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5th Symposium on the Impacts of an Ice-Diminishing Arctic
on Naval and Maritime Operations

Visualizations

Each of the topics linked below include images and animations that illustrate the current state of Arctic ice.

The Arctic's Record Breaking Ice Melt - September 2012

NOAA Visualization Lab: 2012 Record Breaking Ice MeltThe sea ice in the Arctic Ocean dropped below the previous all-time record set in 2007. This year also marks the first time that there has been less than 4 million square kilometers (1.54 million square miles) of sea ice since satellite observations began in 1979. This animation shows the 2012 time-series of ice extent using sea ice concentration data from the DMSP SSMI/S satellite sensor. The black area represents the daily average (median) sea ice extent over the 1979-2000 time period. Layered over top of that are the daily satellite measurements from January 1 - September 14, 2012. A rapid melt begins in July, whereby the 2012 ice extents fall far below the historical average. The National Snow and Ice Data Center will confirm the final minimum ice extent data and area once the melt stabilizes, usually in mid-September.

Arctic Sea Ice Getting Thinner, Younger - October 2012

NOAA Climate Watch: Arctic Sea Ice Getting Thinner, YoungerSurface area isn't the only quality of the ice that is changing. Wind and ocean circulation patterns are conspiring with a warmer climate to reduce the amount of year-round (multi-year) ice, transforming the remaining ice into a younger, thinner version of its old self. The loss of thick, melt-resistant, multi-year ice can easily become a self-reinforcing process. When multi-year ice melts away--or when young ice fails to survive any melt seasons--the ice that remains in the Arctic will be predisposed to melt quickly during the following summer.

Arctic Sea Ice Extent Sets Seasonal Record - September 2012

NOAA Visualization Lab: Arctic Sea Ice Extent Sets Seasonal RecordThe National Snow and Ice Data Center announced today that on September 16, 2012 sea ice extent dropped to 3.41 million square kilometers (1.32 million square miles). This appears to have been the lowest extent of the year. In response to the setting sun and falling temperatures, ice extent will now climb through autumn and winter. However, a shift in wind patterns or a period of late season melt could still push the ice extent lower. The minimum extent was reached three days later than the 1979 to 2000 average minimum date of September 13.

Visual Highlights of 2012 Arctic Report Card - December 2012

NOAA Climate Watch: 2012 Arctic Report CardNOAA released the 2012 installment of the annual Arctic Report Card on December 5, 2012, as part of the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting. You won't find these graphics in the Report Card itself. This collection is a gallery of highlights based on the report's major themes. It was developed by the NOAA Climate.gov team in cooperation with Arctic Report Card authors and other Arctic experts. It includes images depicting a record-breaking melt on Greenland, a lengthening high-latitude growing season, and a record low spring snowcover in the Northern Hemisphere.

(Graphics courtesy of the NOAA Environmental Visualization Lab and NOAA Climate Watch)
 
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Office of Naval Intelligence
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White House Office of Science and Technology Policy logo
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Rutgers Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences logo
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Data, algorithms, and images presented on STAR websites are intended for experimental use only and are not supported on an operational basis.  More information

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