study, setting up the applications, coordinating between dozens of participants to get data submitted, and running presentations and demonstrations.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Genomics, Transcriptomics, and eDNA-OH MY! How can advances in these fields help answer your crab and groundfish research questions?
Presenter(s): Wes Larson, NOAA AFSC ABL
Date & Time: 15 December 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar by Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Groundfish Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Genomics, Transcriptomics, and eDNA-OHMY! How can advances in these fields help answer your crab and groundfish research questions?

Presenter(s): Wes Larson, NOAA AFSC ABL

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesPlease contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mb66637e99438b9610e5a9a4465bd9053Webex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 727 5307 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 199 727 5307

Abstract: Thegenomic revolution has prompted major advances in genetics research that can beleveraged to answer myriad questions relating to conservation and management ofnatural resources. In this talk we will provide an overview of some of theseadvances and discuss the ways they may be applied to address topics related togroundfish management and the AFSC mission. We hope to provide a roadmap thatwill give non-geneticists guidance on when genomics approaches might be usefulto pursue and how to integrate these methods into their research programs.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Drought and Water Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District
Date & Time: 15 December 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2709260833712009485

Abstract:
The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar is part of a monthly (twice a month during drought status) webinar series designed to provide stakeholders, water-resource managers, and other interested parties in the ACF region with timely information on current drought status, seasonal forecasts and outlooks, streamflow conditions and forecasts, groundwater conditions, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir conditions.

Recordings:
Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

14 December 2020

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): John Abatzoglou, UC-Merced, Andrea Bair, NWS Western Region, Daniel Leavell, Oregon State University, Bart Nijssen, University of Washington
Date & Time: 14 December 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Climate Recap & Current Conditions
John Abatzoglou | UC-Merced

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Andrea Bair | NWS Western Region

How Landowners Can Assess to Address Post-Fire Erosion or Landslide Damage Potential to Homes, Property, or Infrastructure
Daniel Leavell | Oregon State University

Partner Opportunities for a New NIDIS Funded Grant to Improve Drought Impact Indicators in the PNW
Bart Nijssen | University of Washington

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System, Climate Impacts Research Consortium, USDA Northwest Climate Hub, National Weather Service

Seminar Contact(s): Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6146125274071200526

Abstract:
According to the December 1, 2020 U.S. Drought Monitor, 40.6% of the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) is in drought, including 13.2% in Extreme Drought (D3). Will the drought continue through fall and winter? Find out the latest on conditions, climate outlook, and watch the following presentations:
  • How Landowners Can Assess to Address Post-Fire Erosion or Landslide Damage Potential to Homes, Property, or Infrastructure
  • Partner Opportunities for a New NIDIS Funded Grant to Improve Drought Impact Indicators in the PNW.
These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: NESDIS Snowfall Rate and Radar-Satellite Blended Snowfall Rate Products
Presenter(s): Huan Meng, Physical Scientist,Satellite Climate Studies Branch, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/CoRP, College Park, MD
Date & Time: 14 December 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: WEBEX Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s): Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s): HuanMeng, Physical Scientist, Satellite Climate Studies Branch,NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/CoRP, College Park, MD

Abstract:

TheNESDIS operational snowfall rate (SFR) product is retrieved from passivemicrowave sensors aboard a constellation of satellites including NOAA-20 andS-NPP. The product has benefited significantly from continuous development inrecent years. Some of the advancements include the addition of new missions,updated algorithms and bias correction, extension to cold regime using machinelearning, and snowfall detection over ice-free ocean, sea ice, and coast, etc.A radar-satellite blended snowfall rate product (mSFR) has also been developedthat merges the NSSL Multi-Radar/Multi-Sensor (MRMS) instantaneousprecipitation rate with SFR. The mSFR product takes advantage of satellite'sbroad spatial coverage and provides no-gap snowfall rate estimates withinsatellite swath. It provides situational awareness for weather forecasting byidentifying the extend and intensity of snow at real-time, and tracking stormevolution with its looping capability

Remote Access

Description:877-401-9225
passcode: 53339716

JOIN WEBEX MEETING

https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m18a5020cf5889c9d770d35b1c1cf4eff

Meeting password: Jpss2020!


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

10 December 2020

Title: Disaster Recovery and Coral Reef Restoration
Presenter(s): Eileen Alicea, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program; Michael Nemeth, NOAA's Restoration Center; Autumn Lotze, NOAA's Disaster Preparedness Program
Date & Time: 10 December 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Disaster Recovery and Coral Reef Restoration

Presenter(s):
Eileen Alicea, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program Michael Nemeth, NOAA's Restoration CenterAutumn Lotze, NOAA's Disaster Preparedness Program

Sponsor(s):
Coral Collaboration Webinar Series - NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program

Seminar Contact(s):
Robin Garcia, robin.garcia@noaa.gov

Remote Access:AdobeConnect information:
1. To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/
2. Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio.

Abstract:Coral reefs are susceptible to impacts from natural hazards such as hurricanes, and restoration of the damages is an important part of comprehensive recovery and mitigation planning for coastal communities after disaster. Join Eileen Alicea of NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, Michael Nemeth of NOAA's Restoration Center, and Autumn Lotze of NOAA's Disaster Preparedness Program to learn more about how NOAA engages with the federal disaster recovery process and works with communities to support natural resource recovery efforts after disaster, including highlights and lessons learned from ongoing coral reef restoration planning work in Puerto Rico.

Bio(s):
Eileen Alicea is a senior program analyst with NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program in the Office for Coastal Management.Michael Nemeth is a coral reef restoration specialist with NOAA's Restoration Center in the Office for Habitat Conservation.Autumn Lotze is a natural resource and community recovery specialist with NOAA's Disaster Preparedness Program in the Office of Response and Restoration.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: GPSonBM Transformation Tool Campaign Update
Presenter(s): Galen Scott, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 10 December 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: GPSonBM Transformation Tool Campaign Update

Presenter(s): Galen Scott, National Geodetic Survey (NGS)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. POC: Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6213472559604168461

Abstract: This webinar will provide an update on the GPSonBM program's progress toward the ambitious goals set for the 2022 Transformation Tool Campaign. We will recap the data received so far, review the existing tools, and explore remaining data gaps to focus participants' efforts in 2021.

Technical Content Rating: Intermediate - Prior knowledge of this topic is helpful. Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

9 December 2020

Title: Explore U.S. Marine Ecosystems and the Nation at-a-glance with NOAA’s New “National Marine Ecosystem Status” Web Portal
Presenter(s): IEA) program, Office of Science & Technology, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 9 December 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7176794265318594306 Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Presenter(s): Ellen Spooner, M.S., communications specialist for NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) program, Office of Science & Technology, NOAA Fisheries.

Abstract: NOAA's new National Marine Ecosystem Status website provides a starting point for the interested public to explore the status of marine ecosystems at -a -glance. It provides easy access to NOAA's wide range of important coastal and marine ecosystem data. The website distills ocean data into a consistent easy to view presentation. NOAA monitors and analyzes a range of coastal and marine ecosystem data. Until now it was difficult to find all this information online in one place. These ecosystems provide food, jobs and other services to many U.S. ocean-dependent businesses. Ms. Spooner will display the resources available on the site.

Key Words: Marine Ecosystems, Web Portal, Status & Indicators

Bio(s): Ellen Spooner is the communication specialist for NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) program. She collaborated to develop NOAA's IEA website and the new National Marine Ecosystem Status web portal. She was the ocean education specialist for the Smithsonian Natural History museum's Ocean Hall. She was a 2016 Knauss fellow for NMFS and the Smithsonian's Ocean education team. She received her master's from the University of Michigan in Natural Resources and the Environment.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

(Ellen Spooner, M.S., communications specialist for NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment
Title: 24 Years of Maui Sea Turtle Conservation with Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund
Presenter(s): Hannah Bernard, Executive Director of Hawaii Wildlife Fund
Date & Time: 9 December 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Hannah Bernard, Executive Director of Hawaii Wildlife Fund

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2499641139684469772

Abstract: Hannah Bernard is the executive director of the Hawai'i Wildlife Fund, a non-profit organization whose mission is to protect native wildlife, focusing on coastal and marine wildlife species in the Hawaiian Islands, including the hawksbill sea turtle (honuea) and the Hawaiian green sea turtle (honu). She will discuss the latest information on their work with the various sea turtle species found within the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: The Science of Sea-Bird Scientific
Presenter(s): Kim Martini, PhD, Sea-Bird Scientific, Seattle, WA, kmartini@seabird.com
Date & Time: 9 December 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Science of Sea-Bird Scientific

Presenter(s): Kim Martini, PhD, Sea-Bird Scientific, Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: How design, calibration and data mining are being used to continually improve oceanographic sensors.

Bio(s): Dr. Kim Martini received her Ph.D. in Oceanography at the University of Washington, and went on to do post-doctoral work at the University of Alaska. Kim came to Sea-Bird from NOAA PMEL, where she was a lead scientist with the Ecosystems & Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations (EcoFOCI) group. Throughout here career, Kim worked with many Sea-Bird Scientific instruments on a wide variety of platforms. Her job at Sea-Bird is to make your data better. She is an expert in ocean instrumentation and data analysis, working globally with customers to solve problems and refine sensor performance. As the lead instructor for Sea-Bird University, Kim directly train scientists and technicians on observational and processing best practices. https://www.seabird.com/science-team

Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).


Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Taking Action based on Science: Emergency Management Decision-Making and Severe Weather
Presenter(s): Terri Adams-Fuller, Howard University, Professor; Jayson Kratoville, University @ Albany, Director of the National Center for Security & Preparedness
Date & Time: 9 December 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: Vankita Brown, vankita.brown@noaa.gov , NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3532356337751273996

Presenter(s): Terri Adams-Fuller, Howard University, Professor; Jayson Kratoville, University @ Albany, Director of the National Center for Security & Preparedness

Abstract: As the science and technology used to forecast severe weather advances, so should the decision-making for severe weather incidents. Howard University and the University at Albany, in partnership with government institutions in the U.S. and Taiwan, are exploring how emergency managers make decisions using risk-based presentations of forecast models. Based on the findings, the team is building a scenario-driven Severe Weather and Risk Management training course for emergency managers. This dynamic connection between research and training will be applicable to emerging techniques like artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Key Words: Severe Weather, Emergency Management Decision-Making, Risk Management

Bio(s): Dr. Terri Adams-Fuller is a Professor in the Department of Sociology and Criminology, and Interim Director at the NOAA Cooperative Science Center for Atmospheric Sciences & Meteorology at Howard University. Her research takes an interdisciplinary approach to examine issues that have both theoretical and practical implications. Dr. Adams-Fuller's most recent work focuses on the decision-making processes of both individuals and organizations in the face of natural disasters.

Jayson Kratoville is the Interim Director of the National Center for Security & Preparedness at UAlbany's College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security, and Cybersecurity. He works with people and organizations as they adapt to emerging science, technology, and threats. He has led teams of subject-matter experts to build and deliver behavioral training courses for tens of thousands of first responders, emergency managers, and other homeland security professionals.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: RESCHED to 1/11/21: An evaluation of international policies and local management strategies to mitigate cetacean bycatch in data-limited fisheries
Presenter(s): Gregg Verutes, Biogeographer, University of Santiago de Compostela
Date & Time: 9 December 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: An evaluation of international policies and local management strategies to mitigate cetacean bycatch in data-limited fisheries

Presenter(s): Gregg Verutes, Biogeographer, University of Santiago de Compostela

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series: coordinator is Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/verutes/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: Sustainable development planning in today's blue economy relies on spatial explicit information and dynamic ocean management to protect biodiversity and ecosystem services (nature's contribution to people). However, when working in developing countries or at local scales these data are often inaccessible, of low quality, or dispersed among multiple sources. Here, we discuss a review of international policies to protect marine mammals and the development of a GIS-based risk assessment tool, with the unifying goal of making better use of available data and reducing fisheries bycatch, the unintended capture of non-target species. We evaluated the historical success of cetacean conservation policies in North American and European waters and designed a cohesive spatial management framework for bycatch risk assessment in two Southeast Asian nations likely to be impacted by a new seafood import rule for compliance with provisions of the US Marine Mammal Protection Act. Key elements of existing policies and agreements were analyzed with respect to management actions for monitoring and mitigating cetacean bycatch, including time and area closures, acoustic alarms (pingers), fishery observers, and remote electronic monitoring. It was noteworthy that, while a precautionary principle can be aspirationally better, policy implementation (i.e. compliance and enforcement) was often less water-tight compared to a more reactionary approach, which had its own set of ecological and social challenges. Putting these insights about enabling and limiting conditions into practice, we leveraged existing data on animal distributions, fisheries effort, and estimates of interaction rates by combining expert knowledge and spatial analyses to visualize and characterize bycatch risk at local scales. By identifying areas of bycatch concern while accounting for data uncertainty, we demonstrate the importance of integrating available geospatial data in an accessible format that taps into local knowledge and can be corroborated by and communicated to stakeholders of data-limited fisheries. Our methodological approach aims to meet a critical need of fisheries managers: to identify emergent interaction patterns between fishing gears and marine mammals and support the development of management actions that can lead to sustainable fisheries and mitigate bycatch risk for species of conservation concern.

Bio(s): With a strong background in spatial analysis, Gregg Verutes blends the fields of geography and technology to empower others who are passionate about protecting the planet. His research interests include biodiversity conservation and natural resource management in the context of intensified human activity and climate change. Gregg specializes in designing scientific tools to support sustainable development planning through data-driven visualization, interactive storytelling, and game-based learning. Gregg is currently completing a Ph.D. in marine science, technology, and management at the University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain. His dissertation compares the US Marine Mammal Protection Act to similar policies in the European Union that aim to protect cetaceans from fisheries bycatch.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

8 December 2020

Title: NOAA Environmental Leadership: My Observations of 3 Years of World Class Science and Engineering
Presenter(s): RDML Tim Gallaudet, PhD, USN Retired. Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and
Atmosphere and Deputy NOAA Administrator
Date & Time: 8 December 2020
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

You may view the recording from this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pusz2gpbi32s/

The NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series -These webinars are open to all.



Title: NOAA Environmental Leadership: My Observations of 3 Years of World Class Science and Engineering

Presenter(s): RDML Tim Gallaudet, PhD, USN Retired. Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Deputy NOAA Administrator.

Sponsor(s): NOAA Environmental Leadership seminar series.The NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series was created to provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council. Archived seminars are here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries
For questions about the seminars, contact: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov,
Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov, or Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/worldclassscience/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box. To access the video and PDF of the presentation after the seminar, visit:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries
And Look under tab called Past Presentations.

Abstract: Over the past three years with NOAA, I have witnessed the fine women and men of our agency achieve truly tremendous accomplishments in environmental science and engineering. From deep ocean acoustics to space weather, marine biology to atmospheric chemistry, and numerical prediction to satellite engineering, our activities have been extraordinarily diverse, superior in quality, and exceedingly impactful. I will acknowledge as many of these advances as time will allow, emphasizing how the communication and application of these results have benefited every American life, every day, in a positive way.

Bio(s): Timothy Gallaudet, Ph.D., was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on October 5, 2017, as the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere for the Department of Commerce, NOAA. Dr. Gallaudet was previously a rear admiral in the U.S. Navy, where his most recent assignment was Oceanographer of the Navy and Commander of the Navy Meteorology and Oceanography Command. During his 32 years of military service, Dr. Gallaudet has had experience in weather and ocean forecasting, hydrographic surveying, developing policy and plans to counter illegal, unregulated and unreported fishing, and assessing the national security impacts of climate change. He has led teams of Navy sailors and civilians performing such diverse functions as overseeing aircraft carrier combat operations, planning and conducting humanitarian assistance and disaster response efforts, assisting Navy SEAL Teams during high visibility counter-terrorism operations, and developing the Navy's annual $52 billion information technology, cyber security and intelligence budget. Dr. Gallaudet holds a bachelor's degree from the U.S. Naval Academy and master's and doctoral degrees from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, all in oceanography.
https://www.noaa.gov/our-people/leadership/rdml-tim-gallaudet-phd-usn-ret


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Developing a financial sustainability assessment tool for Marine Protected Areas
Presenter(s): John Bohorquez of Stony Brook University
Date & Time: 8 December 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Remote only; See description for registration information
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: Developing a financial sustainability assessment tool for Marine Protected Areas

Remote Access: Register for webinar at hhttps://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Tik52a_iQFGqppbrnIZnYg

Presenter(s): John Bohorquez of Stony Brook University

Abstract: Lack of financial resources and staff capacity may limit the effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in meeting their conservation objectives. We are developing a replicable framework to assess the sustainability of MPA financial strategies and identify potential solutions to identified risks, including improving the efficiency and allocation of available resources, expanding or improving in-place financial mechanisms, and developing alternative financial mechanisms. The framework development and assessment is supported by real-world case studies from Colombia, the Caribbean Netherlands, Belize, and Mexico.

Co-

Sponsor(s): NOAA National MPA Center and OCTO (MPA News, OpenChannels, EBM Tools Network)

Seminar Contact(s): Lauren Wenzel (lauren.wenzel@noaa.gov) and Zachary Cannizzo (zac.cannizzo@noaa.gov)

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + High Tide Flooding
Presenter(s): David Zierden, Florida Climate Center; Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center;Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center; Pam Knox, University of Georgia; William Sweet, NOAA National Ocean Service
Date & Time: 8 December 2020
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Climate Overview: David Zierden, Florida Climate Center

Water Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox, University of Georgia

High Tide Flooding: William Sweet, NOAA National Ocean Service

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NIDIS, (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/1287144793876293389

Abstract:
Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

The December 8 webinar will also feature a presentation on High Tide Flooding by William Sweet, NOAA National Ocean Service.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

3 December 2020

Title: How a 90 minute fake data simulation solved a puzzle my lab had spent 3,000+ hours on
Presenter(s): Lizzie Wolkovich, PhD, Associate Professor, Forest & Conservation Sciences, University of British Columbia
Date & Time: 3 December 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar by Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Groundfish Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Lizzie Wolkovich, PhD, Associate Professor, Forest & Conservation Sciences, University of British Columbia

Sponsor(s): More information: NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website

Contact Us: Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov



JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 183 732
Meeting password: JhWEAzQs628

JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 903 183 732Can't join the meeting? Contact support.

ABSTRACTOver the last five years, a growing number of studies have documented dampened shifts in tree leafout with continued warming. These findings supported experimental studies that showed shifting cues for plants as
temperatures rise, and suggested climate change has already reshaped fundamental biological processes. Over the same time, my lab launched a major meta-analysis of all published growth chamber studies of tree
leafout---scraping 16,000 rows of data spanning 60 years of research, spending at least 3,000 person hours on data cleaning, scrubbing, and analysis using Bayesian hierarchical models---to try to understand these shifts. Here I'll review how we tackled the meta-analyses, what we learned from it about fundamental plant responses to temperature and daylength in experiments and in natural conditions across Europe.

After all our work, we found ourselves no closer to understanding dampening effects of spring temperatures with warming. But a 90 minute data simulation I did on a train to Seattle one morning suggests a simple answer to this puzzle, that could affect many studies of temperature responses with climate change.

BIOGRAPHY
Elizabeth Wolkovich is an Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC) where she runs the Temporal Ecology Lab. She received her PhD from Dartmouth, completed postdoctoral work at UC-Santa
Barbara, UC-San Diego, UBC and is a Visiting Scholar in Organismic & Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University. Her research program examines how climate change shapes plants and plant communities, with
a focus on shifts in the timing of seasonal development (e.g., budburst, flowering and fruit maturity)---known as phenology. Currently she is studying how temperature and photoperiod drive phenology across North
American woody species and how climate change impacts different winegrape varieties' phenologies.
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Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 22: AI/ML for Models Parameterization, Emulation, and Hybrid Model/AI Construct, Part 2
Presenter(s): Vladimir Krasnopolsky - NOAA/NCEP/EMC, Spencer Clark - Vulcan, Inc./NOAA GFDL, Garrett Limon - University of Michigan, Janni Yuval - MIT
Date & Time: 3 December 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 22: AI/ML for Models Parameterization, Emulation, and Hybrid Model/AI Construct, Part 2 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):

Using Neural Networks as Model Physics Components in Numerical Weather Prediction - Vladimir Krasnopolsky (NOAA/NCEP/EMC)

Challenges associated with training a machine-learning based moist physics parameterization by coarse-graining in a model with topography - Spencer Clark (Vulcan, Inc./NOAA GFDL)

Exploring Various Machine Learning Techniques for Emulating Simplified Physical Parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model - Garrett Limon (University of Michigan)

Stable machine-learning parameterization of subgrid processes for climate modeling at a range of resolutions - Janni Yuval (MIT)

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8119485862289831948

Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

2 December 2020

Title: Taking Action on Climate, from Long Island to Pennsylvania
Presenter(s): Shavonne Smith, Shinnecock Environmental Department and Heidi Kunka, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
Date & Time: 2 December 2020
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: http://www.ccrun.org/resources/seminars/
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Shavonne Smith, Director at Shinnecock Environmental Department, and
Heidi Kunka, Energy Program Specialist, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

Sponsor(s): Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA RISA Team

Remote Access: Must register at https://drexel.zoom.us/webinar/register/1415905103950/WN_fBF2Bk7YRhabkkmwptflEg
Be advised: This meeting uses Zoom, but will be recorded. See info below.Recording: All sessions are recorded and archived on the CCRUN website http://www.ccrun.org/resources/seminars/Abstract: Taking action on climate has many forms, and this seminar will explore approaches to address climate change at two different scales and geographies.

From the east end of Long Island, Shavonne Smith will present on how the Shinnecock Indian Nation has been preparing for climate change by evaluating their environmental risks and conducting a climate vulnerability assessment in partnership with the Peconic Estuary Program. The Shinnecock Indian Nation territory is 800 acres of ancestral land, with 500 tribal members living on the reservation. Residing at sea level, the Shinnecock Indian Nation is vulnerable to coastal storms and flooding, as experienced during Hurricane Sandy. Sea level rise and coastal erosion are posing immediate threats to the Nation Lands, already encroaching on the tribal burial grounds near the shoreline. Shavonne will discuss some of the measures the Shinnecock Indian Nation is taking on to address these and other environmental risks caused by climate change.
Heidi Kunka from PA Department of Environmental Protection's Energy Programs Office will take a statewide lens and provide an overview of the 2018 Pennsylvania Climate Action Plan, including recommended greenhouse gas reduction strategies and actions, as well as PA's most recent annual greenhouse gas inventory and climate impacts assessment. She will share how the PA government is leading by example via the creation of a GreenGov Council, as well as how it is supporting local governments in doing the same via a local climate action program DEP is currently funding. The program utilizes a contractor to train college students on developing greenhouse gas inventories & climate action plans for local governments in Pennsylvania. Two students who participated in this program, Eric Raabe and Madeleine Pelchat, will then share their experiences and lessons learned. Visit ccrun.org/abstracts to learn more about the speakers.Seminar POC for questions: Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov) or Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Using Esri tools to help countries report on UN Sustainable Development Goal 14.1 indicators
Presenter(s): Kieth VanGraafeiland, Esri
Date & Time: 2 December 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

NOCCG Seminar cross-listed with OneNOAA and STAR Seminars

Title: Using Esri tools to help countries report on UN Sustainable Development Goal 14.1 indicators

Presenter(s): Keith VanGraafeiland, Esri

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s):
Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/274328445

You can also dial in using your phone.
+1 (872) 240-3311

Access Code: 274-328-445

Abstract: Addressing the global nature of marine pollution needs tools to monitor and measure its extent in the ocean. With Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14 target 14.1, the United Nations established a charge for countries to "by 2025, prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution". While In-situ measures of nutrient pollution would provide high-resolution data, not all countries have the capacity to provide this information. To address this gap, GEO Blue Planet, Esri and the UN Environment Programme have developed the methodology to report on SDG 14.1.1a - Index of Coastal Eutrophication. This collaboration includes the production of statistics for the global indicators for eutrophication so the data can be included in the 2021 SDG Progress report. Additionally, this collaboration is developing application dashboards on satellite-derived chlorophyll-a for countries to assist with the identification of potential eutrophication hot spots.

Bio(s): Keith VanGraafeiland is a Principal Product Engineer with Esri in Washington D.C. He serves as the Ocean Content Lead for the ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World, a long-term project whose emphasis is on visually appealing and useful map information products. In his role at Esri, he is responsible for curating, developing and implementing ocean related content for the GIS community. This includes maintaining a network of authoritative data providers and working with them towards nominating their layers, maps and apps for inclusion the Living Atlas of the World and working with the community to understand information needs. Keith has been focusing on marine environmental GIS solutions for over 15 years. You can get in touch with Keith by emailing him at KVanGraafeiland@esri.com and you can connect with him on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/keithvangraafeiland/Slides, Recordings Other Materials: When available after the seminar they can be found here: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov
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Title: To be rescheduled: Amplifying diverse voices, advocacy for the protection and integration of Arctic indigenous culture, language and knowledge in science and policy
Presenter(s): Kimberly Aiken, Potential PhD Candidate at the Arctic University, Tromso, Norway
Date & Time: 2 December 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Amplifying diverse voices, advocacy for the protection and integration of Arctic indigenous culture, language and knowledge in science and policy

Presenter(s): Kimberly Aiken, Potential PhD Candidate at the Arctic University, Tromso, Norway

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract:

Bio(s): Kimberly Aiken is an an early career professional focusing on stakeholder engagement, polar political policy, and diversity and inclusion. Kimberly's interests include Arctic Indigenous traditional and local knowledge, incorporating these knowledge systems in all areas of Arctic research, with the aim of informing policy and improving communication and collaboration between various stakeholder groups. Kimberly advocates for the protection of the Antarctic Southern Ocean and the integration of Indigenous knowledge in science and policy. Kimberly aspires to be an inspirational leader and role model for young girls and people of color that are interested in the Polar Regions. https://womeninthearcticandantarctic.ca/women-in-the-arctic-profiles/antarctic-profiles/kimberly-aiken/

Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).


Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Salmon in the Central Valley: Climate, flow, habitat, and fisheries
Presenter(s): Stuart Munsch, NWFSC
Date & Time: 2 December 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: Salmon in the Central Valley:Climate, flow, habitat, and fisheries

Presenter(s): Dr. Stuart Munsch, NWFSC

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division;coordinator: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/prt-ezpa-trv; phone number: +1 661-473-0853; PIN: 764850 507#; Please arrive on time to avoid disruption.

Abstract: Salmon in the Central Valley face many stressors, including a harshclimate, hydroregulation, habitat degradation, and fishing. The first partof this talk will discuss the evolution of climate forcing on the fishery'sperformance across 170 years of ecological simplification. In brief, thecontemporary fishery appears to reflect a shifted baseline whereby temperature effectsare severe and the fishery does not diffuse impacts of poor climate years inthe watershed across multiple fishing years. This lost climateresilience co-evolved with human legacy effects that concentrated thefishery's climate risk into a predominant salmon life history type. The secondpart will discuss integrative effects of flow, spawners, and the landscape onhabitat use by natural origin fry, highlighting the potentialinterdependence of water, fisheries, and habitat restoration managementarenas in actualizing effects of habitat restoration. Overall, there appears tobe potential to improve the natural productivity of the system. And, for fry toinhabit much of the landscape, including restoration sites, will likely requireintermediate or higher levels of flow and escapement.

Bio(s): Stuworks at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center. Most of his research focuseson salmon in the Central Valley and nearshore ecology in Puget Sound.Generally, this work seeks to understand how fish use habitats so that sciencecan inform decisions to mitigate human stressors and promote ecosystemfunctions. He earned his PhD from the University of Washington in 2016.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science SeminarSeries weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject orbody.
Title: Exploration of hydrocarbon seep ecosystems and their ties to the deep ocean and the blue economy
Presenter(s): Erik Cordes, Professor and Vice Chair, Department of Biology, Cordes Laboratory, Temple University
Date & Time: 2 December 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
You may view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pw7vpft7puwl/

Title: Exploration of hydrocarbon seep ecosystems and their ties to the deep ocean and the blue economy

Presenter(s): Erik Cordes, Professor and Vice Chair, Department of Biology,
Cordes Laboratory, Temple UniversityWhen: Tuesday, December 2, 2020, 12-1pm EST

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Coordinators for this talk are Tom.Hourigan@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/cordes/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: In recent years, new exploration technologies and techniques have revealed an abundance of hydrocarbon seeps along continental margins worldwide. With the increasing industrialization of the deep sea resulting from the development of the blue economy, the study and management of these ecosystems has become of paramount importance. In this seminar, we will review the methods used to discover locations of active oil and gas release from the seafloor and sample the communities associated with them in order to understand the relationships between the seeps and the surrounding deep ocean. We will then discuss how to apply this knowledge to the effective and sustainable management of these systems, with a focus on offshore energy development.

Bio(s): Dr. Cordes is a Full Professor and Vice Chair in the Department of Biology. He received his M.S. from Moss Landing Marine Labs, his Ph.D. from Penn State University and was a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard University. He has worked on the ecology of the deep sea for over 25 years, and spent a year-and-a-half on over 30 research cruises and has made 46 dives in manned submersibles. He is a self-described ocean explorer whose research is focused on deep-sea coral reefs, natural hydrocarbon seeps, and hydrothermal vents. He has organized and led expeditions to the east coast of the U.S., the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean Sea, the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, and the Phoenix Islands Protected Area in the central Pacific. Dr. Cordes is among the Pool of Experts for the ongoing U.N. World Ocean Assessment, an Expert Reviewer for the IPCC Report, the Chair of the Oil & Gas Working Group of the Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative, and on the Board of Directors for a non-profit conference center in New Hampshire.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

1 December 2020

Title: Combining fisheries surveys to inform marine species distribution modelling
Presenter(s): Meadhbh Moriarty, Marine Scotland Science / Ulster Univ., UK
Date & Time: 1 December 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar by Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Groundfish Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Combining fisheries surveys to inform marine species distribution modelling

Presenter(s): Meadhbh Moriarty, Marine Scotland Science / Ulster Univ., UK

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mb66637e99438b9610e5a9a4465bd9053Webex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 727 5307 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 199 727 5307

Abstract: Examination of fish communities typically involves creating spatiotemporally-explicit relative abundance distribution maps using data derived from multiple fishery-independent surveys. However, survey sampling performance varies by vessel and sampling gear, which may influence estimated species distribution patterns. A framework for combining fisheries surveys to examine at distribution on a multi-regional scale in this casethe entire North East Atlantic region will be presented. This analysis was two-fold; simulation studies were used to explore the effects of simulated differences in gear efficiency and then this methodology was applied to fisheries survey data, while appropriately capturing the effects of using multiple vessels and gears to collect the information.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: For the Love of Science and the Ocean - From Academia to over three decades with NOAA
Presenter(s): Dr. Nathalie Valette-Silver, just retired from NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research
Date & Time: 1 December 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science SeminarView a recording of this webinar at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pex64njej9xd/

Title: For the Love of Science and the Ocean - From Academia to over three decades with NOAA

Presenter(s): Dr. Nathalie Valette-Silver, just retired from NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov is the coordinator for this series.

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/valette-silver/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: This presentation will describe the path taken by Dr. Nathalie Valette-Silver, from academia to government and from France to the USA, in support of her love for science and the ocean. She will explain what she was able to do and what she learned along many decades of scientific work. This long career gave her an opportunity to learn more about leadership styles and what work is still needed to use and protect the ocean efficiently.

Bio(s): Dr. Nathalie Valette-Silver received an undergraduate degree in natural sciences, and three Masters degrees, in geology/geochemistry, geophysics/volcanology and oceanography from the University of Paris-Sorbonne, France. She then obtained a PhD from the University of Montpellier-Perpignan France. She came to the USA in 1978 as a postdoctoral fellow at UCR/UCSD-Scripps, and then to Maryland as a scientist at the Carnegie Institution for Science. Nathalie also held a teaching/research position at the University of Maryland. After working for many years in academia, she joined NOAA in 1989 where she was a physical scientist for over three decades. She is a biogeochemist with experience in natural hazards and hydrothermal systems. She worked on the impact of pollutants on biota, and more recently on ocean exploration and technology. She just retired from NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research in November 2020.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

30 November 2020

Title: The Cultural Significance of Humpback Whales in Hawaiʻi
Presenter(s): Solomon Pili Kahoohalahala, seventh generation native Hawaiian descendant, kupaina, from the small island of Lnai
Date & Time: 30 November 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Solomon Pili Kahoohalahala, seventh generation native Hawaiian descendant, kupaina, from the small island of Lnai

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8591043309396061454

Abstract: Whales are known as kohol in Hawaiian and have long had a place in the Hawaiian culture. The Kumulipo creation chant speaks about the birth of the whale, Hanau ka Palaoa noho i kai (born is the whale living in the sea). The kohol was believed to be a manifestation of Kanaloa, the god of the ocean, and is said to be responsible in helping the Polynesians discover the Hawaiian Islands. Join Solomon Pili Kahoohalahala as he shares that whales are also revered as aumakua (spiritual protector) to specific families and were generally viewed as divine beings.

This presentation is in celebration of November, which is Hoi Kohol (Return of Humpback Whale Month).More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

24 November 2020

Title: Virtual Alaska Weather Symposium (VAWS) - NWS Alaska Sea Ice Program Operations
Presenter(s): Mary-Beth Schreck, NWS Alaska Sea Ice Program
Date & Time: 24 November 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Mary-Beth Schreck, Sea Ice Program Leader, NWS Alaska Sea Ice Program

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/vaws-november2020/

Abstract:
The Alaska Sea Ice Program (ASIP) is a unique program within the National Weather Service. The program has seen many changes over the years, including evolving from hand drawn sea ice analyses using a light box to GIS-based digital analyses. We will take a look at where we started, where we are now and what we do, and where we hope to be in the future. We will also look at some times when sea ice in Alaska waters has caused problems for both Alaska residents and others operating within Alaskan waters.
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Drought and Water Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District
Date & Time: 24 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/3343275517350002704

Abstract:
The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar is part of a monthly (twice a month during drought status) webinar series designed to provide stakeholders, water-resource managers, and other interested parties in the ACF region with timely information on current drought status, seasonal forecasts and outlooks, streamflow conditions and forecasts, groundwater conditions, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir conditions.

Recordings:
Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

23 November 2020

Title: Winter in the Changing Arctic: overwintering onboard RV Polarstern | Science and Stories from MOSAIC
Presenter(s): Julia Grosse, PhD, Biological Oceanographer at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, GERMANY, jgrosse@geomar.de
Date & Time: 23 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Winter in the Changing Arctic: overwintering onboard RV Polarstern | Science and Stories from MOSAIC

Presenter(s): Julia Grosse, PhD, Biological Oceanographer at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: This talk is about my first hand experience overwintering onboard RV Polarstern in the Central Arctic Ocean. In fall 2019 the largest Arctic research expedition set out to be trapped in the ice for an entire year to fill the data gaps. The MOSAiC (Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate) campaign onboard the German icebreaker POLARSTERN drifted across the Central Arctic Ocean so an international team from 20 countries could study atmospheric processes, ice and ocean physics, biogeochemical cycles and ecosystem changes. The winter leg from November to March was defined by low temperatures and constant darkness but also by lead openings and buildup of pressure ridges, demonstrating that the New Arctic is not just a concept anymore but that it is already a reality.

Bio(s): Dr. Julia Grosse is a member of the Biological Oceanography Group in the Marine Biogeochemistry Division at GEOMAR and a postdoc in the Micro-ARC project. She is a phytoplankton ecologist/ biogeochemist interested in the drivers of phytoplankton productivity, the consequences on the cycling of organic matter (especially individual compounds such as amino acids and carbohydrates) and the repercussions for the microbial loop as well as food webs.

Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).


Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

20 November 2020

Title: November 2020 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP/University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 20 November 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: http://accap.adobeconnect.com/november2020/event/registration.html

Abstract:
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Scoping and Design of Actionable Science: A case study of integrating urban climatology and land-use planning
Presenter(s): Mariana Fragomeni, PhD, Professor, University of Connecticut
Date & Time: 20 November 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording of this webinar thru adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pkclbkd5dl65/

Title: Scoping and Design of Actionable Science: A case study of integrating urban climatology and land-use planning

Presenter(s):
Mariana Fragomeni, PhD, Professor, Assistant Professor in theDepartment of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Connecticut;
Lupita McClenning, Director of Planning andDevelopment for the Greater Salt Lake Municipal Services District, FormerlyDirector of Planning for the Coastal Regional Commission of Georgia; &
Russell Oliver, Senior planner at the CoastalRegional Commission of Georgia

Sponsor(s): NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Points of contact are Andrew.Lade@noaa.gov for content and Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov for webinar questions.

Remote Access: Register at
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/co-production/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, by visiting:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: Coastal communities in the southeastern US are vulnerable to prolonged heat exposure due to storm driven power outages. To effectively address this vulnerability, cities must develop heat response plans that reduce health risks associated with prolonged heat exposure. Actionableheat response plans require intensive collaboration between public health departments, emergency management agencies, planning agencies and climatologists, a process referred to as co-production. This seminar details the collaborative effort undertaken by researchers, resource managers and decision makers to co-produce an actionable heat response plan for the city of Savannah, GA. First, we will discuss iterative steps taken during the scoping phase of the project including a rapid assessment process that gathered insiders' perspectives of an issue through intensive teamwork and data triangulation. Next, we describe a heat response planning workshop where we used a geodesign framework, which allowed participants to visualize individual variables of heat vulnerability and how those variables interact with each other. Finally, we will present how workshop participants reconciled their different heat response priorities to collaboratively produce a heat response plan that included 15 actions, 10 policies, and 5 projects.

Bio(s): Dr. Mariana Fragomeni is an assistant professor in the Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture at the University of Connecticut. She holds a PhD in Integrative Conservation and Geography (2019)and a master's degree in Environmental Planning and Design (2014) from the University of Georgia. She also holds a specialist degree in Sustainable Environmental Rehabilitation in Architecture and Urbanism from the Universidade de Brasilia (2011) and a B.S. in Architecture and Urbanism from the Universidade Federal da Bahia (2008), both in Brazil. Prior to becoming an academic, she was a practitioner working in the fields of energy efficiency,architecture, and landscape architecture. Dr. Fragomeni's areas of expertise are urban planning and design, urban climatology, human bioclimatology, climate adaptation, and bioclimatic landscape architecture.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

19 November 2020

Title: Bioluminescent Blooms
Presenter(s): Dr. Steve Haddock, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and Johnny Chien, Nature Photographer
Date & Time: 19 November 2020
9:00 pm - 10:30 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Steve Haddock, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and Johnny Chien, Nature Photographer

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5247215144847549709

Abstract: Join Dr. Steve Haddock, senior scientist at Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and nature photographer Johnny Chien as we explore the phenomenon of Bioluminescence or "glowing waves" from two unique perspectives. The event will be a pairing of science and art, focusing on plankton blooms in Monterey Bay in a changing climate, and the light producing organisms that spark the firework blooms we witnessed in the crashing waves at night.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Reframing wahi kūpuna: The tangibles and intangibles of cultural heritage in Papahānaumokuākea
Presenter(s): V. Kalani Quiocho Jr., Native Hawaiian Program Specialist, Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument
Date & Time: 19 November 2020
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): V. Kalani Quiocho Jr., Native Hawaiian Program Specialist, Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8626817019558516749

Abstract: As Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument (PMNM) celebrates 10 years as a natural and cultural World Heritage site and over two decades of protections, Hawaiian community leaders continue to be active agents of biocultural conservation and restoration in PMNM. Innovative practitioners within the Hawaiian cultural resources management (CRM) community have led a resurgence in iwi (Indigenous) institutions and methodologies and conducted (re)search on (k)new information and ancestral memories about the functions of cultural land- and seascapes. This presentation provides a brief history of research on cultural resources, and several examples illustrating how the concept of cultural resources is (re)framed and implemented in PMNM management.This presentation is part of the Third Thursday By the Bay Presentation Series at Mokuppapa Discovery Center that is the visitor center for Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument in Hilo, Hawai'i. It is also supported by a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation through the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Justin Glisan, Iowa State Climatologist
Date & Time: 19 November 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Justin Glisan, Iowa State Climatologist

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7528179497868100876

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

November topics will include information on the NOAA Winter Outlook, La Nia, the continuing high water levels in the Great Lakes, regional wildfire information, recent climate/weather impacts and future impacts, and the latest precipitation, temperature, and drought outlooks for the fall and winter. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 20: Looking Ahead (Using AI for NOAA mission), Part 2
Presenter(s): David Hall - NVIDIA, Dan Morris - Microsoft AI for Earth, Kimberly Goetz - NOAA/NMFS/AFSC/MML, Matt Dornback - NOAA/OAR/OER
Date & Time: 19 November 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 20: Looking Ahead (Using AI for NOAA mission), Part 2 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):

Exploring the Frontiers of Deep Learning for Earth and Space - David Hall (NVIDIA)

Accelerating biodiversity surveys with computer vision: successes and challenges - Dan Morris (Microsoft AI for Earth)

Counting Belugas from Space: Can we use very high resolution satellite imagery to accurately assess the critically endangered beluga whale population in Cook Inlet, Alaska? - Kimberly Goetz (NOAA/NMFS/AFSC/MML)

Tackling challenges of Ocean Exploration with Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence - Matt Dornback (NOAA/OAR/OER)

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/634104158879112716

Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Elasmobranch Community Dynamics in Florida's Indian River Lagoon
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 19 November 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

The NOAA Central Library welcomes the 2020 Knauss Fellows. Knauss Fellows present on the third Thursday of every month.

Join us online at 12PM ET for our next Knauss presentation.

Please register for the webinar: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7856999450908763661

Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

POC: Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov); 2020 Knauss Fellow POC: Michael Acquafredda (michael.acquafredda@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s): Grace Roskar, Knauss Fellow, NOAA FIsheries, Office of Science and Technology

Title: Elasmobranch Community Dynamics in Florida's Indian River Lagoon

Abstract: Florida's Indian River Lagoon (IRL) is an estuary of national significance yet little is known about the current status of elasmobranchs (sharks and rays) in the lagoon. We implemented a fishery-independent survey to characterize the elasmobranch community in the southern IRL. This presentation will introduce the species sampled, their spatial and temporal distribution patterns, and how this information develops the capacity to understand how these species may respond to environmental changes in this highly impacted estuary.

Bio(s): Grace Roskar is a 2020 Knauss Fellow in NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology, supporting the Marine Ecosystems Division as a habitat science specialist. Grace holds a B.S. from the University of Miami and an M.S. from Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute. Her graduate research focused on estuarine elasmobranch ecology in Florida as well as evaluating fishing gear performance in a fishery-independent survey.

Accessibility: If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.
Title: Guides to ID Deep-sea corals: Different approaches to demystifying coral diversity of the US Atlantic margin
Presenter(s): Enrique J Salgado, Marine Data Specialist, and Andrew Shuler, Ecological Science Analyst, both with CSS, Inc., in support of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 19 November 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science SeminarYou may view the recording of this webinar through Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/px79sknuy3ni/

Title: Guides for the Identification of Deep-sea corals: Different approaches to demystifying coral diversity of the US Atlantic margin

Presenter(s): Enrique J Salgado, Marine Data Specialist, CSS, Inc., in support of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, andAndrew Shuler, Ecological Science Analyst, CSS, Inc., in support of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Coordinator is
Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/deepseacoralid/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: The Biogeography Branch of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), along with collaborators from the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER), and academic partners, have produced two photo-identification collections, intended to provide visual references to commonly observed deep-sea corals in the Southeast United States, Gulf of Mexico, and U.S.Caribbean. These documents also aim to provide an effectual representation of the diversity of coral fauna in mesophotic and deep-sea marine areas of the greater U.S. Southeast region. The first release uses a database to correlate specimens collected during recent Okeanos Explorer cruises, and representative in situ photographs, to produce dynamic reference guides. This database, and the corresponding outputs can be updated as new observations, revised taxonomic identifications, and data from new explorations becomes available. The second collection provides documentation of Alcyonacean specimens collected and/or photographed from the Pinnacle Trend, using in situ and ex situ photography, with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The collection of samples utilized from the DWH NRDA does not represent a comprehensive census of everytaxon that could possibly occur in the area. However, it provides edification of the most common taxa observed and collected. Both guides provide remarks regarding the recommended level of precision in terms of identifications from in situ imagery, and whether the catalogued taxa have been confirmed by morphological or genetic analysis.The utility of these guides is to help support video/image based analysis in future surveys of the region. With these releases NOAA scientists attempt to garner the expertise of taxonomic experts to photographically correlate collected specimens to in situ observations, where needed, and therefore enhance the scientific value of deep-sea exploration and discovery. We also strive to improve the consistent identification and systematics of many of the taxa featured in this volume as essential for the valuation and protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems (VMEs), and to document potential new discoveries.

Bio(s): Enrique (Ren) Salgado developed a love and respect for the sea growing up fishing, sailing, and diving in the shores of Puerto Rico and the USVI. Ren has been one of the key players in spearheading the deep-sea coral program in NCCOS and has been involved in ROV science, coral biology, husbandry, and marine spatial data analysis since 2006. Ren has extensive experience with image analysis using multiple vehicles and platforms in the Gulf of Mexico, Southeast US, Caribbean and Alaska. Ren is currently a marine data specialist for CSS, inc. under contract to NOAA.Andrew Shuler is originally from the Eastern Shore of MD, but started his scientific career in 2001 as a member of Alan Lewitus' South Carolina Algal Ecology Lab (SCDNR). Since then he has developed a robust taxonomic knowledge of microbial, invertebrate, and fin fish species. As well as, developed extensive advanced microscopy skills, which have focused both on light and electron microscopy. Andrew became part of the NCCOS family in 2009 as a member of NOAA's Phytoplankton Monitoring Program and in2014 he became part of NCCOS' Deep Coral Ecology Lab where his taxonomic and microscopy skills are being put to use identifying deep sea corals.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: El Nino Observations for the Eastern Region
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center and Michelle L'Heureux, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 19 November 2020
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: via GoToWebinar (registration required)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/El Nino Observations for the Eastern Region

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and
Michelle L'Heureux, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center.


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:
Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of November conditions and a discussion on conditions that set up El Nino and potential impacts to the Eastern Region.

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

18 November 2020

Title: Measuring Climate Adaptation Success and Progress: Introduction to the Resilience Metrics Toolkit
Presenter(s): Kristen Goodrich, Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve , California, kgoodrich@trnerr.org; Susi Moser, NERRS Science Collaborative, promundi@susannemoser.com
Date & Time: 18 November 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Measuring Climate Adaptation Success and Progress: Introduction to the Resilience Metrics Toolkit

Presenter(s): Kristen Goodrich, Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve; Susi Moser, NERRS Science Collaborative

Sponsor(s): This seminar is sponsored by the NERRS Science Collaborative

Seminar Contact(s): Doug George (douglas.george@noaa.gov) or Nick Soberal (nsoberal@umich.edu)

Remote Access: Please register through GoToWebinar (https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7741280250174382864)

Accessibility:

Abstract: One of the most challenging parts of advancing climate adaptation is defining what success looks like and tracking progress toward those goals. Over the past six years, a group of National Estuarine Research Reserves has been finding creative ways to tackle this problem in their own communities through the Successful Adaptation Indicators and Metrics project. The team recently launched a new web-based toolkit - Resilience Metrics - which shares a suite of lessons learned, tools and tactics to help communities identify locally relevant climate adaptation metrics.

In this webinar, two members of the project team will share their experiences and lessons learned with defining climate adaptation success - conceptually and in practice. They will introduce the resources available on the Resilience Metrics toolkit and explain how the case studies, job aids and facilitation tools can be used by coastal managers and adaptation professionals everywhere to facilitate conversations and planning around successful adaptation.

Bio(s): Kristen Goodrich is the Coastal Training Program Coordinator at the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve. There, she provides training and technical assistance to coastal decision-makers in Southern and Baja California. Working on the U.S.-Mexico border has provided her with a unique perspective on the challenges and opportunities for collaboration and boundary spanning and inspires her research on psychosocial resilience.
Susi Moser's work focuses on adaptation to climate change, vulnerability, resilience, climate change communication, social change, decision support and the interaction between scientists, policy-makers and the public. She is a geographer by training, and has contributed to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in multiple capacities. Over the past five years, Susi has partnered with different reserves to develop indicators of successful climate adaptation. Learn more about Susi and her Science Collaborative work.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: An old, new threat: increasing fisheries and seabird bycatch in the Canadian Arctic
Presenter(s): Jennifer Provencher, Conservation Biologist at the Environment and Climate Change Canada, Ottawa, Canada, jennifer.provencher@canada.ca
Date & Time: 18 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: An old, new threat: increasing fisheries and seabird bycatch in the Canadian Arctic

Presenter(s): Jennifer Provencher, Conservation Biologist at the Environment and Climate Change Canada, Ottawa, Canada

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: We examine the implications of growing fisheries in the eastern Canadian Arctic on northern fulmar populations using a variety of modelling, observation and genomic tools.

Bio(s): Jennifer F. Provencher is a Canadian conservation biologis focusing on the impact of human activities on the health of Arctic seabirds and marine ecosystems. Jennifer Provencher is Head of the Wildlife Health Unit at the Canadian Wildlife Service (Environment and Climate Change Canada), and her work focuses on the effect of diseases, parasites and contaminants on the conservation of wildlife. As of 2019, she is an adjunct researcher at three Canadian universities: Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario; Acadia University, Wolfville, Nova Scotia; and Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada

Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).


Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

17 November 2020

Title: Will we lose reefs of the deep ... and how will we know?
Presenter(s): Dr. Sebastian Hennige, Senior Lecturer, University of Edinburgh, UK and Dr. Uwe Wolfram, Assistant Professor, Heriot-Watt University, UK
Date & Time: 17 November 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science SeminarYou may view this webinar via Adobe Connect here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p6pvajz0fp22/

Title: Will we lose reefs of the deepand how will we know?

Presenter(s): Dr. Sebastian Hennige, Senior Lecturer, University of Edinburgh, UK and
Dr. Uwe Wolfram, Assistant Professor, Heriot-Watt University, UK

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Coordinator for today's webinar are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Peter.Etnoyer@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/deepreefs/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: Cold-water coral reefs are under threat from ocean acidification, ocean warming and deoxygenation. Tools have been developed to predict the risk of tropical coral bleaching, but there is no similar tool or routine set of measurements that currently exist to assess cold-water coral reef health. Cold-water corals (CWCs) create a complex, 3-dimensional habitat comprising of dead coral skeleton supporting live corals, and this supports a diversity and abundance of marine life. The dead coral skeleton contributes the majority of mass to CWC reefs, and it is this portion that is at particular risk of dissolution from ocean acidification. We present micromechanical, microscopy and synchrotron radiation computed tomography data from long-term experiments and in situ
samples taken from reefs already living below the aragonite saturation horizon in the Northeast Pacific. These techniques allow us to assess coral skeleton structure from aragonite crystal to reef length scale. We demonstrate that although the material properties of the skeleton does not change, the loss (dissolution) of material in specific locations from ocean acidification leads to a significant weakening of the skeleton, increasing its fragility and potential for mechanical failure. These increases in porosity observed in in situ samples as well as in experimental samples, highlight the risk of skeletal structural failure from ocean acidification leading to habitat loss in these vulnerable marine ecosystems. Through understanding this process, we can quantify the risk as well as timescales of future CWC habitat loss, giving us powerful tools to help conserve these habitats and biodiversity.

Bio(s): Dr. Hennige's research has centred around the impact of climate change and pollutants on marine organisms and ecosystems, with particular focus on tropical and cold-water coral reefs. He studied at the University of St. Andrews before taking a PhD at the University of Essex examining acclimation and adaptations of corals across environmental gradients. Following this, he went to the University of Delaware before returning to Scotland to conduct the first long-term multiple stressor experiments on cold-water corals.
Dr. Uwe Wolfram's research has centred around multiscale mechanics of biologic tissues and databased engineering with a focus of musculoskeletal tissues. He is Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering at the School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University. Before that he was a postdoc at Bern University until 2015 and he obtained his PhD in 2011 at Ulm University focusing on multiscale mechanical properties of bone tissue.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

16 November 2020

Title: Characterization and Application of JPSS Atmospheric Composition Products
Presenter(s): Dr Greg Frost, Research Chemist, Chemical Sciences Laboratory, Boulder, CO
Program Manager, Climate Program Office, Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 16 November 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: WEBEX Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s): Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s): Dr Greg Frost, Research Chemist, Chemical Sciences Laboratory, Boulder, CO
Program Manager, Climate Program Office, Silver Spring, MD

Abstract: Our work focuses on characterizing Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) atmospheric composition products through comparisons with in-situ observations. Aircraft measurements collected in NOAA and NASA field campaigns provide objective comparisons for the NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) trace gas retrievals from the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) and NOAA-20 satellites. We are expanding our JPSS atmospheric composition product evaluations to include Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aerosol data and Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) trace gas retrievals. These JPSS atmospheric composition products are subsequently used in a variety of NOAA forecasting and science applications. CrIS trace gas and VIIRS aerosol data were used in flight planning for the NOAA/NASA FIREX-AQ campaign, which generated data useful for further validating JPSS retrievals. JPSS atmospheric composition products are helping to quantify changes to urban emissions during the COVID-19 pandemic. VIIRS aerosol retrievals play a key role in evaluating the performance of NOAA's new Global Forecast System (GFS), and we expect that VIIRS and CrIS products will eventually be critical input to data assimilation systems that will improve GFS forecasts. Remote Access

Description:877-401-9225
passcode: 53339716
JOIN WEBEX MEETING

https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m2ec57d539977c99a26917f56d1e4b5e9

Meeting password: Jpss2020!


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

12 November 2020

Title: Scientific Integrity and Fundamental Research Communications in NOAA
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 12 November 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

Introducing the NOAA Central Library's Publishing @ NOAA Series of seminars!

This month's topic is Scientific Integrity and Fundamental Research Communications in NOAA

Guest speaker: Cynthia J Decker, NOAA Scientific Integrity Officer
Join us on the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2113985238961158413

This presentation will give a brief overview of the scientific integrity policy in NOAA as well as the NOAA guidelines for fundamental research communications. The areas where these intersect will be highlighted.

About our

Presenter(s): Cynthia Decker is the NOAA Scientific Integrity Officer for NOAA, a position she has held for the past six years. She adjudicates allegations of scientific misconduct, develops training, and works with the DU/O and NOAA Science Council to consider all the ways in which scientific integrity is woven into NOAA's work. Dr. Decker balances this job with that of Executive Director for the NOAA Science Advisory Board. She has a Ph.D in oceanography and has been at NOAA for 15 years.

Join us every second Thursday for the Publishing @ NOAA Series
Title: You’re so money, and you don’t even know it": Using Bibliometrics and Research Evaluation to Measure Impact
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 12 November 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Host: Introducing the NOAA Central Library Publishing @ NOAA Series of seminars!

This month's topic is "You're so money, and you don't even know it": Using Bibliometrics and Research Evaluation to Measure Impact

The library's bibliometrics team uses citation databases and various tools to measure the volume and impact of NOAA research but what are those tools and what does bibliometrics mean for you? What's the difference between an H-index and a percentile rank? Why does the library use Web of Science and not Google Scholar? How can these services help you? Join NOAA Librarians Sarah Davis and Hope Shinn for the answer to these questions and more as we discuss research evaluation, citation analysis and the library's bibliometric services.

Join us on the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5789379930607543052

Schedule of upcoming webinars in the Publishing @ NOAA Series: TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information

Title: Intentional Automatic Identification System (AIS) disabling by high seas fisheries
Presenter(s): Heather Welch, M.Sc., Research Scientist, University of California, Santa Cruz/NOAA Fisheries' Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 12 November 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Heather Welch, M.Sc., Research Scientist, University of California, Santa Cruz/NOAA Fisheries' Southwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website. Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINARJoin WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 183 732
Meeting password: JhWEAzQs628

JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 903 183 732Can't join the meeting? Contact support.
ABSTRACT Recent advances allow most of the world's high seas fishing fleets to be tracked publicly through the Automatic Identification System (AIS), improving transparency in an industry with a high level of illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing. However, vessels can intentionally disable their AIS devices, impeding the utility of AIS as a monitoring tool. Here, we present the first global dataset of suspected disabling in the high seas, which we estimate obscures 5-10% of high seas fishing effort by vessels with AIS. Disabling events were concentrated adjacent to Argentinean Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and in the Northwest Pacific - two regions of IUU concern. Using machine learning, we found that AIS disabling was primarily driven by human behavior as opposed to the environment, with disabling most common adjacent to foreign EEZs and in areas with high transshipment activity. These findings suggest that AIS devices are often disabled to avoid management oversight rather than to hide profitable fishing locations.

BIOGRAPHYHeather Welch is a research associate at UCSC / ERD SWFSC located in Monterey, CA. Her research focuses on the intersection of big data, statistical modelling, remote sensing, and decision-support science to predict and manage species, oceanographic features, and human activities that are dynamic and space and time. Foremost in her work, she aims to produce practical methodologies and tools that can be widely applied, facilitating the applied management of our fundamentally dynamic world.--

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Title: NGS Coastal Mapping Program Update
Presenter(s): Mike Aslaksen, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 November 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NGS Coastal Mapping Program Update

Presenter(s): Mike Aslaksen, Chief, Remote Sensing Division, National Geodetic Survey (NGS)

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. POC: Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1443528335186201611

Abstract: This webinar describes how NGS collects coastal mapping data, and the many ways the data are used.

This webinar covers:

NGS delineates the national shoreline through various photogrammetric sources, including tide-coordinated stereo aerial photographs, commercial satellite imagery, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), and related remote sensing technologies.

Technical Content Rating: Beginner - No prior knowledge of this topic is necessary.

Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 19: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 2
Presenter(s): William Collins - LBNL, UC Berkeley, Srija Chakraborty - NASA GSFC/ USRA, Xiaoming Liu - NOAA/NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 12 November 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 19: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 2 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):
Machine learning for detection of climate extremes: New approaches to uncertainty quantification - William Collins (LBNL, UC Berkeley)

Analysis of Multispectral Land Surface Reflectance Time-Series for Detecting and Classifying Land Cover Change - Srija Chakraborty (NASA GSFC/ USRA)

Super-Resolution of VIIRS-Measured Ocean Color Products Using Deep Convolutional Neural Network - Xiaoming Liu (NOAA/NESDIS/STAR)

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5650166364746654476

Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

10 November 2020

Title: An Ecosystem Lens for Evaluating Deepwater Horizon Impacts and Effects of Some Restoration Activities
Presenter(s): Steven A. Murawski, Ph.D., Professor, Peter Betzer Endowed Chair of Biological Oceanography at the University of South Florida, College of Marine Science in St. Petersburg, Florida
Date & Time: 10 November 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Steven A. Murawski, Ph.D., Professor, Peter Betzer Endowed Chair of Biological Oceanography at the University of South Florida, College of Marine Science in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7176794265318594306 Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: The 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill is the largest marine oil well blowout in global history. Covering over 200,000 km2 of sea surface, DWH spill impacted a wide diversity of sub-ecosystems and species. A series of countermeasures were deployed to disperse, contain and remove oil. Impacts to ecosystems of the oil and countermeasures were profound and are ongoing more than a decade hence. Dr. Murawski will consider the impacts the spill and the deployed countermeasures. Some restoration projects currently being implemented will have profound consequences for species and ecosystems in the future.

Keywords: Ecosystem, DWH Oil spill, Gulf of Mexico

Bio(s): Dr. Murawski is a fishery biologist specializing in population and ecosystem dynamics, with 45+ years of professional experience. He worked for NOAA for 35 years, last serving as the Director of Scientific Programs and Chief Science Advisor for the National Marine Fisheries Service. Murawski was a principal author of the 2007 reauthorization of the Magnuson Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, and the National Ocean Policy E.O. of 2010.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Observing Alaska Lake and River Freeze-up through Fresh Eyes on Ice
Presenter(s): Dana Brown, Laura Oxtoby, and Chris Arp, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 10 November 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Dana Brown, Dr. Laura Oxtoby, and Dr. Chris Arp
Investigators, Fresh Eyes on Ice Project
University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/fresh-eyes-ice/

Abstract:
The timing of freeze-up and winter conditions have changed throughout Alaska, and this has consequences for our ecosystems and our way of life in the winter season. Changing ice conditions and their influence on our winter travel and recreation safety has motivated the UAF Fresh Eyes on Ice project, a new freshwater ice observation network across Alaska. This seminar will provide an overview of freeze-up science and how you can be involved in helping share freeze-up and other ice condition observations this winter.Fresh Eyes on Ice Project PageAre our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

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Title: The Future of NOAA’s Satellite Observing and Data Information Systems
Presenter(s): Vanessa Griffin, Director, Office of Strategic Architecture and Advanced Planning, NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service
Date & Time: 10 November 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
You may view the recording of this webinar, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p0mxe1s2rfmy/

Title: The Future of NOAA's Satellite Observing and Data Information Systems
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Vanessa Griffin, Director, Office of Strategic Architecture and Advanced Planning, NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Environmental Leadership seminar series; Please contact:
Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, katie.rowley@noaa.gov, sandra.claar@noaa.gov, or tracy.gill@noaa.gov
The NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series was created to provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council. See archived seminars here:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/griffin/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) is responsible for providing space-based data to support NOAA mission needs, as well as providing this data beyond NOAA to support myriad domestic and international users. In recent years NESDIS has begun to launch NOAA's latest satellite systems"JPSS and the GOES-R series"which have improved the data available for monitoring severe weather, for feeding numerical weather prediction models, for tracking characteristics of the oceans, and more. With these satellites in operation, NESDIS has begun planning for the satellite systems to follow in the 2030s and beyond, completing a multi-year cost-benefit analysis of alternative approaches to its future satellite architecture in support of NOAA Line Office needs. This presentation will preview the next-generation of capabilities NESDIS is pursuing. We will review plans for the next NOAA satellite systems, as well as new ways of doing business, expanded partnerships and joint ventures to leverage the capabilities of our international partners, other federal agencies, and the commercial aerospace sector, and new ground services necessary to generate the data products and services that our users demand in a rapidly-changing world.

Bio(s): Vanessa Griffin has over 40 years' experience in the Federal Government helping foster the research, development, and operations of the Nation's critical environmental satellites and IT. As the Director of NOAA/NESDIS's Office of Systems Architecture and Advanced Planning (OSAAP) Office of Satellite and Product Operations (OSPO), Ms. Griffin directs the architectural development for the next generation of NOAA environmental satellite constellations, adapting new technology and space commerce business practices to achieve enhanced performance at lower cost.
Ms. Griffin oversees the execution of NOAA's commercial weather data program that acquires critical weather data needed to meet NOAA's mission from commercial providers. Prior to her position in OSAAP, Ms. Griffin directed the 550+-person team responsible for the successful operation of eighteen of the Nation's environmental satellites along with the production and analysis of science products using the data from those satellites. Ms. Griffin previously served as the Project Manager for NOAA's largest IT development project, responsible for the design and development of the large, complex ground system NOAA uses to operate the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - Series R (GOES-R) satellites. Ms. Griffin developed her in-depth knowledge of satellite and ground system development and operations while serving in a variety of positions during her extensive career.As Chief of NOAA's Ground Systems Division she sustained and modernized NOAA's satellite ground systems. As the Science Operations Manager for NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System she supervised the operations of NASA's nine Distributed Active Archive Centers. She has held a variety of NASA Program Management and System Engineering positions. Ms Griffin maintains a strong customerfocus cultivated during the ten years she served as an Advanced Meteorologist with the United States Air Force. Ms. Griffin holds a Master of Science Degree in Atmospheric Science from the Georgia Institute of Technology along with Bachelor of Science Degrees in both Meteorology and Computer Science.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Effects of otolith-informed spatial misspecification on assessment model performance
Presenter(s): Matt Siskey, AFSC/SAFS, JISAO post-doc
Date & Time: 10 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar by Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Groundfish Seminar Series, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Effects of otolith-informed spatial misspecification on assessment model performance

Presenter(s): Matt Siskey, Alaska Fisheries Science Center/School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean post-doc

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesPlease contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mb66637e99438b9610e5a9a4465bd9053Webex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 727 5307 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 199 727 5307

Abstract: Understanding how populationstructure has been altered throughout the exploitation history of a stock is akey element to sustainable fisheries management and future rebuilding plans ofdepleted stocks. This study used otolith-derived substockand contingent compositional information of winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectesamericanus)to inform alternative operating models, and explore the effect of stockassessment model misspecification on the perception of stock status and theability for simulated populations to recover from a depleted state. Thefindings of this study suggest that, when identified, information on localpopulation structure and the relative contributions of substockareas to global recruitment should be integrated into stock assessment andmanagement frameworks to promote recovery and reduce bias associated withderived quantities.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Democratizing the Creation of Custom Models with GOES and NEXRAD Data
Presenter(s): Dr. Guha Jayachandran, Founder; Shriphani Palakodety; Galana Gebisa
Date & Time: 10 November 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: Tiffany House tiffany.house@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7416270111623128332

Join us for our next NOAA Innovators Seminar on November 10th at 12PM EST!

Presenter(s): Dr. Guha Jayachandran, Onai, Founder; Shriphani Palakodety, Onai; Galana Gebisa, Onai

Abstract: NOAA's Big Data Project has made available several valuable weather satellite and radar station datasets. While a critical first step, many organizations that would benefit from the data are not technologically capable of easily performing state-of-the-art machine learning. Unlocking the power of the data for those who can most benefit, we demonstrate a browser-accessible tool that enables users to automatically build deep learning models and leverage NOAA data to address their own challenges.

Key Words: GOES, NEXRAD, Artificial Intelligence

Bio(s): Headquartered in Silicon Valley, Onai's world-class team is developing the future of decentralized computing and machine intelligence technologies, with a focus on addressing real-world challenges. The speakers bring expertise in groundbreaking computational capabilities together with a desire to maximize the positive real-world impact of NOAA's datasets.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Winter Outlook
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center, Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, Pam Knox, University of Georgia, Mike Halpert, NWS Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 10 November 2020
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Climate Overview and Hurricane Outlook Update: Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox, University of Georgia

Winter Outlook: Mike Halpert, NWS Climate Prediction Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NIDIS, (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/1287144793876293389

Abstract:
Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

The November 10 webinar will also feature a presentation on the Winter Outlook by Mike Halpert, NWS Climate Prediction Center.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

9 November 2020

Title: The Contribution of Diet to the Dramatic Reduction of the 2013 Year-Class of Age-0 Pollock in the Western Gulf of Alaska
Presenter(s): Jesse Lamb, Fisheries Biologist at the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA, jesse.f.lamb@noaa.gov
Date & Time: 9 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Contribution of Diet to the Dramatic Reduction of the 2013 Year-Class of Age-0 Pollock in the Western Gulf of Alaska

Presenter(s): Jesse Lamb, Fisheries Biologist at the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: The 2013 year-class of age-0 Walleye Pollock potentially crashed due to relatively poor feeding conditions for large proportions of the population, which left them undersized and therefore ill prepared for overwinter survival.

Bio(s): Since 1999, I have been working primarily as a zooplankton taxonomist. My main interest is how climate change affects zooplankton ecology and therefore the upper trophic levels supported by the zooplankton community. It has been demonstrated over the last twenty years that the zooplankton community structure reflects the hydrology of the habitat from which they live, and therefore zooplankton can be ecosystem indicators of climate change. I joined EcoFOCI in November, 2015 after many years working on the zooplankton community off the Oregon and Washington coasts. At EcoFOCI, I use my taxonomic expertise to identify both the zooplankton community and the stomach contents of larval fish of the Gulf of Alaska, Bering Sea, and Arctic. Using the zooplankton community as biological indicators of current climate conditions and therefore larval fish recruitment has the potential of being a critical tool for fisheries management in the future of these regions.

Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).


Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

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Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

6 November 2020

Title: The Occurrence of Humpback Whales Across the Hawaiian Archipelago Revealed Through Acoustics
Presenter(s): Dr. Marc Lammers, Research Coordinator at NOAA's Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 6 November 2020
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Marc Lammers, Research Coordinator at NOAA's Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8498167562172672271

Abstract: This presentation will describe recent fluctuations in the presence of humpback whales in Hawai'i over the past several years and the science being conducted to understand these trends. Dr. Marc Lammers will describe the application of novel tools to understand the occurrence of humpback whales in remote habitats, including the use of a Wave Glider and machine learning algorithms to detect the presence of whales in the Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Development and Applications of Dense Optical Flow for New Generation Satellite Imagery
Presenter(s): Jason Apke, CIRA
Date & Time: 6 November 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Note: This seminar will be presented online only.

Presenter(s): Jason Apke,Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA)

Contributions From: Steven Miller (CIRA), Dan Lindsey (NOAA/STAR), Kristopher Bedka (NASA/Langley Research Center), and Eric Olson (CIRA)

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Abstract: The science of computing brightness motion in imagery pairs and sequences at every image pixel, or so-called Dense Optical Flow (DOF), has advanced considerably in the last four decades to support applications like objective robotic vision, autonomous driving, augmented reality, and motion picture special effects. While seldom explored, DOF derivation is now enabled in visible and infrared satellite imagery by the spatial and temporal resolution of new-generation instruments like the Advanced Baseline Imager on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-R series platform. DOF derivation from satellite imagery would have a variety of unique applications that are beneficial for research,forecasting, and decision-making products currently in development. These applications include atmospheric motion vector retrieval, temporal brightness interpolation, feature tracking, feature nowcasting, image stereoscopy, and semi-Lagrangian cloud-top cooling derivation. This presentation will go into detail on how some of these new DOF techniques are derived and highlight studies at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere to explore and validate novel applications. Demonstrations will also be shown on how improving feature tracking with DOF can complement machine-learning and artificial intelligence efforts for image classification and prognosis tasks. Examples of several DOF satellite imagery applications will be presented along with validation comparisons to state-of-the-art Derived Motion Wind products. Finally, this presentation will highlight current efforts to bring novel DOF applications into relevant operational environments.

Bio(s):

Jason Apke is a Research Scientist I at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere. He received his Bachelor of Sciences degree in Meteorology from the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley, CO in 2011, a Master's degree in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 2013, and a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Alabama-Huntsville in 2018. His dissertation focused on using atmospheric motion vectors to depict flow fields over deep convection observed from super-rapid scan geostationary satellite imagery, and how they could be used to identify signals relevant severe weather forecasting. He currently works on developing and implementing dense-optical flow derivation algorithms for a variety of satellite meteorology-related applications.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Seminar Contact(s):
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

5 November 2020

Title: Enhancing Stock Assessment Methodologies for Main Hawaiian Islands Bottomfish Through Inclusion of Research Video-Camera Surveys
Presenter(s): Benjamin Richards, NOAA-PIFSC, Fisheries Research Biologist; Brian Langseth, NOAA-NWFSC, Research Mathematical Statistician
Date & Time: 5 November 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series and National Stock Assessment Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov, and Kristan Blackhart, kristan.blackhart@noaa.gov

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7254265869094580752


Presenter(s): Benjamin Richards, NOAA-PIFSC, Fisheries Research Biologist; Brian Langseth, NOAA-NWFSC, Research Mathematical Statistician

Abstract: We present a summary of the collective efforts between stock assessment scientists, survey technologists, fishermen, and academics in incorporating a fishery-dependent survey into the stock assessment for deepwater bottomfish in Hawaii. These efforts were initiated in 2012 but first incorporated into stock assessment in 2018, and were awarded the NOAA Bronze medal this year. We highlight the process and discuss lessons learned for inspiring similar efforts in other data moderate fisheries.

Bio(s): Benjamin Richards received his PhD from the University of Hawaii, studying spatial distribution of Pacific reef fishes and currently serves as a fishery biologist at the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center. Ben is lead scientist for the Bottomfish Fishery-Independent Survey in Hawaii, largely responsible for initial survey design and its continued implementation. He led development and implementation of the current video camera systems and manages industry research fishing operations.

Brian Langseth is a stock assessment scientist currently with the Northwest Fisheries Science Center but previously with the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center. While at PIFSC Brian led deepwater bottomfish stock assessments in Hawaii and the territories. He received his Ph.D from Michigan State University, incorporating food-web interactions into harvest policies for lake whitefish in Lake Huron.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: Integrating sensor networks and simulation modeling to forecast reservoir water quality
Presenter(s): Cayelan Carey, Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Virginia Tech
Date & Time: 5 November 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Cayelan Carey, Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Virginia Tech

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website. Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINARJoin WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 183 732
Meeting password: JhWEAzQs628

JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 903 183 732Can't join the meeting? Contact support.ABSTRACT
This seminar will examine ecological forecasting as a framework for advancing freshwater science and management. Near-term iterative ecological forecasts, or predictions of future ecosystem conditions with fully-specified uncertainties, hold great promise for improving our understanding of freshwater ecosystems in the face of increasingly variable conditions due to land use and climate change. This approach has particular application for drinking water supply reservoirs, which exhibit dynamic water quality conditions day to day yet must provide critical ecosystem services upon which society depends.

BIOGRAPHY Dr. Cayelan Carey is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Virginia Tech. Her research program integrates ecosystem science and data science to understand how lakes and reservoirs are changing in response to human activities, which in turn will alter how humans value and make decisions about their freshwater resources. Carey leads Macrosystems EDDIE (Environmental Data-Driven Inquiry & Exploration), a teaching program that integrates high-frequency sensor data and ecosystem modeling into undergraduate classrooms and serves in leadership roles in the Global Lakes Ecological Observatory Network and the Ecological Forecasting Initiative. She is passionate about developing new ways to engage researchers spanning multiple disciplines in grassroots collaborative networks, especially when large, messy ecological datasets are involved. Prior to coming to Virginia Tech, Carey was a postdoctoral associate at the University of Wisconsin and has a Ph.D. in Ecology from Cornell University and an A.B. in Environmental Biology from Dartmouth College.

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Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 17: AI/ML for Post-Processing and Data dissemination, Part 4
Presenter(s): Hyesook Lee - KMA, Theodore A.D. Slawecki - LimnoTech, Hui Su - JPL/Caltech
Date & Time: 5 November 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 17: AI/ML for Post-Processing and Data dissemination, Part 4 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):

NIMS R&D strategy for Alpha Weather - Hyesook Lee (KMA)

Predicting Algal Bloom Toxicity in Lake Erie: Lessons From Machine Learning - Theodore A.D. Slawecki (LimnoTech)

Applying satellite observations of tropical cyclone internal structures to rapid intensification forecast with machine learning - Hui Su (JPL/Caltech)

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6712726705247924236

Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Microplastics in invasive mussels (Dreissena sp.) of Lake Michigan: Patterns across sites and relationship to chemical pollutants
Presenter(s): Timothy Hoellein, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Loyola University, Chicago
Date & Time: 5 November 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: Microplastics in invasive mussels (Dreissena sp.) of Lake Michigan: Patterns across sites and relationship to chemical pollutants You may view this recording thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pbt077d2hbpi/

Presenter(s): Timothy Hoellein, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Loyola University, Chicago

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series and NOAA Office of Response and Restoration; coordinators for this seminar are Amy.Uhrin@noaa.gov and
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/hoellein/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: Invasive zebra and quagga mussels (Dreissena sp.) in the Great Lakes of North America serve as biomonitors for chemical contaminants, but are also exposed to microplastics (< 5mm). Little research has examined microplastic consumption by dreissenid mussels or the relationship between microplastics and other contaminants. We measured microplastics and contaminant concentration in mussels from Milwaukee Harbor (Lake Michigan, USA) spanning a gradient from reference (i.e., clean water) conditions to sites influenced by wastewater and urban river discharge. Mussels were deployed in cages, collected after 30 and 60 days, sorted by size class, and analyzed for microplastics and contaminants. As expected, microplastic concentrations were high in the largest mussels at the wastewater-adjacent site in July. However, there was no distinction among sites for microplastic concentrations for smaller size classes, and no differences among sites in August. Microplastics and chemical contaminants were unrelated in mussels. Microplastics have a diversity of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which influence their ingestion, retention, and egestion by mussels, and are likely distinct for chemicals relative to particulate pollutants. Dreissenid mussels may not serve as plastic pollution 'indicators' as they do for chemical contaminants. However, microplastic ingestion by dreissenid mussels is widespread, with unknown effects on physiology, population dynamics, and mussel-mediated ecosystem processes. These data will inform our understanding of the spatial distribution of microplastics in urban freshwaters, the role of dreissenid mussels in plastic budgets, and models for the fate of plastic contaminants in the Great Lakes and elsewhere.

Bio(s): Dr. Hoellein is originally from Edinboro, PA, and completed a BS in Biology from West Virginia Wesleyan College and a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Notre Dame. Since 2010, he's been a professor in the Biology Department at Loyola University Chicago. Dr. Hoellein's research focuses on measuring the sources, fate, and biological interactions of pollutants including dissolved chemicals (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus) and particulates (i.e., microplastics and trash) in urban, freshwater environments. The goals of this research are to 1) quantify pollution dynamics in order to contribute to solutions, 2) include students and teaching into the research process, and 3) communicate our results to scientists, policy makers, and the general public.

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4 November 2020

Title: Climate Resilience in Newark, NJ and Baltimore, MD
Presenter(s): Jonathan Gordon, Newark Office of Sustainability, et al. see description
Date & Time: 4 November 2020
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jonathan Gordon, Climate Action Coordinator for Newark's Office of Sustainability;
Halimah Shabazz, the Environmental Specialist in Newark's Water Department;
Lisa McNeilly, Director of Sustainability in Baltimore's Office of Sustainability; and
Kimberly Grove, Chief of the Office of Compliance & Research in Baltimore City's Department of Public Works.Seminar sponsor: Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA RISA Team

Remote Access: Must register at https://drexel.zoom.us/webinar/register/1415905103950/WN_pF_lLWubS4a6OvM0k8Jh5w
Be advised: This meeting uses Zoom, but will be recorded. See info below.Recording: All sessions are recorded and archived on the CCRUN website http://www.ccrun.org/resources/seminars/Abstract: Join representatives from Newark, NJ and Baltimore, MD as they discuss how their cities are adapting to Climate Change, including how they're addressing flooding, heat vulnerability, and equity.Jonathan Gordon, Newark's Climate Action Coordinator, and Halimah Shabazz, Environmental Specialist in Newark's Water and Sewer Department will discuss the City's Greenhouse Gas emissions reporting, and public engagement through green infrastructure programs such as Adopt a Catch Basin and rain barrel giveaways. They will also discuss how climate change will affect the community, and how they are planning and improving their practices for a better future.Baltimore's presentation will focus on resiliency planning through partnerships, looking beyond the disaster. Lisa McNeilly, Director of Baltimore's Office of Sustainability, and Kim Grove, Chief of the Office of Compliance & Research for Baltimore City's Department of Public Works, will discuss the progression of resiliency planning for the City, focusing on water, waste and energy, while highlighting examples of public-private partnerships for plan development and implementation.Visit ccrun.org/abstracts to learn more about the speakers.Seminar POC for questions: Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu) or Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov)

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Title: Mapping the water depths from polar-orbiting ocean color satellites: leveraging temporal variation in image data
Presenter(s): Jianwei Wei, NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 4 November 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

NOCCG Seminar cross-listed with OneNOAA and STAR Seminars

Title: NOCCG Seminar : Mapping the water depths from polar-orbiting ocean color satellites: leveraging temporal variation in image data

Presenter(s): Jianwei Wei, Global Science and Technology/NOAA/NESDIS/STAR

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s):
Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/217486949

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (312) 757-3121

Access Code: 217-486-949

Abstract: Water depth is a much-needed geophysical parameter in the coastal ocean. It is important for navigation, engineering, tourism, and resource management including benthic biodiversity and water quality monitoring. Polar-orbiting satellites frequently fly over the global shallow waters, generating ocean color images potentially useful for the derivation of the water depths. In this talk, we present a newly developed physics-based algorithm for such retrieval. The algorithm takes into account the temporal variation of water-column optical properties and the fact that the water depths and bottom substrates remain relatively stable within a short period. Practically it incorporates two images into one optimization process to estimate the water depth. We evaluate the algorithm performance with synthetic water depth and light field data. We show that the algorithm can be applied to different benthic substrates such as coral reefs, seagrass meadows, and sand, with satisfactory depth estimates. The application of the algorithm is also demonstrated with satellite ocean color images from Landsat 8, Suomi-NPP, and Sentinel 3. Our analyses confirm the promise of the semi-analytical water depth retrieval from multi-spectral satellite sensors by delineating the temporal characteristics in images. It suggests one path forward for operational mapping of the water depths in global shallow environments.

Bio(s): Jianwei earned his Ph.D. degree from the Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Canada, in 2013. Shortly after graduation, he went to Boston to pursue postdoctoral training at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Upon finishing PostDoc, he stayed on as a research associate, and later took a position as research assistant professor with School for the Environment, University of Massachusetts Boston. Starting from September of 2019, he has been a senior remote sensing scientist contracting with Global Science & Technology, Inc. to work at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR at College Park, Maryland.His research experiences include ocean color instrumentation, development of ocean color calibration and validation techniques, development of ocean color algorithms for retrieval of water-column and bottom properties, and ocean color classification and data quality assurance, etc. His current research includes the satellite estimation of the ocean primary production. In his research career, he has authored and co-authored about 30 peer-reviewed manuscripts. He participated in the NASA GEO-CAPE and HyspIRI missions and multiple NOAA ocean color Cal/Val missions. He is currently a science team member for the NASA Carbon Monitoring System.Slides, Recordings Other Materials: When available after the seminar they can be found here: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

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Title: Three Lightning Talks: Labrador Sea freshening linked to Beaufort Gyre freshwater release, Summer pCO2 dynamics based on autonomous surface vehicles in eastern Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea, & Developing Ocean Acidification Indices for Bering Sea Fisheries
Presenter(s): Jiaxu Zhang, University of Washington Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies, jiaxu.zhang@noaa.gov; Hongie Wang, University of Washington Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies, hongjie.wang@noaa.gov; Esther Kennedy, University of California Davis, egkennedy at ucdavis.edu
Date & Time: 4 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Titles: Labrador Sea freshening linked to Beaufort Gyre freshwater release (Jiaxu Zhang); Summer pCO2 dynamics based on autonomous surface vehicles in eastern Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea (Hongjie Wang) & Developing Ocean Acidification Indices for Bering Sea Fisheries (Esther Kennedy) / EcoFOCI Seminar Series Lightning Talks

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jiaxu Zhang, PhD, Post-doctoral Researcher at the University of Washington Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies, Seattle, WA
Hongjie Wang, PhD, Post-doctoral Researcher at the University of Washington Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies, Seattle, WA
Esther Kennedy, University of California Davis, Davis, CA

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstracts:

Bio(s): Jiaxu Zhang is a postdoc scholar of physical oceanography at UW/CICOES and NOAA/PMEL. Her current work focuses specifically on Arctic freshwater content and its distribution, Beaufort Gyre dynamics, and Arctic-Atlantic/Arctic-Pacific interactions. Hongjie Wang is a postdoc scholar at UW/CICOES and NOAA/PMEL conducting research focusing on the Arctic and Alaska marine carbon cycle including new technology development and ocean acidification monitoring. Esther Kennedy is a PhD student at UC Davis working in the Ocean Climate Lab led by Dr. Tessa Hill.

Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).


Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

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Title: Joint seminar: Benefits of fishing portfolios & Commercial fisheries and local economies
Presenter(s): Kiva Oken and Matt Reimer, University of California, Davis
Date & Time: 4 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Titles: The effects of populationsynchrony, life history, and access constraints on benefits from fishingportfolios and Commercial fisheries & local economies

Presenter(s): Drs. Kiva Oken and Matt Reimer, University of California,Davis

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division;coordinator: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/prt-ezpa-trv; phonenumber: +1 661-473-0853; PIN: 764 850 507#; Please arrive on time to avoid disruption.Abstracts: (1) Harvesting from ataxonomically and/or geographically diverse portfolio of fisheries can reducefinancial risk that fishermen incur, but constraining access to fisheries hasother ecological and economic benefits. As linked human-natural systems, bothecological and fishing dynamics influence the specific advantages anddisadvantages of increasing the diversity of fishing portfolios. To explorethis, I built a bioeconomic model based on the Dungeness crab, Chinook salmon,and groundfish fisheries in the California Current. I used it to explore theinfluence of population synchrony, life history, and permit access on averagerevenue and revenue variability at the fleet and individual levels, as well asinequality within the fleet. Overall, the results illustrate theimportance of considering connections between social and ecological dynamicswhen evaluating management options that constrain or facilitate fishers'ability to diversify their fishing. Finally, I will briefly touch on some ofthe other themes of my overall research program.(2) Do commercialfisheries contribute to local economies? The answer to this question is oftenpresumed to be yes and plays an influential role in the decisions of policymakers. However, there is actually little empirical evidence to support thisclaim. This is surprising since natural resources are generally not guaranteedto contribute to local economies in a meaningful way. In this talk, I'llpresent some recent work that attempts to estimate direct and spillover effectsfrom Alaskan commercial fisheries on local wages, employment, and income.Commercially exploited fish stocks are found to have positive direct effects:additional fishing and processing crew are hired, and processed harvestsproduce more value added. We also find statistical evidence of employmentspillovers from commercial fishing into non-fishing sectors. Overall, we findan increase of one dollar in fisheries earnings results in an increase of totalincome by 1.54 dollars. Our results also suggest that the primary channelthrough which spillover effects take place is the earnings of localcommercial-fishing permit owners, as opposed to the delivery (or landing) offish to local businesses for value-added processing.

Bio(s): Kiva Oken is an assistant professor in theDepartment of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology at the University ofCalifornia, Davis. Her research uses mathematical models and statistical toolsto study the dynamics and ecology of marine populations, how they respond tohuman pressures, and ultimately how all of those dynamics impact the ecosystemservices that populations provide. She completed her PhD at the University ofWashington in Quantitative Ecology & Resource Management and didpostdoctoral research at Rutgers University and the Northwest Fisheries ScienceCenter.Matt Reimer is an Associate Professor at UCDavis in the Departments of Agricultural & Resource Economics andEnvironmental Science & Policy. Previously, Matt spent seven years at theUniversity of Alaska. Matt's research focuses on the design and evaluation ofpublic policies for managing marine resources. Recent topics include predictivemodels of commercial fishing behavior, contributions of commercial fisheries tolocal economies, economic impacts of marine protected areas, policy-inducedspillovers across fisheries, and decision support tools for adaptive managementof marine resources.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weeklyemail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Autonomous and fabulous: The U.S. Antarctic Marine Living Resources Program’s transition to using underwater gliders for fisheries surveys
Presenter(s): Jen Walsh, Research Biologist, NOAA Fisheries, Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 4 November 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science SeminarYou may view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/prj9gegynby7/

Title: Autonomous and fabulous: The U.S. Antarctic Marine Living Resources Program's transition to using underwater gliders for fisheries surveys

Presenter(s): Jen Walsh, Research Biologist, NOAA Fisheries, Southwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Coordinator is
Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/gliders/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: In December 2018, the U.S. Antarctic Marine Living Resources (AMLR) Program at NOAA Fisheries transitioned to an at-sea program of glider-based fisheries surveys as a replacement for our traditional vessel-based surveys. During the past two Antarctic summers (December through March), we deployed five deep-diving (1000m), long-range underwater gliders - two in 2018/19 and three in 2019/20. Our deployments occurred around the northern Antarctic Peninsula, and our objective was to obtain biomass estimates of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba), the target of the largest fishery in the Southern Ocean, in areas that are important for the fishery and foraging penguins and seals. We continue to process data from 2019/20; however, glider-based biomass estimates from 2018/19 were comparable to previous estimates from the AMLR Program's 25-year, ship-based time series. In under a year, we demonstrated that glider-based fisheries surveys are a promising alternative to vessel-based surveys, and can provide the data needed to manage regional fisheries. We also demonstrated that the transition from ships to gliders can happen quickly, but the learning curve is steep. This presentation is from the perspective of a brand-new glider pilot, plucked from her station at a chemistry lab fume hood and tossed into a world of oceanographic robots, with only 10 months to go from neophyte to dynamite.

Bio(s): Jen Walsh is a Research Biologist with the Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center. For the first nine years of her NOAA career, she spent her time doing biochemical analyses of Antarctic krill and other zooplankton to study diet, body condition, and trophic position in relation to environmental conditions. These days, she spends her time piloting autonomous underwater gliders in Antarctica to study the distribution and abundance of krill in relation to chlorophyll concentration. When she's not virtually chasing gliders around the Southern Ocean, she enjoys kayaking, cooking, and messing up knitting projects.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

3 November 2020

Title: Developing a Public-Private Partnership to Manage Elevated Phosphorus Fields For Agricultural Production and Water Quality
Presenter(s): Jay Martin, The Ohio State University
Date & Time: 3 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Developing a Public-Private Partnership to Manage Elevated Phosphorus Fields For Agricultural Production and Water Quality / Great Lakes Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jay Martin, Ohio State University

Remote Access: Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6620608521895602699

Sponsor(s): NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (NOAA GLERL) and the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR)

Seminar Contact(s): Mary Ogdahl, ogdahlm@umich.edu

Abstract: We established a Private Public Partnership (PPP) to identify and manage agricultural fields in the Western Lake Erie Basin where large reductions in phosphorus are likely to be realized. Fields with high risk of phosphorus runoff were identified based on soil test phosphorus levels two times greater than agronomic recommendations. Phosphorus runoff from these fields cannot be managed by only in field practices because fertilizer application is not required for crop production. Therefore, to further reduce phosphorus runoff from these sites requires the use of edge of field BMPs. Establishing a PPP allowed private partners to maintain proprietary data while assisting the public partners in identifying fields with high risk of phosphorus loss. The private partners, farmers and their consultants, best know their field characteristics and can facilitate field identification and the selection of conservation plans that are likely to be effective. Through collaboration with 4R Certification Program, Nutrient Service Providers, and farmers we are implementing and monitoring the impacts of conservation practices on 14 elevated phosphorus fields in the Maumee Watershed. Preliminary results from the project will describe the characteristics and runoff water quality from elevated phosphorus fields. The structure and results from this research demonstrate the value of collaborating with NSPs to identify legacy sources of nutrients, and the value of forming PPPs when proprietary information can limit the identification and accessibility of sites where environmental management practices can be most beneficial.

Bio(s): Jay Martin is a professor of ecological engineering who analyzes and integrates human and natural systems. As a faculty member in the Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering and a Faculty co-lead for the OSU Sustainability Institute, he seeks to use natural systems to improve water quality and increase sustainability. His interdisciplinary research links field studies, watershed models, and socio-economic analyses with stakeholder groups to investigate connections between downstream water quality and management practices in upstream watersheds.Currently, Dr. Martin is leading a $5M USDA-NIFA project to establish a Public-Private Partnership with crop consultants and farmers, to identify fields with elevated nutrient levels where management practices will be installed and monitored in an effort to reduce nutrient runoff. He is also leading an interdisciplinary research team to evaluate the impacts of a large green infrastructure project, Blueprint Columbus, on water, communities, ecosystems, economics and public health within the City of Columbus. Outside of Ohio, Dr. Martin's other research has included Mayan agroecosystems in southern Mexico, biodigesters in Costa Rica, Andes wetlands in Colombia, and the use of algae as a soil amendment by Oahu farmers in Hawaii. As of 2019, he has published over 65 peer-reviewed articles, successfully advised over 35 Graduate Students and Post Docs, and been awarded more than $17M to support his research program. He is certified as a Senior Ecologist by the Ecological Society of America and a Professional Engineer in Ohio.

Recordings: Recording will be made available shortly after the seminar at: https://ciglr.seas.umich.edu/event/110320-jay-martin/
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Title: Optimizing multispecies stratified survey designs for Gulf of Alaska groundfishes
Presenter(s): Zack Oyafuso, AFSC, NRC post-doc
Date & Time: 3 November 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webex Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Optimizing multispecies stratified survey designs for Gulf of Alaska groundfishes

Presenter(s): Zack Oyafuso, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Research Council post-doc

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesPlease contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mb66637e99438b9610e5a9a4465bd9053Webex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 727 5307 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 199 727 5307

Abstract: In designing and performingsurveys of population abundance, fisheries monitoring programs often struggleto determine the sampling intensity and design required to achieve theirobjectives, and this problem greatly increases in complexity for multispeciessurveys with inherent tradeoffs among species. To address these issues, Ideveloped a flexible stratified survey design optimization using a geneticalgorithm that optimizes both the stratification as well as the optimal effortallocation across strata subject to pre-specified precision targets. I willpresent this framework using the Gulf of Alaska groundfish bottom trawl surveyas a case example.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

2 November 2020

Title: What Has Happened at Hanauma Bay Without Direct Human Impact?
Presenter(s): Sarah Severino, University of Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology
Date & Time: 2 November 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Sarah Severino, University of Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1594633118402444560

Abstract: Hanauma Bay located within the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary is one of the most famous and popular visitor destinations in all of Hawaii. During normal times, Hanauma Bay attracts over over three million visitors per year and suffers greatly from overuse. Hanauma is both a Nature Preserve and a Marine Life Conservation District (the first of several established in the State of Hawaii). Visitors are required by law to refrain from mistreating marine animals or from touching and walking on the coral reefs.However, since March 2020, the Bay has been closed to all public uses. This has allowed researchers from the University of Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology to study the impact of humans on the park's diverse marine life. Join Ms. Severino as she discusses what researchers have learned so far and how this data can add to our knowledge of what happens to marine protected areas when human uses are taken out of the equation.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

30 October 2020

Title: Three Minute Thesis Webinar: Communication and Engagement in a Virtual World
Presenter(s): Michelle (Micki) Olson, NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Weather Program Office; Corey Pieper, National Weather Service Office of Communications; Charlie Woodrum, National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office - Shreveport, LA; Beth Russell & Hilary Peddicord, NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Global Systems Laboratory; Tricia Ryan, NOAA National Ocean Service Office of Coastal Management; Greg Romano, NOAA National Weather Service Heritage Project Lead and Senior Advisor; Tim Brice, National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office - El Paso, TX; John Ogren, National Weather Service Chief Learning Office
Date & Time: 30 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Three Minute Thesis

Remote Access: Communication and Engagement in a Virtual World

Presenter(s):
Best Practices for Virtual and Mediated Communication -- Michelle (Micki) Olson (NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Weather Program Office)Twitter: A Few Things Everyone Should Know -- Corey Pieper (National Weather Service Office of Communications) Facebook Live During COVID-19 with High-Impact Weather -- Charlie Woodrum (National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office - Shreveport, LA)Science On a Sphere Explorer (SOSx): The Go-To for NOAA Virtual Education -- Beth Russell & Hilary Peddicord (NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Global Systems Laboratory)

How to Get Better at Being Online All the Time -- Tricia Ryan (NOAA National Ocean Service Office of Coastal Management)Meet Me for Coffee: Personal Connections in a Virtual World -- Greg Romano (NOAA National Weather Service Heritage Project Lead and Senior Advisor)Connecting Scientists to Classrooms -- Tim Brice (National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office - El Paso, TX)Learning in a Virtual World -- John Ogren (National Weather Service Chief Learning Officer)

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Region Collaboration Team

Seminar Contact(s): Keli Pirtle, keli.pirtle@noaa.gov and Bethany Perry, bethany.perry@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register for the Three Minute Thesis

Remote Access: Communication and Engagement in a Virtual World -- https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3622511892013962254 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract: What's a Three Minute Thesis Webinar? Borrowing from a format used by universities across the country, colleagues from NOAA and partners will each have one slide and three minutes to present on their topic. There will also be time for questions from the audience between each group of speakers. We look forward to your attendance and feedback on the webinar - a way to get to know more about your colleagues, partners, noteworthy projects, unique ideas, and more!

Recordings: Unable to attend in person? A recording of the webinar will be made available at https://www.regions.noaa.gov/central/ on Monday after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

29 October 2020

Title: Designing Interactive Tools for Understanding Urban Accessibility
Presenter(s): Manaswi Saha, Ph.D. Student, Computer Science and Engineering, University of Washington
Date & Time: 29 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Manaswi Saha, Ph.D. Student, Computer Science and Engineering, University of Washington

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website. Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINARJoin WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 183 732
Meeting password: JhWEAzQs628

JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 903 183 732Can't join the meeting? Contact support.
ABSTRACTSidewalks form the backbone of pedestrian infrastructure. Urban accessibility, specifically sidewalk accessibility, significantly impacts the mobility, safety, and independence of millions of citizens, especially people with disabilities. Over 30 million people have some form of disability in the US. Of these, half report using mobility aids. But despite the growing need for accessible sidewalks, many cities remain inaccessible even after 30 years of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regulations being in place. Existing approaches to sidewalk data collection relies on physical audits, which is a laborious and an expensive process. Due to a lack of city scale data, limited tools exist for people to know more about urban accessibility. This talk will present Project Sidewalk (http://projectsidewalk.io), an interactive crowdsourcing-based web tool that collects sidewalk accessibility data virtually by utilizing volunteers who explore city streets remotely. The talk will then touch upon tools that utilize this data, one of which is an interactive web visualization tool that will help (i) visualize and quantify the issue of urban (in)accessibility across cities, (ii) make city's accessibility efforts more visible, and (iii) aid citizens in holding civic leaders accountable for accessibility issues in their cities. With this project, we hope to build tools that make this issue more visible and drive cities towards improving physical accessibility of urban infrastructure.

BIOGRAPHYManaswi Saha is a Computer Science and Engineering Ph.D. student at the University of Washington, Seattle. Her research lies at the intersection of Human Computer Interaction (HCI), accessibility, urban and civic technology, and data visualization. Her experience in the domain of urban informatics started from her research in energy sustainability of buildings and smart homes. However, in the last four years, she transitioned to urban accessibility, where her work ranges from building navigation tools for people with visual disabilities to tools for generating awareness around urban accessibility. She has published in major HCI conferences, has received several awards and fellowships, including being a Google Ph.D. Fellow, and the work on Project Sidewalk won the best paper award at CHI, the top conference in HCI.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 16: AI/ML for Post-Processing and Data dissemination, Part 3
Presenter(s): Laura Dobbs - Microsoft, Yun Fan - NCEP/CPC, Manuel Castellote - NOAA AFSC and UW, Sunyoung Kim - NIMS, KMA
Date & Time: 29 October 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 16: AI/ML for Post-Processing and Data dissemination, Part 3 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):

AI and Clouds at Microsoft - Laura Dobbs (Microsoft)

Improving CFS Precipitation and 2m Temperature Anomaly Outlooks from Week-1 to Week-6 with Machine Learning- Yun Fan (NCEP/CPC)

Shifting to AI for Passive Acoustic Monitoring of the Endangered Cook Inlet Beluga Whale - Manuel Castellote (NOAA AFSC and UW)

Precipitation prediction from radar data using deep learning - Sunyoung Kim (NIMS, KMA)
Panel Discussion - Panelists: Science Committee Members

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5493025262133451019

Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: Drought Projects for the NE DEWS
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center and Dan McElvoy, Desert Research Institute, Art DeGaetano, Northeast Regional Climate Center, Kirsten Lackstrom, Carolinas Integrated Sciences and Assessments, Matt Petkewich, US Geological Survey, and Mathew Barlow, UMass-Lowell
Date & Time: 29 October 2020
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: via GoToWebinar (registration required)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Drought Projects for the NE DEWS

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and
Dan McElvoy, Desert Research Laboratory,
Art DeGaetano, Northeast Regional Climate Center,
Kirsten Lackstrom, Carolinas Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments team, with
Matt Petkewich, U.S. Geological Survey, and
Mathew Barlow, UMass-Lowell.


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:
Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of October conditions and a panel of speakers reviewing the projects they're working on related to drought in the Northeast Drought Early Warning System (New England and New York). These projects are, or were, supported by NOAA and the National Integrated Drought Information System.

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

28 October 2020

Title: Climate Change Adaptation in Coastal Communities: Finding Courage, Compassion, and Commitment to Act in the Arctic and South Pacific
Presenter(s): Victoria Herrmann, PhD, President & Managing Director at The Arctic Institute, Washington, D.C, victoria.herrmann@thearcticinstitute.org
Date & Time: 28 October 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Climate Change Adaptation in Coastal Communities: Finding Courage, Compassion, and Commitment to Act in the Arctic and South Pacific

Presenter(s): Victoria Herrmann, PhD, President & Managing Director at The Arctic Institute, Washington, D.C

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic.Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: The daunting drumbeat of recent climate change reports can make it difficult not to feel hopeless and helpless in adapting to the climate impacts we can no longer avoid. Victoria Herrmann will discuss climate change adaptation work in the Arctic and South Pacific, using the lens of two current projects: Rise Up To Rising Tides and the Arctic Migration in Harmony Research Coordination Network. She will speak to the challenges and pathways to engage with on-the-ground capacity building and climate policy in the U.S. and U.S. Territory Communities from Alaska to American Samoa. In particular, Victoria will create a space for discussion on how everyone, from students to senior scholars, can commit to climate change action in their work and bridge the gap between research and community action.

Bio(s): Dr. Victoria Herrmann is the Managing Director of The Arctic Institute, where she researches climate change impacts and adaptation. As an Assistant Research Professor at Georgetown University, Victoria serves as the Principle Investigator of the National Science Foundation funded Arctic Migration in Harmony, a major international initiative to integrate discipline-isolated research on changing Arctic migration patterns. Victoria also studies climate-induced displacement in North America and Fiji as a National Geographic Explorer. In her project America's Eroding Edges, she traveled across the country interviewing 350 local leaders to identify what's needed most to safeguard coastal communities against the unavoidable impacts of climate change. Her current initiative, Rise Up to Rising Tides, is creating an online matchmaking platform that connects pro bono experts with climate-affected communities. She serves on the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States' and Arctic Youth Networks' Board of Directors and as an IF/THEN Ambassador for the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She was a Junior Fellow at the Carnegie Endowment, a Canada Fulbright Awardee, a Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the National Academies of Sciences, and a Gates Scholar at the University of Cambridge, where she received her PhD in Geography.

Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested from the speaker(s).


Recordings: This presentation may be recorded and if so will be made available on our YouTube Channel.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Mayday.ai: New technology for faster disaster warnings
Presenter(s): James L. Carr and Kian Mirshahi
Date & Time: 28 October 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: Derek Parks, derek.parks@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3864338479868471824

Join us for our next NOAA Innovators Seminar on October 28th at 12PM Eastern! What's it about? Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, Hazard Warning



Presenter(s): James L. Carr and Kian Mirshahi



Abstract: Mayday.ai applies methods of artificial intelligence and machine learning to provide timely geospatial intelligence to civilians, first responders, and disaster managers. Mayday.ai acquires data from all sources, including NOAA satellites, traffic cameras, and social media, to synthesize actionable warnings and situational awareness about disasters and hazards.



Bio(s): Dr. Carr is the founder and CEO of Carr Astronautics, a science and technology firm working in the NASA, NOAA, and international space arenas, with a particular emphasis on atmospheric remote sensing. Dr. Carr functions as both a scientist and a senior executive, and strives to spend at least 50% of his time as a scientific leader on the programs within his company's business portfolio. Kian Mirshahi is the CEO of Mayday.ai. He is a seasoned business/IT transformation leader with global experience gained from working with a wide range of companies. His areas of expertise are in Big Data, Data Mining & Analytics, AI, Machine Learning, Growth Strategy, Leading Innovation & Disruptive Technologies.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: Using Community and Food-Web Approaches to Inform Marsh Restoration in Coastal Louisiana
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Polito, Associate Professor, Louisiana State University
Date & Time: 28 October 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pycaj6862yef/

Title: Using Community and Food-Web Approaches to Inform Marsh Restoration in Coastal Louisiana
Part of NOAA's RESTORE Science Program Seminar Series: Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico

Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Polito, Associate Professor, Louisiana State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Points of contact: Andrew.Lade@noaa.gov and for webinar questions, Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/polito/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer,so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: The combined effects of climate change, leveeing of the Mississippi River, sea level rise, and other factors have led to a landloss crisis in coastal Louisiana. This loss is a concern for coastal communities that benefit from the various ecosystem services they provide, such as storm protection, flood control, and habitat for economically and ecologically important plants and animals. As such the construction of new tidal marshes and restoring degraded marshes to their original functionality has become a core strategy in Louisiana's coastal master plan. However, as funding is often preferentially directed towards restoration over post-construction monitoring it can be difficult to assess if newly created marshes are functionally and ecologically equivalent to existing marshes. The NOAA Restore Marsh Food Webs project takes a holistic approach to this issue by characterizing species compositions and using stable isotope approaches to evaluate the structure and complexity of created and natural marshes. The project's goal is to identify the key habitat characteristics that drive community and food web recovery following restoration. We have found that differences in elevation, flooding duration, and soil characteristics among and within created and natural marshes can lead to differing vegetation abundances and community composition. In contrast, nekton communities remain broadly similar though differing habitat characteristics among created and natural marshes can lead to differences in nektonic food web structure. For example, created marshes had broader resource use and a relatively higher input of aquatic vs. terrestrial carbon sources relative to reference marshes. Our findings indicate that elevation and hydroperiod can be used as proxies to assess the degree to which constructed marshes are functionally and ecologically equivalent to existing natural marshes. The knowledge gained from this work can be used by restoration managers to inform their decision-making process surrounding future coastal wetlands construction projects and monitoring activities.

Bio(s): Michael Polito is an associate professor in the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, College of the Coast and Environment, at Louisiana State University. He holds a B.S. and Ph.D. in Marine Biology from the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. He is an ecologist with a focus on the food web dynamics of marine and coastal ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico and around the world. His research uses stable isotopes and other geochemical biomarkers to explore species' ecological responses to environmental stressors such as oil spills and climate change and evaluate the ecological implications of coastal restoration and fisheries management.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

27 October 2020

Title: Learning from a regional ocean model: How ocean acidification has changed the seascape of the Gulf of Alaska
Presenter(s): Claudine Hauri, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 27 October 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Claudine Hauri, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/oa-model/

Abstract:
Ocean acidification and climate change are quickly altering the Gulf of Alaska marine ecosystem. Dr. Hauri will present her latest modeling results on how ocean acidification has changed the marine habitats of some of Alaska's most important species. She will also demonstrate how her publicly available model output can be easily used to study the seascape of the Gulf of Alaska.Feel free to explore the Gulf of Alaska Ocean Acidification tool ahead of time.Please note unusual time for our Tuesday webinar seriesAre our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Arizona & New Mexico Monsoon Recap and Winter Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Dave DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist; Mike Crimmins, Department of Environmental Science at the University of Arizona; Mike Halpert, Deputy Director of the NWS Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 27 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Dave DuBois | New Mexico State Climatologist

Mike Crimmins | Department of Environmental Science at the University of Arizona

Mike Halpert | Deputy Director of the NWS Climate Prediction Center

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Quivira Coalition, CLIMAS, USDA Southwest Climate Hub, USGS Southwest Climate Adaptation Center, USGS South Central Climate Adaptation Center, Santa Ana Natural Resources

Seminar Contact(s): Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbeemuth@noaa.gov)

Access here: https://arizona.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_JgNbnPUwSxilBs-zjQLLsw

Abstract:
Following a poor monsoon, much of the Southwest U.S. is going into winter with a rainfall deficit. This webinar will look at some of the impacts of the current drought across Arizona and New Mexico, including tribal lands, and review the seasonal outlook for the upcoming winter.

Recordings:
Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Drought and Water Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District
Date & Time: 27 October 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/3343275517350002704

Abstract:
The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar is part of a monthly (twice a month during drought status) webinar series designed to provide stakeholders, water-resource managers, and other interested parties in the ACF region with timely information on current drought status, seasonal forecasts and outlooks, streamflow conditions and forecasts, groundwater conditions, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir conditions.

Recordings:
Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Moving toward next generation groundfish tactical and strategic models using oceanographic drivers of recruitment
Presenter(s): Melissa Haltuch, NWFSC
Date & Time: 27 October 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webex Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: Moving toward next generation groundfish tactical and strategic models using oceanographic drivers of recruitment

Presenter(s): Melissa Haltuch, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesPlease contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mb66637e99438b9610e5a9a4465bd9053Webex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 727 5307 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 199 727 5307

Abstract: Next Generation Stock Assessmentsseek to incorporate ecosystem considerations to support Ecosystem Based FisheryManagement (EBFM). We present NextGenassessments utilizing oceanographic drivers of recruitment for the U.S. WestCoast groundfish stocks of sablefish (Anoplopomafimbria) and petralesole (Eopsettajordani).This work demonstrates practical steps toward developing environmentalrecruitment indices that can provide leading indicators of recruitment withinstock assessments in the absence of survey observations.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: The open ocean Gulf of Mexico: what have we learned about this remarkable pelagic ecosystem?
Presenter(s): Tracey T. Sutton, PhD, Professor Director, DEEPEND|RESTORE, Guy Harvey Oceanographic Center, Halmos College of Arts and Sciences, Nova Southeastern University, Dania Beach, Florida
Date & Time: 27 October 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science SeminarYou may view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect; here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p5qa5vuhe6zp/

Title: The open ocean Gulf of Mexico: what have we learned about this remarkable pelagic ecosystem?

Presenter(s): Tracey T. Sutton, PhD, Professor Director, DEEPEND|RESTORE, Guy Harvey Oceanographic Center, Halmos College of Arts and Sciences, Nova Southeastern University,
Dania Beach, Florida.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series. Coordinators for this seminar are Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov and John.Quinlan@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/traceysutton/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) disaster was unique for its size and the range of ecosystems affected. Of these, the deep-sea pelagic ecosystem was by far the largest. Assessment of impact to this ecosystem was hindered by a lack of existing data, necessitating an extensive, multi-year survey of the fauna from the sea-surface to 1500 m depth. Here we report results from three sequential research programs (two NOAA-funded) over a 10-year period that have profoundly changed our perspective of this ecosystem. First, the Gulf is one of the most diverse pelagic ecosystems in the World Ocean, owing to a number of factors. With 897species of fishes identified since 2010 (including 186 new records), we now know that the majority of fish species in the Gulf spend all or part of their lives in the pelagic realm. Second, the pelagic fauna is highly connected vertically due to daily migrations and horizontally due to onshore advection. This finding necessitates a holistic approach to the management of the Gulf as a large marine ecosystem. Third, pelagic populations in the Gulf have plummeted since DWH, with declines of some taxa exceeding 90%. Declines occurred between Sep 2011 and April 2015, and subsequent sampling/analysis (to August 2018) has not shown signs of recovery. Available evidence suggests that trophic levels in the open Gulf are tightly linked, suggesting that reductions in intermediate levels could reverberate throughout the system. Ongoing efforts of the DEEPEND|RESTORE program will further investigate population trends and drivers, as well as translate offshore data products into resource management tools. With the deepening trajectory of the oil industry in the Gulf (i.e. increasing likelihood of future spills), the vital role the deep-pelagic fauna play in carbon sequestration, and the linkages between the deep-pelagic fauna and federally managed species (e.g., cetaceans, tunas, billfishes, sharks), sustained observation of the open ocean Gulf is critical.

Bio(s): Dr. Tracey T. Sutton is a Professor in the Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences at Nova Southeastern University in Dania Beach, Florida. His lab at the Guy Harvey Oceanographic Center specializes in oceanic ecology, with emphasis on community structure, food web modelling, biophysical coupling, biogeography, and taxonomy. He is also interested in all aspects of fishbiology and ecology. He currently leads the DEEPEND Consortium, a 10+-year program comprising 104 participants from 21 institutions that focuses on research and resource management of the deep Gulf of Mexico water column, including effects of disturbances such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Sutton is an invited Expert Panel Member of the United Nations First and Second World Ocean Assessments, an Advisory Board member of the Deep-Ocean Stewardship Initiative, and a society-elected member of the Board of Governors of the American Society of Ichthyology and Herpetology. Dr. Sutton received his Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography from the University of South Florida College of Marine Science and was a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

26 October 2020

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Kesley Jencso, Montana Climate Office, Mike Halpert, NWS Climate Prediction Center, Robb Lankston, Lankston Consulting LLC, Sonia Hall, Washington State University
Date & Time: 26 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Climate Recap & Current Conditions
Kesley Jencso | Montana Climate Office

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outlook
Mike Halpert | NWS Climate Prediction Center

Overview and Application of Fuelcast.net
Robb Lankston | Lankston Consulting LLC

WSU Rangeland Resilience Videos & Case Studies
Sonia Hall | Washington State University

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System, Climate Impacts Research Consortium, USDA Northwest Climate Hub, National Weather Service

Seminar Contact(s): Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8886511764215780365

Abstract:
According to the October 6, 2020 U.S. Drought Monitor, 52.9% of the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) is in drought, including 14.5% in Extreme Drought (D3). Will the drought continue through fall? Find out the latest on conditions, climate outlook, and presentations on Fuelcast.net and rangeland resilience videos and case studies from Washington State University.

These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

23 October 2020

Title: NEDTalk- The Fierce Urgency of Now: Integrating Equity in Emergency Management
Presenter(s): Curtis Brown, VDEM/I-DIEM
Date & Time: 23 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: NEDTalk- The Fierce Urgency of Now: Integrating Equity in Emergency Management

Presenter(s): Curtis Brown, Virginia Department of Emergency Managers/I-DIEM

Sponsor(s): NOAA NESDIS NEDTalk.

Seminar Contact(s): lyric.prince@noaa.gov

Remote Access: To see a presentation, join the Q&A session via Adobe Connect, click here and follow the prompts to "enter as a guest."URL: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/noaa-interview/More info on DataFest and NEDTalks: https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/nedtalks Date/Time: October 23, 2 PM EDT

Abstract: In terms of climate change and disaster, socially and economically disadvantaged populations are disproportionately impacted, have more limited access to recovery resources, and often take longer to recover, or not recover at all. Residents of environmental justice neighborhoods generally have high levels of uncertainty, distrust, and suspicion about research related to natural hazard vulnerabilities and environmental conditions. To improve resiliency, it is imperative to increase local government awareness of social inequity and the actions that can be taken to ameliorate it. Curtis Brown will discuss challenges, opportunities, and resources for people looking for disaster resources and solutions to share with their communities.

Bio(s): Curtis Brown is co-founder of the Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management (IDIEM) a 501c3 non-profit organization dedicated to increasing diversity in the field of emergency management, promoting the elimination of systemic biases, and integrating the application of equitable practices to improve disaster outcomes for vulnerable communities. Last month, Governor Ralph Northam appointed Curtis as State Coordinator of Emergency Management at the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM). He is the first African-American to assume this position. He most recently served as Chief Deputy State Coordinator at the agency. Previously, Curtis served as Deputy Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security, Regional Emergency Management Administrator for the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission and professional staff on the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Homeland Security.
Curtis received a Bachelor of Science in Political Science from Radford University, Master of Public Administration from Virginia Tech, and Master of Arts in Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness from Virginia Commonwealth University. He is a graduate of FEMA's Emergency Management Executive Academy and Executive Leaders Program through the Naval Postgraduate School's Center for Homeland Defense and Security. Curtis is recognized as a Certified Emergency Manager by the International Association of Emergency Managers. He serves as an Adjunct Instructor for the Homeland Security and Emergency Management at VCU's Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs and on the Equitable Climate Resilience Advisory Panel for the Institute for Building Technology and Safety (IBTS) Equitable Climate Resilience for US Local Governments.


Recordings: Webinar will be posted on NOAA Satellites' YouTube

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

22 October 2020

Title: Giant Seabass: Kings of the Kelp Forest
Presenter(s): Dr. Ryan Freedman, Research Ecologist, NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 22 October 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Ryan Freedman, Research Ecologist, NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7239334497593642766

Abstract: Giant Seabass are a species of large fish that live in the cool waters off the coast of California. This fish is the top predator of the kelp forest ecosystem, but the population has been low because of overfishing. Thanks to government protections in California, Giant Seabass are beginning to return to Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and NOAA is working with other groups to study them. The fish is unique because scientists believe it uses sounds to communicate. NOAA is working to record these sounds in the wild and study how these fish move around Santa Barbara Island, a small offshore island in the sanctuary.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Building Pathways for Open and Reproducible Research in Earth Science
Presenter(s): Amanda Tan, Ph.D., Data Scientist, University of Washington, eScience Institute
Date & Time: 22 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Amanda Tan, Ph.D., Data Scientist, University of Washington, eScience Institute

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website. Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINARJoin WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 183 732
Meeting password: JhWEAzQs628

JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 903 183 732Can't join the meeting? Contact support.

ABSTRACTComputational and data science skills have become essential in accelerating the scientific discovery process in Earth Sciences. There exists a need within the community to transition from currently siloed approaches into more collaborative and inclusive practices that better enable transformative science. This talk will explore several avenues that the eScience Institute at the University of Washington has utilized to expedite the adoption of data science methodologies and computational tools for data-intensive research. I will expand on the hackweek model, lessons learned from successfully facilitating virtual meetings and workshops as well as various pathways to encourage the adoption of open and reproducible science within the Earth Science community.

BIOGRAPHYAmanda Tan is a data scientist with the eScience Institute. She primarily helps researchers migrate their work to the cloud and facilitates strategies for open data access, effective data visualization and collaborative cloud-based tools. Amanda received her Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Washington and currently works on developing community-based tools for utilizing large-scale satellite imagery. She has co-organized hackweeks across different domains and works closely with various earth science organizations on open science education and outreach.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: Microplastic occurrence and effects in the Black sea bass, an east coast commercial fishery species
Presenter(s): Dr. Susanne Brander, Assistant Professor, Oregon State University and Dr. Alison Taylor, Professor, University of North Carolina Wilmington
Date & Time: 22 October 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science SeminarYou may view the recording of this webinar through adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p3v720g9ciym/

Title: Microplastic occurrence and effects in the Black sea bass, an east coast commercial fishery species.
Seminar 4 of 4 in the Series - NOAA Marine Debris Research Webinar Series: Addressing the Ecological Risks of Microplastic

Presenter(s): Dr. Susanne Brander, Assistant Professor, Oregon State University and Dr. Alison Taylor, Professor, University of North Carolina WilmingtonWhen: Thursday, October 22, 2020, 12-1pm EDT

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series and NOAA Office of Response and Restoration; coordinators for this seminar are Amy.Uhrin@noaa.gov and
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/blackseabass/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: Plastics are found in many types of seafood, suggesting a risk to humans from exposure to sorbed chemicals. However, the risk is credible only if: a) contaminated microplastics are ingested, b) typically used POPs are bioavailable, and c) plastics and POPs are trophically-transferred from prey to predator. We have assessed these three aspects by investigating the potential for seafood contamination in the commercially fished black sea bass (Centropristis striata). We first evaluated wild-caught specimens for plastic ingestion and overall health. We then cultured C. striata of two different developmental stages (larval and juvenile) in controlled studies and assessed trophic transfer of microplastics from prey. Lastly, we examined plastic pellet ingestion (e.g. feeding preference depending on plastic type, biofilm) and the potential leaching of an associated contaminant (diethylhexyl phthalate) during digestion and following excretion in adult black sea bass. We confirmed that wild adult sea bass do ingest microplastics at two sites off the coast of North Carolina. We found that larval sea bass acquire more microspheres (10-20 um) from microzooplankton prey than directly from the water, and that juvenile sea bass exhibit physiological responses (increased respiration, decreased immune response) when exposed to certain types of microplastics in water. Adults fed dosed pellets in the lab did not exhibit a preference between pellets loaded with DHP or with biofilms growing on them in comparison to control clean pellets, and DHP did not leach off pellets during the digestive period up to a length of 120 hours (5 days). Modeling results suggest that at higher concentrations, physiological effects caused by microplastic internalization in juveniles may contribute to population decline.

Bio(s): Dr. Susanne Brander has been faculty at Oregon State University since 2017, after moving from the University of North Carolina, Wilmington where she had been on the faculty for 4 years. Brander's research in the Dept. of Fisheries and Wildlife, Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station, encompasses the fields of toxicology, endocrinology, and ecology; integrating molecular approaches with measurements at the organism and population level. Brander's main focus is on the effects of stressors such as emerging pollutants, plastics, and changing climate on aquatic organisms, but her research and teaching also spans the links between ecological and human health. She has a Ph.D. in Toxicology and Pharmacology from UC Davis (2011), and an M.S. in Environmental Science and Policy from Johns Hopkins University (2005).Dr. Alison Taylor is Professor of Biology and Marine Biology at the University of North Carolina Wilmington where she uses a combination of cell and molecular approaches combined with high-resolution imaging to understand the environmental physiology and sensory biology of ecologically important marine protists. Current research themes are focused on understanding cellular mechanisms of algal biomineralization, microbial environmental sensing and signaling, and trophic and allelopathic interactions among marine microbial eukaryotes. More recently, in collaboration with Dr. Susanne Brander at Oregon State University, Dr. Taylor has initiated research on phagocytosis and mechanisms of uptake of anthropogenic particles by microzooplankton and their potential to act as vectors for trophic transfer in marine food webs. Dr. Taylor received her PhD in Neuroscience at Oxford Brookes University UK, before pursuing postdoctoral and fellowship research in the USA and UK on membrane physiology and signaling in plants and marine phytoplankton. She was Research Fellow and Senior Research Fellow of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom between 1999-2006 before joining The University of North Carolina Wilmington in 2007.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: What You Didn't Know About the DOC Gold & Silver Award
Presenter(s): Dr. Gerry Coffee, OAR and Darryl Thomas, OHCS
Date & Time: 22 October 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Gerry Coffee, NOAA/OAR and Darryl Thomas, NOAA/OHCS

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov; Dr. Gerry Coffee Gerry.Coffee@noaa.gov

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7782948442931468045

Abstract: This presentation is designed to be informative, educational and engage dialogue on the DOC Gold & Silver Awards process targeted to NOAA Awards POCs, nominators and program staff.

Bio(s): Dr. Gerry Coffee is the OAR Awards Program Manager. He has worked for Deloitte, Dept of Treasury and several other federal agencies. His expertise is in qualitative & quantitative analysis with a specialty in building data collection instruments.
Darryl D. Thomas has been with NOAA Office of Human Capital Services, Human Capital Strategies Divisions Centers of Expertise for four years. He's currently NOAA's Awards and Recognition Program Manager. Prior to coming to NOAA he retired from the US Navy after serving 20yrs. He holds BS in World Lit, MSCIS Management, MBA-Organizational Psychology and Development , Lean Six Sigma Green and Black Belts, Workforce Development Professional Certification, HCI- Workforce Planning Certification and currently pursuing his Doctorate in Management and Organizational Development.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
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Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 15: AI for Innovation: New Ways to Exploit Environmental Data, Part 1
Presenter(s): Sebastian Lerch - KIT, Tyler Christensen - NOAA/NOS/IMO, Shruti A. Upadhyaya - CIMMS, Ming Zhong - Microsoft, Philippe Tissot - Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi
Date & Time: 22 October 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 15: AI for Innovation: New Ways to Exploit Environmental Data, Part 1 Chairs: TBD

Presenter(s):

Neural Networks for Postprocessing Ensemble Weather Forecasts - Sebastian Lerch (KIT)

What is "AI-Ready" Open Data? - Tyler Christensen (NOAA/NOS/IMO)

Investigating the potential of Convolution Neural Networks (CNN) for precipitation quantification from GOES-R satellite observations - Shruti A. Upadhyaya (CIMMS)

Improving Passive Acoustic Monitoring Applications to the Endangered Cook Inlet Beluga Whale - Ming Zhong (Microsoft)

Leveraging NWP for Operational Machine Learning Predictions for Coastal and Environmental Stakeholders - Philippe Tissot (Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi)

Panel Discussion - Panelists: Science Committee Members

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8855380198384043019

Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

21 October 2020

Title: Ocean Observing Prize: Opening the DEVELOP Competition
Presenter(s): IOOS)
Date & Time: 21 October 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1956898011311360014


Presenter(s): Carrie Schmaus, Technology Manager at the Water Power Technologies Office, Department of Energy & Michelle Harris, Knauss Fellow, U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS)

Abstract: The Powering the Blue Economy: Ocean Observing Prize challenges innovators to integrate marine renewable energy with ocean observation platforms, ultimately revolutionizing our ability to collect the data needed to understand, map, and monitor the ocean. This joint prize is led by the Water Power Technologies Office (WPTO) at the U.S. Department of Energy and the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) program at NOAA, further supported by The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Bio(s): Carrie Schmaus is a MRE (marine renewable energy) Technology Manager at the U.S. Department of Energy and a 2018 Young Professional Leader at the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Before spending two and a half years with WPTO as a NOAA Knauss Fellow and ORISE Fellow from 2018-2020, she worked as a research fellow at the National Council for Public-Private Partnerships. Her master's is from the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs at the University of Washington.

Michelle Harris is a NOAA Knauss Fellow in the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) Program Office within NOAA NOS. Prior to the start of her fellowship, she completed her MS in Geography from the Wind-Induced Nearshore Dynamics (WIND) Lab at the University of South Carolina where she focused on coastal and aeolian geomorphology, remote sensing/GIS, and coastal management.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

(Carrie Schmaus, Technology Manager at the Water Power Technologies Office, Department of Energy & Michelle Harris, Knauss Fellow, U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System
Title: Laser Spectroscopy for Trace Gas Sensing in the Atmosphere
Presenter(s): Chris Hovde, Ph.D., Southwest Sciences, Inc., Principal Research Scientist
Date & Time: 21 October 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: Tiffany House, tiffany.house@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2121806063708228110

Join us for our next NOAA Innovators Seminar!


Presenter(s): Chris Hovde, Ph.D., Southwest Sciences, Inc., Principal Research Scientist

Abstract: This talk focuses on recent laser-based gas sensing developments at Southwest Sciences. In one project, techniques and instrumentation developed for eddy flux measurements were repurposed to show the proof of principle of a Mars rover that can track trace gas plumes to their source, using controlled releases of methane. The methane flux sensor is available from our licensee. A Raman based probe for nitrogen led to combustion diagnostics. Finally, a compact sensor for measuring flux of nitrogen dioxide (N2O) from soils and agricultural sites has been developed and is available for Phase III applications.

Key Takeaways:
  • Laser-based gas sensing instrumentation can be compact, rugged and sensitive.
  • Adding wind measurements allows measurement of gas flux or tracing a plume back to its source.
  • Techniques exist for measuring many small, infrared-active gases


Bio(s): Dr. Hovde received his Bachelor's degree in Chemistry at Yale, his Ph.D. in Chemistry at UC Berkeley, and then joined Southwest Sciences, Inc. in 1990 after a post-doctoral appointment at Princeton. His research includes the development of laser-based methods for measuring fluxes and concentrations of trace gases.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

20 October 2020

Title: What we did on our fall vacations –Submersible research on the fishes of southern California oil/gas platforms
Presenter(s): Milton Love, UC Santa Barbara
Date & Time: 20 October 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webex Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: What we did on our fall vacations "Submersible research on the fishes of southern California oil/gas platforms

Presenter(s): Milton Love, UC Santa Barbara

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesPlease contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mb66637e99438b9610e5a9a4465bd9053Webex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 727 5307 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 199 727 5307

Abstract: Most of us lead drab andcolorless lives as drones and cogs in faceless organizations. With his tales ofresearch around southern California oil and gas platforms, Milton (only hiswife calls him Dr. Love) will enter your world like a bright and fancifulrainbow, or a swatch of William Morris wallpaper, or perhaps one of those Baratzaespresso makers that look like something out of a caffeine-induced fantasy. Acareer retrospective published earlier this year in the ICES Journal of MarineScience (https://doi.org/10.1093/icesjms/fsaa002)summarizes in a text-only format what Milton willshare with us in an audio-visual extravaganza.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Out of sight, but not out of mind: investigating the risk of nano- and micro-pollutants in bivalve shellfish
Presenter(s): J. Evan Ward, PhD, Professor and Head, Department of Marine Sciences, UConn
Date & Time: 20 October 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

You may view a recording of the recording, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ptg9tnz5nyau/

Title: Out of sight, but not out of mind: investigating the risk of nano- and micro-pollutants in bivalve shellfish
Seminar 3 of 4 in the Series - NOAA Marine Debris Research Webinar Series: Addressing the Ecological Risks of Microplastic

Presenter(s): J. Evan Ward, PhD, Professor and Head, Department of Marine Sciences, UConn
Co-Authors:
Kayla Mladinich, MSc, Graduate student, Department of Marine Sciences, UConn
Bridget Holohan, MSc, Research assistant, Department of Marine Sciences, UConn
Sandy Shumway, PhD, Professor emeritus, Department of Marine Sciences, UConn

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series and NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration; coordinators for this seminar are Amy.Uhrin@noaa.gov and
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/micro-pollutants/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: Many pollutants are readily apparent in the environment. Spilled oil, plastic bottles, and plastic bags are easily seen and their impacts on marine organisms well known. There are, however, pollutants that cannot be seen, but have contaminated marine waters worldwide. This presentation will focus on two unseen pollutants of emerging concern: 1) manufactured nanoparticles (titania) found in sunscreens and other personal care products,and 2) microplastics that arise from the weathering and fragmentation of plastic debris. Under controlled laboratory conditions, bivalves were exposed to several types of titania nanoparticles and microplastics with different characteristics (i.e., size, shape, surface charge, surface wettability), and the most frequently ingested, rejected, and egested types determined. With these data, we are characterizing how bivalves interact with particulate pollutants, and are developing a numerical model that can predict which types are most likely ingested and how long they are retained in the animals' tissues.

Bio(s): J. Evan Ward is the Head of the Department of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut. He was awarded a Ph.D. in Marine Biology and Biochemistry from the University of Delaware in 1989, receiving the College's E. Sam Fitz Award for greatest aptitude for professional development in marine studies. Ward was the recipient of a National Science Foundation Career Award and two Fulbright Foreign Scholarships. He was a visiting scholar at the University of Panama (2004) and University of Exeter in the UK (2011). Ward also served as the lead PI and director of one of NOAA's Oceans and Human Health training consortium, focusing on interdisciplinary research and training in coastal-ecosystems & human health. In 2013, he was elected to the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering. For the past 30 years, Ward has studied the environmental physiology of marine, suspension-feeding invertebrates. Recently, his research has focused on capture, ingestion and elimination of microplastics and nanomaterials by commercially important species. Ward has published over 85 scientific papers and book chapters and serves on the Editorial Board of several scientific journals.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. For more, visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website.

19 October 2020

Title: Serving the 50 states and territories with merged JPSS observations of midlatitude and tropical weather: MIMIC-TPW, Blended TPW, ARCHER and SATCON
Presenter(s): Tony Wimmers - University of Wisconsin - Madison, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies CIMSS
Date & Time: 19 October 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: WEBEX Only
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s): Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s): Tony Wimmers - University of Wisconsin - Madison, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS)

Abstract:
The current generation of JPSS sounders present a new level of clarityin operational meteorological observation, but with this comes the challenge ofintegrating these observations into actionable knowledge of impactful weather.This presentation will address two areas of JPSS-driven research: Data mergingof precipitable water observations to characterize atmospheric rivers, dry airstreams, tropical cyclone environments and frontal systems; and retrievingdetailed information of tropical cyclones in remote areas through featuredetection. We will also discuss new approaches in the systems engineering sideof this work where we employ a community development model to maintain thesealgorithms and plan keep them integrated into the operational forecastingenvironment.

Remote Access Description:877-401-9225
passcode: 53339716
JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m47147a4d4f07e3778de510ebfc9484a9

Meeting password: Jpss2020!

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 October 2020

Title: October 2020 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP
Date & Time: 16 October 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: http://accap.adobeconnect.com/october2020/event/registration.html

Abstract:
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: NEDTalk- Rising Voices Panel
Presenter(s): Bill Thomas, Office of Coastal Management, NOAA; Heather Lazrus, Environmental Studies, UCAR; and Michelle Montgomery, Ethnic/Gender/Labor Studies, University of Washington, Tacoma
Date & Time: 16 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: NEDTalk-Rising Voices DiscussionPanelists: Bill Thomas, Office of Coastal Management, NOAA; Heather Lazrus, Environmental Studies, UCAR; and Michelle Montgomery, Ethnic/Gender/Labor Studies, University of Washington, Tacoma.

Sponsor(s): NOAA NESDIS NEDTalk.

Seminar Contact(s): lyric.prince@noaa.gov

Remote Access: To see a presentation, join the Q&A session via Adobe Connect, click here and follow the prompts to "enter as a guest."URL: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/noaa-interview/More info on DataFest and NEDTalks: https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/nedtalksDate/Time: October 9, 10 AM EDT

Abstract: The Rising Voices Center for Indigenous and Earth Sciences aims to advance science through collaborations that bring Indigenous and Earth (atmospheric, social, biological, ecological) sciences into partnership. Panelists will discuss and explore the nature of Indigenous data, which is often referred to as Traditional Knowledge (TK)- why and how does it differ from Western knowledge? The panelists' research and experiences will demonstrate how combining western technology and Indigenous research can yield novel insights into and actions for preserving our environment. Additionally, they will explain how oral histories and TK contain information that cannot be picked up with remote sensing technology or other Western principles, and how much of Indigenous generational knowledge of the land was later replicated by Western technology.

Bio(s): Bill Thomas' bio can be accessed here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1gVlhRAYQi-vuMzXfd-xGufXIqAmWxD0W/view?usp=sharingHeather Lazrus' bio can be accessed here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1XcRKbMZ1KprBqqGMUXl3cTemuOsLf6Goo2_w6ASAXoc/edit?usp=sharingMichelle Montgomery's bio can be accessed here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1PAljgjLf7tQyfjxD3UrW9dwxwbuAuktP/view?usp=sharing

Recordings: Webinar will be posted on NOAA Satellites' YouTubeSubscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

15 October 2020

Title: Revealing the Secret Lives of Sharks
Presenter(s): Carl Meyer, PhD, Associate Researcher, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology
Date & Time: 15 October 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Carl Meyer, PhD, Associate Researcher, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5924541794415286285

Abstract: The ocean conceals the daily lives of its inhabitants from our view. For us to learn about the natural behaviors of elusive marine animals like sharks, we need a way to remotely unveil what is happening beneath the surface and beyond our sight. Recent decades have seen the development of increasingly sophisticated, animal-borne electronic devices that are providing surprising new insights into shark biology and guiding management and conservation strategies. Within Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument, long-term tracking studies have followed individual sharks and ulua for up to 11 years revealing their daily and seasonal migrations, discovering some unexpected journeys and providing a portal into predator responses to a destructive hurricane strike.

This presentation is part of the Third Thursday By the Bay Presentation Series at Mokuppapa Discovery Center that is the visitor center for Papahnaumokukea Marine National Monument in Hilo, Hawai'i.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Building a collaborative data sharing portal for Alzheimer's disease research
Presenter(s): Kara Woo, M.Sc. , Bioinformatics Engineer , Sage Bionetworks
Date & Time: 15 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: Building a collaborative data sharing portal for Alzheimer's disease research

Presenter(s): Kara Woo, M.Sc., Bioinformatics Engineer , Sage Bionetworks

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website; POC: Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 183 732
Meeting password: JhWEAzQs628

JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 903 183 732Can't join the meeting? Contact support.
ABSTRACT The AD Knowledge Portal provides data, analysis results, and tools to support research into new therapies for Alzheimer's disease. Hundreds of researchers have contributed to the data available in the portal, which ranges in type from genomic to behavioral and includes human data as well as model systems. This talk will present the portal's development as a case study in open, collaborative research and development among scientists, data curators, engineers, designers, governance experts, users, and many others. It will discuss a pair of tools, dccvalidator and dccmonitor, that we developed in R to streamline data curation and validation for our collaborators and our internal data curation team, and will discuss how our approach to collaboration and data curation has evolved to support the Alzheimer's disease research community.

BIOGRAPHY Kara Woo is a principal bioinformatics engineer at Sage Bionetworks, where she leads a team that develops tools for open science. She previously worked as an information manager at National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis at Washington State University. Kara holds a B.S. in environmental science from Brown University and an MLIS from the University of Washington.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Laura Edwards, South Dakota State Climatologist, Brad Rippey, USDA, Climatologist
Date & Time: 15 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
  • Laura Edwards | South Dakota State Climatologist
  • Brad Rippey | USDA, Climatologist


Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7528179497868100876

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar series is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free monthly webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

October topics will include information on the 2020 growing/harvest season, conditions and impacts across the central U.S., the current La Nina advisory and its potential impacts, the continuing high-water levels in the Great Lakes, regional wildfire information, and the latest precipitation, temperature, and drought outlooks for the fall and winter. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Marine Recreational Information Gathering Habits and Opinions on Fisheries Management and Data Collection
Presenter(s): Andrew Ropicki, Food and Resource Economics/Florida Sea Grant, University of Florida, Assistant Professor and Extension Economist; Stuart Carlton, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, Purdue University, Assistant Director
Date & Time: 15 October 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov; David.Bard@noaa.gov

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6215586920800878859


Presenter(s): Andrew Ropicki, Food and Resource Economics/Florida Sea Grant, University of Florida, Assistant Professor and Extension Economist; Stuart Carlton, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, Purdue University, Assistant Director

Abstract: This presentation will provide the results of a NOAA Fisheries mail survey of Atlantic and Gulf states marine recreational anglers on their attitudes, beliefs, knowledge of, and information sources used to gather information on saltwater recreational fisheries management and data collection issues. The objective of the survey was to better understand recreational angler attitudes and beliefs on recreational fisheries management and data collection issues and how information sources are used to develop those attitudes and beliefs.

Key Takeaways:
  • The more anglers say they understand recreational fishing data collection, the higher their trust in fisheries management.
  • Information sources that rely on personal interaction (e.g. friends, family, and bait and tackle shops) and state and federal agency websites and regulation guides are the most trusted sources for fisheries management and data collection issues.


Bio(s): Dr. Ropicki is an assistant professor in the Food and Resource Economics Department at the University of Florida focused on marine resource economics. In addition, Dr. Ropicki is the Florida Sea Grant marine economics extension specialist and works with stakeholder groups on fisheries, aquaculture, and natural resource management issues.

Dr. Carlton is assistant director of Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant in the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources at Purdue University. Dr. Carlton's research focuses on the relationship between values, attitudes, trust, and behavior in complex environmental and natural resources systems.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 13: AI/ML for Data Fusion/Assimilation, Part 1
Presenter(s): Dr. Neil Jacobs - NOAA, John Williams - IBM Weather, Jason Hickey - Google, Stephen Penny - NOAA PSD/CIRES, Michael Pavolonis - NOAA/NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 15 October 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 13: AI/ML for Data Fusion/Assimilation, Part 1 Chairs: Peter Jan van Leeuwen (CSU), Steve Penny (NOAA PSD/CIRES)

Presenter(s):

Keynote Address - Dr. Neil Jacobs (NOAA Administrator)

Overview of AI activities at IBM Weather - John Williams (IBM Weather)
Overview of AI activities at Google - Jason Hickey (Google)

Integrating AI/ML with Data Assimilation for Prediction Applications at NOAA - Stephen Penny (NOAA PSD/CIRES)

Automated Analysis of Satellite Imagery in Support of Severe Weather Nowcasting - Michael Pavolonis (NOAA/NESDIS/STAR)Panel Discussion - Panelists: Science Committee Members

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1544839535487414539

Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Knauss Library Seminar Lecture Series: Welcomes 2020 Knauss Fellows
Presenter(s): Michelle Harris, Knauss Fellow, U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System, IOOS Program Office
Date & Time: 15 October 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
The NOAA Central Library welcomes the 2020 Knauss Fellows. Knauss Fellows present on the third Thursday of every month.

Join us online at 12PM ET for our next Knauss presentation. Please register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7856999450908763661

Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Presenter(s): Michelle Harris, Knauss Fellow, U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) Program Office

Title: Understanding Coastal Dune Response to Tropical Cyclones

Abstract: Understanding dune response to episodic coastal hazards (i.e., tropical cyclones) is an essential aspect for coastal management. A common challenge within this field of research is discerning these events within various temporal scales. This talk will present three components within a larger longitudinal study seeking to quantify dune response on a South Carolina barrier island.

Bio(s): Michelle Harris is a 2020 Knauss Fellow placed in the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) Program Office. Prior to her fellowship, she completed her M.S. in Geography at the University of South Carolina where she was a research associate within the Wind-Induced Nearshore Dynamics (WIND) lab. Her research within coastal geomorphology have primary focused on beach-dune interactions, coastal hazards, remote sensing and GIS for management applications.

Presenter(s): Tori Luu, Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of International Affairs

Title: You are what you eat: Groundtruthing what coral skeletons can tell us about nutrient cycling

Abstract: Geochemical proxies, such as the nitrogen isotopic composition of organic matter in coral and foram minerals, are now often used to fill in the spatial and temporal gaps in direct observations of ocean nutrient cycling. Environmental groundtruthing of new proxies, both in the lab and in the natural environment, is important to ensure robust interpretations. Are coral skeletons truthful record keepers of the environment, or are they corrupt storytellers?

Bio(s): Tori Luu is a 2020 Knauss Fellow in NOAA's Office of International Affairs, supporting policy work in the Arctic, Cuba, Sargasso Sea, and other international fora. She is finishing up a Ph.D. in ocean biogeochemistry at Princeton University, using isotope geochemistry to study nutrient cycling in coral reefs. Her research has focused on ground-truthing the use of coral skeletal nitrogen isotopic ratio as a proxy to understand environmental nutrient dynamics. This work has taken her from the low-nutrient waters of Bermuda to the upwelling zone of the equatorial Pacific.

POC: Library Seminars (library.seminars@noaa.gov); 2020 Knauss Fellow POC: Michael Acquafredda (michael.acquafredda@noaa.gov),

Accessibility: If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

14 October 2020

Title: Trends and regional variability of observed Arctic sea ice thickness
Presenter(s): Zack Labe, Colorado State University
Date & Time: 14 October 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Zack Labe, Colorado State University

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/vaws_october2020/

Abstract:
Unlike the passive microwave satellite record of Arctic sea ice extent, long-term observations of sea ice thickness remain quite limited. In this webinar, I'll discuss the different methods (satellite instruments and model simulations) of observing sea ice thickness in order to understand changes in the recent Arctic amplification era. I'll also highlight the large-scale environmental and societal consequences of a thinning Arctic sea ice cover.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Ecosystem and Socio-economic Profiles for Fishery Management Decision Making
Presenter(s): Kalei Shotwell, Research Fishery Biologist, Alaska Fisheries Science Center. Auke Bay Laboratories, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 14 October 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Kalei Shotwell, Research Fishery Biologist, Alaska Fisheries Science Center. Auke Bay Laboratories, NOAA Fisheries

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7176794265318594306 Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Despite large strides in the realm of ecosystem-based science, the gap remains between conducting ecosystem research and integrating with the stock assessment process. There are three general disciplines within the Council process: stock assessment, ecosystem/economic assessment, and fisheries management. When considering the interactions of these disciplines, fisheries management is fed information through the stock-specific stock assessment and fishery evaluation reports and ESRs. We have developed a new framework termed the Ecosystem and Socioeconomic Profile for operationalizing the integration of ecosystem and socioeconomic factors.

Key Takeaways:
-Description of ESPs, a standardized reporting framework, designed to identify, test, and vet the ecosystem process linkages within the scientific review process.
-This seminar will provide an overview of the ESP process and associated products including recent developments regarding workshops, data accessibility, and coordination along multiple lines of EBFM programs.

Bio(s): Kalei Shotwell, a Research Fishery Biologist, in the Status of Stocks and Multispecies Assessment program in the Resource Ecology & Fisheries Mgt. division at the AKFSC. Her research interests include developing ecosystem linked stock assessments and furthering their utility within the stock assessment process through developing on-ramps for inclusion in the operational stock assessment. Kalei is the lead developer of the ESPs and also conducts several stock assessments on AK groundfish stocks.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

13 October 2020

Title: From Orchids to Oceans - Environmental Citizen Science Leadership in Action
Presenter(s): Dr. Neil Jacobs, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental Observation and Prediction, performing the duties of Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere
Date & Time: 13 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
You may view this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pxj3o43e7t02/

Title: From Orchids to Oceans - Environmental Citizen Science Leadership in Action
Part of the NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Neil Jacobs, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental Observation and Prediction, performing the duties of Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere

Sponsor(s): NOAA Environmental Leadership series; Please contact:
Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, katie.rowley@noaa.gov, sandra.claar@noaa.gov, tracy.gill@noaa.gov
The NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series was created to provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council. See archived seminars here:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/neiljacobs/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the question and answer box.

Bio(s): Dr. Neil Jacobs is the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental Observation and Prediction, performing the duties of Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere. Dr. Jacobs is responsible for the strategic direction and oversight of over $5.54 billion in annual spending, including key investments in developing a community model framework to advance U.S. weather modeling and prediction, space innovation, streamlining unmanned systems research to provide critical data across NOAA's mission areas, and unlocking the partnership potential of non-governmental and private organizations to study our nation's oceans and promote a blue economy. Previously as the Chief Atmospheric Scientist at Panasonic Avionics Corporation, he directed the research and development of both the aviation weather observing platform and weather forecast model programs. He was previously the Chair of the American Meteorological Society's Forecast Improvement Group, and also served on the World Meteorological Organization's aircraft-based observing systems expert team. Dr. Jacobs holds a bachelor degree in mathematics and physics from the University of South Carolina and masters and doctoral degrees in atmospheric science from North Carolina State University. See https://www.noaa.gov/our-people/leadership/dr-neil-jacobs .

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: A framework for simulating latitudinal catchability variation
Presenter(s): Sean Rohan, AFSC GAP
Date & Time: 13 October 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webex Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: A framework for simulating latitudinal catchability variation

Presenter(s): Sean Rohan, AFSC GAP

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesPlease contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mb66637e99438b9610e5a9a4465bd9053Webex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 727 5307 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 199 727 5307

Abstract: In recent years, unprecedentedwarm conditions facilitated a rapid northward range expansion of subarcticfishes in the Bering and Chukchi Seas. Due to extreme latitudinal and seasonalvariation in day length, these range shifts may change the visual environmentwhere fisheries and fishery-independent surveys encounter subarctic fishes,which would affect catchability because vision plays a role in the captureprocess. In this talk, I will present a model to simulate the effects oflatitudinal shifts on the catchability of bottom trawl fisheries andfishery-independent surveys.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar + Fall Foliage Outlook
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne and Chip Konrad, Southeast Regional Climate Center, Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, Pam Knox, University of Georgia
Date & Time: 13 October 2020
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Climate Overview and Tropical Update: Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox, University of Georgia

Fall Foliage Outlook: Chip Konrad | Southeast Regional Climate Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NIDIS, (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/1287144793876293389

Abstract:
Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

The October 13 webinar will also feature a presentation on the Fall Foliage Outlook by Chip Konrad, Southeast Regional Climate Center.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

8 October 2020

Title: The Great Collaboration: A Conservation Adventure Story from the Frontlines of Coral Rescue
Presenter(s): Beth Firchau, Florida Reef Tract Rescue Project Coordinator for the Association of Zoos and Aquariums; Steve Olson, Senior Vice President of Government Affairs for the Association of Zoos and Aquariums
Date & Time: 8 October 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: The Great Collaboration: A Conservation Adventure Story from the Frontlines of Coral Rescue

Presenter(s):
Beth Firchau, Florida Reef Tract Rescue Project Coordinator for the Association of Zoos and AquariumsSteve Olson, Senior Vice President of Government Affairs for the Association of Zoos and Aquariums

Sponsor(s):
Coral Collaboration Webinar Series - NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program

Seminar Contact(s):
Robin Garcia, robin.garcia@noaa.gov

Remote Access:AdobeConnect information:
1. To join the meeting: http://noaacsc.adobeconnect.com/coralscollab/
2. Click the microphone at the top of the screen to connect audio.


Abstract:The story of the stony coral tissue loss disease response and planned coral rescue taking place to save the Florida Reef Tract has all the ingredients of a great adventure story: an exotic location, an evil villain, and a cast of colorful, charismatic characters. What makes this story even more compelling and significant is the story's cast of heroes and heroines. A band of capable, same-souled, fearless individuals who, against all odds, even a global human pandemic, are bringing hope to Florida's Coral Reef.Since November 2019, in response to the environmental emergency taking place on the largest coral reef in the continental United States, and by invitation from NOAA Fisheries and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, this band of coral conservation crusaders from Association of Zoos and Aquariums' accredited facilities have chosen action over complacency. Together, with Federal and Florida State agencies, academic centers, commercial industry leaders, and non-profits, they have built a coral hope network. Today, nearly 2000 Florida coral reef-ugees are in safe keeping at 18 AZA accredited facilities in 12 states and the investment in coral conservation is being measured in the millions of dollars. The moral of this coral conservation adventure story is that collaboration works.Working together, we will help ensure a future for one of our nation's most fragile natural treasures.


Bio(s):
Beth Firchau is the Florida Reef Tract Rescue Project Coordinator for the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.Steve Olson is the Senior Vice President of Government Affairs for the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Open Research Data Publishing @ Dryad
Presenter(s): Daniella Lowenberg, Dryad Product Manager, University of California Office of the President / Dryadr
Date & Time: 8 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: Open Research Data Publishing @ Dryad

Presenter(s): Daniella Lowenberg, Dryad Product Manager, University of California Office of the President / Dryad

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website; POC: Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 183 732
Meeting password: JhWEAzQs628

JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 903 183 732Can't join the meeting? Contact support.ABSTRACT Research data is increasingly valued as a necessary component of reproducible and open science. Initiatives focused on the usability of data like FAIR, coupled with mandates from funders and publishers that require data to be openly accessible, increase the need for a data savvy research workforce. This talk will focus on: understanding the value and need to publish research data, how to prepare data in a usable way that allows for re-use, and how and where to publish data to advance scientific discovery and comply with funder and publisher policies.

BIOGRAPHY
Daniella is at the California Digital Library (CDL), a part of the University of California. She is the Dryad Product Manager and provides direction and oversight in UC's efforts to drive adoption of research data publishing. She is also Principal Investigator for the Sloan Foundation-funded Make Data Count initiative, focused on the development of open research data metrics. Prior to this, Daniella was a Publications Manager at PLOS ONE where she implemented and oversaw the PLOS Open Data Policy. She has a background in Microbiology and published on antibiotic resistance in the public health context as well as pharmacogenomics pathways of chemotherapy drugs.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Global Reference Frames: How They Are Made and How/Why NGS Aligns to Them
Presenter(s): Phillip McFarland, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 8 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Global Reference Frames: How They Are Made and How/Why NGS Aligns to Them

Presenter(s): Phillip McFarland, National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. POC: Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/211226483685186059

Abstract: The U.S. National Spatial Reference System (NSRS) is aligned with the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). This presentation discusses what that statement means, why it is done, and how it is achieved.

This webinar covers:


What global reference frames are and why they are useful, including a brief discussion of the difference between reference frames and reference systems.
Briefly the historical context of why the U.S. national frames are aligned with the ITRF.
What we mean when we say the NSRS is aligned with the ITRF, and how we achieve this alignment using the NOAA CORS Network (NCN).
Examples of what this looks like in practice, and how it affects NGS stakeholders.

This webinar covers:
What global reference frames are and why they are useful, including a brief discussion of the difference between reference frames and reference systems.
Briefly the historical context of why the U.S. national frames are aligned with the ITRF.
What we mean when we say the NSRS is aligned with the ITRF, and how we achieve this alignment using the NOAA CORS Network (NCN).
Examples of what this looks like in practice, and how it affects NGS stakeholders.
Technical Content Rating: Intermediate - Some prior knowledge is helpful.

Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).

Title: Point of no return: determining the depth at which sea turtle carcasses experience constant submergence
Presenter(s): Emma Schultz, Fisheries Biologist I, Mississippi Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network Assistant Coordinator, Riverside Technology Inc., in support of NOAA Fisheries, Southeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 8 October 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science SeminarYou may watch a recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pxgtpwa46zwa/

Title: Point of no return - determining the depth at which sea turtle carcasses experience constant submergence

Presenter(s): Emma Schultz, Fisheries Biologist I, Mississippi Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network Assistant Coordinator, Riverside Technology Inc., in support of NOAA Fisheries, Southeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Coordinator is
Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/seaturtle/event/registration.htmlAfter registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: When a sea turtle dies, it typically sinks to the bottom, begins decomposing, and then floats to the surface if enough internal gases accumulate. A total of 42 cold-stunned sea turtle carcasses,15 green (Chelonia mydas) and 27 Kemp's ridley (Lepidochelys kempii), were placed in wire mesh weighted cages at varying water depths and temperatures in the northern Gulf of Mexico from June 2018 to October 2019. Cameras and temperature-depth-orientation devices (TDRs) were used to record the carcass movements. Overall, carcasses did not float when deployed in colder and deeper waters and carcasses tended to float faster at shallower depths. We did not identify the exact depth at which sea turtle carcasses cannot generate enough gases to float, but that depth is likely very close to 40 m. Inconsistencies in overall ability to float as well as the variability of float time for individual carcasses along with species-specific differences were documented. This work provides information to enhance the existing sea turtle backtracking analysis mortality mapping tool as well as considerations for at-sea mortality estimates based on stranding information.

Bio(s): Emma Schultz is a contractor for Riverside Technology Inc. working at the NOAA Pascagoula Laboratory. She began her role as the Assistant Coordinator for the Mississippi Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network in early 2019. Prior to this position, Emma worked as a technician and biologist for the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources Marine Turtle Conservation Program. Emma received her Master of Science in Marine Sciences from Savannah State University where she studied nesting behavior, genetics, and movement patterns of green sea turtles in the US Virgin Islands.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

7 October 2020

Title: Collaborations for Climate Resilience: Lessons for Philadelphia from Boston, Pittsburgh, and NYC
Presenter(s): Adam Parris, New York City et al. see description
Date & Time: 7 October 2020
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Adam Parris (Deputy Director of Climate Science and Risk Communication, New York City),
Grant Ervin (Chief Resilience Officer and Sustainability Manager, City of Pittsburgh),
Carl Spector (Commissioner of the Environment Department, City of Boston)

Moderators:
Saleem Chapman (Chief Resilience Officer, City of Philadelphia)
Julia Rockwell (Climate Adaptation Program Manager, Philadelphia Water Department)

Additional Panelists:
William Solecki (Professor, Department of Geography at Hunter College CUNY and Lead Investigator, CCRUN)
Aurora Sharrard (Director of Sustainability at the University of Pittsburgh)
Paul Kirshen (Professor of Adaptation in the School for the Environment, University of Massachusetts Boston)Seminar sponsor: Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), a NOAA RISA Team

Remote Access: Must register at https://drexel.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_CwXZsY27RvGYA9r19ine8g Be advised: This meeting uses Zoom, but will be recorded. See info below.Recording: All sessions are recorded and archived on the CCRUN website http://www.ccrun.org/resources/seminars/Abstract: When Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney entered his second term earlier this year, he committed to working with external stakeholders to develop a citywide climate adaptation plan and hiring a Chief Resiliency Officer. As the City develops its climate adaptation plan, we can look towards cities across the region that have developed unique frameworks to engage external partners in addressing climate change, such as Boston's Green Ribbon Commission, New York City's Panel on Climate Change and Pittsburgh's Higher Education Climate Consortium. This panel discussion is an opportunity for the City of Philadelphia and Drexel University to learn from the experiences of Boston, NYC and Pittsburgh in how they've managed partnerships with civic institutions, their best practices and lessons learned, and their advice to best provide value to city operational and citywide efforts around resilience.

The seminar will begin with presentations by city leaders on how they've been addressing climate change, followed by a panel discussion with city officials and university representatives, moderated by the City of Philadelphia.

This event is part of Climate Year, a year of climate and sustainability focused events, teaching, and civic engagement at Drexel University and the Academy of Natural Sciences.
Seminar POC for questions: Korin Tangtrakul (krt73@drexel.edu) or Sean Bath (sean.bath@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Ecological predictability and surprise
Presenter(s): Tony Ives, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Date & Time: 7 October 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: Ecological predictability and surprise

Presenter(s): Dr. Tony Ives, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Dept of Zoology

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division; coordinator: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://meet.google.com/prt-ezpa-trv; phone number: +1 661-473-0853; PIN: 764 850 507#; Please arrive on time to avoid disruption.

Abstract: Ecological predictions face known knowns, known unknowns, and unknown unknowns. I will present three scientific vignettes that highlight the challenges these present. First, with increasing availability and sophistication of monitoring technologies, we have increasing amounts of data. It can be a challenge, however, to translate these data into knowns which we can use to make predictions. I will illustrate the challenges of known knowns (interpreting information from known observations) using remote-sensing data to ask whether the Arctic has become greener over the last 35 years of global change. Second, many ecological systems are inherently hard to predict. When they show complex nonlinear dynamics, even if you know everything there is to know about the system, making predictions might still be impossible. I will illustrate the challenges of known unknowns (making predictions for well-understood but complex systems) using long-term research on the population dynamics of midges in Mvatn, Iceland. Third, in many cases we don't know enough about a system to be confident in predictions. I will illustrate the challenges of unknown unknowns (making predictions when we don't know what we need to know) using long-term data documenting the collapse of the puffin population around the islands of Vestmannaeyjar, Iceland. These three vignettes show that data are essential for making predictions about our changing world, but data by themselves are not enough: we need strong analytical tools to translate data into predictions.

Bio(s): Information about the Ives lab can be found here https://ives.labs.wisc.edu/ Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Ecosystem Modeling for Fisheries Management in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): David Chagaris, Professor, IFAS Nature Coast Biological Station, University of Florida and Dr. Igal Berenshtein, Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami
Date & Time: 7 October 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording of this webinar through Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/px6c4rg42yt2/

Title: Ecosystem Modeling for Fisheries Management in the Gulf of Mexico
Part of NOAA's RESTORE Science Program Seminar Series: Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico

Presenter(s): Dr. David Chagaris, Assistant Professor, IFAS Nature Coast Biological Station, University of Florida, and Dr. Igal Berenshtein, Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami

Sponsor(s): NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Points of contact are Andrew.Lade@noaa.gov and for webinar questions, Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ecosystemmodeling/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm . Audio is over the computer,so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: The overall goal of this project is to integrate information on ecosystem stressors and predator-prey interactions into the assessment and management of fisheries in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). Two existing trophic-dynamic ecosystem models for the GoM were updated and expanded. The first is an ecosystem model of the West Florida Shelf (WFS), that focuses on reef fish species and red tides. The second model is a Gulf-wide (U.S. territorial waters) ecosystem model that focuses on federally managed species, the role of forage fish, and effects of bycatch. Both models utilize the Ecopath with Ecosim and Ecospace (EwE) modeling software package. In the WFS EwE model, a new feature was added to enable estimation of red tide mortality over space and time, while accounting for potential bloom avoidance and effects of food web impacts on recovery times. An important output from this model is a time series of red tide mortality that can be incorporated into reef fish stock assessments and can also inform projection scenarios used by managers to set annual catch limits. The Gulf-wide EwE model focuses on Gulf menhaden and generates time series of predation mortality for stock assessment and presents managers with the tradeoff between menhaden harvest and predator populations. Primary end users of these tools include stock assessment scientists, scientific advisory committees, and state and federal fisheries managers. Input from end users was obtained during an initial scoping workshop and we remained engaged with our end users by providing updates opportunistically during routine meetings. In the case of Gulf menhaden, our end user engagement efforts highlighted constraints and limitations in their management structure, impeding immediate uptake of the ecosystem information. Over the next year, we will finalize ecosystem model outputs to upcoming stock assessments and management actions for gag grouper, scamp, gray snapper, and Gulf menhaden as well as the recently initiated Gulf Fishery Ecosystem Plan.

Bio(s): Dr. David Chagaris is a research assistant professor at the IFAS Nature Coast Biological Station, University of Florida. Dr. Chagaris is a quantitative fisheries scientist that analyzes datasets and develops population dynamic and ecosystem models that incorporate environmental drivers, food web dynamics, and habitat interactions in order to understand how fisheries resources and marine ecosystems respond to fishing and environmental change. Those models are then used to improve population assessments, screen policy options for unintended consequences, evaluate ecosystem effects of natural and anthropogenic perturbations, and develop new management reference points that account for ecosystem interactions and the uncertainty therein. Dr. Chagaris is also currently a member of the Gulf Council SSC, the Gulf Council Ecosystem Technical Committee, and the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Ecological Reference Points workgroup.Dr. Igal Berenshtein is a postdoctoral research associate at the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami, and the NOAA Fisheries Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Dr. Berenshtein is a quantitative marine ecologist working on the broad aspects of ecological and environmental questions by integrating analytical approaches, such as biophysical modeling, behavioral experiments, empirical studies and ecosystem modeling. Igal has completed his first Postdoc at the university of Miami working on Marine pollution and larval dispersal, and he is now in his second post-doc position at the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, working on ecosystem modeling in the Gulf of Mexico.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

6 October 2020

Title: An interdisciplinary review of Atlantic cod stock structure in US waters
Presenter(s): Rich McBride, NEFSC
Date & Time: 6 October 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webex Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series


Title: An interdisciplinary review of Atlantic cod stock structure in US waters

Presenter(s): Rich McBride, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesPlease contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmerman@noaa.gov with any questions!

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mb66637e99438b9610e5a9a4465bd9053Webex meeting number (https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com): 199 727 5307 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1 (415) 527-5035 Access code: 199 727 5307

Abstract: The Atlantic Cod Stock Structure Working Group recently reviewed all relevant interdisciplinary information about stock structure of Atlantic cod in US waters, and the interactions of US stocks with adjacent Canadian Stocks. The WG identified a number of mismatches between the two current US management units and biological stock structure, and they proposed five biological stocks in US waters. Learn more about the process and how their recommendations are moving forward for the next benchmark cod assessment, scheduled for 2023.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Assessment of Plastic Marine Debris Export Mechanisms and Risk to Sea Scallop Fisheries of the Mid-Atlantic Bight
Presenter(s): Scott Gallager, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Date & Time: 6 October 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: Assessment of Plastic Marine Debris Export Mechanisms and Risk to Sea Scallop Fisheries of the Mid-Atlantic Bight

Presenter(s): Scott Gallager, Woods Hole Oceanographic InstitutionCo-Authors:
Linda Amaral-Zettler and Erik Zettler, Marine Biological Laboratory and The NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Utrecht University, and
Tracy Mincer, Florida Atlantic University, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute

When: Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 12-1pm EDT

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series and NOAA Office of Response and Restoration; coordinators for this seminar are Amy.Uhrin@noaa.gov and
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/scallop/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: In this study, we assessed the following hypotheses:
H1) Coastal phytoplankton bloom events promote seasonal MP transport deeper in the water column.
H2) MP transported deeper in the water column is available to filter feeding species such as sea scallop and is ingested.
H3) MP consumption presents a threat to sea scallop populations, particularly larvae which are especially vulnerable.
H4) MP harbors potential pathogens that can be transferred to sea scallops that ingest it.
Our conclusions were the following: Microplastic density changes with diatom colonization either making them heavy or light depending on species composition. All adult scallops from the Northeast Continental Shelf processed to date have microplastics in their gut from 2 to 12 fibers per scallop. PAN (polyactrilonitrile-Creslan), PVA (Polyvinyl alcohol), and LDPE (low density polyethylene) fibers dominate. Scallop larvae readily ingest microplastics, which displace nutritious food causing loss of lipid and starvation yielding low growth and death at environmental levels of microplastics. In particular, lipid energy reserve accumulation is greatly reduced even at a ratio of MP to algae of 1:1000. Vibrio-laden MPs are readily ingested by adult scallops and Vibrio are retained in gut even after 48h depuration. Open ocean concentrations of microplastics can be surprisingly high > 230 fragments/m^3. While the deep pelagic >2000m contains fewer particles, it is clear that high numbers persist throughout the water column providing a plethora of polymer types available for ingestion by adult and particularly larval scallops. A Risk Mitigation framework provides a process for understanding the impacts of microplastics on the scallop fishing industry.

Bio(s): Dr Scott Gallager is a tenured scientist in the WHOI Biology Department. As a Plankton Ecologist, he has been designing optical instrumentation for over 35 years to study tiny particles in some of the harshest environments on the planet from the crushing pressures of the deep ocean to the bitter cold of the Antarctic and Arctic. His experiences in studying the farthest edges of the aquatic world is well established. Following his graduate research at Boston University, he received the ONR Young Investigator Award to study the biophysical environment of pteropods and other plankton using optical microscopes he designed for use directly in the ocean. He has also developed the stereo optical imaging vehicle called HabCam, which is currently being used by NOAA to conduct stock assessments of the billion-dollar sea scallop industry and was recently awarded the prestigious three year CINAR Cooperative Fellowship to work with NOAA researchers on critical environmental problems.Realizing the magnitude of the issue of microplastics in the marine food chain influencing bacteria to human food organisms, Dr. Gallager Chairs the microplastics catalyst program at WHOI. Along with nine of his colleagues he has been developing the program to address critical issues of scientific rigor, instrumentation development, standardization of sampling and analysis protocols, distribution of microplastics from large rivers to our coastal waters and deep sea, impacts on marine organisms and the potential for biomagnification of polymers and toxic organic compounds adhered to microplastic particles up the food chain to humans. Dr. Gallager is committed to better understanding the impacts of microplastics on the marine environment and its implications to human health through the initiation of a global workshop in October of 2019 where 125 experts convened to design a rigorous path forward in the field of microplastics.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

1 October 2020

Title: Estimating Catch Misreporting in a State-space Stock Assessment Model
Presenter(s): Dr. Charles Perretti, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Research Fishery Biologist
Date & Time: 1 October 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov, and Kristan Blackhart, kristan.blackhart@noaa.gov

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7391445337052946704


Presenter(s): Dr. Charles Perretti, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Research Fishery Biologist

Abstract: State-space stock assessment models have become increasingly common in recent years due to their ability to estimate unobserved variables and multiple sources of error. Given these features, they may be able to estimate the unobserved process of misreported fishery catch. I describe recent research examining whether the state-space assessment model SAM is able to estimate misreported catch in a simulated fishery. I present results from a factorial experiment testing three formulations of SAM, including a new approach utilizing a random walk model of misreporting, and show the impact of misreporting on important stock assessment output.

Bio(s): Dr. Charles Perretti is a Research Fishery Biologist at the NEFSC in Woods Hole, MA. He is the lead stock assessment scientist for Gulf of Maine cod and haddock. His research interests include improving stock assessment methods, ecological forecasting, and model validation.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: Linking habitat to recruitment: evaluating the importance of pelagic Sargassum to fisheries management in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Frank Hernandez, Associate Professor, University of Southern Mississippi
Date & Time: 1 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: Linking habitat to recruitment: evaluating the importance of pelagic Sargassum to fisheries management in the Gulf of MexicoSeminar 10 of 13 in NOAA's RESTORE Science Program Seminar Series: Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico

Presenter(s): Frank Hernandez, Associate Professor, University of Southern MississippiWhen: Thursday, October 1, 2020, 2-3pm EDT

Sponsor(s): NOAA's NOAA RESTORE Science Program Seminar Series and National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Coordinators are Andrew.Lade@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/sargassum/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: Sargassum is a holopelagic brown algae found in the surface waters of the Atlantic Ocean, including the Gulf of Mexico. The accumulation of Sargassum biomass along convergence features provides refuge and foraging habitat for many marine species in an otherwise featureless open ocean. Among the fishes associated with Sargassum are the juvenile stages of managed species, such as Gray Triggerfish, Greater Amberjack, and Tripletail, among others. Sargassum is designated as Essential Fish Habitat, yet our understanding of the nursery function of Sargassum for juvenile life stages of these fishes is lacking, and managers know little about the environmental factors that drive variability in Sargassum abundance and distribution. In this presentation I will present updates from an on-going NOAA RESTORE project that is evaluating the importance of Sargassum to fisheries, and our efforts to develop a standardized Sargassum habitat index that can be used in population assessments of managed fish species that rely on Sargassum during the early life stages. Habitat indices are developed using both vessel-based and remote sensing observations, and are related to the recruitment of juvenile fishes (e.g., age-0 Gray Triggerfish). The variability in trophic ecology for several target species is also described, with an emphasis on the biological and oceanographic drivers of food web dynamics. Understanding the relationships between Sargassum and managed fish species is increasingly important, given the potential impacts of additional Sargassum biomass entering the Gulf of Mexico from recent blooms in the central Atlantic and Caribbean.

Bio(s): Dr. Frank Hernandez is an Associate Professor in the Department of Coastal Sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi. His research interests include the biology and ecology of marine fish in early life stages (eggs, larvae, and juveniles), and the oceanographic and environmental factors that determine their abundance, distribution, and survival to adult stages. Dr. Hernandez is a Louisiana native, and has been involved with fisheries research in the Gulf of Mexico for over 20 years. He has a BS degree in Zoology from LSU, a MS degree in Marine Biology from UNCW, and a PhD in Oceanography and Coastal Sciences from LSU.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: Nextstrain, Sequencing, and the SARS-CoV-2 Pandemic
Presenter(s): Emma Hodcroft, Ph.D., Postdoctoral researcher, University of Basel, Switzerland
Date & Time: 1 October 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Emma Hodcroft, Ph.D., Postdoctoral researcher, University of Basel, Switzerland

Sponsor(s): NWFSC Monster Seminar Jam website. Monster Seminar Jam Coordinator, email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINARJoin WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 183 732
Meeting password: JhWEAzQs628

JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 903 183 732Can't join the meeting? Contact support.

Abstract: The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 has driven an enormous global effort to contribute and share genomic data in order to inform local authorities and the international community about key aspects of the outbreak. Analyses of these data have played an important role in tracking the epidemiology and evolution of the virus in real-time. Nextstrain (nextstrain.org) is an open science initiative to harness the scientific and public health potential of pathogen genome data, and has previously provided key insight into outbreaks of Ebola and Zika, and longer-term pathogen spread of Influenza and Enterovirus. It provides a continually-updated view of publicly available data alongside powerful analytic and visualization tools for use by the community. The Nextstrain team has been maintaining an up-to-date analysis of SARS-CoV-2 at nextstrain.org/ncov since 20 Jan 2020. In this talk, I'll discuss the realisation of 'real-time tracking' with SARS-CoV-2 and what genetic epidemiology has allowed us to uncover about the virus' spread. I'll also discuss some of the challenges Nextstrain has faced in processing and displaying large amounts of real-time data with unprecedented public attention, and how the move from 'global' to 'local' focus is presenting new challenges.

Bio(s): Emma received her PhD from the University of Edinburgh in 2015, studying the hertiability of viral load in HIV. While working for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation PANGEA_HIV initiative, she developed an agent-based model to simulate realistic HIV phylogenies, and sequences, used to validate phylogenetic methods for inferring epidemic parameters. In 2017, Emma joined the Neher Lab, in large part to work on Nextstrain, an analysis & visualisation pipeline to enable real-time tracking of pathogens. She has since become a key developer on Nextstrain, adapting it to work with bacterial data and helping to completely refactor the project into a more modular code-base. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Emma worked on projects with tuberculosis, campylobacter, influenza, and RSV, but primarily studied Enterovirus D68, where she has formulated new hypotheses about its evolution and transmission patterns. Emma moved to working full-time on SARS-CoV-2 in February 2020, and has been a major player in maintaining the daily, dedicated Nextstrain builds, as well as adapting the platform to cope with the challenges the pandemic has brought, and aiding with phylogenetic analyses on data from all over the world. Emma is a strong advocate for open-source, open-science, & open-data, as well as promoting gender equality and diversity in science. Her dedication to accurate and accessible science communication has seen her rise to prominence during the pandemic, gaining over 20,000 Twitter followers, citations in over 60 media articles, and a German Wikipedia page. She is a recurring weekly guest on two BBC radio programmes.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 12: AI/ML for Models Parameterization, Emulation, and Hybrid Model/AI Construct, Part 1
Presenter(s): Jeremy McGibbon - Vulcan,Jiali Wang - Argonne National Laboratory, Carlos Gaitan - Benchmark Labs, Po-Lun Ma - PNNL, Alex Belochitski - IMSG at NOAA/NCEP/EMC
Date & Time: 1 October 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 12: AI/ML for Models Parameterization, Emulation, and Hybrid Model/AI Construct, Part 1 Chairs: Vladimir Krasnopolsky (NOAA/NCEP/EMC), Kayo Ide (UMD)

Presenter(s):

First steps toward a machine-learning based moist physics parameterization by coarse-graining - Jeremy McGibbon (Vulcan)

Precipitation downscaling using conditional super-resolution based deep neural network- Jiali Wang (Argonne National Laboratory)

Operational In-Field Forecasting using Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machines- Carlos Gaitan (Benchmark Labs)

Representing Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Using Machine Learning Techniques in Energy Exascale Earth System Model- Po-Lun Ma (PNNL)

Robustness of NN Emulations of Radiative Transfer Parameterizations in a State-of-the-Art GCM- Alex Belochitski (IMSG at NOAA/NCEP/EMC)

Panel Discussion - Panelists: Science Committee Members

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5465778263841479437

Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

30 September 2020

Title: Right Whales and Shipping: Using Corporate Responsibility to protect right whales from ship strike
Presenter(s): David Wiley, Research Coordinator and Michael Thompson, Geographer; NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 30 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p4oq5dy6ntf7/

Title: Right Whales and Shipping: Using Corporate Responsibility to protect right whales from ship strike

Presenter(s): David Wiley, Research Coordinator and Michael Thompson, Geographer;
NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; coordinators for this seminar are Tracy.GIll@noaa.govWhen: September 30, 12-1pm EDT

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/rightwhale/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm.
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: Lethal injury from collisions with large vessels is a major problem inhibiting the recovery of critically endangered North Atlantic right whales. To aid recovery the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration promulgated the Right Whale Ship Strike Reduction Rule, which created Seasonal Management Areas (SMAs)requiring large ships slowing to 10 knots or less in specific time/areas. To encourage compliance with the two SMAs that overlap the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, the sanctuary and NMFS initiated a corporate responsibility project. The concept of corporate responsibility involves companies increasing their commitment to behaviors that benefit society, such as slowing to safeguard right whales, and acknowledging positive corporate behavior. Since 2015, we have used the US Coast Guard's automatic Identification system (AIS) to track vessels through the two SMAs. We used these data to grade ships based on the percent SMA distance traveled at compliant speeds as follows: A+: 99 - 100% compliance and mean speed =<10 kts;
A: 90-98.9% compliance or mean speed =<10 kts. & meanspeed least compliant transit =< 10kts;
B: 80-89.9% compliance or mean speed =<10 kts. & meanspeed least compliant transit <10.5 kts;
C: 70-79.9% compliance or mean speed 10 -10.5 kts. & meanspeed least compliant transit 10.5-11 kts;
D: 60-69.9% compliance or mean speed >10.5 kts. & meanspeed least compliant transit >11 kts;
F: <60% compliance or mean speed >11 kts. & mean speedleast compliant transit >11.5 kts.Report cards were sent to each ship and to the companies using the ships, with addresses provided by the US Coast Guard. Ships and companies receiving A+ or A grades were sent a certificate acknowledging their positive behavior. In 2015 72% (146/203) of ships received certificates. In 2019 86% (118/145) of the companies and 85% (175/211) of the ships received certificates. Reaction from specific companies will be provided. This project is now used as a model for similar programs in west coast sanctuaries and around the world.

Bio(s): David Wiley and Michael Thompson team to investigate living marine resources in NOAA's Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Their work ranges from using biotelemetry to investigate the underwater behavior of large whales and the habitat use of seabirds to the ecosystem function of forage fish and climate change impacts to the sanctuary. The report card method they developed to track shipping compliance received the Society for Marine Mammalogy's award for Excellence in Scientific Communication.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

29 September 2020

Title: Explore Deep-Sea Coral Communities off the West Coast in Real Time without Going to Sea
Presenter(s): West Coast Education Team for the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 29 September 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Julie Bursek of Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, Jennifer Stock of Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary and Melissa Baffa, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7316278324245416462

Abstract: The NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries is partnering with Ocean Exploration Trust remotely aboard Exploration Vessel Nautilus to seek out new discoveries on little known regions of the deep sea along the North American West Coast. Scientists on board Nautilus and on shore participating via telepresence will conduct research that focuses on deep-sea coral habitats and an extensive octopus aggregation in our national marine sanctuaries. Most of the world's deep ocean remains largely unexplored, leaving significant gaps in knowledge needed to manage and protect ocean resources and to understand and predict future change. Learn about deep-sea coral resources that are available for teachers and students to understand these important deep-sea communities and opportunities to explore alongside researchers during the expedition.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Colorado River Basin Climate and Hydrology Webinar Series: Current Understanding of Processes, Patterns, and Variability
Presenter(s): Jeff Lukas and Liz Payton, Western Water Assessment
Date & Time: 29 September 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Colorado River Basin Climate and Hydrology, Part 3: Current Understanding of Processes, Patterns, and Variability

Presenter(s): Jeff Lukas (Western Water Assessment) and Liz Payton (Western Water Assessment)Seminar sponsor: Western Water Assessment (a NOAA RISA Team)

Remote Access: You must register at https://cuboulder.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_V7fluNGBSoyZkHO_CTneDw

NOAA employees, please note this webinar uses Zoom. We apologize for the access limitations. See recording info below.Recording: A recording will be made available via YouTube and embeded at https://wwa.colorado.edu/publications/reports/CRBreport/Abstract: Join Western Water Assessment's Jeff Lukas and Liz Payton for a presentation about the fundamental features of the Colorado River Basin's hydroclimate, their spatial and temporal variability, and the mechanisms behind that variability.This third installment in the Colorado River Basin Climate and Hydrology: State of the Science report webinar series will focus on Chapter 2, which covers moisture sources, storm tracks, seasonality of precipitation, the influence of topography and elevation, snowmelt, groundwater, mechanisms of variability, and recent trends. After summarizing the current understanding in these areas, Jeff will conclude with research challenges and opportunities, followed by Q&A.

The Colorado River Basin Climate and Hydrology: State of the Science report was conceived and commissioned by a group of federal, state, and local water agencies working to advance scientific understanding in the Colorado River Basin. By serving as a common knowledge base and identifying challenges and opportunities, the report is intended to support ongoing efforts to improve near-term forecasts and longer-term projections of water supply and system conditions, and also inform broader discussions about planning for the basin's water future.Seminar POC for questions: wwa@colorado.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 11: Poster Session I
Presenter(s): Elhadi Abdalla - NTNU
Date & Time: 29 September 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 11: Poster Session I Chair:
Kevin Garrett, NOAA/NESDIS/STAR

Poster Session, First Hour Registration (Lightning Round Overview):
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1085573527921302541

Poster Session, Second Hour Registration (Slack Channels with Presenters):

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfQtwDJcUwuhty9_BE57RWp6RXVI0FgDIkDPwOljNK6A7wdNA/viewform

Presenter(s):
Modelling runoff from green roofs using Deep Neural Networks - Elhadi Abdalla (NTNU)
Fine-Delineated Tropical Cyclone Detection from Geostationary Satellites and IBTrACS data using Advanced Neural Networks- Ata Akbari Asanjan (Universities Space Research Association)Pixel-wise Deep Sequence learning for wildfire spread prediction in Alberta, Canada- Xinli Cai (University of Alberta)
Using deep super-resolution for high resolution precipitation images- Xinli Cai (University of Alberta)
Upwelling Prediction in the eastern coast of Korean Peninsula using LSTM- Jin Yong Choi (KIOST)
Lightning prediction in the Atlantic offshore region -John Cintineo (University of Wisconsin - Madison)
Spatiotemporal Fusion of NASA ECOSTRESS and NOAA GOES-16 for Study of the Urban Thermal Response - Harold Gamarro (NOAA Center for Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Technologies)Connecting ocean physical and biogeochemical properties with the spatial distribution of mesopelagic fish abundance -Donglai Gong (Virginia Institute of Marine Science - William & Mary)The hunt for red tides: Deep learning algorithm forecasts shellfish toxicity at site scales in coastal Maine - Isabella Grasso (Clarkson University)
Using Data Mining Decision Tree Method to Identify the Optimal Fire Detection Thresholds - Yingxin Gu (IMSG at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR)
Application of Advanced Deep Learning Algorithms in Precipitation Estimation from Multiple Sources of Information - Negin Hayatbini (University of California, Irvine)
Low Cloud Detection for the GOES ABI using a Random Forest Classifier - John Haynes (CIRA / Colorado State University)3D Convolutional Deep Learning for Coastal Fog Predictions -Hamid Kamangir (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi)
Neural Network-Based Estimations of Phytoplankton Biomass and Primary Production in the Upper Ocean and Forecasting Capability: A Hybrid Approach -Hae-Cheol Kim (UCAR at GFDL)
Verification of a Machine Learning Algorithm in the Prediction of Flash Flooding - Mark Klein (NWS/Weather Prediction Center)
Utilizing CNN's to produce Quantitative Precipitation Estimates -Micheal Simpson (University of Oklahoma)
Refining aerosol optical depth retrievals over land by constructing the relationship of spectral surface reflectances through deep learning: application to Himawari-8 - Tianning Su (UMD)

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1085573527921302541

Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Understanding the Role of Unmanned Systems in NOAA with the NOAA R&D Database
Presenter(s): Ishrat Jabin, NOAA EPP Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Scholar
Date & Time: 29 September 2020
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov, and Laura Newcomb laura.newcomb@noaa.gov

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5613444874963372560


Presenter(s): Ishrat Jabin, NOAA EPP Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Scholar

Abstract: Autonomous systems can both augment traditional manned observing systems, as well as serve a unique role not possible with traditional platforms. At the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), autonomous systems are in use for numerous applications in both the Great Lakes and marine environment, including fisheries applications. Starting in 2017, NOAA began efforts to systematically catalog all research and development (R&D) projects in the agency in the NOAA R&D Database (NRDD). Using the NRDD, we examine where and how unmanned systems are in use at NOAA in contrast to traditional platforms, including ship-based measurements.

Bio(s): Ishrat Jabin is a second year's master's student at the City College of New York. Her background is in Environmental Engineering and is presently a NOAA CESSRST Scholar and my research is focused on California cash crops and their impact on watersheds. For her NERTO internship in OAR's Office of Science Support she performed analyses on NOAA's R&D portfolio and contributed to NOAA R&D Data Science Community of Practice and used these tools to inform management decisions and analyze trends.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: Earth System Modeling and Fisheries Applications
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center and Charlie Stock, NOAA/OAR/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory
Date & Time: 29 September 2020
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: via GoToWebinar (registration required)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Earth System Modeling and Fisheries Applications

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and
Charlie Stock, NOAA/OAR/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory.


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:
Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of September conditions and a discussion on GFDL's modeling expertise and applications to fisheries and ocean management issues.

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

28 September 2020

Title: California-Nevada Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Andrea Bair, National Weather Service Western Region, Shrad Shukla | California Nevada Applications Program, UC Santa Barbara, Dan McEvoy | Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute
Date & Time: 28 September 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Drought & Climate Update
Andrea Bair | National Weather Service Western Region

Drought & Climate Outlook
Shrad Shukla | California Nevada Applications Program, UC Santa Barbara

Projected Changes in Reference Evapotranspiration in California and Nevada: Implications for Drought and Wildland Fire Danger
Dan McEvoy | Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), California Nevada Climate Applications Program, National Weather Service, Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute, UC Santa Barbara

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6198673126304875533

Seminar Contact(s): Amanda Sheffield, NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Abstract:
It's been a difficult summer in CA/NV with the heat, drought, devastating wildfires, and smoke. According to the September 8 U.S. Drought Monitor, 71.4% of CA/NV is in drought, including 10.5% in Extreme Drought (D3). It's still the dry season and the wildfire potential is typically elevated through October. This webinar will provide an overview of the current conditions and outlook for the fall as well as present results from a timely project on "Projected Changes in Reference Evapotranspiration in California and Nevada: Implications for Drought and Wildland Fire Danger." The project was funded by NIDIS and led by a team with CNAP, a NOAA RISA team.

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) September 2020 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Nio and La Nia).

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body)

Title: NEDTalk- Climate, Flooding, and Money
Presenter(s): Jim Blackburn, The Baker Institute/SSPEED, Rice University
Date & Time: 28 September 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NEDTalk- Climate, Flooding, and Money

Presenter(s): Jim Blackburn, Baker Institute Faculty Scholar/Co-Director of SSPEED, Rice University

Sponsor(s): NOAA NESDIS NEDTalk.

Seminar Contact(s): lyric.prince@noaa.gov

Remote Access: To see a presentation, join the Q&A session via Adobe Connect, click here and follow the prompts to "enter as a guest."URL: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/noaa-interview/More info on DataFest and NEDTalks: https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/nedtalks Date/Time: September 28, 2 PM EDT

Abstract: Mr. Blackburn's topic is Climate, Flooding, and Money, and he will present a survey of his recent work including the creation of a proposed U.S. standard for soil carbon storage transactions and trying to understand how Houston will (or will not) adapt to the flooding challenges represented by climate change and the big one. This work is in association with the Severe Storm (SSPEED) Center and the Baker Institute at Rice University in Houston. In this presentation, Mr. Blackburn will discuss both difficulties of and strategies to improve communications and thinking regarding climate change which is a central element in both the evolving carbon standard and flooding in Houston. Among other things, Mr. Blackburn has discovered that discussing monetary implications of climate can help move the conversation forward, particularly in the area of carbon emission reduction and storage.

Bio(s): Jim Blackburn is a professor in the practice of environmental law in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Rice University, teaching courses in sustainable development and environmental law. He is also a practicing environmental lawyer with the Blackburn & Carter law firm in Houston and a Rice faculty scholar at the Baker Institute. At Rice, he serves as the co-director of the Severe Storm Prediction, Education and Evacuation from Disaster (SSPEED) Center and as director of the undergraduate minor in energy and water sustainability. At the SSPEED Center, Blackburn has been responsible for the development of landscape-scale green space solutions for surge damage mitigation, including the Lone Star Coastal National Recreation Area, a web-based ecological services exchange, and structural alternatives. He is the author of The Book of Texas Bays (Texas A&M University Press, 2004), which focuses on the environmental health of bays in Texas and efforts undertaken to protect them. He has received various public service awards, including the Barbara C. Jordan Community Advocate Award from Texas Southern University in 2007, the National Conservation Achievement Award from the National Wildlife Federation in 2001, and the Bob Eckhardt Lifetime Achievement Award for coastal preservation efforts from the Texas General Land Office in 1998. In 2003, he was awarded an honorary membership by the American Institute of Architects for legal work associated with urban quality of life issues in Houston. Blackburn received a B.A. in history and a J.D. from The University of Texas at Austin and an M.S. in environmental science from Rice University.

Recordings: Webinar will be posted on NOAA Satellites' YouTube

24 September 2020

Title: Dams and Sediment in the Hudson
Presenter(s): Sarah Fernald, Research Coordinator, Hudson River NERR; Brian Yellen, Geologist, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Date & Time: 24 September 2020
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Dams and Sediment in the Hudson

Presenter(s):
Sarah Fernald, Research Coordinator, Hudson River NERR; Brian Yellen, Geologist, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative

To Register: Visit https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1865879338166282000

Seminar Contact(s):
dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

Abstract:
Hundreds of dams built on tributaries of the Hudson River estuary have outlived their usefulness. Removing these relic dams is a priority for the state of New York in order to improve aquatic habitat connectivity, restore fish spawning grounds, and reduce the risk of dam failure. To better understand how sediment released by dam removals in the Lower Hudson River watershed will affect the 240 km-long estuary, including the potential for dam-derived sediments to help build tidal wetland resilience in the face of sea level rise, the Dams and Sediment in the Hudson (DaSH) project brought together a collaborative team of scientists and stakeholders to research key questions and provide practical tools to regulators and practitioners.

In this webinar, project team members will highlight how their multidisciplinary approach " which combined field observations with analyses of sediment transport, and integrated feedback from a broad coalition of stakeholders " allowed them to answer questions about how dam removal will impact conditions in the estuary. They will share some surprising findings about marsh development and accretion and introduce a tool they developed that allows engineers and regulators to estimate the amount of sediment stored behind a dam and assess preliminary impacts of sediment release following dam removal. To learn about their findings and tools visit http://www.nerrssciencecollaborative.org/project/Ralston16.

About the speakers:
Sarah Fernald is a marine scientist and is responsible for managing long term monitoring and research at the Hudson River NERR (See: program). Sarah ensured alignment between this project, her reserve and NY state's management needs, and helped translate results for regulators. Leveraging her reserve's long term monitoring data, she helped compare sediment dynamics during recent extreme weather events with a hypothetical dam removal.

Brian Yellen is a geologist that specializes in watershed processes and the movement of water and sediment (See: bio). For this project, Brian led the sediment core sampling behind dams and in tidal marshes. He found that sediment supply to marshes in the Hudson River is high enough to keep pace with sea level rise, and human-made structures accelerate marsh formation. Brian also led the development of the dam sediment estimation tool.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminarsrequest@list.woc.noaa.gov with the work 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Shared software development strategies facilitate implementing ecosystem-based fisheries management
Presenter(s): Christine Stawitz, Ph.D., Stock Assessment Scientist, ECS Federal in support of NOAA Fisheries' Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 24 September 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Christine Stawitz, Ph.D., Stock Assessment Scientist, ECS Federal in support of NOAA Fisheries' Office of Science and Technology

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Monster Jam seminars: POC: email Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 183 732
Meeting password: JhWEAzQs628

JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 903 183 732Can't join the meeting? Contact support.

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: New Mexico Weather Outlook Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Dave DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist
Date & Time: 24 September 2020
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers
Dave DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist

Sponsor(s): NOAA, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USDA Southwest Climate Hub, New Mexico Climate Center, Quivira Coalition, Santa Ana Natural Resources

Seminar Contact(s): Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov)

Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7590421755382798093

Abstract:
These monthly webinar presentations will provide information on current and upcoming weather and climate conditions in New Mexico, with a highlight on conditions on Tribal lands. Agricultural producers and land managers are encouraged to attend. The webinars will take place on the 4th Thursday of the next 4 months (June 25, July 23, August 27, September 24).

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: A Risk Assessment of Microplastics and Associated Contaminants in Coastal Environments and Seafood in American Samoa
Presenter(s): Dr. Beth Polidoro, Associate Professor of Marine Conservation and Environmental Chemistry, Deputy Director, Center for Biodiversity Outcomes, Arizona State University
Date & Time: 24 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording of this webinar through Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pj78zmsi4ziv/

Title: A Risk Assessment of Microplastics and Associated Contaminants in Coastal Environments and Seafood in American Samoa
Seminar 1 of 4 in the Series - NOAA Marine Debris Research Webinar Series: Addressing the Ecological Risks of Microplastic

Presenter(s): Dr. Beth Polidoro, Associate Professor of Marine Conservation and Environmental Chemistry, Deputy Director, Center for Biodiversity Outcomes, Arizona State UniversityWhen: Thursday, September 24, 2020, 12-1pm EDT

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series and NOAA Office of Response and Restoration; coordinators for this seminar are Amy.Uhrin@noaa.gov and
Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/polidoro/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: Solid waste disposal is a massive concern among Pacific Island nations. With severe limitations in land area, in combination with the lack of reuse or recycling options, many near-shore marine ecosystems across Oceania are severely impacted by locally derived marine debris, including plastics, microplastics and associated chemical contaminants. In order to catalyze improved solid waste management and plastic use policies, the potential ecological and public health risks must be clearly identified and communicated. In this case study, we will present results from a community-based, screening-level ecological and public health risk assessment of microplastics and associated contaminants in American Samoa. The multiple challenges and benefits of conducting field and laboratory-based risk assessments in collaboration with community groups in data poor regions will also be discussed. We will highlight best practices and suggested methods to return results to a variety of local partners for the purposes of improved regulation, educational outreach, and longer-term community conservation efforts. As seafood is an important source of protein in American Samoa and other Pacific Island nations, this case study can provide a framework for community, scientific or regulatory agencies working in data-poor regions to conduct screening-level risk assessments using in-situ environmental monitoring studies at the local or regional scale.

Bio(s): Dr. Beth Polidoro is an Associate Professor of Marine Toxicology in the School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences at Arizona State University (ASU). She also serves as the Deputy Director of ASU's Center for Biodiversity Outcomes, and as a member of the IUCN Species Survival Commission's Marine Conservation Committee. Her primary research interests are in risk assessment, environmental chemistry and applied toxicology within the context of marine and freshwater biodiversity conservation, human health and sustainable development. Currently, she works on various environmental conservation initiatives and community-based risk assessments in southeast Asia, Latin America, Africa and Oceania. She also supports a long-term monitoring project for plastics and other pollutants in urban aquatic resources in metro-Phoenix.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 10: AI/ML for Post-Processing and Data dissemination, Part 2
Presenter(s): V. Balaji - NOAA/GFDL, Maike Sonnewald - NOAA/GFDL, Damien Pierce, Yusef Shafi, Lily Hu, Anudhyan Boral - Google Research, Mihai Alexe - Spire Global
Date & Time: 24 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:45 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 10: AI/ML for Post-Processing and Data dissemination, Part 2 Chairs: Nikunj Oza (NASA), Allen Huang (UW-Madison)

Presenter(s):
The role of machine learning in a seamless modeling approach from weather to climate time scales - V. Balaji (NOAA/GFDL)Elucidating Ecological Complexity: Unsupervised Learning determines global marine eco-provinces -Maike Sonnewald (NOAA/GFDL) Accelerating Google's Flood Forecasting Initiative with Tensor Processing Units - Damien Pierce, Yusef Shafi, Lily Hu, Anudhyan Boral (Google Research)Predicting global cloud ceiling values with machine learning - Mihai Alexe (Spire Global)
Panel Discussion - Panelists: Science Committee Members

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4866135408377793805

Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

23 September 2020

Title: Complementary Uses of GEO and LEO Satellite Data in Alaska
Presenter(s): Carl Dierking, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 23 September 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Carl Dierking
Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA)
University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://uaf-accap.org/event/september2020-vaws/

Abstract:
The National Environmental Satellite Data Information Service (NESDIS) which is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates a number of satellites for monitoring the earth's environment. These satellites are divided into two types of orbiting strategies.

Geostationary (GEO) satellites orbit at the same speed and direction as the earth's rotation. Their fixed position relative to the earth provides continuous monitoring of the development and movement of weather systems, however to synchronize with the earth's rotation their orbit is quite distant from the surface and centered over the equator. This results in degraded resolution and parallax displacement in the high latitudes like Alaska. The newest generation of GEO satellites can take observations as frequently as every 30 seconds.

Polar-orbiting satellites travel from pole to pole covering a new swath of the earth with each pass. They are positioned much lower than geostationary satellites and are often referred as Low Earth Orbiting or LEO satellites. LEO satellites are usually sun-synchronous, covering the entire globe twice a day (once ascending and once descending) and passing over the same point around the same time each day. They have much higher resolution imagery than GEO and minimal parallax, however even with multiple LEO satellites and orbital trajectories converging over northern latitudes, the coverage for Alaska is less frequent than GEO. LEO satellites are often equipped with additional sensors, such as passive microwave which is able to see through clouds.

For Alaska, LEO and GEO satellites have advantages and disadvantages, however other traditional observation networks are sparse in the state, so it is important to utilize the best qualities of each platform to fully diagnose and monitor hazardous natural events. This presentation will show several examples of how data from each of these satellite platforms can be complementary in this process.
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

22 September 2020

Title: An Overview of NOAA's Fiscal Year 2021 Effects of Sea Level Rise (ESLR) Funding Opportunity for Potential Applicants
Presenter(s): David Kidwell, Director, NOAA NCCOS Competitive Research Program, and Trevor Meckley, Program Manager, NOAA NCCOS Effects of Sea Level Rise-ESLR-Competitive Research Program
Date & Time: 22 September 2020
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: An Overview of NOAA's Fiscal Year 2021 Effects of Sea Level Rise (ESLR) Funding Opportunity for Potential Applicants

Presenter(s): David Kidwell, Director, NOAA NCCOS Competitive Research Program; and Trevor Meckley, Program Manager, NOAA NCCOS Effects of Sea Level Rise (ESLR) Competitive Research Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCOS Competitive Research Program. Points of contact are Trevor.Meckley@noaa.gov and for webinar questions, Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/eslr/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.
Note: A recording of the webinar will be made available afterwards; contact
Trevor.Meckley@noaa.gov

Abstract: The NOAA Competitive Research invites potential applicants to join a webinar on the FY21 Effects of Sea Level Rise (ESLR)federal funding opportunity. The funding opportunity is soliciting proposals to evaluate and quantify the ability of natural and nature-based features (NNBF)to mitigate the effects of sea level rise (SLR) and inundation (storm surge,nuisance flooding, and/or wave actions). This FFO will support research to inform adaptation planning and coastal management decisions in response to SLR and coastal inundation, through advancement of models of physical and biological processes capable of evaluating vulnerability and resilience under multiple sea level rise, inundation, and management scenarios, including evaluation of nature based solutions. The opportunity has two focal areas; coastal resilience and surface transportation resilience, which will be described in detail in the webinar. Two to four projects are expected to be funded in each focal area for a length of 2 to 4 years. Projects will be fundedfor $200 to $400 thousand a year for the coastal resilience focal area and $200to $500 thousand a year for the surface transportation resilience focal area. The webinar will discuss the ESLR program and the funding opportunity due dates and requirements. There will be an opportunity to ask clarifying questions at the end of the webinar. More information on the funding opportunity, a link to the full funding opportunity description,and a recording of this webinar after the event, can all be found on the ESLR Program's website.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: Increasing Industry Ocean, Weather and Climate Observations: The World Ocean Council SMART Ocean-SMART Industries Program
Presenter(s): Paul Holthus, CEO, World Ocean Council
Date & Time: 22 September 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6119514892984665100


Presenter(s): Paul Holthus, CEO, World Ocean Council

Abstract: Ocean industries operate tens of thousands of vessels and platforms, and a million km of submarine cables, all with the potential for cost effectively collecting information, often in data poor areas. An industry-led system for strategic and sustained data collection is needed. The World Ocean Council (WOC) brings together all ocean industries and its WOC SMART Ocean-SMART Industries program is a comprehensive structure and process to foster and facilitate scaling up data that industry can provide by hosting or deploying instruments or sharing previously collected data.

Key Takeaways:
  1. Ocean industries have a large number of vessels, platforms and cables that can cost effectively collect ocean weather and climate data.
  2. A comprehensive system of engaging companies and brokering interaction with the science community is needed to scale up industry data collection and sharing.
  3. There are opportunities for accelerating industry involvement in observations through a partnership between NOAA and the World Ocean Council SMART Ocean-SMART Industries program.


Bio(s): Paul Holthus founded the World Ocean Council - the Global "Blue Economy" Business Organization, an international leadership alliance on ocean sustainable development, science, and stewardship that brings together investment, shipping, fisheries, aquaculture, tourism, oil/gas, and offshore renewables for leadership, collaboration and action. Paul held senior positions with UNEP and other international organizations and is a regular speaker at ocean and business events around the world.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: NEDTalk-A Social Science Perspective of Disaster Impacts on Latino and Indigenous Migrant Communities
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Mendez, Environmental Policy and Planning, UC Irvine
Date & Time: 22 September 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NEDTalk- A Social Science Perspective of Disaster Impacts on Latino and Indigenous Migrant Communities

Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Mendez, University of California, Irvine.

Sponsor(s): NOAA NESDIS NEDTalk

Seminar Contact(s): lyric.prince@noaa.gov

Remote Access: To see a presentation, join the Q&A session via Adobe Connect, click here and follow the prompts to "enter as a guest."URL: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/noaa-interview/More info on DataFest and NEDTalks: https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/nedtalks Date/Time: September 22, 2 PM EDT

Abstract: As climate change advances, communities across the United States are adapting to the increased threat of wildfires, drought, heatwaves, and hurricanes. Such disasters are expected to become more frequent and severe. Now more than ever, it is crucial to understand how these events amplify existing inequalities, and how to lessen the resulting harms. Differences in human vulnerability to disaster stem from a range of social, economic, historical, and political factors. Undocumented Latinx and Indigenous migrants are disproportionately affected by racial discrimination, exploitation, economic hardships, language discrimination, and fear of deportation in their everyday lives" their pre-disaster marginalized status. Dr. Mendez will discuss the increasing severity of disasters and the need to understand the differential impacts on undocumented migrants to improve disaster planning to protect the most vulnerable populations.

Bio(s): Dr. Michael Mendez is an assistant professor of environmental policy and planning at the University of California, Irvine. He previously was the inaugural James and Mary Pinchot Faculty Fellow in Sustainability Studies at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Dr. Mendez has more than a decade of senior-level experience in the public and private sectors, where he consulted and actively engaged in the policymaking process. This included working for the California State Legislature as a senior consultant, lobbyist, gubernatorial appointee, and as vice-chair of the Sacramento City Planning Commission. His new book Climate Change from the Streets, published through Yale University Press (2020), is an urgent and timely story of the contentious politics of incorporating environmental justice into global climate change policy.Dr. Mendez contributed to state and national research policy initiatives, including serving as an advisor to a California Air Resources Board member, and as a participant of the U.S. Global Change Research Program's workgroup on Climate Vulnerability and Social Science Perspectives. Most recently, he was appointed by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to the Board on Environmental Change and Society (BECS). He also serves as a panel reviewer for the National Academies of Sciences' Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP).
New Article: The (in)visible victims of disaster: Understanding the vulnerability of undocumented Latino/a and indigenous immigrants, through Geoforum.
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016718520301925

Recordings: Webinar will be posted on NOAA Satellites' YouTube
Title: Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar
Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District
Date & Time: 22 September 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Florida Climate Center, ADECA Office of Water Resources, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Auburn University Water Resources Center

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth (meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/3343275517350002704

Abstract:
The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Drought Assessment Webinar is part of a monthly (twice a month during drought status) webinar series designed to provide stakeholders, water-resource managers, and other interested parties in the ACF region with timely information on current drought status, seasonal forecasts and outlooks, streamflow conditions and forecasts, groundwater conditions, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir conditions.

Recordings:
Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: The Sediment-bound Contaminant Resilience and Response (SCoRR) Strategy – A framework for evaluating potential environmental contaminant exposures
Presenter(s): Daniel Jones, Geographer, US Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah
Date & Time: 22 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesYou may view the recording for this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/plfhooo37jho/

Title: The Sediment-bound Contaminant Resilience and Response (SCoRR) Strategy -
A framework for evaluating potential environmental contaminant exposures

Presenter(s): Daniel Jones, Geographer, US Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah
Co-author: Timothy Reilly, USGS

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; coordinators for this seminar include Mark.Osler@noaa.gov, Pamela.Braff@noaa.gov, and Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/scorr/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: In response to Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed the Sediment-bound Contaminant Resiliency and Response (SCoRR) strategy to define baseline and post-event sediment-bound environmental health (EH) stressors (https://toxics.usgs.gov/scorr). The strategy includes a tiered decision-support tool, field survey methods, and geospatial screening tools for rapid and systematic local to regional-scale assessments of potential contaminant exposures. Foundational data used in the strategy include potential contaminant sources to ecological and human health, stakeholder submitted assets (key habitats, study locations, etc.), and historic storm vulnerabilities. The strategy was designed to accommodate variable data types and quality and is easily adaptable. While initially developed to evaluate vulnerabilities associated with coastal storms and flooding, the strategy has since been applied to inland areas, varied sample media, and other disaster scenarios. Of note has been a recent application to oil and gas-related hazards in the Northeast Region, which included an extensive multi-state stakeholder data compilation effort.Assembled data provides extensive accounting of stakeholder assets (e.g., key habitat, study locations, recreation) and their associated vulnerabilities to potential contamination from oil and gas-related activities. Ongoing work will expand upon previous data compilation efforts to other geographies, disaster scenarios, and focused contaminant hazards, and will continue to develop EH vulnerability metrics for each new data compilation. Key to these efforts is the identification of new federal, state, and local stakeholder priorities nationwide to apply the strategy to, ultimately leading to nationally consistent datasets and EH vulnerability metrics.

Bio(s): Dan Jones is a geographer with the USGS Utah Water Science Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. He began his career in the USGS Reston headquarters in 2013, moving to SLC in 2016 for his wife's new position at the University of Utah. His work spans a range of topics broadly dealing with the occurrence, transport, and fate of contaminants in the environment, and the potential health risks they pose to organisms and the environment. Dan also manages the Geospatial Analyses and Applications Lab which is a team of geographers, statisticians, and programmers that work together to provide geospatial data, tools, and analyses to help address large-scale environmental questions. The group is always looking for new collaborative opportunities and encourages reaching out to Dan to discuss potential ideas.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

21 September 2020

Title: A Model for Service Delivery and Decision Support for NOAA
Presenter(s): Ellen Mecray, Regional Climate Services Director, Eastern Region, NOAA/NESDIS/National Centers for Environmental Information
Date & Time: 21 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s): Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s): Ellen Mecray, Regional Climate ServicesDirector, Eastern Region, NOAA/NESDIS/National Centers for Environmental Information

Abstract:
NOAA has been transforming from a scientific and technologically constrained set of products and services, to valuing user needs as a critical input for developing useful, actionable information. Timely and specific user needs are essential inputs for advancing and deploying new technologies, models, tools, and resources. In NOAA, and in many of our partner organizations, there is a focus on the path between Research and Operations. In this talk, we emphasize stretching that path to include Services as a central tenet for bridging the gap all the way from the user needs to the product development lifecycle, to the evaluation of the user's use of the information. The NOAA Service Delivery framework describes a consistent approach that will enhance NOAA's delivery of water-related services, and could also be applied to other NOAA initiatives that cite the need to understand and apply user needs to guide product and service development. Institutionalizing and integrating these processes to align with other weather-, ocean-, coast-, climate-, and fisheries-related initiatives and activities will better equip NOAA to fulfill its vision of developing and sustaining resilient ecosystems, communities and economies.Remote Access
Phone: 877-401-9225
passcode: 53339716
JOIN WEBEX MEETING

https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m4f8268313ab167164937c651a98b3856 Meeting password: Jpss2020!

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

18 September 2020

Title: September 2020 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP
Date & Time: 18 September 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access: http://accap.adobeconnect.com/september2020/event/registration.html

Abstract:
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: NEDTalk- Cross-Cultural Competencies: The Interface Between Indigenous People’s Traditional Knowledge and Western Science
Presenter(s): Mr. James Rattling Leaf, Sr., Consultant to the Great Plains Tribal Water Alliance
Date & Time: 18 September 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: NEDTalk- Cross-cultural competencies: The interface between Indigenous people's traditional knowledge and western science

Presenter(s): Mr. James Rattling Leaf, Consultant to the Great Plains Tribal Water Alliance

Sponsor(s): NOAA's NESDIS NEDTalks

Seminar Contact(s): lyric.prince@noaa.gov

Remote Access: To see a presentation, join the Q&A session via Adobe Connect, click here and follow the prompts to "enter as a guest."
URL: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/noaa-interview/
More info on DataFest and NEDTalks: https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/nedtalks

Recordings: Webinar will be posted on NOAA Satellites' YouTube

Abstract: James Rattling Leaf, Sr. will speak on his experiences as a cultural intelligence consultant with a specialty in tribal/indigenous ways of knowing. He specializes in developing programs that utilize the interface between indigenous people's traditional knowledge and western science. Mr. Rattling Leaf will discuss his tribal heritage as a means to strengthen his Tribe through education---focusing on community, economic, and human development while preserving the Lakota values and heritage. Also, he will discuss the legacy of RezMappers, a software interface that incorporated the Lakota language in conjunction with governmental satellite imagery and ESRI technology. Finally, he will discuss his efforts with students to enhance their geoscience experience by developing funding, finding scholarships, and providing mentoring and internship opportunities, such as those that address the coronavirus pandemic and investigate the difference in land use and cover between two buffalo pastures and an un-grazed control site using remote sensing technology.

Bio(s): Currently, James is a Research Associate at the Cooperative Institute Research Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder as well as a Co-Principal Investigator, North Central Climate Adaptation Science Center. He specializes in developing programs that utilize the interface between Indigenous People's Traditional Knowledge and Western Science. He has over 25 years' experience serving as a cross cultural/broker resource to Federal Government, Higher Education Institutions and Non-Profits to developing, maintaining positive on-going working relationships with federally and non-federally recognized Indian tribes, Tribal College and Universities and Tribal Communities.
He is a founding member of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Indigenous Alliance that was established at GEO Week 2019 in Canberra, Australia to foster a continued, effective, respectful, and reciprocal relationship with GEO and representatives of indigenous communities from around the world. He was born on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation USA and is an enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. His higher education comes from Sinte Gleska University.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

17 September 2020

Title: 3D Modeling Coral Reefs: How Data Science Helps Us Better Understand Coral Reef Ecosystems
Presenter(s): John Burns, PhD. University of Hawai'i at Hilo
Date & Time: 17 September 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): John Burns, PhD. University of Hawai'i at Hilo

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3521555833268029710

Abstract: Coral reefs are both culturally and economically important, yet these ecosystems still remain poorly understood. Join Dr. John Burns to learn how the Multiscale Environmental Graphical Analysis Lab uses cutting-edge 3D technology to map reefs in high-resolution. These 3D reconstructions are then layered with real-world data to improve our understanding of the biology and ecology of these habitats. This work has helped us to learn how coral reefs are changing over time, and how these changes affect associated reef organisms and the services we as humans depend on. Ultimately, our goal is to use innovative technologies to improve our understanding of coral reefs and develop techniques to help protect and preserve these ecosystems for future generations.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 17 September 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
TBD

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7528179497868100876

Abstract:
The focus area for this webinar is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia.

Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 8: Machine Learning Tools and Best Practices, Part 1
Presenter(s): Imme Ebert-Uphoff - CIRA, Karthik Kashinath - Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, David Gagne - NCAR, Ian Foster - ORNL
Date & Time: 17 September 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 8: Machine Learning Tools and Best Practices, Part 1 Chairs: Sue Haupt (NCAR), Jason Hickey (Google)

Presenter(s):
Which strategies did my neural network learn? - Imme Ebert-Uphoff (CIRA)
ClimateNet: an expert-labelled open dataset and Deep Learning architecture for enabling high-precision analyses of extreme weather - Karthik Kashinath (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab) The AI for Earth System Science Hackathon: Challenge Problems and Lessons Learned - David Gagne (NCAR) AI for Science program at Argonne NL- Ian Foster (ORNL)Panel Discussion - Panelists: Science Committee Members

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7018443713400087819

Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Environmental drivers of transcription in three species of marine organisms.
Presenter(s): Ewelina Rubin, Ph.D, Senior Research Associate II, OCED - AOML and CIMAS - University of Miami
Date & Time: 17 September 2020
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: Via Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: Environmental drivers of transcription in three species of marine organisms.

Presenter(s): Ewelina Rubin, Ph.D, Senior Research Associate II, OCED

Seminar Contact(s): Ewelina Rubin ewelina.rubin@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Atlantic Oceanic Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/804733661
You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (872) 240-3412Access Code: 804-733-661

Abstract: Marine ecosystems often experience dynamic changes in environmental conditions, including light, temperature, and nutrients, as well as prey availability. Marine organisms must cope with these rapidly fluctuating environmental factors. In some cases, their physiological-plasticity is reflected in cellular changes occurring at the gene transcription-level. This seminar will cover three examples of differential gene expression analysis to understand the molecular function and performances of different marine organisms. First, I will present studies that I conducted to investigate two different plankton species, including a diatom and a heterotrophicdinoflagellate, as they respond to environmental and ecological perturbation.Diatoms were observed to respond to low phosphate concentrations with transcriptional changes leading to cell membrane remodeling and scavenging of organic phosphates. Dinoflagellates exhibited dynamic transcriptome alteration as a function of prey availability, demonstrating molecular readjustments needed to find and capture prey food, as well as to cope with starvation. My research at AOML builds upon these studies, employing similar methodological tools to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying coral persistence. For this work I am focusing on populations of Pseudodiploria strigosa in the Port of Miami that have been able to withstand levels of environmental stress that would otherwise kill corals in more-natural reef environments. Differential gene expression of these corals and their symbiotic associates is revealing mechanisms of resilience that have wider implications for coral reefs in an era of global change.

Bio(s): For Bio please see https://www.coral.noaa.gov/people/ewelina-rubin.html
Subscribe tothe OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

16 September 2020

Title: OceanReports: Automating Ocean Planning Analysis
Presenter(s): Dave Stein, Geographer, NOAA's Office for Coastal Management, Charleston, SC
Date & Time: 16 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
You can view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p4nf6y4fu2ye/

Title: OceanReports: Automating Ocean Planning Analysis
Webinar No.4 in NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Dave Stein, Geographer, NOAA's Office for Coastal Management, Charleston, SC

When: Wednesday, September 16, 2020, 12-1pm EDT

Sponsor(s): NOAA's IOCM Webinar Series and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series Webinar Coordinators/contacts are Amber.Butler@noaa.gov and Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/oceanreports/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: Designed as a freely available web application, OceanReports allows users with no technical experience in GIS to select an area of US ocean space and instantaneously obtain more than 80 unique, information rich infographics derived from an automated spatial analysis of data associated with that location. These include information on energy and minerals, natural resources, transportation and infrastructure, the oceanographic and biophysical conditions, and the local ocean economy. For anywhere in US ocean waters - from the coastal shelf of Florida to the Bering Sea of Alaska to the far ocean reaches of the Pacific Islands - users can start with an area of ocean space in mind and in return receive a comprehensive automated report detailing key environmental and space use considerations essential for offshore planning. OceanReports increases the power and utility of scientific data for technical and nontechnical users such as coastal managers, environment-focused nongovermental organizations (eNGOs), environmental policy analysts, geographic information systems (GIS) managers, K-12 educators, international partners, industry consultants, and congressional and policy staff. OceanReports was developed by BOEM and NOAA OCM and NCCOS as part of MarineCadastre.gov's suite of products.

Bio(s): Dave Stein is a Geographer with NOAA's Office for Coastal Management in Charleston, SC. He co-leads MarineCadastre.gov and is the Contract Officer's Representative (COR) on the Coastal Geospatial Services Contract. His interests are in applying geospatial and remote sensing technologies to coastal and ocean managementissues.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. For more, visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website.

Title: AccuTrace: A Sub-Centimeter Vertical Level Positioning System
Presenter(s): Samer Khanafseh, PhD, TruNav LLC, Principal
Date & Time: 16 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov, and Tiffany House, tiffany.house@noaa.gov

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/962552470885648909


Presenter(s): Samer Khanafseh, PhD, TruNav LLC, Principal

Abstract: AccuTrace is a Differential Global Navigation Satellite System (DGNSS) capable of providing high precision positioning accuracy for quasi-static scientific, mapping, and survey applications. It fuses multi-frequency multi-constellation measurements using seamless filtering algorithms to provide sub-centimeter vertical leveling accuracy on quasi-static platforms, and sub-decimeter accuracy on dynamic platforms. AccuTrace utilizes CORS data in addition to advanced error modeling, fault detection algorithms and innovative filtering methods.

Key Takeaways:
1. AccuTrace is a high precision GNSS-based positioning system that provides sub-centimeter vertical leveling accuracy on quasi-static platforms, and sub-decimeter accuracy on dynamic platforms.
2. It was validated using 1700-station CORS network as user surrogates, and in a field test in NOAA's Co-Ops facility.
3. It can also be used for many other high-precision surveying, mapping and structural monitoring applications.

Bio(s): Khanafseh is currently the co-founder and principal of TruNav LLC and a research assistant professor at the Illinois Institute of Technology. His expertise is in high accuracy and high integrity navigation algorithms for close proximity applications, cycle ambiguity resolution, fault monitoring, and robust estimation techniques. He is an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems, and was the recipient of the 2011 Institute of Navigation Early Achievement Award.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: Evidence of Abundant Aerosols Near Cloud Clusters that Developed Into Tropical Cyclones
Presenter(s): Chris Collimore, NOAA CESSRST/City College of New York
Date & Time: 16 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar series

Note: This seminar will be presented online only.

Presenter(s): Dr. Chris Collimore, NOAA CESSRST/City College of New York

Sponsor(s): STAR Science Seminar Series

Abstract: The relationship between aerosol concentrations and tropical cyclone (TC) formation is investigated. Sixty-three convective cloud clusters in the tropical Atlantic that developed into TCs (developers) and 98 tropical Atlantic clusters that dissipated before becoming a TC (nondevelopers) were examined. Aerosol content (as measured by satellite-derived aerosol optical depth) near developers was averaged; likewise for nondevelopers. The average aerosol content surrounding developers was much higher than that surrounding nondevelopers. This indicates high aerosol concentrations do not significantly inhibit a cluster's ability to develop into a TC, which is contrary to widespread perception. Several analyses indicate the measured difference between developer and nondeveloper aerosol content is quite robust.

Bio(s):

Dr. Chris Collimore obtained his B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1985, majoring in Geography. He then obtained an M.S. in Atmospheric Science from Colorado State University in 1989. The topic of his thesis was the cause of the cessation of El Nino. He then worked as a researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for several years, using satellite data to test different theories related to atmospheric phenomena. Most notably, he investigated seasonal variations of deep convection in the tropics and how to predict them. He then returned to graduate school and earned his doctorate in Atmospheric Science from UCLA in June, 2018. The topic of his dissertation was the role aerosols play in hurricane formation. Dr. Collimore is currently a Postdoc at NOAA CESSRST/City College of New York.

Seminar Contact(s):

Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

15 September 2020

Title: A Web-Based Decision Support System for Adaptation of Coastal Urban and Natural Ecosystems (ACUNE) in Southwest Florida
Presenter(s): Peter Sheng, Research Professor, University of Florida
Date & Time: 15 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science SeminarYou can view the recording of this webinar thru adobe connect, here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pi2bds2codna/

Title: A Web-Based Decision Support System for Adaptation of Coastal Urban and Natural Ecosystems (ACUNE) in Southwest FloridaSeminar 9 of 13 in NOAA's RESTORE Science Program Seminar Series: Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico

Presenter(s): Peter Sheng, Research Professor, University of Florida

Sponsor(s): NOAA's NOAA RESTORE Science Program Seminar Series and National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Coordinators are Andrew.Lade@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/acune/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: Southwest Florida is facing increasing coastal inundation risk due to sea level rise, low land elevation, increasing population, and frequent tropical cyclones which are becoming stronger, slower, and wetter in the 21st century. To develop adaptation plans, local governments and natural system managers seek science-based decision support tools that are developed with best available and actionable science. Funded by the NOAA Restore Science Program since 2017, a multi-institution team has been developing the ACUNE web tool to inform local governments and natural system managers of the coastal inundation vulnerability in the 21st century. The tool includes high-resolution probabilistic coastal inundation maps for 2030, 2060, and 2100, incorporating the effects of sea level rise and future tropical cyclones predicted by CMIP5 climate models, and numerous infrastructure layers including buildings, highways, bridges, stormwater systems, cultural and archeological sites, etc. A three-dimensional vegetation-resolving surge-wave model with time-varying mangrove distribution and structure is used to account for the role of mangroves and marshes in buffering surge, wave, and structural loss. Moreover, a Rapid Forecasting and Mapping System is developed to enable local governments to develop emergency and resilience plans for what-if'' scenarios. Numerous end users have been engaged in various aspects of this project. The project will deliver and train personnel from Collier County and the cities of Naples and Marco Island on the use of the ACUNE decision-support tool to support coastal planning, zoning, land acquisition, and restoration in southwest Florida.

Bio(s): Peter Sheng is a Research Professor in the Engineering School of Sustainable Infrastructure and Environment (ESSIE) at the University of Florida. Prior to joining UF in 1986, Peter spent seven years at Aeronautical Research Associates of Princeton as a Senior Consultant, after receiving his Ph.D. in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Case Western Reserve University. Peter's research includes coastal hydrodynamics and ecosystem dynamics, storm surge and wave forecasting, effects of climate change on coastal inundation, and the use of green infrastructures for mitigating coastal inundation risk. In addition to the ACUNE project, Peter is leading a NOAA-funded study on the role of Natural and Nature-Based Features in buffering coastal flood damage in Florida, and another project on the role of tidal marsh in buffering flood and wave damage in New York.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

11 September 2020

Title: NEDTalk-Disaster Response and Flooding Resilience
Presenter(s): Dr. Jennifer Horney, Department of Epidemiology, University of Delaware
Date & Time: 11 September 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: NEDTalk- Disaster Response and Flooding Resilience

Presenter(s): Dr. Jennifer Horney, Department of Epidemiology, University of Delaware

Sponsor(s): NOAA's NESDIS NEDTalksPOC: lyric.prince@noaa.gov

Remote Access: To see a presentation, join the Q&A session via Adobe Connect, click here and follow the prompts to "enter as a guest."URL: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/noaa-interview/
More info on DataFest and NEDTalks: https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/nedtalks

Recordings: Webinar will be posted on NOAA Satellites' YouTube

Abstract: Dr. Horney will discuss her experiences as a member of a team of public health practitioners who responded to Hurricanes Isabel, Charley, Katrina, Wilma, Irene, and Harvey where she conducted rapid assessments of disaster impact on the public health of individuals and communities. She will discuss how NOAA's data has assisted her with providing technical assistance to public health agencies within the U.S. and globally around disasters, emerging infectious disease outbreaks, and pandemic influenza planning and response.

Bio(s): Jennifer Horney is Professor and Founding Director of the Program in Epidemiology and Core Faculty at the Disaster Research Center at the University of Delaware. Dr. Horney received her Ph.D. and MPH from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where her research focused on the role of social factors in decision making during disasters. She has served on a number of national committees and is currently a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Center for Preparedness and Response, a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's Planning Committee on Exploring Best Practices in Integration of Public Health and Human Services Service Delivery and Assessment Following Large Scale Disasters, and a member of the Publications Board of the American Public Health Association. She has led interdisciplinary research projects funded by the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Academies of Sciences, the Department of Homeland Security, and other federal, state, and local agencies.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

10 September 2020

Title: Into The Deep: Literally, Virtually, and Fictionally
Presenter(s): Dr. James Lindholm, Author and James W. Rote Distinguished Professor of Marine Science and Policy at CSU Monterey Bay
Date & Time: 10 September 2020
9:00 pm - 10:30 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. James Lindholm, Author and James W. Rote Distinguished Professor of Marine Science and Policy at CSU Monterey Bay

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1430134083675931403

Abstract: Come hear Dr. James Lindholm share tales of undersea exploration, including on-going projects in Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary and beyond. Immersive, virtual dives will take you along the journey, and you'll also discover how it all reappears in a new series of undersea adventure novels.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Spatial Processes And Stock Assessment Methods: What has our group learned after four years of simulations?
Presenter(s): Dr. Daniel Goethel, Alaska Fisheries Science Center; Dr. Aaron Berger, Northwest Fisheries Science Center; Dr. Amy Schueller, Southeast Fisheries Science Center; Dr. Brian Langseth, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 10 September 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

Description: OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s): NOAA Central Library and the National Stock Assessment Workshop Seminar

Series POC: kristan.blackhart@noaa.gov

Register for the webinar here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7969152934983712523


Presenter(s): Dr. Daniel Goethel, Alaska Fisheries Science Center; Dr. Aaron Berger, Northwest Fisheries Science Center; Dr. Amy Schueller, Southeast Fisheries Science Center; Dr. Brian Langseth, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Abstract: Spatial stock assessment models can enhance sustainable fisheries management. Over the last four years our group has developed and applied a spatially explicit simulation-estimation framework to explore the dynamics of fish resources under different population structure and movement assumptions. Results from our work have provided insight around spatial quota allocations, movement parameterizations, tagging study designs, and the consequences associated with misaligned management and population boundaries. Listen in as we discuss the implications of our work for developing and implementing spatial stock assessment models on management advice.About the

Presenter(s): This national, interdisciplinary group formed around discussions during the 2015 American Fisheries Society meeting in Portland, Oregon. Each participant had developed spatial-related applications to better understand fisheries dynamics in their regions, and was awarded funding to collectively address this topic.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 7: Fundamentals of AI, Part 2
Presenter(s): Jason Hickey - Google, Massimo Bonavita - ECMWF, Eviatar Bach - UMD, Richard Berk - U. Penn
Date & Time: 10 September 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 7: Fundamentals of AI, Part 2
Chairs: Amy McGovern (OU), David Hall (NVIDIA)

Presenter(s):
Trustworthy AI for High Impact Weather Prediction - Amy McGovern (OU)Machine Learning for Model Error Inference and Correction - Massimo Bonavita (ECMWF) Ensemble Oscillation Correction (EnOC): Leveraging oscillatory modes to improve forecasts of chaotic systems - Eviatar Bach (UMD)
Asymmetric Loss Functions for Machine Learning - Richard Berk (U. Penn)Panel Discussion - Panelists: Science Committee Members

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/605457482001059595

Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

9 September 2020

Title: Cyanobacteria Bloom Assessment in Lakes of the Contiguous United States using Satellite Observations
Presenter(s): Sachi Mishra, NCCOS
Date & Time: 9 September 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

NOCCG Seminar cross-listed with OneNOAA and STAR Seminars

Title: CyanobacteriaBloom Assessment in Lakes of the Contiguous United States using SatelliteObservations

Presenter(s): Sachi Mishra, NOAA NCCOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s):
Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please join from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://www.gotomeet.me/GEOAquaWatch/noccg-seminar

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 891-404-197

Abstract: Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CyanoHABs) are seriousenvironmental, water quality, and public health issues worldwide. CyanoHABsproduce toxins and odorous compounds that can adversely affect public drinkingwater supplies, as well as recreation, fisheries, and tourism. A method tosystematically derive quantitative information on spatiotemporal distributionsof CyanoHAB magnitude is needed, thereby allowing for effective evaluation ofrecreational and drinking water lakes. In this study, we present a method forestimating CyanoHAB magnitude in freshwater lakes using satellite observations.CyanoHAB magnitude was estimated as the spatiotemporal mean ofsatellite-derived areal CyanoHAB biomass, which is calculated from MediumResolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and Ocean Land Color Imager (OLCI)sensors. CyanoHAB magnitudes in all satellite-resolvable Contiguous UnitedStates (CONUS) lakes were calculated for the entire MERIS (2003"2011) and OLCI(2016"present) time series. These CONUS lakes were further ranked based onmedian magnitude over the years. With 300 m - 300 m resolution, 2,369 lakeswere evaluated, with the majority of these lakes in Minnesota, Maine, Michigan,Texas, and Florida. About 40% of all the lakes had CyanoHAB magnitude ofpotentially high risk (based on World Health Organization guidelines), comparedwith 1/3 of lakes in the National Lake Assessment having cyanotoxins. Theselakes were found in all regions of the country. Ranking of lakes providesactionable insight, which can be used by water quality managers to prioritizemanagement strategies. The same method could be transferred to other geographicregions and therefore be applied to lakes around the world for assessingCyanoHABs.

Bio(s): Sachi Mishra receivedhis Ph.D. in Earth and Atmospheric Science from Mississippi State University in2012 with a focus on ocean color remote sensing and CyanoHABs. Then, he wasappointed as Associate Remote Sensing Scientist in the Data Science Group at DowInc. He came to NCCOS in December 2016, and since then, he has been workingclosely with Dr. Rick Stumpf as a member of the CyAN project team. His researchinterests are focused on the use of remote sensing and geospatial technology tostudy HABs. Slides, Recordings Other Materials: When available after the seminar they can be found here: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov
with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Advancing Fish Assessments to Support EBFM – A National Perspective
Presenter(s): Patrick Lynch, the Assessment and Monitoring Division Chief for NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 9 September 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Patrick Lynch, the Assessment and Monitoring Division Chief for NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology

Sponsor(s): NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: EBFM/EBM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7176794265318594306 Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Stock assessments are a core activity that provide advice to fishery managers to achieve sustainable fisheries based on the best scientific information available. NOAA Fisheries conducts high quality stock assessments that have played a major role in efforts to end overfishing and rebuild overfished stocks. With rapidly changing ecosystems, stock assessments and related activities need to adapt and advance to more holistic approaches to meet 21st century fishery management needs and support Ecosystem Based Fishery Management (EBFM) priorities. With the coordinated development of national strategies related to stock assessments, EBFM, and climate science, NOAA Fisheries has committed to supporting climate-ready ecosystem-based sustainable fishery management. This seminar provides an overview of NOAA Fisheries stock assessments, including national coordination, strategic direction, as well as a summary of recent progress that has advanced and expanded fish stock assessments.

Bio(s): Patrick Lynch serves as the Assessment and Monitoring Division Chief for NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology. In this capacity, Patrick oversees the Division's Fisheries and Protected Species Science Branches, which collectively include fishery-independent resource surveys, advanced sampling technologies, the National Observer Program, a sea bird program, protected species science and stock assessments, cooperative research, the independent peer review process, and the National Stock Assessment Program, which Patrick oversaw in his previous position. Patrick's background and research have broadly considered sustainable fishing practices and holistic ecosystem approaches to aquatic resource management, with a focus on fish population dynamics and stock assessment and relationships between fish populations and the ecosystem, including biotic and abiotic interactions on historical to climate change time scales.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Sunburst Sensors: Oceanographic Instrumentation from Montana to Mauritius
Presenter(s): James C. Beck, Sunburst Sensors, LLC.
Date & Time: 9 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov, and Tiffany House, tiffany.house@noaa.gov

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/734021177919965707

Presenter(s): James C. Beck - Sunburst Sensors, LLC (Missoula, MT) - CEO/Chief Engineer

Abstract: Sunburst Sensors, located in Missoula, MT is a small company that has done big things in its 20-year history. Its instruments are used around the world to study ocean acidification and the marine carbonate system. Winners of the Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE (2015), Sunburst Sensors continues to develop new products to help scientists understand important ocean processes. Sunburst Sensors has taken advantage of grants from the NOAA SBIR program, the NOPP program, and other funding along the way to help innovate. Its sensors are being used under the ice in the arctic and in the shallows of the reefs of Mauritius.

Key Takeaways:
1. SBIR funding programs are an important means for small companies to innovate and develop products that wouldn't otherwise see the light of day.
2. Ocean acidification, driven by anthropogenic carbon dioxide needs to be understood and mitigated. Providing instrumentation for this is part of Sunburst Sensors' mission.

Bio(s): James C. Beck is the CEO of Sunburst Sensors, LLC of Missoula, MT, and its Chief Engineer. For the last fifteen years he has worked with co-owner, Mike DeGrandpre on the development of pH, pCO2 and alkalinity sensors for marine and freshwater applications, while building the company into a competitive player in the biogeochemical instrumentation market. He has his BSME from MIT and MSME from the University of Washington.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

8 September 2020

Title: Empowered to Lead: Inspiring the Next Generation of Leaders
Presenter(s): Albert 'Benjie' Spencer, Chief Engineer, Director, Engineering Standards, NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 8 September 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

The recording from this webinar can be viewed thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pgr92d58eslt/

NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series

Title: Empowered to Lead - Inspiring the Next Generation of Leaders

Presenter(s): Albert (Benjie) Spencer, Chief Engineer, Director, Engineering Standards, NOAA's National Weather Service

Sponsor(s): 2020 NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series: To provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council. See archived seminars here:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

Seminar POCs for questions: For questions about the seminars: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov, Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register for webinar at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/spencer/event/registration.html

After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address. Seminars are available to the Public via webinar, and NOAA staff can attend in person or via webinar. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: NOAA's mission is vital and empowering our future leaders is paramount, especially in these uncertain times. How do we embrace and prepare ourselves as a virtual leader? What are the questions that we need to ask as we evolve into a new normalcy in the midst of a pandemic? How do I ensure fairness and equality? How do I empower myself to be a leader and ensure NOAA's mission?

Bio(s): Mr. Albert (Benjie) Spencer serves as the Chief Engineer, and Director of Engineering Standards Division, for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Weather Service within the Office of Planning and Programming for Service Delivery. Mr. Spencer is responsible for implementing policy, providing end-to-end system engineering oversight, assessing risks, and ensuring consistent engineering processes and standards are applied throughout the organization. Mr. Spencer has over 40 years of civil service with NOAA, with over 25 years of systems engineering and major acquisition experience, having served in various engineering positions for some of NOAA's major acquisitions of the NEXRAD (Next Generation Weather RADAR), NOAA Aircraft Acquisition for a Gulfstream G4 business class aircraft modified for meteorological and atmospheric measurements, AWIPS (Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System) and NPOESS (National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System), which are critical to providing timely climate and weather information to the public. Mr. Spencer was highlighted in the Spring 2015 issue of the magazine, Minority Engineer, sharing his story in helping NWS to build a Weather-Ready Nation, and the challenges to get minorities interested in science and engineering careers at NOAA. Mr. Spencer is also the recipient of the 2017 Black Engineer of the Year Award (BEYA) for Career Achievement in the Federal Government. Mr. Spencer served on the Reimbursable Projects Program Standing Review Board (SRB) and currently serves on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) SRB. He also serves on the Executive Advisory Board (EAB) for the Systems Engineering Research Center (SERC) and the External Advisory Board of the NOAA Cooperative Science Center for Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology (NCAS-M).Mr. Spencer obtained his Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering degree from Howard University in Washington, D.C. and received his Graduate Certificate in Systems Engineering and Architecting from Stevens Institute of Technology. Mr. Spencer is the recipient of The U.S. Department of Commerce Gold and Silver Medals, the highest two honor awards that can be granted by the Secretary of Commerce, and two Bronze Medal awards, NOAA's highest honor award. Mr. Spencer is a member of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE), American Meteorological Society (AMS) and the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). Mr. Spencer is also a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Mr. Spencer has been married for 36 years to his wife Margo, and he is a native of Washington, D.C., raised in Portsmouth, Va.

Recordings: When available these will be posted here:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center, Jeff Dobur, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center, Pam Knox, University of Georgia, Victor Murphy, NWS Southern Region
Date & Time: 8 September 2020
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Climate Overview and Hurricane Outlook Update: Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview: Jeff Dobur and Todd Hamill, NWS Southeast River Forecast Center

Agriculture Impact Update: Pam Knox, University of Georgia

El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Update: Victor Murphy , NWS Southern Region

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact(s): Meredith Muth, NIDIS, (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/1287144793876293389

Abstract:
Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

3 September 2020

Title: Using Film to Drive Social Change
Presenter(s): Tirrea Billings, Creative Director and Co-Founder of Reflct Media, LLC
Date & Time: 3 September 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Tirrea Billings, Creative Director and Co-Founder of Reflct Media, LLC

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2160293366302456334

Abstract: In 2011, Tirrea Billings was one of five high school students who undertook the adventure of a lifetime during Project Shiphunt: hunt for a shipwreck, investigate its identity, and document it in 3-D for future generations. Accompanied by a team of scientists and historians from NOAA, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and other partners, the students conducted a full-fledged research mission, as they searched the deep waters of northwestern Lake Huron. Join Tirrea Billings to learn more about this experience and how it helped shape her love for film and storytelling, her journey as an entrepreneur, and how she uses her gifts as an activist in digital spaces.Tirrea Billings is a multidisciplinary storyteller, social justice entrepreneur, and aspiring scholar in communication, culture, and documentary media. She is driven by her passion to tell stories and committed to ensuring that marginalized communities have a space to share their lived experiences. Everyone has a story, and she wants to make certain that underrepresented voices also have a seat at the table and a chance to be heard.Tirrea holds a Bachelor of Arts in Film/Video/Media studies and a Master of Arts in Communication, both from Western Michigan University and is the Creative Director and Co-Founder or Reflct Media, LLC. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 6: AI/ML for Information Extraction from Data, Part 1
Presenter(s): Amy McGovern - OU; Greg Dusek - NOAA/NOS; Ann Allen - NOAA/NMFS/PIFSC
Date & Time: 3 September 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 6: AI/ML for Information Extraction from Data, Part 1
Chairs:
Philippe Tissot (Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi), Jebb Stewart (NOAA, ESRL)

Presenter(s):
  • AI Quality Control of NOAA Tide Gauge Observations - Gregory Dusek (NOAA/NOS)
  • Artificial Intelligence and Deep Machine learning for Passive Acoustic Monitoring at NOAA Fisheries - Ann Allen, Manuel Castellote, Shannon Rankin (NOAA/NMFS/PIFSC, NOAA/NMFS/AFSC, NOAA/NMFS/SWFSC)
  • Panel Discussion - Panelists: Science Committee Members


Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s):
Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/125409605802317323

Recordings: Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Expanding Alabama’s Real-time Coastal Observing System for coastal management applications
Presenter(s): Brian Dzwonkowski, Associate Professor, University of South Alabama
Date & Time: 3 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Expanding Alabama's Real-time Coastal Observing System for Coastal Management Applications
Seminar 8 of 13 in NOAA's RESTORE Science Program Seminar Series:
Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico
This seminar recording may be watched thru Adobe Connect here:https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pe8gwtub9x3z/


Presenter(s): Brian Dzwonkowski, Associate Professor, University of South Alabama

Sponsor(s): NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Points of contact are Andrew.Lade@noaa.gov and Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov .

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/dzwonkowski/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
One of the many challenges in the management of coastal regions is their ever-changing environmental conditions. Being at the interface of terrestrial and marine regions, coastal and estuarine systems can experience dramatic variability in their physical and biogeochemical properties which have significant ramifications for water quality and the associated ecosystem. In order to support various Alabama stakeholders in their use and management of the coastal zone, Dauphin Island Sea Lab (DISL) developed a network of monitoring stations (Alabama's Real-time Coastal Observing System, ARCOS) beginning in 2003 that provide continuous real-time hydrographic and meteorological observations across coastal Alabama. To improve the quality of data as well as broaden the user community, DISL has been in the process of upgrading and expanding the network capacity. In 2017, supported by NOAA RESTORE program, DISL has been modernizing the station infrastructure and data delivery platform as well as expanding the measurement parameters and spatial extent of the network. This work has also involved actively engaging with our existing users as well as developing additional uses of the network to attract new users and interest groups that could benefit from this decision support tool. In particular, we will highlight a new understanding of regional hypoxia as well as guidance on the intensification potential for approaching hurricanes that has been provided by this network. This effort demonstrates the benefits that long-term monitoring of coastal and estuarine environments can provide to decision-making in coastal regions.

Bio(s):
Brian Dzwonkowski is an Associate Professor in the Department of Marine Sciences at the University of South Alabama where he has been a faculty member since 2014. His research interests lie in coastal physical oceanography (i.e. things related to the structure and flow of water such as currents, tides, stratification) as well as how physical processes impact biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem function. He spends much of his time trying to understand the dynamics of Mobile Bay and the Mississippi Bight and how physical insights can inform our understanding and management of this region.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

2 September 2020

Title: The Future of Drought in Texas: What Do Researchers and Stakeholders Need to Know?
Presenter(s): John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas State Climatologist
Date & Time: 2 September 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas State Climatologist

Sponsor(s): Texas State Climate Office, NOAA, NIDIS

Seminar contact: Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov)

Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2194997252451413262

Abstract:
Longrange water planning is complicated by factors that are rapidly changing in the 21st century, including climate, population, and water use. Climate projections indicate the latter half of the 21st century may be even drier in some parts of the United States than even the most arid centuries of the last 1,000 years that included megadroughts.

In this webinar, Texas State Climatologist Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon will discuss these drought projections and related climate factors for Texas, and some barriers to the use of these projections by Texas agricultural producers, large surface water suppliers, small groundwater management districts, and regional water planning districts.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Living Shipwrecks 3D: Exploring North Carolina's World War II Heritage
Presenter(s): Dr. Chris Taylor and Dr. Avery Paxton, with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, and Mr. Tane Casserley, with NOAA's Monitor National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 2 September 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Living Shipwrecks 3D: Exploring North Carolina's World War II Heritage

Presenter(s): Dr. Chris Taylor and Dr. Avery Paxton with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), and Mr. Tane Casserley, with NOAA's Monitor National Marine Sanctuary.

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and NOAA's Monitor National Marine Sanctuary. Webinar host is Shannon.Ricles@noaa.gov. After the webinar, we will likely email the recording and PDF of slides to registrants when available.

Remote Access: Register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4963519152964002575

Abstract: In honor and commemoration of the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II, researchers will discuss how NOAA is honoring that heritage both above and below the waves.

For the past decade, NOAA's Monitor National Marine Sanctuary (MNMS) and the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) Beaufort Lab have been leading an effort off the coast of North Carolina to document shipwrecks from the Battle of the Atlantic that brought World War II to our shores. The research conducted by these two NOAA agencies honors the sacrifices of our Allied seamen and the heroism of the U.S. Merchant Marine, as well as recognizing the role these nationally significant shipwrecks play in the region's health as habitat for marine ecosystems.

This presentation will highlight the advanced technologies that MNMS and NCCOS utilize, including acoustic surveys aboard the NOAA ship Nancy Foster, to document the shipwrecks and create acoustic fish visualizations of the surrounding marine life. Along with collecting critical data to interpret this naval battlefield, the project also demonstrates the significance of these shipwrecks as both ecological and historical wonders. This project is an example of NOAA offices collaborating to use their best assets to document the incredible maritime history and marine life off North Carolina's shores. Click here to explore the Living Shipwrecks 3D website.

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: Comparing losses of tidal forests and tidal marsh on the Oregon coast: A paradigm shift for estuary restoration and conservation
Presenter(s): Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, OR
Date & Time: 2 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar SeriesThis seminar recording may be watched thru Adobe Connect, here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p2g42ql99gzy/Title coast: Comparing losses of tidal forests and tidal marsh on the Oregon coast: A paradigm shift for estuary restoration and conservation

Presenter(s): Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, OR

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at:https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/paradigmshift/event/registration.html After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract: This groundbreaking study showed that prior to European settlement, over half of Oregon coast's tidal wetlands were forested "tidal swamps," but 95% of these tidal forests have been lost to diking, logging, development, and conversion to agricultural land uses. Today's remnants of these tidal forests contain deep, structurally-complex tidal channels that shelter young salmon on their way to the sea, providing rich food resources and protection from predators and high river flows. These tidal swamps, typically dominated by salt-tolerant Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), also store more carbon per hectare than almost any other ecosystem on earth. The near-eradication of these tidal forests has greatly impacted their provision of these and other valued wetland functions. Our study used accurate elevation-based estuary mapping methods to document the historical extent, current extent, and losses of these tidal forests on the Oregon coast, compared to emergent tidal marsh and tidal scrub-shrub wetlands. We found that historically, forested and scrub-shrub tidal wetlands (collectively called "tidal swamp") formed a majority (57.8%) of the coast's tidal wetland area, with forested wetlands strongly predominating (54.4%). Emergent tidal wetlands ("tidal marsh") occupied a smaller area (42.2%). Together, diking and vegetation conversion resulted in the loss of 95% of historical tidal forested wetlands and 96% of historical scrub-shrub tidal wetlands, compared to 59% of historical tidal marsh. One factor offset some of the losses of historical tidal marsh: the substantial gain (1770 ha) of new tidal marsh in former mudflats due to sediment accretion and low relative sea level rise (SLR). We did not find evidence of widespread erosion or drowning of tidal wetlands on the Oregon coast, suggesting that Oregon's tidal wetlands may be more resilient to SLR than some other coastal regions of the United States. The study represents a major step forward in understanding the history of the Oregon coast, and highlights the importance of protecting remaining tidal forested wetlands and restoring these habitats where appropriate. The presentation and project report include information on approaches and methods for tidal swamp restoration, and emphasize the need for further field monitoring and research to support these efforts.

Bio(s): Laura Brophy is the Director of the Estuary Technical Group at the Institute for Applied Ecology in Corvallis,Oregon. For over 20 years, she has provided leadership in science-based decision support for estuary restoration and conservation in the Pacific Northwest andU.S. West Coast. Through her field research and her participation in collaborative groups that share the common goal of improving estuary restoration science and application, she has been central to the recent renaissance of estuary restoration planning in the West. In these collaborations, she has led the development of several heavily-used spatial mapping tools for estuary management and climate change adaptation planning.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

1 September 2020

Title: Building a shared context for science: Cross-group engagement at the science-policy interface
Presenter(s): Lindsey C. Williams, PhD, University of New Hampshire, Independent Consultant
Date & Time: 1 September 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science SeminarYou can listen to the recording for this webinar via Adobe Connect, here: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/p0v57iwmxiod/

Title: Building a shared context for science: Cross-group engagement at the science-policy interface

Presenter(s): Lindsey C. Williams, PhD, University of New Hampshire, Independent Consultant

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Coordinator is Tracy Gill.

Remote Access: Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/engagement/event/registration.html After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box. After the webinar, we will likely email the recording and PDF of slides to registrants when available.

Abstract: It is widely accepted that public policy decisions that account for scientific and technical advice are likely to improve outcomes for all. Even with more data and information available than ever before, it has become increasingly difficult to agree on baseline facts and develop mutually beneficial paths ahead. Drawing lessons from dispute resolution and negotiation theory along with the literature on public engagement and collaborative processes, this seminar uses research findings from two case studies (groundfish management and estuarine water quality management) to illustrate opportunities ahead. Based on participant observation and analysis of semi-structured interviews with researchers, managers, and the regulated community within each case, we consider the role of credibility, legitimacy,and salience in the use of science as well as the impact of engagement and collaboration opportunities. The findings from this research and other experiences shows that when done well, engagement activities can help to develop relationships, open lines of communication, expand individual and collective understanding of the issues at hand (not driven by just one group view), and create space for creative solutions. While decisions will ultimately still need to be made, processes that enable a more complete picture and an expansion of the ideas at the table are more likely to account for science and technical information and will ultimately be more resilient and adaptive in the face of change. These approaches can be hampered by several factors including poor process design, power imbalances, lack of resources, limited familiarity with negotiation, and lack of exposure to other perspectives or ways of thinking.Efforts to think differently about systems approaches, changes to research processes, new perspectives on stakeholder engagement, and multi partner collaborative efforts might help make the jump towards progress in social-ecological systems.

Bio(s): Lindsey Williams is a social scientist and policy specialist with over 17 years of experience in research, teaching, and practice on ocean and coastal management issues, including 10 years in federal government service in several budget, policy, and communications roles. Her current work focuses on the science-policy interface, negotiation and consensus building, and collaborative processes particularly as they relate to coastal and environmental matters. She holds a PhD in Natural Resources and Environmental Studies from the University of New Hampshire, a Master of Marine Policy from the University of Delaware, and Bachelor of Arts in Biology from Colby College. Lindsey works as an independent consultant,advisor, and lecturer and is currently teaching several courses at the University of New Hampshire, serving on the Scientific and Statistical Committee for the New England Fishery Management Council, and is in her second term as an At-Large member of City Council in Dover, NH.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

31 August 2020

Title: Applying NUCAPS During Recent Saharan Air Layer and Bush Fire Events
Presenter(s): Arunas P Kuciauskas, Research Meteorologist, Naval Research Laboratory, Marine Meteorology Division NRL-MMD, Monterey CA
Date & Time: 31 August 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s): Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Seminar Contact(s): Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s): Arunas P Kuciauskas, Research Meteorologist, Naval Research Laboratory -
Marine Meteorology Division (NRL-MMD), Monterey CA 93943

Abstract:
This presentation promotes NUCAPS as an invaluable resource to NWS forecasting in both Saharan Air Layer (SAL) and wild fire events. Two recent cases will be presented: a) the classic Saharan Air Layer (SAL) outbreak (once in 50 years) during the middle of June in the north tropical Atlantic, and b) Pyrocumulonimbus (PyroCb)eruptions that occurred during late December/early January within very intensive bush fires over Southeast Australia. In a) we look for SAL signatures within elevated dry and warm layers, while in b) we anticipate NUCAPS toprofile pre-convective conditions, similar to those encountered during high level and dry thunderstorm outbreaks. For each of these cases, we will look at the strengths and weaknesses of NUCAPS performance. Material for this talk,along with hopeful audience feedback will be assimilated to train NWS and outside forecasters in implementing NUCAPS toward these specific weather occurrences.

Remote Access
Phone: 877-401-9225
passcode: 53339716
JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m30886e9795bcd44b3e525dc443e79db9
passcode: Jpss2020!

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

27 August 2020

Title: New Estimates of Volume and Heat Transport at 34.5°S
Presenter(s): Marion Kersale, Postdoctoral Fellow UM/CIMAS & AOML/PhOD
Date & Time: 27 August 2020
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: New estimates of volume and heat transport at 34.5S

Presenter(s): Marion Kersale, Postdoctoral Fellow, UM/CIMAS, AOML/PhOD

Seminar Contact(s): Marion Kersale - marion.kersale@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

A recording of this meeting can also be found on: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQu7Lftb2LwZ2jfDaJm8_RJojWjcS1Ry1

Abstract: Variations in the mass and heat transported by the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) have important, well-documented, influences on global and regional climate, weather, and coastal sea levels. The structure and variability of the MOC volume transport, and the associated Meridional Heat Transport (MHT), will be discussed for the South Atlantic at 34.5S. Multiple years of full-depth daily observations from moored instruments are used together with satellite observations of winds and sea level to achieve a daily temporal resolution of the Atlantic MOC and MHT. A new method for using satellite sea level observations to estimate full-depth ocean profiles of temperature and salinity will be discussed. The best-to-date daily record for the strength of the volume transport of the upper (shallower than 3100m) overturning cell, and the first-ever daily record of the abyssal (>3100m) overturning cell volume transport strength, in the South Atlantic will also be presented.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Delayed Release of the Modernized National Spatial Reference System (NSRS)
Presenter(s): Dr. Dru Smith, NSRS Modernization Manager, NOAA's Office of National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 27 August 2020
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Delayed Release of the Modernized National Spatial Reference System (NSRS)

Presenter(s): Dr. Dru Smith, NSRS Modernization Manager, NOAA's Office of National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. Point of contact is Steve Vogel.

Abstract: NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) is announcing a delay in the release of the modernized National Spatial Reference System (NSRS). NGS is currently conducting a comprehensive analysis of ongoing projects, programs, and resources required to complete NSRS modernization and will continue to provide regular updates on our progress.

Bio(s): Dru Smith is currently NOAA's National Spatial Reference System modernization manager, and was previously the NOAA/NGS Chief Geodesist.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: New Mexico Weather Outlook Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Dave DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist
Date & Time: 27 August 2020
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers
Dave DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist

Sponsor(s): NOAA, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USDA Southwest Climate Hub, New Mexico Climate Center, Quivira Coalition, Santa Ana Natural Resources

Seminar Contact(s): Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
These monthly webinar presentations will provide information on current and upcoming weather and climate conditions in New Mexico, with a highlight on conditions on Tribal lands. Agricultural producers and land managers are encouraged to attend. The webinars will take place on the 4th Thursday of the next 4 months (June 25, July 23, August 27, September 24).

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: NOAA AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science - Session 5: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 1
Presenter(s): Alan Geer - ECMWF, Elizabeth Barnes - CSU, Matthew Dawkins - Kitware Inc., Likun Wang - RTi at NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 27 August 2020
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Title: AI Workshop - Leveraging AI in Environmental Science -
Session 5: AI/ML for Environmental Data, Image, and Signal Processing, Part 1
Chairs: Imme Ebert-Uphoff (CIRA), Ryan Lagerquist (NCAR)

Presenter(s):
Combining data assimilation and machine learning for weather forecasting - Alan Geer (ECMWF)Viewing Climate Signals through an AI Lens - Elizabeth Barnes (CSU)Video and Image Analytics for Marine Environments (VIAME), a Do-it-yourself AI Toolkit - Matthew Dawkins (Kitware Inc)Generating High Temporal and Spatial Microwave Hurricane Image Products Using Artificial intelligence and Machine Learning Technique - Likun Wang (RTi at NESDIS/STAR)Panel Discussion - Panelists: Science Committee Members

Sponsor(s):
AI Workshop Science Committee:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop.php

Seminar Contact(s): Stacy Bunin, Stacy.Bunin@noaa.gov

Recordings:
Recordings will be posted at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/meeting_2020AIWorkshop_agenda.php
usually the day after the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: Hurricane Season Outlook 2
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center and Gerry Bell, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 27 August 2020
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: via GoToWebinar (registration required),
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Hurricane Season Outlook 2

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and
Gerry Bell, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center.


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of August conditions and a discussion on the analytical indicators and an outlook for the North Atlantic Hurricane Season.

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

26 August 2020

Title: Deconstructing Surface Water in Permafrost Regions
Presenter(s): Erin Trochim, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 26 August 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Erin Trochim, University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), a NOAA RISA Team

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Satellite records from the mid 1980s onward provide the opportunity to examine surface water distribution and change in permafrost regions. This is important because the nature of permafrost can create conditions where change is likely to occur but hydrology conditions can be highly variable. We will discuss how to account for these conditions and produce summaries which can be easily understood and updated.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Trawl and eDNA Assessment of Marine Fish Diversity, Seasonality, and Relative Abundance in Coastal New Jersey, USA
Presenter(s): Mark Stoeckle, Senior Research Associate, and Jesse Ausubel, Director, Program for the Human Environment, The Rockefeller University
Date & Time: 26 August 2020
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
The recording for this webinar can be viewed from Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ppciqa4wrhzh/


Title: Trawl and eDNA Assessment of Marine Fish Diversity, Seasonality, and Relative Abundance in Coastal New Jersey, USA

Presenter(s):
Mark Stoeckle, Senior Research Associate, and Jesse Ausubel, Director, Program for the Human Environment, The Rockefeller University

Co-Authors: Jason Adolf, Zachary Charlop, Keith J. Dunton, Gregory Hinks, and Stacy M. Van Morter

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service and National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series. Coordinators for this webinar are Lindsey.Kraatz@noaa.gov & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: eDNA technology potentially improves monitoring of marine fish populations. Realizing this promise awaits better understanding of how eDNA relates to fish presence and abundance. Here we evaluate performance by comparing bottom trawl catches to eDNA from concurrent water samples in the New Jersey Ocean Trawl Survey. Most species detected by trawl in a given month were also detected by eDNA, and vice versa, including nearly all abundant species. Trawl and eDNA peak seasonal abundance agreed for about 70% offish species. In comparisons by month, eDNA species reads correlated with species trawl biomass, and more strongly with an index of surface area. Piggybacking eDNA onto an existing survey provided a relatively low-cost approach to better understand eDNA for marine fish stock assessment.

Bio(s):
Mark Stoeckle is Senior Research Associate in the Program for the Human Environment at The Rockefeller University. His research interests include environmental genomics, DNA barcoding, and molecular evolution. Dr. Stoeckle helped organize the early meetings that laid the foundation for the DNA barcoding initiative. His DNA barcoding projects with high school students attracted wide attention, including front-page articles in The New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal. Dr. Stoeckle published the first time-series environmental DNA (eDNA) study of fish in the lower Hudson River estuary in 2017, presented on eDNA at the United Nations in September 2018, and helped organize the first National Conference on Marine Environmental DNA, held at The Rockefeller University in November 2018. In 2020, he reported eDNA-led discovery of previously overlooked coastal marine fish in the mid-Atlantic. Dr. Stoeckle is a graduate of Harvard University and Harvard Medical School.
Jesse Huntley Ausubel is Director of the Program for the Human Environment at The Rockefeller University in New York. The program elaborates the technicalvision of a large, prosperous society that emits little harmful and spares large amounts of land and sea for nature. Mr. Ausubel both conducts and manages research. Programs he has helped conceive and lead include the Census of Marine Life, to assess and explain the diversity, distribution,and abundance of life in all oceans; the Barcode of Life Initiative, to provide short DNA sequences that identify animal, plant, and fungal species; Encyclopedia of Life to create a webpage for every species; Deep Carbon Observatory, to search for the origin and limits of life and the roots of petroleum and natural gas, and International Quiet Ocean Experiment to survey the ocean soundscape and assess effects of sound added by human activities on marine life. Author or editor of 150 publications, Mr. Ausubel is an adjunct scientist of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served on President Clinton's Panel on Ocean Exploration in 2000 and co-chaired the 2012 decadal review of the US government program in ocean exploration. In 2010 he received the Blue Frontier/Peter Benchley prize for ocean science and in 2012 was named America's National Ocean Champion.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: Benthic habitat mapping to meet the needs of the National Park Service: An example from Fire Island National Seashore Post-Hurricane Sandy
Presenter(s): Monique LaFrance Bartley, Marine Ecologist, National Park Service; Ocean and Coastal Resources Branch, Fort Collins, CO
Date & Time: 26 August 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar
The recording of this webinar can be viewed thru Adobe Connect, here;
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pmp5lhybr4hr/

Title: Benthic habitat mapping to meet the needs of the National Park Service: An example from Fire Island National Seashore Post-Hurricane Sandy
Webinar No.3 in NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Monique LaFrance Bartley, Marine Ecologist, National Park Service; Ocean and Coastal Resources Branch, Fort Collins, CO

Sponsor(s): NOAA's IOCM Webinar Series and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series Webinar Coordinators/contacts are Amber.Butler@noaa.gov and Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Abstract: Hurricane Sandy made landfall along the Atlantic coast in October 2012, creating a new tidal inlet at Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS) in New York. The event provided a unique research opportunity and numerous efforts were undertaken to understand the ecological and management implications of the new inlet. One such effort was benthic habitat mapping along the bay side of FIIS within Great South Bay. This presentation will discuss the acoustic and ground-truthing data acquisition and analysis used to develop benthic habitat maps that depict statistically significant relationships between macrofaunal communities and their associated environment; how the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) played a key role in developing and assessing the habitat map units; and the influence of the new inlet on benthic habitats. This study provides further understanding of biotic-abiotic relationships within FIIS and serves as a comprehensive baseline dataset, since previous data are limited. More broadly, the study demonstrates the value of benthic habitat mapping and CMECS for guiding science-based management strategies and provides an example of mapping in extremely shallow waters (<3m) in turbid environments where optical methods are not possible.The presentation will also introduce a new NPS effort to develop maps for all 88 coastal and Great Lakes parks (e.g. topobathymetry, geomorphic features, benthic habitats). The initial phase of the project involves compiling and assessing existing data within parks (e.g. LiDAR, multibeam, backscatter, sidescan, aerial imagery, ground-truthing) to identify data gaps. In addition, we would like to coordinate and collaborate with other federal agencies to acquire data where needed, as well as contribute to national mapping efforts.

Bio(s): Monique recently joined the National Park Service as a Marine Ecologist within the Ocean and Coastal Resources Branch. Her primarily role is managing benthic mapping and sediment and shoreline management projects that serve all 88 coastal and Great Lakes parks. In addition, she provides technical expertise at the request of parks, and is responsible for implementing and managing interagency collaborations. Prior to joining NPS, Monique spent twelve years at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography, where she was a Marine Research Specialist and earned her MS and PhD in Oceanography. Her research focused on shallow water benthic habitat mapping and its real-world value to resource management, application of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS), and GIS. Her work also involved interpreting and presenting scientific information to managers, regulators, and non-scientific audiences.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: A Voyage Across an Ancient Ocean: A Bicycle Journey Through the Northern Dominion of Oil
Presenter(s): David Goodrich, NOAA Retired
Date & Time: 26 August 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Presenter(s): David Goodrich, author, NOAA (Retired)

Abstract: As a climate scientist and former NOAA Corps officer, I embarked on a different kind of voyage in the summer of 2018, looking to go to places where climate change comes from, that is, where carbon is coming from the ground. I started in the oil sands of Alberta and rode 1100 miles solo through the boreal forest and prairie to the Bakken oil field of North Dakota. The ancient ocean of the title is the inland sea that laid down both oil deposits. The ride ended at Theodore Roosevelt National Park, where our original conservationist president spent his days as a cowboy. A volume with the above title was released this month from Pegasus Books.

Bio(s): David Goodrich worked at NOAA's Climate Program Office in Silver Spring, retiring as director of Climate Observations. He also served as the Director of the UN Global Climate Observing System in Geneva, Switzerland. In addition to the bicycle trip from Alberta to North Dakota, he has ridden from Delaware to Oregon, down the Appalachians and across Montana, South Dakota, France and Spain. His earlier book was A Hole in the Wind: A Climate Scientist's Bicycle Journey Across the United States. He lives in Maryland.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

25 August 2020

Title: Funding Opportunity: Planning for Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Julien Lartigue, Director, NOAA RESTORE Science Program
Date & Time: 25 August 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Funding Opportunity: Planning for Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico
Webinar 3 of 3 announcing RESTORE Science Program Funding Opportunity.

Presenter(s): Julien Lartigue, Director, NOAA RESTORE Science Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Points of contact: Andrew.Lade@noaa.gov and for webinar questions, Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Abstract: The NOAA RESTORE Science Program invites you to join a webinar on our current funding opportunity which will support teams of managers, researchers, and other stakeholders to plan a research project that informs a specific management decision impacting natural resources in the Gulf of Mexico. This funding opportunity lays the foundation for the co-production of actionable science in two ways. One way is by focusing on the creation of partnerships between natural resource managers and researchers. The second way is by providing those partnerships with funding to jointly scope and design a research project that informs a future natural resource management decision. NOAA is making approximately $2.5 million available through this competition to fund approximately 20 projects for 12 months each. As these planning projects conclude, the Science Program plans to release a second competition for funding to execute and apply actionable science in the Gulf of Mexico. Each webinar is expected to last approximately 30 minutes, and will begin with a 12-minute overview of the funding competition followed by questions from participants. A recording of the webinar will be placed here on the Science Program's website by September 1. After the competition is publicly released on August 11, an overview of the competition along with frequently asked questions can be found on the Science Program's website.

Bio(s): Julien Lartigue is the Director of NOAA RESTORE Science Program. Julien uses his experience working at academic institutions across the Gulf States and with federal and state agencies to connect the research and information needs of resource managers to the problem-solving capacity within the research community. As a long-time resident of the Gulf Coast, he is committed to the conservation and wise-management of the region's natural resources and the future of its coastal communities. Julien has a BA in Biology from Swarthmore College and holds a PhD in Marine Sciences from the University of South Alabama.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Title: It’s not all Sunshine in Summertime: Interior Alaska’s Changing Warm Season
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP & Cecilia Borries-Strigle, UAF
Date & Time: 25 August 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) & Cecilia Borries-Strigle, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract:
Spring and summer in Interior Alaska is now warmer, and in recent years wetter than in the past, and the impacts of these changes are affecting the lives and livelihoods of Alaskans. Persistent rains keep water levels high of rivers but potentially accelerate permafrost melt. Warmer springs and higher nighttime temperatures open up more garden and agricultural possibilities but also set the stage for increased wildfire activity. We'll examine what's happening and what the coming decades may bring for Interior summers. Precipitation variability and change has important impacts on fire weather and its management, and fire managers need skillful information regarding the upcoming fire season to inform decisions. We will also examine using multi-model seasonal forecasts as a potential tool for fire managers to develop fire weather outlooks in March when management information is needed.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Assessing coral health in an era of changing global climate: August 2020 update
Presenter(s): Anderson B. Mayfield, Ph.D. OCED - AOML and CIMAS - University of Miami
Date & Time: 25 August 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: Assessing coral health in an era of changing global climate: August 2020 update

Presenter(s): Anderson B. Mayfield, Ph.D., (NOAA/AOML/OCED) & CIMAS (University of Miami)

Seminar Contact(s): Chris Kelble, Ph.D. chris.kelble@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Atlantic Oceanic Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)
You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (786) 535-3211 Access Code: 856-490-485

Abstract: I will discuss progress in a number of coral reef-focused projects in which I have been involved over the past 1.5 years(since starting at the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in Miami, FL in spring of 2019). Specifically, I will present some new findings on the molecular biology of thermally-challenged reef corals, as well as outline how such data could be potentially useful in the development of models seeking to predict coral fate.

Bio(s): Anderson Mayfield is a marine biologist with ~20 years of experience in the study of coral reef ecosystems. Although trained in molecular and cellular physiology,his research has spanned all levels of biological organization, from molecules to ecosystems, and he is particularly interested in evaluating the health of reef-building corals and predicting which (if any) will be the winners with respect to their capacity for acclimatizing or adapting to their rapidly changing environments. Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Please email me at anderson.mayfield@noaa.gov, and I will provide you with all slides (either before or after the talk).

Recordings: This seminar will be recorded by Go-To-Meeting. Please contact Chris Kelble or Anderson Mayfield (emails above) for a link to the video file. Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

Title: Fish Predation on a Landscape Scale
Presenter(s): Cyril J. Michel, University of California, Santa Cruz/NOAA-NMFS
Date & Time: 25 August 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

A recording of this webinar may be viewed via adobe connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/phgu5xbn16d9/

Title: Fish Predation on a Landscape Scale

Presenter(s): Cyril J. Michel, University of California - Santa Cruz / NOAA-NMFS

Co-Authors:
Mark J. Henderson, USGS / Humboldt State University, Arcata
Christopher M. Loomis, Humboldt State University, Arcata
Joseph M. Smith, NOAA-NMFS-NWFSC, Seattle
Nicholas J. Demetras, NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz
Ilysa S. Iglesias, NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz
Brendan M. Lehman, NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz
David D. Huff, NOAA-NMFS NWFSC, Newport

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov. After the webinar, we will likely email the recording and PDF of slides to registrants when available.

Abstract: California's Central Valley salmon populations are in decline, and it is believed that one of the major contributors to these declines is low survival during residence in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The mechanism of their mortality is unclear, but it is believed that a significant contributor is predation by the large populations of predators present there. However, it is currently not clear what proportion of juvenile salmonid mortality can be directly attributed to fish predation, largely because empirical data on predation has only been collected at limited spatial scales. In 2017, we quantified predation mortality rates, predator abundance, and relevant environmental covariates in 21 randomly selected study sites in the Delta, using a randomized selection protocol. Predation mortality rates were quantified using Predation Event Recorders (standardized predation monitoring devices), and predator densities were quantified using Dual-Identification Sonar cameras. This site selection protocol allowed for the inference of relationships between the environment and predation across a broader spatial scale than previous studies. Using these statistical relationships, we then developed the capability to produce high-resolution spatially and temporally-explicit predation risk estimates. We then put these predation risk estimates in the context of their impacts on migrating juvenile salmon, allowing us to assess the potential success of different potential survival-enhancing management actions.

Bio(s): Cyril has spent his career to date passionately devoted to restoring salmon stocks in California's Central Valley. This work has led him through a natural progression, starting with his Master's Thesis work on investigating the outmigration survival dynamics of juvenile late-fall Chinook salmon, to present day, which consists of being the team leader for the salmon acoustic telemetry and salmon predation programs at University of California Santa Cruz, in affiliation with the National Marine Fisheries Service Southwest Fisheries Science Center. These two programs are both currently maturing and moving from the monitoring phase, in other words, assessing the spatial and temporal dynamics as well as environmental drivers of juvenile salmon survival and predation risk, to the experimental phase, with different studies testing ways to manipulate juvenile salmon survival and predation risk on a landscape scale. When Cyril isn't working tirelessly to restore salmon populations, he's secretly out (trying to) catch them on his boat and keep them for dinner.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

Title: RESCHEDULED Ocean Dashboard: Examples of Affordable Ocean Monitoring Using Small, Satellite Reporting Smart Sensors
Presenter(s): Marco Flagg, Desert Star Systems LLC, CEO
Date & Time: 25 August 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov, and Tiffany House, tiffany.house@noaa.gov

Presenter(s): Marco Flagg, Desert Star Systems LLC, CEO

Abstract: Ocean Dashboard is Desert Star's vision for comprehensive near real-time ocean monitoring using small (generally less than 500g), long-endurance autonomous satellite reporting sensors that can be deployed in large enough numbers to significantly improve sampling density. This presentation provides examples including an Atlantic traversing tag originally monitoring a tiger shark that subsequently discovered' methane seeps; new tags that can detect the time and location of fish spawning; and opportunities for autonomous acoustic monitoring including potentially tracking the ocean migration of endangered cetaceans beyond the reach of static monitors.

Key Takeaways:
1. Small, autonomous satellite reporting smart sensors offer extensive capabilities for physical and biological ocean observations.
2. Small size, ease of deployment and endurance supports high sampling densities that would otherwise be cost prohibitive.
3. The growing use of such sensors, can give us a near real-time window into fish and cetacean migration, human activities and physical processes alike, combining to form an ocean dashboard that improves our understanding.

Bio(s): Recognizing the vicious cycle of high cost leading to limited availability of ocean sensors, Marco Flagg defined a strategy of modular design that produces efficiencies of scale across an ever-growing portfolio. Marco combines out-of-the-box engineering thought with a passion for ocean exploration that has led him to journeys of the deep ocean gaining a new understanding of the particular environment and the needs of researchers, and translating that knowledge into new products and concepts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

24 August 2020

Title: Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Nicolas Bond, Office of the Washington State Climatologist, Jeremy Wolf, NWS Spokane, Joseph Vaughn, Western Washington University, Dave Peterson, University of Washington
Date & Time: 24 August 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Climate Recap & Current Conditions: Nicholas Bond, Office of the Washington State Climatologist

Seasonal Conditions/Climate Outlook: Jeremy Wolf, NWS Spokane

AIRPACT: Air-Quality Forecasting for the Pacific Northwest: Joseph Vaughn, Washington State University

Changing wildfire, changing forests: the effects of climate change on fire regimes and vegetation in the Pacific Northwest: Dave Peterson | University of Washington

Sponsor(s): National Integrated Drought Information System, Climate Impacts Research Consortium, USDA Northwest Climate Hub, National Weather Service

Seminar Contact(s): Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
According to the July 28, 2020 U.S. Drought Monitor, 35.9% of the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) is in drought, including areas of Extreme Drought (D3) in Oregon. Will the drought continue into fall? Find out the latest on conditions, climate outlook, effects of climate change on fire regimes and vegetation in the Pacific Northwest on the August 24 Webinar.

These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Nio and La Nia. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

Recordings: Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

21 August 2020

Title: August 2020 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP
Date & Time: 21 August 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s): Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Abstract:
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: NOAA’s 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop Closing Plenary
Presenter(s): Stephen Volz, NESDIS/AA; Robert Sears, OCIO/SDD/N-Wave; Dave Mauro, OCIO/SDD/N-Wave; David Fischman, NESDIS/NCEI
Date & Time: 21 August 2020
2:00 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3953347242513235214, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title: NOAA's 2020 Environmental Data Management Workshop Closing Plenary

Presenter(s): Dr. Stephen Volz, Roberts Sears, Dave Mauro and David Fishcman. This presentation will be delivered remotely.

Sponsor(s): NOAA 2020 Environmental Data Management (EDM) Workshop sponsored by the NOAA Environmental Data Management Committee.

Seminar Contact(s): edmw.planning.team@noaa.gov

Accessibility: Video recordings with captions and transcripts of the presentation will be available on the workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) after the presentation.

Abstract: The keynote speaker for the closing plenary of the 2020 NOAA Environmental Data Workshop will be Dr. Stephen Volz, NOAA's Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services. The closing plenary will continue with Rob Sears and Dave Mauro will talk about NOAA's enterprise network N-Wave. N-Wave is built on partnerships and relationships among NOAA and the Academic and State research network communities, connecting researchers to the data and resources needed to advance environmental science. David Fischman will close the session with a presentation titled NOAA's 3rd Wave. Fischman will talk about how NOAA can build a new way to connect all the data and metadata via APIs for machine to machine access which will lead to amazing findings. For more information please visit the workshop website here: https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/

Bio(s): Dr. Stephen Volz serves as the NOAA's Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services. He is a leader in the international Earth observation community, serving as the NOAA Principal to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). In this capacity he leads efforts to coordinate global satellite based observations among international space agency partners to further the development of a Global Earth Observation System of Systems.Robert Sears is the director of N-Wave, NOAA's Enterprise Network program. N-Wave operates within the NOAA Office of the Chief Information Officer to align and execute on NOAA's strategic plan for network transport and optimization. Dave Mauro is an N-Wave solutions architect focused on customer engagement and planning. Dave Fischman started his NOAA career as a survey technician, he then transitioned to NOAA Corps and served as the Operations Officer on the NOAA Ship Ka'imimoana. Dave now works for NESDIS/NCEI in Boulder, Colorado.
Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Slides will be available on the EDM Workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) the day after the presentation and will be available to noaa.gov email addresses.

Recordings: Recording of the presentation will be available on the EDM Workshop website (https://noaaedm2020.sched.com/) several weeks after the workshop and will be available to noaa.gov email addresses.Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Corals, shipwrecks, and dolphins, oh my! Diving into Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Hannah MacDonald, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Stephanie Gandulla, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, Lesslee Dort
Date & Time: 21 August 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: REMOTE
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Hannah MacDonald, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: hannah.macdonald@noaa.gov

Abstract: Join Blue Star Diving operators Key Dives and Fury Watersport Adventures while they swap sea stories of their favorite moments beneath the waves of Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.During this live interaction, you will learn about the wonders that are protected within Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, how you can become an underwater explorer, and what you can do to help protect this special place. Hear from Florida Keys dive experts on their experiences inside the sanctuaries stunning reefs. Join us for this live interaction to learn more!More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Live Interaction Series:
https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/live/watch.html
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7705142600218021390

Recordings:
Yes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwKFsJZmdxpHC9veUEL_gwk8b1BtS_lXP

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Funding Opportunity: Planning for Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Julien Lartigue, Director, NOAA RESTORE Science Program
Date & Time: 21 August 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Vai webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Funding Opportunity: Planning for Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico
Webinar 2 of 3 announcing RESTORE Science Program Funding Opportunity.
Last webinars is on August 25 at 4pm ET.


Presenter(s): Julien Lartigue, Director, NOAA RESTORE Science Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Points of contact: Andrew.Lade@noaa.gov and for webinar questions, Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Abstract: The NOAA RESTORE Science Program invites you to join a webinar on our current funding opportunity which will support teams of managers, researchers, and other stakeholders to plan a research project that informs a specific management decision impacting natural resources in the Gulf of Mexico. This funding opportunity lays the foundation for the co-production of actionable science in two ways. One way is by focusing on the creation of partnerships between natural resource managers and researchers. The second way is by providing those partnerships with funding to jointly scope and design a research project that informs a future natural resource management decision. NOAA is making approximately $2.5 million available through this competition to fund approximately 20 projects for 12 months each. As these planning projects conclude, the Science Program plans to release a second competition for funding to execute and apply actionable science in the Gulf of Mexico. Each webinar is expected to last approximately 30 minutes, and will begin with a 12-minute overview of the funding competition followed by questions from participants. A recording of the webinar will be placed here on the Science Program's website by September 1. After the competition is publicly released on August 11, an overview of the competition along with frequently asked questions can be found on the Science Program's website.

Bio(s): Julien Lartigue is the Director of NOAA RESTORE Science Program. Julien uses his experience working at academic institutions across the Gulf States and with federal and state agencies to connect the research and information needs of resource managers to the problem-solving capacity within the research community. As a long-time resident of the Gulf Coast, he is committed to the conservation and wise-management of the region's natural resources and the future of its coastal communities. Julien has a BA in Biology from Swarthmore College and holds a PhD in Marine Sciences from the University of South Alabama.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

20 August 2020

Title: Unleashing the Innovator in Every Child
Presenter(s): Christian Wong, Hawaii Science and Technology Museum
Date & Time: 20 August 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Christian Wong, Hawaii Science and Technology Museum

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Abstract: Join Hawaii Science and Technology Museum (HSTM) Executive Director Christian Wong for his talk about community robotics, and mentoring the next generation of science and engineering leaders. In partnership with NOAAs Mokuppapa Discovery Center in Hilo, Christian and HSTM developed the Kenyan K. Beals Community Robotics Center in support of student engineering and robotics projects and are currently preparing to launch a small satellite they helped develop to take measurements of the thermosphere. Christian will also talk about how HSTM is adjusting to providing STEM education during the pandemic, and the role innovation plays in edu