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2018 STAR Seminars

This page lists past seminars and presentations by STAR scientists and visiting scientists. These seminars include the STAR Science Forum and similar events. Presentation materials for seminars will be provided when available.

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

15 January 2018

Title: STAR 2018 AMS Presentation Summaries
Presenter(s): All STAR Scientists and Contractors who participated at AMS 2018 in Austin, TX
Date & Time: 15 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
Presenter(s):
All STAR Scientists and Contractors who participated at AMS 2018 in Austin, TX



Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminars
/ summary coordinated by Ralph Ferraro

Summary slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/AMSSummary20180214.pdf

30 April 2018

Title: Machine Learning in Operational Remote Sensing
Presenter(s): Dr.-Ing. Diego Loyola
German Aerospace Center - DLR
Date & Time: 30 April 2018
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553 , NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
Presenter:
Dr.-Ing. Diego Loyola
German Aerospace Center (DLR)

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Monday, April 30, 2018 11:00 am, Eastern Daylight Time (New York, GMT-04:00)
Event number: 995 559 474
Event password: STAR
Event address for attendees:
https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=e2782d756fcae9a0874f485ff165d190b

Audio:
Tel:866-832-9297
Participant code: 6070416

21 June 2018

Title: STAR / NWS Seminar on Use of Satellite Data in Operational Forecasting
Presenter(s): Alek Krautmann, NESDIS, Jennifer Vogtmiller, NWS, Christopher Gitro, NWS, Michael Jurewicz, NWS, Tim Schmit, STAR, Deb Molenar, STAR, Bill Line, NWS
Date & Time: 21 June 2018
9:00 am - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Auditorium, NCWCP, 5830 University Research Ct, College Park, MD 20740
Description:

STAR / NWS Seminar



Presenter(s):
Multiple, see detailed agenda below



Sponsor(s):
STAR and NWS; contact for queries is Ana.Carrion@NOAA.gov



Remote Access:
Remote access via Webex

Webex Event address for attendees:
https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=ed752b41af9f3bd0c1794ad4e5a0ef7e0
Event number: 998 598 693

Event password: STAR


Conference Dial-In Number:
US:      866-832-9297
Int'l:     203-566-7610
Passcode:  6070416
Talk Schedule
----------------------------------------------------------------
9:00 - 9:15 AM EDT
Opening Remarks - Harry Cikanek (Director, Center for Satellite Applications and Research - STAR)
9:15 - 9:45 AM EDT
Introduction to the NWS Operations - Alek Krautmann - (NESDIS Program Coordination Officer)
9:45 - 10:00 AM EDT
Break
10:00 - 10:45 AM EDT
Satellite Data during Severe Weather Ops - Jennifer VogtMiller (General Forecaster/ Satellite Focal - Weather Forecast Office, (WFO) Albany, NWS)
10:45 - 11:15 AM EDT
Discussion
11:15 - 12:00 PM EDT
Satellite Data in Operations - Christopher Gitro (Lead Forecaster/Satellite Focal WFO Kansas City, NWS) / Michael Jurewicz (Lead Forecaster/Satellite Focal WFO Binghamton, NWS)
12:00 - 1:00 PM EDT
Lunch
1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT
Vision - Distance Learning Capabilities - Tim Schmit - Satellite Research Meteorologist (STAR & ASPB)
2:00 - 2:15 PM EDT
Break
2:15 - 3:00 PM EDT
AWIPS Access - SET/ABI - Deb Molenar - IT Specialist (STAR)
3:00 - 3:30 PM EDT
Discussion
3:30 - 3:45 PM EDT
Break
3:45 - 4:15 PM EDT
Satellite Liaison - Bill Line (Meteorologist/WFO Pueblo, NWS)
4:15 - 5:00 PM EDT
Path Forward/Discussion - Harry Cikanek (Director, Center for Satellite Applications and Research - STAR)

----------------------------------------------------------------

18 July 2018

Title: NESDIS snowfall rate product and assessment in NWS Forecast Offices
Presenter(s): Huan Meng, NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research, and Kristopher White, NWS/Huntsville, AL Weather Forecast Office and NASA/MSFC/Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center
Date & Time: 18 July 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Room 2554-2555, NCWCP, 5830 University Research Ct, College Park, MD 20740, USA
Description:

STAR Seminar Series

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series



Presenter(s):
Huan Meng, NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research, and Kristopher White, NWS/Huntsville, AL Weather Forecast Office and NASA/MSFC/Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center



Sponsor(s):
NOAA NESDIS STAR

Host and contact: Ralph.R.Ferraro@noaa.gov



Remote Access:

Webex - event address for attendees: https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=e6264cd9de7be3b4177ecc46f0791645e

Event number: 991 988 937

Event password: STAR



Audio:

Conference #:  1-888-396-1320

Passcode: 9371952



Slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/Meng20180718.pdf



Abstract:

An over land snowfall rate (SFR) product has been produced operationally at NOAA/NESDIS since 2012. The product utilizes the passive microwave measurements from the ATMS sensor aboard S-NPP and NOAA-20, and from AMSU and MHS sensor pair aboard the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) operated by NOAA and EUMETSAT. Recently, SFR product has also been developed for SSMIS aboard the DMSP satellites and for GMI aboard NASA's GPM core satellite. The SFR algorithm consists of two components: snowfall detection and snowfall rate estimation. Both components mainly rely on the high frequencies at and above 88/89 GHz due to their sensitivity to solid precipitation. The snowfall detection component is a statistical algorithm that optimally combines snowfall probabilities derived from a satellite-based module and a numerical weather prediction model-based module. The snowfall rate component is a physical, 1DVAR-based algorithm. The SFR product has been validated extensively against gauge observations and radar snowfall rate estimates with satisfactory results. As part of a project supported by the JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction program, the SFR product retrieved from eight satellites was also evaluated at some NWS Weather Forecast Offices in winter 2017-2018. NWS meteorologists evaluated and provided feedback regarding the SFR product suite via an online survey, emails and a webinar. Evaluation results affirmed operational utility of the SFR product, especially as it pertains to the analysis and forecast of snowfall rates in regions that lack necessary radar and in-situ observations. Some data issues were also discovered and addressed during the evaluation period, highlighting the positive aspects of the intensive assessment process, which fosters direct interaction between product developers and end-users. Conclusions and recommendations for future iterations of the SFR product will also be discussed.

About the

Presenter(s):

Huan Meng:

Huan Meng received her MS in Physical Oceanography from the Florida State University in
1993, and her PhD in Hydrology from the Colorado State University in 2004. She supported
STAR as a contractor between 1999 and 2006 and then joined STAR as a federal employee. Her
research interest is in the development of passive microwave products. She has received two
NOAA group bronze medals. One of them was for developing NOAA's first operational
snowfall rate product.

Kristopher White:

Mr. White received his B.S. in Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma in 2002. After graduation, Mr. White worked at the Reagan Missile Test Site on the Kwajalein Atoll, serving as lead mission meteorologist for several test missions, including introductory SpaceX launch tests.
Mr. White entered the National Weather Service (NWS) in Duluth, Minnesota in 2006, and was later promoted to journey and then lead meteorologist at the NWS office in Huntsville, Alabama. In 2011, Mr. White was promoted to Applications Integration Meteorologist, serving both as a lead meteorologist and principal liaison between the NWS and the NASA SPoRT program.

30 August 2018

Title: Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in Tropical Cyclone Monitoring
Presenter(s): Xiaofeng Li, NESDIS/STAR/SOCD/MECB
Date & Time: 30 August 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar
STAR Science Seminar
Seminar sponsor: NOAA Central Library

Presenter:
Dr. Xiaofeng Li, GST at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR
Slides downloadable at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/LiX_2018-SAR-Hurricane-NOAA-Seminar.pdf

Abstract:
We present a suite of hurricane products (wind, wave, rain, pressure, eye location) that can be generated from the Spaceborne synthetic Aperture Radar onboard Canadian RADARSAT and ESA's Sentinel-1 satellites.

Bio:
Xiaofeng Li received his Ph.D. in physical oceanography from North Carolina State University in 1997. He has been supporting the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) tasks ever since. He has authored more than 130 peer-reviewed publications and edited 3 books. He currently serves as an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing and the Ocean Section Editor-in-Chief of Remote Sensing
Remote access: Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1938566935465839874
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).
Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

4 October 2018

Title: IAC 2018 Global Technical Symposium Earth Observation Session
Presenter(s): Harry Cikanek of NESDIS/STAR
Date & Time: 4 October 2018
9:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553 , NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
Presenter:
Harry Cikanek, NESDIS/STAR

Sponsor(s):

International Astronautical Congress

Remote Access:
If you are interested in joining the Earth Observation or other sessions remotely from other
locations (whether individually or as a group with other colleagues from your
institute), please register using the following link:
http://bit.ly/2LTz7OU
Registration is free. Upon completing your registration, you will be provided with a single
connection link which you can use to attend all of the 5 GTS sessions.

Abstract:
This year, 5 Global TechnicalSymposium (GTS) sessions will be held focusing on topics
such as Human Space Flight, Space Communication and Navigation, Small Satellite
Missions and Citizen Science in Global Earth Observation.
Of particular note to NOAA is the Earth Observation session, which will focus on citizen
science. The session will feature 6 speakers from Europe, Africa, and North America
(including our own Manoj Nair from NESDIS NCEI Boulder, Co Chair Harry Cikanek,
NESDIS STAR, co-rapporteur, NESDIS OSAAP Kate Becker) discussing various citizen
science projects and the policy implications of citizen science. The session will feature a
demonstration of CrowdMag, an app providing real-time crowd-sourced magnetic data; the
demonstration will include outputs using data gathered by those who downloaded the app
at last year's IAC.

10 October 2018

Title: The SPOC (SPectral Ocean Color Imager) CubeSat Mission
Presenter(s): David Cotten, Research Scientist, The University of Georgia Small Satellite Research Laboratory, presenting remotely
Date & Time: 10 October 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room #3555, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

STAR Science Seminars

with SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group

Presenter:
David Cotten, Research Scientist     
The University of Georgia Small Satellite Research Laboratory
(presenting remotely)

Sponsor(s):

SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group
The NOCCG is a NOAA organization founded in 2011 by Dr. Paul DiGiacomo, Chief of the Satellite Oceanography and Climatology Division at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR.  The purpose of the NOCCG is to keep members up to date about developments in the field of satellite ocean color and connect ocean color science development with users and applications.  We have representatives from all the NOAA line offices, including National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, National Ocean Service, National Weather Service and from several levels of the National Environmental and Satellite Data and Information Service (where Paul is housed).  Dr. Cara Wilson of South East Fisheries Science Center is our current chair. We meet bi-weekly on Wednesday afternoons, 3 PM Eastern Time in room 3555 at the National Center for Weather and Climate Prediction building in College Park, MD with teleconferencing and Webex for out of town members and guests.  We host a guest speaker, usually about once a month.

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:    998 627 277
Password: NOCCG
Event address for attendees:
 https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=e3e2ab01b46387376f54953be0be5f502

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-564-7828 Passcode: 9942991

Abstract:
This work introduces the mission concept, technologies, and development status for the Spectral Ocean Color (SPOC) small satellite mission, which will use an adjustable multispectral imager to map sensitive coastal regions and off coast water quality near the state of Georgia and beyond.  SPOC is being developed by The University of Georgia's Small Satellite Research Laboratory (SSRL) with funds from NASA's Undergraduates Student Instrument Project (USIP). The project is led by undergraduates from a wide range of backgrounds and supervised by a multidisciplinary team of Principal Investigators. The mission will collect spectral data along a 300km swath using the grating spectrometer to diffract the incoming radiation into the 440-865 nm spectral range.  The resulting images will be 75 km x 300 km in size, have a 120 m spatial resolution, and a spectral resolution of 20 nm, covering 16 adjustable spectral bands.

18 October 2018

Title: Instrument Calibration and Radiance Validation of GOES-R ABI
Presenter(s): Xiangqian "Fred" Wu of NESDIS/STAR/SMCD
Date & Time: 18 October 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553 , NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
Presenter:
Xiangqian "Fred" Wu of NESDIS/STAR/SMCD

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx Event Number:    994 102 241
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
    https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/star-nesdis-noaa/onstage/g.php?MTID=ea1573d2cb2ba8fa8087bdacc9ce7a9e7

Slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/20181018_FredWu.pptx

Audio:
   USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416

Abstract:
This seminar summarizes the plan, execution, and results of the instrument calibration and radiance validation for the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites R-Series (GOES-R). GOES-R is the new generation of NOAA's GOES that provides constant surveillance of the United States and its surrounding for the next two decades, with GOES-16 operational since December 2017 and GOES-17 to be operational in December 2018. We begin with a review of transition to Imager, the instrument for NOAA's 2nd generation of GOES, with emphasis on the technological advancement at the time that brought much improved performance to meet users' demands and calibration difficulties that challenge the instrument scientists. Some of these difficulties were anticipated, some even overly prepared, but some not so much. The transition to ABI, the key payload of NOAA's 3rd generation of GOES, resembles many of the last transition, meanwhile some new tools have become available (e.g., Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System or GSICS) or applicable (e.g., Rayleigh scattering). The GOES-R Calibration Working Group (CWG) planned and executed the ABI calibration and validation with all these considerations. We end with a summary of ABI performance.

Bio:
Xiangqian (Fred) Wu leads calibration support for NOAA's operations of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on POES (since 2002), Imager and Sounder on GOES (since 2004), Ozone Mapper Profiler Suite (OMPS) on S-NPP (2011-2014), and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) on GOES-R (since 2014). He has been a member of the WMO-sponsored Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System (GSICS) Research Working Group since its inception in 2006, and served as its first chair.

7 November 2018

Title: STAR Seminars - Uncertainty in the Retrieval of Coastal Aquatic Properties from Remote Sensing Imposed by Sensor Noise
Presenter(s): Dr. Steven G. Ackleson, Section Head, Oceanographer at U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
Date & Time: 7 November 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room #3555, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

STAR Science Seminars

with SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group

Presenter:
Dr. Steven G. Ackleson, Section Head
Oceanographer at U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
(presenting in person)

Sponsor(s):

SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group
The NOCCG is a NOAA organization founded in 2011 by Dr. Paul DiGiacomo, Chief of the Satellite Oceanography and Climatology Division at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR.  The purpose of the NOCCG is to keep members up to date about developments in the field of satellite ocean color and connect ocean color science development with users and applications.  We have representatives from all the NOAA line offices, including National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, National Ocean Service, National Weather Service and from several levels of the National Environmental and Satellite Data and Information Service (where Paul is housed).  Dr. Cara Wilson of South East Fisheries Science Center is our current chair. We meet bi-weekly on Wednesday afternoons, 3 PM Eastern Time in room 3555 at the National Center for Weather and Climate Prediction building in College Park, MD with teleconferencing and Webex for out of town members and guests.  We host a guest speaker, usually about once a month.

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:    904 100 286
Password: NOCCG
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=m24421776bea92bc59a200ac492d83c49

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-564-7828 Passcode: 9942991

Abstract:
Satellite remote sensing systems designed for coastal aquatic applications strive to provide high quality data across the visible and near infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum.  Data quality is driven by uncertainties related to sensor design and environmental variability.  The work is focused on the impact of sensor signal to noise (SNR) on the retrieval of key aquatic ecological parameters; water column impurity concentration (chlorophyll, colored dissolved organic matter, and suspended sediment) water depth, and benthic cover.  Uncertainty is defined as parameter variability producing a reflectance signal that is indistinguishable from the true condition.  The impact of sensor SNR is investigated using modeling methods and remote sensing data analyses.  The results quantify parameter retrieval uncertainty as a function of sensor design SNR and environmental noise attributed to surface glint.  The results will be discussed within the context of future satellite systems designed for coastal applications, such as the NASA Surface Biology and Geology sensor.

8 November 2018

Title: STAR Seminars - Enterprise EDR Assessment at STAR
Presenter(s): Tony Reale of NESDIS/STAR/SMCD
Date & Time: 8 November 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
Presenter:
Tony Reale of NESDIS/STAR/SMCD

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx Event Number:    908 568 560
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=me248ee288f8f1f1719f234c2afd921ee

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416
Download slides at:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/20181108_Reale.pdf

Abstract:
A difference in current NESDIS STAR (post 2000) and pre-2000 Office of Research and Applications (ORA) infra-structure is the lack of an independent Research to Operation (R2O) sanctioning function for EDRs that is overseen by the government.  At least for operational atmospheric soundings, the responsibility for assessments leading to R2O transition currently lies mainly with the developer.   Enterprise assessment, in simplest form, means comparing “different” product suites for a given EDR to the “same” targets.  This seminar focuses on what enterprise validation should entail and then cites examples using the NOAA Products Validation System (NPROVS) currently operated at STAR for EDR soundings (vertical temperature and moisture profiles).  The seminar also explores enterprise validation scenarios for gas profiles and non-sounding products.  The goal is to “entice” STAR and developers that it is in the mutual best interest to reconsider the original ORA structure. 
In general, the underlying framework of enterprise validation consists of “routinely” compiled datasets of collocated “ground-truth”, models and EDR products from multiple satellites, sensors and product suites.  This is the carrot, STAR would inherit the mundane, time consuming dirty-work (when you consider monitoring, reprocessing missing data, etc) of creating and maintaining enterprise validation datasets.  Once compiled however, these datasets are a source for reliable, routine assessment across multiple EDR suites and highly useful to identify problem areas and provide a “stamp of approval” for proposed upgrades including for new satellites (Small Satellites, COSMIC-2 …).  This does not replace developer assessment, but shifts that assessment to focus on development and leaving the busy, mundane work of enterprise assessment to the government (STAR).  
Examples of enterprise validation and value to developers in product monitoring and identifying problem areas is demonstrated using NPROVS for atmospheric temperature and moisture soundings.  Soundings inherit the relatively large and diverse global radiosonde network including subsets of reference observations providing multiple targets for assessment.  This is not true for other products, so extending enterprise assessment to product suites such as of gases, surface temperature, clouds, aerosol, fires etc requires a separate “consideration” for each.   As discussed, the key for each suite is defining/accessing the available sets of products (including test products) and then underscoring them common sets of ground-truth targets, models, intensive observations, etc.  These steps clearly must leverage and integrate the existing capabilities and expertise from respective developers requiring extensive interaction.  Questions concerning why developers should bother when they can do it themselves (can they? do they?) and perceptions that STAR managed enterprise assessments would undermine (not enhance) developers are addressed.     

Bio:
Anthony Reale received B.S. degrees in Meteorology and Physics from the State University of New York, College at Oswego in 1976. Following three years as a research fellow at the University of Nevada, Reno, he received his M.S. degree in Atmospheric Physics in 1979. He then spent three years in the field conducting remote sensing measurements programs to establish background air-quality and meteorological profiles at selected locations in the pristine eastern Mohave Desert. Mr. Reale was hired as a NOAA support contractor in 1983 where he began working on the problem of deriving atmospheric sounding products from remote satellite sensors onboard NOAA operational polar orbiting satellites.  Mr. Reale was hired by NOAA in 1984 where he provided technical guidance and direction to government and support contractor staff focused on the development of scientific software and associated graphical evaluation tools to assess atmospheric sounding products from operational satellites.  Beginning 2008, he became task leader for the development of the NOAA Products Validation System (NPROVS), designed to provide an “enterprise” approach for assessing atmospheric profiles from multiple satellites against in-situ (radiosonde) observations.  This was expanded in 2013 to include reference radiosondes from the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Reference Upper Air network (GRUAN). 

29 November 2018

Title: STAR Seminar - air-LUSI: How we flew a Lab Instrument on an Airplane at 70,000 Feet
Presenter(s): Thomas C. Larason of NIST
Date & Time: 29 November 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
Presenter:
Thomas C. Larason of NIST

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx Event Number:    905 337 337
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=mb3bd4127edcc02c1c808a287305d0fc0

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416

Abstract:
Due to the stability of the lunar reflectance and the fact that it is an exo-atmospheric target with flux levels close to levels observed by Earth Remote Sensing instruments, many sensors routinely measure the lunar spectral irradiance.  While many sources of uncertainly that arise when vicariously calibrating sensors using land targets are eliminated, lunar measurements are complicated - though predictable - because of the lunar irradiance is a function of the relative positions of the Sun, Moon, and Observer among other variables.  The United States Geological Survey has developed a model, called the Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) Model of lunar reflectance/irradiance that accounts for changes in lunar irradiance as a function of these variables; utilizing the ROLO Model, NASA has demonstrated the ability to track sensor responsivity changes at the 0.1 % level.  The current uncertainties in the ROLO Model are estimated to be between 3 % and 6 % in the VNIR spectral region and are not traceable to the International System of Units (the SI).
The objective of the airborne Lunar Spectral Irradiance (air-LUSI) project is to make highly accurate (sub-0.5 % uncertainty), SI-traceable measurements of the lunar spectral irradiance in the VNIR region using a laboratory instrument on an airplane at 70,000 feet.  The measurements, corrected for residual atmospheric attenuation, will be compared with the ROLO model-predicted exo-atmospheric lunar irradiance and may be used to establish limits on the uncertainty in the ROLO Model as well as to possibly serve as tie-points to the Model over this spectral range.
The first step was to integrate the air-LUSI instrument onto a NASA ER-2 research aircraft and have Engineering Flights to demonstrate that the instrument concept was valid and that the instrument could function properly at-altitude.  Two Engineering Flights took place in August 2018 in Palmdale, CA at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center.  The talk will focus on what happened during the deployment both from a technical and personal point of view; results of the radiometric measurements and the performance of the instrument lend insight into a path forward to lower uncertainty measurements during the next Flight Campaign and will be presented.
 

Bio:
Mr. Thomas Larason is an Electronics Engineer in the Sensor Science Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). His career at NIST began in 1989 where his research has focused on the development, characterization and calibration of detectors that measure ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared light.  Additional research areas include the measurement of photocurrent, aperture area, and the development of new transfer standards.  He has collaborated with both university and industry researchers on various projects, for example, investigating UV light sensors used for the inactivation of pathogens for drinking water.  He has twice received the Department of Commerce Bronze Medal Award. 

17 December 2018

Title: STAR Seminars - Interpretable AI for Deep-Learning-Based Meteorological Applications
Presenter(s): Eric Wendoloski, Connor Sprague, and Ingrid Guch - The Aerospace Corporation
Date & Time: 17 December 2018
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
Presenter:
Eric Wendoloski, Connor Sprague, and Ingrid Guch of The Aerospace Corporation

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx
Event Number: 906 823 554  
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees: https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=m85e78702a2eeab99a81b293480679bab

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416

Abstract:
The number of machine-learning (ML) applications has surged within the meteorological community over the last several years. This surge includes the development and application of numerous ML techniques to improve forecasting as well as physical models while reducing computational complexity and time. Given the vast trove of available satellite-based weather imagery and the gridded structure of many meteorological datasets, deep-learning (DL) methods for providing predictions and diagnostics for numerous subdomains are experiencing increased adoption. However, full adoption will require forecasters and decision makers to interpret why model output is produced given the input, especially if the output has implications for human well-being. Due to their complex architectures, interpreting DL models can be especially difficult, and models are often treated as black boxes. This work examines contemporary methods for assessing the interpretability of a convolutional neural network (CNN) trained to predict tropical cyclone (TC) intensity based on available satellite-weather data, primarily in the IR band. CNNs excel at distilling image data into the most important feature abstractions for developing functional associations between input images and required prediction output. The goal of this work is not necessarily to produce the most accurate TC intensity model, but to assess whether such a DL architecture is capable of learning physically relevant abstractions for the problem at hand. We will describe and apply interpretability methods to the TC intensity CNN model to assess the importance of physical concepts to final predictions. We will also assess the traceability of predictions across the learned network.

Bio:
Eric Wendoloski is a Senior Member of the Technical staff for The Aerospace Corporation in Chantilly, VA. Since joining Aerospace, Eric has supported projects ranging from the deployment of machine-learning-based applications to large scale systems engineering studies including the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture (NSOSA) study. Prior to joining Aerospace, Eric obtained his B.S. (2013) in meteorology from Millersville University and his M.S. (2015) in meteorology from Penn State University. Eric was also a recipient of the Ernest F. Hollings scholarship as an undergraduate. Connor Sprague is a graduate intern at The Aerospace Corporation. His research focuses on applicable machine learning and data science for hurricane prediction and tracking, data fusion, and predictive weather algorithms. He is finishing M.S in systems engineering at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. Ingrid Guch is a Systems Director at The Aerospace Corporation. She has over 20 years' experience working with NOAA/NESDIS including in product operations, systems development, applications and research. She is currently co-located with the NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research in College Park, MD. She obtained her B.S. in mathematical sciences from University of California Santa Barbara and her M.S. in atmospheric sciences from Colorado State University.

19 December 2018

Title: STAR Seminars - New technology support for remote sensing of lake water quality using automated field radiometers
Presenter(s): Dr. Timothy S. Moore, Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory
Date & Time: 19 December 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room #3555, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

STAR Science Seminars

with SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group
This seminar was originally scheduled for 12/5/2018.

Presenter:
Dr. Timothy S. Moore - Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory
Institute for Earth, Oceans and Space
University of New Hampshire

Sponsor(s):

SOCD / NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group
The NOCCG is a NOAA organization founded in 2011 by Dr. Paul DiGiacomo, Chief of the Satellite Oceanography and Climatology Division at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR.  The purpose of the NOCCG is to keep members up to date about developments in the field of satellite ocean color and connect ocean color science development with users and applications.  We have representatives from all the NOAA line offices, including National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, National Ocean Service, National Weather Service and from several levels of the National Environmental and Satellite Data and Information Service (where Paul is housed).  Dr. Cara Wilson of South East Fisheries Science Center is our current chair. We meet bi-weekly on Wednesday afternoons, 3 PM Eastern Time in room 3555 at the National Center for Weather and Climate Prediction building in College Park, MD with teleconferencing and Webex for out of town members and guests.  We host a guest speaker, usually about once a month.

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:    907 721 095
Password: NOCCG
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=mf7555abe45f0f5eb592ac618bd9b38b1

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-564-7828 Passcode: 9942991

Abstract:
 In the summer of 2016, a robotic sun photometer called the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurements (SeaPRISM), was deployed at a Coast Guard channel marker in western Lake Erie, measuring atmospheric properties and spectral water-leaving radiance. The instrument was deployed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to support remote sensing validation and harmful algal bloom (HAB) satellite products. The Lake Erie SeaPRISM is also part of the international federated AERONET program maintained by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and more specifically is part of the AERONET Ocean Color (AERNOET-OC) network. The main purpose of this component of AERONET is specific to calibration/validation efforts for ocean color. In the summer of 2017, a new 12-channel version was deployed at the same site with additional channels in the red and near-infrared. This unit is the first ‘lake' version of the SeaPRISM. In this webinar, the data collected by the SeaPRISM at this site over the last three years (2016-2018) will be examined in the context of HABs and remote sensing validation. The SeaPRISM observations in relation to remote sensing validation and on cyanobacteria blooms from hourly to weekly time scales will be highlighted in this presentation.

Bio:
Dr. Moore has been working with ocean color remote sensing for over 25 years. Throughout that time, he has been involved with bio-optical algorithm development, application, and satellite validation. He was worked with ocean color imagery in marine and freshwater systems. He was a member of the NASA MODIS Science Team and NASA PACE Science Team. For the past six years, he has been working extensively in the western Lake Erie system collaborating with NOAA GLERL and other regional entities. Under a collaborative project between NOAA NESDIS, NOAA GLERL and UNH, Dr. Moore led the effort to introduce an autonomous, robotic radiometer to Lake Erie with a unique band configuration, which will be the subject of his presentation. 

POC:
Nolvia Herrera, 301-683-3308, Nolvia.Herrera@noaa.gov
NOCCG Coordinator: Veronica P. Lance, PhD, NOAA, 301-683-3319, Veronica.Lance@noaa.gov

20 December 2018

Title: STAR Seminars - The JCSDA Community Radiative Transfer Model: From Development to Operations
Presenter(s): Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson - JCSDA
Date & Time: 20 December 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
Presenter:
Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson - JCSDA

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx
Event Number: 905 776 033  
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=md8d79cffbe41f5b7949986d2b669c0ed

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416

Slides:
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/20181220_Johnson.pdf
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/documents/seminardocs/2018/20181220_Johnson.pptx

Abstract:
The Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) is a fast, 1-D radiative transfer model designed to simulate top-of-the-atmosphere radiances consistent with a wide variety of satellite based sensors. The CRTM was primarily developed by JCSDA-funded scientists with essential contributions from NOAA/STAR and NOAA/EMC scientists. The primary goal of CRTM is to provide fast, accurate satellite radiance simulations and associated Jacobian calculations under all weather and surface conditions. CRTM supports all current operational and many research passive sensors, covering wavelengths ranging from the visible through the microwave. The model has undergone substantial improvement and expansion, since the first version in 2004. The CRTM has been used in the NOAA/NCEP and U.S. Navy operational data assimilation systems and by many other JCSDA partners such as NOAA/NESDIS/STAR, NOAA/OAR, NASA/GMAO, Naval Research Laboratory, Air Force Weather, and within multiple university environments. Over the past 14 years, both external research groups and operational centers alike have made essential contributions to the continued development and growth of CRTM.
A major goal of the CRTM core team is to ensure that CRTM becomes a true community radiative transfer model for all users. The CRTM official baseline code is developed and maintained based on internal and community-wide inputs, consisting of both improvements and externally contributed codes.
This presentation will briefly review the scientific and technical basis of CRTM, including its many strengths and limitations. There will also be an overview of the current status of the recently released CRTM version 2.3.0; and the future planned release of CRTM version 3.0.0 - which will represent a major milestone in CRTM's development and capabilities.

Bio:
Dr. Benjamin T. Johnson joined NOAA/NESDIS/STAR (via AER, Inc.) in support of JCSDA in July 2015.  In January 2017, he was hired through UCAR as the JCSDA project lead for the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM).    Dr. Johnson's primary responsibilities are to ensure that the CRTM project continues to be proactively developed and managed to meet operational user requirements.   This involves coordinating efforts and support for a large number of users and developers across a wide range of agencies and universities, both domestic and international.  
Dr. Johnson received a B.S. in Physics from Oklahoma State University, with an emphasis on hard-sphere sedimentation crystallization and photonics.  Combining his interest in weather, computing, and physics, he studied Atmospheric Science at Purdue University, where he received a M.S. degree. The next stop was the University of Wisconsin, where he completed his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science advised by Dr. Grant Petty.
Before completing his Ph.D. in 2007, Dr. Johnson started working at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in 2004 on the Global Precipitation Measurement mission, primarily focused on precipitation retrieval algorithm development and satellite observation simulations. During the intervening years, he has coordinated multiple NASA field campaigns as a mission scientist, and actively participates in the CGMS/WMO International Precipitation Working Group (IPWG), International TOVs Working Group (ITWC), and the International Workshop on Space-based Snowfall Measurement (IWSSM).   He is a member of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), and the American Meteorological Society (AMS).  
Dr. Johnson's primary areas of expertise are measuring and simulating cloud microphysical processes, theoretical and applied atmospheric radiative transfer, satellite remote sensing of clouds and precipitation, and satellite-based radar simulations in cold-cloud precipitating scenes.

Data, algorithms, and images presented on STAR websites are intended for experimental use only and are not supported on an operational basis.  More information

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