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Hurricane Irma

Hurricane Irma Moves Through the Caribbean - GOES-16 Full Color Animation

Most Recent 48-Hour Animation starting: 7 Sep 2017 - 13:15:15 Z to: 11 Sep 2017 - 13:00:00 Z

6 September 2017 - Hurricane Irma, currently approaching Puerto Rico and the Leeward Islands, is historic in size and strength, with maximum sustained winds of 185 mph and recorded gusts to 225 mph. In this view, Florida and the southeastern US are in the upper left, currently under cloud cover. The animation above is created with GOES-16 full color imagery updated every 15 minutes. Special thanks to RAMMB/CIRA and STAR IT for image animation and development support. Please note that the underlying map layer at night is static and doesn't reflect power outages caused by the storm.

NOAA's GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational. Its data are preliminary and undergoing testing.

Hurricane Irma - Approaching the Continental U.S. - GOES-16 Infrared Band 13

48-Hour Animation starting: 10 Sep 2017 - 13:22:22 Z to: 11 Sep 2017 - 13:22:22 Z

6 September 2017 - As Hurricane Irma moves west and north in the next few days, this animation will capture its trajectory approaching the continental United States. It is just becoming visible in the lower right hand corner of the frame at 8:00 pm EST Wednesday. This animation shows GOES-16 images from infrared Band 13, refreshed every 5 minutes. Special thanks to RAMMB/CIRA and STAR IT for image animation and development support.

NOAA's GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational. Its data are preliminary and undergoing testing.

Hurricane Irma - Detailed View of the Eye - GOES-16 Visible Band 2

Animation from 5 September 2017, 1451 - 1736 UTC

6 September 2017 - This band 2 visible loop is zoomed in on the eye of Hurricane Irma. At this time, the eye is approximately 25 nautical miles in diameter. GOES-16's 500-meter resolution visible channel allows unprecedented views of the low- level clouds within the eye, including some mesovortices that can be seen rotating around the center axis.

Credit and thanks to to RAMMB/CIRA and Dan Lindsey for this extraordinary view.

NOAA's GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational. Its data are preliminary and undergoing testing.

Hurricane Irma - GOES-16 Infrared Band 13 Animation

Most Recent 24-Hour Animation starting: 10 Sep 2017 - 13:22:22 Z to: 11 Sep 2017 - 13:22:22 Z

5 September 2017 - Hurricane Irma, currently approaching Puerto Rico and the Leeward Islands, is historic in size and strength. It is currently moving westward toward Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Haiti. As of 2:00 PM AST the storm was reported to carry maximum sustained winds of 185 mph. See the NOAA National Hurricane Center for updates.

The animation above is built with GOES-16 images updated every minute from infrared band 13. Special thanks to RAMMB/CIRA and STAR IT for image animation and development support.

NOAA's GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational. Its data are preliminary and undergoing testing.

Hurricane Irma over Barbuda, 6 September 2017, 05:24 Z (9:24 EST) Hurricane Irma east of the Leeward Islands, 5 September 2017, 17:04 Z (1:04 pm EST) Hurricane Irma east of the Leeward Islands, 5 September 2017, 16:50 Z (2:50 pm EST) Hurricane Irma and Jose, 7 September 2017, 5:30 Z (1:30 am EST)

VIIRS Near-Constant Contrast DNB Image - 6 September 2017, 05:24 Z (9:24 am EST)

Near-Constant Contrast (NCC) satellite image of Hurricane Irma at 0524Z, 6 September 2017 as it approaches Puerto Rico. The NCC is a derived product of the Day/Night Band sensor that utilizes a sun/moon reflectance model that illuminates atmospheric features, senses reflected and emitted light sources, and assists with cloud monitoring during the nighttime. In the image, notice the island of Barbuda is located in the eye-wall of the hurricane. In the top- right corner of the image, the moon percent visibility and moon elevation angle are provided. A full moon present and a positive moon elevation angle imply that the moon was above the horizon, and provided adequate reflected moonlight of the ambient atmospheric features.

Thanks and credit: Jorel Torres (CIRA). Click images to enlarge.

VIIRS Infrared Image of Irma - 6 September 2017

Hurricane Irma, at that point east of the Leeward Islands at at 16.88 N 58.97 W, produced from the S-NPP VIIRS instrument using the I band.

Thanks and credit: RAMMB/CIRA. Click images to enlarge.

VIIRS Day-Night Band Image of Irma - 6 September 2017

Hurricane Irma as it moves toward Puerto Rico. This image is produced from the S-NPP VIIRS instrument using the Day-Night band.

Thanks and credit: JPSS EDR Team / Ryan Smith. Click images to enlarge.

VIIRS Day-Night Band Image of Irma and Jose - 7 September 2017

Hurricane Irma on the left, northwest of Puerto Rico. Hurricane Jose much farther east. Image produced from the S-NPP VIIRS instrument using the Day-Night band.

Thanks and credit: JPSS EDR Team / Ryan Smith. Click images to enlarge.

Sentinel radar image of Hurricane Irma Sentinel radar image of Hurricane Irma Winds - 7 September 2017 6:30 pm EDT Sentinel radar image of Hurricane Irma

Sentinel Radar Image of Irma's Eye - 7 September 2017 6:30 pm EDT

Sentinel-1A and Sentinel-1B are high-resolution radars from the European Space Agency. STAR radar imaging specialists work extensively with this data to extract geophysical information valuable to NOAA. Sentinel's radar can "see" through clouds and the radar image brightness (or backscatter) is the result of ocean surface roughness (on the scale of a few centimeters). The lower winds located in the hurricane's eye result in lower surface roughness and so appear darker than the surrounding (brighter) areas of higher winds. The image above shows a Sentinel overpass directly over Irma's eye acquired by Sentinel-1A on September 7, 2017, 6:30 pm EDT.

Thanks and credit: Frank Monaldo and Christopher Jackson, STAR. Image contains modified Copernicus Sentinel-1 data from ESA. Click to enlarge image.

Sentinel Radar Image of Irma Winds - 7 September 2017 6:30 pm EDT

Sentinel-1A and 1B are high-resolution radars from the European Space Agency. STAR radar imaging specialists work extensively with this data to extract geophysical information valuable to NOAA. Sentinel's radar can "see" through clouds and the radar image brightness is the result of ocean surface roughness. The lower winds located in the hurricane's eye result in lower surface roughness and so appear darker than the surrounding (brighter) areas of higher winds. The image above shows a Sentinel overpass directly over Irma's eye acquired by Sentinel-1A on 7 September 2017, 6:30 pm EDT. NOAA has used the radar measurements to estimate the near surface wind speed.

Thanks and credit: Frank Monaldo and Christopher Jackson, STAR. Image contains modified Copernicus Sentinel-1 data from ESA. Click to enlarge image.

Sentinel Radar Image of Irma Winds - 10 September 2017 7:26 pm EDT

Sentinel-1A and 1B are high-resolution radars from the European Space Agency. STAR radar imaging specialists work extensively with this data to extract geophysical information valuable to NOAA. Sentinel's radar can "see" through clouds and the radar image brightness is the result of ocean surface roughness. The lower winds located in the hurricane's eye result in lower surface roughness and so appear darker than the surrounding (brighter) areas of higher winds. The image above shows a Sentinel overpass directly over Irma's eye acquired by Sentinel-1A on 10 September 2017, 7:26 pm EDT. NOAA has used the radar measurements to estimate the near surface wind speed.

Thanks and credit: Frank Monaldo and Christopher Jackson, STAR. Image contains modified Copernicus Sentinel-1 data from ESA. Click to enlarge image.

Side by side comparison of Hurricanes Andrew and Irma Side by side comparison of Hurricanes Charley (2012) and Irma (2017) making landfall

Hurricane Andrew vs. Hurricane Irma - 8 September 2017

Infrared satellite image comparison of Hurricanes Andrew and Irma, using GOES-7 and GOES-16 images. The Andrew image was captured by GOES-7 at 10.5 µm on 24 August 1992, 8:31 UTC as Andrew made landfall near Miami. The Irma image came from GOES-16, 10.35 µm infrared band on 8 September 2017, 8:30 UTC, as Irma passed northeast of Cuba at 21.7°N, 73.8°W. Click image to enlarge. Thanks and credit to John Knaff at RAMMB / CIRA. See more amazing storm imagery at at: Real- Time Tropical Cyclone Products.

Hurricane Charley vs. Hurricane Irma - 10 September 2017

Infrared satellite image comparison of Hurricanes Charley and Irma, using GOES-12 and GOES-16 images. The Charley image was captured by GOES-12 at 10.7 µm on 13 August 2004, 19:45 UTC as Charley made landfall near Naples, Florida. The Irma image came from GOES-16, 10.35 µm infrared band on 10 September 2017, 19:15 UTC, as Irma made landfall near Marco Island, Florida at 25.9°N, 81.6°W. Click image to enlarge. Thanks and credit to John Knaff at RAMMB / CIRA. See more amazing storm imagery at at: Real- Time Tropical Cyclone Products.

Ocean Heat Content (OHC) Products and Understanding Irma

8 September 2017, 8:30 UTC

Irma Predicted Track Across Caribbean Ocean Heat Content product image, 8 September 2017

Click image to enlarge

8 September 2017 - Oceanic heat content (OHC) is the heat stored in the ocean. Accurate ongoing measurement and modeling of OHC is useful for understanding evolving intensity of tropical storms, like Irma.

In the case of Irma, with favorable atmospheric conditions, Irma has intensified to category 5 status (as of 9-8, it is now Category 4). Central to its intensity increase is the relatively high ocean heat content values (80-120 kJ cm- 2) as shown in the image above. As Irma approached the Florida Straits, the high heat content water coming through the Yucatan Straits into the Gulf is essentially taking a quick right turn out of the Gulf of Mexico since the Loop Current is now retracted after separating a large warm core eddy in the eastern Gulf. The white areas near Cuba and coastal Florida are too shallow to product valid OHC data, but are expected to be at least as warm as surrounding waters.

The exiting water from the Gulf of Mexico forms the core of the Florida Current. Given the large current speeds of 2 m s- 1, this current advects the warm water through the Straits. Given both the current strength and depth of the warm water, any ocean mixing induced by hurricane force winds is arrested. Thus, there is very little sea surface temperature cooling and the the air-sea fluxes are sustained to Irma, allowing the storm to intensify.

The National Hurricane Center requested that STAR generate an OHC product that is operational 24/7 for Hurricane Intensity Forecasting which can be accessed for the North Atlantic at: http://www.ospo.noaa.gov/Products/ocean/ohc_natl.html.

Thanks and credit for this image and story to Eileen Maturi and the STAR / SOCD / Sea Surface Temperature team.


Hurricane Harvey Seen by GOES-16

Hurricane Harvey from GOES-16, 25 August 2017

25 August 2017 - Hurricane Harvey made landfall midway along the Texas coast late on 25 August 2017. GOES-16 imagery of the storm from infrared band 13 shown above. See geocolor and Band 13 IR animations.


The Great Eclipse of 2017 from GOES-16

Western Hemisphere from GOES-16, 21 August 2017

21 August 2017 - On Monday, August 21, 2017, the first total solar eclipse to move across the conterminous United States in 99 years occurred, treating all of North America to a rare and spectacular astronomical display. Read more.


Suomi NPP Captures the Eclipse

Solar Eclipse shown through S-NPP VIIRS I-band imagery, 21 August 2017

21 August 2017 - The August 21 eclipse was also captured by the Suomi NPP polar satellite, which flew over the path of totality as it cross the Southeastern United States. S-NPP teams have contributed interesting images and data artifacts of the eclipse from the OMPS, VIIRS, and CrIS instruments. Read more.



Latest STAR Publications

Updated: Fri, 17 Mar 2017

Title:
Characterization of Long-Term Stability of Suomi NPP Cross-Track Infrared Sounder Spectral Calibration
Authors:
Chen Y, Han Y and Weng FZ
Journal:
IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 55(2):1147-1159.
DOI: 10.1109/tgrs.2016.2620438
Date:
Feb 2017
Title:
Development of a Mid-Infrared Sea and Lake Ice Index (MISI) Using the GOES Imager
Authors:
Dorofy P, Nazari R, Romanov P and Key J
Journal:
Remote Sensing 8(12)
DOI: 10.3390/rs8121015
Date:
Dec 2016
Title:
Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals
Authors:
Hughes TP, Kerry JT, Álvarez-Noriega M, Álvarez-Romero JG, Anderson KD, Baird AH, Babcock RC, Beger M, Bellwood DR, et al.
Journal:
Nature 543(7645):373-377.
DOI: 10.1038/nature21707
Date:
Mar 16 2017
Title:
The floating Sargassum (Phaeophyceae) of the South Atlantic Ocean - likely scenarios
Authors:
Sissini MN, de Barros Barreto MBB, Menezes Szechy MT, de Lucena MB, Oliveira MC, Gower J, Liu G, de Oliveira Bastos E, Milstein D, et al.
Journal:
Phycologia 56(3):321-328.
DOI: 10.2216/16-92.1
Date:
May 2017
Title:
Managing living marine resources in a dynamic environment: The role of seasonal to decadal climate forecasts
Authors:
Tommasi D, Stock CA, Hobday AJ, Methot R, Kaplan IC, Eveson JP, Holsman K, Miller TJ, Gaichas S, et al.
Journal:
Progress in Oceanography 152:15-49.
DOI: 10.1016/j.pocean.2016.12.011
Date:
Mar 2017
Title:
Excess seawater nutrients, enlarged algal symbiont densities and bleaching sensitive reef locations: 2. A regional-scale predictive model for the Great Barrier Reef, Australia
Authors:
Wooldridge SA, Heron SF, Brodie JE, Done TJ, Masiri I and Hinrichs S
Journal:
Marine Pollution Bulletin 114(1):343-354.
DOI: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2016.09.045
Date:
Jan 15 2017

View all of STAR's latest research articles.

 

Data, algorithms, and images presented on STAR websites are intended for experimental use only and are not supported on an operational basis.  More information

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