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All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

November 26, 2018

Title: Preparing your Winter Toolbox: Drought & Climate Outlook for California-Nevada
Presenter(s): Julie Kalansky, CNAP-NOAA RISA, Scripps Institution of Oceanography-SIO; Michelle L'Heureux, NWS Climate Prediction Center; Brian Kawzenuk, Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes, SIO; NWS California Nevada River Forecast Center
Date & Time: November 26, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Julie Kalansky, CNAP (a NOAA RISA), Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO); Michelle L'Heureux, NWS Climate Prediction Center; Brian Kawzenuk, Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes, SIO; NWS California Nevada River Forecast Center

Seminar sponsor: National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA Climate Program Office

Seminar POC for questions: amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov 

Remote access: Register for the webinar at: https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/california-nevada-drought-climate-outlook-webinar-nov-26-2018 

Abstract

Will drought come back to California and Nevada this winter? December is typically the beginning of wetter winter conditions in California and Nevada, but dry winters are not uncommon for the region. This creates a fair amount of uncertainty, which makes tracking precipitation and potential drought impacts through the winter crucial for future planning. This webinar will provide an overview of current conditions and outlooks for winter, and special guest speakers will share a toolbox of partner tools that can help track dry or wet progress through winter. Co-hosted by NIDIS and CNAP (a NOAA RISA team), this webinar will feature speakers from the CNAP, the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes (CW3E), and the National Weather Service. 

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) November 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlooks webinars designed to provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. This webinar will take place on Monday, November 26th, 2018 at 11:00 am PT/2:00 pm ET

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Drought & Climate Update
Julie Kalansky | CNAP (a NOAA RISA), Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO)

Drought & Climate Outlook
Michelle L'Heureux | NWS Climate Prediction Center

Preparing Your Winter Toolbox
Julie Kalansky | CNAP, SIO
Brian Kawzenuk | Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes (CW3E), SIO
TBD | NWS California Nevada River Forecast Center 

About the Speakers:

Julie Kalansky is a climate scientist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography/UC San Diego and program manager with CNAP (California Nevada Climate Application Program - a NOAA RISA) at Scripps. 

Michelle L'Heureux
 is a meteorologist with NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. Her primary responsibility is to coordinate a team that updates the official status and forecast for the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

Brian Kawzenuk is a Hydrometeorological Research Analyst at the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Brian specializes in extreme precipitation, hydrometeorology,  atmospheric dynamics, and improving atmospheric predictability. 

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
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November 27, 2018

Title: Launching PArticle Size, Image, and Velocity probe (PASIV): Innovation for Severe Storm In-Situ Sensing
Presenter(s): Sean Waugh, OAR
Date & Time: November 27, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAAScienceSeminar

Join the NOAA Central Library and the Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) for the new NOAA Innovators Series! This series and inaugural presentation will be facilitated by Derek Parks, Technology Transfer Program Manager. 


Please register for the webinar  https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5012577148641287427 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Speaker: Dr. Sean Waugh, Research Meteorologist, National Severe Storms Laboratory, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Abstract: The NSSL Field Observing Facilities and Support group (FOFS) has built a special balloon-borne instrument called a PArticle Size, Image, and Velocity probe or PASIV, which is designed to capture high-definition images of water and ice particles as it is launched into, and rises up through a thunderstorm.

Dr. Sean Waugh will tell us about the innovative design, the creative and design processes the FOFS team used to develop the instrument, and how it is now being used by NSSL to better understand the macro and microphysical properties in thunderstorms.

About The Speaker: Dr. Sean Waugh earned his Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma in 2016 when he started working for the National Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman, Oklahoma. His career there began much earlier when he started working with NSSL back in 2007, quickly becoming the go-to source for developing instrumentation and equipment needed for a variety of field projects such as VORTEX 2, DC3, MPEX, and a even deployments to Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Florence. His interest in a wide range of weather conditions and instrumentation leads to his involvement in a variety of field work. 

POC: Outreach Librarian, Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Integration of Habitat Mapping & Acoustic Technologies to Advance Ecosystem Based Management
Presenter(s): Dr. Mark Monaco, Director, Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, NCCOS. Presenting in person in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: November 27, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Integration of Habitat Mapping & Acoustic Technologies to Advance Ecosystem Based Management

Speaker: Dr. Mark Monaco, Director, Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). Presenting in person in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract: NOAA/NCCOS's Marine Spatial Ecology Division and partners couple satellite-based and air-borne remote sensing (e.g., multi-spectral imagery) and ship-based (e.g., multi-beam soundings) technologies to map coastal and benthic habitats. The map products are key components in structuring sampling designs to monitor reef fish distribution and abundance through visual and fish acoustic surveys. The habitat maps and reef fish monitoring data support development of ecologically relevant hydro-acoustics arrays to define species' habitat utilization patterns and movements through acoustic telemetry. The integration of the biophysical data advances our ability to define ecological connectivity of marine ecosystems based on species' habitat utilization patterns and is a key component to advance EBM through spatial management of marine resources. We present results of benthic habitat mapping efforts coupled with underwater acoustic telemetry to quantify diel movements, spatial patterns, and habitat affinities of reef fishes and pelagic prey in the U.S Caribbean. Fish presence and movement data contribute to defining ecological connectivity among habitats (e.g., corals, algae, seagrasses) and associated management areas. Results aid in assessing the efficacy of managed areas designed to enhance coral reef ecosystems and provided evidence of ecological connectivity across habitat types in the seascape and among management areas to support EBM efforts.

About the Speaker: Dr. Mark E. Monaco of NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) has been a practicing scientist and manager in the field of marine spatial planning for over 35 years. His current position is Chief of the Marine Spatial Ecology Division of NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science that is comprised of about 120 Federal and contract staff located around the country. During his career at NOAA, he led development and implementation NOAA's Biogeographic Assessment Framework that has been used in conducting geospatial assessments to facilitate marine spatial planning processes and implementation plans. Applications include defining and evaluating the efficacy of marine protected areas, defining and modifying the spatial boundaries of NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries, and supporting US States in developing marine spatial plans with emphasis on the siting of alternative energy facilities. He currently serves as the co-chair of the steering committee for NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program that provides a framework to inform ecosystem-based management decisions. He represents NOAA on the Chesapeake Bay Scientific Technical Advisory Committee and co-Leads NOAA's Ecological Forecasting-Habitat Science and Ecological Forecasting Technical Team that is addressing how habitats are changing in quantity and quality over space and time to forecast ecosystem responses to habitat modifications. Today he will present an integrated suite of remote sensing technologies to couple habitat and species distributions to support Ecosystem Based Management.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Using fishing industry catch data directly for stock assessment: Aleutian Islands Golden King Crab
Presenter(s): Chris Siddon, Marine Fisheries Scientist, Division of Commercial Fisheries, Alaska Department of Fish and Game
Date & Time: November 27, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Chris Siddon, Marine Fisheries Scientist, Division of Commercial Fisheries, Alaska Department of Fish and Game

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access:
AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.
 
2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, Liz Dawson, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, November 27, 2018
10:00 am  |  Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00)  |  1 hr
Meeting number: 805 217 062
Meeting password: dawson
   

When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode: 5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 28, 2018

Title: A multidisciplinary approach for generating globally consistent data on mesophotic, deep-pelagic and bathyl biological communities: The General Ocean Survey and Sampling Iterative Protocol
Presenter(s): Lucy Woodall, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation. Presenting remotely
Date & Time: November 28, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: VIa webinar (see login below) or for NOAA staff: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A multidisciplinary approach for generating globally consistent data on mesophotic, deep-pelagic and bathyl biological communities: The General Ocean Survey and Sampling Iterative Protocol

Speaker:
Lucy Woodall, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation. Presenting remotely.

Co-Authors and Affiliations: Dominic A. Andradi-Brown, World Wildlife Fund-US; Andrew S. Brierley, University of St Andrews, Malcolm R. Clark, National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research; Douglas Connelly, National Oceanography Centre; Rob A. Hall, University of East Anglia; Kerry L. Howell, University of Plymouth; Veerle A.I. Huvenne, National Oceanography Centre; Katrin Linse, British Antarctic Survey; Rebecca E. Ross, University of Plymouth; Paul Snelgrove, Memorial University of Newfoundland; Paris V. Stefanoudis, Nekton Foundation; Tracey T. Sutton, Nova Southeastern University; Michelle Taylor, University of Essex; Thomas F. Thornton, University of Oxford; Alex D. Rogers, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation

Authors and Affiliations: Lucy Woodall, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation; Dominic A. Andradi-Brown, World Wildlife Fund-US; Andrew S. Brierley, University of St Andrews; Malcolm R. Clark, National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research; Douglas Connelly, National Oceanography Centre; Rob A. Hall, University of East Anglia; Kerry L. Howell, University of Plymouth; Veerle A.I. Huvenne, National Oceanography Centre; Katrin Linse, British Antarctic Survey; Rebecca E. Ross, University of Plymouth; Paul Snelgrove, Memorial University of Newfoundland; Paris V. Stefanoudis, Nekton Foundation; Tracey T. Sutton, Nova Southeastern University; Michelle Taylor, University of Essex; Thomas F. Thornton, University of Oxford; and Alex D. Rogers, University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov.

Webinar Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar. To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and "Enter as Guest":
 https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: In marine science there are almost as many sampling methods as there are researchers. Our individual research questions are fundamental to how we conduct our research and the data we collect; however, understanding the patterns of diversity of ocean life over different temporal and geographic scales requires extensive data both biological and environmental. Therefore, to address these questions, extensive collaboration and comparable data are required. GOSSIP (General Ocean Survey and Sampling Iterative Protocol) is a multidisciplinary framework for generating globally comparable data for biological communities, which has been designed as a guide on how these data can be collected. In this presentation we will share the 20 parameters that have been chosen, explain why each is considered important and how the framework could be utilised. GOSSIP is intended to change over time as technology and techniques evolve. Alongside this recently published paper, we have produced a technical guide that simply pulls together data on current protocols and indicates where further information can be found.

About the Speaker: Lucy is a marine biologist and her research sits within the theme of Ocean Risk. She is based at Oxford University where she lectures in Marine Ecology and Animal Adaptions. Lucy's current work broadly focuses on understanding the processes that drive biodiversity in the marine biome and how human activities modify these. She has conducted work into microplastics and litter in the marine environment, and her microplastics research was the first to reveal the ubiquity of this pollutant in the deep sea. She continues to publish research about microplastics and marine litter, is actively involved in policy consultations and leads a program to develop a model to help prioritise location specific solutions to minimising litter. Alongside her work in marine plastics, Lucy leads a program in deep-sea exploration, sits on the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC) for seahorses and pipefish, and leads the legislation implementation working group for this team. Lucy regularly provides expert evidence for national and international organisations and through Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative (DOSI), is actively engaged in providing solutions that can be used in the high-seas regulation implementing agreement that is currently being negotiated at the UN.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
Rescheduled - Satellite-Based Tropical Cyclone Intensity Estimation in the JPSS-GOES-R Era
Presenter(s): Derrick Herndon Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, CIMSS; Madison, WI
Date & Time: November 28, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Building, 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771, Conference Room: S650
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Derrick Herndon Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) Madison, WI

877-401-9225
pc: 53339716
JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m606cdbd843327880fd2fd90950c16ae6
Meeting number: 746 721 241
Host key: 467591
Meeting password: Jpss2018!

The SATellite CONsensus (SATCON) algorithm is being run as a real-time proving ground demonstration product at CIMSS starting in the 2017 tropical cyclone (TC) season. The algorithm blends concurrent TC intensity estimates from the geostationary-based Advanced Dvorak Technique (including GOES-16), microwave sounder TC intensity estimates from the CIMSS AMSU and SSMIS algorithms, CIMSS and CIRA ATMS estimates from S-NPP and JPSS, and TC structure information from the CIMSS ARCHER algorithm. Each SATCON input is situationally-weighted based on the member's statistical performance over several seasons. The final SATCON estimate is adjusted based on TC eye size, storm motion and storm structure inputs to produce an estimate that is more skillful than the individual members or a simple average of their estimates. Engagement, feedback and training of NHC/CPHC/JTWC end users have resulted in increased operational use of the SATCON intensity estimates during the 2018 season. NHC final storm reports now include the SATCON estimates as one of the TC intensity sources for determination of their final Best Tracks. Performance statistics for the 2017-2018 seasons compared to aircraft ground truth will be presented along with example cases that highlight the algorithm performance during challenging intensity analysis scenarios.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Modeled impact of coastal biogeochemical processes and climate variability on ocean acidification in the Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Dr. Darren Pilcher, Research Scientist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: November 28, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s): Dr. Darren Pilcher, Research Scientist, University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access: Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101 

You can also dial in using your phone. 
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311 
Access Code: 891-851-101 

Abstract: Examination of spatial and temporal variability of the carbon cycle from 2003-2012 and the connection to ocean acidification.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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November 29, 2018

Title: Warming Seas, Falling Fortunes - Stories of Fishermen on the Front Lines of Climate Change
Presenter(s): Avery Siciliano, former ocean policy research associate at the Center for American Progress and current program integrity specialist at Best Aquaculture Practices, and Alexandra Carter, ocean policy research associate at the Center for American Progress
Date & Time: November 29, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Warming Seas, Falling Fortunes - Stories of Fishermen on the Front Lines of Climate Change

Speakers: Avery Siciliano, former ocean policy research associate at the Center for American Progress and current program integrity specialist at Best Aquaculture Practices, and 
Alexandra Carter, ocean policy research associate at the Center for American Progress

Sponsor:
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will use the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.
To join a session, please go to this site at the scheduled date and time and "enter as guest",
and please enter your name: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.
Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.
You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
As the northwest Atlantic warms, more than two-thirds of marine species are moving north in search of cooler water. Similar changes are occurring from Alaska to Florida; fish and shellfish once found in large numbers in certain locations are now scarce in those same places. These shifts are causing economic hardships as fishing stocks and fishing effort become misaligned. In the absence of a global carbon solution, many fishermen have changed the way they do business to compete in this new environment. 

The report pulls first-hand experiences of over a dozen fishermen from around the country and couples them with current scientific evidence to illustrate man-made climate change impacts on the industry.

About the Speakers: 

Avery Siciliano: Avery Siciliano is a specialist at the Global Aquaculture Alliance's Best Aquaculture Practices certification program. Her focus is on advancing environmental and social responsibility in the global aquaculture supply chain. Prior to joining Best Aquaculture Practices, Avery advocated for sustainable fisheries policy and seafood traceability at the Center for American Progress and Oceana in Washington, DC. 

Alexandra Carter is a research associate for Ocean Policy at the Center for American Progress. Her primary field experience is in fisheries management, having worked with the California and Oregon Departments of Fish and Wildlife and as a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-certified fisheries observer in the Bering Sea, Alaska. Prior to joining American Progress, Carter worked in the office of Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-OR).

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: air-LUSI: How we flew a Lab Instrument on an Airplane at 70,000 Feet
Presenter(s): Thomas C. Larason of NIST
Date & Time: November 29, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553 , NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Thomas C. Larason of NIST

Sponsor:  STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx Event Number:    905 337 337
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=mb3bd4127edcc02c1c808a287305d0fc0

Audio:  
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416

Abstract:
Due to the stability of the lunar reflectance and the fact that it is an exo-atmospheric target with flux levels close to levels observed by Earth Remote Sensing instruments, many sensors routinely measure the lunar spectral irradiance.  While many sources of uncertainly that arise when vicariously calibrating sensors using land targets are eliminated, lunar measurements are complicated - though predictable - because of the lunar irradiance is a function of the relative positions of the Sun, Moon, and Observer among other variables.  The United States Geological Survey has developed a model, called the Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) Model of lunar reflectance/irradiance that accounts for changes in lunar irradiance as a function of these variables; utilizing the ROLO Model, NASA has demonstrated the ability to track sensor responsivity changes at the 0.1 % level.  The current uncertainties in the ROLO Model are estimated to be between 3 % and 6 % in the VNIR spectral region and are not traceable to the International System of Units (the SI). The objective of the airborne Lunar Spectral Irradiance (air-LUSI) project is to make highly accurate (sub-0.5 % uncertainty), SI-traceable measurements of the lunar spectral irradiance in the VNIR region using a laboratory instrument on an airplane at 70,000 feet.  The measurements, corrected for residual atmospheric attenuation, will be compared with the ROLO model-predicted exo-atmospheric lunar irradiance and may be used to establish limits on the uncertainty in the ROLO Model as well as to possibly serve as tie-points to the Model over this spectral range. The first step was to integrate the air-LUSI instrument onto a NASA ER-2 research aircraft and have Engineering Flights to demonstrate that the instrument concept was valid and that the instrument could function properly at-altitude.  Two Engineering Flights took place in August 2018 in Palmdale, CA at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center.  The talk will focus on what happened during the deployment both from a technical and personal point of view; results of the radiometric measurements and the performance of the instrument lend insight into a path forward to lower uncertainty measurements during the next Flight Campaign and will be presented.
 
About the Speaker:
Mr. Thomas Larason is an Electronics Engineer in the Sensor Science Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). His career at NIST began in 1989 where his research has focused on the development, characterization and calibration of detectors that measure ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared light.  Additional research areas include the measurement of photocurrent, aperture area, and the development of new transfer standards.  He has collaborated with both university and industry researchers on various projects, for example, investigating UV light sensors used for the inactivation of pathogens for drinking water.  He has twice received the Department of Commerce Bronze Medal Award. 
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Title: NOAA’s Aquaculture Program: Having Our Fish and Eating Them Too
Presenter(s): Laura Hoberecht, Ph.D., Aquaculture Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region, NOAA Western Regional Center
Date & Time: November 29, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: LAURA HOBERECHT, Ph.D., Aquaculture Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region, NOAA Western Regional Center   

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
Update: El Niño and the Southwest Drought
Presenter(s): Speakers: Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Mike Halpert, Deputy Director, NOAA NWS Climate Prediction Center; Royce Fontenot, Senior Hydrologist, NOAA National Weather Service
Date & Time: November 29, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below), NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers: Elizabeth Weight, NIDIS; Mike Halpert, Deputy Director, NOAA's Climate Prediction Center; Royce Fontenot, Senior Hydrologist, NOAA's National Weather Service

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with the National Weather Service

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov 

Remote access: Register for the webinar at: https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/update-el-nino-and-southwest-drought

Abstract: 

What is the current status of El Niño and how has El Niño affected the drought in the Southwest? This webinar will provide up-to-date information on the drought, its impacts, and how El Niño may influence temperature and precipitation in the region, which includes portions of Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. The webinar series is a collaboration of NOAA/NIDIS, NWS, USDA, state climatologists, universities and other drought experts.

About the Speakers:  

Elizabeth Weight is the Regional Drought Information Coordinator for both the Intermountain West and Southern Plains Drought Early Warning Systems (DEWS) for NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS). Elizabeth has more than 20 years of international water management and research experience in 14 countries in Asia and Africa, most recently with the CGIAR's International Water Management Institute in Sri Lanka.

Mike is the Deputy Director of the Climate Prediction Center (CPC). In this capacity, he provides support to the director ensuring the day-to-day operation of the CPC. Mike leads efforts to communicate CPC's goals and vision to customers, stakeholders, the media and the public, serving as CPC.'s point of contact for NWS Public Affairs. He also serves as CPC's property custodian and works to ensure the successful execution of budget priorities. He is also a member of the ENSO and seasonal forecast teams. He led CPC's real-time climate monitoring efforts throughout much of the 1990s and their forecast operations between 2002 and 2007. He has co-authored many peer-reviewed journal articles on numerous topics in climate variability and climate prediction, including papers detailing El Niño impacts around the globe. He received his bachelor's degree in Meteorology from Cook College, Rutgers University and his master's degree in Atmospheric Science from the University of Michigan. He began is career at CPC as a summer student in 1981.

Royce Fontenot is the Senior Service Hydrologist at the NWS Weather Forecast Office in Albuquerque, NM. Royce manages the hydrologic services programs for both the Albuquerque and El Paso, TX forecast offices and serves as the NWS state liaison to State and Federal agencies throughout New Mexico. In addition to his duties as a hydrologist, Royce also is an NWS Incident Meteorologist (Trainee), providing on-site weather support to wildland fire incidents. Before being located in Albuquerque, he has worked at NWS offices in Alaska, Louisiana, and Washington State. Prior to his NWS career, Royce was on staff at the Southern Regional Climate Center and the LSU AgCenter in Baton Rouge, LA. He has a B.Sci in Geography and a Masters in Natural Science, both from Louisiana State University. 

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December 4, 2018

Title: Acquiring Multispectral Images Using a Commercial Camera
Presenter(s): Carlos Iturrino, Electrical Engineer, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Currently he is completing his Master of Science degree in Digital Signal Processing at UPRM as a CREST Scholar. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: December 4, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Acquiring Multispectral Images Using a Commercial Camera

Speaker: Carlos Iturrino, Electrical Engineer, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Currently completing his Master of Science degree in Digital Signal Processing at UPRM as a CREST Scholar. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor: NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinators for this seminar are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Robert.A.Warner@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: We will be using the Adobe Connect platform for this webinar.To join, please go to link below, clock Guest, and then please add your first and last name:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future.You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets. Questions? Email tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract: Multispectral Images are a powerful tool for many marine scientists but they have to rely on satellite information and/or expensive instruments. Carlos presents a useful system that can acquire multispectral information using a commercial camera. The goal of this work is for this system is to be mounted on a drone for data acquisition of ocean color in coastal regions, especially where satellite optical sensors do not have sufficient spatial or temporal resolution.

About the Speaker: Carlos Iturrino was born in 1991 in San Juan Puerto Rico. He graduated from the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, specializing in Instrumentation and automatic control. Currently he is completing his Master of Science degree in Digital Signal Processing at UPRM as a CREST scholar. His project is based on acquiring spatial and spectral information using a commercial camera. In other words, he is developing a multispectral camera. Its main application is to measure ocean color, so this system will be mounted on a drone. Carlos will be at NOAA Silver Spring until the end of December (SSMC4, cube 9XXX), please stop by his office if you are interested in this work. Carlos has loved the ocean since he was a little boy. Almost all of his hobbies and the things that he likes to do in Puerto Rico are in the ocean, including surfing, fishing, spear fishing, diving, sailing, snorkeling, etc. As an engineer and a sea lover, he tries to look for the best way to incorporate both. So through his college years he has worked on projects like an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), where he and his team developed the instrumentation and camera systems for the AUV. Another relevant project was a wave measuring buoy, with data transmitted to a smart phone. Currently he is developing a camera for measuring ocean color to be mounted on a drone. Carlos hasn't decided what he will do after he receives his MS in Electrical Engineering from UPRM. He is considering continuing his education for a PhD or working in marine engineering.   

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Title: Making a case for model-based estimation of data products from fisheries-independent surveys
Presenter(s): Stan Kotwicki, Program Manager, Groundfish Assessment Program, Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: December 4, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Stan Kotwicki, Program Manager, Groundfish Assessment Program, Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor: NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access: AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.
 
2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, December 4, 2018
10:00 am  |  Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00)  |  1 hr
Meeting number: 806 290 992
Meeting password: dawson
   

When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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December 5, 2018

Title:
New
Initial Geostationary Lightning Mapper Observations - RESCHEDULED from 11/15/2018
Presenter(s): Scott Rudlosky  - NESDIS/STAR/CoRP
Date & Time: December 5, 2018
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

This talk was originally scheduled for 11/15/2018


Presenter: Scott Rudlosky  - NESDIS/STAR/CoRP

Sponsor: STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:    903 126 314
Password: STARSeminar

Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=m58ef2c99eed604b36781eae3ac7eb228

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416


Download slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/20181115_Rudlosky.pdf

https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/20181115_Rudlosky.pptx

Abstract:
The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) is the first sensor of its kind, and this technological advancement now allows continuous operational monitoring of lightning on time and space scales never before available. This has led to a golden age of lightning observations, which will spur more rapid progress toward synthesis of these observations with other meteorological datasets and forecasting tools. This study documents the first nine months of GLM observations, illustrating that the GLM captures similar spatial patterns of lightning occurrence to many previous studies. The present study shows that GLM flashes are less common over the oceans, but that the oceanic flashes are larger, brighter, and last longer than flashes over land. The GLM characteristics also help diagnose and document data quality artifacts that diminish in time with tuning of the instrument and filters. The GLM presents profound possibilities, with countless new applications anticipated over the coming decades. The baseline values reported herein aim to guide the early development and application of the GLM observations.

About the Speaker:
Dr. Scott Rudlosky is a NOAA/NESDIS physical scientist in the Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) Cooperative Research Program (CoRP). He is co-located with the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites (CICS) in College Park, Maryland. Scott is the NESDIS Subject Matter Expert on lightning and science lead for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). He originally joined CICS as a Research Associate in January 2011 following completion of his M.S. (2007) and Ph.D. (2011) in Meteorology at Florida State University. He obtained his B.S. (2004) in Geography with a specialization in Atmospheric Science from Ohio State University.
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December 6, 2018

Title:
New
Coastal Blue Carbon as a Negative Emissions Technology
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: December 6, 2018
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Tiffany Troxler, Florida International University

Seminar Host: U.S. National Academies of Sciences 
NOAA Science Seminar Sponsor: OAR, NMFS and NOS (as co-sponsors of the NAS report)

Remote Access: 
Register online for webinar here



Abstract: Negative emissions technologies (NETs) that aim to remove and sequester excess carbon from the atmosphere have been identified as an important part of the portfolio of responses to climate change. These approaches have been garnering new attention as the international community has identified lower thresholds for global temperature increases, which can only be accomplished with net negative carbon emissions to the atmosphere. Negative Emissions Technologies and Reliable Sequestration: A Research Agenda, which was released in October 2018, provides a detailed research and development agenda needed to assess the benefits, risks, and sustainable scale potential for carbon dioxide removal and sequestration approaches; and increase their commercial viability.


One of the carbon removal approaches the committee assessed is coastal blue carbon, which involves land use and management practices to increase the carbon stored in living plants and soils of coastal ecosystems, particularly mangroves, tidal marshes, and seagrass beds. Committee member, Tiffany Troxler, Florida International University, will present findings and recommendations from the report with a focus on coastal blue carbon. The webinar will cover the state of knowledge related to carbon capacity and flux in coastal systems, the processes driving sustainability of coastal wetland carbon storage in the future, and the essential components of a coastal blue carbon research and development program, including its estimated costs and potential impact. The webinar will be held on Thursday, December 6, 2018 at 10am ET. 
Register for the webinar here.
More information on the 2018 NAS report: https://nas-sites.org/dels/studies/cdr/


Seminar POC: Meredith Muth/OAR (meredith.f.muth@noaa.gov, 301-734-1217) and Janine Harris/NMFS  (janine.harris@noaa.gov, 301-427-8635)

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Title:
New
The Little Rapids Restoration Project: A 25 year partnership to improve habitat in the St. Mary's River Area of Concern
Presenter(s): Eric Ellis and Ashley Moerke, Great Lakes Commission. Presenting remotely.
Date & Time: December 6, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Little Rapids Restoration Project: A 25 year partnership to improve habitat in the St. Mary's River Area of Concern

Speakers: Eric Ellis and Ashley Moerke, Great Lakes Commission

Sponsors: Restoration Webinar Series, sponsored by FWS and NOAA. Please direct all requests for closed captioning or other accommodation needs to Eric Tsakiris, 304-876-7430, eric_tsakiris@fws.gov, TTY 800-877-8339 at least three business days in advance of the event.  NOAA contact is Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: For more information, or to register for the webinar:
1. Go to https://doilearn2.webex.com/doilearn2/onstage/g.php?MTID=e0f1a0ae02aa7405eafee3158741be68a
2. Click "Register".
3. Fill out the registration form and then click "Submit".
For more information and for upcoming webinars visit the Restoration Webinar Series program page. Check out the flier for a schedule of our upcoming webinars. 

Abstract: Eric Ellis and Ashley Moerke of the Great Lakes Commission will highlight
the aspects of the planning, implementation, and monitoring associated with the 25 Year Project to Restore Rapids Habitat in the Binational St. Mary's River Area of Concern.

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: Send an email to
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Title: Salmon Ocean Ecology in British Columbia
Presenter(s): Jackie King, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Date & Time: December 6, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar or at Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Jackie King, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada  

Sponsor: NWFSC Fall Monster Jam. Co-chair hosts: Brian Beckman, Andy Dittman, and Adam Luckenbach (nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov). For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 802 966 043
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/webappng/sites/nwfsc200/meeting/info/88870882297028757?MTID=m06e53a1c59ca759c0a95c76ddab2ca0d
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 
Need help joining? Contact Support: https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412

ABSTRACT: TBD

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December 11, 2018

Title: Interaction of commercial fishing gears and long-lived structure forming invertebrate species in the Aleutian Islands: A risk assessment
Presenter(s): John Olson, Fisheries Biologist, Habitat Conservation Division, Alaska Regional Office
Date & Time: December 11, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Conf Line 1-877-953-3919 (PP:5944500), AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2079 (RACE)
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: John Olson, Fisheries Biologist, Habitat Conservation Division, Alaska Regional Office

Sponsor:
NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series

Webinar Access:
AFSC WebEx2 invites you to join this Webex meeting.
 
2018 Groundfish Seminar Series, RACE Conference Room (2079)
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
10:00 am  |  Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00)  |  1 hr
Meeting number: 808 190 652
Meeting password: dawson
   

When it's time, join the meeting.

Audio is separate from WebEx, please call-in to: 1-877-953-3919, Attendee passcode:5944500#
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: NOAA Research and Development Database (NRDD): Project Management Data for NOAA’s R&D
Presenter(s): Meka Laster & Shanie Gal-Edd, OAR
Date & Time: December 11, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar 
Presenters: Meka Laster, Director and Shanie Gal-Edd, Program Manager, for the NOAA Research & Development Database


POC: Outreach Librarian, Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)


Remote access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6001639534869668609  Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract: Introduction to the NOAA Research and Development Database (NRDD). NRDD is a secure, web-based enterprise performance management / business intelligence tool, designed to contain information about the R&D projects conducted and funded by NOAA.

About The Speaker: Meka Laster works in the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and joined the NRDD team in 2016. Shanie Gal-Edd also works in the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and joined the NRDD team in 2017. Shanie worked at NOAA since her Knauss Fellowship year in 2016. 

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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December 12, 2018

Title: Analyses of multi species ichthyoplankton data along the US west coast as indicators of ecosystem changes
Presenter(s): Jens Nielsen Ph.D., NRC postdoctoral researcher, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA.
Date & Time: December 12, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s):
Jens Nielsen Ph.D., NRC postdoctoral researcher, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA.

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101 

You can also dial in using your phone. 
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311 
Access Code: 891-851-101 

Abstract: Do different fish larvae communities have shared responses to climatic changes?

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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December 17, 2018

Title: Fishing for Solutions: A Science Briefing on Ocean Change and Fisheries
Presenter(s): Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor in Dept.of Ecology, Evolution & Natural Resources, Rutgers University; Michael Luisi, Monitoring and Assessment Division Director, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chair of the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Roger Griffis, Climate Coordinator, NOAA's Fisheries Service; Heather Mannix, Assistant Director of Policy Engagement, COMPASS; and Stephen Posner, Assistant Director of Policy Engagement, COMPASS
Date & Time: December 17, 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Fishing for Solutions: A Science Briefing on Ocean Change and Fisheries 

Speakers:
Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor in Department of Ecology, Evolution & Natural Resources, Rutgers University;
Michael Luisi, Monitoring and Assessment Division Director, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, and Chair of the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council;
Roger Griffis, Climate Coordinator, NOAA's Fisheries Service;
Heather Mannix, Assistant Director of Policy Engagement; COMPASS; and 
Stephen Posner, Assistant Director of Policy Engagement with COMPASS

Sponsors: COMPASS and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; contacts are Jacob.Robertson@compassscicomm.org and  Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov 

Webinar Access: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/4615410924533/WN_cFozyDw2QfytHHWi0pvLOg 
Questions? Email Jacob.Robertson@compassscicomm.org

Abstract: Ocean warming and a host of related stressors - including ocean acidification, hypoxia, and sea-level rise - have profound implications for marine life and human communities worldwide. The rate and scale of change that we see now is impacting fish, the ecosystems that fish depend on, and the communities, businesses, and economies that a rich fishing culture supports. As fisheries change, society needs to effectively respond to interconnected ecological, social, and economic challenges - including: how the ocean is changing, what this means for fisheries and for people, what is at risk, and how management systems can respond.

This webinar will discuss science, policy and management gaps and opportunities across fisheries, marine ecology, social science, policy, law, and management fields that arose from a 2-day roundtable convened by COMPASS in 2018. Aligning the capabilities of science with the mounting challenges of a changing ocean is about gaps in current knowledge, and also about how to mobilize people based on the knowledge we have now. Productive dialogue among scientists, decision makers, non-governmental organizations, and ocean resource managers can support the development and implementation of effective fisheries policies based on relevant scientific evidence.

About the Speakers:
Malin Pinsky is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources at Rutgers University. He leads a research group studying the ecology and evolution of global change in the ocean, including conservation and management solutions. He developed and maintains the OceanAdapt website to document shifting ocean animals in North America, a resource used by governments and NGOs for climate adaptation planning. He has published articles in Science, PNAS, and other journals, and his research has received extensive coverage in the press. He has received early career awards and fellowships from the National Academy of Sciences, American Society of Naturalists, and the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. Previously, he was a David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellow at Princeton University. He has a Ph.D. from Stanford University, an A.B. from Williams College, and grew up along the coast of Maine.

Michael Luisi serves as the director of monitoring and assessment with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources fishing and boating services. He was appointed to the Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management Council as Maryland's State Official Designee in June 2010 and was elected as Council Chairman in 2016. Mike also serves as one of Maryland's administrative representatives on the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission. His career in fisheries began at the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries while working as a technician on the Statewide Stream Survey Project. Since joining MDNR in 2000, he has held multiple positions in the department, including the management of the State's Commercial Striped Bass Fishery and the Coastal Fisheries Program. Mike has a B.S. degree from Mary Washington College and a M.S. from Tennessee Technological University.

Roger Griffis is a marine ecologist with 20 years of experience advancing science and management of marine and coastal resources with NOAA. As Climate Coordinator for NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), he works with many partners to increase the production, delivery and use of climate-related information to fulfill NMFS mandates in a changing world. Past positions include Manager of NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program and Policy Advisor in NOAA's Office of Policy and Strategy Planning.

Heather Mannix is an Interim Co-Director of Policy Engagement at COMPASS, where she works to facilitate constructive discussion and interaction between scientists and decision makers. Before coming to COMPASS, she spent over seven years at the Consortium for Ocean Leadership in Washington D.C. working with large ocean research programs such as the Census of Marine Life and the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative. Heather also managed the Ocean Research Advisory Panel, a science advisory body to the Federal Government. She received her B.A. from Hood College in Environmental Science and Policy and my M.A. from American University in Global Environmental Policy.
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December 19, 2018

Title: A New Diet Index: Predicting fish length from diet composition
Presenter(s): Nissa C. Ferm, Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Contractor with Lynker Inc., Seattle, WA
Date & Time: December 19, 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker(s):
Nissa C. Ferm, Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Contractor with Lynker Inc., Seattle, WA

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.
 
Remote Access: Please join our meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101 

You can also dial in using your phone. 
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311 
Access Code: 891-851-101 

Abstract: What did the fish eat? On the surface this seems to be a relatively simple question. However, when diet data are incorporated into models, there are both logistical and ecological limitations. Understanding the methodologies of how diet data are generated, combined with an understanding of the underlying predator-prey ecology, can help generate more informed models.  I will present an overview of diet data methodologies used to investigate feeding of young of the year Walleye Pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus). Based on this knowledge, I will describe a Random Forest model, built upon the scaffold of predator-prey ecology that was designed to predict Walleye Pollock condition. The model I developed predicts fish length from consumed prey taxa weight and composition. Fish length is related to known ontogentic shifts in diet that are important milestones for juvenile Pollock survival and ability to overwinter. Using the difference between the actual length of the fish and the modeled length gives us a metric. This metric tells us how far away a fish is from an average diet for its specific length. The metric was determined to have a significant non-linear relationship with dry energy density.  When modeled fish size was much larger than observed, dry energy density declined. I concluded that fish were not consuming their optimal prey for their particular size in order to meet energetic demands. One possible mechanism for not meeting these energetic demands is a spatial mismatch between the fish and optimal prey.

Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

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December 20, 2018

Title: The JCSDA Community Radiative Transfer Model: From Development to Operations
Presenter(s): Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson - JCSDA
Date & Time: December 20, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553 , NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter: Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson - JCSDA

Sponsor: STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx
Event Number: 905 776 033 
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=md8d79cffbe41f5b7949986d2b669c0ed

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416

Abstract:
The Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) is a fast, 1-D radiative transfer model designed to simulate top-of-the-atmosphere radiances consistent with a wide variety of satellite based sensors. The CRTM was primarily developed by JCSDA-funded scientists with essential contributions from NOAA/STAR and NOAA/EMC scientists. The primary goal of CRTM is to provide fast, accurate satellite radiance simulations and associated Jacobian calculations under all weather and surface conditions. CRTM supports all current operational and many research passive sensors, covering wavelengths ranging from the visible through the microwave. The model has undergone substantial improvement and expansion, since the first version in 2004. The CRTM has been used in the NOAA/NCEP and U.S. Navy operational data assimilation systems and by many other JCSDA partners such as NOAA/NESDIS/STAR, NOAA/OAR, NASA/GMAO, Naval Research Laboratory, Air Force Weather, and within multiple university environments. Over the past 14 years, both external research groups and operational centers alike have made essential contributions to the continued development and growth of CRTM.
A major goal of the CRTM core team is to ensure that CRTM becomes a true community radiative transfer model for all users. The CRTM official baseline code is developed and maintained based on internal and community-wide inputs, consisting of both improvements and externally contributed codes.
This presentation will briefly review the scientific and technical basis of CRTM, including its many strengths and limitations. There will also be an overview of the current status of the recently released CRTM version 2.3.0; and the future planned release of CRTM version 3.0.0 - which will represent a major milestone in CRTM's development and capabilities.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson joined NOAA/NESDIS/STAR (via AER, Inc.) in support of JCSDA in July 2015.  In January 2017, he was hired through UCAR as the JCSDA project lead for the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM).  Dr. Johnson's primary responsibilities are to ensure that the CRTM project continues to be proactively developed and managed to meet operational user requirements.   This involves coordinating efforts and support for a large number of users and developers across a wide range of agencies and universities, both domestic and international.

 Dr. Johnson received a B.S. in Physics from Oklahoma State University, with an emphasis on hard-sphere sedimentation crystallization and photonics.  Combining his interest in weather, computing, and physics, he studied Atmospheric Science at Purdue University, where he received a M.S. degree. The next stop was the University of Wisconsin, where he completed his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science advised by Dr. Grant Petty.
Before completing his Ph.D. in 2007, Dr. Johnson started working at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in 2004 on the Global Precipitation Measurement mission, primarily focused on precipitation retrieval algorithm development and satellite observation simulations. During the intervening years, he has coordinated multiple NASA field campaigns as a mission scientist, and actively participates in the CGMS/WMO International Precipitation Working Group (IPWG), International TOVs Working Group (ITWC), and the International Workshop on Space-based Snowfall Measurement (IWSSM).   He is a member of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), and the American Meteorological Society (AMS).   
Dr. Johnson's primary areas of expertise are measuring and simulating cloud microphysical processes, theoretical and applied atmospheric radiative transfer, satellite remote sensing of clouds and precipitation, and satellite-based radar simulations in cold-cloud precipitating scenes.

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December 21, 2018

Title: December 2018 NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: December 21, 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: online or in-person IARC/Akasofu 407
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminr Series

Speaker: Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) 
Sponsor: Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and  National Weather Service
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (richard.thoman@noaa.gov or rthoman@alaska.edu)
Remote Access: https://accap.uaf.edu/December2018
Abstract:The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for January 2019! and the winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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February 5, 2019

Title: Home Front Hawai`i: A Naval Legacy beneath the Sea
Presenter(s): Dr. Hans van Tilburg, Maritime Heritage Program Coordinator, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: February 5, 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Hans van Tilburg, Maritime Heritage Program Coordinator, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1125812340237400321

Abstract: Shipwrecks and other submerged properties tell stories of the past, and some of those stories are about WWII in the Pacific. The Hawaiian Islands were very different during the war period, a plantation territory suddenly witness to the initial attack on Pearl Harbor and subsequent years of intensive combat training both on land and sea. The events of this critical period have left a legacy of sites that act as windows on history, a heritage landscape to be shared in the present.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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May 21, 2019

Title: Estimating Coral Feeding Habits from Space
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Fox, Former Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar
Date & Time: May 21, 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr. Michael Fox, Postdoctoral Scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote access: Register for webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6762138742323434253

Abstract: Reef-building corals rely on a symbiosis with microscopic algae for much of their energetic needs. Rising ocean temperatures threaten this symbiosis and can cause it to break down in a process known as coral bleaching, which is one of the primary threats to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems globally. Corals are not helpless, however, as they are also excellent predators and if they can capture food to maintain their energy budgets while bleached they may have a greater chance for survival. Learn more how natural variation in food availability on reefs around the world and how this may influence coral resilience and recovery from bleaching events.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Developer - Lori K. Brown

 

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