NOAA Center for Satellite Applications and Research banner
 
Intranet • Contact • Skip navigation
National Oceanographic & Atmospheric Administration website NOAA Center for Satellite Applications and Research website

graphic: collage of presentation slides and text: Science SeminarsOther Seminar Series

NOAA logoOneNOAA Science Seminar Series

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

February 21, 2019

Title: An Industry Perspective on West Coast Groundfish, or: How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love Stock Synthesis
Presenter(s): Brad Pettinger, Commercial Fisherman & PFMC Council Member, Pacific Fishery Management Council
Date & Time: February 21, 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Brad Pettinger, Commercial Fisherman & PFMC Council Member, Pacific Fishery Management Council

Sponsor: NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

WEBINAR  
Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 806 890 931 
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=mea734766f61e14996b056612f2b0a471
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207  


ABSTRACT
 
The relationship between the West Coast fishing industry and the fisheries scientific community has historically been a contentious one. This tumultuous relationship over the last 30+ years is explored through an industry perspective on the groundfish fishery's boom, bust and rebirth. Pettinger gives his take on what went wrong, what went right and why the fishery's promising future is more fragile than we might think.

BIO
 
Brad Pettinger has participated in the West Coast commercial fishing industry for more than 50 years as a crewman, skipper and a vessel owner. During that time he has trolled for salmon and albacore tuna, trapped Dungeness crab and trawled for pink shrimp and groundfish off of the three West Coast states.
 
He has also served on numerous fishing industry committees and commissions during his career and worked 15 years as the director of the Oregon Trawl Commission (OTC), departing that position in June 2018. In his time at the OTC, Pettinger worked collaboratively in the Pacific Fishery Management Council process to improve the management of West Coast groundfish fisheries. Under his leadership at the OTC, all three of Oregon trawl fisheries were certified by the Marine Stewardship Council as well-managed and sustainable fisheries.
 
Pettinger currently owns a vessel that participates in the West Coast trawl groundfish catch share program off the coast of northern California and southern Oregon.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

February 26, 2019

Title: From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle Assessment
Presenter(s): Gyami Shrestha, U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program; Nancy Cavallaoro, USDA NIFA National Program Leader; and Zhiliang Zhu, USGS, Chief, Biologic Carbon Sequestration Program
Date & Time: February 26, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle Assessment. 
Seminar No. 1 in the "2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2)" Seminar Series

This is the first seminar in a series we plan to run on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28; more information on future seminar series coming soon.

12:00pm-12:30pm ET Part 1: ‘Carbon Cycle Science across NOAA: Discussing the 'Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group"(CCIWG) and SOCCR2 science and societal relevance to NOAA's mission' 

Speakers: Gyami Shrestha, U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program; Nancy Cavallaoro, USDA NIFA National Program Leader; and Zhiliang Zhu, USGS, Chief, Biologic Carbon Sequestration Program. 

12:30-12:55pm ET: Part 2: ‘From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle Assessment' 

Speaker: Gyami Shrestha, PhD, U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office Director / UCAR CPAESS, Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group (CCIWG). Presenting at NOAA in SIlver Spring.

12:45-1:00pm ET:  Q&A

Sponsors: U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/, enter as "Guest", and
please enter your first and last name. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
What was the fate and impact of carbon in atmospheric, aquatic and terrestrial systems across North America over the last decade? How is it projected to grow and impact future climate change, given current scenarios and how can we harness current scientific and socio-economic advances in our knowledge of the carbon cycle at the intersection of human dimensions to better manage it in order to reduce future climate change risks? The just released Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (#SOCCR2, 2018) tells you all about it. SOCCR2 is a Sustained Assessment series special product of the U.S. Global Change Research Program, spanning 4 sections, 19 chapters and 7 appendices across 878 pages, developed by a 200+ member international team who produced over 6 formal drafts reviewed over 6 times, including by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the general public before final review and released by the 13 agencies of the USGCRP the same day as the 4th National Climate Assessment. To kick-off this special One NOAA SOCCR2 Seminar Series ‘From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle Assessment', this talk will provide an overview of the multiyear, multi-step, interagency assessment formulation and development process. A snapshot of the many scientifically significant and societally relevant key findings, as a preview of the upcoming SOCCR2 OneNOAA Seminar talks the following Tuesdays (12-1 pm ET, Feb 26-May 28) will also be provided. This talk will also focus on potential carbon management strategies along with trade-offs and co-benefits of certain actions, to showcase the carbon cycle science-derived climate change actions and solutions that decades of the interdisciplinary research has rendered possible. SOCCR2 can be downloaded at: https://carbon2018.globalchange.gov

About The Speaker:  
Dr. Gyami Shrestha, directs the US Carbon Cycle Science Program Office activities for the Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group (CCIWG), such as the Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2) which she just completed as Lead Development Advisor & Manager with a 200+ multinational team, as a lead editor, lead author & contributor on multiple chapters (See carbon2018.globalchange.gov). Interfacing with scientists & funders, Gyami supports, conceptualizes, leads & co-leads, community & interagency US Government programs & activities around carbon & climate change. Her domestic & international portfolio helps to catalyze coordinated scientific advances in the context of US Government priorities in collaboration with the CCIWG, UCAR, USGCRP, White House & community. Prior to joining the Program in 2011, she acquired a decade of research, management & consulting experience in NGOs/INGOs, academia & consulting. Previously, Gyami recruited & managed research proposal review panels for King Abdullah City for Science & Technology (KACST) via the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences (AAAS) & completed degrees in Environmental Systems (incl. Air Quality & Health Training Certificate) & Soil Science & Water Resources with Restoration Ecology Certificate. As Science & Technology Policy Fellow at the US National Academy of Sciences, Gyami contributed to research, writing & review panel recruitment to finalize the landmark America's Climate Choices Advancing the Science of Climate Change Report. Prior research includes terrestrial carbon with a focus on pyrolized/black carbon, carbon sequestration, land reclamation & restoration; stakeholder analysis & decision-support tool development for rainwater harvesting, improved cookstoves & gender mainstreaming via participatory tech transfer in rural Nepal and South Asian network building. She also served on Advisory Boards of the University of California & the Nepalese Children's Education Fund. Bio link at https://www.carboncyclescience.us/Gyami-Shrestha 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

February 27, 2019

Title:
New
Managing bacterial shellfish pathogens in commercial hatcheries
Presenter(s): Diane Kapareoko, NMFS
Date & Time: February 27, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: WEBINAR Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Please register for the webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8544710975790654721 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Join the NOAA Central Library and the Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) for the NOAA Innovators Series! This series will be facilitated by Derek Parks, Technology Transfer Program Manager. 

Speaker: Diane Kapareiko, USDOC/NOAA Fisheries/Milford Laboratory, Biological Laboratory Technician-Microbiology

Abstract
: In an effort to improve hatchery production of Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) seed for aquaculture and restoration, NOAA's Milford Laboratory has isolated and evaluated a naturally-occurring beneficial bacterial isolate, probiotic strain OY15 (Vibrio alginolyticus) from the digestive glands of adult Eastern oysters. This probiotic strain has demonstrated significant protective effects against a shellfish larval pathogen B183 (Vibrio corallyliticus) in experimental larval trials and can improve survival by 20-35%. Advancing these efforts to develop natural methods to prevent disease in commercial oyster aquaculture facilities has led NOAA's Milford Laboratory to partner with public and private companies through Material Transfer Agreements (MTA) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA) to commercialize probiotic bacterial strain OY15 for use as an economic and stable feed supplement to prevent bacteriosis and improve survival of all life-stages of the Eastern oyster.

About the Speaker: In 1980, Diane Kapareiko graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from the University of Bridgeport. After participating in a cooperative internship semester at the NOAA Fisheries Milford Laboratory to complete her degree requirements, Diane was hired as a Biological Laboratory Technician in Microbiology. She has recently completed 35 years in federal service at NOAA's Milford laboratory. Diane has been the principle investigator for researching and developing probiotics for oysters, beneficial bacterial strains which can prevent bacterial disease and improve hatchery production of Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) seed for aquaculture and restoration. In 2016, Diane Kapareiko, Dorothy Jeffress and Gary Wikfors of the Aquaculture Sustainability Branch at the Milford Laboratory, were awarded the Department of Commerce Group Silver Medal for Scientific and Engineering Achievement for this probiotic research as well as negotiating a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement for commercialization.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title:
New
On the data quality and quantity of VIIRS/SNPP ocean color data products: from research to applications
Presenter(s): Dr. Chuanmin Hu, University of South Florida College of Marine Science
Date & Time: February 27, 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room #3555, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

STAR Science Seminars
with SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group


Presenter:
Dr. Chuanmin Hu - University of South Florida College of Marine Science, St. Petersburg, FL, USA

Sponsor:

SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group
The NOCCG is a NOAA organization founded in 2011 by Dr. Paul DiGiacomo, Chief of the Satellite Oceanography and Climatology Division at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR.  The purpose of the NOCCG is to keep members up to date about developments in the field of satellite ocean color and connect ocean color science development with users and applications.  We have representatives from all the NOAA line offices, including National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, National Ocean Service, National Weather Service and from several levels of the National Environmental and Satellite Data and Information Service (where Paul is housed).  Dr. Cara Wilson of South East Fisheries Science Center is our current chair. We meet bi-weekly on Wednesday afternoons, 3 PM Eastern Time in room 3555 at the National Center for Weather and Climate Prediction building in College Park, MD with teleconferencing and Webex for out of town members and guests.  We host a guest speaker, usually about once a month.


Join Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/103820156

One tap mobile
+16699006833,,103820156# US (San Jose)
+19292056099,,103820156# US

Dial by your location
        +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
        +1 929 205 6099 US
Meeting ID: 103 820 156
Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/acIbT5eKEC

Abstract:

To be provided.

About the Speaker:

Chuanmin Hu received a BS degree in physics from the University of Science and Technology of China in 1989 and a PhD degree in physics (environmental optics) from the University of Miami (Florida, USA) in 1997. He is currently a professor of optical oceanography at the University of South Florida (USA), who also directs the Optical Oceanography Lab[HC1] . He uses laboratory, field, and remote sensing techniques to study marine algal blooms (harmful and non-harmful, macroalgae and microalgae), oil spills, coastal and inland water quality, and global changes. His expertise is in the development of remote sensing algorithms and data products as well as application of these data products to address earth science questions. He has authored and co-authored >250 refereed articles, many of which have been highlighted on journal covers and by AGU and NASA. His research has led to the establishment of a Virtual Antenna System to generate and distribute customized data products in near real-time, from which unique coastal observing systems have been developed to address specific monitoring and research needs. These include a Virtual Buoy System (VBS[HC2] ) to monitor coastal and estuarine water quality, an Integrated Redtide Information System (IRIS[HC3] ) to provide near real-time information on harmful algal blooms, and a Sargassum Watch System (SaWS[HC4] ) to combine remote sensing and numerical modeling to track macroalgae. Between 2009 and 2014 he served as a topical editor on ocean optics and ocean color remote sensing at Applied Optics, and between 2015 and 2017 he served as a chief editor at Remote Sensing of Environment.  

POC:
Nolvia Herrera, 301-683-3308, Nolvia.Herrera@noaa.gov
NOCCG Coordinator: Veronica P. Lance, PhD, NOAA, 301-683-3319, Veronica.Lance@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title:
New
NESDIS Snowfall Rate Product and Assessment
Presenter(s): Huan Meng, NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research and Wes Adkins, NWS/Juneau, Alaska Weather Forecast Office
Date & Time: February 27, 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: WEBINAR Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Huan Meng, NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research and Wes Adkins, NWS/Juneau, Alaska Weather Forecast Office

Host: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy

Remote access: https://accap.uaf.edu/VAWS_Feb2019
 
Abstract: An over land snowfall rate (SFR) product has been produced operationally at NOAA/NESDIS since 2012. The product utilizes measurements from passive microwave sensors aboard eight polar-orbiting satellites managed by NOAA, NASA, EUMETSAT, and DMSP. The SFR algorithm consists of a statistical snowfall detection component and a 1DVAR-based physical snowfall rate estimation component. The product has been validated against gauge observations and radar snowfall rate estimates. NASA SPoRT has also made it available in AWIPS and provides the product to some NWS WFOs at near real-time. This seminar will include a description of the SFR product, algorithm validation, and its assessment at the Juneau and Anchorage WFOs.  

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

February 28, 2019

Title: Assessment of Conservation Needs for the Regional Sea Turtle Hotspot Isla Arena-Celestun
Presenter(s): Eduardo Cuevas, Universidad Autónoma del Carmen
Date & Time: February 28, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor: Patrick Opay, Protected Resources Division, Southeast Regional Office, NOAA Fisheries (patrick.opay@noaa.gov)

Join the NOAA Central Library for a webinar only presentation on the "Assessment of Conservation Needs for the Regional Sea Turtle Hotspot Isla Arena-Celestun: Critical Aggregation Habitat for Sea Turtles in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean" on Thursday, February 28, 2019 at 12-1PM EST. 

Speaker: Eduardo Cuevas, Researcher at the Universidad Autónoma del Carmen, Campeche, México.

Register for the Webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8505684910207754498  After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Kemp's ridley, loggerhead, green, and hawksbill sea turtles are all found in the waters off of the northwestern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. These species are migratory and use the waters of many countries, including the United States of America. This presentation will show the areas used by these species, outline the threats to their conservation, and emphasize the actions needed to address sea turtle recovery in the Yucatan. Efforts to address conservation issues of the Yucatan are important to NMFS sea turtle conservation programs and successful recovery of the species.

About The Speaker: Eduardo Cuevas has worked studying ecological and reproductive aspects of sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean for almost 20 years. He leads the Laboratory of Spatial and Movement Ecology at his University, and they are just closing a project on satellite telemetry for 4 sea turtle species in the Gulf of Mexico, assessing their ecological vulnerability and elaborating a Response Plan in case of oil spills. He is Country Co-Coordinator for WIDECAST in Mexico, member of the MTSG and Co-Vicechair in the Atlantic and Caribbean for the MTSG/SSC/IUCN.

(MTSG = Marine Turtle Specialist Group; WIDECAST is the Wider Sea Turtle Conservation Network; SSC = Species Survival Commission; IUCN = International Union for the Conservation of Nature)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title:
New
Observations of Atmospheric Dynamics in 3D with LEO-GEO and GEO-GEO Stereo Imaging
Presenter(s): James L. Carr - Carr Astronautic Corp
Date & Time: February 28, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Host: STAR Science Seminars

Presenter:
James L. Carr, Carr Astronautic Corp., jcarr@carrastro.com

Sponsor:
STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:    903 968 181
Password: STARSeminar

Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=mc7b8262cf3d07c33edd7b7c2a663910d

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416

Abstract:
Multi-temporal imagery from a single geostationary (GEO) satellite such as NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) are routinely used to derive Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMVs) that represent winds in the atmosphere.  The AMV method generally assumes that the cloud or moisture feature being tracked is undergoing horizontal motion that is observed by the displacement of the feature in a sequence of images.  Observations from a single vantage point provide no geometric information about the height of an AMV in the atmosphere; therefore, AMV heights are generally assigned using IR temperatures and an a priori model atmosphere.  Such height assignments can have large uncertainties and are error prone in the presence of multiple cloud layers.  Multi-angle, multi-satellite stereo imaging is a powerful tool for observing atmospheric dynamics in three dimensions.  When a tracked feature is viewed from multiple vantage points, additional information in the form of geometric parallax enables accurate determination of feature height and even the possibility of measuring vertical motion.  This talk describes our work in this area using LEO-GEO combinations under NASA sponsorship and GEO-GEO combinations under NOAA sponsorship, and includes results combining imagery from the GOES-R satellites paired with each other and paired with imagery from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft.  The advanced Image Navigation and Registration (INR) of GOES-R is the key to very accurate coupled retrievals of wind velocities and wind heights.  We show that adding GOES-R improves AMV measurements from a single LEO (e.g., MISR), for which separating in-track cloud motion and height-induced parallax is difficult.  Our methods are generally applicable to all LEO-GEO, LEO-LEO, and GEO-GEO combinations, including combinations with GOES, Meteosat, Himawari, MODIS, VIIRS, and others, and requires no synchronization between observing systems.  Wind retrievals using these methods should play an important role in addressing the 2017 Earth Science Decadal Survey objectives to observe 3D atmospheric dynamics as well as for improving NOAA operational capabilities with existing and future assets.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Carr is the founder and CEO of Carr Astronautics, a science and technology firm working in the NASA, NOAA, and international space arenas, with an emphasis on atmospheric remote sensing.  Dr. Carr functions as both a scientist and a senior executive and strives to spend at least 50% of his time as a scientific leader on the programs within his company's business portfolio.  Dr. Carr enjoys building mathematical models of complex systems and finding innovative and entrepreneurial solutions to complex problems.  Dr. Carr earned a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Maryland in 1989.  Dr. Carr founded his company in 1991 to help design the European Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) weather satellite, during which he resided in France for five years with his family.  After returning to the U.S., he became a leader in the development of the GOES-NOP and GOES-R weather satellite systems.  Dr. Carr is a Co-Investigator on the NASA TEMPO mission, which is a hosted payload for remote sensing of the atmosphere from geostationary orbit.  TEMPO will retrieve trace gas concentrations for O3, NO2, H2CO, SO2, and C2H2O2 species, hourly across Greater North America, at fine spatial resolution, to enable the study of the sources, sinks, and propagation of atmospheric pollutants.  Dr. Carr is the lead investigator on two 3D Winds projects, one funded by NASA and the other by NOAA, exploiting observations from multiple satellites to resolve cloud-motion winds in 3D.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Move, Adapt, or Die: California Sea Lion Responses to a Changing California Current
Presenter(s): Sharon Melin, PhD., Wildlife Research Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/AFSC/, Marine Mammal Laboratory, CA Current Ecosystem Program
Date & Time: February 28, 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Sharon Melin, PhD., Wildlife Research Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/AFSC/, Marine Mammal Laboratory, CA Current Ecosystem Program

Sponsor: NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov. 

WEBINAR  
Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 806 890 931 
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=mea734766f61e14996b056612f2b0a471
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207  


ABSTRACT: TBD


BIO: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: GEOID18 Improvements and a Look Ahead
Presenter(s): Galen Scott, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: February 28, 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar: To register, go to https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1033532529423311361
Description:

GEOID18 Improvements and a Look Ahead


February 28, 2019, 2 pm, Eastern Time

Galen Scott, National Geodetic Survey

This webinar provides an overview of the 2018 GPSonBM campaign and how these new observations improved GEOID18. We will also look ahead to the 2019 GPSonBM campaign, review the new priority list, and discuss the many different ways that sharing GPSonBM data will improve NGS models and tools.

Location Webinar access

Description:
OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Galen Scott, National Geodetic Survey 

Galen Scott is a program analyst in NGS' Geosciences Research Division. He is the project lead for GEOID18 and the project to collect GPS data to support the development of the transformation tools for NAPGD2022.
Webinar Access: To register for this presentation, go to https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1033532529423311361
This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract: This webinar provides an overview of the 2018 GPSonBM campaign and how these new observations improved GEOID18. We will also look ahead to the 2019 GPSonBM campaign, review the new priority list, and discuss the many different ways that sharing GPSonBM data will improve NGS models and tools.Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge is helpful.
To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit:
https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 

Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are usually held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

March 5, 2019

Title:
New
Computer Vision for Conservation
Presenter(s): Christin Khan, NMFS
Date & Time: March 5, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Register for the Webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1022800197484532482  After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Join the NOAA Central Library for a presentation on Computer Vision for Conservation on March 5th at 12PM ET.
 
Speaker: Christin Khan, NOAA Fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, READ division, Protected Species Branch 

Abstract: Motivated by recent developments in image recognition, we hosted a data science challenge on the crowdsourcing platform Kaggle to automate the identification of endangered North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis).The winning solution automatically identified individual whales with 87% accuracy with a series of convolutional neural networks to identify the region of interest on an image, rotate, crop, and create standardized photographs of uniform size and orientation and then identify the correct individual whale from these passport-like photographs. Recent advances in deep learning coupled with this fully automated workflow have yielded impressive results and have the potential to revolutionize traditional methods for the collection of data on the abundance and distribution of wild populations.
 
About The Speaker: Christin Khan is a Fishery Biologist in the Protected Species Branch at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole. She is an aerial survey observer of the North Atlantic Right Whale Sighting Survey which conducts aerial surveys to monitor right whale abundance and distribution from New Jersey to Canada. When not in the air, Christin also works on right whale social behavior, automated image recognition, right whale outreach signs, the Right Whale Sighting Advisory System, interactive Google map, and the Whale Alert app.

Check out her recently published paper:"Applying deep learning to right whale photo identification" https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/cobi.13226


Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Rising Carbon Dioxide’s effects on Land and Ocean
Presenter(s): Sarah Cooley, Director, Ocean Acidification Program at Ocean Conservancy & David Moore, Associate Professor, University of Arizona
Date & Time: March 5, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Rising Carbon Dioxide's effects on Land and Ocean 
Seminar 2 in the Series: From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle, the 2nd State of  the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2)

We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28

Speaker: Sarah Cooley, Director, Ocean Acidification Program at Ocean Conservancy & David Moore, Associate Professor, University of Arizona 

Sponsors: U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/, enter as "Guest", and
please enter your first and last name. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Rising carbon dioxide (CO2) has decreased seawater pH at long-term observing stations around the world, driving ocean acidification that has already affected some marine species and altered fundamental ecosystem processes. Further effects are likely. While atmospheric CO2 rises at approximately the same rate all over the globe, its non-climate effects on land vary depending on climate and dominant species. In terrestrial ecosystems, rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations are expected to increase plant photosynthesis, growth, and water-use efficiency, though these effects are reduced when nutrients, drought or other factors limit plant growth. Rising CO2 would likely change carbon storage and influence terrestrial hydrology and biogeochemical cycling, but concomitant effects on vegetation composition and nutrient feedbacks are challenging to predict, making decadal forecasts uncertain. Consequences of rising atmospheric CO2 are expected to include difficult-to-predict changes in the ecosystem services that terrestrial and ocean systems provide to humans. Continued persistence of uptake of carbon by the land and ocean is uncertain. Climate and environmental change create complex feedbacks to the carbon cycle and it is not clear how feedbacks modulate future effects of rising CO2 on carbon sinks. These are several mechanisms that could reduce future sink capacity.

About the Speaker: Sarah Cooley is the Director of the Ocean Acidification Program at Ocean Conservancy, in Washington DC. Prior to 2014, she was a researcher and postdoctoral investigator at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), as well as the ocean acidification scientist in the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program Project Office.Sarah's guiding interests include ocean carbon cycling, science communication, and incorporating accurate ocean science knowledge into policy. In her position at Ocean Conservancy, Sarah works to educate and engage decision-makers and stakeholders from every political perspective at regional to international levels on ocean acidification, identifying ways that different groups can take concrete, stepwise action on the issue. In her work, Sarah combines science synthesis, strategic communications, political strategy and advocacy, and public advocacy.  https://oceanconservancy.org/people/sarah-cooley/ 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

March 7, 2019

Title: Capital and Income Breeding: How Breeding Type Influences Estimation of Reproductive Potential in Exploited Fish Stocks
Presenter(s): Richard MKcBride, Branch Chief & Supervisory, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/NEFSC/, Population Biology Branch
Date & Time: March 7, 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Richard MKcBride, Branch Chief & Supervisory, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA/NMFS/NEFSC/, Population Biology Branch

Sponsor: NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov. 

WEBINAR  
Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 806 890 931 
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=mea734766f61e14996b056612f2b0a471
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207  


ABSTRACT: TBD


BIO: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

March 12, 2019

Title: Recent Trends, Drivers & Projections of Carbon Cycle in Forests and Wetland Soils across North America
Presenter(s): Grant Domke, USDA Forest Service; Chris Williams, Clark University;Randy Kolka, Research Soil Scientist, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station; and Carl Trettin, Research Soil Scientist, USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station
Date & Time: March 12, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Title:  Recent Trends, Drivers, and Projections of Carbon Cycle in Forests and Wetland Soils across North America

Seminar 3 in the Series, From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle, the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2)
We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28

Today's seminar includes two presentations:
12:05-12:30: Recent Trends, Drivers, & Projections of Carbon Cycle Processes in Forests of North America  
Speakers: Grant Domke, USDA Forest Service and Chris Williams, Clark University

12:35-12:55 New Estimates of Terrestrial Wetland Soil Stocks and Fluxes
Speakers: Randy Kolka, Research Soil Scientist, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station & 
Carl Trettin, Research Soil Scientist, USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station

Sponsors: U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/, enter as "Guest", and
please enter your first and last name. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract for first presentation: Forest ecosystems are the largest terrestrial carbon sink on earth and their management has been recognized as a relatively cost-effective strategy for offsetting greenhouse gas emissions. In North America, forests, including urban forests, woodlands and the products obtained from them, play a major role in the carbon cycle. In this presentation we examine recent trends, drivers, and projections of U.S. and North American carbon cycle processes, stocks, and flows in the context of interactions with global scale budgets and climate change impacts in managed and unmanaged forest ecosystems. We will also highlight carbon management science and tools for informing decisions and opportunities for improving carbon measurements, observations, and projections in forests.

Abstract for second presentation: Because carbon (C) density of terrestrial wetlands is much greater than that of upland ecosystems, consideration of C stocks and fluxes along with associated changes resulting from management or land-use change are of particular importance at local, regional and global scales. Through new analyses of recent available data bases and literature, C stocks, net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and methane (CH4) fluxes were estimated for North American (US, Canada, Mexico and Puerto Rico) terrestrial wetlands. North America contains approximately 2.2 million km2 of terrestrial wetlands (approximately 37% of the global wetland area) with anecosystem C pool of approximately 161 Pg (approximately 36% of global wetland C stock). Canada has the greatest area of terrestrial wetlands (52%), followed by the US (47%), Mexico (1%) and Puerto Rico. Likewise, Canada has the largest C stocks, NEE, and CH4 fluxes (80%, 51%, and 57%, respectfully) followed by the US (19%, 43%, and 39%, respectfully) and Mexico (1%, 7%, and 4%, respectfully). Forested wetlands comprise 55% of the total terrestrial wetland area, with the vast majority occurring in Canada. Organic-soil wetlands comprise 58% of the total terrestrial wetland area and contain 80% of the C stock. Overall, North American terrestrial wetlands currently are a CO2 sink (i.e., negative NEE) of approximately 126 Tg of C per year. However, North American terrestrial wetlands are a natural source of CH4, with mineral-soil wetlands emitting 56% and non-forested wetlands emitting 55% of the estimated total of 45 Tg CH4 "C per year.  

About the Speakers presenting first: 


Grant Domke is a research scientist and group leader for Timber Products Output and Carbon Estimation and Report in the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program within the USDA Forest Service. Domke studies how carbon is cycled through forest ecosystems and harvested wood products in the U.S. using strategic-level forest inventory data and auxiliary information. He and his team are responsible for compiling estimates of greenhouse gas emissions and removals in forests each year as part of the U.S.' commitment to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Domke has served as a lead author on several national and international reports including the recently released Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report and the Fourth National Climate Assessment as well as the forthcoming 2019 Refinement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories. For additional information on Domke's work visit: https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/people/gmdomke 

Chris Williams: TBD

About the Speakers presenting second: 

Randy Kolka holds a B.S. degree in Soil Science from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, and MS and PhD degrees in Soil Science from the University of Minnesota. Following the completion of his PhD in 1996, he was a post-doctoral Research Soil Scientist with the USDA Forest Service's Southern Research Station on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. In 1998 he became an Assistant Professor of Forest Hydrology and Watershed Management in the Department of Forestry at the University of Kentucky. In 2002, he became Team Leader and Research Soil Scientist with the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station in Grand Rapids, MN. In this position, he currently leads a team of scientists, graduate students and post-docs conducting research on the cycling of water, carbon, nutrients, mercury and other pollutants at the plot to watershed scale in urban, agricultural, forested, wetland and aquatic ecosystems across the globe. He is an adjunct faculty member at 6 universities and has published over 200 scientific articles in his career.

 Carl Trettin: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title:
New
How to Update Reserve Visitor Centers and Create Workforce Ready Students at the Same Time
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: March 12, 2019
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Please register through GoToWebinar (see below).
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Maggie Pletta, Education Coordinator, Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve System

Sponsors:
NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html or http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar). 

Webinar Access: Please register through GoToWebinar:  
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7444307644349965313

Abstract:
 Technology has become an integral part of environmental education, however purchasing or producing technology can be very cost-prohibitive. As part of a NERRS Science Collaborative Science Transfer grant, the Delaware, Guana Tolomato Matanzas, and Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserves (the clients) partnered with the University of Delaware Introduction to Software Engineering course (the consultants). As part of their coursework, students produced educational computer games that promote interactive, free-choice learning opportunities. Learn more about the process that led to the final educational games that are being installed in the three centers, including the ups and downs of working with students. 

Learn more about this work at: http://graham.umich.edu/media/pubs/Rainer-Fact-Sheet.pdf

About the Speaker: Maggie Pletta is the current Education Coordinator at the Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve (DNERR) where she is tasked with managing and leading K-12 fieldtrips and outreach, public programs, family events, and teacher professional development workshops. Prior to her position at DNERR she held positions at the National Park Service, NASA, Educational Non-Profits, and DNREC's Wetland Monitoring and Assessment Program. Her professional areas of interest include teaching people about estuaries and climate change, as well as reconnecting children with nature, and making science fun for all ages.

Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to 
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. 
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: The Art of Knowledge Exchange – Lessons from World Bank Experience and Applications for Marine Conservation
Presenter(s): Phil Karp, Principal Knowledge Management Officer with the World Bank's Social/Urban/Rural Development and Resilience Global Practice
Date & Time: March 12, 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 Large Conference Room - Rm 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Phil Karp, Principal Knowledge Management Officer with the World Bank's Social/Urban/Rural Development and Resilience Global Practice, will join us remotely to present the following:

The Art of Knowledge Exchange " Lessons from World Bank Experience and Applications for Marine Conservation: Knowledge exchange, or peer-to-peer learning, is a powerful way to share, replicate and scale up practical solutions to challenges and to transform ideas into action. But the challenge remains as to how best to design and execute knowledge exchange to achieve intended results, and how to integrate it as part of larger change processes. Drawing on lessons from its extensive involvement in knowledge exchange, the World Bank has developed a systematic framework and guide to help practitioners to play a more effective role as knowledge providers, brokers, or recipients. At the core of the framework is a 5-step process which can be easily mastered and applied to: connect various actors to new information; catalyze innovative thinking; accelerate decision making; overcome bottlenecks to action; enhance skills to replicate and scale up solutions; and measure results. The webinar will present the framework, introducing the range of knowledge exchange instruments and activities that are available and how these can be blended and sequenced to achieve desired outcomes. This will be followed by a discussion of how this approach can be applied in the realm of marine ecosystem conservation, drawing on several examples. The presentation will also look at the impact and implications of new communications modalities, such as social media, and of new actors, most notably citizen scientists.
Meeting Details:

WebEx conferencing information:
Meeting Number: 746964141
Meeting Passcode: corals1234
1. To join the meeting:
http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=746964141&p=corals1234&t=c
2. Enter the required fields.
3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy.
4. Click on Proceed.

To access the sound you must dial in using the following number; it is not through the web.
Dial: (866) 581-0524
Passcode: 6578691#

Please visit the Coral Collaboration site for slides from past meetings and to submit updates and/or ideas for a future talk.

Contact me directly if you would like to be removed from the Coral Collaboration email list.

Robin Garcia
Communications Director, The Baldwin Group Contractor
NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program
240-533-0776
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

March 14, 2019

Title: Atmospheric methane: where did you come from, where did you go?
Presenter(s): Alexander J. Turner, Atmospheric Chemist, Miller Postdoctoral Fellow. UC Berkeley. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: March 14, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Atmospheric methane: where did you come from, where did you go?

Speaker: Alexander J. Turner, Atmospheric Chemist, Miller Postdoctoral Fellow. UC Berkeley. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/, enter as "Guest", and please enter your first and last name. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Atmospheric methane plays a major role in controlling climate and its atmospheric burden has more than doubled since 1850, yet contemporary methane trends (1982-2017) have defied explanation. Methane concentrations stabilized in the early 2000s and began increasing again in 2007. Neither the stabilization nor the recent growth are well understood, as evidenced by multiple competing hypotheses in the literature over the past 2 years. Explanations for the increases and stabilization have invoked changes in tropical wetlands, livestock, fossil fuels, biomass burning, and the methane sink. This talk will address three main questions: 1) "What do we know about sources, sinks, and underlying processes driving observed trends in atmospheric methane?", 2) "How will global methane respond to changes in anthropogenic emissions?", and 3) "What future observations could help resolve changes in the methane budget?"

This talk will draw on results from a recent open-access paper: Turner*, Frankenberg*, & Kort*, PNAS (2019). The paper is available on the PNAS website or at: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1814297116

About The Speaker:
 Alex Turner is a Miller Postdoctoral Fellow at UC Berkeley working with Ron Cohen and Inez Fung. He works on a variety of topics related to atmospheric chemistry, the carbon cycle, inverse modeling, and remote sensing. Broadly, his research focuses on understanding how carbon cycles through the various reservoirs in the earth system (e.g., the atmosphere, ocean, and biosphere). He completed his PhD in atmospheric chemistry in 2017 at Harvard where he worked with Daniel Jacob and his BS in mechanical engineering in 2012 at CU Boulder where he worked with Daven Henze. He was supported by a NOAA Hollings Scholarship and a DOE CSGF fellowship during his undergraduate and graduate work, respectively.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Communicating Fisheries Management Advice for Tactical and Strategic Decision-Making in Light of Uncertainty and Variability
Presenter(s): Allan Hicks, PhD., Quantitative Scientist, International Pacific Halibut Commission
Date & Time: March 14, 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Allan Hicks, PhD., Quantitative Scientist, International Pacific Halibut Commission

Sponsor: NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov. 

WEBINAR  
Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 806 890 931 
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=mea734766f61e14996b056612f2b0a471
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207  


ABSTRACT: TBD


BIO: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

March 19, 2019

Title: Carbon Cycling in North America’s Land–Ocean Aquatic Continuum
Presenter(s): Ray Najjar, Professor of Oceanography, Penn State University
Date & Time: March 19, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Carbon Cycling in North America's Land"Ocean Aquatic Continuum

Seminar 4 in the Series, From Science to Solutions: The State of the Carbon Cycle, the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2)

We plan to host seminars in this series on most Tuesdays, 12-1pm ET, Feb. 26 - May 28
Title: Recent trends, drivers, and projections of carbon cycle processes in forests of North America


Speaker: Ray Najjar, Professor of Oceanography, Penn State University 

Sponsors: U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office/UCAR and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators are Gyami Shrestha (gshrestha@usgcrp.gov), & Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will use Adobe Connect.To join the session, go to https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/, enter as "Guest", and
please enter your first and last name. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: TBD
 
About the Speakers: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

March 27, 2019

Title: Recovery of North Atlantic Right Whales Constrained by Human-caused Mortality
Presenter(s): Dr Peter Corkeron. Leader, Large Whale Team, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center. Woods Hole MA.. Presenting remotely from Woods Hole
Date & Time: March 27, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150, and NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Clark Conference Room, Aquarium building
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Recovery of North Atlantic Right Whales Constrained by Human-caused Mortality
Rescheduled from 2/7/19

Speaker: Dr Peter Corkeron. Leader, Large Whale Team, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center. Woods Hole MA. Presenting remotely from Woods Hole.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will use Adobe Connect. Login info TBD.

Abstract: North Atlantic right whales (NARW), Eubalaena glacialis, were nearly exterminated by historical whaling. Their abundance slowly increased up until 2010, to a maximum of fewer than 500 whales, and since then they have been in decline. We assessed the extent to which the relatively slow increase demonstrated by NARW was intrinsic, and how much could be due to anthropogenic impacts. In order to do so, we first compared calf counts of three populations of Southern right whales (SRW), E. australis, with that of NARW, over the period 1992"2016. By this index, the annual rate of increase of NARW was approximately one-third of that of SRW. Next we constructed a population projection model for female NARW, using the highest annual survival estimates available from recent mark"resight analysis, and assuming a four-year calving interval. The model results indicated an intrinsic rate of increase of 4% per year, approximately twice that observed, and that adult female mortality is the main factor influencing this rate. Necropsy records demonstrate that anthropogenic mortality is the primary cause of known mortality of NARW. Anthropogenic mortality and morbidity has limited the recovery of NARW, and baseline conditions prior to their recent decline were already jeopardizing NARW recovery.

About the Speaker: Dr Peter Corkeron has led the large whale research program at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center since 2011. The primary focus of this program is to assess the status as well as the anthropogenic and ecological drivers affecting North Atlantic right whales. Peter's work also includes assessing the effects of noise on large whales, developing new technology to enhance our understanding of whales' behavior and ecology, and applying these technologies to improve conservation outcomes for whales. He serves on the editorial boards of Marine Ecology Progress Series and Tourism in Marine Environments, and is a member of the World Conservation Union's (IUCN) Cetacean Specialist Group. Dr Corkeron's PhD on the ecology of inshore dolphins in the waters off Brisbane, Queensland, was the first PhD on the biology of living cetaceans awarded by an Australian university.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

March 28, 2019

Title: Using Field Observations and Biophysical Transport Models to Examine the Early Life Ecology of Arctic Gadids in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas
Presenter(s): Cathleem Vestfals, PhD., Post-Doctoral Fellow, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: March 28, 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Cathleem Vestfals, PhD., Post-Doctoral Fellow, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor: NWFSC Jam Seminars; For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series, please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov. 

WEBINAR  
Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 806 890 931 
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=mea734766f61e14996b056612f2b0a471
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207  


ABSTRACT: TBD


BIO: TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

April 4, 2019

Title:
New
Radio Occultation Data Assimilation Using a Limited-ray-path 2D Raytracing Operator and an Impact Multipath Quality Control in the Tropical Lower Troposphere
Presenter(s): Xiaolei Zou - Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland
Date & Time: April 4, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Host: STAR Science Seminars

Presenter:
Xiaolei Zou, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland

Sponsor:
STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:    901 608 434
Password: STARSeminar

Event address for attendees:
    https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=mf8cfbc9d27001bbf30fd54ca92a5423a

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416


Abstract:
The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC-2) has more powerful GPS receiver antennas, a twice higher sampling rate of 100 Hz, and a three times smaller inclination of 24o than those of COSMIC-1. COSMIC-2 will, therefore, provide an unprecedented ample number of radio occultation (RO) data in the tropics. Assimilation of RO data in the tropics is challenging due to unique features such as large horizontal gradients of refractivity, spherical asymmetry, and impact multipath in the moist tropical lower troposphere. In this talk, I'll first show occurrences of multipath in the tropical lower troposphere using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/Global Forecast System analysis as input to a 2D raytracing operator for COSMIC ROs in March and April 2017. An up to 600-m lift in the impact parameter is observed for simulated RO rays in the presence of a strong horizontal gradient of refractivity over 250-km distances from the perigee, rendering the simulation bending angles multivalued functions of impact parameter. An impact multipath quality control (QC) procedure is developed to effectively identify the multipath simulations. Second, the accuracy and precision of a two-dimensional (2D) limited-ray-path raytracing operator is tested against the 2D raytracing operator that simulates global ray paths. Finally, bending angle data assimilation in the tropical lower troposphere is done using the 2D limited-ray-path raytracing operator and a one-dimensional (1D) Abel transform operator. The impact multipath QC is incorporated to eliminate occurrences of impact multipath in bending angle simulations. The fractional differences in bending angle simulations between the limited-path-length raytracing operators and the original 2D raytracing operator have zero bias, and their standard deviations are more than three times smaller than those between the 1D Abel transform operator and the 2D raytracing operator. The highest accuracy and precision are achieved for the 2D limited-ray-path raytracing operator if the ray path is confined within  400 km. Use of the physically based impact multipath QC is shown to improve COSMIC data assimilation and forecast results using either the 1D Abel transform or the 2D limited-ray-path observation operators of bending angle in the tropical lower troposphere.
About the Speaker:
Dr. Xiaolei Zou received a PhD in Meteorology is a research professor at ESSIC at University of Maryland. 

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

May 21, 2019

Title: Estimating Coral Feeding Habits from Space
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Fox, Postdoctoral Scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Date & Time: May 21, 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Michael Fox, Postdoctoral Scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6762138742323434253

Abstract: Reef-building corals rely on a symbiosis with microscopic algae for much of their energetic needs. Rising ocean temperatures threaten this symbiosis and can cause it to break down in a process known as coral bleaching, which is one of the primary threats to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems globally. Corals are not helpless, however, as they are also excellent predators and if they can capture food to maintain their energy budgets while bleached they may have a greater chance for survival. Learn more how natural variation in food availability on reefs around the world and how this may influence coral resilience and recovery from bleaching events.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

 

Hosted at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR for the OneNOAA Seminar Series
Developer - Lori K. Brown

 

Data, algorithms, and images presented on STAR websites are intended for experimental use only and are not supported on an operational basis.  More information

Level A conformance icon, W3C-WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 and Valid HTML 4.01 IconDept. of Commerce  •  NOAA  •  NESDIS  •  Website Owner: STAR  •  Contact webmaster  •  Last revised: November 8, 2018
Heartbleed Notice  •  Privacy Policy  •  Disclaimers  •  Information Quality  •  Accessibility  •  Search  •  Customer Survey
icon: valid HTML 4.01 transitional. Level A conformance icon, W3C-WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0